Science.gov

Sample records for conventional mismatch controls

  1. Dynamic control of strand excision during human DNA mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yongmoon; Kim, Daehyung; Martín-López, Juana V; Lee, Ryanggeun; Oh, Jungsic; Hanne, Jeungphill; Fishel, Richard; Lee, Jong-Bong

    2016-03-22

    Mismatch repair (MMR) is activated by evolutionarily conserved MutS homologs (MSH) and MutL homologs (MLH/PMS). MSH recognizes mismatched nucleotides and form extremely stable sliding clamps that may be bound by MLH/PMS to ultimately authorize strand-specific excision starting at a distant 3'- or 5'-DNA scission. The mechanical processes associated with a complete MMR reaction remain enigmatic. The purified human (Homo sapien or Hs) 5'-MMR excision reaction requires the HsMSH2-HsMSH6 heterodimer, the 5' → 3' exonuclease HsEXOI, and the single-stranded binding heterotrimer HsRPA. The HsMLH1-HsPMS2 heterodimer substantially influences 5'-MMR excision in cell extracts but is not required in the purified system. Using real-time single-molecule imaging, we show that HsRPA or Escherichia coli EcSSB restricts HsEXOI excision activity on nicked or gapped DNA. HsMSH2-HsMSH6 activates HsEXOI by overcoming HsRPA/EcSSB inhibition and exploits multiple dynamic sliding clamps to increase tract length. Conversely, HsMLH1-HsPMS2 regulates tract length by controlling the number of excision complexes, providing a link to 5' MMR.

  2. Decentralized Adaptive Control of Systems with Uncertain Interconnections, Plant-Model Mismatch and Actuator Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patre, Parag; Joshi, Suresh M.

    2011-01-01

    Decentralized adaptive control is considered for systems consisting of multiple interconnected subsystems. It is assumed that each subsystem s parameters are uncertain and the interconnection parameters are not known. In addition, mismatch can exist between each subsystem and its reference model. A strictly decentralized adaptive control scheme is developed, wherein each subsystem has access only to its own state but has the knowledge of all reference model states. The mismatch is estimated online for each subsystem and the mismatch estimates are used to adaptively modify the corresponding reference models. The adaptive control scheme is extended to the case with actuator failures in addition to mismatch.

  3. Rubberband Effect in Temporal Control of Mismatch Negativity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lingyan; Lin, Xiaoxiong; Zhou, Bin; Pöppel, Ernst; Bao, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Mismatch negativity (MMN) is a difference event-related potential (ERP) wave reflecting the brain’s automatic reaction to deviant sensory stimuli, and it has been proven to be a useful tool in research on cognitive functions or clinical disorders. In most MMN studies, amplitude, peak latency, or the integral of the responses, in rare cases also the slopes of the responses, have been employed as parameters of the ERP responses for quantitative analyses. However, little is known about correlations between these parameters. To better understand the relations between different ERP parameters, we extracted and correlated several different parameters characterizing the MMN waves. We found an unexpected correlation which gives new insight into the temporal control of MMN: response amplitudes are positively correlated with downside slopes, whereas barely correlated with upside slopes. This result suggests an efficient feedback mechanism for the MMN to return to the baseline within a predefined time window, contradicting an exponential decay function as one might expect. As a metaphor we suggest a rubberband effect for the MMN responses, i.e., the larger the distance of the response from neural equilibrium, the stronger the return force to equilibrium. PMID:27642285

  4. Bilayer Thickness Mismatch Controls Domain Size in Model Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Heberle, Frederick A; Petruzielo, Robin S; Pan, Jianjun; Drazba, Paul; Kucerka, Norbert; Feigenson, Gerald; Katsaras, John

    2013-01-01

    The observation of lateral phase separation in lipid bilayers has received considerable attention, especially in connection to lipid raft phenomena in cells. It is widely accepted that rafts play a central role in cellular processes, notably signal transduction. While micrometer-sized domains are observed with some model membrane mixtures, rafts much smaller than 100 nm beyond the reach of optical microscopy are now thought to exist, both in vitro and in vivo. We have used small-angle neutron scattering, a probe free technique, to measure the size of nanoscopic membrane domains in unilamellar vesicles with unprecedented accuracy. These experiments were performed using a four-component model system containing fixed proportions of cholesterol and the saturated phospholipid 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC), mixed with varying amounts of the unsaturated phospholipids 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and 1,2-dioleoylsn- glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC). We find that liquid domain size increases with the extent of acyl chain unsaturation (DOPC:POPC ratio). Furthermore, we find a direct correlation between domain size and the mismatch in bilayer thickness of the coexisting liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases, suggesting a dominant role for line tension in controlling domain size. While this result is expected from line tension theories, we provide the first experimental verification in free-floating bilayers. Importantly, we also find that changes in bilayer thickness, which accompany changes in the degree of lipid chain unsaturation, are entirely confined to the disordered phase. Together, these results suggest how the size of functional domains in homeothermic cells may be regulated through changes in lipid composition.

  5. A Direct Adaptive Control Approach in the Presence of Model Mismatch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Suresh M.; Tao, Gang; Khong, Thuan

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of direct model reference adaptive control when the plant-model matching conditions are violated due to abnormal changes in the plant or incorrect knowledge of the plant's mathematical structure. The approach consists of direct adaptation of state feedback gains for state tracking, and simultaneous estimation of the plant-model mismatch. Because of the mismatch, the plant can no longer track the state of the original reference model, but may be able to track a new reference model that still provides satisfactory performance. The reference model is updated if the estimated plant-model mismatch exceeds a bound that is determined via robust stability and/or performance criteria. The resulting controller is a hybrid direct-indirect adaptive controller that offers asymptotic state tracking in the presence of plant-model mismatch as well as parameter deviations.

  6. XTOD to Conventional Facilities Interface Control Document

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, D

    2005-09-29

    This document describes the interface between the LCLS X-ray Transport and Diagnostics (XTOD) (WBS 1.5) and the LCLS Conventional Facilities (CF) (WBS 1.1). The interface locations ranging from the beam dump to the far experimental hall are identified. Conventional Facilities provides x-ray, beamline and equipment enclosures, mounting surfaces, conventional utilities, compressed (clean, dry) air, process and purge gases, exhaust systems, power, and environmental conditions for the XTOD components and controls.

  7. Effect of delay mismatch in Pyragas feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purewal, A. S.; Postlethwaite, C. M.; Krauskopf, B.

    2014-11-01

    Pyragas time-delayed feedback is a control scheme designed to stabilize unstable periodic orbits, which occur naturally in many nonlinear dynamical systems. It has been successfully implemented in a number of applications, including lasers and chemical systems. The control scheme targets a specific unstable periodic orbit by adding a feedback term with a delay chosen as the period of the unstable periodic orbit. However, in an experimental or industrial environment, obtaining the exact period or setting the delay equal to the exact period of the target periodic orbit may be difficult. This could be due to a number of factors, such as incomplete information on the system or the delay being set by inaccurate equipment. In this paper, we evaluate the effect of Pyragas control on the prototypical generic subcritical Hopf normal form when the delay is close to but not equal to the period of the target periodic orbit. Specifically, we consider two cases: first, a constant, and second, a linear approximation of the period. We compare these two cases to the case where the delay is set exactly to the target period, which serves as the benchmark case. For this comparison, we construct bifurcation diagrams and determine any regions where a stable periodic orbit close to the target is stabilized by the control scheme. In this way, we find that at least a linear approximation of the period is required for successful stabilization by Pyragas control.

  8. FAT-based adaptive control for pneumatic servo systems with mismatched uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yi-Chang; Huang, An-Chyau

    2008-08-01

    In this paper, a function approximation technique (FAT)-based adaptive controller is proposed for pneumatic servo systems with variable payload and uncertain disturbances. The system model is firstly described by a set of non-autonomous state equations with mismatched uncertainties. Since the uncertainties are time-varying and their variation bounds are not available, most traditional robust designs or adaptive strategies are not directly applicable. The FAT-based design is proposed here to estimate these uncertainties so that the closed-loop stability can be proved by using the Lyapunov-like theory. The problem in dealing with the mismatched uncertainties is circumvented by using the multiple-surface sliding control (MSSC) algorithm. Experimental results justify that the proposed scheme can give good performance regardless of various uncertainties.

  9. Event-triggered reliable control for fuzzy Markovian jump systems with mismatched membership functions.

    PubMed

    Hou, Liyuan; Cheng, Jun; Qi, Wenhai

    2017-01-01

    The problem of event-triggered reliable control for fuzzy Markovian jump system (FMJS) with mismatched membership functions (MMFs) is addressed. Based on the mode-dependent reliable control and event-triggered communication scheme, the stability conditions and control design procedure are formulated. More precisely, a general actuator-failure is designed such that the FMJS is reliable in the sense of stochastically stable and reduce the utilization of network resources. Furthermore, the improved MMFs are introduced to reduce the conservativeness of obtained results. Finally, simulation results indicate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  10. Disturbance observer based sliding mode control of nonlinear mismatched uncertain systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginoya, Divyesh; Shendge, P. D.; Phadke, S. B.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a new design of multiple-surface sliding mode control for a class of nonlinear uncertain systems with mismatched uncertainties and disturbances. In the method of multiple-surface sliding mode control, it is required to compensate for the derivatives of the virtual inputs which gives rise to the so-called problem of 'explosion of terms'. In this paper a disturbance observer based multiple-surface sliding mode control is proposed to estimate the uncertainties as well as the derivative of the virtual inputs to overcome this problem. The practical stability of the overall system is proved. The effectiveness of the proposed control strategy is illustrated via simulation of a benchmark problem and comparison with other control strategies. The proposed scheme is validated by implementing it on a serial flexible joint manipulator in the laboratory.

  11. Robust control of nonlinear MAGLEV suspension system with mismatched uncertainties via DOBC approach.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Zolotas, Argyrios; Chen, Wen-Hua; Michail, Konstantinos; Li, Shihua

    2011-07-01

    Robust control of a class of uncertain systems that have disturbances and uncertainties not satisfying "matching" condition is investigated in this paper via a disturbance observer based control (DOBC) approach. In the context of this paper, "matched" disturbances/uncertainties stand for the disturbances/uncertainties entering the system through the same channels as control inputs. By properly designing a disturbance compensation gain, a novel composite controller is proposed to counteract the "mismatched" lumped disturbances from the output channels. The proposed method significantly extends the applicability of the DOBC methods. Rigorous stability analysis of the closed-loop system with the proposed method is established under mild assumptions. The proposed method is applied to a nonlinear MAGnetic LEViation (MAGLEV) suspension system. Simulation shows that compared to the widely used integral control method, the proposed method provides significantly improved disturbance rejection and robustness against load variation.

  12. Artificial mismatch hybridization

    DOEpatents

    Guo, Zhen; Smith, Lloyd M.

    1998-01-01

    An improved nucleic acid hybridization process is provided which employs a modified oligonucleotide and improves the ability to discriminate a control nucleic acid target from a variant nucleic acid target containing a sequence variation. The modified probe contains at least one artificial mismatch relative to the control nucleic acid target in addition to any mismatch(es) arising from the sequence variation. The invention has direct and advantageous application to numerous existing hybridization methods, including, applications that employ, for example, the Polymerase Chain Reaction, allele-specific nucleic acid sequencing methods, and diagnostic hybridization methods.

  13. SPATIAL MISMATCH OR RACIAL MISMATCH?*

    PubMed Central

    Hellerstein, Judith K.; Neumark, David; McInerney, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    We contrast the spatial mismatch hypothesis with what we term the racial mismatch hypothesis – that the problem is not a lack of jobs, per se, where blacks live, but a lack of jobs where blacks live into which blacks are hired. We first report new evidence on the spatial mismatch hypothesis, using data from Census Long-Form respondents. We construct direct measures of the presence of jobs in detailed geographic areas, and find that these job density measures are related to employment of black male residents in ways that would be predicted by the spatial mismatch hypothesis – in particular that spatial mismatch is primarily an issue for low-skilled black male workers. We then look at mismatch along not only spatial lines but racial lines as well, by estimating the effects of job density measures that are disaggregated by race. We find that it is primarily black job density that influences black male employment, whereas white job density has little if any influence on their employment. The evidence implies that space alone plays a relatively minor role in low black male employment rates. PMID:19727422

  14. Energy losses of nanomechanical resonators induced by atomic force microscopy-controlled mechanical impedance mismatching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, Johannes; Isacsson, Andreas; Seitner, Maximilian J.; Kotthaus, Jörg P.; Weig, Eva M.

    2014-03-01

    Clamping losses are a widely discussed damping mechanism in nanoelectromechanical systems, limiting the performance of these devices. Here we present a method to investigate this dissipation channel. Using an atomic force microscope tip as a local perturbation in the clamping region of a nanoelectromechanical resonator, we increase the energy loss of its flexural modes by at least one order of magnitude. We explain this by a transfer of vibrational energy into the cantilever, which is theoretically described by a reduced mechanical impedance mismatch between the resonator and its environment. A theoretical model for this mismatch, in conjunction with finite element simulations of the evanescent strain field of the mechanical modes in the clamping region, allows us to quantitatively analyse data on position and force dependence of the tip-induced damping. Our experiments yield insights into the damping of nanoelectromechanical systems with the prospect of engineering the energy exchange in resonator networks.

  15. Energy losses of nanomechanical resonators induced by atomic force microscopy-controlled mechanical impedance mismatching

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, Johannes; Isacsson, Andreas; Seitner, Maximilian J.; Kotthaus, Jörg P.; Weig, Eva M.

    2014-01-01

    Clamping losses are a widely discussed damping mechanism in nanoelectromechanical systems, limiting the performance of these devices. Here we present a method to investigate this dissipation channel. Using an atomic force microscope tip as a local perturbation in the clamping region of a nanoelectromechanical resonator, we increase the energy loss of its flexural modes by at least one order of magnitude. We explain this by a transfer of vibrational energy into the cantilever, which is theoretically described by a reduced mechanical impedance mismatch between the resonator and its environment. A theoretical model for this mismatch, in conjunction with finite element simulations of the evanescent strain field of the mechanical modes in the clamping region, allows us to quantitatively analyse data on position and force dependence of the tip-induced damping. Our experiments yield insights into the damping of nanoelectromechanical systems with the prospect of engineering the energy exchange in resonator networks. PMID:24594876

  16. Origins of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control

    PubMed Central

    Roemer, Ruth; Taylor, Allyn; Lariviere, Jean

    2005-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Framework Convention on Tobacco Control originated in 1993 with a decision by Ruth Roemer and Allyn Taylor to apply to tobacco control Taylor’s idea that the WHO should utilize its constitutional authority to develop international conventions to advance global health. In 1995, Taylor and Ruth Roemer proposed various options to WHO, recommending the framework convention-protocol approach conceptualized by Taylor. Despite initial resistance by some WHO officials, this approach gained wide acceptance. In 1996, the World Health Assembly voted to proceed with its development. Negotiations by WHO member states led the World Health Assembly in May 2003 to adopt by consensus the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control—the first international treaty adopted under WHO auspices. The treaty formally entered into force for state parties on February 27, 2005. PMID:15914812

  17. Mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Fishel, Richard

    2015-10-30

    Highly conserved MutS homologs (MSH) and MutL homologs (MLH/PMS) are the fundamental components of mismatch repair (MMR). After decades of debate, it appears clear that the MSH proteins initiate MMR by recognizing a mismatch and forming multiple extremely stable ATP-bound sliding clamps that diffuse without hydrolysis along the adjacent DNA. The function(s) of MLH/PMS proteins is less clear, although they too bind ATP and are targeted to MMR by MSH sliding clamps. Structural analysis combined with recent real-time single molecule and cellular imaging technologies are providing new and detailed insight into the thermal-driven motions that animate the complete MMR mechanism.

  18. Ice Nucleation Efficiency of Hydroxylated Organic Surfaces Is Controlled by Their Structural Fluctuations and Mismatch to Ice.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yuqing; Odendahl, Nathan; Hudait, Arpa; Mason, Ryan; Bertram, Allan K; Paesani, Francesco; DeMott, Paul J; Molinero, Valeria

    2017-03-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation of ice induced by organic materials is of fundamental importance for climate, biology, and industry. Among organic ice-nucleating surfaces, monolayers of long chain alcohols are particularly effective, while monolayers of fatty acids are significantly less so. As these monolayers expose to water hydroxyl groups with an order that resembles the one in the basal plane of ice, it was proposed that lattice matching between ice and the surface controls their ice-nucleating efficiency. Organic monolayers are soft materials and display significant fluctuations. It has been conjectured that these fluctuations assist in the nucleation of ice. Here we use molecular dynamic simulations and laboratory experiments to investigate the relationship between the structure and fluctuations of hydroxylated organic surfaces and the temperature at which they nucleate ice. We find that these surfaces order interfacial water to form domains with ice-like order that are the birthplace of ice. Both mismatch and fluctuations decrease the size of the preordered domains and monotonously decrease the ice freezing temperature. The simulations indicate that fluctuations depress the freezing efficiency of monolayers of alcohols or acids to half the value predicted from lattice mismatch alone. The model captures the experimental trend in freezing efficiencies as a function of chain length and predicts that alcohols have higher freezing efficiency than acids of the same chain length. These trends are mostly controlled by the modulation of the structural mismatch to ice. We use classical nucleation theory to show that the freezing efficiencies of the monolayers are directly related to their free energy of binding to ice. This study provides a general framework to relate the equilibrium thermodynamics of ice binding to a surface and the nonequilibrium ice freezing temperature and suggests that these could be predicted from the structure of interfacial water.

  19. CONTROL OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS BY STEADY-STATE CONVENTIONAL TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pilot-scale experiments have been performed to assess the ability of conventional treatment to control Cryptosporidium oocysts under steady-state conditions. The work was performed with a pilot plant that was designed to minimize flow rates and, as a result, the number of oocyst...

  20. Fuzzy and conventional control of high-frequency ventilation.

    PubMed

    Noshiro, M; Matsunami, T; Takakuda, K; Ryumae, S; Kagawa, T; Shimizu, M; Fujino, T

    1994-07-01

    A high-frequency ventilator was developed, consisting of a single-phase induction motor, an unbalanced mass and a mechanical vibration system. Intermittent positive pressure respiration was combined with high-frequency ventilation to measure end-tidal pCO2. Hysteresis was observed between the rotational frequency of the high-frequency ventilator and end-tidal pCO2. A fuzzy proportional plus integral control system, designed on the basis of the static characteristics of the controlled system and a knowledge of respiratory physiology, successfully regulated end-tidal pCO2. The characteristics of gas exchange under high-frequency ventilation was approximated by a first-order linear model. A conventional PI control system, designed on the basis of the approximated model, regulated end-tidal pCO2 with a performance similar to that of the fuzzy PI control system. The design of the fuzzy control system required less knowledge about the controlled system than that of the conventional control system.

  1. Cascading MutS and MutL sliding clamps control DNA diffusion to activate mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiaquan; Hanne, Jeungphill; Britton, Brooke M; Bennett, Jared; Kim, Daehyung; Lee, Jong-Bong; Fishel, Richard

    2016-11-24

    Mismatched nucleotides arise from polymerase misincorporation errors, recombination between heteroallelic parents and chemical or physical DNA damage. Highly conserved MutS (MSH) and MutL (MLH/PMS) homologues initiate mismatch repair and, in higher eukaryotes, act as DNA damage sensors that can trigger apoptosis. Defects in human mismatch repair genes cause Lynch syndrome or hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer and 10-40% of related sporadic tumours. However, the collaborative mechanics of MSH and MLH/PMS proteins have not been resolved in any organism. We visualized Escherichia coli (Ec) ensemble mismatch repair and confirmed that EcMutS mismatch recognition results in the formation of stable ATP-bound sliding clamps that randomly diffuse along the DNA with intermittent backbone contact. The EcMutS sliding clamps act as a platform to recruit EcMutL onto the mismatched DNA, forming an EcMutS-EcMutL search complex that then closely follows the DNA backbone. ATP binding by EcMutL establishes a second long-lived DNA clamp that oscillates between the principal EcMutS-EcMutL search complex and unrestricted EcMutS and EcMutL sliding clamps. The EcMutH endonuclease that targets mismatch repair excision only binds clamped EcMutL, increasing its DNA association kinetics by more than 1,000-fold. The assembly of an EcMutS-EcMutL-EcMutH search complex illustrates how sequential stable sliding clamps can modulate one-dimensional diffusion mechanics along the DNA to direct mismatch repair.

  2. Conventional Arms Control Revisited: Objectives in the New Phase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    ORIMiNG ORSANIZATION NMAE AMO -AGOMES UIIVX4AUTI I Ibj TASK? Thyi RAND Corporation Sanita Monica , CA. 90406 _____________Itn. CaiOO TR Lse4 arluCa MAI AN... convento settle this argumenlt We have instead strpalated an objective ofh"stalwav t conventional defense" capability: a balane in which NATO forces

  3. A new fractional-order sliding mode controller via a nonlinear disturbance observer for a class of dynamical systems with mismatched disturbances.

    PubMed

    Pashaei, Shabnam; Badamchizadeh, Mohammadali

    2016-07-01

    This paper investigates the stabilization and disturbance rejection for a class of fractional-order nonlinear dynamical systems with mismatched disturbances. To fulfill this purpose a new fractional-order sliding mode control (FOSMC) based on a nonlinear disturbance observer is proposed. In order to design the suitable fractional-order sliding mode controller, a proper switching surface is introduced. Afterward, by using the sliding mode theory and Lyapunov stability theory, a robust fractional-order control law via a nonlinear disturbance observer is proposed to assure the existence of the sliding motion in finite time. The proposed fractional-order sliding mode controller exposes better control performance, ensures fast and robust stability of the closed-loop system, eliminates the disturbances and diminishes the chattering problem. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed fractional-order controller is depicted via numerical simulation results of practical example and is compared with some other controllers.

  4. Conventional Arms Control and Europe's Future. Headline Series No. 287.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloan, Stanley R.

    This brief issues booklet provides basic information about the arms control issue in Europe, as of 1988. The table of contents includes the following: (1) "Trying Again"; (2) "Prelude to Arms Control"; (3) "The First Attempts: MBFR (Mutual and Balanced Force Reductions) and CSCE (Conference on Security and Cooperation in…

  5. Drug-induced sleep endoscopy: conventional versus target controlled infusion techniques--a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    De Vito, Andrea; Agnoletti, Vanni; Berrettini, Stefano; Piraccini, Emanuele; Criscuolo, Armando; Corso, Ruggero; Campanini, Aldo; Gambale, Giorgio; Vicini, Claudio

    2011-03-01

    Understanding the sites of pharyngeal collapse is mandatory for surgical treatment decision-making in obstructive sleep-apnea-hypopnea syndrome patients. Drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) allows for the direct observation of the upper airway during sedative-induced sleep. In order to re-create snoring and apnea patterns related to a spontaneous sleep situation, the authors used a target-controlled infusion (TCI) sleep endoscopy (DISE-TCI), comparing this technique to conventional DISE, in which sedation was reached by a manual bolus injection. The authors conducted a prospective, randomized, unicenter study. The apneic event observation and its correlation with pharyngeal collapse patterns is the primary endpoint; secondary endpoints are defined as stability and safety of sedation plans of DISE-TCI technique. From January 2009 to June 2009, 40 OSAHS patients were included in the study and randomized allocated in two groups: the bolus injection conventional DISE group and the DISE-TCI group. We recorded the complete apnea event at the oropharynx and hypopharynx levels in 4 patients of the conventional DISE group (20%) and in 17 patients of the DISE-TCI group (85%) (P < 0.0001). Two patients needed oxygen in the conventional DISE group because of severe desaturation that resulted from the first bolus of propofol (1 mg/kg) (P = 0.4872 ns). We recorded the instability of the sedation plan in 13 patients from the conventional DISE group (65%) and 1 patient from the DISE-TCI group (5%) (P = 0.0001). Our results suggest that the DISE-TCI technique should be the first choice in performing sleep endoscopy because of its increased accuracy, stability and safety.

  6. High mobility AlGaN/GaN heterostructures grown on Si substrates using a large lattice-mismatch induced stress control technology

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jianpeng; Yang, Xuelin Sang, Ling; Guo, Lei; Hu, Anqi; Xu, Fujun; Tang, Ning; Wang, Xinqiang; Shen, Bo

    2015-04-06

    A large lattice-mismatch induced stress control technology with a low Al content AlGaN layer has been used to grow high quality GaN layers on 4-in. Si substrates. The use of this technology allows for high mobility AlGaN/GaN heterostructures with electron mobility of 2040 cm{sup 2}/(V·s) at sheet charge density of 8.4 × 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2}. Strain relaxation and dislocation evolution mechanisms have been investigated. It is demonstrated that the large lattice mismatch between the low Al content AlGaN layer and AlN buffer layer could effectively promote the edge dislocation inclination with relatively large bend angles and therefore significantly reduce the dislocation density in the GaN epilayer. Our results show a great potential for fabrication of low-cost and high performance GaN-on-Si power devices.

  7. Decreased functional diversity and biological pest control in conventional compared to organic crop fields.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Jochen; Gallenberger, Iris; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf

    2011-01-01

    Organic farming is one of the most successful agri-environmental schemes, as humans benefit from high quality food, farmers from higher prices for their products and it often successfully protects biodiversity. However there is little knowledge if organic farming also increases ecosystem services like pest control. We assessed 30 triticale fields (15 organic vs. 15 conventional) and recorded vascular plants, pollinators, aphids and their predators. Further, five conventional fields which were treated with insecticides were compared with 10 non-treated conventional fields. Organic fields had five times higher plant species richness and about twenty times higher pollinator species richness compared to conventional fields. Abundance of pollinators was even more than one-hundred times higher on organic fields. In contrast, the abundance of cereal aphids was five times lower in organic fields, while predator abundances were three times higher and predator-prey ratios twenty times higher in organic fields, indicating a significantly higher potential for biological pest control in organic fields. Insecticide treatment in conventional fields had only a short-term effect on aphid densities while later in the season aphid abundances were even higher and predator abundances lower in treated compared to untreated conventional fields. Our data indicate that insecticide treatment kept aphid predators at low abundances throughout the season, thereby significantly reducing top-down control of aphid populations. Plant and pollinator species richness as well as predator abundances and predator-prey ratios were higher at field edges compared to field centres, highlighting the importance of field edges for ecosystem services. In conclusion organic farming increases biodiversity, including important functional groups like plants, pollinators and predators which enhance natural pest control. Preventative insecticide application in conventional fields has only short-term effects on aphid

  8. Conventional forces and arms control: Technology and strategy in a changing world

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, J.F.; White, P.C.

    1990-06-01

    To address the implications of changes for future roles of conventional forces and to assess the technology implications of future strategies, force requirements, and conventional arms control agreements, the Center for National Security Studies in cooperation with the Defense Research and Applications Directorate of the Los Alamos National Laboratory held a conference on Conventional Forces and Arms Control: Technology and Strategy in a Changing World'' at Los Alamos from September 25--27, 1989. The distinguished participants from government, industry, and academia in the United States and Western Europe addressed such issues as: What are the implications of geopolitical and technological trends for international security and stability How will these global changes affect US and allied strategies and force structure, especially the requirements for conventional, nonnuclear forces What will be the role of and rationale for conventional forces in the context of current and prospective allied security requirements How can the West assure it will have the forces necessary for its security How will technological developments influence the structure of tomorrow's conventional forces What impacts will arms reductions have on future systems and force structures What are the prospects for the development and deployment in weapon systems of future conventional military technologies, in light of existing and potential political, economic, bureaucratic, and other impediments

  9. Improvement of helicopter attitude stability by active control of the conventional swash plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ham, Norman D.

    1993-01-01

    The Final Report on improvement of helicopter attitude stability by active control of the conventional swash plate covering the period from Nov. 1986 to Dec. 1993 is presented. A paper on the history, principles, and applications of helicopter individual-blade-control is included.

  10. Civil society and the negotiation of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control

    PubMed Central

    MAMUDU, H. M.

    2008-01-01

    Tobacco control civil society organisations mobilised to influence countries during the negotiation of the World Health Organization (WHO) Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) between 1999 and 2003. Tobacco control civil society organisations and coalitions around the world embraced the idea of an international tobacco control treaty and came together as the Framework Convention Alliance (FCA), becoming an important non-state actor within the international system of tobacco control. Archival documents and interviews demonstrate that the FCA successfully used strategies including publication of a newsletter, shaming, symbolism and media advocacy to influence policy positions of countries during the FCTC negotiation. The FCA became influential in the negotiation process by mobilising tobacco control civil society organisations and resources with the help of the Internet and framing the tobacco control discussion around global public health. PMID:19333806

  11. Civil society and the negotiation of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control.

    PubMed

    Mamudu, H M; Glantz, S A

    2009-01-01

    Tobacco control civil society organisations mobilised to influence countries during the negotiation of the World Health Organisation (WHO) Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) between 1999 and 2003. Tobacco control civil society organisations and coalitions around the world embraced the idea of an international tobacco control treaty and came together as the Framework Convention Alliance (FCA), becoming an important non-state actor within the international system of tobacco control. Archival documents and interviews demonstrate that the FCA successfully used strategies, including publication of a newsletter, shaming symbolism and media advocacy to influence policy positions of countries during the FCTC negotiation. The FCA became influential in the negotiation process, by mobilising tobacco control civil society organisations and resources with the help of the Internet, and framing the tobacco control discussion around global public health.

  12. Operation logic and functionality of automatic dose rate and image quality control of conventional fluoroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Pei-Jan Paul

    2009-05-15

    New generation of fluoroscopic imaging systems is equipped with spectral shaping filters complemented with sophisticated automatic dose rate and image quality control logic called ''fluoroscopy curve'' or ''trajectory''. Such fluoroscopy curves were implemented first on cardiovascular angiographic imaging systems and are now available on conventional fluoroscopy equipment. This study aims to investigate the control logic operations under the fluoroscopy mode and acquisition mode (equivalent to the legacy spot filming) of a conventional fluoroscopy system typically installed for upper-lower gastrointestinal examinations, interventional endoscopy laboratories, gastrointestinal laboratory, and pain clinics.

  13. Cooperative Mmonitoring Center Occasional Paper/5: Propspects of Conventional Arms Control in South Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Amit; Kamal, Nazir

    1998-11-01

    The intensely adversarial relationship between India and Pakistan is marked by military rivalry, mutual distrust, and suspicion. The most dividing disagreement has been over the Kashmir region. An inability to discuss the Kashmir issue has prevented discussion on other important issues. Since there is little prospect of detente, at least in the near-term, the question is whether this rivalry can be contained by other means, such as arms control approaches. Conventional arms control has been applied flexibly and successfully in some regions to reduce threat-perceptions and achieve reassuring military stability. Some lessons from other international models might be applied to the India/Pakistan context. This paper discusses the status of conventional arms control in South Asia, the dominant Indian and Pakistani perceptions about arms control, the benefits that could be derived from arms control, as well as the problems and prospects of arms control. It also discusses existing conventional arms control agreements at the regional and global levels as well as the potential role of cooperative monitoring technology.

  14. Ground Truthing the 'Conventional Wisdom' of Lead Corrosion Control Using Mineralogical Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    For drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) with lead-bearing plumbing materials some form of corrosion control is typically necessary, with the goal of mitigating lead release by forming adherent, stable corrosion scales composed of low-solubility mineral phases. Conventional...

  15. Ground Truthing the ‘Conventional Wisdom’ of Lead Corrosion Control Using Mineralogical Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    For drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) with lead-bearing plumbing materials some form of corrosion control is typically necessary, with the goal of mitigating lead release by forming adherent, stable corrosion scales composed of low-solubility mineral phases. Conventional...

  16. SHIFTS IN VINEYARD WEED SEED BANK COMPOSITION IN REPONSE TO ORGANIC AND CONVENTIONAL WEED CONTROL PRACTICES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this research was to compare the organic weed control practice, soil cultivation, to the conventional practice, applications of the herbicide, glyphosate, in terms of their effects on weed seed bank in a vineyard system. The experiment was conducted in a commercial winegrape vineyard in t...

  17. Nonlinear disturbance observer-based control for multi-input multi-output nonlinear systems subject to mismatching condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun; Li, Shihua; Chen, Wen-Hua

    2012-08-01

    For a multi-input multi-output (MIMO) nonlinear system, the existing disturbance observer-based control (DOBC) only provides solutions to those whose disturbance relative degree (DRD) is higher than or equal to its input relative degree. By designing a novel disturbance compensation gain matrix, a generalised nonlinear DOBC method is proposed in this article to solve the disturbance attenuation problem of the MIMO nonlinear system with arbitrary DRD. It is shown that the disturbances are able to be removed from the output channels by the proposed method with appropriately chosen control parameters. The property of nominal performance recovery, which is the major merit of the DOBCs, is retained with the proposed method. The feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method are demonstrated by simulation studies of both the numerical and application examples.

  18. Integration of Kinetic Control and Lattice Mismatch To Synthesize Pd@AuCu Core-Shell Planar Tetrapods with Size-Dependent Optical Properties.

    PubMed

    Meng, Min; Fang, Zhicheng; Zhang, Chao; Su, Hongyang; He, Rong; Zhang, Renpeng; Li, Hongliang; Li, Zhi-Yuan; Wu, Xiaojun; Ma, Chao; Zeng, Jie

    2016-05-11

    Planar nanocrystals with multiple branches exhibit unique localized surface plasmon resonance properties and great promise in optical applications. Here, we report an aqueous synthesis of Pd@AuCu core-shell planar tetrapods through preferential overgrowth on Pd cubic seeds. The large lattice mismatch between the Pd core and the AuCu shell is the key to induce the formation of branches under sluggish reduction kinetics. Meanwhile, the capping effect of cetyltrimethylammonium chloride on the {100} facets of Pd cubes with an aspect ratio of 1.2 can determine the growth direction of AuCu branches to form a planar structure. Through simply varying the amounts of Pd cubic seeds, the sizes of products can be well-controlled in the range from 33 to 70 nm. With the manipulation of sizes, the peak position of in-plane dipole resonance can be adjusted from visible to near-infrared region. Due to the presence of tips and edges in the branches, planar tetrapods exhibited excellent surface-enhanced Raman scattering performance with an enhancement factor up to 9.0 × 10(3) for 70 nm Pd@AuCu planar tetrapods.

  19. A comparison of the real-time controllability of pattern recognition to conventional myoelectric control for discrete and simultaneous movements.

    PubMed

    Young, Aaron J; Smith, Lauren H; Rouse, Elliott J; Hargrove, Levi J

    2014-01-10

    Myoelectric control has been used for decades to control powered upper limb prostheses. Conventional, amplitude-based control has been employed to control a single prosthesis degree of freedom (DOF) such as closing and opening of the hand. Within the last decade, new and advanced arm and hand prostheses have been constructed that are capable of actuating numerous DOFs. Pattern recognition control has been proposed to control a greater number of DOFs than conventional control, but has traditionally been limited to sequentially controlling DOFs one at a time. However, able-bodied individuals use multiple DOFs simultaneously, and it may be beneficial to provide amputees the ability to perform simultaneous movements. In this study, four amputees who had undergone targeted motor reinnervation (TMR) surgery with previous training using myoelectric prostheses were configured to use three control strategies: 1) conventional amplitude-based myoelectric control, 2) sequential (one-DOF) pattern recognition control, 3) simultaneous pattern recognition control. Simultaneous pattern recognition was enabled by having amputees train each simultaneous movement as a separate motion class. For tasks that required control over just one DOF, sequential pattern recognition based control performed the best with the lowest average completion times, completion rates and length error. For tasks that required control over 2 DOFs, the simultaneous pattern recognition controller performed the best with the lowest average completion times, completion rates and length error compared to the other control strategies. In the two strategies in which users could employ simultaneous movements (conventional and simultaneous pattern recognition), amputees chose to use simultaneous movements 78% of the time with simultaneous pattern recognition and 64% of the time with conventional control for tasks that required two DOF motions to reach the target. These results suggest that when amputees are given the

  20. Quantitative trait loci associated with longevity of lettuce seeds under conventional and controlled deterioration storage conditions.

    PubMed

    Schwember, Andrés R; Bradford, Kent J

    2010-10-01

    Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) seeds have poor shelf life and exhibit thermoinhibition (fail to germinate) above ∼25°C. Seed priming (controlled hydration followed by drying) alleviates thermoinhibition by increasing the maximum germination temperature, but reduces lettuce seed longevity. Controlled deterioration (CD) or accelerated ageing storage conditions (i.e. elevated temperature and relative humidity) are used to study seed longevity and to predict potential seed lifetimes under conventional storage conditions. Seeds produced in 2002 and 2006 of a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population derived from a cross between L. sativa cv. Salinas×L. serriola accession UC96US23 were utilized to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with seed longevity under CD and conventional storage conditions. Multiple longevity-associated QTLs were identified under both conventional and CD storage conditions for control (non-primed) and primed seeds. However, seed longevity was poorly correlated between the two storage conditions, suggesting that deterioration processes under CD conditions are not predictive of ageing in conventional storage conditions. Additionally, the same QTLs were not identified when RIL populations were grown in different years, indicating that lettuce seed longevity is strongly affected by production environment. Nonetheless, a major QTL on chromosome 4 [Seed longevity 4.1 (Slg4.1)] was responsible for almost 23% of the phenotypic variation in viability of the conventionally stored control seeds of the 2006 RIL population, with improved longevity conferred by the Salinas allele. QTL analyses may enable identification of mechanisms responsible for the sensitivity of primed seeds to CD conditions and breeding for improved seed longevity.

  1. Comparison of conventional and integrated programs for control of Tetranychus urticae (Acari: Tetranychidae).

    PubMed

    Iwassaki, Larissa Akemi; Sato, Mário Eidi; Calegario, Fagoni Fayer; Poletti, Marcelo; Maia, Aline de Holanda Nunes

    2015-02-01

    The twospotted spider mite (TSSM), Tetranychus urticae Koch, is one of the main pests on strawberry crops in Brazil. TSSM can be difficult to control due to acaricide resistance. The objective of this work was to compare the effect of conventional and integrated strawberry production (ISP) systems on mite abundance and acaricide resistance. The control of TSSM in ISP was based on the release of Neoseiulus californicus (McGregor) or application of a selective acaricide (propargite), when TSSM monitoring indicated the timing for the release of predaceous mites (1-3 mites per leaflet on 30% leaflets) or chemical intervention (>10 mites per leaflet). Only acaricides (abamectin, fenpyroximate) were applied in the conventional system. Integrated control of TSSM were sufficient to maintain a significantly lower pest infestation level, resulting in a sixfold reduction in the frequency of acaricide applications, and consequently, a lower selection pressure for acaricide resistance. Strategies for the management of TSSM in strawberry fields are described and discussed.

  2. Thermal control of a lidar laser system using a non-conventional ram air heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killough, Brian D.; Alexander, William, Jr.; Swofford, Doyle P.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the analysis and performance testing of a uniquely designed external heat exchanger. The heat exchanger is attached externally to an aircraft and is used to cool a laser system within the fuselage. Estimates showed insufficient cooling capacity with a conventional staggered tube array in the limited space available. Thus, a non-conventional design wes developed with larger tube and fin area exposed to the ram air to increase the heat transfer performance. The basic design consists of 28 circular finned aluminum tubes arranged in two parallel banks. Wind tunnel tests were performed to simulate air and liquid flight conditions for the non-conventional parallel bank arrangement and the conventional staggered tube arrangement. Performance comparisons of each of the two designs are presented. Test results are used in a computer model of the heat exchanger to predict the operating performance for the entire flight profile. These analyses predict significantly improved performance over the conventional design and show adequate thermal control margins.

  3. Effect of conventional and controlled freezing method on the post thaw characteristics of boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Baishya, S K; Biswas, R K; Kadirvel, G; Deka, B C; Kumar, Suresh; Sinha, S; Dutta, D J; Saikia, G K

    2014-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of conventional, and controlled freezing method adopting three freezing rates 20°C, 40°C and 60°C/min for cryopreservation of boar semen. Sixty sperm-rich fractions of ejaculates from six boars were utilized for freezing of semen with different freezing methods in lactose-egg yolk glycerol extender using 0.5 ml straws. Semen samples were evaluated for sperm motility, live sperm, acrosome integrity, plasma membrane integrity (PMI) by carboxyfluorescein diacetate plus propidium iodide (PI) staining, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) by combined JC-1 plus PI staining and lipid peroxidation (LPO) by BODIPY (581/591)-C11 probe after equilibration and after freezing. The results revealed that the post thaw sperm motility, live sperm, live intact acrosome and plasma membrane integrity were significantly (p<0.05) higher in all the three controlled freezing methods (20°C, 40°C and 60°C/min) as compared to that in conventional method. In addition, the controlled freezing methods yielded higher (p>0.05) mean values of live sperm with high MMP as compared to conventional freezing. However, the post thaw sperm LPO did not influence by difference in freezing methods. No significant difference on the post thaw sperm qualities was recorded among the three controlled freezing rates. All the sperm parameters assessed declined significantly (p<0.05) after freezing as compared to that after equilibration irrespective of freezing method employed. In conclusion, cryopreservation of boar semen with controlled freezing methods conferred better post thaw sperm quality as compared to conventional method, and the freezing rates of either 20, 40 or 60°C/min could provide better freezability of boar semen.

  4. ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC INDUSTRIAL CONTROL. A-C CONVENTIONAL MAGNETIC MOTOR CONTROL, PART II, UNIT 6, ASSIGNMENTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SUTTON, MACK C.

    THIS STUDY GUIDE IS FOR INDIVIDUAL STUDENT USE IN STUDYING ALTERNATING CURRENT CONVENTIONAL MAGNETIC MOTOR CONTROL IN ELECTRICAL-ELECTRONIC PROGRAMS. IT WAS DEVELOPED BY AN INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS SPECIALIST AND ADVISERS. EACH OF THE 10 ASSIGNMENT SHEETS PROVIDES THE LESSON SUBJECT, PURPOSE, INTRODUCTORY INFORMATION, STUDY REFERENCES,…

  5. ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC INDUSTRIAL CONTROL. A-C CONVENTIONAL MAGNETIC MOTOR CONTROL, PART I, UNIT 5, INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SUTTON, MACK C.

    THIS GUIDE IS FOR TEACHER USE IN DIRECTING INDIVIDUAL STUDY OF ALTERNATING CURRENT CONVENTIONAL MAGNETIC MOTOR CONTROL IN ELECTRICAL-ELECTRONIC PROGRAMS. IT WAS DEVELOPED BY AN INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS SPECIALIST AND ADVISERS. EACH OF THE 10 INSTRUCTOR'S SHEETS GIVES THE LESSON SUBJECT, PURPOSE, INTRODUCTORY INFORMATION, REFERENCES, AND…

  6. ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC INDUSTRIAL CONTROL. A-C CONVENTIONAL MAGNETIC MOTOR CONTROL, PART I, UNIT 5, ASSIGNMENTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SUTTON, MACK C.

    THIS GUIDE IS FOR INDIVIDUAL STUDENT USE IN STUDYING ALTERNATING CURRENT CONVENTIONAL MAGNETIC MOTOR CONTROL IN ELECTRICAL-ELECTRONIC PROGRAMS. IT WAS DEVELOPED BY AN INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS SPECIALIST AND ADVISERS. EACH OF THE 10 ASSIGNMENT SHEETS PROVIDES THE LESSON SUBJECT, PURPOSE, INTRODUCTORY INFORMATION, STUDY REFERENCES, SUPPLEMENTARY…

  7. ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC INDUSTRIAL CONTROL. A-C CONVENTIONAL MAGNETIC MOTOR CONTROL, PART II, UNIT 6, INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SUTTON, MACK C.

    THIS GUIDE IS FOR TEACHER USE IN DIRECTING INDIVIDUAL STUDY OF ALTERNATING CURRENT CONVENTIONAL MAGNETIC MOTOR CONTROL IN ELECTRICAL-ELECTRONIC PROGRAMS. IT WAS DEVELOPED BY AN INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS SPECIALIST AND ADVISERS. EACH OF THE 10 INSTRUCTOR'S SHEETS GIVES THE LESSON SUBJECT, PURPOSE, INTRODUCTORY INFORMATION, REFERENCES, SUPPLEMENTARY…

  8. Conventional Middle East arms control: Impact of the end of the cold war. Study project report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.L.; Johnsen, W.T.

    1993-03-31

    The end of the Gulf War brought to the forefront concern for dangers posed by unrestrained militarization of the Middle East. In response, on 29 May 1991 President Bush unveiled a comprehensive Middle East arms control policy in a speech at the U.S. Air Force Academy. A key element of the policy banned the sale of the most dangerous conventional weapons to the region. Although the major arms suppliers (which also happen to be the five permanent members of the U.N. Security Council) have held a series of high level meetings to discuss options for restricting sales to the region, all continue conventional arms transfers to the Middle East and are likely to continue to do so. This paper contends that the end of the Cold War put additional economic pressure on the major suppliers to export arms to the Middle East; and, their interests are so compelling that the suppliers are unlikely to support President Bush's proposal. This position is supported by analyzing the interests that influence major arms suppliers to sell arms abroad. The format for this analysis includes an assessment of: each country's interest in selling arms during the Cold War; the impact of the Cold War's end on those interests; and whether the post Cold War interests conflict with President Bush's conventional arms control proposal. The paper concludes with recommendations for US policy in the region.

  9. 40 CFR 442.22 - Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT). 442.22 Section 442.22 Protection of... EQUIPMENT CLEANING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Rail Tank Cars Transporting Chemical and Petroleum Cargos § 442.22 Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control...

  10. 40 CFR 442.22 - Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT). 442.22 Section 442.22 Protection of... EQUIPMENT CLEANING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Rail Tank Cars Transporting Chemical and Petroleum Cargos § 442.22 Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control...

  11. 40 CFR 442.42 - Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT). 442.42 Section 442.42 Protection of...) TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT CLEANING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Tanks Transporting Food Grade Cargos § 442.42 Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT)....

  12. 40 CFR 442.32 - Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT). 442.32 Section 442.32 Protection of... Petroleum Cargos § 442.32 Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT). Except as provided in 40 CFR 125.30 through 125.32, any existing...

  13. 40 CFR 442.32 - Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT). 442.32 Section 442.32 Protection of... Petroleum Cargos § 442.32 Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT). Except as provided in 40 CFR 125.30 through 125.32, any existing...

  14. 40 CFR 442.12 - Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT). 442.12 Section 442.12 Protection of... and Petroleum Cargos § 442.12 Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT). Except as provided in 40 CFR 125.30 through 125.32,...

  15. 40 CFR 442.12 - Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT). 442.12 Section 442.12 Protection of... and Petroleum Cargos § 442.12 Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT). Except as provided in 40 CFR 125.30 through 125.32,...

  16. 40 CFR 442.42 - Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT). 442.42 Section 442.42 Protection of...) TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT CLEANING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Tanks Transporting Food Grade Cargos § 442.42 Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT)....

  17. 40 CFR 442.42 - Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT). 442.42 Section 442.42 Protection of... EQUIPMENT CLEANING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Tanks Transporting Food Grade Cargos § 442.42 Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT). Except as...

  18. 40 CFR 442.42 - Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT). 442.42 Section 442.42 Protection of... EQUIPMENT CLEANING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Tanks Transporting Food Grade Cargos § 442.42 Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT). Except as...

  19. 40 CFR 442.42 - Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT). 442.42 Section 442.42 Protection of...) TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT CLEANING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Tanks Transporting Food Grade Cargos § 442.42 Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT)....

  20. A Randomized Controlled Study to Compare Conventional and Evidence Based Treatment Protocols in Fresh Compound Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Kanika; Singh, Girish Kumar; Kumar, Santosh; Avasthi, Sachin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A recent concept review in Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (JBJS) outlines evidence to control peri-operative infections in compound fractures. However, evidence for impact of adopting a protocol combining measures that have some evidence is lacking in literature. The present method of treatment at King George’s Medical University (KGMU) is representative of the conventional practice of managing compound fractures in India and is an appropriate control for trial against the Experimental Evidence Based Protocol (EBP). Aim To study the additional impact of adopting Evidence Based Protocol on parameters defining infection rate and bone union. Materials and Methods This randomized controlled study was conducted at the orthopaedics department of KGMU. Two hundred and twenty six patients of compound fractures of both bone leg, age > 12y were randomized to two groups. One group received standard treatment and the experimental group received treatment as per JBJS review. Statistical Analysis Random allocation was tested by comparing baseline characteristics of the two groups. The two groups were compared for all the outcome variables in terms of time to a negative wound culture, time to wound healing, time to union at fracture site and time to achieve complete range of motion at knee joint. Results Random allocation was successful. EBP group reported significantly lesser time to a negative culture report from wound (mean in conventional=4.619, experimental=1.9146, p=0.0006), lesser time to bony union (mean in conventional=23.8427 weeks, experimental=22.8125 weeks, p=0.0027), lesser time to wound healing (mean in conventional=14.4425 weeks experimental=10.4513 weeks, p=0.0032), and a lesser duration of hospital stay (mean in conventional=6.5982 days, experimental=4.5000 days, p=0.0343). Conclusion EBP based on the guidelines suggested by Fletcher et al., significantly shorten the time taken for achieving a negative culture and hasten wound and fracture

  1. Access and benefit sharing (ABS) under the convention on biological diversity (CBD): implications for microbial biological control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Researchers and implementers of biological control are confronted with a variety of scientific, regulatory and administrative challenges to their biological control programs. One developing challenge will arise from the implementation of provisions of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) co...

  2. Comparison of model-based and conventional controllers on a pilot-scale heat exchanger.

    PubMed

    Raul, Pramod R; Srinivasan, Haritha; Kulkarni, Sanket; Shokrian, Mazdak; Shrivastava, Glory; Russell Rhinehart, R

    2013-05-01

    This pilot-scale heat exchanger demonstration compares two relatively simple nonlinear model-based control strategies to conventional proportional-integral (PI) control. The two nonlinear controllers, generic model control (GMC) and process-model based control (PMBC), use a first-principles model thereby providing characterization of the nonlinear process throughout the operating range. There are two approaches to GMC, one uses a dynamic model, the other a steady-state model. This work uses the steady-state model; accordingly, will use the term GMC-SS, which can be classified as output characterization for a PI controller, making it relatively simple to implement. PMBC uses a dynamic model and adapts to represent the process. These two nonlinear controllers were selected for this application evaluation because of their simplicity (they can be implemented in-house within many commercial control systems), diversity (steady-state and dynamic models), and demonstrated utility for control of nonlinear single-input-single-output processes. The application and results are presented and discussed. Summarizing the results: Within a small temperature operating range PI provides good control, but over the full operating range, the nonlinear and variable delay of the process lead to poor control with PI. GMC can handle the nonlinear issues, but using the convenient steady-state model; it also, provides poor control because of the variable delay associated with flow rate. PMBC was able to provide good control throughout the entire operating range. PMBC has a further advantage of only having one tuning coefficient, while PI and GMC-SS have two.

  3. Conventional vs. Tablet Computer-Based Patient Education following Lung Transplantation – A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Suhling, Hendrik; Rademacher, Jessica; Zinowsky, Imke; Fuge, Jan; Greer, Mark; Warnecke, Gregor; Smits, Jacqueline M.; Bertram, Anna; Haverich, Axel; Welte, Tobias; Gottlieb, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Background Accurate immunosuppression is of critical importance in preventing rejection, while avoiding toxicity following lung transplantation. The mainstay immunosuppressants are calcineurin inhibitors, which require regular monitoring due to interactions with other medications and diet. Adherence to immunosuppression and patient knowledge is vital and can be improved through patient education. Education using tablet-computers was investigated. Objective To compare tablet-PC education and conventional education in improving immunosuppression trough levels in target range 6 months after a single education. Secondary parameters were ratio of immunosuppression level measurements divided by per protocol recommended measurements, time and patient satisfaction regarding education. Design Single-centre, open labelled randomised controlled trial. Participants Patients >6 months after lung-transplantation with <50% of calcineurin inhibitor trough levels in target range. Intervention Tablet-pc education versus personal, nurse-led education. Measurements Calcineurin inhibitor levels in target range 6 months after education, level variability, interval adherence, knowledge and adherence was studied. As outcome parameter, renal function was measured and adverse events registered. Results Sixty-four patients were 1:1 randomised for either intervention. Levels of immunosuppression 6 months after education were equal (tablet-PC 58% vs. conventional 48%, p = 0.27), both groups improved in achieving a CNI trough level within target range by either education method (delta tablet-PC 29% vs. conventional 20%). In all patients, level variability decreased (−20.4%), whereas interval adherence remained unchanged. Knowledge about immunosuppression improved by 7% and compliance tests demonstrated universal improvements with no significant difference between groups. Conclusion Education is a simple, effective tool in improving adherence to immunosuppression. Tablet-PC education was

  4. Instrument Display Visual Angles for Conventional Aircraft and the MQ-9 Ground Control Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bendrick, Gregg A.; Kamine, Tovy Haber

    2008-01-01

    Aircraft instrument panels should be designed such that primary displays are in optimal viewing location to minimize pilot perception and response time. Human Factors engineers define three zones (i.e. "cones") of visual location: 1) "Easy Eye Movement" (foveal vision); 2) "Maximum Eye Movement" (peripheral vision with saccades), and 3) "Head Movement" (head movement required). Instrument display visual angles were measured to determine how well conventional aircraft (T-34, T-38, F- 15B, F-16XL, F/A-18A, U-2D, ER-2, King Air, G-III, B-52H, DC-10, B747-SCA) and the MQ-9 ground control station (GCS) complied with these standards, and how they compared with each other. Methods: Selected instrument parameters included: attitude, pitch, bank, power, airspeed, altitude, vertical speed, heading, turn rate, slip/skid, AOA, flight path, latitude, longitude, course, bearing, range and time. Vertical and horizontal visual angles for each component were measured from the pilot s eye position in each system. Results: The vertical visual angles of displays in conventional aircraft lay within the cone of "Easy Eye Movement" for all but three of the parameters measured, and almost all of the horizontal visual angles fell within this range. All conventional vertical and horizontal visual angles lay within the cone of "Maximum Eye Movement". However, most instrument vertical visual angles of the MQ-9 GCS lay outside the cone of "Easy Eye Movement", though all were within the cone of "Maximum Eye Movement". All the horizontal visual angles for the MQ-9 GCS were within the cone of "Easy Eye Movement". Discussion: Most instrument displays in conventional aircraft lay within the cone of "Easy Eye Movement", though mission-critical instruments sometimes displaced less important instruments outside this area. Many of the MQ-9 GCS systems lay outside this area. Specific training for MQ-9 pilots may be needed to avoid increased response time and potential error during flight.

  5. Optimal control strategies of eradicating invisible glioblastoma cells after conventional surgery

    PubMed Central

    de los Reyes V, Aurelio A.; Jung, Eunok; Kim, Yangjin

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma, the most aggressive type of brain cancer, has median survival time of 1 year after diagnosis. It is characterized by alternating modes of rapid proliferation and aggressive invasion in response to metabolic stress in the microenvironment. A particular microRNA, miR-451, and its downstream signalling molecules, AMPK complex, are known to be key determinants in switching cell fate. These components form a core control system determining a balance between cell growth and migration which is regulated by fluctuating glucose levels in the microenvironment. An important factor from the treatment point of view is that low levels of glucose affect metabolism and activate cell migration through the miR-451-AMPK control system, creating ‘invisible’ migratory cells and making them inaccessible by conventional surgery. In this work, we apply optimal control theory to deal with the problem of maintaining upregulated miR-451 levels that prevent cell infiltration to surrounding brain tissue and thus induce localization of these cancer cells at the surgical site. The model also considers the effect of a drug that blocks inhibitive pathways of miR-451 from AMPK complex. Glucose infusion control and drug infusion control are chosen to represent dose rates of glucose and drug intravenous administrations, respectively. The characteristics of optimal control lead us to investigate the structure of optimal intravenous infusion regimen under various circumstances and predict best clinical outcomes with minimum expense possible. PMID:25833239

  6. Instrument Display Visual Angles for Conventional Aircraft and the MQ-9 Ground Control Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamine, Tovy Haber; Bendrick, Gregg A.

    2008-01-01

    Aircraft instrument panels should be designed such that primary displays are in optimal viewing location to minimize pilot perception and response time. Human Factors engineers define three zones (i.e. cones ) of visual location: 1) "Easy Eye Movement" (foveal vision); 2) "Maximum Eye Movement" (peripheral vision with saccades), and 3) "Head Movement (head movement required). Instrument display visual angles were measured to determine how well conventional aircraft (T-34, T-38, F- 15B, F-16XL, F/A-18A, U-2D, ER-2, King Air, G-III, B-52H, DC-10, B747-SCA) and the MQ-9 ground control station (GCS) complied with these standards, and how they compared with each other. Selected instrument parameters included: attitude, pitch, bank, power, airspeed, altitude, vertical speed, heading, turn rate, slip/skid, AOA, flight path, latitude, longitude, course, bearing, range and time. Vertical and horizontal visual angles for each component were measured from the pilot s eye position in each system. The vertical visual angles of displays in conventional aircraft lay within the cone of "Easy Eye Movement" for all but three of the parameters measured, and almost all of the horizontal visual angles fell within this range. All conventional vertical and horizontal visual angles lay within the cone of Maximum Eye Movement. However, most instrument vertical visual angles of the MQ-9 GCS lay outside the cone of Easy Eye Movement, though all were within the cone of Maximum Eye Movement. All the horizontal visual angles for the MQ-9 GCS were within the cone of "Easy Eye Movement". Most instrument displays in conventional aircraft lay within the cone of Easy Eye Movement, though mission-critical instruments sometimes displaced less important instruments outside this area. Many of the MQ-9 GCS systems lay outside this area. Specific training for MQ-9 pilots may be needed to avoid increased response time and potential error during flight. The learning objectives include: 1) Know three

  7. Temperature-dependent spectral mismatch corrections

    DOE PAGES

    Osterwald, Carl R.; Campanelli, Mark; Moriarty, Tom; ...

    2015-11-01

    This study develops the mathematical foundation for a translation of solar cell short-circuit current from one thermal and spectral irradiance operating condition to another without the use of ill-defined and error-prone temperature coefficients typically employed in solar cell metrology. Using the partial derivative of quantum efficiency with respect to temperature, the conventional isothermal expression for spectral mismatch corrections is modified to account for changes of current due to temperature; this modification completely eliminates the need for short-circuit-current temperature coefficients. An example calculation is provided to demonstrate use of the new translation.

  8. A comprehensive model to evaluate implementation of the world health organization framework convention of tobacco control

    PubMed Central

    Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Kelishad, Roya; Rabiei, Katayoun; Abedi, Heidarali; Mohaseli, Khadijeh Fereydoun; Masooleh, Hasan Azaripour; Alavi, Mousa; Heidari, Gholamreza; Ghaffari, Mostafa; O’Loughlin, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Background: Iran is one of the countries that has ratified the World Health Organization Framework Convention of Tobacco Control (WHO-FCTC), and has implemented a series of tobacco control interventions including the Comprehensive Tobacco Control Law. Enforcement of this legislation and assessment of its outcome requires a dedicated evaluation system. This study aimed to develop a generic model to evaluate the implementation of the Comprehensive Tobacco Control Law in Iran that was provided based on WHO-FCTC articles. Materials and Methods: Using a grounded theory approach, qualitative data were collected from 265 subjects in individual interviews and focus group discussions with policymakers who designed the legislation, key stakeholders, and members of the target community. In addition, field observations data in supermarkets/shops, restaurants, teahouses and coffee shops were collected. Data were analyzed in two stages through conceptual theoretical coding. Findings: Overall, 617 open codes were extracted from the data into tables; 72 level-3 codes were retained from the level-2 code series. Using a Model Met paradigm, the relationships between the components of each paradigm were depicted graphically. The evaluation model entailed three levels, namely: short-term results, process evaluation and long-term results. Conclusions: Central concept of the process of evaluation is that enforcing the law influences a variety of internal and environmental factors including legislative changes. These factors will be examined during the process evaluation and context evaluation. The current model can be applicable for providing FCTC evaluation tools across other jurisdictions. PMID:23833621

  9. Data quality control methodologies for large, non-conventional DC resistivity datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Michael A.; Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    2016-12-01

    With developments in instrumentation and computational resources, the collection of large, non-conventional DC resistivity datasets has become commonplace. While the increased data content of these large datasets can significantly improve the resolution of inverse models, these datasets also present challenges for standard data quality control (QC) methodologies. Standard QC methodologies for DC resistivity datasets typically rely on our ability to decompose the dataset into 2D lines and/or reciprocal measurements. Non-conventional electrode geometries and the cost of collecting a large number of reciprocal measurements can severely limit the applicability of standard DC resistivity QC methodologies. To address these limitations, we developed a more generalized data QC methodology which utilizes statistical analysis and classification tools. The merit of this methodology is illustrated using a field dataset collected in an underground potash mine and several synthetic examples. Results from these applications show that the methodology has the ability to identify and characterize highly noise-contaminated data from a number of different sources. The flexibility of the 4-stage methodology allows it be tailored to accommodate data from any type of DC resistivity survey and the use of statistical analysis and classification tools decreases the subjectivity of the process. Although this study focuses on the applicability of this methodology for DC resistivity data, it is potentially applicable to a variety of geophysical surveys.

  10. Project Cerberus: tobacco industry strategy to create an alternative to the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control.

    PubMed

    Mamudu, Hadii M; Hammond, Ross; Glantz, Stanton A

    2008-09-01

    Between 1999 and 2001, British American Tobacco, Philip Morris, and Japan Tobacco International executed Project Cerberus to develop a global voluntary regulatory regime as an alternative to the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC). They aimed to develop a global voluntary regulatory code to be overseen by an independent audit body and to focus attention on youth smoking prevention. The International Tobacco Products Marketing Standards announced in September 2001, however, did not have the independent audit body. Although the companies did not stop the FCTC, they continue to promote the International Tobacco Products Marketing Standards youth smoking prevention as an alternative to the FCTC. Public health civil society groups should help policymakers and governments understand the importance of not working with the tobacco industry.

  11. Global health, equity and the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The report of the WHO Commission on Social Determinants of Health demonstrates the renewed salience of health inequalities within the international health policy agenda. The tobacco pandemic is characterized by an escalating burden of death and disease that is increasingly being borne by developing countries. Efforts to promote global health equity must therefore prioritize reductions in tobacco consumption. The WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) offers a remarkable opportunity to address the health inequalities associated with tobacco use, and represents an important innovation within global governance. But the FCTC’s failure to adequately address the health impacts of trade liberalization highlights the difficulties of ensuring policy coherence across international health, development and economic policies. Recognition of such limitations is important both to inform the further development of the FCTC and to ensure that appropriate lessons are drawn for future initiatives. PMID:20595357

  12. Retracted: Postoperative pain after irrigation with Vibringe versus a conventional needle: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bilgili, D; Yilmaz, S; Dumani, A; Yoldas, O

    2016-08-01

    The following article from International Endodontic Journal, 'Postoperative pain after irrigation with Vibringe versus a conventional needle: a randomized controlled trial' by D. Bilgili, S. Yilmaz, A. Dumani & O. Yoldas, published online on 29 February 2016 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the Journal Editor in Chief, Prof. Paul Dummer, and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. The retraction has been agreed because the corresponding author did not contact the first author who carried out the work before alterations to the article were made prior to submission. This damages the integrity of the work and there are additional concerns over the number of patients and the accuracy of the results and conclusions.

  13. Project Cerberus: Tobacco Industry Strategy to Create an Alternative to the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control

    PubMed Central

    Mamudu, Hadii M.; Hammond, Ross; Glantz, Stanton A.

    2008-01-01

    Between 1999 and 2001, British American Tobacco, Philip Morris, and Japan Tobacco International executed Project Cerberus to develop a global voluntary regulatory regime as an alternative to the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC). They aimed to develop a global voluntary regulatory code to be overseen by an independent audit body and to focus attention on youth smoking prevention. The International Tobacco Products Marketing Standards announced in September 2001, however, did not have the independent audit body. Although the companies did not stop the FCTC, they continue to promote the International Tobacco Products Marketing Standards youth smoking prevention as an alternative to the FCTC. Public health civil society groups should help policymakers and governments understand the importance of not working with the tobacco industry. PMID:18633079

  14. A Chilling Example? Uruguay, Philip Morris International, and WHO's Framework Convention on Tobacco Control.

    PubMed

    Russell, Andrew; Wainwright, Megan; Mamudu, Hadii

    2015-06-01

    The World Health Organization's Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) is the first international public health treaty to address the global spread of tobacco products. Ethnographic research at the fourth meeting of the FCTC's Conference of the Parties in Uruguay highlights the role of the FCTC in recalibrating the relationship between international trade and investment agreements and those of global public health. Specifically, we chart the origins and development of the Punta del Este Declaration, tabled by Uruguay at the conference, to counter a legal request by Philip Morris International, the world's largest tobacco transnational, for arbitration by the International Centre for the Settlement of Investment Disputes over Uruguay's alleged violations of several international trade and investment treaties. We argue that medical anthropologists should give greater consideration to global health governance and diplomacy as a potential counterweight to the 'politics of resignation' associated with corporate capitalism.

  15. 78 FR 64014 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; United States Pharmacopeial Convention

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... Pharmacopeial Convention Pursuant to Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations 1301.34 (a), this is notice that on July 31, 2013, United States Pharmacopeial Convention, 12601 Twinbrook Parkway, Rockville,...

  16. Interpretation of the source-specific substantive control measures of the Minamata Convention on Mercury.

    PubMed

    You, Mingqing

    2015-02-01

    Being persistent, toxic, and bio-accumulative, Mercury (Hg) seriously affects the environment and human health. Due to Hg's attribute of long-range environmental transport across national borders, especially through atmospheric transport, no country can fully protect its environment and human health with its own efforts, without global cooperation. The Minamata Convention on Mercury, which was formally adopted and opened for signature in October 2013, is the only global environmental regime on the control of Hg pollution. Its main substantive control measures are source-specific: its phasing-out, phasing-down, and other main substantive requirements all direct to specific categories of pollution sources through the regulation of specific sectors of the economy and social life. This Convention does not take a national quota approach to quantify the Parties' nationwide total allowable consumption or discharge of Hg or Hg compounds, nor does it quantify their nationwide total reduction requirements. This paper attempts to find the underlying reasons for this source-specific approach and offers two interpretations. One possible interpretation is that Hg might be a non-threshold pollutant, i.e., a pollutant without a risk-free value of concentration. The existence of a reference dose (RfD), reference concentration (RfC), provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI), minimal risk level (MRL) or other similar reference values of Hg does not necessarily mean that Hg cannot be regarded as non-threshold because such reference values have scientific uncertainties and may also involve policy considerations. Another interpretation is that Hg lacks a feasibly determinable total allowable quantity. There is evidence that negotiators might have treated Hg as non-threshold, or at least accepted that Hg lacks a feasibly determinable total allowable quantity: (1) The negotiators were informed about the serious situations of the current emissions, releases, and legacy deposition; (2

  17. Hingeless rotor theory and experiment on vibration reduction by periodic variation of conventional controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sissingh, G. J.; Donham, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The reduction of the n per rev. pitch-, roll- and vertical vibrations of an n-bladed rotor by n per rev. sinusoidal variations of the collective and cyclic controls is investigated. The numerical results presented refer to a four-bladed, 7.5-foot model and are based on frequency response tests conducted under an Army-sponsored research program. The following subjects are treated: extraction of the rotor transfer functions (.073R hub flapping and model thrust versus servo valve command, amplitude and phase), calculation of servo commands (volts) required to compensate .073R hub flapping (3P and 5P) and model thrust (4P), evaluation of the effect of the vibratory control inputs on blade loads, and theoretical prediction of the root flapbending moments generated by 0 to 5P perturbations of the feathering angle and rotor angle of attack. Five operating conditions are investigated covering advance ratios from approximately 0.2 to 0.85. The feasibility of vibration reduction by periodic variation on conventional controls is evaluated.

  18. [WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) Article 11: packaging and labelling of tobacco products].

    PubMed

    Bekki, Kanae; Inaba, Yohei; Kunugita, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) requires member countries to implement measures aimed at reducing the demand for tobacco products. FCTC article 11 describes the important forms of health communication and packaging regulations. And this article recommends on large pictorial health warnings and encourages more effective forms of disclosure on constituents and emissions. Furthermore, article 11 recognizes the importance of the package as a promotional vehicle for tobacco companies and requires the removal of potentially misleading packaging information, including the terms "light" and "mild." The Conference of the Parties (COP) adopted guidelines for implementation of article 11 on "Packaging and labelling of Tobacco Products". Some countries, such as Canada, the U.S.A., Australia, EU countries etc. positively promoted tobacco control by implementing countermeasures such as the graphic health warning labels and plain packages. These countermeasures showed the significant effects of decreasing smoking rate and preventing smoking initiation in young people. Furthermore, these warning labels were effective for the literally challenged. However, the Japanese government has not implemented these countermeasures, and only limited texts are shown on Japanese tobacco packaging. Therefore, Japan should emulate approaches taken by other countries, and promote the tobacco control policy in accordance with FCTC.

  19. [Tobacco smoking and principles of the who framework convention on tobacco control: a review].

    PubMed

    Melkadze, N

    2013-02-01

    The aim of a review is to examine the current state of the relevant publications on tobacco smoking, the Guidelines on Protection from Exposure to Tobacco Smoke, and WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC), which commits countries to protect the public's health by adopting various measures to reduce demand for tobacco. Georgia ratified the treaty in February 2006. In Georgia the implementation of the WHO FCTC is regulated by the "Law on Tobacco Control" (Law). It went into effect in September 2003. Changes and additions to the Law were approved by the Parliament in December 2008 (N 941 - rs) and in December 2010 (№4059-rs). According to Article 10 of the Law, smoking is prohibited at the educational and childcare institutions, medical and pharmaceutical facilities, at the entire area of petrol, gas and gas-distribution stations, in public transport, indoor areas of work and mass gathering... In spite of the legislation rights of non-smokers are very poorly preserved. With this in mind, the Welfare Foundation, the FCTC and the Tobacco Control Alliance, organized a public discussion on enforcing smoke-free laws in Georgia, in December 2012 at Tbilisi Marriott Courtyard Hotel. In order to make public libraries, educational, cultural institutions «de jure» and «de facto» free from tobacco smoke, the campaign against tobacco, which aims to strengthen implementation of the Tobacco Control Law and Regulation should be held in public libraries - not in the hotels. It is necessary to hang a poster - «Environment free from Smoke» at the entrance to buildings where smoking is prohibited throughout. In Rules and regulations for the use of the library there must be a note: smoking is prohibited in the library. We hope that Georgia in the nearest future will be in the list of countries with smoke-free public and work places.

  20. Automatic speed control of conventional beam pumping units in heavy oil production

    SciTech Connect

    Best, L.

    1995-12-31

    Problems inherent in the production of heavy oil are not found in the production of higher gravity crude. A great deal of time and resources has been expended researching various methods of both reservoir stimulation and production, with somewhat limited success. Modern Production Services, Inc. (MPS) of Fort Worth, Texas, has been heavily involved in research and development of technology in the production of heavy oil for nearly three years. The resultant ACCU DRIVE 4140 control system for conventional beam pumping units has shown dramatic results in increasing production while simultaneously reducing maintenance problems. By working closely with several oil companies, MPS has developed a completely automatic control system that varies the pumping rate within a stroke in such a manner as to optimize oil production. In addition, as well conditions change, the system changes pump rates to continue maximum production. Five wells are presently being produced by Maraven that had heretofore posed such problems as to be not economical. Other wells have shown marked increases in production and reductions in component stress. The reduction of problems commonly encountered and the increase of production by automatically varying pump rates within a stroke is the subject of this paper.

  1. Comparison between a novel and conventional artificial pancreas for perioperative glycemic control using a closed-loop system.

    PubMed

    Namikawa, Tsutomu; Munekage, Masaya; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Yatabe, Tomoaki; Maeda, Hiromichi; Tsukamoto, Yuuki; Hirano, Kenichi; Asano, Takuji; Kinoshita, Yoshihiko; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2017-03-01

    This clinical study aimed to compare a novel and conventional artificial pancreas (AP) used in surgical patients for perioperative glycemic control, with respect to usability, blood glucose measurements, and glycemic control characteristics. From July in 2010 to March in 2015, 177 patients underwent perioperative glycemic control using a novel AP. Among them, 166 patients were eligible for inclusion in this study. Intensive insulin therapy (IIT) targeting a blood glucose range of 80-110 mg/dL was implemented in 82 patients (49 %), and the remaining 84 patients (51 %) received a less-intensive regime of insulin therapy. Data were collected prospectively and were reviewed or analyzed retrospectively. A comparison study of 324 patients undergoing IIT for glycemic control using a novel (n = 82) or conventional AP (n = 242) was conducted retrospectively. All patients had no hypoglycemia. The comparison study revealed no significant differences in perioperative mean blood glucose level, achievement rates for target blood glucose range, and variability in blood glucose level achieved with IIT between the novel AP and conventional AP groups. The usability, performance with respect to blood glucose measurement, and glycemic control characteristics of IIT were comparable between novel and conventional AP systems. However, the novel AP was easier to manipulate than the conventional AP due to its smaller size, lower weight, and shorter time for preparation. In the near future, this novel AP system might be accepted worldwide as a safe and useful device for use in perioperative glycemic control.

  2. Ankaferd Blood Stopper for controlling gastrointestinal bleeding due to distinct benign lesions refractory to conventional antihemorrhagic measures

    PubMed Central

    Kurt, Mevlut; Onal, Ibrahim Koral; Akdogan, Meral; Kekilli, Murat; Arhan, Mehmet; Sayilir, Abdurrahim; Oztas, Erkin; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim Celalettin

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the hemostatic efficacy of the Ankaferd Blood Stopper (ABS, Ankaferd Health Products Ltd, Turkey) hemostatic agent for controlling gastrointestinal bleeding associated with various benign lesions refractory to conventional antihemorrhagic measures. METHODS: The records of all patients who underwent upper and lower endoscopy procedures at the Turkiye Yuksek Ihtisas Teaching and Research Hospital (Ankara, Turkey) between April 2008 and June 2009 were reviewed. Patients in whom ABS was used as a primary or adjuvant hemostatic agent were included in the study. Rates of bleeding control and postprocedural complications were documented. RESULTS: Hemostasis with no immediate complications was achieved in all patients within seconds of endoscopic application of ABS. CONCLUSIONS: ABS may have a role as a primary treatment or as an adjuvant to conventional modalities used to control gastrointestinal bleeding. Prospective controlled studies are needed to help establish its efficacy and, perhaps, offer a comparison with conventional hemostatic interventions. PMID:20559581

  3. Helminth ova control in wastewater and sludge for advanced and conventional sanitation.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, B; Maya, C; Galván, M

    2007-01-01

    Worldwide, the most important reuse of wastewater, in volume, is agricultural irrigation. Therefore, there is a need to properly treat wastewater for such purpose, considering the removal of pathogens while leaving suitable amounts of nutrients and other compounds to increase productivity. Helminth ova are one of the main targeted pathogens in the new guidelines for water reuse in agriculture and aquaculture issued in 2006 by the World Health Organization. However, relatively little research has been done recently on how to remove and inactivate helminth ova from wastewater and sludge and recommendations given several decades ago are still used, but when put into practice, particularly in developing countries, produce unsatisfactory results. One problem is that these criteria were developed using inaccurate analytical techniques and the other is the large number and variety of helminth ova species found in wastewater and sludge from the developing world. In fact, the few technological options to remove and inactivate helminth ova come from research performed using wastewater and sludge with low helminth ova content, and refer almost only to Ascaris (one type of helminth). This paper summarises recent research work and results from practical experience concerning helminth ova control for advanced and conventional sanitation.

  4. Challenges and Potential Solutions for Reducing Climate Control Loads in Conventional and Hybrid Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, R.B., Anderson, R., Blake, D.M., Burch, S.D.; Cuddy, M.R., Keyser, M.A., Rugh, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy national laboratory, is collaborating with U.S. automotive manufacturers to develop innovative techniques to reduce national fuel consumption and vehicle tailpipe emissions by reducing vehicle climate control loads. A new U.S. emissions test, the Supplemental Federal Test Procedure (SFTP), will soon begin measuring tailpipe emissions with the air conditioning system operating. Modeled results show that emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and carbon monoxide (CO) more than double during the air conditioning part of the SFTP. Reducing the transmittance of the glazing can have a greater impact on the cabin soak temperature than ventilating the vehicle during a hot soak. Reducing the amount of outside air can decrease cooling and heating loads but requires that the recirculated air be cleaned. We discuss a photocatalytic oxidation air-cleaning process for removing volatile organic compounds and bioareosols. We conclude with an example of modeling the thermal comfort of the occupants. An auxiliary load increase of only 400 Watts (W) results in a 0.4 km/L (1 mpg) decrease for a conventional 11.9-L/100-km (28-mpg) vehicle. If every vehicle in the United States were to save only 0.4 km/L (1 mpg), $4 billion (U.S. dollars) would be saved annually in gasoline and oil costs. Further information can be found at http://www.ctts.nrel.gov/auxload.html.

  5. [WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) Article 8: protection from exposure to tobacco smoke].

    PubMed

    Yamato, Hiroshi; Jiang, Ying; Ohta, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    It is necessary to implement 100% smoke-free environments in all indoor workplaces and indoor public places in order to protect people from exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke (SHS). Forty-four countries have already implemented comprehensive smoke-free legislations according to the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) Guidelines on protection from exposure to tobacco smoke. The Occupational Safety and Health Law (OSHL) was partially revised to strengthen the countermeasures against SHS in Japan in 2014. However, the revision was only minimal. Firstly, it is necessary to make efforts to implement countermeasures against SHS (their implementations are not obligatory, as required in Article 8). Secondly, the revised OSHL allowed the implementation of designated smoking rooms inside workplaces (Article 8 requires 100% smoke-free environments). Thirdly, revised OSHL does not effectively cover the small-scale entertainment industry so that workers in restaurants and pubs will not be protected from occupational SHS. We explain the importance of implementation of 100% smoke-free environments by law, using the data on leakage of smoke from designated smoking rooms, and occupational exposure to SHS among service industry workers. The decrease in the incidence of smoking-related diseases in people where a comprehensive smoke-free law is implemented is also introduced. These data and information should be widely disseminated to policy makers, media, owners of service industries, and Japanese people.

  6. Synergistic mercury removal by conventional pollutant control strategies for coal-fired power plants in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuxiao; Zhang, Lei; Wu, Ye; Ancora, Maria Pia; Zhao, Yu; Hao, Jiming

    2010-06-01

    China's 11th 5-yr plan has regulated total sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions by installing flue gas desulfurization (FGD) devices and shutting down small thermal power units. These control measures will not only significantly reduce the emission of conventional pollutants but also benefit the reduction of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. This paper uses the emission factor method to estimate the efficiencies of these measures on mercury emission abatement. From 2005 to 2010, coal consumption in power plants will increase by 59%; however, the mercury emission will only rise from 141 to 155 t, with an increase of 10%. The average emission rate of mercury from coal burning will decrease from 126 mg Hg/t of coal to 87 mg Hg/t of coal. The effects of the three desulfurization measures were assessed and show that wet FGD will play an important role in mercury removal. Mercury emissions in 2015 and 2020 are also projected under different policy scenarios. Under the most probable scenario, the total mercury emission in coal-fired power plants in China will decrease to 130 t by 2020, which will benefit from the rapid installation of fabric filters and selective catalytic reduction.

  7. Infrequent identity mismatches are frequently undetected

    PubMed Central

    Goldinger, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to quickly and accurately match faces to photographs bears critically on many domains, from controlling purchase of age-restricted goods to law enforcement and airport security. Despite its pervasiveness and importance, research has shown that face matching is surprisingly error prone. The majority of face-matching research is conducted under idealized conditions (e.g., using photographs of individuals taken on the same day) and with equal proportions of match and mismatch trials, a rate that is likely not observed in everyday face matching. In four experiments, we presented observers with photographs of faces taken an average of 1.5 years apart and tested whether face-matching performance is affected by the prevalence of identity mismatches, comparing conditions of low (10 %) and high (50 %) mismatch prevalence. Like the low-prevalence effect in visual search, we observed inflated miss rates under low-prevalence conditions. This effect persisted when participants were allowed to correct their initial responses (Experiment 2), when they had to verify every decision with a certainty judgment (Experiment 3) and when they were permitted “second looks” at face pairs (Experiment 4). These results suggest that, under realistic viewing conditions, the low-prevalence effect in face matching is a large, persistent source of errors. PMID:24500751

  8. Investment Incentives and the Implementation of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control: Evidence from Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Drope, Jeffrey; Labonte, Ronald; Zulu, Richard; Goma, Fastone

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Policy misalignment across different sectors of government serves as one of the pivotal barriers to WHO Framework convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) implementation. This paper examines the logic used by government officials to justify providing investment incentives to increase tobacco processing and manufacturing in the context of FCTC implementation in Zambia. Methods We conducted qualitative semi-structured interviews with key informants from government, civil society and intergovernmental economic organizations (n=23). We supplemented the interview data with an analysis of public documents pertaining to economic development policy in Zambia. Results We found gross misalignments between the policies of the economic sector and efforts to implement the provisions of the FCTC. Our interviews uncovered the rationale used by officials in the economic sector to justify providing economic incentives to bolster tobacco processing and manufacturing in Zambia: 1) tobacco is not consumed by Zambians/tobacco is an export commodity, 2) economic benefits outweigh health costs, and 3) tobacco consumption is a personal choice. Conclusions Much of the struggle Zambia has experienced implementing the FCTC can be attributed to misalignments between the economic and health sectors. Zambia’s development agenda seeks to bolster agricultural processing and manufacturing. Tobacco control proponents must understand and work within this context of economic development in order to foster productive strategies with those working on tobacco supply issues. These findings are broadly applicable to the global analysis on the barriers and facilitators of FCTC implementation. It is important that the Ministry of Health monitors the tobacco policy of other sectors and engages with these sectors to find ways of harmonizing FCTC implementation across sectors. PMID:26135987

  9. Mismatch repair proteins: key regulators of genetic recombination.

    PubMed

    Surtees, J A; Argueso, J L; Alani, E

    2004-01-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) systems are central to maintaining genome stability in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. MMR proteins play a fundamental role in avoiding mutations, primarily by removing misincorporation errors that occur during DNA replication. MMR proteins also act during genetic recombination in steps that include repairing mismatches in heteroduplex DNA, modulating meiotic crossover control, removing 3' non-homologous tails during double-strand break repair, and preventing recombination between divergent sequences. In this review we will, first, discuss roles for MMR proteins in repairing mismatches that occur during recombination, particularly during meiosis. We will also explore how studying this process has helped to refine models of double-strand break repair, and particularly to our understanding of gene conversion gradients. Second, we will examine the role of MMR proteins in repressing homeologous recombination, i.e. recombination between divergent sequences. We will also compare the requirements for MMR proteins in preventing homeologous recombination to the requirements for these proteins in mismatch repair.

  10. Visual mismatch negativity: a predictive coding view

    PubMed Central

    Stefanics, Gábor; Kremláček, Jan; Czigler, István

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of studies investigate the visual mismatch negativity (vMMN) or use the vMMN as a tool to probe various aspects of human cognition. This paper reviews the theoretical underpinnings of vMMN in the light of methodological considerations and provides recommendations for measuring and interpreting the vMMN. The following key issues are discussed from the experimentalist's point of view in a predictive coding framework: (1) experimental protocols and procedures to control “refractoriness” effects; (2) methods to control attention; (3) vMMN and veridical perception. PMID:25278859

  11. Mismatches in genetic markers in a large family study.

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, G C

    1980-01-01

    The Hawaii Family Study of Cognition provided an opportunity to investigate the frequency and implications of non-agreement, or mismatches, between observed and expected genetic marker phenotypes of husbands, wives, and children. Mismatch data from 68 families in which one or both spouses were known not to be a biological parent were used to determine the rate of undeclared nonparentage in 1,748 families in which conventional relationships were claimed. Two independent approaches gave consistent estimates, suggesting that approximately 2.3% of the 2,839 tested children from these families were probably the result of infidelity, concealed adoption, or another event. About two-thirds of the mismatches detected were probably due to properties of the techniques employed. PMID:6930820

  12. Breaking Free of Control: How Conventional T Cells Overcome Regulatory T Cell Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Mercadante, Emily R.; Lorenz, Ulrike M.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional T (Tcon) cells are crucial in shaping the immune response, whether it is protection against a pathogen, a cytotoxic attack on tumor cells, or an unwanted response to self-antigens in the context of autoimmunity. In each of these immune settings, regulatory T cells (Tregs) can potentially exert control over the Tcon cell response, resulting in either suppression or activation of the Tcon cells. Under physiological conditions, Tcon cells are able to transiently overcome Treg-imposed restraints to mount a protective response against an infectious threat, achieving clonal expansion, differentiation, and effector function. However, evidence has accumulated in recent years to suggest that Tcon cell resistance to Treg-mediated suppression centrally contributes to the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease. Tipping the balance too far in the other direction, cancerous tumors utilize Tregs to establish an overly suppressive microenvironment, preventing antitumor Tcon cell responses. Given the wide-ranging clinical importance of the Tcon/Treg interaction, this review aims to provide a better understanding of what determines whether a Tcon cell is susceptible to Treg-mediated suppression and how perturbations to this finely tuned balance play a role in pathological conditions. Here, we focus in detail on the complex array of factors that confer Tcon cells with resistance to Treg suppression, which we have divided into two categories: (1) extracellular factor-mediated signaling and (2) intracellular signaling molecules. Further, we explore the therapeutic implications of manipulating the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway, which is proposed to be the convergence point of signaling pathways that mediate Tcon resistance to suppression. Finally, we address important unresolved questions on the timing and location of acquisition of resistance, and the stability of the “Treg-resistant” phenotype. PMID:27242798

  13. Dynamics of DNA Mismatch Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coats, Julie; Lin, Yuyen; Rasnik, Ivan

    2009-11-01

    DNA mismatch repair protects the genome from spontaneous mutations by recognizing errors, excising damage, and re-synthesizing DNA in a pathway that is highly conserved. Mismatch recognition is accomplished by the MutS family of proteins which are weak ATPases that bind specifically to damaged DNA, but the specific molecular mechanisms by which these proteins recognize damage and initiate excision are not known. Previous structural investigations have implied that protein-induced conformational changes are central to mismatch recognition. Because damage detection is a highly dynamic process in which conformational changes of the protein-DNA complexes occur on a time scale of a few seconds, it is difficult to obtain meaningful kinetic information with traditional ensemble techniques. In this work, we use single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) to study the conformational dynamics of fluorescently labeled DNA substrates in the presence of the mismatch repair protein MutS from E. coli and its human homolog MSH2/MSH6. Our studies allow us to obtain quantitative kinetic information about the rates of binding and dissociation and to determine the conformational states for each protein-DNA complex.

  14. Experimental investigation of piston heat transfer under conventional diesel and reactivity-controlled compression ignition combustion regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Splitter, Derek A; Hendricks, Terry Lee; Ghandhi, Jaal B

    2014-01-01

    The piston of a heavy-duty single-cylinder research engine was instrumented with 11 fast-response surface thermocouples, and a commercial wireless telemetry system was used to transmit the signals from the moving piston. The raw thermocouple data were processed using an inverse heat conduction method that included Tikhonov regularization to recover transient heat flux. By applying symmetry, the data were compiled to provide time-resolved spatial maps of the piston heat flux and surface temperature. A detailed comparison was made between conventional diesel combustion and reactivity-controlled compression ignition combustion operations at matched conditions of load, speed, boost pressure, and combustion phasing. The integrated piston heat transfer was found to be 24% lower, and the mean surface temperature was 25 C lower for reactivity-controlled compression ignition operation as compared to conventional diesel combustion, in spite of the higher peak heat release rate. Lower integrated piston heat transfer for reactivity-controlled compression ignition was found over all the operating conditions tested. The results showed that increasing speed decreased the integrated heat transfer for conventional diesel combustion and reactivity-controlled compression ignition. The effect of the start of injection timing was found to strongly influence conventional diesel combustion heat flux, but had a negligible effect on reactivity-controlled compression ignition heat flux, even in the limit of near top dead center high-reactivity fuel injection timings. These results suggest that the role of the high-reactivity fuel injection does not significantly affect the thermal environment even though it is important for controlling the ignition timing and heat release rate shape. The integrated heat transfer and the dynamic surface heat flux were found to be insensitive to changes in boost pressure for both conventional diesel combustion and reactivity-controlled compression ignition

  15. Genetic control of conventional and pheromone-stimulated biofilm formation in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Hsuan; Kabrawala, Shail; Fox, Emily P; Nobile, Clarissa J; Johnson, Alexander D; Bennett, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans can stochastically switch between two phenotypes, white and opaque. Opaque cells are the sexually competent form of C. albicans and therefore undergo efficient polarized growth and mating in the presence of pheromone. In contrast, white cells cannot mate, but are induced - under a specialized set of conditions - to form biofilms in response to pheromone. In this work, we compare the genetic regulation of such "pheromone-stimulated" biofilms with that of "conventional" C. albicans biofilms. In particular, we examined a network of six transcriptional regulators (Bcr1, Brg1, Efg1, Tec1, Ndt80, and Rob1) that mediate conventional biofilm formation for their potential roles in pheromone-stimulated biofilm formation. We show that four of the six transcription factors (Bcr1, Brg1, Rob1, and Tec1) promote formation of both conventional and pheromone-stimulated biofilms, indicating they play general roles in cell cohesion and biofilm development. In addition, we identify the master transcriptional regulator of pheromone-stimulated biofilms as C. albicans Cph1, ortholog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ste12. Cph1 regulates mating in C. albicans opaque cells, and here we show that Cph1 is also essential for pheromone-stimulated biofilm formation in white cells. In contrast, Cph1 is dispensable for the formation of conventional biofilms. The regulation of pheromone- stimulated biofilm formation was further investigated by transcriptional profiling and genetic analyses. These studies identified 196 genes that are induced by pheromone signaling during biofilm formation. One of these genes, HGC1, is shown to be required for both conventional and pheromone-stimulated biofilm formation. Taken together, these observations compare and contrast the regulation of conventional and pheromone-stimulated biofilm formation in C. albicans, and demonstrate that Cph1 is required for the latter, but not the former.

  16. Mismatch negativity, social cognition, and functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hui-yan; Li, Qiang; Chen, Xi-ping; Tao, Lu-yang

    2015-01-01

    Mismatch negativity is generated automatically, and is an early monitoring indicator of neuronal integrity impairment and functional abnormality in patients with brain injury, leading to decline of cognitive function. Antipsychotic medication cannot affect mismatch negativity. The present study aimed to explore the relationships of mismatch negativity with neurocognition, daily life and social functional outcomes in patients after brain injury. Twelve patients with traumatic brain injury and 12 healthy controls were recruited in this study. We examined neurocognition with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised China, and daily and social functional outcomes with the Activity of Daily Living Scale and Social Disability Screening Schedule, respectively. Mismatch negativity was analyzed from electroencephalogram recording. The results showed that mismatch negativity amplitudes decreased in patients with traumatic brain injury compared with healthy controls. Mismatch negativity amplitude was negatively correlated with measurements of neurocognition and positively correlated with functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury. Further, the most significant positive correlations were found between mismatch negativity in the fronto-central region and measures of functional outcomes. The most significant positive correlations were also found between mismatch negativity at the FCz electrode and daily living function. Mismatch negativity amplitudes were extremely positively associated with Social Disability Screening Schedule scores at the Fz electrode in brain injury patients. These experimental findings suggest that mismatch negativity might efficiently reflect functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury. PMID:26170824

  17. Comparison between Variable and Conventional Volume-Controlled Ventilation on Cardiorespiratory Parameters in Experimental Emphysema.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Isabela; Padilha, Gisele A; Huhle, Robert; Wierzchon, Caio; Miranda, Paulo J B; Ramos, Isalira P; Rocha, Nazareth; Cruz, Fernanda F; Santos, Raquel S; de Oliveira, Milena V; Souza, Sergio A; Goldenberg, Regina C; Luiz, Ronir R; Pelosi, Paolo; de Abreu, Marcelo G; Silva, Pedro L; Rocco, Patricia R M

    2016-01-01

    Emphysema is characterized by loss of lung tissue elasticity and destruction of structures supporting alveoli and capillaries. The impact of mechanical ventilation strategies on ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) in emphysema is poorly defined. New ventilator strategies should be developed to minimize VILI in emphysema. The present study was divided into two protocols: (1) characterization of an elastase-induced emphysema model in rats and identification of the time point of greatest cardiorespiratory impairment, defined as a high specific lung elastance associated with large right ventricular end-diastolic area; and (2) comparison between variable (VV) and conventional volume-controlled ventilation (VCV) on lung mechanics and morphometry, biological markers, and cardiac function at that time point. In the first protocol, Wistar rats (n = 62) received saline (SAL) or porcine pancreatic elastase (ELA) intratracheally once weekly for 4 weeks, respectively. Evaluations were performed 1, 3, 5, or 8 weeks after the last intratracheal instillation of saline or elastase. After identifying the time point of greatest cardiorespiratory impairment, an additional 32 Wistar rats were randomized into the SAL and ELA groups and then ventilated with VV or VCV (n = 8/group) [tidal volume (VT) = 6 mL/kg, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) = 3 cmH2O, fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) = 0.4] for 2 h. VV was applied on a breath-to-breath basis as a sequence of randomly generated VT values (mean VT = 6 mL/kg), with a 30% coefficient of variation. Non-ventilated (NV) SAL and ELA animals were used for molecular biology analysis. The time point of greatest cardiorespiratory impairment, was observed 5 weeks after the last elastase instillation. At this time point, interleukin (IL)-6, cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC)-1, amphiregulin, angiopoietin (Ang)-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA levels were higher in ELA compared to SAL. In ELA animals

  18. Comparison between Variable and Conventional Volume-Controlled Ventilation on Cardiorespiratory Parameters in Experimental Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Isabela; Padilha, Gisele A.; Huhle, Robert; Wierzchon, Caio; Miranda, Paulo J. B.; Ramos, Isalira P.; Rocha, Nazareth; Cruz, Fernanda F.; Santos, Raquel S.; de Oliveira, Milena V.; Souza, Sergio A.; Goldenberg, Regina C.; Luiz, Ronir R.; Pelosi, Paolo; de Abreu, Marcelo G.; Silva, Pedro L.; Rocco, Patricia R. M.

    2016-01-01

    Emphysema is characterized by loss of lung tissue elasticity and destruction of structures supporting alveoli and capillaries. The impact of mechanical ventilation strategies on ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) in emphysema is poorly defined. New ventilator strategies should be developed to minimize VILI in emphysema. The present study was divided into two protocols: (1) characterization of an elastase-induced emphysema model in rats and identification of the time point of greatest cardiorespiratory impairment, defined as a high specific lung elastance associated with large right ventricular end-diastolic area; and (2) comparison between variable (VV) and conventional volume-controlled ventilation (VCV) on lung mechanics and morphometry, biological markers, and cardiac function at that time point. In the first protocol, Wistar rats (n = 62) received saline (SAL) or porcine pancreatic elastase (ELA) intratracheally once weekly for 4 weeks, respectively. Evaluations were performed 1, 3, 5, or 8 weeks after the last intratracheal instillation of saline or elastase. After identifying the time point of greatest cardiorespiratory impairment, an additional 32 Wistar rats were randomized into the SAL and ELA groups and then ventilated with VV or VCV (n = 8/group) [tidal volume (VT) = 6 mL/kg, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) = 3 cmH2O, fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) = 0.4] for 2 h. VV was applied on a breath-to-breath basis as a sequence of randomly generated VT values (mean VT = 6 mL/kg), with a 30% coefficient of variation. Non-ventilated (NV) SAL and ELA animals were used for molecular biology analysis. The time point of greatest cardiorespiratory impairment, was observed 5 weeks after the last elastase instillation. At this time point, interleukin (IL)-6, cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC)-1, amphiregulin, angiopoietin (Ang)-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA levels were higher in ELA compared to SAL. In ELA animals

  19. 40 CFR 442.22 - Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT). 442.22 Section 442.22 Protection of...) TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT CLEANING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Rail Tank Cars Transporting Chemical and Petroleum Cargos... technology (BCT). Except as provided in 40 CFR 125.30 through 125.32, any existing point source subject...

  20. 40 CFR 442.22 - Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT). 442.22 Section 442.22 Protection of...) TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT CLEANING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Rail Tank Cars Transporting Chemical and Petroleum Cargos... technology (BCT). Except as provided in 40 CFR 125.30 through 125.32, any existing point source subject...

  1. 40 CFR 442.22 - Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT). 442.22 Section 442.22 Protection of...) TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT CLEANING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Rail Tank Cars Transporting Chemical and Petroleum Cargos... technology (BCT). Except as provided in 40 CFR 125.30 through 125.32, any existing point source subject...

  2. Localized and Controlled Delivery of Nitric Oxide to the Conventional Outflow Pathway via Enzyme Biocatalysis: Toward Therapy for Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Chandrawati, Rona; Chang, Jason Y H; Reina-Torres, Ester; Jumeaux, Coline; Sherwood, Joseph M; Stamer, W Daniel; Zelikin, Alexander N; Overby, Darryl R; Stevens, Molly M

    2017-02-21

    Nitric oxide (NO) is able to lower intraocular pressure (IOP); however, its therapeutic effects on outflow physiology are location- and dose-dependent. An NO delivery platform that directly targets the resistance-generating region of the conventional outflow pathway and locally liberates a controlled dose of NO is reported. An increase in outflow facility (decrease in IOP) is demonstrated in a mouse model.

  3. 40 CFR 439.33 - Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT). 439.33 Section 439.33 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS...

  4. 40 CFR 439.23 - Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT). 439.23 Section 439.23 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS...

  5. 40 CFR 439.13 - Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT). 439.13 Section 439.13 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS...

  6. 40 CFR 439.43 - Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT). 439.43 Section 439.43 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS...

  7. 40 CFR 439.33 - Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT). 439.33 Section 439.33 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS...

  8. 40 CFR 439.23 - Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT). 439.23 Section 439.23 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS...

  9. 40 CFR 439.13 - Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT). 439.13 Section 439.13 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS...

  10. 40 CFR 439.43 - Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT). 439.43 Section 439.43 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS...

  11. Differences in proprioception, muscle force control and comfort between conventional and new-generation knee and ankle orthoses.

    PubMed

    Marchini, A; Lauermann, S P; Minetto, M A; Massazza, G; Maffiuletti, N A

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare muscle force control and proprioception between conventional and new-generation experimental orthoses. Sixteen healthy subjects participated in a single-blind controlled trial in which two different types of orthosis were applied to the dominant knee or ankle, while the following variables were evaluated: muscle force control (accuracy), joint position sense, kinesthesia, static balance as well as subjective outcomes. The use of experimental orthoses resulted in better force accuracy during isometric knee extensions compared to conventional orthoses (P=0.005). Moreover, the use of experimental orthoses resulted in better force accuracy during concentric (P=0.010) and eccentric (P=0.014) ankle plantar flexions and better knee joint kinesthesia in the flexed position (P=0.004) compared to conventional orthoses. Subjective comfort (P<0.001) and preference scores were higher with experimental orthoses compared to conventional ones. In conclusion, orthosis type affected static and dynamic muscle force control, kinesthesia, and perceived comfort in healthy subjects. New-generation experimental knee and ankle orthoses may thus be recommended for prophylactic joint bracing during physical activity and to improve the compliance for orthosis use, particularly in patients who require long-term bracing.

  12. 40 CFR 442.32 - Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT CLEANING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Tank Barges and Ocean/Sea Tankers Transporting Chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT). 442.32 Section 442.32 Protection...

  13. 40 CFR 442.32 - Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT CLEANING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Tank Barges and Ocean/Sea Tankers Transporting Chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT). 442.32 Section 442.32 Protection...

  14. 40 CFR 442.32 - Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT CLEANING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Tank Barges and Ocean/Sea Tankers Transporting Chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Effluent limitations attainable by the application of the best conventional pollutant control technology (BCT). 442.32 Section 442.32 Protection...

  15. Analysis of the computed torque drive method and comparison with conventional position servo for a computer-controlled manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markiewicz, B. R.

    1973-01-01

    A manipulator and its control system (modeled after a Stanford design) is being developed as part of an artificial intelligence project. This development includes an analytical study of the control system software. A comparison is presented of the computed torque method and the conventional position servo. No conclusion is made as to the perference of one system over the other, as it is dependent upon the application and the results of a sampled data analysis.

  16. 40 CFR 434.84 - Effluent limitations attainable by application of the best conventional pollutant control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS COAL MINING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY BPT, BAT, BCT LIMITATIONS AND NEW SOURCE PERFORMANCE STANDARDS Western Alkaline Coal Mining § 434.84 Effluent limitations attainable by application of the best conventional pollutant...

  17. 40 CFR 434.84 - Effluent limitations attainable by application of the best conventional pollutant control...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS COAL MINING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY BPT, BAT, BCT LIMITATIONS AND NEW SOURCE PERFORMANCE STANDARDS Western Alkaline Coal Mining § 434.84 Effluent limitations attainable by application of the best conventional pollutant...

  18. Educational Mismatch and Self-Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Keith A.; Roche, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    Previous research on educational mismatch concentrates on estimating its labor market consequences but with a focus on wage and salary workers. This paper examines the far less studied influence of mismatch on the self-employed. Using a sample of workers in science and engineering fields, results show larger earnings penalties for mismatch among…

  19. Minimum Power Requirements and Optimal Rotor Design for Conventional, Compound, and Coaxial Helicopters Using Higher Harmonic Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovanetti, Eli B.

    This thesis presents a method for computing the optimal aerodynamic performance of conventional, compound, and coaxial helicopters in trimmed forward flight with a limited set of design variables, including the blade's radial twist and chord distributions and conventional and higher harmonic blade pitch control. The optimal design problem, which is cast as a variational statement, minimizes the sum of the induced and viscous power required to develop a prescribed lift and/or thrust. The variational statement is discretized and solved efficiently using a vortex-lattice technique. We present two variants of the analysis. In the first, the sectional blade aerodynamics are modeled using a linear lift curve and a quadratic drag polar, and flow angles are assumed to be small. The result is a quadratic programming problem that yields a linear set of equations to solve for the unknown optimal design variables. In the second approach, the problem is cast as a constrained nonlinear optimization problem, which is solved using Newton iteration. This approach, which accounts for realistic lift and drag coefficients including the effects of stall and the attendant increase in drag at high angles of attack, is capable of optimizing the blade planform in addition to the radial twist distribution and conventional and higher harmonic blade pitch control. We show that for conventional rotors, coaxial counterrotating rotors, and a wing-rotor compound, using radially varying twist and chord distributions and higher harmonic blade pitch control can produce significant reductions in required power, especially at high advance ratios.

  20. Opposite Drug Prescription and Cost Trajectories following Integrative and Conventional Care for Pain – A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Sundberg, Tobias; Petzold, Max; Kohls, Niko; Falkenberg, Torkel

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Pharmacotherapy may have a limited role in long-term pain management. Comparative trajectories of drug prescriptions and costs, two quality-of-care indicators for pain conditions, are largely unknown subsequent to conventional or integrative care (IC) management. The objectives of this study were to compare prescribed defined daily doses (DDD) and cost of first line drugs for pain patients referred to conventional or anthroposophic IC in Stockholm County, Sweden. Methods In this retrospective high quality registry case-control study, IC and conventional care patients were identified through inpatient care registries and matched on pain diagnosis (ICD-10: M79), age, gender and socio-demographics. National drug registry data was used to investigate changes in DDD and costs from 90/180 days before, to 90/180 days after, index visits to IC and conventional care. The primary selected drug category was analgesics, complemented by musculo-skeletal system drugs (e.g. anti-inflammatories, muscle relaxants) and psycholeptics (e.g. hypnotics, sedatives). Results After index care visits, conventional care pain patients (n = 1050) compared to IC patients (n = 213), were prescribed significantly more analgesics. The average (95% CI) group difference was 15.2 (6.0 to 24.3), p = 0.001, DDD/patient after 90 days; and 21.5 (7.4 to 35.6), p = 0.003, DDD/patient after 180 days. The cost of the prescribed and sold analgesics was significantly higher for conventional care after 90 days: euro/patient 10.7 (1.3 to 20.0), p = 0.025. Changes in drug prescription and costs for the other drug categories were not significantly different between groups. Conclusions Drug prescriptions and costs of analgesics increased following conventional care and decreased following IC, indicating potentially fewer adverse drug events and beneficial societal cost savings with IC. PMID:24827981

  1. European Expert Consensus Paper on the implementation of Article 14 of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Luke

    2016-11-01

    On 24 November 2015, under the auspices of the European Policy Roundtable on Smoking Cessation, 15 experts on tobacco control and dependence from across the European Union, chaired by Professor Luke Clancy, met in Oslo, Norway, to discuss the implementation of the Tobacco Products Directive and the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, namely Article 14. On the occasion of the 10th anniversary of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, this paper reports the consensus reached by all Roundtable participants on the need to further advance the availability and access to services to support cessation of tobacco use. The implementation of services to support cessation of tobacco use in line with Article 14 can and should be significantly improved to protect the health of European citizens. The meeting was initiated and funded by Pfizer.

  2. Outline of an on-site inspection regime for conventional arms control in Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The complexity of the negotiations on Conventional Forces in Europe (CFE) was emphasized recently by General John R. Galvin, SACEUR, when he stated, {open_quotes}The difficulties of comparing the relative strengths of strategic or intermediate-range nuclear arsenals pale in comparison with the problems of assessing the relative capabilities of opposing conventional forces.{open_quotes} Throughout this process, intensive and rigorous verification measures must be developed and enforced to ensure an acceptable degree of reliability. The eventual agreement will require a complex verification monitoring process covering a vast geographical area. The long-term success of the agreement to a large extent will depend on the level of confidence achieved by the verification process and the effective deployment of technological means will be essential to that process.

  3. A Pilot Randomized, Controlled Study of Nanocrystalline Silver, Manuka Honey, and Conventional Dressing in Healing Diabetic Foot Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Enid Wai-Yung; To, Tony Shing-Shun; Wong, Thomas Kwok-Shing

    2017-01-01

    Nanocrystalline silver (nAg) and Manuka honey (MH) dressing have increasing popularity for treating diabetic foot ulcer (DFU). This study was an open-label randomized controlled trial with three parallel groups' design in examining the preliminary effectiveness of nAg against MH and conventional dressing in healing DFU in terms of ulcer healing, ulcer infection, and inflammation. 31 participants (11 in the nAg group, 10 in the MH group, and 10 in the convention group) diagnosed with type 2 diabetes were enrolled. Wound cleaning, debridement, and topical dressing application were performed according to the group allocation in each visit at weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12. The results found that the proportions of complete ulcer healing were 81.8%, 50%, and 40% in the nAg, MH, and conventional groups, respectively. The ulcer size reduction rate was potentially higher in the nAg group (97.45%) than the MH group (86.21%) and the conventional group (75.17%). In bacteriology, nAg showed a greater rate of microorganism reduction although it was not significant. To conclude, nAg alginate was potentially superior to MH and conventional dressing in healing diabetic foot ulcer in terms of ulcer size reduction rate. PMID:28239398

  4. Control of Structure in Conventional Friction Stir Welds Through a Kinematic Theory of Metal Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    suggested a “chaotic-dynamic mixing” in the material [2]. Later tracer studies, using steel shot [3], aluminum shims [4], copper foil [5], bi-metallic...35812 Keywords: friction stir welding, AA2219, material flow Abstract In friction stir welding ( FSW ), a rotating pin is translated along a...welding, by a shoulder on the pin. In conventional FSW , the weld metal rests on an “anvil”, which supports the heavy “plunge” load on the tool. In

  5. The structural impact of DNA mismatches

    PubMed Central

    Rossetti, Giulia; Dans, Pablo D.; Gomez-Pinto, Irene; Ivani, Ivan; Gonzalez, Carlos; Orozco, Modesto

    2015-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of all the transversion and transition mismatches in three different DNA environments have been characterized by molecular dynamics simulations and NMR spectroscopy. We found that the presence of mismatches produced significant local structural alterations, especially in the case of purine transversions. Mismatched pairs often show promiscuous hydrogen bonding patterns, which interchange among each other in the nanosecond time scale. This therefore defines flexible base pairs, where breathing is frequent, and where distortions in helical parameters are strong, resulting in significant alterations in groove dimension. Even if the DNA structure is plastic enough to absorb the structural impact of the mismatch, local structural changes can be propagated far from the mismatch site, following the expected through-backbone and a previously unknown through-space mechanism. The structural changes related to the presence of mismatches help to understand the different susceptibility of mismatches to the action of repairing proteins. PMID:25820425

  6. Phase-reduction-theory-based treatment of extended delayed feedback control algorithm in the presence of a small time delay mismatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novičenko, Viktor; Pyragas, Kestutis

    2012-08-01

    The delayed feedback control (DFC) methods are noninvasive, which means that the control signal vanishes if the delay time is adjusted to be equal to the period of a target unstable periodic orbit (UPO). If the delay time differs slightly from the UPO period, a nonvanishing periodic control signal is observed. We derive an analytical expression for this period for a general class of multiple-input multiple-output systems controlled by an extended DFC algorithm. Our approach is based on the phase-reduction theory adapted to systems with time delay. The analytical results are supported by numerical simulations of the controlled Rössler system.

  7. German cockroach allergen levels in North Carolina schools: comparison of integrated pest management and conventional cockroach control.

    PubMed

    Nalyanya, Godfrey; Gore, J Chad; Linker, H Michael; Schal, Coby

    2009-05-01

    Cockroach suppression is fundamental to cockroach allergen mitigation in infested homes. The effects of various cockroach control strategies on cockroach populations and allergen concentration have not been examined in schools. This study was conducted to compare the effectiveness of integrated pest management (IPM) and conventional pest control in controlling German cockroach (Blattella germanica L.) infestations and concentrations of the cockroach allergen Bla g 1 in public school buildings. Two school districts included six schools that used conventional pest control and one district included seven schools that used IPM to control pests. Cockroach traps were deployed to assess the level of infestation, settled dust samples were collected in food service areas, classrooms, and other school areas, and the Bla g 1 allergen was quantified by ELISA. Both cockroach counts and Bla g 1 concentrations were dependent on the pest control approach, with highly significant differences between IPM-treated schools and conventionally treated schools in both the cockroach mean trap counts (0 versus 82.6 +/- 17.3 cockroaches/trap/wk, respectively) and in the amount of Bla g 1 in dust samples (2.8 +/- 0.3 versus 30.6 +/- 3.4 U/g dust). Cockroaches and Bla g 1 were primarily associated with food preparation and food service areas and much less with classrooms and offices. Our data extend recent findings from studies in homes, showing that cockroach allergens can be reduced by cockroach elimination alone or by integrating several tactics including education, cleaning, and pest control. IPM is not only effective at controlling cockroaches but also can lead to long-term reductions in cockroach allergen concentrations, resulting in a healthier environment for students and school personnel.

  8. Chimeric Proteins to Detect DNA Damage and Mismatches

    SciTech Connect

    McCutchen-Maloney, S; Malfatti, M; Robbins, K M

    2002-01-14

    assays in which we looked both at (1) preferential degradation of damaged or mismatched DNA after addition of a chimeric protein, and (2) preferential binding of the chimeric proteins to damaged or mismatched DNA. In our experiments, we used various samples containing damage or mismatches and a control sample containing no damage or mismatches. When a chimeric protein was added to the DNA samples, the damage- or mismatch-recognition portion of the chimeric protein bound the samples containing the DNA damage or mismatch, allowing the nuclease portion to degrade the DNA. Thus, we measured both the preferential binding to the damaged or mismatched DNA and the preferential degradation of these same samples. We showed this in gel-based assays as well as in multiplex flow-cytometry assays. This year, we also focused on a thermophilic protein, MutS, which in nature functions to detect mistakes in DNA replication by its mismatch-detection capability in an organism that lives under extreme thermal conditions (75 C). Because of its thermophilic stability, this protein has great potential as a SNP detection tool. However, the results of our multiplex experiments were unclear-potentially because of interference between samples on different beads. In summary, our results using chimeric proteins and MutS suggest that the proteins and methods developed in this project have application for detecting SNPs and DNA damage as well as for genetic testing.

  9. Costa Rica’s implementation of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control: Overcoming decades of industry dominance

    PubMed Central

    Crosbie, Eric; Sosa, Patricia; Glantz, Stanton A

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze the passage of Costa Rica’s 2012 tobacco control law. Materials and methods Review of legislation, newspaper articles, and key informant interviews. Results Tobacco control advocates, in close collaboration with international health groups, recruited national, regional and international experts to testify in the Legislative Assembly, implemented grassroots advocacy campaigns, and generated media coverage to enact strong legislation in March 2012 consistent with the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, despite tobacco industry lobbying efforts that for decades blocked effective tobacco control legislation. Conclusion Costa Rica’s experience illustrates how with resources, good strategic planning, aggressive tactics and perseverance tobacco control advocates can overcome tobacco industry opposition in the Legislative Assembly and Executive Branch. This determined approach has positioned Costa Rica to become a regional leader in tobacco control. PMID:26879509

  10. Effect of strength mismatch on fracture toughness of HSLA steel weld joints

    SciTech Connect

    Rak, I.; Gliha, V.; Gubeljak, N.; Praunseis, Z.; Kocak, M.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this experimental work is to present the results of measured toughness and strength on mismatched weld joints made on HSLA steel grade HT 80. In the determined over and undermatched weld joints the local mismatching in the through thickness direction was found by hardness measurement. It seems that local mismatch because of WM low toughness has controlled the fracture behavior of weld metal and HAZ in both cases instead of the global one. Direct local CTOD({delta}{sub 5}) technique is found to be particular useful for the determination of fracture toughness values on mismatched weld joints.

  11. Mandibular arch orthodontic treatment stability using passive self-ligating and conventional systems in adults: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Wey, Mang Chek; Othman, Siti Adibah

    2017-01-01

    Objective This randomized controlled trial aimed to compare the stability of mandibular arch orthodontic treatment outcomes between passive self-ligating and conventional systems during 6 months of retention. Methods Fortyseven orthodontic patients with mild to moderate crowding malocclusions not requiring extraction were recruited based on inclusion criteria. Patients (mean age 21.58 ± 2.94 years) were randomized into two groups to receive either passive self-ligating (Damon® 3MX, n = 23) or conventional system (Gemini MBT, n = 24) orthodontic treatment. Direct measurements of the final sample comprising 20 study models per group were performed using a digital caliper at the debonding stage, and 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after debonding. Paired t-test, independent t-test, and non-parametric test were used for statistical analysis. Results A significant increase (p < 0.01) in incisor irregularity was observed in both self-ligating and conventional system groups. A significant reduction (p < 0.01) in second interpremolar width was observed in both groups. Mandibular arch length decreased significantly (p = 0.001) in the conventional system group but not in the self-ligating system group. A similar pattern of stability was observed for intercanine width, first interpremolar width, intermolar width, and arch depth throughout the 6-month retention period after debonding. Comparison of incisor irregularity and arch dimension changes between self-ligating system and conventional system groups during the 6 months were non-significant. Conclusions The stability of treatment outcomes for mild to moderate crowding malocclusions was similar between the self-ligating system and conventional system during the first 6 months of retention. PMID:28127535

  12. From public health to international law: possible protocols for inclusion in the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control.

    PubMed Central

    Joossens, L.

    2000-01-01

    Faced with a difficult business environment in the United States and the falling demand for cigarettes in industrialized countries, multinational tobacco companies have been competing fiercely to expand their sales in developing countries. Because of the worldwide threat posed by smoking to health and the emphasis being placed by international tobacco companies on marketing in developing countries, an international regulatory strategy, such as the WHO proposed Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, is needed. This review describes from a public health perspective the possible scope and key considerations of protocols that should be included in the convention. The key international areas that should be considered in tobacco control are: prices, smuggling; tax-free tobacco products; advertising and sponsorship; the Internet; testing methods; package design and labelling; agriculture; and information sharing. PMID:10994267

  13. Tracking the relevance of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control in legislation and litigation through the online resource, Tobacco Control Laws.

    PubMed

    Muggli, Monique E; Zheng, Annie; Liberman, Jonathan; Coxon, Nicholas; Candler, Liz; Donley, Kaitlin; Lambert, Patricia

    2014-09-01

    The WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control is increasingly referenced and incorporated into the objectives, definitions and provisions of domestic legislation worldwide. It is also relied upon by courts in interpreting and upholding strong tobacco control measures challenged by the tobacco industry. In this special communication, we describe these trends and explore the important new online resource-Tobacco Control Laws (http://www.tobaccocontrollaws.org)--that has been used to track them.

  14. Control of Structure in Conventional Friction Stir Welds through a Kinematic Theory of Metal Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubisoff, H.A.; Schneider, J.A.; Nunes, A.C.

    2009-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW), a rotating pin is translated along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. Metal is prevented from flowing up the pin, which would result in plowing/cutting instead of welding, by a shoulder on the pin. In conventional FSW, the weld metal rests on an "anvil", which supports the heavy "plunge" load on the tool. In this study, both embedded tungsten wires along and copper plating on the faying surfaces were used to trace the flow of AA2219 weld metal around the C-FSW tool. The effect of tool rotational speed, travel speed, plunge load, and pin thread pitch on the resulting weld metal flow was evaluated. Plan, longitudinal, and transverse section x-ray radiographs were examined to trace the metal flow paths. The results are interpreted in terms of a kinematic theory of metal flow in FSW.

  15. The influence of sound generator associated with conventional amplification for tinnitus control: randomized blind clinical trial.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Gisele Munhoes; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; de Medeiros, Italo Roberto Torres; Oiticcica, Jeanne; da Silva, Eleonora Csipai; Penteado, Silvio

    2014-07-23

    Hearing aids with an integrated sound generator have been used to enhance the treatment of tinnitus. The main aim of this study was to verify whether the combined use of amplification and sound generator is more effective than conventional amplification alone in reducing tinnitus annoyance by means of the use of a new hearing aid with an integrated sound generator. A total of 49 patients underwent a blind randomized clinical trial. Tinnitus annoyance was measured by Tinnitus Handicap Inventory and numerical scales, and psychoacoustic measures of tinnitus were also performed. The sound generator was set at the lowest intensity capable of providing relief from tinnitus. Results showed that 62.5% of the patients presented a reduction in tinnitus annoyance in the combined fitting group and in the group with amplification alone, 78% showed a reduction. This difference between the groups was not statistically significant.

  16. Job Sprawl, Spatial Mismatch, and Black Employment Disadvantage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoll, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between job sprawl and the spatial mismatch between blacks and jobs. Using data from a variety of sources, including the 1990 and 2000 U.S. Census and U.S. Department of Commerce's ZIP Code Business Patterns, I control extensively for metropolitan area characteristics and other factors. In addition, I use…

  17. DNA Triplet Repeat Expansion and Mismatch Repair

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Ravi R.; Pluciennik, Anna; Napierala, Marek; Wells, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair is a conserved antimutagenic pathway that maintains genomic stability through rectification of DNA replication errors and attenuation of chromosomal rearrangements. Paradoxically, mutagenic action of mismatch repair has been implicated as a cause of triplet repeat expansions that cause neurological diseases such as Huntington disease and myotonic dystrophy. This mutagenic process requires the mismatch recognition factor MutSβ and the MutLα (and/or possibly MutLγ) endonuclease, and is thought to be triggered by the transient formation of unusual DNA structures within the expanded triplet repeat element. This review summarizes the current knowledge of DNA mismatch repair involvement in triplet repeat expansion, which encompasses in vitro biochemical findings, cellular studies, and various in vivo transgenic animal model experiments. We present current mechanistic hypotheses regarding mismatch repair protein function in mediating triplet repeat expansions and discuss potential therapeutic approaches targeting the mismatch repair pathway. PMID:25580529

  18. 78 FR 54913 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; United States Pharmacopeial Convention

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; United States..., made application by renewal to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to be registered as...

  19. 77 FR 60144 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; United States Pharmacopeial Convention

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; United States... 20852, made application by renewal to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to be registered as...

  20. Veganism Is a Viable Alternative to Conventional Diet Therapy for Improving Blood Lipids and Glycemic Control.

    PubMed

    Trepanowski, John F; Varady, Krista A

    2015-01-01

    The American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) have each outlined a set of dietary recommendations aimed at improving glycemic control and blood lipids, respectively. However, traditional vegan diets (low-fat diets that proscribe animal product consumption) are also effective at improving glycemic control, and dietary portfolios (vegan diets that contain prescribed amounts of plant sterols, viscous fibers, soy protein, and nuts) are also effective at improving blood lipids. The purpose of this review was to compare the effects of traditional vegan diets and dietary portfolios with ADA and NCEP diets on body weight, blood lipids, blood pressure, and glycemic control. The main findings are that traditional vegan diets appear to improve glycemic control better than ADA diets in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), while dietary portfolios have been consistently shown to improve blood lipids better than NCEP diets in hypercholesterolemic individuals.

  1. Numerical simulations of flow fields through conventionally controlled wind turbines & wind farms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emre Yilmaz, Ali; Meyers, Johan

    2014-06-01

    In the current study, an Actuator-Line Model (ALM) is implemented in our in-house pseudo-spectral LES solver SP-WIND, including a turbine controller. Below rated wind speed, turbines are controlled by a standard-torque-controller aiming at maximum power extraction from the wind. Above rated wind speed, the extracted power is limited by a blade pitch controller which is based on a proportional-integral type control algorithm. This model is used to perform a series of single turbine and wind farm simulations using the NREL 5MW turbine. First of all, we focus on below-rated wind speed, and investigate the effect of the farm layout on the controller calibration curves. These calibration curves are expressed in terms of nondimensional torque and rotational speed, using the mean turbine-disk velocity as reference. We show that this normalization leads to calibration curves that are independent of wind speed, but the calibration curves do depend on the farm layout, in particular for tightly spaced farms. Compared to turbines in a lone-standing set-up, turbines in a farm experience a different wind distribution over the rotor due to the farm boundary-layer interaction. We demonstrate this for fully developed wind-farm boundary layers with aligned turbine arrangements at different spacings (5D, 7D, 9D). Further we also compare calibration curves obtained from full farm simulations with calibration curves that can be obtained at a much lower cost using a minimal flow unit.

  2. Periacetabular bone mineral density changes after resurfacing hip arthroplasty versus conventional total hip arthroplasty. A randomized controlled DEXA study.

    PubMed

    Smolders, José M H; Pakvis, Dean F; Hendrickx, Baudewijn W; Verdonschot, Nico; van Susante, Job L C

    2013-08-01

    A randomized controlled trial was performed to evaluate acetabular bone mineral density (BMD) changes after hip resurfacing (RHA) versus an established conventional total hip arthroplasty (THA). A total of 71 patients were allocated randomly to receive either an RHA press-fit cobalt-chromium cup (n=38) or a THA with a threaded titanium cup and polyethylene-metal-inlay insert (n=33). The BMD in five separate periacetabular regions of interest (ROI) was prospectively quantified preoperative until 24 months. We conclude that, in contrast to our hypothesis, periacetabular BMD was better preserved after RHA than after placement of a conventional THA. Long term follow-up studies are necessary to see whether this benefit in bone preservation sustains over longer time periods and whether it is turned into clinical benefits at future revision surgery.

  3. A randomised controlled trial comparing a dilating vaginal speculum with a conventional bivalve speculum.

    PubMed

    Thomas, A; Weisberg, E; Lieberman, D; Fraser, I S

    2001-11-01

    Cervical smears are traditionally taken with the aid of a metal or disposable plastic bivalve speculum. Many women complain of discomfort with these specula. This study compares the efficacy and women's experiences of a new 'dilating speculum' called the Veda-scope, with a conventional metal bivalve speculum (Pederson). The aims of this study were: to determine whether the Veda-scope provides adequate visualisation of the cervix and vaginal walls and an adequate cervical cytology specimen; and to compare user acceptability and women's levels of comfort between the Veda-scope and the bivalve speculum. Sixty-four women were randomised to be examined with the Veda-scope and 60 with the bivalve speculum, by one of two operators. Each woman completed a questionnaire that included subjective views of their previous cervical smear experiences, and acceptability of the examination at the study consultation. Cytologists were blinded as to which speculum was used for cervical sampling. Of women examined, 7-83% of women found Veda-scope examinations comfortable, compared to 38-62% of women who found examinations with the bivalve comfortable; 94% of the women preferred the 'comfort' of the Veda-scope. The Veda-scope was as good as the bivalve speculum in providing samples for cytological analysis following the initial learning curve, and also provided markedly superior magnified views of the cervix and vaginal fornices.

  4. Defect Control of Conventional and Anomalous Electron Transport at Complex Oxide Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunkel, F.; Bell, Chris; Inoue, Hisashi; Kim, Bongju; Swartz, Adrian G.; Merz, Tyler A.; Hikita, Yasuyuki; Harashima, Satoshi; Sato, Hiroki K.; Minohara, Makoto; Hoffmann-Eifert, Susanne; Dittmann, Regina; Hwang, Harold Y.

    2016-07-01

    Using low-temperature electrical measurements, the interrelation between electron transport, magnetic properties, and ionic defect structure in complex oxide interface systems is investigated, focusing on NdGaO3 /SrTiO3 (100) interfaces. Field-dependent Hall characteristics (2-300 K) are obtained for samples grown at various growth pressures. In addition to multiple electron transport, interfacial magnetism is tracked exploiting the anomalous Hall effect (AHE). These two properties both contribute to a nonlinearity in the field dependence of the Hall resistance, with multiple carrier conduction evident below 30 K and AHE at temperatures ≲10 K . Considering these two sources of nonlinearity, we suggest a phenomenological model capturing the complex field dependence of the Hall characteristics in the low-temperature regime. Our model allows the extraction of the conventional transport parameters and a qualitative analysis of the magnetization. The electron mobility is found to decrease systematically with increasing growth pressure. This suggests dominant electron scattering by acceptor-type strontium vacancies incorporated during growth. The AHE scales with growth pressure. The most pronounced AHE is found at increased growth pressure and, thus, in the most defective, low-mobility samples, indicating a correlation between transport, magnetism, and cation defect concentration.

  5. Randomised controlled trial of doxorubicin-eluting beads vs conventional chemoembolisation for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Golfieri, R; Giampalma, E; Renzulli, M; Cioni, R; Bargellini, I; Bartolozzi, C; Breatta, A D; Gandini, G; Nani, R; Gasparini, D; Cucchetti, A; Bolondi, L; Trevisani, F

    2014-01-01

    Background: Transcatheter arterial chemoembolisation (TACE) is the treatment of choice for intermediate stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Doxorubicin-loaded drug-eluting beads (DEB)-TACE is expected to improve the performance of conventional TACE (cTACE). The aim of this study was to compare DEB-TACE with cTACE in terms of time-to-tumour progression (TTP), adverse events (AEs), and 2-year survival. Methods: Patients were randomised one-to-one to undergo cTACE or DEB-TACE and followed-up for at least 2 years or until death. Transcatheter arterial chemoembolisation was repeated ‘on-demand'. Results: We enrolled 177 patients: 89 underwent DEB-TACE and 88 cTACE. The median number of procedures was 2 in each arm, and the in-hospital stay was 3 and 4 days, respectively (P=0.323). No differences were found in local and overall tumour response. The median TTP was 9 months in both arms. The AE incidence and severity did not differ between the arms, except for post-procedural pain, more frequent and severe after cTACE (P<0.001). The 1- and 2-year survival rates were 86.2% and 56.8% after DEB-TACE and 83.5% and 55.4% after cTACE (P=0.949). Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG), serum albumin, and tumour number independently predicted survival (P<0.05). Conclusions: The DEB-TACE and the cTACE are equally effective and safe, with the only advantage of DEB-TACE being less post-procedural abdominal pain. PMID:24937669

  6. Cost Comparison of Conventional Gray Combined Sewer Overflow Control Infrastructure versus a Green/Gray Combination

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper outlines a life-cycle cost analysis comparing a green (rain gardens) and gray (tunnels) infrastructure combination to a gray-only option to control combined sewer overflow in the Turkey Creek Combined Sewer Overflow Basin, in Kansas City, MO. The plan area of this Bas...

  7. Linking Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS) data to the WHO framework convention on tobacco control: the case for India.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Dhirendra Narain; Reddy, K Srinath; Rahman, Khalilur; Warren, Charles W; Jones, Nathan R; Asma, Samira

    2006-01-01

    India ratified the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC) on February 27, 2005. The WHO FCTC is the world's first public health treaty that aims to promote and protect public health and reduce the devastating health and economic impacts of tobacco. Post ratification, each member state as part of general obligation has agreed to develop, implement, periodically update and review comprehensive multisectoral national tobacco control strategies, plans and programmes in accordance with this Convention and the protocols to which it is a Party. The Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS) was developed to track tobacco use among young people across countries and the GYTS surveillance system intends to enhance the capacity of countries to design, implement, and evaluate tobacco control and prevention programs. The South-East Asia Region of WHO has developed the "Regional Strategy for Utilization of the GYTS" to meet this need for countries in the Region. In 2003, India has passed its national tobacco control legislation (India Tobacco Control Act [ITCA]), which includes provisions designed to reduce tobacco consumption and protect citizens from exposure to second hand smoke. Data in the GYTS (India) report can be used as a baseline measure for future evaluation of the tobacco control programs implemented by the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India. India has to upscale some provisions of its National Law to accommodate all of the requirements of FCTC. Using determinants measured by GYTS in India, the government can monitor the impact of enforcing various provisions of the ITCA and the progress made in achieving the goals of the WHO FCTC and the Regional Strategies. Effective enforcement of the provisions of ITCA will show in the receding numbers of tobacco use prevalence figures and reduction in the expenditures associated with tobacco use in India.

  8. Emotion-Related Visual Mismatch Responses in Schizophrenia: Impairments and Correlations with Emotion Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Csukly, Gábor; Stefanics, Gábor; Komlósi, Sarolta; Czigler, István; Czobor, Pál

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives Mismatch negativity (MMN) is an event-related potential (ERP) measure of preattentional sensory processing. While deficits in the auditory MMN are robust electrophysiological findings in schizophrenia, little is known about visual mismatch response and its association with social cognitive functions such as emotion recognition in schizophrenia. Our aim was to study the potential deficit in the visual mismatch response to unexpected facial emotions in schizophrenia and its association with emotion recognition impairments, and to localize the sources of the mismatch signals. Experimental Design The sample comprised 24 patients with schizophrenia and 24 healthy control subjects. Controls were matched individually to patients by gender, age, and education. ERPs were recorded using a high-density 128-channel BioSemi amplifier. Mismatch responses to happy and fearful faces were determined in 2 time windows over six regions of interest (ROIs). Emotion recognition performance and its association with the mismatch response were also investigated. Principal Observations Mismatch signals to both emotional conditions were significantly attenuated in patients compared to controls in central and temporal ROIs. Controls recognized emotions significantly better than patients. The association between overall emotion recognition performance and mismatch response to the happy condition was significant in the 250–360 ms time window in the central ROI. The estimated sources of the mismatch responses for both emotional conditions were localized in frontal regions, where patients showed significantly lower activity. Conclusions Impaired generation of mismatch signals indicate insufficient automatic processing of emotions in patients with schizophrenia, which correlates strongly with decreased emotion recognition. PMID:24116046

  9. Rethinking the Air Operations Center, Air Force Command and Control in Conventional War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    ADm-A285 444 DTIC ELECT ,IAll Rethinking the Air Operations Center Air Force C)mmand and Control in Conv6ntal War. J. TAYOR SIMK, Lt Col, USAF School...at the theater level as the best way to achieve these dual aims.3 Indeed, this advocacy is tightly intertwined with the history of the USAF in its...Conversely, fully effective strikes on poorly selected targets will, at best , merely waste effort, and are quite likely to be counterproductive. Thus

  10. Connections between conventional and singular-value-based multi-variable flight control system design techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcruer, D. T.; Myers, T. T.; Thompson, P. M.

    1986-01-01

    It is proposed that frequency-domain multivariable robustness techniques, when combined with classical multivariable procedures, can offer an additional means of evaluating FCS designs. A lateral-directional FCS for an advanced fighter is used as an example. Robustness to unstructured aircraft-input uncertainties is assessed using purely numerical singular-value procedures. Literal approximations for the singular values of the open-loop plant and controller and for the inverse return difference are shown to provide a means of decomposing and diagnosing robustness problems that are insoluble via purely numerical methods.

  11. Valence band anticrossing in highly mismatched alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberi, Kirstin Mclean

    Semiconductor alloys offer the ability to tune certain material parameters such as the band gap or carrier effective mass through precise control of the alloy composition, allowing them to be optimized for specific device requirements. While many alloys demonstrate near linear composition dependencies in these properties, those containing isoelectronic anion species that are significantly mismatched in electronegativity or ionization energy, known as highly mismatched alloys (HMA), exhibit substantial deviation from this trend. Here, the optical and electrical properties of HMAs containing dilute concentrations of large metallic anions are investigated in the context of a valence band anticrossing (VBAC) theory. Minority species with low ionization energies often introduce localized p-states near the valence band edge of the host semiconductor. Hybridization of these localized states with the extended p-states of the host may be described by a 12 x 12 Hamiltonian and produces a splitting of the alloy valence band into E+ and E - states. Photomodulated reflectance studies coupled with the VBAC theory confirm that the band gap bowing observed in GaSbxAs1-x and GaBixAs1-x is caused by an upward movement of the valence band edge as a result of the anticrossing interaction between the E+ and E- states. The valence band restructuring also adversely affects hole transport in these alloys through an increase in the heavy hole effective mass and the addition of an alloy disorder scattering mechanism. Finally, the VBAC theory has been extended to group IV HMAs as well as to the dilute magnetic semiconductor Ga1-x MnxAs, both of which exhibit strong hole localization at the minority species sites.

  12. Entanglement verification with detection efficiency mismatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanbao; Lütkenhaus, Norbert

    Entanglement is a necessary condition for secure quantum key distribution (QKD). When there is an efficiency mismatch between various detectors used in the QKD system, it is still an open problem how to verify entanglement. Here we present a method to address this problem, given that the detection efficiency mismatch is characterized and known. The method works without assuming an upper bound on the number of photons going to each threshold detector. Our results suggest that the efficiency mismatch affects the ability to verify entanglement: the larger the efficiency mismatch is, the smaller the set of entangled states that can be verified becomes. When there is no mismatch, our method can verify entanglement even if the method based on squashing maps [PRL 101, 093601 (2008)] fails.

  13. Mismatch Receptive Fields in Mouse Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Zmarz, Pawel; Keller, Georg B

    2016-11-23

    In primary visual cortex, a subset of neurons responds when a particular stimulus is encountered in a certain location in visual space. This activity can be modeled using a visual receptive field. In addition to visually driven activity, there are neurons in visual cortex that integrate visual and motor-related input to signal a mismatch between actual and predicted visual flow. Here we show that these mismatch neurons have receptive fields and signal a local mismatch between actual and predicted visual flow in restricted regions of visual space. These mismatch receptive fields are aligned to the retinotopic map of visual cortex and are similar in size to visual receptive fields. Thus, neurons with mismatch receptive fields signal local deviations of actual visual flow from visual flow predicted based on self-motion and could therefore underlie the detection of objects moving relative to the visual flow caused by self-motion. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  14. Osmium complexation of mismatched DNA: effect of the bases adjacent to mismatched 5-methylcytosine.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Akiko; Tainaka, Kazuki; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2009-03-18

    The efficiency of osmium complex formation at 5-methylcytosine in mismatched DNA duplexes is a key point for the design of sequence-specific detection of DNA methylation. Osmium complexation was not observed in fully matched duplexes, whereas the complexation site and efficiency in mismatched duplexes changed depending on the type of 5'-neighboring base of the 5-methylcytosine forming a mismatched base pair. In particular, when the base adjacent to the 5' side of the mismatched base pair was thymine, a unique "side reaction" was observed. However, the nature of the mismatched base pairs in the reaction site did not influence the selectivity of osmium complex formation with methylated DNA.

  15. The Association Between Broad Antigen HLA Mismatches, Eplet HLA Mismatches and Acute Rejection After Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Do Nguyen, Hung Thanh; Wong, Germaine; Chapman, Jeremy R.; McDonald, Stephen P.; Coates, Patrick T.; Watson, Narelle; Russ, Graeme R.; D'Orsogna, Lloyd; Lim, Wai Hon

    2016-01-01

    Background Epitope matching, which evaluates mismatched amino acids within antigen-antibody interaction sites (eplets), may better predict acute rejection than broad antigen matching alone. We aimed to determine the association between eplet mismatches and acute rejection in kidney transplant recipients. Methods The association between eplet mismatches, broad antigen mismatches and acute rejection was assessed using adjusted Cox proportional hazard regression. Model discrimination for acute rejection was evaluated using the area under receiver operating characteristic curves. Results Of the 3,499 kidney transplant recipients from 2006 to 2011, the average (SD) number of broad antigen and eplet mismatches were 3.4 (1.7) and 22.8 (12.2), respectively. Compared with 0 to 2 eplet mismatches, the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for acute rejection among those with 20 or greater eplet mismatches was 2.16 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.33-3.52; P = 0.001). The adjusted area under the curve for broad antigen mismatches was 0.58 (95% CI, 0.56-0.61), similar to that for eplet mismatches (HR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.56-0.61; P = 0.365). In recipients who were considered as low immunological risk (0-2 broad antigen HLA-ABDR mismatch), those with 20 or greater eplet mismatches experienced an increased risk of rejection compared to those with less than 20 mismatches (adjusted HR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.11-3.08; P = 0.019). Conclusions Increasing number of eplet mismatches is associated with acute rejection in kidney transplant recipients. Consideration of eplet HLA mismatches may improve risk stratification for acute rejection in a selected group of kidney transplant candidates. PMID:27990485

  16. Instantaneous Conventions

    PubMed Central

    Misyak, Jennifer; Noguchi, Takao; Chater, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Humans can communicate even with few existing conventions in common (e.g., when they lack a shared language). We explored what makes this phenomenon possible with a nonlinguistic experimental task requiring participants to coordinate toward a common goal. We observed participants creating new communicative conventions using the most minimal possible signals. These conventions, furthermore, changed on a trial-by-trial basis in response to shared environmental and task constraints. Strikingly, as a result, signals of the same form successfully conveyed contradictory messages from trial to trial. Such behavior is evidence for the involvement of what we term joint inference, in which social interactants spontaneously infer the most sensible communicative convention in light of the common ground between them. Joint inference may help to elucidate how communicative conventions emerge instantaneously and how they are modified and reshaped into the elaborate systems of conventions involved in human communication, including natural languages. PMID:27793986

  17. Do differences in food web structure between organic and conventional farms affect the ecosystem service of pest control?

    PubMed

    Macfadyen, Sarina; Gibson, Rachel; Polaszek, Andrew; Morris, Rebecca J; Craze, Paul G; Planqué, Robert; Symondson, William O C; Memmott, Jane

    2009-03-01

    While many studies have demonstrated that organic farms support greater levels of biodiversity, it is not known whether this translates into better provision of ecosystem services. Here we use a food-web approach to analyse the community structure and function at the whole-farm scale. Quantitative food webs from 10 replicate pairs of organic and conventional farms showed that organic farms have significantly more species at three trophic levels (plant, herbivore and parasitoid) and significantly different network structure. Herbivores on organic farms were attacked by more parasitoid species on organic farms than on conventional farms. However, differences in network structure did not translate into differences in robustness to simulated species loss and we found no difference in percentage parasitism (natural pest control) across a variety of host species. Furthermore, a manipulative field experiment demonstrated that the higher species richness of parasitoids on the organic farms did not increase mortality of a novel herbivore used to bioassay ecosystem service. The explanation for these differences is likely to include inherent differences in management strategies and landscape structure between the two farming systems.

  18. Pain exposure physical therapy (PEPT) compared to conventional treatment in complex regional pain syndrome type 1: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Barnhoorn, Karlijn J; van de Meent, Henk; van Dongen, Robert T M; Klomp, Frank P; Groenewoud, Hans; Samwel, Han; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; Frölke, Jan Paul M; Staal, J Bart

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the effectiveness of pain exposure physical therapy (PEPT) with conventional treatment in patients with complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1) in a randomised controlled trial with a blinded assessor. Setting The study was conducted at a level 1 trauma centre in the Netherlands. Participants 56 adult patients with CRPS-1 participated. Three patients were lost to follow-up. Interventions Patients received either PEPT in a maximum of five treatment sessions, or conventional treatment following the Dutch multidisciplinary guideline. Measurements Outcomes were assessed at baseline and at 3, 6 and 9 months after randomisation. The primary outcome measure was the Impairment level Sum Score—Restricted Version (ISS-RV), consisting of visual analogue scale for pain (VAS-pain), McGill Pain Questionnaire, active range of motion (AROM) and skin temperature. Secondary outcome measures included Pain Disability Index (PDI); muscle strength; Short Form 36 (SF-36); disability of arm, shoulder and hand; Lower Limb Tasks Questionnaire (LLTQ); 10 m walk test; timed up-and-go test (TUG) and EuroQol-5D. Results The intention-to-treat analysis showed a clinically relevant decrease in ISS-RV (6.7 points for PEPT and 6.2 points for conventional treatment), but the between-group difference was not significant (0.96, 95% CI −1.56 to 3.48). Participants allocated to PEPT experienced a greater improvement in AROM (between-group difference 0.51, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.94; p=0.02). The per protocol analysis showed larger and significant between-group effects on ISS-RV, VAS-pain, AROM, PDI, SF-36, LLTQ and TUG. Conclusions We cannot conclude that PEPT is superior to conventional treatment for patients with CRPS-1. Further high-quality research on the effects of PEPT is warranted given the potential effects as indicated by the per protocol analysis. Trial registration numbers NCT00817128 and NTR 2090. PMID:26628523

  19. Lattice QCD with mismatched fermi surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Arata

    2014-04-25

    We study two flavor fermions with mismatched chemical potentials in quenched lattice QCD. We first consider a large isospin chemical potential, where a charged pion is condensed, and then introduce a small mismatch between the chemical potentials of the up quark and the down antiquark. We find that the homogeneous pion condensate is destroyed by the mismatch of the chemical potentials. We also find that the two-point correlation function shows spatial oscillation, which indicates an inhomogeneous ground state, although it is not massless but massive in the present simulation setup.

  20. Monitoring Fine-Grained Sediment in the Colorado River Ecosystem, Arizona - Control Network and Conventional Survey Techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hazel, Joseph E.; Kaplinski, Matt; Parnell, Roderic A.; Kohl, Keith; Schmidt, John C.

    2008-01-01

    In 2002, fine-grained sediment (sand, silt, and clay) monitoring in the Colorado River downstream from Glen Canyon Dam was initiated to survey channel topography at scales previously unobtainable in this canyon setting. This report presents the methods used to establish the high-resolution global positioning system (GPS) control network required for this effort as well as the conventional surveying techniques used in the study. Using simultaneous, dual-frequency GPS vector-based methods, the network points were determined to have positioning accuracies of less than 0.03 meters (m) and ellipsoidal height accuracies of between 0.01 and 0.10 m at a 95-percent degree of confidence. We also assessed network point quality with repeated, electronic (optical) total-station observations at 39 points for a total of 362 measurements; the mean range was 0.022 m in horizontal and 0.13 in vertical at a 95-percent confidence interval. These results indicate that the control network is of sufficient spatial and vertical accuracy for collection of airborne and subaerial remote-sensing technologies and integration of these data in a geographic information system on a repeatable basis without anomalies. The monitoring methods were employed in up to 11 discrete reaches over various time intervals. The reaches varied from 1.3 to 6.4 kilometers in length. Field results from surveys in 2000, 2002, and 2004 are described, during which conventional surveying was used to collect more than 3000 points per day. Ground points were used as checkpoints and to supplement areas just below or above the water surface, where remote-sensing data are not collected or are subject to greater error. An accuracy of +or- 0.05 m was identified as the minimum precision of individual ground points. These results are important for assessing digital elevation model (DEM) quality and identifying detection limits of significant change among surfaces generated from remote-sensing technologies.

  1. Suction assisted pulse lavage: randomised controlled studies comparing its efficacy with conventional dressings in healing of chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Rahul; Barreto, Elvino; Paul, Kingsly M

    2014-02-01

    Chronic, open, non-healing wounds pose a continual challenge in medicine as the treatment is variable and there are no documented consistent responses. Although wound aetiologies vary and there are a number of factors that affect chronic wound pathogenesis, wound ischaemia and bacterial colonisation of wounds are the chief concerns among them. Conventionally, pulse lavage has been used primarily as a wound debriding device. To address both the critical factors of wound ischaemia and bacterial burden, a couple of technical points were proposed and applied in this study. The objective of our study was to evaluate pulse lavage therapy's ability to improve the healing rate of chronic wounds compared to that of the traditional saline-wet-to-moist dressings. The study period was from 1 August 2010 to 31 January 2012 and was conducted in our institution. Thirty patients with 31 chronic, non-healing wounds were enrolled in the study after obtaining proper consent. Subjects were randomised (15 patients each) to the pulse lavage group and the control group. Patients in the test group were subjected to irrigation of their wounds with pulsed lavage at 10 to 15 psi pressure. In the control group, wound was closed by applying moist betadine saline gauze dressings after cleaning with saline. Wounds treated with pulse lavage system significantly reduced in size, had better control of bacterial contamination and had overall faster healing rates. Efficacy of pulse lavage can be increased by correct method of administration of the irrigant.

  2. Genetic control of conventional labeling through the bovine meat production chain by single nucleotide polymorphisms using real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Capoferri, Rossana; Bongioni, Graziella; Galli, Andrea; Aleandri, Riccardo

    2006-08-01

    Since January 2002, the European Union has adopted precise guidelines aimed at protecting the safety of meat and controlling the production chain. To this purpose, the conventional traceability of livestock and meat represents the main tool, but verification of traceability requires genetic support. At present, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) represent the most innovative molecular markers in genotyping studies. The aim of this study was to verify correct labeling in a bovine meat production chain by a real-time PCR protocol based on SNP analysis. Reference hair samples from 5,000 animals were randomly collected from 22 farms. Twelve hundred meat samples were collected at different steps of the bovine meat production chain. In particular, 1,000 meat samples were collected at the slaughterhouse and 200 samples from the same animals directly at the butcher's shop. The protocol was optimized and validated by testing a set of 16 SNP markers on 95 DNA samples from bovine sires of different breeds. Thereafter, the genotyping of 2,200 samples was conducted with a set of 12 selected SNPs to verify traceability of the meat production chain at three different stages: farm, slaughterhouse, and butcher's shop. Irregularities in conventional traceability were evidenced directly in 1.87% of the samples at the slaughterhouse. This percentage increased to 3.25% when sampling was conducted at the butcher's shop. This study demonstrates that despite the precautions adopted over the meat production chain, some critical points still exist that cause the loss of a correct association between registration numbers and samples.

  3. Implementation of the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control in China: An arduous and long-term task.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Dan; Bai, Chun-Xue; Chen, Zheng-Ming; Wang, Chen

    2015-09-01

    China is the largest producer and consumer of tobacco in the world. Consequently, the burden of tobacco-related diseases in China is enormous. Implementation of the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC) may lead to a significant reduction in tobacco-related morbidity and mortality both in China and globally. In this review, the authors summarize the epidemic of tobacco use and the progress made in implementing the WHO FCTC, including the promotion of legislation for smoke-free public places; smoking-cessation assistance; labeling of tobacco packaging; enforcement of bans on tobacco advertising, promotion, and sponsorship; increased taxes on tobacco products; increased tobacco prices; improvements in public awareness of the dangers of smoking; and identifying the barriers to implementing effective tobacco-control measures in China. Since the WHO FCTC officially took effect in China on January 9, 2006, China has taken some important steps, especially in promoting legislation for smoke-free public places. Because tobacco permeates the fabric of society, business, commerce, and politics in China, commitments and actions from the government are crucial, and implementing the WHO FCTC in China will be an arduous and long-term task.

  4. The origins, development, effects, and future of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control: a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Yach, Derek

    2014-05-17

    Worldwide, more than 1 billion people use tobacco, resulting in about 6 million deaths per year. The tobacco industry's documented history of subverting control efforts required innovative approaches by WHO--led by Gro Harlem Brundtland--including invocation of its constitutional authority to develop treaties. In 2003, WHO member states adopted the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC). In the decade since, 177 countries have ratified and started to implement its full provisions. Success has been tempered by new challenges. Tobacco use has fallen in countries that are members of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development but increased in low-income and middle-income countries, a result in no small part of illicit trade and cheap products from China and other unregulated state monopolies. This review of 50 years of policy development aimed at reducing the burden of disease attributable to tobacco reviews the origins and strategies used in forging the WHO FCTC, from the perspective of one who was there.

  5. Accelerated Adoption of Smoke-Free Laws After Ratification of the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control

    PubMed Central

    Uang, Randy; Hiilamo, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to evaluate the effect of ratifying the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) on countries enacting smoke-free laws covering indoor workplaces, restaurants, and bars. Methods. We compared adoption of smoke-free indoor workplace, restaurant, and bar laws in countries that did versus did not ratify the FCTC, accounting for years since the ratification of the FCTC and for countries’ World Bank income group. Results. Ratification of the FCTC significantly (P < .001) increased the probability of smoke-free laws. This effect faded with time, with a half-life of 3.1 years for indoor workplaces and 3.8 years for restaurants and bars. Compared with high-income countries, upper-middle–income countries had a significantly higher probability of smoke-free indoor workplace laws. Conclusions. The FCTC accelerated the adoption of smoke-free indoor workplace, restaurant, and bar laws, with the greatest effect in the years immediately following ratification. The policy implication is that health advocates must increase efforts to secure implementation of FCTC smoke-free provisions in countries that have not done so. PMID:26562125

  6. Novel Noxipoint Therapy versus Conventional Physical Therapy for Chronic Neck and Shoulder Pain: Multicentre Randomised Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Charles C.; Lin, Ray S.; Wang, Tyng-Guey; Tsauo, Jau-Yih; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Yen, Chen-Tung; Biswal, Sandip

    2015-01-01

    As chronic pain affects 115 million people and costs $600B annually in the US alone, effective noninvasive nonpharmacological remedies are desirable. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy and the generalisability of Noxipoint therapy (NT), a novel electrotherapy characterised by site-specific stimulation, intensity-and-submodality-specific settings and a immobilization period, for chronic neck and shoulder pain. Ninety-seven heavily pretreated severe chronic neck/shoulder pain patients were recruited; 34 and 44 patients were randomly allocated to different treatment arms in two patient-and-assessor-blinded, randomised controlled studies. The participants received NT or conventional physical therapy including transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (PT-TENS) for three to six 90-minute sessions. In Study One, NT improved chronic pain (−89.6%, Brief Pain Inventory, p < 0.0001, 95% confidence interval), function (+77.4%, range of motion) and quality of life (+88.1%) at follow-up (from 4 weeks to 5 months), whereas PT-TENS resulted in no significant changes in these parameters. Study Two demonstrated similar advantages of NT over PT-TENS and the generalisability of NT. NT-like treatments in a randomised rat study showed a similar reduction in chronic hypersensitivity (−81%, p < 0.01) compared with sham treatments. NT substantially reduces chronic neck and shoulder pain, restores function, and improves quality of life in a sustained manner. PMID:26552835

  7. Integrated application of active controls (IAAC) technology to an advanced subsonic transport project. Conventional baseline configuration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Characteristics of the U.S. domestic fleet were evaluated to determine the mission characteristics that would have the most impact on U. S. transport fuel use in the future. This resulted in selection of a 197-passenger (plus cargo), about 3710-km (2000 nmi) mission. The existing data base was reviewed and additional analysis was conducted as necessary to complete the technical descriptions. The resulting baseline configuration utilizes a double-lobe, but nearly circular, body with seven-abreast seating. External characteristics feature an 8.71 aspect ratio, 31.5-degree sweep wing, a T-tail empennage, and a dual CF6-6D2, wing-mounted engine arrangement. It provides for 22 LD-2 or 11 LD-3 containers plus bulk cargo in the lower lobe. Passenger/cargo loading, servicing provisions, taxi/takeoff speeds, and field length characteristics are all compatible with accepted airline operations and regulatory provisions. The baseline configuration construction uses conventional aluminum structure except for advanced aluminum alloys and a limited amount of graphite epoxy secondary structure. Modern systems are used, including advanced guidance, navigation, and controls which emphasize application of digital electronics and advanced displays.

  8. [Effects of coated controlled release urea combined with conventional urea on winter wheat growth and soil NO3- -N].

    PubMed

    Yi, Wen-ping; Sun, Zhe; Wu, Liang; Shi, Gui-fang; Zhu, Guo-liang; Li, Ya-xing; Gu, Jia-lin; Xu, Qiu-ming

    2011-03-01

    Field experiments were conducted to study the effects of different dosages coated controlled release urea (PCU60, 60 d release duration) combined with conventional urea (U) used as basal on the winter wheat grain yield, nitrogen (N) recovery rate, and soil NO3- -N content, etc. Five treatments were installed, i.e., U (CK), 10% PCU60+90% U (PU1), 20% PCU60+80% U (PU2), 30% PCU60+70% U (PU3), and 40% PCU60+60% U (PU4). In the meantime, a comparative analysis was also carried out on the PCU60 N release characteristics under field condition and in 25 "C static water. At the same N dosage, all the test indices in treatment PU4 were significantly higher, with the grain yield, N recovery rate, total N accumulation amount, total tiller number and aboveground biomass at ripening stage, and economic benefit increased by 5.6%, 14.6%, 7.2%, 2.6%, 7.5%, and 984.3 yuan x hm(-2), respectively, compared with those in treatment U. The accumulation amount of NO3- -N in 0-100 cm soil layer in all treatments ranged in 39.70-49.93 kg x hm-2, and was the lowest (39.70 kg x hm(-2)) in treatment PU4. The N release pattern of PCU60 under field condition better fitted the N absorption characteristics of winter wheat.

  9. Effects of organic fractions on the formation and control of N-nitrosamine precursors during conventional drinking water treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengkun; Zhang, Xiaojian; Wang, Jun; Liu, Shuming; Chen, Chao; Xie, Yuefeng

    2013-04-01

    Knowledge of N-nitrosamine precursors from dissolved organic matter (DOM) is important for water professionals to better control N-nitrosamine formation. The characterization of DOM from the Luan River in Northern China was conducted using Amberlite XAD resins and ultra-filtration methods. N-nitrosamine formation potentials were investigated for various DOM fractions. The removal of the DOM during water treatment were evaluated using dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm (UV254) bulk parameters as well as size exclusion chromatography and fluorescence spectroscopy. The results indicated that the XAD-4 hydrophilic fraction, with normalized yields of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), N-nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYR), N-nitrosomorpholine (NMOR), and N-nitrosopiperidine (NPIP) of 27.2, 5.2, 5.9, and 6.1 ng/mg-DOC, respectively, tended to form more N-nitrosamines than the hydrophobic and the transphilic fractions. The DOM fraction with a molecular weight (MW) below 1 kDa, with normalized yields of NDMA, NPYR, NMOR, and NPIP of 39.6, 8.1, 14.7, and 3.3 ng/mg-DOC, respectively, tended to form more N-nitrosamines than those with a higher MW. The limited removal of the hydrophilic fraction and the lower MW DOM faction during conventional water treatment processes suggests that the process may not effectively remove the nitrosamine precursors.

  10. Means and ENDS - e-cigarettes, the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, and global health diplomacy in action.

    PubMed

    Russell, Andrew; Wainwright, Megan; Tilson, Melodie

    2016-03-07

    E-cigarettes are a new and disruptive element in global health diplomacy (GHD) and policy-making. This is an ethnographic account of how e-cigarettes and other Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems (ENDS) were tackled at the 6th Conference of the Parties to the World Health Organization's Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. It demonstrates how uncertainty about ENDS and differences of opinion are currently so great that 'agreeing to disagree' as a consensus position and 'strategic use of time' were the principles that ensured effective GHD in this case. Observers representing accredited non-governmental organisations were active in briefing and lobbying country delegates not to spend too much time debating an issue for which insufficient evidence exists, and for which countries were unlikely to reach a consensus on a specific regulatory approach or universally applicable regulatory measures. Equally, the work of Costa Rica in preparing and re-negotiating the draft decision, and the work of the relevant Committee Chair in managing the discussion, contributed to effectively reining in lengthy statements from Parties and focusing on points of consensus. As well as summarising the debate itself and analysing the issues surrounding it, this account offers an example of GHD working effectively in a situation of epistemic uncertainty.

  11. Intensive Patient Education Improves Glycaemic Control in Diabetes Compared to Conventional Education: A Randomised Controlled Trial in a Nigerian Tertiary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Essien, Okon; Otu, Akaninyene; Umoh, Victor; Enang, Ofem; Hicks, Joseph Paul; Walley, John

    2017-01-01

    Background Diabetes is now a global epidemic, but most cases are now in low- and middle-income countries. Diabetes self-management education (DSME) is key to enabling patients to manage their chronic condition and can reduce the occurrence of costly and devastating complications. However, there is limited evidence on the effectiveness of different DSME programmes in resource limited settings. Methods We conducted an unblinded, parallel-group, individually-randomised controlled trial at the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital (Nigeria) to evaluate whether an intensive and systematic DSME programme, using structured guidelines, improved glycaemic control compared to the existing ad hoc patient education (clinical practice was unchanged). Eligible patients (≥18 years, HbA1c > 8.5% and physically able to participate) were randomly allocated by permuted block randomisation to participate for six months in either an intensive or conventional education group. The primary outcome was HbA1c (%) at six-months. Results We randomised 59 participants to each group and obtained six-month HbA1c outcomes from 53 and 51 participants in the intensive and conventional education groups, respectively. Intensive group participants had a mean six-month HbA1c (%) of 8.4 (95% CI: 8 to 8.9), while participants in the conventional education group had a mean six-month HbA1c (%) of 10.2 (95% CI: 9.8 to 10.7). The difference was statistically (P < 0.0001) and clinically significant, with intensive group participants having HbA1c outcomes on average -1.8 (95% CI: -2.4 to -1.2) percentage points lower than conventional group participants. Results were robust to adjustment for a range of covariates and multiple imputation of missing outcome data. Conclusions This study demonstrates the effectiveness of a structured, guideline-based DSME intervention in a LMIC setting versus a pragmatic comparator. The intervention is potentially replicable at other levels of the Nigerian healthcare system

  12. Influence of sequence mismatches on the specificity of recombinase polymerase amplification technology.

    PubMed

    Daher, Rana K; Stewart, Gale; Boissinot, Maurice; Boudreau, Dominique K; Bergeron, Michel G

    2015-04-01

    Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) technology relies on three major proteins, recombinase proteins, single-strand binding proteins, and polymerases, to specifically amplify nucleic acid sequences in an isothermal format. The performance of RPA with respect to sequence mismatches of closely-related non-target molecules is not well documented and the influence of the number and distribution of mismatches in DNA sequences on RPA amplification reaction is not well understood. We investigated the specificity of RPA by testing closely-related species bearing naturally occurring mismatches for the tuf gene sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and/or Mycobacterium tuberculosis and for the cfb gene sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae. In addition, the impact of the number and distribution of mismatches on RPA efficiency was assessed by synthetically generating 14 types of mismatched forward primers for detecting five bacterial species of high diagnostic relevance such as Clostridium difficile, Staphylococcus aureus, S. agalactiae, P. aeruginosa, and M. tuberculosis as well as Bacillus atropheus subsp. globigii for which we use the spores as internal control in diagnostic assays. A total of 87 mismatched primers were tested in this study. We observed that target specific RPA primers with mismatches (n > 1) at their 3'extrimity hampered RPA reaction. In addition, 3 mismatches covering both extremities and the center of the primer sequence negatively affected RPA yield. We demonstrated that the specificity of RPA was multifactorial. Therefore its application in clinical settings must be selected and validated a priori. We recommend that the selection of a target gene must consider the presence of closely-related non-target genes. It is advisable to choose target regions with a high number of mismatches (≥36%, relative to the size of amplicon) with respect to closely-related species and the best case scenario would be by choosing a unique target gene.

  13. Control of damping-off of organic and conventional cucumber with extracts from a plant-associated bacterium rivals a seed treatment pesticide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Environmentally friendly control measures are needed for soilborne diseases of crops grown in organic and conventional production systems. We tested ethanol extracts from cultures of Serratia marcescens N4-5 and N2-4, Burkholderia cepacia BC-1 and BC-2, and B. ambifaria BC-F for control of damping-o...

  14. Research Required for the Effective Implementation of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, Articles 9 and 10

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This paper is part of a series of articles intended to set out the research questions that are relevant to the successful implementation of the various provisions of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC). This paper focuses on issues affecting Articles 9 and 10 of the FCTC. This paper focuses on the research that is most important for most countries, rather than on what is desirable in countries with high levels of research capacity. Articles 9 and 10 of the FCTC address the regulation of contents and emissions of tobacco products and regulation of tobacco product disclosure. Such regulation will be essential if the long-term objective of reducing the danger of tobacco products is to be achieved. There are many components of tobacco and tobacco smoke that are excessively toxic and dangerous to the user. Many of these components are carcinogenic and addictive and can be removed or reduced substantially with current known technology. The fact that these components remain in tobacco and tobacco smoke at levels that are unnecessarily dangerous is precisely the reason why the successful implementation of Articles 9 and 10 of the FCTC is important to tobacco control. This paper discusses the scientific challenges involved in successfully implementing Articles 9 and 10 of the FCTC, which focuses on regulating carcinogens and toxins in tobacco and tobacco smoke, the abuse liability of tobacco products, and the additives and engineering features in tobacco products that make tobacco products appealing to future consumers. The research issues we focus on are those required to support the early stages of regulation. As regulation proceeds, new and more sophisticated research questions will undoubtedly emerge. PMID:23024247

  15. Higher-Than-Conventional Radiation Doses in Localized Prostate Cancer Treatment: A Meta-analysis of Randomized, Controlled Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Viani, Gustavo Arruda Stefano, Eduardo Jose; Afonso, Sergio Luis

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: To determine in a meta-analysis whether the outcomes in men with localized prostate cancer treated with high-dose radiotherapy (HDRT) are better than those in men treated with conventional-dose radiotherapy (CDRT), by quantifying the effect of the total dose of radiotherapy on biochemical control (BC). Methods and Materials: The MEDLINE, EMBASE, CANCERLIT, and Cochrane Library databases, as well as the proceedings of annual meetings, were systematically searched to identify randomized, controlled studies comparing HDRT with CDRT for localized prostate cancer. To evaluate the dose-response relationship, we conducted a meta-regression analysis of BC ratios by means of weighted linear regression. Results: Seven RCTs with a total patient population of 2812 were identified that met the study criteria. Pooled results from these RCTs showed a significant reduction in the incidence of biochemical failure in those patients with prostate cancer treated with HDRT (p < 0.0001). However, there was no difference in the mortality rate (p = 0.38) and specific prostate cancer mortality rates (p = 0.45) between the groups receiving HDRT and CDRT. However, there were more cases of late Grade >2 gastrointestinal toxicity after HDRT than after CDRT. In the subgroup analysis, patients classified as being at low (p = 0.007), intermediate (p < 0.0001), and high risk (p < 0.0001) of biochemical failure all showed a benefit from HDRT. The meta-regression analysis also detected a linear correlation between the total dose of radiotherapy and biochemical failure (BC = -67.3 + [1.8 x radiotherapy total dose in Gy]; p = 0.04). Conclusions: Our meta-analysis showed that HDRT is superior to CDRT in preventing biochemical failure in low-, intermediate-, and high-risk prostate cancer patients, suggesting that this should be offered as a treatment for all patients, regardless of their risk status.

  16. Research required for the effective implementation of the framework convention on tobacco control, articles 9 and 10.

    PubMed

    Gray, Nigel; Borland, Ron

    2013-04-01

    This paper is part of a series of articles intended to set out the research questions that are relevant to the successful implementation of the various provisions of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC). This paper focuses on issues affecting Articles 9 and 10 of the FCTC. This paper focuses on the research that is most important for most countries, rather than on what is desirable in countries with high levels of research capacity. Articles 9 and 10 of the FCTC address the regulation of contents and emissions of tobacco products and regulation of tobacco product disclosure. Such regulation will be essential if the long-term objective of reducing the danger of tobacco products is to be achieved. There are many components of tobacco and tobacco smoke that are excessively toxic and dangerous to the user. Many of these components are carcinogenic and addictive and can be removed or reduced substantially with current known technology. The fact that these components remain in tobacco and tobacco smoke at levels that are unnecessarily dangerous is precisely the reason why the successful implementation of Articles 9 and 10 of the FCTC is important to tobacco control. This paper discusses the scientific challenges involved in successfully implementing Articles 9 and 10 of the FCTC, which focuses on regulating carcinogens and toxins in tobacco and tobacco smoke, the abuse liability of tobacco products, and the additives and engineering features in tobacco products that make tobacco products appealing to future consumers. The research issues we focus on are those required to support the early stages of regulation. As regulation proceeds, new and more sophisticated research questions will undoubtedly emerge.

  17. Memory-based mismatch response to frequency changes in rats.

    PubMed

    Astikainen, Piia; Stefanics, Gabor; Nokia, Miriam; Lipponen, Arto; Cong, Fengyu; Penttonen, Markku; Ruusuvirta, Timo

    2011-01-01

    Any occasional changes in the acoustic environment are of potential importance for survival. In humans, the preattentive detection of such changes generates the mismatch negativity (MMN) component of event-related brain potentials. MMN is elicited to rare changes ('deviants') in a series of otherwise regularly repeating stimuli ('standards'). Deviant stimuli are detected on the basis of a neural comparison process between the input from the current stimulus and the sensory memory trace of the standard stimuli. It is, however, unclear to what extent animals show a similar comparison process in response to auditory changes. To resolve this issue, epidural potentials were recorded above the primary auditory cortex of urethane-anesthetized rats. In an oddball condition, tone frequency was used to differentiate deviants interspersed randomly among a standard tone. Mismatch responses were observed at 60-100 ms after stimulus onset for frequency increases of 5% and 12.5% but not for similarly descending deviants. The response diminished when the silent inter-stimulus interval was increased from 375 ms to 600 ms for +5% deviants and from 600 ms to 1000 ms for +12.5% deviants. In comparison to the oddball condition the response also diminished in a control condition in which no repetitive standards were presented (equiprobable condition). These findings suggest that the rat mismatch response is similar to the human MMN and indicate that anesthetized rats provide a valuable model for studies of central auditory processing.

  18. Non-canonical actions of mismatch repair

    PubMed Central

    Crouse, Gray F.

    2015-01-01

    At the heart of the mismatch repair (MMR) system are proteins that recognize mismatches in DNA. Such mismatches can be mispairs involving normal or damaged bases or insertion/deletion loops due to strand misalignment. When such mispairs are generated during replication or recombination, MMR will direct removal of an incorrectly paired base or block recombination between nonidentical sequences. However, when mispairs are recognized outside the context of replication, proper strand discrimination between old and new DNA is lost, and MMR can act randomly and mutagenically on mispaired DNA. Such non-canonical actions of MMR are important in somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination, expansion of triplet repeats, and potentially in mutations arising in nondividing cells. MMR involvement in damage recognition and signaling is complex, with the end result likely dependent on the amount of DNA damage in a cell. PMID:26698648

  19. The developmental mismatch in structural brain maturation during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Mills, Kathryn L; Goddings, Anne-Lise; Clasen, Liv S; Giedd, Jay N; Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne

    2014-01-01

    Regions of the human brain develop at different rates across the first two decades of life, with some maturing before others. It has been hypothesized that a mismatch in the timing of maturation between subcortical regions (involved in affect and reward processing) and prefrontal regions (involved in cognitive control) underlies the increase in risk-taking and sensation-seeking behaviors observed during adolescence. Most support for this 'dual systems' hypothesis relies on cross-sectional data, and it is not known whether this pattern is present at an individual level. The current study utilizes longitudinal structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data to describe the developmental trajectories of regions associated with risk-taking and sensation-seeking behaviors, namely, the amygdala, nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and prefrontal cortex (PFC). Structural trajectories of gray matter volumes were analyzed using FreeSurfer in 33 participants aged 7-30 years, each of whom had at least three high-quality MRI scans spanning three developmental periods: late childhood, adolescence and early adulthood (total 152 scans). The majority of individuals in our sample showed relatively earlier maturation in the amygdala and/or NAcc compared to the PFC, providing evidence for a mismatch in the timing of structural maturation between these structures. We then related individual developmental trajectories to retrospectively assessed self-reported risk-taking and sensation-seeking behaviors during adolescence in a subsample of 24 participants. Analysis of this smaller sample failed to find a relationship between the presence of a mismatch in brain maturation and risk-taking and sensation-seeking behaviors during adolescence. Taken together, it appears that the developmental mismatch in structural brain maturation is present in neurotypically developing individuals. This pattern of development did not directly relate to self-reported behaviors at an individual level in our sample

  20. The role of non-governmental organizations in global health diplomacy: negotiating the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control.

    PubMed

    Lencucha, Raphael; Kothari, Anita; Labonté, Ronald

    2011-09-01

    The Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) is an exemplar result of global health diplomacy, based on its global reach (binding on all World Health Organization member nations) and its negotiation process. The FCTC negotiations are one of the first examples of various states and non-state entities coming together to create a legally binding tool to govern global health. They have demonstrated that diplomacy, once consigned to interactions among state officials, has witnessed the dilution of its state-centric origins with the inclusion of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in the diplomacy process. To engage in the discourse of global health diplomacy, NGO diplomats are immediately presented with two challenges: to convey the interests of larger publics and to contribute to inter-state negotiations in a predominantly state-centric system of governance that are often diluted by pressures from private interests or mercantilist self-interest on the part of the state itself. How do NGOs manage these challenges within the process of global health diplomacy itself? What roles do, and can, they play in achieving new forms of global health diplomacy? This paper addresses these questions through presentation of findings from a study of the roles assumed by one group of non-governmental actors (the Canadian NGOs) in the FCTC negotiations. The findings presented are drawn from a larger grounded theory study. Qualitative data were collected from 34 public documents and 18 in-depth interviews with participants from the Canadian government and Canadian NGOs. This analysis yielded five key activities or roles of the Canadian NGOs during the negotiation of the FCTC: monitoring, lobbying, brokering knowledge, offering technical expertise and fostering inclusion. This discussion begins to address one of the key goals of global health diplomacy, namely 'the challenges facing health diplomacy and how they have been addressed by different groups and at different levels of

  1. British American Tobacco on Facebook: undermining article 13 of the global World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Simon

    2010-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC) bans all forms of tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship. The comprehensiveness of this ban has yet to be tested by online social networking media such as Facebook. In this paper, the activities of employees of the transnational tobacco company, British American Tobacco, (BAT) on Facebook and the type of content associated with two globally popular BAT brands (Dunhill and Lucky Strike) are mapped. Methods BAT employees on Facebook were identified and then the term ‘British American Tobacco’ was searched for in the Facebook search engine and results recorded, including titles, descriptions, names and the number of Facebook participants involved for each search result. To further detail any potential promotional activities, a search for two of BAT's global brands, ‘Dunhill’ and ‘Lucky Strike’, was conducted. Results Each of the 3 search terms generated more than 500 items across a variety of Facebook subsections. Discussion Some BAT employees are energetically promoting BAT and BAT brands on Facebook through joining and administrating groups, joining pages as fans and posting photographs of BAT events, products and promotional items. BAT employees undertaking these actions are from countries that have ratified the WHO FCTC, which requires signatories to ban all forms of tobacco advertising, including online and crossborder exposure from countries that are not enforcing advertising restrictions. The results of the present research could be used to test the comprehensiveness of the advertising ban by requesting that governments mandate the removal of this promotional material from Facebook. PMID:20395406

  2. Antiseptic Effect of Conventional Povidone-Iodine Scrub, Chlorhexidine Scrub, and Waterless Hand Rub in a Surgical Room: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jui-Chen; Lin, Yen-Kuang; Huang, Yen-Jung; Loh, El-Wui; Wen, Hsiao-Yun; Wang, Chia-Hui; Tsai, Yin-Tai; Hsieh, Wen-Shyang; Tam, Ka-Wai

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Effective perioperative hand antisepsis is crucial for the safety of patients and medical staff in surgical rooms. The antimicrobial effectiveness of different antiseptic methods, including conventional hand scrubs and waterless hand rubs, has not been well evaluated. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A randomized controlled trial was conducted to investigate the effectiveness of the 3 antiseptic methods among surgical staff of Taipei Medical University-Shuang Ho Hospital. For each method used, a group of 80 participants was enrolled. INTERVENTION Surgical hand cleansing with conventional 10% povidone-iodine scrub, conventional 4% chlorhexidine scrub, or waterless hand rub (1% chlorhexidine gluconate and 61% ethyl alcohol). RESULTS Colony-forming unit (CFU) counts were collected using the hand imprinting method before and after disinfection and after surgery. After surgical hand disinfection, the mean CFU counts of the conventional chlorhexidine (0.5±0.2, P<0.01) and waterless hand rub groups (1.4±0.7, P<0.05) were significantly lower than that of the conventional povidone group (4.3±1.3). No significant difference was observed in the mean CFU count among the groups after surgery. Similar results were obtained when preexisting differences before disinfection were considered in the analysis of covariance. Furthermore, multivariate regression indicated that the antiseptic method (P=.0036), but not other variables, predicted the mean CFU count. CONCLUSIONS Conventional chlorhexidine scrub and waterless hand rub were superior to a conventional povidone-iodine product in bacterial inhibition. We recommend using conventional chlorhexidine scrub as a standard method for perioperative hand antisepsis. Waterless hand rub may be used if the higher cost is affordable. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:417-422.

  3. Mismatch repair during homologous and homeologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Spies, Maria; Fishel, Richard

    2015-03-02

    Homologous recombination (HR) and mismatch repair (MMR) are inextricably linked. HR pairs homologous chromosomes before meiosis I and is ultimately responsible for generating genetic diversity during sexual reproduction. HR is initiated in meiosis by numerous programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs; several hundred in mammals). A characteristic feature of HR is the exchange of DNA strands, which results in the formation of heteroduplex DNA. Mismatched nucleotides arise in heteroduplex DNA because the participating parental chromosomes contain nonidentical sequences. These mismatched nucleotides may be processed by MMR, resulting in nonreciprocal exchange of genetic information (gene conversion). MMR and HR also play prominent roles in mitotic cells during genome duplication; MMR rectifies polymerase misincorporation errors, whereas HR contributes to replication fork maintenance, as well as the repair of spontaneous DSBs and genotoxic lesions that affect both DNA strands. MMR suppresses HR when the heteroduplex DNA contains excessive mismatched nucleotides, termed homeologous recombination. The regulation of homeologous recombination by MMR ensures the accuracy of DSB repair and significantly contributes to species barriers during sexual reproduction. This review discusses the history, genetics, biochemistry, biophysics, and the current state of studies on the role of MMR in homologous and homeologous recombination from bacteria to humans.

  4. Aortic mismatch in heart transplantation: readaptation.

    PubMed

    Miralles, A

    1997-10-01

    Great vessel mismatch between donor and recipient is very usual in heart transplantation. Different procedures have been used to manage this situation. A tailoring aortoplasty is described, as a technical alternative, in cases of considerable size incongruence between donor and recipient aortic diameters.

  5. Mismatch Repair during Homologous and Homeologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Spies, Maria; Fishel, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) and mismatch repair (MMR) are inextricably linked. HR pairs homologous chromosomes before meiosis I and is ultimately responsible for generating genetic diversity during sexual reproduction. HR is initiated in meiosis by numerous programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs; several hundred in mammals). A characteristic feature of HR is the exchange of DNA strands, which results in the formation of heteroduplex DNA. Mismatched nucleotides arise in heteroduplex DNA because the participating parental chromosomes contain nonidentical sequences. These mismatched nucleotides may be processed by MMR, resulting in nonreciprocal exchange of genetic information (gene conversion). MMR and HR also play prominent roles in mitotic cells during genome duplication; MMR rectifies polymerase misincorporation errors, whereas HR contributes to replication fork maintenance, as well as the repair of spontaneous DSBs and genotoxic lesions that affect both DNA strands. MMR suppresses HR when the heteroduplex DNA contains excessive mismatched nucleotides, termed homeologous recombination. The regulation of homeologous recombination by MMR ensures the accuracy of DSB repair and significantly contributes to species barriers during sexual reproduction. This review discusses the history, genetics, biochemistry, biophysics, and the current state of studies on the role of MMR in homologous and homeologous recombination from bacteria to humans. PMID:25731766

  6. Laparoendoscopic single-site surgery (LESS) versus conventional laparoscopic surgery for adnexal preservation: a randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yeon Jean; Kim, Mi-La; Lee, Soo Yoon; Lee, Hee Suk; Kim, Joo Myoung; Joo, Kwan Young

    2012-01-01

    Objective To compare the operative outcomes, postoperative pain, and subsequent convalescence after laparoendoscopic single-site surgery (LESS) or conventional laparoscopic surgery for adnexal preservation. Study design From December 2009 to September 2010, 63 patients underwent LESS (n = 33) or a conventional laparoscopic surgery (n = 30) for cyst enucleation. The overall operative outcomes including postoperative pain measurement using the visual analog scale (VAS) were evaluated (time points 6, 24, and 24 hours). The convalescence data included data obtained from questionnaires on the need for analgesics and on patient-reported time to recovery end points. Results The preoperative characteristics did not significantly differ between the two groups. The postoperative hemoglobin drop was higher in the LESS group than in the conventional laparoscopic surgery group (P = 0.048). Postoperative pain at each VAS time point, oral analgesic requirement, intramuscular analgesic requirement, and the number of days until return to work were similar in both groups. Conclusion In adnexa-preserving surgery performed in reproductive-age women, the operative outcomes, including satisfaction of the patients and convalescence after surgery, are comparable for LESS and conventional laparoscopy. LESS may be a feasible and a promising alternative method for scarless abdominal surgery in the treatment of young women with adnexal cysts PMID:22448110

  7. A Method for Integrating Thrust-Vectoring and Actuated Forebody Strakes with Conventional Aerodynamic Controls on a High-Performance Fighter Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lallman, Frederick J.; Davidson, John B.; Murphy, Patrick C.

    1998-01-01

    A method, called pseudo controls, of integrating several airplane controls to achieve cooperative operation is presented. The method eliminates conflicting control motions, minimizes the number of feedback control gains, and reduces the complication of feedback gain schedules. The method is applied to the lateral/directional controls of a modified high-performance airplane. The airplane has a conventional set of aerodynamic controls, an experimental set of thrust-vectoring controls, and an experimental set of actuated forebody strakes. The experimental controls give the airplane additional control power for enhanced stability and maneuvering capabilities while flying over an expanded envelope, especially at high angles of attack. The flight controls are scheduled to generate independent body-axis control moments. These control moments are coordinated to produce stability-axis angular accelerations. Inertial coupling moments are compensated. Thrust-vectoring controls are engaged according to their effectiveness relative to that of the aerodynamic controls. Vane-relief logic removes steady and slowly varying commands from the thrust-vectoring controls to alleviate heating of the thrust turning devices. The actuated forebody strakes are engaged at high angles of attack. This report presents the forward-loop elements of a flight control system that positions the flight controls according to the desired stability-axis accelerations. This report does not include the generation of the required angular acceleration commands by means of pilot controls or the feedback of sensed airplane motions.

  8. Osmium complex binding to mismatched methylcytosine: effect of adjacent bases.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Akiko; Tainaka, Kazuki; Okamoto, Akimitsu

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the efficiency of osmium complex formation at 5-methylcytosine in mismatched DNA duplexes. Osmium complexation was not observed in fully matched duplexes, whereas the complexation site and efficiency in mismatched duplexes depended on the 5'-neighboring base of the 5-methylcytosine. In particular, when the base adjacent to the 5' side of the mismatched base pair was thymine, a unique side reaction was observed. However, the mismatched base pairs did not influence the selectivity of osmium complexation with methylated DNA.

  9. Mismatch Repair Balances Leading and Lagging Strand DNA Replication Fidelity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-11

    the most deleterious mismatches (i.e., indel mismatches). Within classes of similar deleterious potential (base-base mismatches), evolution has...spontaneous mutation rates and the sequencing of URA3 mutants were as previously described [2,13,21], save that MSH2 was deleted from haploid pol2

  10. A randomised controlled trial of mini incision or conventional incision for saphenous vein harvesting in patients undergoing myocardial revascularization

    PubMed Central

    Gontijo de Deus, Kleber; Diogo Filho, Augusto; Cesar Santos, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Compare the evolution regarding the complications concerning two types of incision (conventional × mini-incision), for saphenectomy in patients that go under myocardial revascularization or otherwise known as coronary artery bypass surgery. Methods In January 2012 to August 2013, 66 patients were prospectively selected for coronary artery bypass with cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. These were divided into two groups: Conventional and Mini-Incision, with 33 patients in each group chosen in a random fashion and with knowledge of which technique to be used being presented only at the start of the surgery. In the conventional group, the patients received an incision to the lower member of 7–10 cm. The patients in the Mini-Incision group received an incision to the lower member of 3–4 cm, both performed without the use of any special material. Results The groups were similar in terms of clinical data and in the preoperative period. Males made up a greater part of the group with 63.7% and 81.9% in groups C and M, respectively. Among the complications analysed, edema (p = 0.011), hematoma (p = 0.020), dehiscence (p = 0.012) and infection (p = 0.012), were significantly greater in group C when compared to group M. When the matter comes to the variable in relation to the risk of Surgical Site Infections (SSI), no difference was found between the groups. Conclusion Coronary artery bypass surgery with mini-incision for saphenectomy, demonstrated a lower rate for preoperative complications when compared to saphenectomy under conventional incision procedures. PMID:27006766

  11. Trophic mismatch requires seasonal heterogeneity of warming.

    PubMed

    Straile, Dietmar; Kerimoglu, Onur; Peeters, Frank

    2015-10-01

    Climate warming has been shown to advance the phenology of species. Asynchronous changes in phenology between interacting species may disrupt feeding interactions (phenological mismatch), which could have tremendous consequences for ecosystem functioning. Long-term field observations have suggested asynchronous shifts in phenology with warming, whereas experimental studies have not been conclusive. Using proxy-based modeling of three trophic levels (algae, herbivores, and fish), we .show that asynchronous changes in phenology only occur if warming is seasonally heterogeneous, but not if warming is constant throughout the year. If warming is seasonally heterogeneous, the degree and even direction of asynchrony depends on the specific seasonality of the warming. Conclusions about phenological mismatches in food web interactions may therefore produce controversial results if the analyses do not distinguish between seasonally constant and seasonal specific warming. Furthermore, our results suggest that predicting asynchrony between interacting species requires reliable warming predictions that resolve sub-seasonal time scales.

  12. Growth and Characterization of Large Lattice Mismatch Heteroepitaxial Systems: SILVER/SILICON(111) and SILVER/SILICON(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyung-Ho.

    In this thesis, the Ag/Si systems have been studied in order to understand the mechanisms of the epitaxial formation and defect evolution in the large lattice mismatch (~25%) heteroepitaxial systems. In this work, special emphasis was placed on studying the effects of the substrate structure on the epitaxial orientation, the crystalline quality and the morphology of the film, the nature of defects in the film, and the thermostability of the Ag/Si interface. Ag films (~600- ~4000 A thickness) were grown on flat and misoriented Si(111), flat Si(100) and thin oxide layers by the Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) technique. The crystalline structures and defects of the films were characterized by using multiple analysis techniques including x-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) and MeV He ^+ RBS/channeling. The thermostability of the Ag/Si interface was studied by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) after annealing the films at 500^ circC for 30 min. Despite the large lattice mismatch between Ag and Si, high quality Ag single crystal films (surface minimum yield chi_{rm min} = 6-10%) were grown on clean Si substrates. The quality of the Ag film depends on the film thickness and the substrate orientation. The model for twinning formation consistent with these observations is proposed. A model accounting for the misorientational growth is proposed. Ag was grown on Si(111) in an island growth mode and the morphology of the film was controlled by the substrate orientation and annealing. The epitaxial Ag/Si interface was thermally stable up to at least 500 ^circC. The adhesion between Ag and the oxide layer was poor and its interface was not thermally stable. The findings in this thesis indicate that (1) the epitaxial films involving "four (Ag) to three (Si) superlattice matching" can be grown in contrast to the conventional thinking that a possible heteroepitaxy system should involve a small lattice mismatch. However, the large lattice mismatch may play

  13. Proteasome inhibition rescues clinically significant unstable variants of the mismatch repair protein Msh2

    PubMed Central

    Arlow, Tim; Scott, Kristan; Wagenseller, Aubrey; Gammie, Alison

    2013-01-01

    MSH2 is required for DNA mismatch repair recognition in eukaryotes. Deleterious mutations in human MSH2 account for approximately half of the alleles associated with a common hereditary cancer syndrome. Previously, we characterized clinically identified MSH2 missense mutations, using yeast as a model system, and found that the most common cause of defective DNA mismatch repair was low levels of the variant Msh2 proteins. Here, we show that increased protein turnover is responsible for the reduced cellular levels. Increasing gene dosage of more than half of the missense alleles fully restored function. A titration experiment revealed that raising the expression level of one variant to less than wild-type levels restored mismatch repair, suggesting that overexpression is not always required to regain function. We found that the ubiquitin-mediated proteasome degradation pathway is the major mechanism for increased turnover of the Msh2 variants and identified the primary ubiquitin ligase as San1. Deletion of San1 restored protein levels for all but one variant, but did not elevate wild-type Msh2 levels. The unstable variants interacted with San1, whereas wild-type Msh2 did not. Additionally, san1Δ suppressed the mismatch repair defect of unstable variants. Of medical significance, the clinically approved drug Bortezomib partially restored protein levels and mismatch repair function for low-level variants and reversed the resistance to cisplatin, a common chemotherapeutic. Our results provide the foundation for an innovative therapeutic regime for certain mismatch-repair-defective cancers that are refractory to conventional chemotherapies. PMID:23248292

  14. Comparison between microprocessor-controlled ankle/foot and conventional prosthetic feet during stair negotiation in people with unilateral transtibial amputation.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Vibhor; Gailey, Robert S; Gaunaurd, Ignacio A; O'Toole, Christopher; Finnieston, Adam A

    2013-01-01

    Contrary to stance-phase dorsiflexion of conventional prosthetic feet, the microprocessor-controlled Proprio foot permits swing-phase dorsiflexion on stairs. The purpose of this study was to compare Symmetry in External Work (SEW) between a microprocessor-controlled foot and conventional prosthetic feet in two groups with unilateral transtibial amputation (Medicare Functional Classification Levels K-Level-2 and K-Level-3) during stair ascent and descent. Ten subjects were evaluated while wearing three conventional prosthetic feet- solid ankle cushion heel (SACH), stationary attachment flexible endoskeleton (SAFE), and Talux-and the Proprio foot using a study socket and were given a 10- to 14-day accommodation period with each foot. Ground reaction forces were collected using F-scan sensors during stair ascent and descent. The SEW between the intact and amputated limbs was calculated for each foot. During stair ascent, the Proprio foot resulted in a higher interlimb symmetry than conventional prosthetic feet, with significant differences between the Pro prio and SACH/SAFE feet. The swing-phase dorsiflexion appeared to promote greater interlimb symmetry because it facilitated forward motion of the body, resulting in a heel-to-toe center of pressure trajectory. During stair descent, all feet had low symmetry without significant differences between feet. The movement strategy used when descending stairs, which is to roll over the edge of a step, had a greater influence on symmetry than the dorsiflexion features of prosthetic feet.

  15. Tretinoin Nanogel 0.025% Versus Conventional Gel 0.025% in Patients with Acne Vulgaris: A Randomized, Active Controlled, Multicentre, Parallel Group, Phase IV Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chandrashekhar, B S; Anitha, M.; Ruparelia, Mukesh; Vaidya, Pradyumna; Aamir, Riyaz; Shah, Sunil; Thilak, S; Aurangabadkar, Sanjeev; Pal, Sandeep; Saraswat, Abir

    2015-01-01

    Background: Conventional topical tretinoin formulation is often associated with local adverse events. Nanogel formulation of tretinoin has good physical stability and enables good penetration of tretinoin into the pilo-sebaceous glands. Aim: The present study was conducted to assess the efficacy and safety of a nanogel formulation of tretinoin as compared to its conventional gel formulation in the treatment of acne vulgaris of the face. Materials and Methods: This randomized, active controlled, multicentric, phase IV clinical trial evaluated the treatment of patients with acne vulgaris of the face by the two gel formulations locally applied once daily at night for 12 wk. Acne lesion counts (inflammatory, non-inflammatory & total) and severity grading were carried out on the monthly scheduled visits along with the tolerability assessments. Results: A total of 207 patients were randomized in the study. Reductions in the total (72.9% vs. 65.0%; p = 0.03) and inflammatory (78.1% vs. 66.9%; p = 0.02) acne lesions were reported to be significantly greater with the nanogel formulation as compared to the conventional gel formulation. Local adverse events were significantly less (p = 0.04) in the nanogel group (13.3%) as compared to the conventional gel group (24.7%). Dryness was the most common adverse event reported in both the treatment groups while peeling of skin, burning sensation and photosensitivity were reported in patients using the conventional gel only. Conclusion: In the treatment of acne vulgaris of the face, tretinoin nanogel formulation appears to be more effective and better tolerated than the conventional gel formulation. PMID:25738069

  16. Eukaryotic Mismatch Repair in Relation to DNA Replication.

    PubMed

    Kunkel, Thomas A; Erie, Dorothy A

    2015-01-01

    Three processes act in series to accurately replicate the eukaryotic nuclear genome. The major replicative DNA polymerases strongly prevent mismatch formation, occasional mismatches that do form are proofread during replication, and rare mismatches that escape proofreading are corrected by mismatch repair (MMR). This review focuses on MMR in light of increasing knowledge about nuclear DNA replication enzymology and the rate and specificity with which mismatches are generated during leading- and lagging-strand replication. We consider differences in MMR efficiency in relation to mismatch recognition, signaling to direct MMR to the nascent strand, mismatch removal, and the timing of MMR. These studies are refining our understanding of relationships between generating and repairing replication errors to achieve accurate replication of both DNA strands of the nuclear genome.

  17. Evaluation of pollutant source strengths and control strategies in conventional and R-2000 houses: A final report

    SciTech Connect

    Piersol, P.

    1997-12-31

    This study was conducted to further research in evaluating materials emissions and the resultant indoor air quality in new and occupied houses. Project objectives were: To characterize the material emissions of common construction and finishing materials; to evaluate the quality of the indoor air of R-2000 houses and conventional houses before and after occupancy; to characterize the degree to which the selection and use of healthy house concepts can improve indoor air quality; and to examine the relationships between construction material emissions, occupant-related emissions, ventilation system performance, and subsequent levels of indoor air quality. Project methodology involved monitoring of house characteristics and indoor air quality together with coincidental materials emissions testing. Materials tested included carpet, vinyl and hardwood flooring, plywood, oriented strand board, cabinet frame and board, oil- and latex-based painted wallboard and trim, and counter tops.

  18. Recovery act. Characterizing structural controls of EGS-candidate and conventional geothermal reservoirs in the Great Basin. Developing successful exploration strategies in extended terranes

    SciTech Connect

    Faulds, James

    2015-06-25

    We conducted a comprehensive analysis of the structural controls of geothermal systems within the Great Basin and adjacent regions. Our main objectives were to: 1) Produce a catalogue of favorable structural environments and models for geothermal systems. 2) Improve site-specific targeting of geothermal resources through detailed studies of representative sites, which included innovative techniques of slip tendency analysis of faults and 3D modeling. 3) Compare and contrast the structural controls and models in different tectonic settings. 4) Synthesize data and develop methodologies for enhancement of exploration strategies for conventional and EGS systems, reduction in the risk of drilling non-productive wells, and selecting the best EGS sites.

  19. Mismatch binding, ADP-ATP exchange and intramolecular signaling during mismatch repair

    PubMed Central

    Hingorani, Manju M.

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this article is on the DNA binding and ATPase activities of the mismatch repair (MMR) protein, MutS—our current understanding of how this protein uses ATP to fuel its actions on DNA and initiate repair via interactions with MutL, the next protein in the pathway. Structure-function and kinetic studies have yielded detailed views of the MutS mechanism of action in MMR. How MutS and MutL work together after mismatch recognition to enable strand-specific nicking, which leads to strand excision and synthesis, is less clear and remains an active area of investigation. PMID:26704427

  20. Comparison of broiler performance and carcass parameters when fed diets containing soybean meal produced from glyphosate-tolerant (MON 89788), control, or conventional reference soybeans.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M; Hartnell, G; Lucas, D; Davis, S; Nemeth, M

    2007-12-01

    A 42-d floor pen study was conducted to compare broiler (Ross x Ross 308) performance and carcass measurements when fed diets containing meal produced from glyphosate-tolerant soybeans (MON 89788) with those of broilers fed diets containing meal produced from control soybean (A3244) that has similar genetic background to MON 89788. Soybean meal produced from 6 conventional soybean varieties was included in the study to provide comparison measurements for broilers fed meal derived from conventional soybeans. It has been found that MON 89788 produces the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase protein from Agrobacterium sp. strain CP4 (cp4 epsps), which confers tolerance to glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup agricultural herbicides. Broilers were fed starter diets (approximately 33% wt/wt dehulled soybean meal) from d 0 to 21 and grower-finisher diets (approximately 30% wt/wt dehulled soybean meal) from d 21 to 42. The study utilized a randomized complete block design with 8 dietary treatments assigned randomly within 5 blocks of 16 pens each (8 male and 8 female) with 10 birds per pen. There were 10 pens per treatment group (5 male and 5 female). No treatment differences (P > 0.05) were detected among dietary treatments for feed intake, weight gain, adjusted feed conversion, or any measured carcass and meat quality parameters. Comparison of all performance, carcass, and meat quality parameters measured showed no differences (P > 0.05) between birds fed the MON 89788 soybean meal diet and the population of birds fed the control and 6 conventional reference soybean meal diets. It is concluded that the diets containing soybean meal produced from MON 89788 were nutritionally equivalent to diets containing soybean meal produced from the control and conventional reference soybean varieties when fed to broilers.

  1. Use of Green Infrastructure Integrated with Conventional Gray Infrastructure for Combined Sewer Overflow Control: Kansas City, MO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advanced design concepts such as Low Impact Development (LID) and Green Solutions (or upland runoff control techniques) are currently being encouraged by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a management practice to contain and control stormwater at the lot ...

  2. Mismatched DNTP Incorporation By DNA Polymerase Beta Does Not Proceed Via Globally Different Conformational Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, K.-H.; Niebuhr, M.; Tung, C.-S.; Chan, H.-c.; Chou, C.-C.; Tsai, M.-D.

    2009-05-26

    Understanding how DNA polymerases control fidelity requires elucidation of the mechanisms of matched and mismatched dNTP incorporations. Little is known about the latter because mismatched complexes do not crystallize readily. In this report, we employed small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and structural modeling to probe the conformations of different intermediate states of mammalian DNA polymerase {beta} (Pol {beta}) in its wild-type and an error-prone variant, I260Q. Our structural results indicate that the mismatched ternary complex lies in-between the open and the closed forms, but more closely resembles the open form for WT and the closed form for I260Q. On the basis of molecular modeling, this over-stabilization of mismatched ternary complex of I260Q is likely caused by formation of a hydrogen bonding network between the side chains of Gln{sup 260}, Tyr{sup 296}, Glu{sup 295} and Arg{sup 258}, freeing up Asp{sup 192} to coordinate MgdNTP. These results argue against recent reports suggesting that mismatched dNTP incorporations follow a conformational path distinctly different from that of matched dNTP incorporation, or that its conformational closing is a major contributor to fidelity.

  3. The Effectiveness of Articaine and Lidocaine Single Buccal Infiltration versus Conventional Buccal and Palatal Injection Using Lidocaine during Primary Maxillary Molar Extraction: A Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kolli, Naveen Kumar Reddy; Nirmala, S. V. S. G.; Nuvvula, Sivakumar

    2017-01-01

    Background: Despite the advent of modern injection techniques, palatal injection continues to be a painful experience for children. Aims: To compare the pain experienced during extraction of maxillary primary molars with conventional lignocaine anesthesia versus lignocaine and articaine buccal infiltration in children aged 6–14 years. Materials and Methods: A prospective randomized triple blinded study was conducted with ninety children (n = 90), randomly allocated to receive lignocaine conventional anesthesia (Group I [control group]), and buccal infiltration using articaine (Group II [articaine group]) or lignocaine (Group III [lignocaine group]). A composite score of self-report (faces pain scale-revised), behavioral measure (face legs activity cry consolability scale), and a physiological response (pulse rate) was measured following maxillary primary molar extraction. Statistical Analysis Used: To test the mean difference between two groups, Students’ t-test was used and among the three groups, one-way ANOVA with post hoc test was used. Results: Articaine group had significantly lower pain scores for self-report (P < 000.1) and behavioral measures (P < 000.1) while there was no significant difference (P > 0.05) between articaine and control groups during primary maxillary molar extraction. Conclusion: Maxillary primary molar extraction procedure can be successfully accomplished by bypassing the palatal injection. Articaine buccal infiltration can be considered as an alternative to conventional local anesthesia for the extraction of maxillary primary molars. PMID:28298777

  4. Tunable sound transmission at an impedance-mismatched fluidic interface assisted by a composite waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Wei, Zhi; Fan, Li; Qu, Jianmin; Zhang, Shu-yi

    2016-01-01

    We report a composite waveguide fabricated by attaching a coupling aperture to a waveguide. The acoustic impedance of the composite waveguide can be regulated by merely controlling its coupling vibrations, depending on its structure size. By changing the size to adjust the acoustic impedance of the composite waveguide at an impedance-mismatched fluidic interface, tunable sound transmission at the desired frequencies is achieved. The reported composite waveguide provides a new method for sound regulation at a mismatched fluidic interface and has extensive frequency hopping and frequency agility applications in air-water sound communication. PMID:27698379

  5. Test report for twinax cable (Rockwell type MB0150-051). [effects of mismatched termination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doland, G. D.

    1978-01-01

    A controlled impedance twisted pair shielded cable was tested to determine the frequency response and effects of mismatched termination. It was found that a long length of this cable, about 100 feet, exhibited a frequency sensitive attenuation roll-off greater than 1.5 db down at 5 MHz. It was also determined that improper termination resulted in losses of 1/2 to 1 db within the frequency range of 200 KHz to greater than 1-1/2 MHz. The test results indicate a possible problem where mismatched connectors are used in video signal cables.

  6. Tunable sound transmission at an impedance-mismatched fluidic interface assisted by a composite waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Wei, Zhi; Fan, Li; Qu, Jianmin; Zhang, Shu-Yi

    2016-10-01

    We report a composite waveguide fabricated by attaching a coupling aperture to a waveguide. The acoustic impedance of the composite waveguide can be regulated by merely controlling its coupling vibrations, depending on its structure size. By changing the size to adjust the acoustic impedance of the composite waveguide at an impedance-mismatched fluidic interface, tunable sound transmission at the desired frequencies is achieved. The reported composite waveguide provides a new method for sound regulation at a mismatched fluidic interface and has extensive frequency hopping and frequency agility applications in air-water sound communication.

  7. Associations of Cognitive Function Scores with Carbon Dioxide, Ventilation, and Volatile Organic Compound Exposures in Office Workers: A Controlled Exposure Study of Green and Conventional Office Environments

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Joseph G.; MacNaughton, Piers; Satish, Usha; Santanam, Suresh; Vallarino, Jose; Spengler, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The indoor built environment plays a critical role in our overall well-being because of both the amount of time we spend indoors (~90%) and the ability of buildings to positively or negatively influence our health. The advent of sustainable design or green building strategies reinvigorated questions regarding the specific factors in buildings that lead to optimized conditions for health and productivity. Objective: We simulated indoor environmental quality (IEQ) conditions in “Green” and “Conventional” buildings and evaluated the impacts on an objective measure of human performance: higher-order cognitive function. Methods: Twenty-four participants spent 6 full work days (0900–1700 hours) in an environmentally controlled office space, blinded to test conditions. On different days, they were exposed to IEQ conditions representative of Conventional [high concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs)] and Green (low concentrations of VOCs) office buildings in the United States. Additional conditions simulated a Green building with a high outdoor air ventilation rate (labeled Green+) and artificially elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) levels independent of ventilation. Results: On average, cognitive scores were 61% higher on the Green building day and 101% higher on the two Green+ building days than on the Conventional building day (p < 0.0001). VOCs and CO2 were independently associated with cognitive scores. Conclusions: Cognitive function scores were significantly better under Green+ building conditions than in the Conventional building conditions for all nine functional domains. These findings have wide-ranging implications because this study was designed to reflect conditions that are commonly encountered every day in many indoor environments. Citation: Allen JG, MacNaughton P, Satish U, Santanam S, Vallarino J, Spengler JD. 2016. Associations of cognitive function scores with carbon dioxide, ventilation, and volatile organic compound

  8. The Impact of Educational Mismatch on Firm Productivity: Evidence from Linked Panel Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kampelmann, Stephan; Rycx, Francois

    2012-01-01

    We provide first evidence regarding the direct impact of educational mismatch on firm productivity. To do so, we rely on representative linked employer-employee panel data for Belgium covering the period 1999-2006. Controlling for simultaneity issues, time-invariant unobserved workplace characteristics, cohort effects and dynamics in the…

  9. Repair of mismatched basepairs in mammalian DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.H.; Hare, J.T.

    1991-08-01

    We have concentrated on three specific areas of our research plan. Our greatest emphasis is on the role of single strand nicks in influencing template strand selection in mismatch repair. We have found, that the ability of a nick in one strand to influence which strand is repaired is not a simple function of distance from the mismatched site but rather that an hot spot where a nick is more likely to have an influence can exist. The second line was production of single-genotype heteroduplexes in order to examine independently the repair of T/G and A/C mispairs within the same sequence context as in our mixed mispair preparations. We have shown preparations of supercoiled heteroduplex can be prepared that were exclusively T/G or exclusively A/C at the mispair site. The third effort has been to understand the difference in repair bias of different cell lines or different transfection conditions as it may relate to different repair systems in the cell. We have identified some of the sources of variation, including cell cycle position. We hope to continue this work to more precisely identify the phase of the cell cycle.

  10. Is case-chaos methodology an appropriate alternative to conventional case-control studies for investigating outbreaks?

    PubMed

    Edelstein, Michael; Wallensten, Anders; Kühlmann-Berenzon, Sharon

    2014-08-15

    Case-chaos methodology is a proposed alternative to case-control studies that simulates controls by randomly reshuffling the exposures of cases. We evaluated the method using data on outbreaks in Sweden. We identified 5 case-control studies from foodborne illness outbreaks that occurred between 2005 and 2012. Using case-chaos methodology, we calculated odds ratios 1,000 times for each exposure. We used the median as the point estimate and the 2.5th and 97.5th percentiles as the confidence interval. We compared case-chaos matched odds ratios with their respective case-control odds ratios in terms of statistical significance. Using Spearman's correlation, we estimated the correlation between matched odds ratios and the proportion of cases exposed to each exposure and quantified the relationship between the 2 using a normal linear mixed model. Each case-control study identified an outbreak vehicle (odds ratios = 4.9-45). Case-chaos methodology identified the outbreak vehicle 3 out of 5 times. It identified significant associations in 22 of 113 exposures that were not associated with outcome and 5 of 18 exposures that were significantly associated with outcome. Log matched odds ratios correlated with their respective proportion of cases exposed (Spearman ρ = 0.91) and increased significantly with the proportion of cases exposed (b = 0.054). Case-chaos methodology missed the outbreak source 2 of 5 times and identified spurious associations between a number of exposures and outcome. Measures of association correlated with the proportion of cases exposed. We recommended against using case-chaos analysis during outbreak investigations.

  11. Reducing measurement scale mismatch to improve surface energy flux estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwema, Joost; Rosolem, Rafael; Rahman, Mostaquimur; Blyth, Eleanor; Wagener, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture importantly controls land surface processes such as energy and water partitioning. A good understanding of these controls is needed especially when recognizing the challenges in providing accurate hyper-resolution hydrometeorological simulations at sub-kilometre scales. Soil moisture controlling factors can, however, differ at distinct scales. In addition, some parameters in land surface models are still often prescribed based on observations obtained at another scale not necessarily employed by such models (e.g., soil properties obtained from lab samples used in regional simulations). To minimize such effects, parameters can be constrained with local data from Eddy-Covariance (EC) towers (i.e., latent and sensible heat fluxes) and Point Scale (PS) soil moisture observations (e.g., TDR). However, measurement scales represented by EC and PS still differ substantially. Here we use the fact that Cosmic-Ray Neutron Sensors (CRNS) estimate soil moisture at horizontal footprint similar to that of EC fluxes to help answer the following question: Does reduced observation scale mismatch yield better soil moisture - surface fluxes representation in land surface models? To answer this question we analysed soil moisture and surface fluxes measurements from twelve COSMOS-Ameriflux sites in the USA characterized by distinct climate, soils and vegetation types. We calibrated model parameters of the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) against PS and CRNS soil moisture data, respectively. We analysed the improvement in soil moisture estimation compared to uncalibrated model simulations and then evaluated the degree of improvement in surface fluxes before and after calibration experiments. Preliminary results suggest that a more accurate representation of soil moisture dynamics is achieved when calibrating against observed soil moisture and further improvement obtained with CRNS relative to PS. However, our results also suggest that a more accurate

  12. Tobacco Industry attempts to counter the World Bank Report Curbing the Epidemic and obstruct the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control

    PubMed Central

    Mamudu, Hadii M; Hammond, Ross

    2008-01-01

    In 1999 the World Bank published a landmark study on the economics of tobacco control, Curbing the Epidemic: Governments and the Economics of Tobacco Control (CTE), which concluded that tobacco control brings unprecedented health benefits without harming economies, threatening the transnational tobacco companies’ ability to use economic arguments to dissuade governments from enacting tobacco control policies and supporting the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC). We used tobacco industry documents to analyze how tobacco companies worked to discredit CTE. They hired public relations firms, had academics critique CTE, hired consultants to produce “independent” estimates of the importance of tobacco to national economies, and worked through front groups, particularly the International Tobacco Growers’ Association, to question CTE’s findings. These efforts failed, and the report remains an authoritative economic analysis of global tobacco control during the ongoing FCTC negotiations. The industry’s failure suggests that the World Bank should continue their analytic work on the economics of tobacco control and make tobacco control part of its development agenda. PMID:18950924

  13. Efficacy of adding the kinesio taping method to guideline-endorsed conventional physiotherapy in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic nonspecific low back pain is a significant health condition with high prevalence worldwide and it is associated with enormous costs to society. Clinical practice guidelines show that many interventions are available to treat patients with chronic low back pain, but the vast majority of these interventions have a modest effect in reducing pain and disability. An intervention that has been widespread in recent years is the use of elastic bandages called Kinesio Taping. Although Kinesio Taping has been used extensively in clinical practice, current evidence does not support the use of this intervention; however these conclusions are based on a small number of underpowered studies. Therefore, questions remain about the effectiveness of the Kinesio Taping method as an additional treatment to interventions, such as conventional physiotherapy, that have already been recommended by the current clinical practice guidelines in robust and high-quality randomised controlled trials. We aim to determine the effectiveness of the addition of the use of Kinesio Taping in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain who receive guideline-endorsed conventional physiotherapy. Methods/design One hundred and forty-eight patients will be randomly allocated to receive either conventional physiotherapy, which consists of a combination of manual therapy techniques, general exercises, and specific stabilisation exercises (Guideline-Endorsed Conventional Physiotherapy Group) or to receive conventional physiotherapy with the addition of Kinesio Taping to the lumbar spine (Conventional Physiotherapy plus Kinesio Taping Group) over a period of 5 weeks (10 sessions of treatment). Clinical outcomes (pain intensity, disability and global perceived effect) will be collected at baseline and at 5 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after randomisation. We will also collect satisfaction with care and adverse effects after treatment. Data will be collected by a blinded assessor. All

  14. Fast HPLC for quality control of Harpagophytum procumbens by using a monolithic silica column: method transfer from conventional particle-based silica column.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Alexander H

    2005-05-06

    The applicability of a monolithic C18-bonded silica column for the rapid HPLC separation of ingredients in medicinal plants and their phytopharmaceutical preparations has been evaluated in the author's laboratory. In this presentation, an existing method for the determination of the iridoid glycoside harpagoside in Harpagophytum procumbens (Devil's Claw) was successfully transferred from a conventional particle-based C18 silica column to a monolithic silica column. The very high porosity of the stationary phase allows chromatography with a much lower backpressure than on conventional columns. Therefore, the flow rate could be easily increased from 0.8 mL/min (particle-based column) to 5 mL/min (monolithic column) and the run-time reduced from 30 to 5 min (that is a reduction about 85% !), without losing any chromatographic resolution of the compound of interest. The amount of harpagoside was measured with the original method on a conventional particle-based silica column and on the adapted method on a monolithic silica column. The statistical mean t-test showed no significant differences of the variances and the means indicating that the fast HPLC method is an acceptable alternative. The shorter analysis time makes the method very valuable for commercial quality control of Harpagophytum extracts and its pharmaceutical preparations.

  15. Global Health Governance and the Commercial Sector: A Documentary Analysis of Tobacco Company Strategies to Influence the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control

    PubMed Central

    Weishaar, Heide; Collin, Jeff; Smith, Katherine; Grüning, Thilo; Mandal, Sema; Gilmore, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Background In successfully negotiating the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC), the World Health Organization (WHO) has led a significant innovation in global health governance, helping to transform international tobacco control. This article provides the first comprehensive review of the diverse campaign initiated by transnational tobacco corporations (TTCs) to try to undermine the proposed convention. Methods and Findings The article is primarily based on an analysis of internal tobacco industry documents made public through litigation, triangulated with data from official documentation relating to the FCTC process and websites of relevant organisations. It is also informed by a comprehensive review of previous studies concerning tobacco industry efforts to influence the FCTC. The findings demonstrate that the industry's strategic response to the proposed WHO convention was two-fold. First, arguments and frames were developed to challenge the FCTC, including: claiming there would be damaging economic consequences; depicting tobacco control as an agenda promoted by high-income countries; alleging the treaty conflicted with trade agreements, “good governance,” and national sovereignty; questioning WHO's mandate; claiming the FCTC would set a precedent for issues beyond tobacco; and presenting corporate social responsibility (CSR) as an alternative. Second, multiple tactics were employed to promote and increase the impact of these arguments, including: directly targeting FCTC delegations and relevant political actors, enlisting diverse allies (e.g., mass media outlets and scientists), and using stakeholder consultation to delay decisions and secure industry participation. Conclusions TTCs' efforts to undermine the FCTC were comprehensive, demonstrating the global application of tactics that TTCs have previously been found to have employed nationally and further included arguments against the FCTC as a key initiative in global health governance

  16. ABO blood group mismatched hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tekgündüz, Sibel Akpınar; Özbek, Namık

    2016-02-01

    Apart from solid organ transplantations, use of ABO-blood group mismatched (ABO-mismatched) donors is acceptable in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) patients. About 20-40% of allogeneic HSCT recipients will receive grafts from ABO-mismatched donors. ABO incompatible HSCT procedures are associated with immediate and late consequences, including but not restricted to acute or delayed hemolytic reactions, delayed red blood cell recovery, pure red cell aplasia and graft-versus-host disease. This review summarizes the current knowledge about consequences of ABO-mismatched HSCT in terms of associated complications and will evaluate its impact on important outcome parameters of HSCT.

  17. Systematic review and meta-analysis of published randomized controlled trials comparing purse-string vs conventional linear closure of the wound following ileostomy (stoma) closure

    PubMed Central

    Sajid, Muhammad Shafique; Bhatti, Muhammad I.; Miles, William FA.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this article is to systematically analyse the randomized, controlled trials comparing the effectiveness of purse-string closure (PSC) of an ileostomy wound with conventional linear closure (CLC). Methods: Randomized, controlled trials comparing the effectiveness of purse-string closure vs conventional linear closure (CLC) of ileostomy wound in patients undergoing ileostomy closure were analysed using RevMan®, and the combined outcomes were expressed as risk ratio (RR) and standardized mean difference (SMD). Results: Three randomized, controlled trials, recruiting 206 patients, were retrieved from medical electronic databases. There were 105 patients in the PSC group and 101 patients in the CLC group. There was no heterogeneity among included trials. Duration of operation (SMD: −0.18; 95% CI: −0.45, 0.09; z = 1.28; P < 0.20) and length of hospital stay (SMD: 0.01; 95% CI: −0.26, 0.28; z = 0.07; P < 0.95) was statistically similar following both approaches of ileostomy wound closure. The risk of surgical site infection (OR, 0.10; 95% CI: 0.03, 0.33; z = 3.78; P < 0.0001) was significantly reduced when ileostomy wound was closed using PSC technique. Conclusion: PSC technique for ileostomy wound is associated with a reduced risk of surgical site infection apparently without influencing the duration of operation and length of hospital stay. PMID:25011379

  18. Altered and Conventional Fractionated Radiotherapy in Locoregional Control and Survival of Patients with Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx, Oropharynx, and Hypopharynx

    PubMed Central

    Krstevska, Valentina; Crvenkova, Simonida

    2006-01-01

    Aim To compare the efficacy of two altered fractionation radiotherapy treatment protocols (hyperfractionation and accelerated fractionation with concomitant boost) with conventional fractionation in improvement of locoregional disease control and survival of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx, oropharynx, or hypopharynx. Methods From March 1999 to December 2000, 51 patients with previously untreated squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx, oropharynx or hypopharynx underwent conventionally fractionated radiotherapy and received 66-70 Gy in 6˝-7 weeks (2 Gy per fraction a day, 5 fractions a week). From January 2001 to June 2004, 101 patients with the same diagnoses underwent either hyperfractionated radiotherapy, with 74.4-79.2 Gy delivered in 6.2-7 weeks (1.2 Gy per fraction twice a day), or accelerated fractionation with concomitant boost, which delivered 68.7-72 Gy in 6 weeks (1.8 Gy per fraction a day and 1.5 Gy per fraction a day to a boost filed as a second daily treatment for the last 11-12 treatment days). Locoregional relapse and overall survival were recorded. Results Complete response to treatment was obtained in 31 of 51 patients treated with conventional fractionation, 33 of 50 patients treated with hyperfractionation, and 36 of 51 patients treated with accelerated fractionation. No significant differences were observed among the patients treated with conventional, hyperfractionated, or accelerated radiotherapy modalities either in locoregional control rate (41% vs 35% vs 49%, respectively; P = 0.690) or overall survival rate (50% vs 40% vs 51%, respectively; P = 0.760). The grade of acute reactions of the larynx significantly differed among the treatment groups (Fisher exact test; P = 0.039). The difference in the grade of acute side effects in the skin among the treatment groups was of borderline significance (χ22 test; P = 0.054). There was also a borderline difference among the groups in the grade of late side

  19. Efficacy and Toxicity of Low-Dose versus Conventional-Dose Chemotherapy for Malignant Tumors: a Meta-Analysis of 6 Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed

    Xie, Xianhe; Wu, Yupeng; Luo, Shuimei; Yang, Haitao; Li, Lina; Zhou, Sijing; Shen, Ruifen; Lin, Heng

    2017-02-01

    Low-dose chemotherapy has emerged as a new strategy for control of cancer. However, there is a controversy as to whether low-dose chemotherapy is an effective way to manage many human malignancies. To shed light on this controversy, we performed a meta-analysis of relative merits between low-dose and conventional-dose chemotherapy in different carcinomas. Studies published before February 29, 2016 were reviewed for the meta-analysis and selected according to defined criteria. The effect levels of low-dose chemotherapy regarding overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS) and severe adverse events (SAEs) (Grade≥3) were calculated as risk ratios (ORs) or adjusted hazard ratios (HRs). Six randomized controlled studies (RCTs) have provided data for low-dose chemotherapy versus conventional-dose chemotherapy for 838 cases and 833 cases, respectively. Interestingly, low-dose chemotherapy achieved the same desired potency as conventional-dose chemotherapy, with no differences in pooled ORR (RR=1.00, 95%CI [0.89, 1.13]; (P=0.97), OS (HR=1.07, 95%CI [0.90, 1.26]; P=0.44) and PFS (HR=1.02, 95%CI [0.84, 1.23]; P=0.87) values. Furthermore, pooled data for common SAEs showed that, compared with conventional-dose chemotherapy regimen, low-dose chemotherapy regimen resulted in significant less mucositis (P<0.0001), thrombocytopenia (P<0.00001), anemia (P=0.0001) and febrile neutropenia (P=0.004). At the same time, no statistically significant differences were observed with regard to treatment-related death (P=0.36), diarrhea (P=0.49), leucopenia (P=0.11), neutropenia (P=0.74) and nausea/vomiting (ʺPʺ=0.21). Publication bias was assessed by Egger’s test and the funnel plot. In conclusion, the meta-analysis seems to support the idea that low-dose chemotherapy may play an important role in achieving the same desired potency as conventional-dose chemotherapy in managing malignant tumors. Moreover, low-dose regimen seems to possess positive advantages of lower

  20. Educational mismatch and health status among foreign-born workers in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Dunlavy, A C; Garcy, A M; Rostila, M

    2016-04-01

    Foreign-born workers have been shown to experience poorer working conditions than native-born workers. Yet relationships between health and educational mismatch have been largely overlooked among foreign-born workers. This study uses objective and self-reported measures of educational mismatch to compare the prevalence of educational mismatch among native (n = 2359) and foreign-born (n = 1789) workers in Sweden and to examine associations between educational mismatch and poor self-rated health. Findings from weighted multivariate logistic regression which controlled for social position and individual-level demographic characteristics suggested that over-educated foreign-born workers had greater odds ratios for poor-self rated health compared to native-born matched workers. This association was particularly evident among men (OR = 2.14, 95% CI: 1.04-4.39) and women (OR = 2.13, 95% CI: 1.12-4.03) from countries outside of Western Europe, North America, and Australia/New Zealand. Associations between under-education and poor-self rated health were also found among women from countries outside of Western Europe, North America, and Australia/New Zealand (OR = 2.02, 95% CI: 1.27-3.18). These findings suggest that educational mismatch may be an important work-related social determinant of health among foreign-born workers. Future studies are needed to examine the effects of long-term versus short-term states of educational mismatch on health and to study relationships over time.

  1. Convergent Transmission of RNAi Guide-Target Mismatch Information across Argonaute Internal Allosteric Network

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Thomas T.; Osman, Roman

    2012-01-01

    In RNA interference, a guide strand derived from a short dsRNA such as a microRNA (miRNA) is loaded into Argonaute, the central protein in the RNA Induced Silencing Complex (RISC) that silences messenger RNAs on a sequence-specific basis. The positions of any mismatched base pairs in an miRNA determine which Argonaute subtype is used. Subsequently, the Argonaute-guide complex binds and silences complementary target mRNAs; certain Argonautes cleave the target. Mismatches between guide strand and the target mRNA decrease cleavage efficiency. Thus, loading and silencing both require that signals about the presence of a mismatched base pair are communicated from the mismatch site to effector sites. These effector sites include the active site, to prevent target cleavage; the binding groove, to modify nucleic acid binding affinity; and surface allosteric sites, to control recruitment of additional proteins to form the RISC. To examine how such signals may be propagated, we analyzed the network of internal allosteric pathways in Argonaute exhibited through correlations of residue-residue interactions. The emerging network can be described as a set of pathways emanating from the core of the protein near the active site, distributed into the bulk of the protein, and converging upon a distributed cluster of surface residues. Nucleotides in the guide strand “seed region” have a stronger relationship with the protein than other nucleotides, concordant with their importance in sequence selectivity. Finally, any of several seed region guide-target mismatches cause certain Argonaute residues to have modified correlations with the rest of the protein. This arises from the aggregation of relatively small interaction correlation changes distributed across a large subset of residues. These residues are in effector sites: the active site, binding groove, and surface, implying that direct functional consequences of guide-target mismatches are mediated through the cumulative

  2. Role of frequency mismatch in neuronal communication through coherence.

    PubMed

    Sancristóbal, Belén; Vicente, Raul; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi

    2014-10-01

    Neuronal gamma oscillations have been described in local field potentials of different brain regions of multiple species. Gamma oscillations are thought to reflect rhythmic synaptic activity organized by inhibitory interneurons. While several aspects of gamma rhythmogenesis are relatively well understood, we have much less solid evidence about how gamma oscillations contribute to information processing in neuronal circuits. One popular hypothesis states that a flexible routing of information between distant populations occurs via the control of the phase or coherence between their respective oscillations. Here, we investigate how a mismatch between the frequencies of gamma oscillations from two populations affects their interaction. In particular, we explore a biophysical model of the reciprocal interaction between two cortical areas displaying gamma oscillations at different frequencies, and quantify their phase coherence and communication efficiency. We observed that a moderate excitatory coupling between the two areas leads to a decrease in their frequency detuning, up to ∼6 Hz, with no frequency locking arising between the gamma peaks. Importantly, for similar gamma peak frequencies a zero phase difference emerges for both LFP and MUA despite small axonal delays. For increasing frequency detunings we found a significant decrease in the phase coherence (at non-zero phase lag) between the MUAs but not the LFPs of the two areas. Such difference between LFPs and MUAs behavior is due to the misalignment between the arrival of afferent synaptic currents and the local excitability windows. To test the efficiency of communication we evaluated the success of transferring rate-modulations between the two areas. Our results indicate that once two populations lock their peak frequencies, an optimal phase relation for communication appears. However, the sensitivity of locking to frequency mismatch suggests that only a precise and active control of gamma frequency could

  3. Comparison of broiler performance when fed diets containing grain from second-generation insect-protected and glyphosate-tolerant, conventional control or commercial reference corn.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M; Hartnell, G; Nemeth, M; Lucas, D; Davis, S

    2007-09-01

    Two 42-d floor pen studies were conducted to compare broiler (Ross x Ross 308) performance and carcass measurements when broilers were fed diets containing grain from either second-generation lepidopteran insect-protected corn (MON 89034; study 1) or second-generation lepidopteran combined with second-generation corn rootworm-protected and glyphosate-tolerant corn (MON 89034 x MON 88017; study 2) with those of diets containing corn grain from the conventional control and 4 conventional corn hybrids. In both studies, broilers were fed starter diets (approximately 55%, wt/wt, corn grain) from d 0 to 21 and grower-finisher diets (approximately 59%, wt/wt, corn grain) from d 21 to 42. Each study used a randomized complete block design with 6 dietary treatments assigned randomly within 5 blocks of 12 pens each (6 male and 6 female) and 10 pens per treatment group (5 male and 5 female). In study 1 (MON 89034), no treatment differences were detected among dietary treatments for feed intake, weight gain, or any measured carcass parameter. A significant difference was noted for adjusted feed conversion between MON 89034 and control birds; however, no differences were detected in individual treatment comparisons between the MON 89034 and 3 of the 4 commercial corn diets. In study 2 (MON 89034 x MON 88017), no treatment differences were observed for feed intake and most carcass parameters. When significant treatment differences were detected, no differences were observed between MON 89034 x MON 88017, its control, and 2 or more of the commercial corn diets. In each study, comparison of all parameters measured showed no differences between birds fed the test diet and the population of birds fed the control and 4 commercial corn diets. In conclusion, the test diets were nutritionally equivalent to diets containing the control and corn grain from commercial hybrids.

  4. Piezoelectric Versus Conventional Rotary Techniques for Impacted Third Molar Extraction: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qian; Qiu, Yating; Yang, Chi; Yang, Jingyun; Chen, Minjie; Zhang, Zhiyuan

    2015-10-01

    Impacted third molars are frequently encountered in clinical work. Surgical removal of impacted third molars is often required to prevent clinical symptoms. Traditional rotary cutting instruments are potentially injurious, and piezosurgery, as a new osteotomy technique, has been introduced in oral and maxillofacial surgery. No consistent conclusion has been reached regarding whether this new technique is associated with fewer or less severe postoperative sequelae after third molar extraction.The aim of this study was to compare piezosurgery with rotary osteotomy techniques, with regard to surgery time and the severity of postoperative sequelae, including pain, swelling, and trismus.We conducted a systematic literature search in the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar.The eligibility criteria of this study included the following: the patients were clearly diagnosed as having impacted mandibular third molars; the patients underwent piezosurgery osteotomy, and in the control group rotary osteotomy techniques, for removing impacted third molars; the outcomes of interest include surgery time, trismus, swelling or pain; the studies are randomized controlled trials.We used random-effects models to calculate the difference in the outcomes, and the corresponding 95% confidence interval. We calculated the weighted mean difference if the trials used the same measurement, and a standardized mean difference if otherwise.A total of seven studies met the eligibility criteria and were included in our analysis. Compared with rotary osteotomy, patients undergoing piezosurgery experienced longer surgery time (mean difference 4.13 minutes, 95% confidence interval 2.75-5.52, P < 0.0001). Patients receiving the piezoelectric technique had less swelling at postoperative days 1, 3, 5, and 7 (all Ps ≤0.023). Additionally, there was a trend of less postoperative pain and trismus in the piezosurgery groups.The number of included randomized controlled trials and the

  5. [Cognitive evoked potentials. Perspectives for mismatch negativity].

    PubMed

    Gurtubay, I G

    2009-01-01

    The techniques of cognitive evoked potentials are considered long and technically complex, which is why their use in clinical practice is not very widespread in spite of their potential utility. Recent advances in registering and analysis, together with improvement of the software managing these signals, have appreciably reduced these problems. Mismatch negativity stands out as the most promising of all the cognitive potentials due to its special characteristics regarding its generation requisites and its proven clinical utility. The fact that it can be generated without care requirements makes it especially useful for evaluating subjects with a low level of consciousness; it serves for predicting when they will emerge from a coma, amongst other uses. The incorporation of this technique into the arsenal of neurophysiological techniques for evaluating the state of these subjects will bring a substantial improvement in the evaluation of cases whose management in clinical practice is extremely complex.

  6. Alignment to natural and imposed mismatches between the senses.

    PubMed

    van der Kooij, K; Brenner, E; van Beers, R J; Schot, W D; Smeets, J B J

    2013-04-01

    Does the nervous system continuously realign the senses so that objects are seen and felt in the same place? Conflicting answers to this question have been given. Research imposing a sensory mismatch has provided evidence that the nervous system realigns the senses to reduce the mismatch. Other studies have shown that when subjects point with the unseen hand to visual targets, their end points show visual-proprioceptive biases that do not disappear after episodes of visual feedback. These biases are indicative of intersensory mismatches that the nervous system does not align for. Here, we directly compare how the nervous system deals with natural and imposed mismatches. Subjects moved a hand-held cube to virtual cubes appearing at pseudorandom locations in three-dimensional space. We alternated blocks in which subjects moved without visual feedback of the hand with feedback blocks in which we rendered a cube representing the hand-held cube. In feedback blocks, we rotated the visual feedback by 5° relative to the subject's head, creating an imposed mismatch between vision and proprioception on top of any natural mismatches. Realignment occurred quickly but was incomplete. We found more realignment to imposed mismatches than to natural mismatches. We propose that this difference is related to the way in which the visual information changed when subjects entered the experiment: the imposed mismatches were different from the mismatch in daily life, so alignment started from scratch, whereas the natural mismatches were not imposed by the experimenter, so subjects are likely to have entered the experiment partly aligned.

  7. Comparison of Piezosurgery and Conventional Rotary Instruments for Removal of Impacted Mandibular Third Molars: A Randomized Controlled Clinical and Radiographic Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shokry, Mohamed; Aboelsaad, Nayer

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the effect of the surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molars using piezosurgery versus the conventional surgical technique on postoperative sequelae and bone healing. Material and Methods. This study was carried out as a randomized controlled clinical trial: split mouth design. Twenty patients with bilateral mandibular third molar mesioangular impaction class II position B indicated for surgical extraction were treated randomly using either the piezosurgery or the conventional bur technique on each site. Duration of the procedure, postoperative edema, trismus, pain, healing, and bone density and quantity were evaluated up to 6 months postoperatively. Results. Test and control sites were compared using paired t-test. There was statistical significance in reduction of pain and swelling in test sites, where the time of the procedure was statistically increased in test site. For bone quantity and quality, statistical difference was found where test site showed better results. Conclusion. Piezosurgery technique improves quality of patient's life in form of decrease of postoperative pain, trismus, and swelling. Furthermore, it enhances bone quality within the extraction socket and bone quantity along the distal aspect of the mandibular second molar. PMID:27597866

  8. Real-time comparison of conventional direct control and pattern recognition myoelectric control in a two-dimensional Fitts' law style test.

    PubMed

    Wurth, Sophie M; Hargrove, Levi J

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have directly compared real-time control performance of pattern recognition to direct control for the next generation of myoelectric controlled upper limb prostheses. Many different implementations of pattern recognition control have been proposed, with minor differentiations in the feature sets and classifiers. An objective and generalizable evaluation tool quantifying the control performance, other than classification accuracy, is needed. This paper used the implementation of such a tool through the design of a target acquisition test, similar to a Fitts' law test, relating movement time of the target acquisition to the difficulty of the target, for a given control strategy. Performance metrics such as throughput (bits/sec), completion rate (%) and path efficiency (%) allow for a complete evaluation of the described strategies. We compared direct control and pattern recognition control with the proposed test and found that 1) the test was valid for control system evaluation by following Fitts' law with high coefficients of determination for both types of control and 2) that pattern recognition significantly outperformed direct control in throughput with similar completion rates and path efficiencies. In this framework, the present pilot study supports pattern recognition as a promising strategy and forms a basis for the development of a general and objective tool for the performance evaluation of upper limb control strategies.

  9. Identification of a mismatch-specific endonuclease in hyperthermophilic Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Ishino, Sonoko; Nishi, Yuki; Oda, Soichiro; Uemori, Takashi; Sagara, Takehiro; Takatsu, Nariaki; Yamagami, Takeshi; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2016-01-01

    The common mismatch repair system processed by MutS and MutL and their homologs was identified in Bacteria and Eukarya. However, no evidence of a functional MutS/L homolog has been reported for archaeal organisms, and it is not known whether the mismatch repair system is conserved in Archaea. Here, we describe an endonuclease that cleaves double-stranded DNA containing a mismatched base pair, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. The corresponding gene revealed that the activity originates from PF0012, and we named this enzyme Endonuclease MS (EndoMS) as the mismatch-specific Endonuclease. The sequence similarity suggested that EndoMS is the ortholog of NucS isolated from Pyrococcus abyssi, published previously. Biochemical characterizations of the EndoMS homolog from Thermococcus kodakarensis clearly showed that EndoMS specifically cleaves both strands of double-stranded DNA into 5′-protruding forms, with the mismatched base pair in the central position. EndoMS cleaves G/T, G/G, T/T, T/C and A/G mismatches, with a more preference for G/T, G/G and T/T, but has very little or no effect on C/C, A/C and A/A mismatches. The discovery of this endonuclease suggests the existence of a novel mismatch repair process, initiated by the double-strand break generated by the EndoMS endonuclease, in Archaea and some Bacteria. PMID:27001046

  10. Speaking Self-Assessment: Mismatches between Learners' and Teachers' Criteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babaii, Esmat; Taghaddomi, Shahin; Pashmforoosh, Roya

    2016-01-01

    Perceptual (mis)matches between teachers and learners are said to affect learning success or failure. Self-assessment, as a formative assessment tool, may, inter alia, be considered a means to minimize such mismatches. Therefore, the present study investigated the extent to which learners' assessment of their own speaking performance, before and…

  11. Design and analysis of mismatch probes for long oligonucleotide microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-08-15

    Nonspecific hybridization is currently a major concern with microarray technology. One of most effective approaches to estimating nonspecific hybridizations in oligonucleotide microarrays is the utilization of mismatch probes; however, this approach has not been used for longer oligonucleotide probes. Here, an oligonucleotide microarray was constructed to evaluate and optimize parameters for 50-mer mismatch probe design. A perfect match (PM) and 28 mismatch (MM) probes were designed for each of ten target genes selected from three microorganisms. The microarrays were hybridized with synthesized complementary oligonucleotide targets at different temperatures (e.g., 42, 45 and 50 C). In general, the probes with evenly distributed mismatches were more distinguishable than those with randomly distributed mismatches. MM probes with 3, 4 and 5 mismatched nucleotides were differentiated for 50-mer oligonucleotide probes hybridized at 50, 45 and 42 C, respectively. Based on the experimental data generated from this study, a modified positional dependent nearest neighbor (MPDNN) model was constructed to adjust the thermodynamic parameters of matched and mismatched dimer nucleotides in the microarray environment. The MM probes with four flexible positional mismatches were designed using the newly established MPDNN model and the experimental results demonstrated that the redesigned MM probes could yield more consistent hybridizations. Conclusions: This study provides guidance on the design of MM probes for long oligonucleotides (e.g., 50 mers). The novel MPDNN model has improved the consistency for long MM probes, and this modeling method can potentially be used for the prediction of oligonucleotide microarray hybridizations.

  12. Educational Mismatch of Graduates: A Multidimensional and Fuzzy Indicator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betti, Gianni; D'Agostino, Antonella; Neri, Laura

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we attempt to measure the educational mismatch, seen as a problem of overeducation, using a multidimensional and fuzzy methodology. Educational mismatch can be difficult to measure because many factors can converge to its definition and the traditional unidimensional indicators presented in literature can offer a restricted view of…

  13. Targeting intensive versus conventional glycaemic control for type 1 diabetes mellitus: a systematic review with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses of randomised clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Kähler, Pernille; Grevstad, Berit; Almdal, Thomas; Gluud, Christian; Wetterslev, Jørn; Vaag, Allan; Hemmingsen, Bianca

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the benefits and harms of targeting intensive versus conventional glycaemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Design A systematic review with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses of randomised clinical trials. Data sources The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded and LILACS to January 2013. Study selection Randomised clinical trials that prespecified different targets of glycaemic control in participants at any age with type 1 diabetes mellitus were included. Data extraction Two authors independently assessed studies for inclusion and extracted data. Results 18 randomised clinical trials included 2254 participants with type 1 diabetes mellitus. All trials had high risk of bias. There was no statistically significant effect of targeting intensive glycaemic control on all-cause mortality (risk ratio 1.16, 95% CI 0.65 to 2.08) or cardiovascular mortality (0.49, 0.19 to 1.24). Targeting intensive glycaemic control reduced the relative risks for the composite macrovascular outcome (0.63, 0.41 to 0.96; p=0.03), and nephropathy (0.37, 0.27 to 0.50; p<0.00001. The effect estimates of retinopathy, ketoacidosis and retinal photocoagulation were not consistently statistically significant between random and fixed effects models. The risk of severe hypoglycaemia was significantly increased with intensive glycaemic targets (1.40, 1.01 to 1.94). Trial sequential analyses showed that the amount of data needed to demonstrate a relative risk reduction of 10% were, in general, inadequate. Conclusions There was no significant effect towards improved all-cause mortality when targeting intensive glycaemic control compared with conventional glycaemic control. However, there may be beneficial effects of targeting intensive glycaemic control on the composite macrovascular outcome and on nephropathy, and detrimental effects on severe hypoglycaemia. Notably, the data for retinopathy and ketoacidosis were inconsistent

  14. Removal of N-6-methyladenine by the nucleotide excision repair pathway triggers the repair of mismatches in yeast gap-repair intermediates.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoge; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2013-12-01

    Gap-repair assays have been an important tool for studying the genetic control of homologous recombination in yeast. Sequence analysis of recombination products derived when a gapped plasmid is diverged relative to the chromosomal repair template additionally has been used to infer structures of strand-exchange intermediates. In the absence of the canonical mismatch repair pathway, mismatches present in these intermediates are expected to persist and segregate at the next round of DNA replication. In a mismatch repair defective (mlh1Δ) background, however, we have observed that recombination-generated mismatches are often corrected to generate gene conversion or restoration events. In the analyses reported here, the source of the aberrant mismatch removal during gap repair was examined. We find that most mismatch removal is linked to the methylation status of the plasmid used in the gap-repair assay. Whereas more than half of Dam-methylated plasmids had patches of gene conversion and/or restoration interspersed with unrepaired mismatches, mismatch removal was observed in less than 10% of products obtained when un-methylated plasmids were used in transformation experiments. The methylation-linked removal of mismatches in recombination intermediates was due specifically to the nucleotide excision repair pathway, with such mismatch removal being partially counteracted by glycosylases of the base excision repair pathway. These data demonstrate that nucleotide excision repair activity is not limited to bulky, helix-distorting DNA lesions, but also targets removal of very modest perturbations in DNA structure. In addition to its effects on mismatch removal, methylation reduced the overall gap-repair efficiency, but this reduction was not affected by the status of excision repair pathways. Finally, gel purification of DNA prior to transformation reduced gap-repair efficiency four-fold in a nucleotide excision repair-defective background, indicating that the collateral

  15. BARC surface property matching for negative-tone development of a conventional positive-tone photoresist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Douglas J.; Krishnamurthy, Vandana; Sullivan, Daniel M.

    2011-04-01

    The main properties controlling a successful negative-tone development (NTD) process include surface energy of the BARC or silicon hardmask, reflectivity control, and type of spin-on carbon (SOC) layer utilized. In this paper, we studied the BARC and silicon-containing hardmask properties needed to achieve successful NTD of a conventional positive-tone photoresist. The surface energy mismatch between BARC and silicon-containing hardmask poses challenges for patterning dense structures. Interaction of the SOC layer and the photoresist was observed, even with the silicon hardmask film present in between these two layers. Strict reflectivity elimination does not guarantee a successful outcome, rather precise control of reflectivity is required to enhance the overall lithographic process.

  16. PD-1 Blockade in Tumors with Mismatch-Repair Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Le, D.T.; Uram, J.N.; Wang, H.; Bartlett, B.R.; Kemberling, H.; Eyring, A.D.; Skora, A.D.; Luber, B.S.; Azad, N.S.; Laheru, D.; Biedrzycki, B.; Donehower, R.C.; Zaheer, A.; Fisher, G.A.; Crocenzi, T.S.; Lee, J.J.; Duffy, S.M.; Goldberg, R.M.; de la Chapelle, A.; Koshiji, M.; Bhaijee, F.; Huebner, T.; Hruban, R.H.; Wood, L.D.; Cuka, N.; Pardoll, D.M.; Papadopoulos, N.; Kinzler, K.W.; Zhou, S.; Cornish, T.C.; Taube, J.M.; Anders, R.A.; Eshleman, J.R.; Vogelstein, B.; Diaz, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Somatic mutations have the potential to encode “non-self” immunogenic antigens. We hypothesized that tumors with a large number of somatic mutations due to mismatch-repair defects may be susceptible to immune checkpoint blockade. METHODS We conducted a phase 2 study to evaluate the clinical activity of pembrolizumab, an anti–programmed death 1 immune checkpoint inhibitor, in 41 patients with progressive metastatic carcinoma with or without mismatch-repair deficiency. Pembrolizumab was administered intravenously at a dose of 10 mg per kilogram of body weight every 14 days in patients with mismatch repair–deficient colorectal cancers, patients with mismatch repair–proficient colorectal cancers, and patients with mismatch repair–deficient cancers that were not colorectal. The coprimary end points were the immune-related objective response rate and the 20-week immune-related progression-free survival rate. RESULTS The immune-related objective response rate and immune-related progression-free survival rate were 40% (4 of 10 patients) and 78% (7 of 9 patients), respectively, for mismatch repair–deficient colorectal cancers and 0% (0 of 18 patients) and 11% (2 of 18 patients) for mismatch repair–proficient colorectal cancers. The median progression-free survival and overall survival were not reached in the cohort with mismatch repair–deficient colorectal cancer but were 2.2 and 5.0 months, respectively, in the cohort with mismatch repair–proficient colorectal cancer (hazard ratio for disease progression or death, 0.10 [P<0.001], and hazard ratio for death, 0.22 [P = 0.05]). Patients with mismatch repair–deficient noncolorectal cancer had responses similar to those of patients with mismatch repair–deficient colorectal cancer (immune-related objective response rate, 71% [5 of 7 patients]; immune-related progression-free survival rate, 67% [4 of 6 patients]). Whole-exome sequencing revealed a mean of 1782 somatic mutations per tumor in

  17. Maladaptation and phenotypic mismatch in hatchery-reared Atlantic salmon Salmo salar released in the wild.

    PubMed

    Stringwell, R; Lock, A; Stutchbury, C J; Baggett, E; Taylor, J; Gough, P J; Garcia de Leaniz, C

    2014-12-01

    Changes in body shape, fluctuating asymmetry (FA) and crypsis were compared among Atlantic salmon Salmo salar fry kept as controls in captivity and those released and subsequently recaptured in the wild according to a before-after-control-impact (BACI) design. Hatchery fish that survived in the wild became more cryptic and displayed a much lower incidence of fin erosion and of asymmetric individuals than control fish kept in captivity. Significant differences in body shape were also apparent, and survivors had longer heads, thicker caudal peduncles and a more streamlined body shape than hatchery controls as early as 20 days following stocking, most likely as a result of phenotypic plasticity and non-random, selective mortality of maladapted phenotypes. Hatchery-reared fish typically perform poorly in the wild and the results of this study indicate that this may be due to phenotypic mismatch, i.e. because hatcheries generate fish that are phenotypically mismatched to the natural environment.

  18. A periodic table of symmetric tandem mismatches in RNA.

    PubMed

    Wu, M; McDowell, J A; Turner, D H

    1995-03-14

    The stabilities and structures of a series of RNA octamers containing symmetric tandem mismatches were studied by UV melting and imino proton NMR. The free energy increments for tandem mismatch formation are found to depend upon both mismatch sequence and adjacent base pairs. The observed sequence dependence of tandem mismatch stability is UGGU > GUUG > GAAG > or = AGGA > UUUU > CAAC > or = CUUC approximately UCCU approximately CCCC approximately ACCA approximately AAAA, and the closing base pair dependence is 5'G3'C > 5'C3'G > 5'U3'A approximately 5'A3'U. These results differ from expectations based on models used in RNA folding algorithms and from the sequence dependence observed for folding of RNA hairpins. Imino proton NMR results indicate the sequence dependence is partially due to hydrogen bonding within mismatches.

  19. Effects of an integrated Yoga Program on Self-reported Depression Scores in Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Conventional Treatment: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Raghavendra Mohan; Raghuram, Nagarathna; Nagendra, HR; Usharani, MR; Gopinath, KS; Diwakar, Ravi B; Patil, Shekar; Bilimagga, Ramesh S; Rao, Nalini

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To compare the effects of yoga program with supportive therapy on self-reported symptoms of depression in breast cancer patients undergoing conventional treatment. Patients and Methods: Ninety-eight breast cancer patients with stage II and III disease from a cancer center were randomly assigned to receive yoga (n = 45) and supportive therapy (n = 53) over a 24-week period during which they underwent surgery followed by adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) or chemotherapy (CT) or both. The study stoppage criteria was progressive disease rendering the patient bedridden or any physical musculoskeletal injury resulting from intervention or less than 60% attendance to yoga intervention. Subjects underwent yoga intervention for 60 min daily with control group undergoing supportive therapy during their hospital visits. Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI) and symptom checklist were assessed at baseline, after surgery, before, during, and after RT and six cycles of CT. We used analysis of covariance (intent-to-treat) to study the effects of intervention on depression scores and Pearson correlation analyses to evaluate the bivariate relationships. Results: A total of 69 participants contributed data to the current analysis (yoga, n = 33, and controls, n = 36). There was 29% attrition in this study. The results suggest an overall decrease in self-reported depression with time in both the groups. There was a significant decrease in depression scores in the yoga group as compared to controls following surgery, RT, and CT (P < 0.01). There was a positive correlation (P < 0.001) between depression scores with symptom severity and distress during surgery, RT, and CT. Conclusion: The results suggest possible antidepressant effects with yoga intervention in breast cancer patients undergoing conventional treatment. PMID:26009671

  20. Late, not early mismatch responses to changes in frequency are reduced or deviant in children with dyslexia: an event-related potential study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Developmental disorders of oral and written language have been linked to deficits in the processing of auditory information. However, findings have been inconsistent, both for behavioural and electrophysiological measures. Methods In this study, we examined event-related potentials (ERPs) in 20 6- to 14-year-old children with developmental dyslexia and 20 age-matched controls, divided into younger (6–11 years, n = 10) and older (11–14 years, n = 10) age bands. We focused on early (mismatch negativity; MMN) and late (late discriminative negativity; LDN) conventional mismatch responses and associated measures derived from time-frequency analysis (inter-trial coherence and event-related spectral perturbation). Responses were elicited using an auditory oddball task, whereby a stream of 1000-Hz standards was interspersed with rare large (1,200 Hz) and small (1,030 Hz) frequency deviants. Results Conventional analyses revealed no significant differences between groups in the size of the MMN to either large or small frequency deviants. However, the younger age band of children with dyslexia showed an enhanced inter-trial coherence in the theta frequency band over the time window corresponding to the MMN to small deviants. By contrast, these same children showed a reduced-amplitude LDN for the small deviants relative to their age-matched controls, whilst the older children with dyslexia showed a shorter and less intense period of event-related desynchronization over this time window. Conclusions Initial detection and discrimination of auditory frequency change appears normal or even enhanced in children with dyslexia. Rather, deficits in late-stage auditory processing appear to be a feature of this population. PMID:25110526

  1. Modeling of integrated environmental control systems for coal-fired power plants: Conventional froth flotation for the IEC coal cleaning plant model

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, E.S.

    1989-01-01

    This report describes the addition of a conventional froth flotation circuit into the FORTRAN coal cleaning module of the Integrated Environmental Control (IEC) model. The purpose of this modification is to include froth flotation as an option to clean the coal fines. The current model has three beneficiation: levels (2, 3, and 4) in which different streams are washed by specific gravity equipment. Level 2 washes only the coarse stream. Level 3 washes the coarse and medium streams. Level 4 washes the coarse, medium, and fine streams. This modification adds a fifth level, which uses specific gravity equipment to wash the coarse and medium streams and froth flotation equipment for the fine stream. The specific size fractions in each stream are specified by the model user. As before, the model optimizes the yield of each circuit in order to achieve a target coal quality for the cleaned coal product.

  2. The effects of phenological mismatches on demography

    PubMed Central

    Miller-Rushing, Abraham J.; Høye, Toke Thomas; Inouye, David W.; Post, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Climate change is altering the phenology of species across the world, but what are the consequences of these phenological changes for the demography and population dynamics of species? Time-sensitive relationships, such as migration, breeding and predation, may be disrupted or altered, which may in turn alter the rates of reproduction and survival, leading some populations to decline and others to increase in abundance. However, finding evidence for disrupted relationships, or lack thereof, and their demographic effects, is difficult because the necessary detailed observational data are rare. Moreover, we do not know how sensitive species will generally be to phenological mismatches when they occur. Existing long-term studies provide preliminary data for analysing the phenology and demography of species in several locations. In many instances, though, observational protocols may need to be optimized to characterize timing-based multi-trophic interactions. As a basis for future research, we outline some of the key questions and approaches to improving our understanding of the relationships among phenology, demography and climate in a multi-trophic context. There are many challenges associated with this line of research, not the least of which is the need for detailed, long-term data on many organisms in a single system. However, we identify key questions that can be addressed with data that already exist and propose approaches that could guide future research. PMID:20819811

  3. Investigating the effects of 6 months extended duration, in-centre nocturnal versus conventional haemodialysis treatment: a non-randomised, controlled feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Graham-Brown, Matthew P M; Preston, Robert; Pickering, Warren; McCann, Gerry P

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In-centre nocturnal haemodialysis (INHD) is an underutilised dialysis regimen that can potentially provide patients with better clinical outcomes due to extended treatment times. We have established an INHD programme within our clinical network, fulfilling a previously unmet patient need. This feasibility study aims to gather sufficient data on numerous outcome measures to inform the design of a multicentre randomised controlled trial that will establish the potential benefits of INHD and increase the availability of this service nationally and internationally. Methods and analysis This will be a non-randomised controlled study. Prevalent patients on haemodialysis (HD) will electively change from a conventional in-centre HD regimen of 4 hours thrice weekly to a regimen of extended treatment times (5–8 hours) delivered in-centre overnight thrice weekly. After recruitment of the INHD cohort, a group of patients matched for age, gender and dialysis vintage will be selected from patients remaining on a conventional daytime dialysis programme. Outcome measures will include left ventricular mass as measured by MRI, physical performance measured by the short physical performance battery and physical activity measured by accelerometry. Additionally we will measure quality of life using validated questionnaires, nutritional status by bioimpedance spectroscopy and food diaries, and blood sampling for markers of cardiovascular disease, systemic inflammation. Suitable statistical tests shall be used to analyse the data. We will use omnibus tests to observe changes over the duration of the intervention and between groups. We will also look for associations between outcome measures that may warrant further investigation. These data will be used to inform the power calculation for future studies. Ethics and dissemination A favourable opinion was granted by Northampton Research Ethics Committee (15/EM/0268). It is anticipated that results of this study will be

  4. Does ergonomic mismatch at school impact pain in school children?

    PubMed

    Brewer, J M; Davis, K G; Dunning, K K; Succop, P A

    2009-01-01

    Musculoskeletal pain in school-aged children is highly prevalent. While there are many potential factors relating to this discomfort, one unexplored factor is the ergonomic mismatch. The objective of this study was to determine whether the degree of mismatch between the body dimensions and the classroom furniture was associated with body discomfort. One hundred and thirty-nine children in a Midwestern U.S. school district participated in the study where demographic information, anthropometric measurements, self-reported regional body discomfort, and furniture measurements were collected. The results indicate an extremely high prevalence of ergonomic mismatch. Contrary to what was hypothesized, the ergonomic mismatch was not associated with body discomfort. The lack of association may have been a result of the extremely high prevalence of ergonomic mismatch as well as potential adaptations by the students. Although almost every student was found to not fit their desk and chairs, ergonomic mismatch had limited impact on the body discomfort. It appears that other factors such as backpack weight and time carrying may contribute more to the discomfort of students. However, caution is stress with regard to dismissing ergonomic mismatch factor as a potential risk factor since the extremely high prevalence may have washed out any effect.

  5. 15 CFR 742.18 - Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or... REGULATIONS CONTROL POLICY-CCL BASED CONTROLS § 742.18 Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention). States... Use of Chemical Weapons and on Their Destruction, also known as the Chemical Weapons Convention...

  6. 15 CFR 742.18 - Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or... REGULATIONS CONTROL POLICY-CCL BASED CONTROLS § 742.18 Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention). States... Use of Chemical Weapons and on Their Destruction, also known as the Chemical Weapons Convention...

  7. 15 CFR 742.18 - Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or... REGULATIONS CONTROL POLICY-CCL BASED CONTROLS § 742.18 Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention). States... Use of Chemical Weapons and on Their Destruction, also known as the Chemical Weapons Convention...

  8. 15 CFR 742.18 - Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or... REGULATIONS CONTROL POLICY-CCL BASED CONTROLS § 742.18 Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention). States... Use of Chemical Weapons and on Their Destruction, also known as the Chemical Weapons Convention...

  9. 15 CFR 742.18 - Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or... REGULATIONS CONTROL POLICY-CCL BASED CONTROLS § 742.18 Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention). States... Use of Chemical Weapons and on Their Destruction, also known as the Chemical Weapons Convention...

  10. [Effects of applying controlled-release fertilizer blended with conventional nitrogen fertilizer on Chinese cabbage yield and quality as well as nitrogen losses].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun-gang; Xu, Kai; Tong, Er-jian; Cao, Bing; Ni, Xiao-hui; Xu, Jun-xiang

    2010-12-01

    An open field experiment was conducted to study the effects of applying controlled-release fertilizer blended with rapidly available chemical N fertilizer on Chinese cabbage yield and quality as well as nitrogen losses, including ammonia volatilization and NO3- -N accumulation and leaching in Beijing suburb. The results showed that a combined application of 2:1 controlled-release fertilizer and urea fertilizer (total N rate 150 kg x hm(-2)) did not induce the reduction of Chinese cabbage yield, and decreased the leaf nitrate and organic acid contents significantly, compared with conventional urea N application (300 kg x hm(-2)), and had no significant difference in the cabbage yield and leaf nitrate content, compared with applying 150 kg x hm(-2) of urea N. The combined application of 2:1 controlled-release fertilizer and urea fertilizer improved the N use efficiency of Chinese cabbage, and reduced the ammonia volatilization and NO3- -N leaching. At harvest, the NO3- -N concentrations in 20-40, 60-80 and 80-100 cm soil layers were significantly lower in the combined application treatment than in urea N treatment.

  11. Policy makers’ viewpoints on implementation of the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control in Iran: A qualitative investigation of program facilitators

    PubMed Central

    Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Rabiei, Katayoun; Alavi, Mousa; Kelishadi, Roya; Manzouri, Leila; Abedi, Heidarali; Fereydoun-Mohaseli, Khadijeh; Azaripour-Masooleh, Hasan; Roohafza, Hamidreza; Heidari, Gholamreza

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The epidemic of smoking is a great concern of health systems. Moreover, the number of smokers is increasing worldwide and this has led to an escalating trend of morbidity, mortality, and burden of smoking-related diseases. Therefore, monitoring the implementation of tobacco control laws in different countries is of extreme importance. This study aimed to describe policy makers’ experiences and perceptions of the facilitating factors of the implementation of the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC) in Iran. METHODS This was a qualitative research in which data were collected through individual interviews. The participants included policy makers who were members of the national assembly for tobacco control. In this study, 13 unstructured interviews of about 45 to 60 minutes duration were conducted in an extrapolative manner. The qualitative content analysis method was applied until extrapolation of basic themes was complete. RESULTS As a result of the analysis, the themes of performance through training, through research, through intersectoral collaboration, and through setting priorities emerged. The emerged themes connote some critical points that have key roles in promoting the effective implementation of the WHO FCTC. Furthermore, the main role of the health sector becomes predominant. CONCLUSION The study findings suggested the managed and coordinated work as one of the main facilitating factors of the implementation of the WHO FCTC at a national level. PMID:27429629

  12. Day and night glycaemic control with a bionic pancreas versus conventional insulin pump therapy in preadolescent children with type 1 diabetes: a randomised crossover trial

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Steven J; Hillard, Mallory A; Balliro, Courtney; Magyar, Kendra L; Selagamsetty, Rajendranath; Sinha, Manasi; Grennan, Kerry; Mondesir, Debbie; Ehklaspour, Laya; Zheng, Hui; Damiano, Edward R; El-Khatib, Firas H

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background The safety and efficacy of continuous, multiday, automated glycaemic management has not been tested in outpatient studies of preadolescent children with type 1 diabetes. We aimed to compare the safety and efficacy of a bihormonal bionic pancreas versus conventional insulin pump therapy in this population of patients in an outpatient setting. Methods In this randomised, open-label, crossover study, we enrolled preadolescent children (aged 6–11 years) with type 1 diabetes (diagnosed for ≥1 year) who were on insulin pump therapy, from two diabetes camps in the USA. With the use of sealed envelopes, participants were randomly assigned in blocks of two to either 5 days with the bionic pancreas or conventional insulin pump therapy (control) as the first intervention, followed by a 3 day washout period and then 5 days with the other intervention. Study allocation was not masked. The autonomously adaptive algorithm of the bionic pancreas received data from a continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) device to control subcutaneous delivery of insulin and glucagon. Conventional insulin pump therapy was administered by the camp physicians and other clinical staff in accordance with their established protocols; participants also wore a CGM device during the control period. The coprimary outcomes, analysed by intention to treat, were mean CGM-measured glucose concentration and the proportion of time with a CGM-measured glucose concentration below 3·3 mmol/L, on days 2–5. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02105324. Findings Between July 20, and Aug 19, 2014, 19 children with a mean age of 9·8 years (SD 1·6) participated in and completed the study. The bionic pancreas period was associated with a lower mean CGM-measured glucose concentration on days 2–5 than was the control period (7·6 mmol/L [SD 0·6] vs 9·3 mmol/L [1·7]; p=0·00037) and a lower proportion of time with a CGM-measured glucose concentration below 3·3 mmol/L on

  13. Concomitant use of FSH and low-dose recombinant hCG during the late follicular phase versus conventional controlled ovarian stimulation for intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles.

    PubMed

    Iaconelli, Carla Andrade Rebello; Setti, Amanda Souza; Braga, Daniela Paes Almeida Ferreira; Maldonado, Luiz Guilherme Louzada; Iaconelli, Assumpto; Borges, Edson; Aoki, Tsutomu

    2017-03-22

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of low-dose hCG supplementation on ICSI outcomes and controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) cost. Three hundred and thirty patients undergoing ICSI were split into groups according to the COS protocol: (i) control group (n = 178), including patients undergoing conventional COS treatment; and (ii) low-dose hCG group (n = 152), including patients undergoing COS with low-dose hCG supplementation. Lower mean total doses of FSH administered and higher mean oestradiol level and mature oocyte rates were observed in the low-dose hCG group. A significantly higher fertilization rate, high-quality embryo rate and blastocyst formation rate were observed in the low-dose hCG group as compared to the control group. The miscarriage rate was significantly higher in the control group compared to the low-dose hCG group. A significantly lower incidence of OHSS was observed in the low-dose hCG group. There was also a significantly lower gonadotropin cost in the low-dose hCG group as compared to the control group ($1235.0 ± 239.0×$1763.0 ± 405.3, p < 0.001). The concomitant use of low-dose hCG and FSH results in a lower abortion rate and increased number of mature oocytes retrieved, as well as improved oocyte quality, embryo quality and blastocyst formation and reduced FSH requirements.

  14. Pilot Quasi-Randomized Controlled Study of Herbal Medicine Hochuekkito as an Adjunct to Conventional Treatment for Progressed Pulmonary Mycobacterium avium Complex Disease

    PubMed Central

    Enomoto, Yasunori; Hagiwara, Eri; Komatsu, Shigeru; Nishihira, Ryuichi; Baba, Tomohisa; Kitamura, Hideya; Sekine, Akimasa; Nakazawa, Atsuhito; Ogura, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Hochuekkito, a traditional herbal medicine, is occasionally prescribed in Japan to treat patients with a poor general condition. We aimed to examine whether this medicine was beneficial and tolerable for patients with progressed pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) disease. Methods This pilot open-label quasi-randomized controlled trial enrolled 18 patients with progressed pulmonary MAC disease who had initiated antimycobacterial treatment over one year ago but were persistently culture-positive or intolerant. All patients continued their baseline treatment regimens with (n = 9) or without (n = 9) oral Hochuekkito for 24 weeks. Results Baseline characteristics were generally similar between the groups. Most patients were elderly (median age 70 years), female, had a low body mass index (<20 kg/m2), and a long-term disease duration (median approximately 8 years). After the 24-week treatment period, no patient achieved sputum conversion. Although the number of colonies in sputum tended to increase in the control group, it generally remained stable in the Hochuekkito group. Radiological disease control was frequently observed in the Hochuekkito group than the control group (8/9 vs. 3/9; p = 0.05). Patients in the Hochuekkito group tended to experience increase in body weight and serum albumin level compared with those in the control group (median body weight change: +0.4 kg vs. −0.8 kg; median albumin change: +0.2 g/dl vs. ±0.0 g/dl). No severe adverse events occurred. Conclusions Hochuekkito could be an effective, feasible adjunct to conventional therapy for patients with progressed pulmonary MAC disease. Future study is needed to explore this possibility. Trial Registration UMIN Clinical Trials Registry UMIN000009920 PMID:25093868

  15. Animal Assisted Therapy (AAT) Program As a Useful Adjunct to Conventional Psychosocial Rehabilitation for Patients with Schizophrenia: Results of a Small-scale Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Paula; Fortuny, Joan R; Guzmán, Sergio; Macías, Cristina; Bowen, Jonathan; García, María L; Orejas, Olivia; Molins, Ferran; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Cerón, José J; Bulbena, Antoni; Fatjó, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    Currently, one of the main objectives of human-animal interaction research is to demonstrate the benefits of animal assisted therapy (AAT) for specific profiles of patients or participants. The aim of this study is to assess the effect of an AAT program as an adjunct to a conventional 6-month psychosocial rehabilitation program for people with schizophrenia. Our hypothesis is that the inclusion of AAT into psychosocial rehabilitation would contribute positively to the impact of the overall program on symptomology and quality of life, and that AAT would be a positive experience for patients. To test these hypotheses, we compared pre-program with post-program scores for the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and the EuroQoL-5 dimensions questionnaire (EuroQol-5D), pre-session with post-session salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase for the last four AAT sessions, and adherence rates between different elements of the program. We conducted a randomized, controlled study in a psychiatric care center in Spain. Twenty-two institutionalized patients with chronic schizophrenia completed the 6-month rehabilitation program, which included individual psychotherapy, group therapy, a functional program (intended to improve daily functioning), a community program (intended to facilitate community reintegration) and a family program. Each member of the control group (n = 8) participated in one activity from a range of therapeutic activities that were part of the functional program. In place of this functional program activity, the AAT-treatment group (n = 14) participated in twice-weekly 1-h sessions of AAT. All participants received the same weekly total number of hours of rehabilitation. At the end of the program, both groups (control and AAT-treatment) showed significant improvements in positive and overall symptomatology, as measured with PANSS, but only the AAT-treatment group showed a significant improvement in negative symptomatology. Adherence to the AAT

  16. Animal Assisted Therapy (AAT) Program As a Useful Adjunct to Conventional Psychosocial Rehabilitation for Patients with Schizophrenia: Results of a Small-scale Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Paula; Fortuny, Joan R.; Guzmán, Sergio; Macías, Cristina; Bowen, Jonathan; García, María L.; Orejas, Olivia; Molins, Ferran; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Cerón, José J.; Bulbena, Antoni; Fatjó, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    Currently, one of the main objectives of human–animal interaction research is to demonstrate the benefits of animal assisted therapy (AAT) for specific profiles of patients or participants. The aim of this study is to assess the effect of an AAT program as an adjunct to a conventional 6–month psychosocial rehabilitation program for people with schizophrenia. Our hypothesis is that the inclusion of AAT into psychosocial rehabilitation would contribute positively to the impact of the overall program on symptomology and quality of life, and that AAT would be a positive experience for patients. To test these hypotheses, we compared pre–program with post–program scores for the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and the EuroQoL-5 dimensions questionnaire (EuroQol-5D), pre–session with post–session salivary cortisol and alpha–amylase for the last four AAT sessions, and adherence rates between different elements of the program. We conducted a randomized, controlled study in a psychiatric care center in Spain. Twenty–two institutionalized patients with chronic schizophrenia completed the 6–month rehabilitation program, which included individual psychotherapy, group therapy, a functional program (intended to improve daily functioning), a community program (intended to facilitate community reintegration) and a family program. Each member of the control group (n = 8) participated in one activity from a range of therapeutic activities that were part of the functional program. In place of this functional program activity, the AAT–treatment group (n = 14) participated in twice–weekly 1–h sessions of AAT. All participants received the same weekly total number of hours of rehabilitation. At the end of the program, both groups (control and AAT–treatment) showed significant improvements in positive and overall symptomatology, as measured with PANSS, but only the AAT–treatment group showed a significant improvement in negative symptomatology

  17. Mismatch repair genes in renal cortical neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Baiyee, Daniel; Banner, Barbara

    2006-02-01

    Mutation of human mutL homolog 1 (MLH-1) and human mutS homolog 2 (MSH-2) has been linked with the pathogenesis of colorectal carcinoma in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer syndrome and other carcinomas. Mutations of these genes in renal cell carcinomas were recently described. The aim of this study was to examine the expression of MLH-1 and MSH-2 in renal cortical neoplasms of various histological types by immunohistochemistry. Thirty-eight (n = 38) resected renal tumors were obtained from the surgical pathology files of the UMass Memorial Healthcare, including clear cell carcinomas (CLEARs, n = 20), papillary carcinomas (PAPs, n = 8), chromophobe carcinomas (CHRs, n = 4), and oncocytomas (ONCs, n = 6). Positive immunostaining for MLH-1 and MSH-2 was graded by the number of positive tumor cell nuclei, as follows: 0, negative; 1, up to one third of positive nuclei; 2, one to two thirds positive; and 3, greater than two thirds positive. Loss of MLH-1 or MSH-2 was defined as a tumor with grade 0 or 1, compared with the normal tubules. Normal tubules and intercalated ducts contained cells positive for MLH-1 and MSH-2 in all cases. For both antibodies, positive staining in tumors ranged from grade 1 to 3 in the CLEAR and PAP but was only grade 2 to 3 in the CHR and ONC. Loss of MLH-1 and/or MSH-2 occurred in malignant tumors but not in ONC. Loss of MLH-1 was present in 8 (40%) of 20 CLEARs and 4 (50%) of 8 PAPs, compared with loss of MSH-2 in 4 (20%) of 20 CLEARs and 1 (25%) of 4 CHRs. Our results suggest that loss of mismatch repair genes is involved in the malignant transformation in some renal carcinomas, particularly those derived from the proximal tubules.

  18. [Avoidance of patient-prosthesis mismatch].

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Y; Hashimoto, K

    2006-04-01

    To minimize the incidence of patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM), we have routinely adopted aortic root enlargement to avoid PPM for patients with small aortic annulus. The aim of this study was to review our strategy of avoiding PPM. The Carpentier-Edwards Perimount (CEP) valves were implanted in 53 patients who were mostly aged over 65 and the St. Jude Medical (SJM) mechanical valves were used in 128 patients aged under 65. A standard 21-mm SJM valve was used in only 3 patients and no 19-mm valves were employed. However, 19-mm CEP valves were used in 12 patients with a small body surface area (1.43 +/- 0.14 m2). Of these, 26 patients (14.4%) who had a small aortic annulus and 24 patients aged under 65 underwent aortic root enlargement. No patient receiving an SJM valve had an projected indexed effective orifice area (EOAI) < or = 0.85 cm2/m2 because of performing aortic valve replacement (AVR) with annular enlargement and only 2 (3.8%) out of 53 patients receiving CEP valves developed PPM. Consequently, the prevalence of PPM was 1.1% in this series. The prevalence of PPM was low in patients over 65 years old with a relatively small body size who received bioprosthetic valves. A pericardial bioprosthesis was considered to be an appropriate valve in older population with regard to avoiding PPM. In patients under 65 years old with a small annulus, the first choice for avoiding PPM is aortic annular enlargement, which may be avoided by high performance mechanical valves with larger EOA.

  19. Comparative effectiveness of a complex Ayurvedic treatment and conventional standard care in osteoarthritis of the knee – study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Traditional Indian Ayurvedic medicine uses complex treatment approaches, including manual therapies, lifestyle and nutritional advice, dietary supplements, medication, yoga, and purification techniques. Ayurvedic strategies are often used to treat osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee; however, no systematic data are available on their effectiveness in comparison with standard care. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of complex Ayurvedic treatment in comparison with conventional methods of treating OA symptoms in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Methods and design In a prospective, multicenter, randomized controlled trial, 150 patients between 40 and 70 years, diagnosed with osteoarthritis of the knee, following American College of Rheumatology criteria and an average pain intensity of ≥40 mm on a 100 mm visual analog scale in the affected knee at baseline will be randomized into two groups. In the Ayurveda group, treatment will include tailored combinations of manual treatments, massages, dietary and lifestyle advice, consideration of selected foods, nutritional supplements, yoga posture advice, and knee massage. Patients in the conventional group will receive self-care advice, pain medication, weight-loss advice (if overweight), and physiotherapy following current international guidelines. Both groups will receive 15 treatment sessions over 12 weeks. Outcomes will be evaluated after 6 and 12 weeks and 6 and 12 months. The primary endpoint is a change in the score on the Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) after 12 weeks. Secondary outcome measurements will use WOMAC subscales, a pain disability index, a visual analog scale for pain and sleep quality, a pain experience scale, a quality-of-life index, a profile of mood states, and Likert scales for patient satisfaction, patient diaries, and safety. Using an adapted PRECIS scale, the trial was identified as lying mainly in the middle of the efficacy

  20. Surface reconstruction: An effective method for the growth of mismatched materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yu; Zheng, Beining; Wu, Xiaofeng; Yuan, Long; Wu, Jie; Guo, Hongping; Huang, Keke; Feng, Shouhua

    2016-01-01

    The crystalline quality of epitaxial films depends on the degree of lattice match between substrates and films. Here, we report a growth strategy for large mismatched epi-films to grow GaSb films on Si(1 1 1) substrates. The epitaxial strategy can be influenced by controlling the surface reconstructions of Sb-treated Si(1 1 1). The film with the best quality was grown on Si(1 1 1)-(5⿿3 ÿ 5⿿3)-Sb surface due to the stress release and the formation of a self-assembled 2D fishbone structure. Controlled surface engineering provides an effective pathway towards the growth of the large mismatched materials.

  1. A direct current superconducting quantum interference device gradiometer with a digital signal processor controlled flux-locked loop and comparison with a conventional analog feedback scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, P.J.; Bracht, R.R.; Flynn, E.R.; Lewis, P.S.

    1996-01-01

    A double-washer dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) gradiometer with a flux-locked loop (FLL) based on a digital signal processor (DSP) has been developed for biomagnetic applications. All of the analog electronics in the conventional FLL are replaced and implemented by the DSP except for the low-noise field-effect transistor preamplifier at the front end of the signal recovery components. The DSP performs the signal demodulation by synchronously sampling the recovered signals and applying the appropriate full wave rectification. The signals are then integrated, filtered, and applied to the output. At 4.2 K, the white flux noise of the gradiometer measured in a DSP FLL mode is about 4{mu}{phi}{sub 0}/{radical}Hz and the noise at 1 Hz is 13 {mu}{phi}{sub 0}/{radical}Hz. The corresponding noise levels in the gradiometer operated by the conventional FLL are 1.8 and 3{mu}{phi}{sub 0}/{radical}Hz. The poorer system performance in the DSP FLL compared to the analog FLL is mainly caused by the ambient field noise and interference signals picked up through the connecting cables. Additional noise is also added to the overall noise floor by the instruments employed in the DSP system in the present prototype setup. Further improvement in the noise characteristics and the dynamic behavior of the DSP SQUID gradiometer is expected when a better configuration of DSP with the associated I/O devices is implemented. Additional improvements of the DSP programs are expected by incorporating higher-order integration, adaptive control, and noise reduction schemes. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Predicting survival in heart failure case and control subjects by use of fully automated methods for deriving nonlinear and conventional indices of heart rate dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, K. K.; Moody, G. B.; Peng, C. K.; Mietus, J. E.; Larson, M. G.; Levy, D.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite much recent interest in quantification of heart rate variability (HRV), the prognostic value of conventional measures of HRV and of newer indices based on nonlinear dynamics is not universally accepted. METHODS AND RESULTS: We have designed algorithms for analyzing ambulatory ECG recordings and measuring HRV without human intervention, using robust methods for obtaining time-domain measures (mean and SD of heart rate), frequency-domain measures (power in the bands of 0.001 to 0.01 Hz [VLF], 0.01 to 0.15 Hz [LF], and 0.15 to 0.5 Hz [HF] and total spectral power [TP] over all three of these bands), and measures based on nonlinear dynamics (approximate entropy [ApEn], a measure of complexity, and detrended fluctuation analysis [DFA], a measure of long-term correlations). The study population consisted of chronic congestive heart failure (CHF) case patients and sex- and age-matched control subjects in the Framingham Heart Study. After exclusion of technically inadequate studies and those with atrial fibrillation, we used these algorithms to study HRV in 2-hour ambulatory ECG recordings of 69 participants (mean age, 71.7+/-8.1 years). By use of separate Cox proportional-hazards models, the conventional measures SD (P<.01), LF (P<.01), VLF (P<.05), and TP (P<.01) and the nonlinear measure DFA (P<.05) were predictors of survival over a mean follow-up period of 1.9 years; other measures, including ApEn (P>.3), were not. In multivariable models, DFA was of borderline predictive significance (P=.06) after adjustment for the diagnosis of CHF and SD. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate that HRV analysis of ambulatory ECG recordings based on fully automated methods can have prognostic value in a population-based study and that nonlinear HRV indices may contribute prognostic value to complement traditional HRV measures.

  3. Efficacy and safety of femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery versus conventional phacoemulsification for cataract: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoyun; Xiao, Wei; Ye, Shaobi; Chen, Weirong; Liu, Yizhi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) versus conventional phacoemulsification cataract surgery (CPCS) in the treatment of cataract. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were searched in PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Nine qualified studies with a total of 989 eyes were included. Compared with CPCS, FLACS significantly reduced mean phaco energy and effective phacoemulsification time (EPT) required in the surgery. Central corneal thickness (CCT) was significantly lower in FLACS at 1 day of follow-up, but CCT and corneal endothelial cells count was comparable at 1 week of follow-up or longer. FLACS achieved a better visual outcome at postoperative 1 week and 6 months, but the difference was not significant at postoperative 1–3 months. Regard to surgical complications, the incidences of intraoperative anterior capsule tear, postoperative macular edema and elevated intraocular pressure were similar. In conclusion, femtosecond laser pretreatment can reduce phaco energy and EPT, which may reduce the heat damage to ocular tissues by ultrasound. This novel technique might be beneficial for patients with dense cataract and/or low preoperative endothelial cell values. Well-designed RCTs with longer follow-up are still necessary to provide more reliable evidence. PMID:26269445

  4. Design of exceptionally strong and conductive Cu alloys beyond the conventional speculation via the interfacial energy-controlled dispersion of γ-Al2O3 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Han, Seung Zeon; Kim, Kwang Ho; Kang, Joonhee; Joh, Hongrae; Kim, Sang Min; Ahn, Jee Hyuk; Lee, Jehyun; Lim, Sung Hwan; Han, Byungchan

    2015-11-30

    The development of Cu-based alloys with high-mechanical properties (strength, ductility) and electrical conductivity plays a key role over a wide range of industrial applications. Successful design of the materials, however, has been rare due to the improvement of mutually exclusive properties as conventionally speculated. In this paper, we demonstrate that these contradictory material properties can be improved simultaneously if the interfacial energies of heterogeneous interfaces are carefully controlled. We uniformly disperse γ-Al2O3 nanoparticles over Cu matrix, and then we controlled atomic level morphology of the interface γ-Al2O3//Cu by adding Ti solutes. It is shown that the Ti dramatically drives the interfacial phase transformation from very irregular to homogeneous spherical morphologies resulting in substantial enhancement of the mechanical property of Cu matrix. Furthermore, the Ti removes impurities (O and Al) in the Cu matrix by forming oxides leading to recovery of the electrical conductivity of pure Cu. We validate experimental results using TEM and EDX combined with first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations, which all consistently poise that our materials are suitable for industrial applications.

  5. Design of exceptionally strong and conductive Cu alloys beyond the conventional speculation via the interfacial energy-controlled dispersion of γ-Al2O3 nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zeon Han, Seung; Kim, Kwang Ho; Kang, Joonhee; Joh, Hongrae; Kim, Sang Min; Ahn, Jee Hyuk; Lee, Jehyun; Lim, Sung Hwan; Han, Byungchan

    2015-01-01

    The development of Cu-based alloys with high-mechanical properties (strength, ductility) and electrical conductivity plays a key role over a wide range of industrial applications. Successful design of the materials, however, has been rare due to the improvement of mutually exclusive properties as conventionally speculated. In this paper, we demonstrate that these contradictory material properties can be improved simultaneously if the interfacial energies of heterogeneous interfaces are carefully controlled. We uniformly disperse γ-Al2O3 nanoparticles over Cu matrix, and then we controlled atomic level morphology of the interface γ-Al2O3//Cu by adding Ti solutes. It is shown that the Ti dramatically drives the interfacial phase transformation from very irregular to homogeneous spherical morphologies resulting in substantial enhancement of the mechanical property of Cu matrix. Furthermore, the Ti removes impurities (O and Al) in the Cu matrix by forming oxides leading to recovery of the electrical conductivity of pure Cu. We validate experimental results using TEM and EDX combined with first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations, which all consistently poise that our materials are suitable for industrial applications. PMID:26616045

  6. Design of exceptionally strong and conductive Cu alloys beyond the conventional speculation via the interfacial energy-controlled dispersion of γ-Al2O3 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeon Han, Seung; Kim, Kwang Ho; Kang, Joonhee; Joh, Hongrae; Kim, Sang Min; Ahn, Jee Hyuk; Lee, Jehyun; Lim, Sung Hwan; Han, Byungchan

    2015-11-01

    The development of Cu-based alloys with high-mechanical properties (strength, ductility) and electrical conductivity plays a key role over a wide range of industrial applications. Successful design of the materials, however, has been rare due to the improvement of mutually exclusive properties as conventionally speculated. In this paper, we demonstrate that these contradictory material properties can be improved simultaneously if the interfacial energies of heterogeneous interfaces are carefully controlled. We uniformly disperse γ-Al2O3 nanoparticles over Cu matrix, and then we controlled atomic level morphology of the interface γ-Al2O3//Cu by adding Ti solutes. It is shown that the Ti dramatically drives the interfacial phase transformation from very irregular to homogeneous spherical morphologies resulting in substantial enhancement of the mechanical property of Cu matrix. Furthermore, the Ti removes impurities (O and Al) in the Cu matrix by forming oxides leading to recovery of the electrical conductivity of pure Cu. We validate experimental results using TEM and EDX combined with first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations, which all consistently poise that our materials are suitable for industrial applications.

  7. Communication in the Home and Classroom: Match or Mismatch?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iglesias, Aquiles

    1985-01-01

    The article examines variations in communication of cultural-linguistic minority children at home and in school and describes a communicative match/mismatch model. Implications of educational policy and program development are noted. (CL)

  8. [Moving sound source discrimination in humans (mismatch negativity and psychophysics)].

    PubMed

    Vasilenko, Iu A; Shestopalova, L B

    2010-01-01

    Ability to discriminate the moving sound sources with different dynamic properties was studied in humans. The auditory motion was simulated by introducing variable interaural time differences into the deviant stimuli. The electrophysiological experiment explored mismatch negativity elicited by the abrupt sound shift taken as deviant against gradual sound motion taken as standard. The psychoacoustic procedure revealed that these stimuli were not differentiated behaviorally. Nevertheless, the significant mismatch negativities were obtained. It was also established that the mismatch negativity was not influenced by the direction of sound motion. The results obtained are discussed from the point of view of actual theories of moving sound localization. The findings are in line with the hypothesis that mismatch negativity should not be considered as a direct index of behavioral discrimination accuracy.

  9. Identifying Mismatches in Alignments of Large Anatomical Ontologies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Songmao; Bodenreider, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to propose a model of matching errors for identifying mismatches in alignments of large anatomical ontologies. Methods: Three approaches to identifying mismatches are utilized: 1) lexical, based on the presence of modifiers in the names of the concepts aligned; 2) structural, identifying conflicting relations resulting from the alignment; and 3) semantic, based on disjoint top-level categories across ontologies. Results: 83% of the potential mismatches identified by the HMatch system are identified by at least one of the approaches. Conclusions: Although not a substitute for a careful validation of the matches, these approaches significantly reduce the need for manual validation by effectively characterizing most mismatches. PMID:18693957

  10. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics of strength-mismatching

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, D.M.; Ganti, S.; McClintock, F.A.

    1996-12-31

    Approximate solutions to stress-fields are provided for a strength-mismatched interface crack in small-scale yielding (SSY) for non-hardening and low hardening materials. Variations of local deformation intensities, characterized by a J-type contour integral, are proposed. The softer material experiences a higher deformation intensity level, J{sub S}, while the harder material sees a much lower deformation intensity level, J{sub H}, compared to that obtained from the applied J near the respective homogeneous crack-tips. For a low hardening material, the stress fields are obtained by scaling from an elastic/perfectly-plastic problem, based on an effective mismatch, M{sub eff}, which is a function of mismatch, M, and the hardening exponent, n. Triaxial stress build-up is discussed quantitatively in terms of M. The influence of strength-mismatch on cleavage fracture is discussed using Weibull statistics.

  11. Hemangioma of the tongue demonstrating a perfusion blood pool mismatch

    SciTech Connect

    Front, D.; Groshar, D.; Israel, O.; Robinson, E.

    1986-02-01

    Perfusion blood pool mismatch using Tc-99m labeled red blood cells (RBCs) in a hemangioma of the tongue is described. The method is useful in the evaluation of size of the residual blood pool after irradiation of the tumor.

  12. Heterodyne detection with mismatch correction based on array detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hongzhou; Li, Guoqiang; Yang, Ruofu; Yang, Chunping; Ao, Mingwu

    2016-07-01

    Based on an array detector, a new heterodyne detection system, which can correct the mismatches of amplitude and phase between signal and local oscillation (LO) beams, is presented in this paper. In the light of the fact that, for a heterodyne signal, there is a certain phase difference between the adjacent two samples of analog-to-digital converter (ADC), we propose to correct the spatial phase mismatch by use of the time-domain phase difference. The corrections can be realized by shifting the output sequences acquired from the detector elements in the array, and the steps of the shifting depend on the quantity of spatial phase mismatch. Numerical calculations of heterodyne efficiency are conducted to confirm the excellent performance of our system. Being different from previous works, our system needs not extra optical devices, so it provides probably an effective means to ease the problem resulted from the mismatches.

  13. Heterodyne detection with mismatch correction base on array detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongzhou, Dong; Guoqiang, Li; Ruofu, Yang; Chunping, Yang; Mingwu, Ao

    2016-07-01

    Based on an array detector, a new heterodyne detection system, which can correct the mismatches of amplitude and phase between signal and local oscillation (LO) beams, is presented in this paper. In the light of the fact that, for a heterodyne signal, there is a certain phase difference between the adjacent two samples of analog-to-digital converter (ADC), we propose to correct the spatial phase mismatch by use of the time-domain phase difference. The corrections can be realized by shifting the output sequences acquired from the detector elements in the array, and the steps of the shifting depend on the quantity of spatial phase mismatch. Numerical calculations of heterodyne efficiency are conducted to confirm the excellent performance of our system. Being different from previous works, our system needs not extra optical devices, so it provides probably an effective means to ease the problem resulted from the mismatches.

  14. Interaction between Mismatch Repair and Genetic Recombination in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Alani, E.; Reenan, RAG.; Kolodner, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a set of genes that show strong amino acid sequence similarity to MutS and MutL, proteins required for mismatch repair in Escherichia coli. We examined the role of MSH2 and PMS1, yeast homologs of mutS and mutL, respectively, in the repair of base pair mismatches formed during meiotic recombination. By using specifically marked HIS4 and ARG4 alleles, we showed that msh2 mutants displayed a severe defect in the repair of all base pair mismatches as well as 1-, 2- and 4-bp insertion/deletion mispairs. The msh2 and pms1 phenotypes were indistinguishable, suggesting that the wild-type gene products act in the same repair pathway. A comparison of gene conversion events in wild-type and msh2 mutants indicated that mismatch repair plays an important role in genetic recombination. (1) Tetrad analysis at five different loci revealed that, in msh2 mutants, the majority of aberrant segregants displayed a sectored phenotype, consistent with a failure to repair mismatches created during heteroduplex formation. In wild type, base pair mismatches were almost exclusively repaired toward conversion rather than restoration. (2) In msh2 strains 10-19% of the aberrant tetrads were Ab4:4. (3) Polarity gradients at HIS4 and ARG4 were nearly abolished in msh2 mutants. The frequency of gene conversion at the 3' end of these genes was increased and was nearly the frequency observed at the 5' end. (4) Co-conversion studies were consistent with mismatch repair acting to regulate heteroduplex DNA tract length. We favor a model proposing that recombination events occur through the formation and resolution of heteroduplex intermediates and that mismatch repair proteins specifically interact with recombination enzymes to regulate the length of symmetric heteroduplex DNA. PMID:8056309

  15. The Effect of Basepair Mismatch on DNA Strand Displacement.

    PubMed

    Broadwater, D W Bo; Kim, Harold D

    2016-04-12

    DNA strand displacement is a key reaction in DNA homologous recombination and DNA mismatch repair and is also heavily utilized in DNA-based computation and locomotion. Despite its ubiquity in science and engineering, sequence-dependent effects of displacement kinetics have not been extensively characterized. Here, we measured toehold-mediated strand displacement kinetics using single-molecule fluorescence in the presence of a single basepair mismatch. The apparent displacement rate varied significantly when the mismatch was introduced in the invading DNA strand. The rate generally decreased as the mismatch in the invader was encountered earlier in displacement. Our data indicate that a single base pair mismatch in the invader stalls branch migration and displacement occurs via direct dissociation of the destabilized incumbent strand from the substrate strand. We combined both branch migration and direct dissociation into a model, which we term the concurrent displacement model, and used the first passage time approach to quantitatively explain the salient features of the observed relationship. We also introduce the concept of splitting probabilities to justify that the concurrent model can be simplified into a three-step sequential model in the presence of an invader mismatch. We expect our model to become a powerful tool to design DNA-based reaction schemes with broad functionality.

  16. Replication infidelity via a mismatch with Watson-Crick geometry.

    PubMed

    Bebenek, Katarzyna; Pedersen, Lars C; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2011-02-01

    In describing the DNA double helix, Watson and Crick suggested that "spontaneous mutation may be due to a base occasionally occurring in one of its less likely tautomeric forms." Indeed, among many mispairing possibilities, either tautomerization or ionization of bases might allow a DNA polymerase to insert a mismatch with correct Watson-Crick geometry. However, despite substantial progress in understanding the structural basis of error prevention during polymerization, no DNA polymerase has yet been shown to form a natural base-base mismatch with Watson-Crick-like geometry. Here we provide such evidence, in the form of a crystal structure of a human DNA polymerase λ variant poised to misinsert dGTP opposite a template T. All atoms needed for catalysis are present at the active site and in positions that overlay with those for a correct base pair. The mismatch has Watson-Crick geometry consistent with a tautomeric or ionized base pair, with the pH dependence of misinsertion consistent with the latter. The results support the original idea that a base substitution can originate from a mismatch having Watson-Crick geometry, and they suggest a common catalytic mechanism for inserting a correct and an incorrect nucleotide. A second structure indicates that after misinsertion, the now primer-terminal G • T mismatch is also poised for catalysis but in the wobble conformation seen in other studies, indicating the dynamic nature of the pathway required to create a mismatch in fully duplex DNA.

  17. Effectiveness of Peer Group and Conventional Method (Dentist) of Oral Health Education Programme Among 12-15 year Old School Children - A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Abhishek; Raju, Rekha; Bashyam, Mamtha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Oral Health Education (OHE) in schools is routinely delivered by the dentist. Another approach which can be cost-effective, easily accessible and equally effective is the trained group of peer students. Aim The objective of the present study was to assess and compare the effectiveness of peer–led and conventional method (dentist-led), OHE on oral health status, oral health knowledge, attitude and practices among 12-15 year old government school children in Bengaluru South Zone-I at baseline, 3 months and 6 months. Materials and Methods The study population comprised of 450 subjects, 150 each in peer, dentist and control group. At baseline, a pre-tested 14 item questionnaire was used to assess the existing oral health knowledge, attitude and oral hygiene practices of the subjects. Clinical examination included recording of plaque index and gingival index, by a pre-calibrated examiner. OHE was provided by the peer group and dentist (using power-point presentation, chalk and talk presentation, using charts, posters, booklets and tooth brushing demonstration models). Data was analyzed using Kruskal Wallis and Chi-square test. Results Both the peer-led and dentist-led OHE intervention were effective in improving oral health knowledge, attitude, oral hygiene practices and oral health status at three and six months when compared to control group. The adolescents in the peer-led group, however, exhibited statistically better oral health behavior than their counterparts in the dentist-led group and control group. Conclusion The two educator-led strategies (peer group and dentist) had a modest effect on the outcome variables included in the study, the results provide some evidence to show that the peer-led strategy may provide a feasible and almost equally effective alternative to the traditional dentist led strategy of oral health education. PMID:27437345

  18. SEATCA Tobacco Industry Interference Index: a tool for measuring implementation of WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control Article 5.3

    PubMed Central

    Assunta, Mary; Dorotheo, E Ulysses

    2016-01-01

    Objective To measure the implementation of WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) Article 5.3 at country level using a new Tobacco Industry Interference Index and to report initial results using this index in seven Southeast Asian countries. Methods Score sheet based on WHO FCTC Article 5.3 Guidelines sent to correspondents in seven Southeast Asian countries, using a scoring system designed with the help of tobacco control experts and validated through focused group discussions. Results The seven countries ranked from the lowest level of interference to the highest are Brunei, Thailand, Lao PDR, Cambodia, Philippines, Malaysia and Indonesia. Countries that face high levels of unnecessary interaction with the tobacco industry also face high levels of tobacco industry influence in policy development. Most governments do not allow any tobacco industry representatives on their delegation to sessions of the Conference of the Parties or its subsidiary bodies nor accept their sponsorship for delegates, but most governments still accept or endorse offers of assistance from the tobacco industry in implementing tobacco control policies. Most governments also receive tobacco industry contributions (monetary or in kind) or endorse industry corporate social responsibility activities. Governments do not have a procedure for disclosing interactions with the tobacco industry, but Lao PDR, Philippines and Thailand have instituted measures to prevent or reduce industry interference. Conclusions This Tobacco Industry Interference Index, based on the WHO FCTC Article 5.3 Guidelines, is a useful advocacy tool for identifying both progress and gaps in national efforts at implementing WHO FCTC Article 5.3. PMID:25908597

  19. Mismatch repair gene MLH3 Pro844Leu and Thr942Ile polymorphisms and the susceptibility to cervical carcinoma and HPV infection: a case-control study in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Ye, Feng; Cheng, Qi; Shen, Jiajie; Zhou, Caiyun; Chen, Huaizeng

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the association between MLH3 Pro844Leu, Thr942Ile polymorphisms and potential linkage with the risk of cervical carcinoma and potential effect on protein function, we carried out a case-control study with 400 cervical squamous cell carcinoma, 400 CIN3 and 1200 normal controls in a Chinese population. The results showed that there was an increased risk of cervical carcinoma and CIN3 associated with the genotype 844CT [OR 2.17 (1.61-2.94); P<0.001; OR 1.49 (1.08-2.07), P 0.017, respectively] and a decreased risk with the 942CT genotype [OR 0.56 (0.38-0.82); P<0.001; OR 0.37 (0.24-0.58), P<0.001, respectively]. Most 844CT genotypes were linkage CT(844)-CC(942), which increased the risk of cervical carcinoma and CIN3 [77/83, OR 2.04 (1.48-2.80), P<0.001; 55/61, OR 1.46 (1.03-2.06), P 0.035, respectively]. Most 942CT were linkage CC(844)-CT(942), which decreased the risk of cervical carcinoma [29/35, OR 0.60 (0.40-0.91); P 0.017; 18/24, OR 0.33 (0.20-0.55), P<0.001, respectively]. In some grouping, the 844CT and 942CT were further enriched; especially HR-HPV-positive subjects both in the CIN3 and the cervical carcinoma, the 844CT had greater enrichment. These results included that CT(844)-CC(942) was associated with a high risk of cervical carcinoma and CIN3, and the CC(844)-CT(942) decreased the risk. The 844CT had a higher level of enrichment in HR-HPV positive individuals, which is probably related to HR-HPV susceptibility. There was no significant difference of the MLH3 mRNA expression and these two amino acid substitutions did not impact on the protein function.

  20. Mismatch Repair Gene MLH3 Pro844Leu and Thr942Ile Polymorphisms and the Susceptibility to Cervical Carcinoma and HPV Infection: A Case-Control Study in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Feng; Cheng, Qi; Shen, Jiajie; Zhou, Caiyun; Chen, Huaizeng

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the association between MLH3 Pro844Leu, Thr942Ile polymorphisms and potential linkage with the risk of cervical carcinoma and potential effect on protein function, we carried out a case-control study with 400 cervical squamous cell carcinoma, 400 CIN3 and 1200 normal controls in a Chinese population. The results showed that there was an increased risk of cervical carcinoma and CIN3 associated with the genotype 844CT [OR 2.17 (1.61–2.94); P<0.001; OR 1.49 (1.08–2.07), P 0.017, respectively] and a decreased risk with the 942CT genotype [OR 0.56 (0.38–0.82); P<0.001; OR 0.37 (0.24–0.58), P<0.001, respectively]. Most 844CT genotypes were linkage CT(844)-CC(942), which increased the risk of cervical carcinoma and CIN3 [77/83, OR 2.04 (1.48–2.80), P<0.001; 55/61, OR 1.46 (1.03–2.06), P 0.035, respectively]. Most 942CT were linkage CC(844)-CT(942), which decreased the risk of cervical carcinoma [29/35, OR 0.60 (0.40–0.91); P 0.017; 18/24, OR 0.33 (0.20–0.55), P<0.001, respectively]. In some grouping, the 844CT and 942CT were further enriched; especially HR-HPV-positive subjects both in the CIN3 and the cervical carcinoma, the 844CT had greater enrichment. These results included that CT(844)-CC(942) was associated with a high risk of cervical carcinoma and CIN3, and the CC(844)-CT(942) decreased the risk. The 844CT had a higher level of enrichment in HR-HPV positive individuals, which is probably related to HR-HPV susceptibility. There was no significant difference of the MLH3 mRNA expression and these two amino acid substitutions did not impact on the protein function. PMID:24759751

  1. Comparison of post-treatment effects of conventional and acupuncture-like transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS): A randomised placebo-controlled study using cold-induced pain and healthy human participants.

    PubMed

    Francis, Richard P; Marchant, Paul R; Johnson, Mark I

    2011-11-01

    TENS can be administered in conventional (high frequency, low intensity) or acupuncture-like (AL-TENS: low frequency, high intensity) formats. It is claimed that AL-TENS produces stronger and longer-lasting hypoalgesia than conventional TENS, although evidence is lacking. This randomised controlled parallel group study compared the effects of 30 minutes of AL-TENS, conventional TENS, and placebo (no current) TENS, on cold-pressor pain threshold (CPT), in 43 healthy participants. Results showed a greater increase in mean log(e) cold-pressor pain threshold relative to baseline for both AL-TENS and conventional TENS vs. placebo TENS, and for AL-TENS vs. placebo 5 and 15 minutes after TENS was switched off. There were no statistically significant differences between conventional TENS vs. placebo or between AL-TENS vs. conventional TENS at 5 or 15 minutes after TENS was switched off. In conclusion, AL-TENS but not conventional TENS prolonged post-stimulation hypoalgesia compared to placebo TENS. However, no differences between AL-TENS and conventional TENS were detected in head-to-head comparisons.

  2. Incidence and natural history of pure red cell aplasia in major ABO-mismatched haematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Aung, Fleur M.; Lichtiger, Benjamin; Bassett, Roland; Liu, Ping; Alousi, Amin; Bashier, Qaiser; Ciurea, Stefan O.; de Lima, Marcos J.; Hosing, Chitra; Kebriaei, Partow; Nieto, Yago; Oran, Betul; Parmar, Simrit; Qazilbash, Muzaffar; Shah, Nina; Khouri, Issa; Champlin, Richard E.; Popat, Uday

    2014-01-01

    Summary Major ABO mismatching is not considered a contraindication to allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Modern reduced-intensity conditioning and reduced-toxicity regimens cause much less myeloablation than conventional myeloablative regimens, such as cyclophosphamide with busulfan or total body irradiation, which may affect the incidence of pure red cell aplasia (PRCA). We estimated the incidence and described the natural history of PRCA in patients with major ABO-mismatched donor stem cells. Between 2007 and 2008, 161 (27% of all patients undergoing HSCT) underwent allogeneic HSCT with major ABO-mismatched stem cells and 12 (7·5%) of these patients developed PRCA. Thirty and ninety day T-cell and myeloid cell chimerism and neutrophil and platelet engraftment did not differ between patients who developed PRCA and those who did not. The only risk factor associated with PRCA was the use of a fludarabine/busulfan conditioning regimen. All patients with PRCA needed red cell transfusion for several months after HSCT resulting in significant iron overload. Pure red cell aplasia resolved spontaneously in the majority (seven patients) but only resolved after stopping tacrolimus in three patients. Hence, after major ABO-mismatched HSCT, the incidence of PRCA was 7·5% and it resolved spontaneously or after withdrawal of immunosuppression in the majority of patients. PMID:23330820

  3. Energy sources for laparoscopic colectomy: a prospective randomized comparison of conventional electrosurgery, bipolar computer-controlled electrosurgery and ultrasonic dissection. Operative outcome and costs analysis.

    PubMed

    Targarona, Eduardo Ma; Balague, Carmen; Marin, Juan; Neto, Rene Berindoague; Martinez, Carmen; Garriga, Jordi; Trias, Manuel

    2005-12-01

    The development of operative laparoscopic surgery is linked to advances in ancillary surgical instrumentation. Ultrasonic energy devices avoid the use of electricity and provide effective control of small- to medium-sized vessels. Bipolar computer-controlled electrosurgical technology eliminates the disadvantages of electrical energy, and a mechanical blade adds a cutting action. This instrument can provide effective hemostasis of large vessels up to 7 mm. Such devices significantly increase the cost of laparoscopic procedures, however, and the amount of evidence-based information on this topic is surprisingly scarce. This study compared the effectiveness of three different energy sources on the laparoscopic performance of a left colectomy. The trial included 38 nonselected patients with a disease of the colon requiring an elective segmental left-sided colon resection. Patients were preoperatively randomized into three groups. Group I had electrosurgery; vascular dissection was performed entirely with an electrosurgery generator, and vessels were controlled with clips. Group II underwent computer-controlled bipolar electrosurgery; vascular and mesocolon section was completed by using the 10-mm Ligasure device alone. In group III, 5-mm ultrasonic shears (Harmonic Scalpel) were used for bowel dissection, vascular pedicle dissection, and mesocolon transection. The mesenteric vessel pedicle was controlled with an endostapler. Demographics (age, sex, body mass index, comorbidity, previous surgery and diagnoses requiring surgery) were recorded, as were surgical details (operative time, conversion, blood loss), additional disposable instruments (number of trocars, EndoGIA charges, and clip appliers), and clinical outcome. Intraoperative economic costs were also evaluated. End points of the trial were operative time and intraoperative blood loss, and an intention-to-treat principle was followed. The three groups were well matched for demographic and pathologic features

  4. Sympathetic cooling of a mass-mismatched two-ion chain in a double-well trap potential

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Taro

    2011-05-15

    Sympathetic cooling of two-ion system, in which one is laser-cooled and the other is sympathetically cooled and their masses are mismatched, in a linear rf trap with a double-well potential is proposed. The double-well potential consists of two wells, and there is one ion in each well. The axial frequencies of the two wells and the spatial interval between them are experimentally controllable. By theoretical analysis, the normal modes of the small oscillations around the equilibrium are derived, and a measure of the sympathetic cooling rate is obtained. As a result, it is found that the sympathetic cooling rate is fast when the frequency of the axial motion of the sympathetically cooled ion is close to that of the laser-cooled ion. In the double-well potential, the sympathetic cooling rate of the ion species whose mass is much heavier or lighter than that of the laser-cooled ion can be fast. The sympathetic cooling rate of C{sub 60}{sup +} by the laser-cooled Ba{sup +} in the double-well potential is estimated to be about 80 times faster than in the conventional setup. The double-well potential may be made by the microfabricated electrode configuration or by the optical dipole force trap.

  5. Systematic misestimation in a vernier task arising from contrast mismatch.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; Lee, Barry B; Baraas, Rigmor C

    2008-01-01

    Luminance signals mediated by the magnocellular (MC) pathway play an important role in vernier tasks. MC ganglion cells show a phase advance in their responses to sinusoidal stimuli with increasing contrast due to contrast gain control mechanisms. If the phase information in MC ganglion cell responses were utilized by central mechanisms in vernier tasks, one might expect systematic errors caused by the phase advance. This systematic error may contribute to the contrast paradox phenomenon, where vernier performance deteriorates, rather than improves, when only one of the target pair increases in contrast. Vernier psychometric functions for a pair of gratings of mismatched contrast were measured to seek such misestimation. In associated electrophysiological experiments, MC and parvocellular (PC) ganglion cells' responses to similar stimuli were measured to provide a physiological reference. The psychophysical experiments show that a high-contrast grating is perceived as phase advanced in the drift direction compared to a low-contrast grating, especially at a high drift rate (8 Hz). The size of the phase advance was comparable to that seen in MC cells under similar stimulus conditions. These results are consistent with the MC pathway supporting vernier performance with achromatic gratings. The shifts in vernier psychometric functions were negligible for pairs of chromatic gratings under the conditions tested here, consistent with the lack of phase advance both in responses of PC ganglion cells and in frequency-doubled chromatic responses of MC ganglion cells.

  6. Meniscus replacement: Influence of geometrical mismatches on chondroprotective capabilities.

    PubMed

    Párraga Quiroga, J M; Ito, K; van Donkelaar, C C

    2015-06-01

    The chondroprotective success of meniscal transplantation is variable. Poorly controlled factors such as a geometrical mismatch of the implant may be partly responsible. Clinical data, animal studies and cadaver experiments suggest that smaller transplants perform better than oversized, but clear evidence is lacking. The hypothesis of this study is that smaller menisci outperform larger ones because they distribute stresses more effectively at those particular locations that receive the highest loads. Consequently, collagen in the adjacent cartilage is protected from damage due to overstraining. Experimentally it is not possible to measure load distribution and collagen strain inside articular cartilage (AC). Therefore, a numerical model was used to determine the mechanical conditions throughout the depth of the AC. Meniscus implants with different sizes and mechanical properties were evaluated. These were compared with healthy and with meniscectomized joints. To account for the time-dependent behavior 600s of loading was simulated; results were visualized after 1s and 600s. Simulations showed that AC's strains strongly depended on implant size and loading duration. They depended less on the stiffness of the implant material. With an oversized implant, collagen strains were particularly large in the femoral AC initially and further increased upon sustained loading. The severest compressive strains occurred after sustained loading in the meniscectomized joint. Strains with an undersized meniscus were comparable to a perfectly sized implant. In conclusion, these results support the hypothesis that an undersized implant may outperform an oversized one because it distributes stresses better in the most intensely loaded joint area.

  7. Anterior insula coordinates hierarchical processing of tactile mismatch responses

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Micah; Fardo, Francesca; Dietz, Martin J.; Hillebrandt, Hauke; Friston, Karl J.; Rees, Geraint; Roepstorff, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The body underlies our sense of self, emotion, and agency. Signals arising from the skin convey warmth, social touch, and the physical characteristics of external stimuli. Surprising or unexpected tactile sensations can herald events of motivational salience, including imminent threats (e.g., an insect bite) and hedonic rewards (e.g., a caressing touch). Awareness of such events is thought to depend upon the hierarchical integration of body-related mismatch responses by the anterior insula. To investigate this possibility, we measured brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging, while healthy participants performed a roving tactile oddball task. Mass-univariate analysis demonstrated robust activations in limbic, somatosensory, and prefrontal cortical areas previously implicated in tactile deviancy, body awareness, and cognitive control. Dynamic Causal Modelling revealed that unexpected stimuli increased the strength of forward connections along a caudal to rostral hierarchy—projecting from thalamic and somatosensory regions towards insula, cingulate and prefrontal cortices. Within this ascending flow of sensory information, the AIC was the only region to show increased backwards connectivity to the somatosensory cortex, augmenting a reciprocal exchange of neuronal signals. Further, participants who rated stimulus changes as easier to detect showed stronger modulation of descending PFC to AIC connections by deviance. These results suggest that the AIC coordinates hierarchical processing of tactile prediction error. They are interpreted in support of an embodied predictive coding model where AIC mediated body awareness is involved in anchoring a global neuronal workspace. PMID:26584870

  8. A prospective double-blind randomized controlled trial comparing the suitability of KTP laser tonsillectomy with conventional dissection tonsillectomy for day case surgery.

    PubMed

    Kothari, P; Patel, S; Brown, P; Obara, L; O'Malley, S

    2002-10-01

    Tonsillectomy using a KTP laser has been performed increasingly but is not a routinely practised technique in the UK. In the USA, tonsillectomy is often performed as a day case procedure but, here in the UK, it is still standard practice to admit patients for overnight stay. We present the largest prospective double-blind randomized controlled trial to date (151 patients) comparing KTP laser with standard dissection tonsillectomy and assess the suitability of both procedures for day case surgery. We found that there was significantly less peroperative haemorrhage if tonsillectomy was performed using the KTP laser, but it did cause more postoperative pain, more depression in mood and a higher rate of both reactionary and secondary haemorrhage, which was not significant when compared with conventional dissection. There was no difference in operating time, and over 40% of patients in each group needed overnight admission. We conclude that KTP laser tonsillectomy offers no benefit apart from less intraoperative bleeding over standard dissection tonsillectomy. Discharge from hospital after tonsillectomy was found to be unpredictable. Tonsillectomy is therefore an unsuitable procedure for planned surgery through a day unit, but approximately 58% of patients could be discharged on the same day from an extended day surgery unit, and the rest have one night in hospital.

  9. Effects of an integrative treatment, therapeutic acupuncture and conventional treatment in alleviating psychological distress in primary care patients - a pragmatic randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To evaluate and compare effects of an integrative treatment (IT), therapeutic acupuncture (TA), and conventional treatment (CT) in alleviating symptoms of anxiety and depression in psychologically distressed primary care patients. Methods An open, pragmatic randomized controlled trial comparing the three treatment regimens at four and eight weeks after treatment. The study sample consisted of 120 adults (40 per treatment arm) aged 20 to 55 years referred from four different primary health care centres in western Sweden for psychological distress. Psychological distress was evaluated at baseline, and after 4 and 8 weeks of treatment using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HAD). Treatment sessions lasted about 60 minutes in IT and 45 minutes in TA. Results No baseline differences were found between groups on HAD depression or anxiety. HAD anxiety and depression decreased significantly more in the IT and TA groups than in the CT group both after 4 and 8 weeks of treatment, but not between IT and TA. Improvements in the TA and IT groups were large and clinically significant, whereas CT effects were small and clinically non-significant. Conclusions Both IT and TA appear to be beneficial in reducing anxiety and depression in primary care patients referred for psychological distress, whereas CT does not. These results need to be confirmed in larger, longer-term studies addressing potentially confounding design issues in the present study. Trial registration ISRCTN trial number NCT01631500. PMID:24200100

  10. Experimental Investigation of Piston Heat Transfer in a Light Duty Engine Under Conventional Diesel, Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition, and Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition Combustion Regimes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-13

    For Official Use Only UNCLASSIFIED Experimental Investigation of Piston Heat Transfer in a Light Duty Engine Under Conventional Diesel...Now affiliated with U.S. Army TARDEC ** University of Wisconsin-Madison Sandia National Laboratory Advanced Engine Combustion Meeting February...Experimental Investigation of Piston Heat Transfer in a Light Duty Engine Under Conventional Diesel, Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition, and Reactivity

  11. Differential partial activation phenotype and production of tumour necrosis factor-α by conventional dendritic cells in response to lipopolysaccharide in HIV+ viraemic subjects and HIV+ controllers.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Sandoval, R; Del Río Estrada, P M; Rivero-Arrieta, A; Reyes-Terán, G; Bonifaz, L C

    2014-12-01

    HIV(+) subjects are reported to have increased soluble CD14 (sCD14) in plasma, an indicator of microbial translocation. We evaluated if microbial translocation has a differential impact on the activation and function of conventional dendritic cells (cDC) from viraemic HIV(+) subjects and HIV(+) controllers (CTs). The HIV(+) subjects were classified into two groups according to their plasma viral load (pVL): CT and viraemic. Subjects without HIV were included as controls (HIV(-) ). The frequencies and phenotypes of cDC from these subjects were evaluated by multi-parameter flow cytometry. In addition, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or single-stranded RNA40 (ssRNA40), the phenotype of the cDC and the intracellular production of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α by the cDC were evaluated by flow cytometry. We observed a partial activation phenotype for the cDC in the viraemic subjects and CTs ex vivo and after LPS activation, which showed differences in the expression of CD40 and CD86. Furthermore, in response to LPS the cDC from the viraemic subjects produced more TNF-α compared to the cDC from CTs. Interestingly, the percentage of TNF-α(+) cDC was found to be correlated positively with the pVL. The partial activation of cDC and the over-production of TNF-α in response to LPS in viraemic HIV(+) subjects might be related to the increased chronic activation observed in these subjects. In contrast, cDC from CTs seem to have a regulated response to LPS, indicating that they respond differently to chronic immune activation. These results may have implications in the development of HIV therapies and vaccines using DC.

  12. Differential partial activation phenotype and production of tumour necrosis factor-α by conventional dendritic cells in response to lipopolysaccharide in HIV+ viraemic subjects and HIV+ controllers

    PubMed Central

    Camacho-Sandoval, R; Del Río Estrada, P M; Rivero-Arrieta, A; Reyes-Terán, G; Bonifaz, L C

    2014-01-01

    HIV+ subjects are reported to have increased soluble CD14 (sCD14) in plasma, an indicator of microbial translocation. We evaluated if microbial translocation has a differential impact on the activation and function of conventional dendritic cells (cDC) from viraemic HIV+ subjects and HIV+ controllers (CTs). The HIV+ subjects were classified into two groups according to their plasma viral load (pVL): CT and viraemic. Subjects without HIV were included as controls (HIV–). The frequencies and phenotypes of cDC from these subjects were evaluated by multi-parameter flow cytometry. In addition, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or single-stranded RNA40 (ssRNA40), the phenotype of the cDC and the intracellular production of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α by the cDC were evaluated by flow cytometry. We observed a partial activation phenotype for the cDC in the viraemic subjects and CTs ex vivo and after LPS activation, which showed differences in the expression of CD40 and CD86. Furthermore, in response to LPS the cDC from the viraemic subjects produced more TNF-α compared to the cDC from CTs. Interestingly, the percentage of TNF-α+ cDC was found to be correlated positively with the pVL. The partial activation of cDC and the over-production of TNF-α in response to LPS in viraemic HIV+ subjects might be related to the increased chronic activation observed in these subjects. In contrast, cDC from CTs seem to have a regulated response to LPS, indicating that they respond differently to chronic immune activation. These results may have implications in the development of HIV therapies and vaccines using DC. PMID:25130456

  13. Tobacco Packaging and Mass Media Campaigns: Research Needs for Articles 11 and 12 of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Communicating the health risks of smoking remains a primary objective of tobacco-control policy. Articles 11 and 12 of the World Health Organization’s Framework Convention on Tobacco Control establish standards for two important forms of communication: packaging regulations (Article 11), and mass media campaigns (Article 12). Methods: A narrative review approach was used to identify existing evidence in the areas of package labeling regulations (including health warnings, constituent and emission messages, and prohibitions on misleading information) and communication activities (including mass media campaigns and news media coverage). When available, recent reviews of the literature were used, updated with more recent high-quality studies from published literature. Results: Implementation of Articles 11 and 12 share several important research priorities: (a) identify existing consumer information needs and gaps, (b) research on the message source to identify effective types of content for health warnings and media campaigns, (c) research on how messages are processed and the extent to which the content and form of messages need to be tailored to different cultural and geographic groups, as well as subgroups within countries, and (d) research to identify the most cost-effective mix and best practices for sustaining health communications over time. Conclusion: A unifying theme of effective health communication through tobacco packaging and mass media campaigns is the need to provide salient, timely, and engaging reminders of the consequences of tobacco use in ways that motivate and support tobacco users trying to quit and make tobacco use less appealing for those at risk of taking it up. PMID:23042986

  14. Palatal positioned implants in severely atrophic maxillae versus conventional implants to support fixed full-arch prostheses: Controlled retrospective study with 5 years of follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Candel-Marti, Eugenia; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Bagán, Leticia; Peñarrocha-Diago, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background To evaluate soft tissue conditions and bone loss around palatal positioned implants supporting fixed full-arch prostheses to rehabilitate edentulous maxillae with horizontal atrophy and compare them with conventional well-centered implants placed in non-atrophic maxillae after a minimum follow-up of 5 years. Material and Methods A clinical retrospective study was performed of patients that were rehabilitated with full-arch fixed implant-supported maxillary prostheses and had a minimum follow-up of 5 years after implant loading. Patients were divided into 2 groups: patients with class IV maxilla according to Cawood and Howell and treated with palatal positioned implants (test) and with class III maxilla and treated with implants well-centered in the alveolar ridge and completely surrounded by bone (control). The following variables were assessed: age, sex, frequency of tooth brushing, smoking, type of prosthesis, type of implant, implant success, amount of buccal keratinized mucosa, buccal retraction, probing depth, plaque index, modified bleeding index, presence of mucositis or peri-implantitis and peri-implant bone loss. Statistical analysis was performed applying Chi2 Test and Student’s t-test using alpha set at 0.05. Results A total of 57 patients were included: 32 patients with 161 palatal positioned implants (test) and 25 patients with 132 well centered implants (control). No statistically significant differences were found regarding age, sex and smoking, but test group patients reported a significantly higher frequency of daily tooth brushing. Implant success rates were 96.9% for test group implants and 96.0% for control group implants. Peri-implant mucosa retraction was significantly higher in the control group than in the test group (p=0,017). No significant differences were observed either for all the other assessed clinical parameters or for peri-implant bone loss. Conclusions Despite its limitations the outcomes of the present study suggest

  15. HLA Haplotype Mismatch Transplants and Posttransplant Cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed

    Bacigalupo, Andrea; Sica, Simona

    2016-01-01

    The use of high dose posttransplant cyclophosphamide (PT-CY) introduced by the Baltimore group approximately 10 years ago has been rapidly adopted worldwide and is becoming a standard for patients undergoing unmanipulated haploidentical (HAPLO) transplants. PT-CY has been used following nonmyeloablative as well as myeloablative conditioning regimens, for bone marrow or peripheral blood grafts, for patients with malignant and nonmalignant disorders. Retrospective comparisons of HAPLO grafts with conventional sibling and unrelated donor grafts have been published and suggest comparable outcome. The current questions to be answered include the use of PT-CY for sibling and unrelated donors transplant, possibly in the context of prospective randomized trial.

  16. HLA Haplotype Mismatch Transplants and Posttransplant Cyclophosphamide

    PubMed Central

    Bacigalupo, Andrea; Sica, Simona

    2016-01-01

    The use of high dose posttransplant cyclophosphamide (PT-CY) introduced by the Baltimore group approximately 10 years ago has been rapidly adopted worldwide and is becoming a standard for patients undergoing unmanipulated haploidentical (HAPLO) transplants. PT-CY has been used following nonmyeloablative as well as myeloablative conditioning regimens, for bone marrow or peripheral blood grafts, for patients with malignant and nonmalignant disorders. Retrospective comparisons of HAPLO grafts with conventional sibling and unrelated donor grafts have been published and suggest comparable outcome. The current questions to be answered include the use of PT-CY for sibling and unrelated donors transplant, possibly in the context of prospective randomized trial. PMID:27143973

  17. Lung cancer diagnosis and staging with endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration compared with conventional approaches: an open-label, pragmatic, randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Navani, Neal; Nankivell, Matthew; Lawrence, David R; Lock, Sara; Makker, Himender; Baldwin, David R; Stephens, Richard J; Parmar, Mahesh K; Spiro, Stephen G; Morris, Stephen; Janes, Sam M

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The diagnosis and staging of lung cancer is an important process that identifies treatment options and guides disease prognosis. We aimed to assess endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration as an initial investigation technique for patients with suspected lung cancer. Methods In this open-label, multicentre, pragmatic, randomised controlled trial, we recruited patients who had undergone a CT scan and had suspected stage I to IIIA lung cancer, from six UK centres and randomly assigned them to either endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) or conventional diagnosis and staging (CDS), for further investigation and staging. If a target node could not be accessed by EBUS-TBNA, then endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) was allowed as an alternative procedure. Randomisation was stratified according to the presence of mediastinal lymph nodes measuring 1 cm or more in the short axis and by recruiting centre. We used a telephone randomisation method with permuted blocks of four generated by a computer. Because of the nature of the intervention, masking of participants and consenting investigators was not possible. The primary endpoint was the time-to-treatment decision after completion of the diagnostic and staging investigations and analysis was by intention-to-diagnose. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00652769. Findings Between June 10, 2008, and July 4, 2011, we randomly allocated 133 patients to treatment: 66 to EBUS-TBNA and 67 to CDS (one later withdrew consent). Two patients from the EBUS-TBNA group underwent EUS-FNA. The median time to treatment decision was shorter with EBUS-TBNA (14 days; 95% CI 14–15) than with CDS (29 days; 23–35) resulting in a hazard ratio of 1·98, (1·39–2·82, p<0·0001). One patient in each group had a pneumothorax from a CT-guided biopsy sample; the patient from the CDS group needed intercostal drainage

  18. Mismatch repair balances leading and lagging strand DNA replication fidelity.

    PubMed

    Lujan, Scott A; Williams, Jessica S; Pursell, Zachary F; Abdulovic-Cui, Amy A; Clark, Alan B; Nick McElhinny, Stephanie A; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2012-01-01

    The two DNA strands of the nuclear genome are replicated asymmetrically using three DNA polymerases, α, δ, and ε. Current evidence suggests that DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) is the primary leading strand replicase, whereas Pols α and δ primarily perform lagging strand replication. The fact that these polymerases differ in fidelity and error specificity is interesting in light of the fact that the stability of the nuclear genome depends in part on the ability of mismatch repair (MMR) to correct different mismatches generated in different contexts during replication. Here we provide the first comparison, to our knowledge, of the efficiency of MMR of leading and lagging strand replication errors. We first use the strand-biased ribonucleotide incorporation propensity of a Pol ε mutator variant to confirm that Pol ε is the primary leading strand replicase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We then use polymerase-specific error signatures to show that MMR efficiency in vivo strongly depends on the polymerase, the mismatch composition, and the location of the mismatch. An extreme case of variation by location is a T-T mismatch that is refractory to MMR. This mismatch is flanked by an AT-rich triplet repeat sequence that, when interrupted, restores MMR to > 95% efficiency. Thus this natural DNA sequence suppresses MMR, placing a nearby base pair at high risk of mutation due to leading strand replication infidelity. We find that, overall, MMR most efficiently corrects the most potentially deleterious errors (indels) and then the most common substitution mismatches. In combination with earlier studies, the results suggest that significant differences exist in the generation and repair of Pol α, δ, and ε replication errors, but in a generally complementary manner that results in high-fidelity replication of both DNA strands of the yeast nuclear genome.

  19. Bubbles and mismatches in DNA melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yan

    We obtained the first experimental measurements of the length of the denaturation bubble appearing in the DNA melting transition. This is achieved by working with short oligomers which can form only one bubble per molecule. We used sequences clamped at the ends with GC pairs (strong binding) and possessing AT rich (weaker binding) middle regions in order to have the bubble open in the middle, and sequences with GC pairs at one end and AT pairs at the other end in order to form the bubble at the end. Use a quenching technique to trap the bubble states, we could measure the length of the bubble and the relative weights of the bubble states as a function of temperature. We found that the average bubble size <ℓ> grows for increasing temperature, but reaches a plateau at a length of order B (the length of the AT region). After the plateau, the average bubble length jumps to 1. This jump of the order parameter is a signature of a discontinuous transition, one where the bubble size remains finite up to critical temperature of strand separation. When B increases, the extension of the plateau shrinks. This suggests a continuous transition for a homogenous sequence (e.g. all AT base pairs) in the thermodynamic limit. The presence of the bubble states decreases as B is reduced. By plotting the average statistical weight of the bubble states vs. B, we obtained the first direct measurement of the nucleation size of the bubble. For a bubble flanked by double-stranded regions, the nucleation size is ˜ 3 bases. For bubbles opening at the ends of the molecule there is no nucleation threshold. The measured statistical weights of the bubble states agree with the predictions of the widely used thermodynamic models in the case of unzipping from the ends; however, internal bubble states are not completely described by the model. For the first time we show experimentally that a single mismatch transforms a transition with many intermediates into a nearly two-state transition for

  20. A Randomized Controlled Study to Compare the Total and Hidden Blood Loss in Computer-Assisted Surgery and Conventional Surgical Technique of Total Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Amit; Kumar, Vijay; Lekha, Chandra; Karthikeyan, G.; Malik, Vishwas

    2015-01-01

    Background Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is associated with considerable blood loss. Computer-assisted surgery (CAS) is different from conventional TKA as it avoids opening the intramedullary canal. Hence, CAS should be associated with less blood loss. Methods Fifty-seven patients were randomized into two groups of CAS and conventional TKA. In conventional group intramedullary femoral and extramedullary tibial jigs were used whereas in CAS group imageless navigation system was used. All surgeries were done under tourniquet. Total and hidden blood loss was calculated in both groups and compared. Results The mean total blood loss was 980 mL in conventional group and 970 mL in CAS group with median of 1,067 mL (range, 59 to 1,791 mL) in conventional group and 863 mL (range, 111 to 2,032 mL) in CAS group. There was no significant difference in total blood loss between the two groups (p = 0.811). We have found significant hidden blood loss in both techniques, which is 54.8% of the total loss in the conventional technique and 59.5% in the computer-assisted navigation technique. Conclusions There is no significant difference in total and hidden blood loss in the TKA in CAS and conventional TKA. However, there is significant hidden blood loss in both techniques. There was no relation of tourniquet time with blood loss. PMID:26217468

  1. The Effect of Codon Mismatch on the Protein Translation System.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dinglin; Chen, Danfeng; Cao, Liaoran; Li, Guohui; Cheng, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Incorrect protein translation, caused by codon mismatch, is an important problem of living cells. In this work, a computational model was introduced to quantify the effects of codon mismatch and the model was used to study the protein translation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. According to simulation results, the probability of codon mismatch will increase when the supply of amino acids is unbalanced, and the longer is the codon sequence, the larger is the probability for incorrect translation to occur, making the synthesis of long peptide chain difficult. By comparing to simulation results without codon mismatch effects taken into account, the fraction of mRNAs with bound ribosome decrease faster along the mRNAs, making the 5' ramp phenomenon more obvious. It was also found in our work that the premature mechanism resulted from codon mismatch can reduce the proportion of incorrect translation when the amino acid supply is extremely unbalanced, which is one possible source of high fidelity protein synthesis after peptidyl transfer.

  2. Intensive or conventional insulin therapy in type 2 diabetic patients? A population-based study on metabolic control and quality of life (The JEVIN-trial).

    PubMed

    Schiel, R; Müller, U A

    1999-01-01

    Long-term micro- and macrovascular complications cause major morbidity and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Up to the present it is not clear whether intensified or conventional insulin treatment is more effective to keep blood glucose concentrations close to the normal range. In the present trial 90% (n = 117) of all insulin-treated type 2 diabetic patients aged 16 to 60 years and living in the city of Jena (100,247 inhabitants), Thuringia, Germany were examined. Fourty patients (34%) were on intensive insulin therapy (ICT, > or = 2 injections of normal- and > or = 1 injection of NPH-/mixed-insulin/day, > or = 1 insulin-dose adjustments/week, > or = 2 blood-glucose self-tests/day) and 77 patients (66%) were on conventional insulin therapy (CIT). Patients with ICT had more injections/d (4.3 +/- 0.7 vs CIT 2.4 +/- 0.7, p < 0.001), more insulin-dose adjustments/week < or = 11.5 +/- 8.2 vs 2.2 +/- 5.2, p < 0.001) and more blood-glucose self-tests/week (25.2 +/- 5.7 vs 9.6 +/- 8.8, p < 0.001). Patients with ICT had higher insulin doses (0.71 +/- 0.32 vs 0.47 +/- 0.2 IU/kg body wt/d, p < 0.001), were younger (50.5 +/-6.7 vs 54.0 +/- 5.9 years, p = 0.004) and they had a non-significant tendency to a better HbAlc (8.7 +/- 2.2 vs 9.2 +/- 2.0%, p = 0.23, HPLC, Diamat, normal range 4.4-5,9%). There was a negative correlation between HbAlc and the frequency of blood-glucose self-tests/week (r = -0.23, p = 0.019) and the number of insulin-dose adjustments/week (r = -0.33, p < 0.001). There were no differences between the groups as regards body-mass index (29.7 +/-4.9 vs 28.0 +/- 4.5 kg/m2, p = 0.06), diabetes duration (12.3 +/- 6.9 vs 12.2 +/- 7.5 years, p = 0.96), duration of insulin therapy (4.2 +/-3.5 versus 4.5 +/- 4.8 years, p = 0.67), incidence of acute complications (severe hypoglycaemia, diabetic coma), prevalence of retino-, nephro- and neuropathy (assessed according to Young et al.) and education or socio-economic factors. Also, in respect of

  3. The importance of drug-induced sedation endoscopy (D.I.S.E.) techniques in surgical decision making: conventional versus target controlled infusion techniques-a prospective randomized controlled study and a retrospective surgical outcomes analysis.

    PubMed

    De Vito, Andrea; Agnoletti, Vanni; Zani, Gianluca; Corso, Ruggero Massimo; D'Agostino, Giovanni; Firinu, Elisabetta; Marchi, Chiara; Hsu, Ying-Shuo; Maitan, Stefano; Vicini, Claudio

    2017-02-17

    Drug-Induced Sedation Endoscopy (DISE) consists of the direct observation of the upper airways during sedative-induced sleep, allowing the identification of the sites of pharyngeal collapse, which is the main pathological event in Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). The Authors have compared Target Controlled Infusion (TCI) sedation endoscopy (TCI-DISE) technique to conventional DISE (CDISE), performed by a manual bolus injection of sedative agent, to recreate accurately and safely snoring and apnea patterns comparable to natural sleep. The authors conducted a prospective, randomized, long-term study and a retrospective analysis of surgical outcomes. The apnea-event observation and its correlation with pharyngeal collapse patterns is the primary endpoint; secondary endpoints are defined as stability and safety of sedation plan of DISE-TCI technique. From January 2009 to January 2011, OSA patients were included in the study and randomly allocated into two groups: the bolus injection conventional DISE group and the TCI-DISE group. Third endpoint is to compare the surgical outcomes enrolling OSA patients from January 2009 to June 2015. We recorded the complete apnea-event at oropharynx and hypopharynx levels in 15/50 pts in conventional DISE group (30%) and in 99/123 pts in TCI-DISE group (81%) (p < 0.0001). Four pts needed oxygen in conventional DISE group because a severe desaturation occurred during the first bolus of propofol (1 mg/kg) (p = 0.4872 ns). We recorded instability of the sedation plan in 13 patients of conventional DISE group (65%) and 1 patient of the TCI-DISE group (5%) (p = 0.0001). In 37 TCI-DISE group surgical patients we reported a significant reduction of postoperative AHI (from 42.7 ± 20.2 to 11.4 ± 10.3) in comparison with postoperative AHI in 15 C-DISE group surgical patients (from 41.3 ± 23.4 to 20.4 ± 15.5) (p = 0.05). Our results suggest the DISE-TCI technique as first choice in performing sleep

  4. Interictal lack of habituation of mismatch negativity in migraine.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, M; Guido, M; Libro, G; Losito, L; Difruscolo, O; Sardaro, M; Puca, F M

    2004-08-01

    The aim was to study mismatch negativity features and habituation during the interictal phase of migraine. In migraine patients, a strong negative correlation has been found between the initial amplitude of long latency auditory-evoked potentials and their amplitude increase during subsequent averaging. We studied 12 outpatients with a diagnosis of migraine without aura recorded in a headache-free interval and 10 gender- and age-matched healthy volunteers not suffering from any recurrent headache. The experiment consisted of two sequential blocks of 2000 stimulations, during which 1800 (90%) recordings for standard tones and 200 (10%) for target tones were selected for averaging. The latency of the N1 component was significantly increased in migraine patients in respect of controls in both the first and second repetitions; the MMN latency was increased in the second repetition. In the control group the MMN amplitude decreased on average by 3.2 +/- 1.4 microV in the second trial, whereas in migraine patients it showed a slight increase of 0.21 +/- 0.11 microV in the second repetition. The MMN latency relieved in the second trial was significantly correlated with the duration of illness in the migraine patients (Spearman correlation coefficient: 0.69; P < 0.05). The increases in N1 latency and MMN latency and amplitude, the latter correlated with duration of illness, seemed to be due to a reduced anticipatory effect of stimulus repetition in migraine patients. This suggests that such hypo-activity of automatic cortical processes, subtending the discrimination of acoustic stimuli, may be a basic abnormality in migraine, developing in the course of the disease.

  5. MUTYH and the mismatch repair system: partners in crime?

    PubMed

    Niessen, Renée C; Sijmons, Rolf H; Ou, J; Olthof, Sandra G M; Osinga, Jan; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Weiss, Marjan M; Tops, Carli M J; Hes, Frederik J; de Bock, Geertruida H; Buys, Charles H C M; Kleibeuker, Jan H; Hofstra, Robert M W

    2006-03-01

    Biallelic germline mutations of MUTYH-a gene encoding a base excision repair protein-are associated with an increased susceptibility of colorectal cancer. Whether monoallelic MUTYH mutations also increase cancer risk is not yet clear, although there is some evidence suggesting a slight increase of risk. As the MUTYH protein interacts with the mismatch repair (MMR) system, we hypothesised that the combination of a monoallelic MUTYH mutation with an MMR gene mutation increases cancer risk. We therefore investigated the prevalence of monoallelic MUTYH mutations in carriers of a germline MMR mutation: 40 carriers of a truncating mutation (group I) and 36 of a missense mutation (group II). These patients had been diagnosed with either colorectal or endometrial cancer. We compared their MUTYH mutation frequencies with those observed in a group of 134 Dutch colorectal and endometrial cancer patients without an MMR gene mutation (0.7%) and those reported for Caucasian controls (1.5%). In group I one monoallelic MUTYH mutation was found (2.5%). In group II five monoallelic germline MUTYH mutations were found (14%), four of them in MSH6 missense mutation carriers (20%). Of all patients with an MMR gene mutation, only those with a missense mutation showed a significantly higher frequency of (monoallelic) MUTYH mutations than the Dutch cancer patients without MMR gene mutations (P = 0.002) and the published controls (P = 0.001). These results warrant further study to test the hypothesis of mutations in MMR genes (in particular MSH6) and MUTYH acting together to increase cancer risk.

  6. Price and Tax Measures and Illicit Trade in the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control: What We Know and What Research Is Required

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Article 6 of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control commits Parties to use tax and price policies to reduce tobacco use, whereas Article 15 commits Parties to implement measures to eliminate the illicit trade in tobacco products. This paper identifies research gaps/needs, especially in low- and middle-income countries, which, if adequately addressed, would help in implementing Articles 6 and 15. Methods: Based on a recent comprehensive review on the impact of tax and price on tobacco consumption and a summary of reviews and narratives about the illicit tobacco market, research gaps are identified. Results: Countries have highly diverse research needs, depending on the stage of the tobacco epidemic, previous research and data availability, and making a ranking of research needs infeasible. Broad issues for further research are the following: (1) monitoring tobacco consumption, prices, and taxes, (2) assessing the effectiveness of the tax structure in generating revenue and reducing tobacco use, (3) strengthening the tax administration system in order to reduce tax evasion and tax avoidance, (4) improving our understanding of the political economy of tobacco tax policy, and (5) employing a multidisciplinary approach to assessing the magnitude of illicit tobacco trade. Conclusions: At a technical level, the case for increasing excise taxes to improve public health and increase government revenue is easily made, but the political and policy environment is often not supportive. In order to effectively impact policy, the required approach would typically make use of rigorous economic techniques, and be cognizant of the political economy of raising excise taxes. PMID:22987785

  7. Low-volume application by mist-blower compared with conventional compression sprayer treatment of houses with residual pyrethroid to control the malaria vector Anopheles albimanus in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, C; Rodriguez, M H; Bown, D N; Arredondo-Jiménez, J I

    1995-04-01

    Village-scale trials were carried out in southern Mexico to compare the efficacy of indoor-spraying of the pyrethroid insecticide lambda-cyhalothrin applied either as low-volume (LV) aqueous emulsion or as wettable-powder (WP) aqueous suspension for residual control of the principal coastal malaria vector Anopheles albimanus. Three indoor spray rounds were conducted at 3-month intervals using back-pack mist-blowers to apply lambda-cyhalothrin 12.5 mg a.i./m2 by LV, whereas the WP was applied by conventional compression sprayer at a mean rate of 26.5 mg a.i./m2. Both treatments caused mosquito mortality indoors and outdoors (collected inside house curtains) as a result of contact with treated surfaces before and after feeding, but had no significant impact on overall population density of An. albimanus resting indoors or assessed by human bait collections. Contact bioassays showed that WP and LV treatments with lambda-cyhalothrin were effective for 12-20 weeks (> 75% mortality) without causing excito-repellency. Compared to the WP treatment (8 houses/man/day), LV treatment (25 houses/man/day) was more than 3 times quicker per house, potentially saving 68% of labour costs. This is offset, however, by the much lower unit price of a compression sprayer (e.g. Hudson 'X-pert' at US$120) than a mist-blower (e.g. 'Super Jolly' at US$350), and higher running costs for LV applications. It was calculated, therefore, that LV becomes more economical than WP after 18.8 treatments/100 houses/10 men at equivalent rates of application, or after 7.6 spray rounds with half-rate LV applications.

  8. Is Consumer Response to Plain/Standardised Tobacco Packaging Consistent with Framework Convention on Tobacco Control Guidelines? A Systematic Review of Quantitative Studies

    PubMed Central

    Stead, Martine; Moodie, Crawford; Angus, Kathryn; Bauld, Linda; McNeill, Ann; Thomas, James; Hastings, Gerard; Hinds, Kate; O'Mara-Eves, Alison; Kwan, Irene; Purves, Richard I.; Bryce, Stuart L.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives Standardised or ‘plain’ tobacco packaging was introduced in Australia in December 2012 and is currently being considered in other countries. The primary objective of this systematic review was to locate, assess and synthesise published and grey literature relating to the potential impacts of standardised tobacco packaging as proposed by the guidelines for the international Framework Convention on Tobacco Control: reduced appeal, increased salience and effectiveness of health warnings, and more accurate perceptions of product strength and harm. Methods Electronic databases were searched and researchers in the field were contacted to identify studies. Eligible studies were published or unpublished primary research of any design, issued since 1980 and concerning tobacco packaging. Twenty-five quantitative studies reported relevant outcomes and met the inclusion criteria. A narrative synthesis was conducted. Results Studies that explored the impact of package design on appeal consistently found that standardised packaging reduced the appeal of cigarettes and smoking, and was associated with perceived lower quality, poorer taste and less desirable smoker identities. Although findings were mixed, standardised packs tended to increase the salience and effectiveness of health warnings in terms of recall, attention, believability and seriousness, with effects being mediated by the warning size, type and position on pack. Pack colour was found to influence perceptions of product harm and strength, with darker coloured standardised packs generally perceived as containing stronger tasting and more harmful cigarettes than fully branded packs; lighter coloured standardised packs suggested weaker and less harmful cigarettes. Findings were largely consistent, irrespective of location and sample. Conclusions The evidence strongly suggests that standardised packaging will reduce the appeal of packaging and of smoking in general; that it will go some way

  9. Evaluation of food additives as alternative or complementary chemicals to conventional fungicides for the control of major postharvest diseases of stone fruit.

    PubMed

    Palou, Lluis; Smilanick, Joseph L; Crisosto, Carlos H

    2009-05-01

    To evaluate potential alternatives to conventional fungicides to control decay, more than 20 food additives and generally regarded as safe compounds were tested at three concentrations in in vivo primary screenings with several cultivars of California peaches, nectarines, and plums that had been artificially inoculated with seven major postharvest pathogens: Monilinia fructicola, Botrytis cinerea, Geotrichum candidum, Alternaria alternata, Penicillium expansum, Mucor piriformis, and Rhizopus stolonifer. Overall, the best compounds were 200 mM potassium sorbate (PS), 200 mM sodium benzoate (SB), 200 mM sodium sorbate, 100 mM 2-deoxy-D-glucose, 400 mM sodium carbonate, and 250 mM potassium carbonate. Sodium and ammonium molybdates, acid lactic, and hydrogen peroxide were somewhat effective but were phytotoxic to fruit skin tissues. However, the best compounds lacked effectiveness and persistence when tested against brown rot in small-scale trials of 60-s dips in aqueous solutions at ambient temperatures; PS and SB reduced brown rot incidence by less than 40%. Rinsing treated fruit with tap water reduced the efficacy of the compounds by up to 30%. In contrast, heating the solutions to 55 or 60 degrees C significantly increased treatment efficacy. Brown rot incidence and severity were reduced by 35 and 25%, respectively, on PS-treated peaches after 7 days of incubation at 20 degrees C. However, treatment efficacy was not superior to that with water alone at these temperatures. In semicommercial trials, mixtures of fludioxonil with PS, SB, or 2-deoxy-D-glucose applied as fruit coatings on a packing line were not synergistic in their effect on brown rot, gray mold, and sour rot.

  10. Xerostomia and quality of life after intensity-modulated radiotherapy vs. conventional radiotherapy for early-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma: Initial report on a randomized controlled clinical trial

    SciTech Connect

    Pow, Edmond; Kwong, Dora; McMillan, Anne S. . E-mail: annemcmillan@hku.hk; Wong, May; Sham, Jonathan; Leung, Lucullus; Leung, W. Keung

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To compare directly the effect of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs. conventional radiotherapy (CRT) on salivary flow and quality of life (QoL) in patients with early-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods and Materials: Fifty-one patients with T2, N0/N1, M0 NPC took part in a randomized controlled clinical study and received IMRT or CRT. Stimulated whole (SWS) and parotid (SPS) saliva flow were measured and Medical Outcomes Short Form 36 (SF-36), European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) core quetionnaire, and EORTC head-and-neck module (QLQ-H and N35) were completed at baseline and 2, 6, and 12 months after radiotherapy. Results: Forty-six patients (88%) were in disease remission 12 months after radiotherapy. At 12 months postradiotherapy, 12 (50.0%) and 20 patients (83.3%) in the IMRT group had recovered at least 25% of preradiotherapy SWS and SPS flow respectively, compared with 1 (4.8%) and 2 patients (9.5%), respectively, in the CRT group. Global health scores showed continuous improvement in QoL after both treatments (p < 0.001). However, after 12 months subscale scores for role-physical, bodily pain, and physical function were significantly higher in the IMRT group, indicating a better condition (p < 0.05). Dry mouth and sticky saliva were problems in both groups 2 months after treatment. In the IMRT group, there was consistent improvement over time with xerostomia-related symptoms significantly less common than in the CRT group at 12 months postradiotherapy. Conclusions: IMRT was significantly better than CRT in terms of parotid sparing and improved QoL for early-stage disease. The findings support the case for assessment of health-related QoL in relation to head-and-neck cancer using a site-specific approach.

  11. Analysis of mismatch and shading effects in a photovoltaic array using different technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, J.; Muñoz, Y.; Ibáñez, F.; Ospino, A.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we analyze the performance of a photovoltaic array implemented in the Universidad Politécnica de Valencia which consists of modules of different technologies and power, connected in series, in order to quantify the energy losses due to mismatch and the effect of the shadows. To do this, the performance of the modules was measured in operation under ambient conditions with field measurement equipment (AMPROBE Solar Analyzer, Solar - 4000), which allows the extrapolation of measures to standard conditions STC. For the data validation, measures under controlled conditions were taken to some modules in the flash test laboratory of the Institute of Energy Technology ITE of Valencia in Spain. Subsequently the array curves measured were validated with a photovoltaic array model developed in MATLAB-Simulink for the same conditions and technologies. The results of this particular array are lost up to 20% of the energy supplied due to the modules mismatch. The study shows the curves and the energy loss due to shadows modules. This result opens scenarios for conceivable modifications to the PV field configurations today, chosen during the design stage and unchangeable during the operating stage; and gives greater importance to the energy loss by mismatch in the PV array.

  12. The differential effects of core stabilization exercise regime and conventional physiotherapy regime on postural control parameters during perturbation in patients with movement and control impairment chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The purpose of the present study was to examine the differential effect of core stability exercise training and conventional physiotherapy regime on altered postural control parameters in patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP). As heterogeneity in CLBP population moderates the effect of intervention on outcomes, in this study, interventions approaches were used based on sub-groups of CLBP. Methods This was an allocation concealed, blinded, sequential and pragmatic control trial. Three groups of participants were investigated during postural perturbations: 1) CLBP patients with movement impairment (n = 15, MI group) randomized to conventional physiotherapy regime 2) fifteen CLBP patients with control impairment randomized to core stability group (CI group) and 3) fifteen healthy controls (HC). Results The MI group did not show any significant changes in postural control parameters after the intervention period however they improved significantly in disability scores and fear avoidance belief questionnaire work score (P < 0.05). The CI group showed significant improvements in Fx, Fz, and My variables (p < 0.013, p < 0.006, and p < 0.002 respectively with larger effect sizes: Hedges's g > 0.8) after 8 weeks of core stability exercises for the adjusted p values. Postural control parameters of HC group were analyzed independently with pre and post postural control parameters of CI and MI group. This revealed the significant improvements in postural control parameters in CI group compared to MI group indicating the specific adaptation to the core stability exercises in CI group. Though the disability scores were reduced significantly in CI and MI groups (p < 0.001), the post intervention scores between groups were not found significant (p < 0.288). Twenty percentage absolute risk reduction in flare-up rates during intervention was found in CI group (95% CI: 0.69-0.98). Conclusions In this study core stability exercise group demonstrated significant

  13. High fitness costs of climate change-induced camouflage mismatch.

    PubMed

    Zimova, Marketa; Mills, L Scott; Nowak, J Joshua

    2016-03-01

    Anthropogenic climate change has created myriad stressors that threaten to cause local extinctions if wild populations fail to adapt to novel conditions. We studied individual and population-level fitness costs of a climate change-induced stressor: camouflage mismatch in seasonally colour molting species confronting decreasing snow cover duration. Based on field measurements of radiocollared snowshoe hares, we found strong selection on coat colour molt phenology, such that animals mismatched with the colour of their background experienced weekly survival decreases up to 7%. In the absence of adaptive response, we show that these mortality costs would result in strong population-level declines by the end of the century. However, natural selection acting on wide individual variation in molt phenology might enable evolutionary adaptation to camouflage mismatch. We conclude that evolutionary rescue will be critical for hares and other colour molting species to keep up with climate change.

  14. Forecasting photovoltaic array power production subject to mismatch losses

    SciTech Connect

    Picault, D.; Raison, B.; Bacha, S.; de la Casa, J.; Aguilera, J.

    2010-07-15

    The development of photovoltaic (PV) energy throughout the world this last decade has brought to light the presence of module mismatch losses in most PV applications. Such power losses, mainly occasioned by partial shading of arrays and differences in PV modules, can be reduced by changing module interconnections of a solar array. This paper presents a novel method to forecast existing PV array production in diverse environmental conditions. In this approach, field measurement data is used to identify module parameters once and for all. The proposed method simulates PV arrays with adaptable module interconnection schemes in order to reduce mismatch losses. The model has been validated by experimental results taken on a 2.2 kW{sub p} plant, with three different interconnection schemes, which show reliable power production forecast precision in both partially shaded and normal operating conditions. Field measurements show interest in using alternative plant configurations in PV systems for decreasing module mismatch losses. (author)

  15. Hydrophobic Mismatch Drives the Interaction of E5 with the Transmembrane Segment of PDGF Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Windisch, Dirk; Ziegler, Colin; Grage, Stephan L.; Bürck, Jochen; Zeitler, Marcel; Gor’kov, Peter L.; Ulrich, Anne S.

    2015-01-01

    The oncogenic E5 protein from bovine papillomavirus is a short (44 amino acids long) integral membrane protein that forms homodimers. It activates platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) β in a ligand-independent manner by transmembrane helix-helix interactions. The nature of this recognition event remains elusive, as numerous mutations are tolerated in the E5 transmembrane segment, with the exception of one hydrogen-bonding residue. Here, we examined the conformation, stability, and alignment of the E5 protein in fluid lipid membranes of substantially varying bilayer thickness, in both the absence and presence of the PDGFR transmembrane segment. Quantitative synchrotron radiation circular dichroism analysis revealed a very long transmembrane helix for E5 of ∼26 amino acids. Oriented circular dichroism and solid-state 15N-NMR showed that the alignment and stability of this unusually long segment depend critically on the membrane thickness. When reconstituted alone in exceptionally thick DNPC lipid bilayers, the E5 helix was found to be inserted almost upright. In moderately thick bilayers (DErPC and DEiPC), it started to tilt and became slightly deformed, and finally it became aggregated in conventional DOPC, POPC, and DMPC membranes due to hydrophobic mismatch. On the other hand, when E5 was co-reconstituted with the transmembrane segment of PDGFR, it was able to tolerate even the most pronounced mismatch and was stabilized by binding to the receptor, which has the same hydrophobic length. As E5 is known to activate PDGFR within the thin membranes of the Golgi compartment, we suggest that the intrinsic hydrophobic mismatch of these two interaction partners drives them together. They seem to recognize each other by forming a closely packed bundle of mutually aligned transmembrane helices, which is further stabilized by a specific pair of hydrogen-bonding residues. PMID:26287626

  16. Estimation of channel mismatches in time-interleaved analog-to-digital converters based on fractional delay and sine curve fitting.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lianping; Tian, Shulin; Jiang, Jun

    2015-03-01

    This paper proposes an algorithm to estimate the channel mismatches in time-interleaved analog-to-digital converter (TIADC) based on fractional delay (FD) and sine curve fitting. Choose one channel as the reference channel and apply FD to the output samples of reference channel to obtain the ideal samples of non-reference channels with no mismatches. Based on least square method, the sine curves are adopted to fit the ideal and the actual samples of non-reference channels, and then the mismatch parameters can be estimated by comparing the ideal sine curves and the actual ones. The principle of this algorithm is simple and easily understood. Moreover, its implementation needs no extra circuits, lowering the hardware cost. Simulation results show that the estimation accuracy of this algorithm can be controlled within 2%. Finally, the practicability of this algorithm is verified by the measurement results of channel mismatch errors of a two-channel TIADC prototype.

  17. Semantic Processing in Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children: Large N400 Mismatch Effects in Brain Responses, Despite Poor Semantic Ability

    PubMed Central

    Kallioinen, Petter; Olofsson, Jonas; Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia; Lindgren, Magnus; Ors, Marianne; Sahlén, Birgitta S.; Lyxell, Björn; Engström, Elisabet; Uhlén, Inger

    2016-01-01

    Difficulties in auditory and phonological processing affect semantic processing in speech comprehension for deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) children. However, little is known about brain responses related to semantic processing in this group. We investigated event-related potentials (ERPs) in DHH children with cochlear implants (CIs) and/or hearing aids (HAs), and in normally hearing controls (NH). We used a semantic priming task with spoken word primes followed by picture targets. In both DHH children and controls, cortical response differences between matching and mismatching targets revealed a typical N400 effect associated with semantic processing. Children with CI had the largest mismatch response despite poor semantic abilities overall; Children with CI also had the largest ERP differentiation between mismatch types, with small effects in within-category mismatch trials (target from same category as prime) and large effects in between-category mismatch trials (where target is from a different category than prime), compared to matching trials. Children with NH and HA had similar responses to both mismatch types. While the large and differentiated ERP responses in the CI group were unexpected and should be interpreted with caution, the results could reflect less precision in semantic processing among children with CI, or a stronger reliance on predictive processing. PMID:27559320

  18. Does Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging Combined With Conventional Imaging Modalities Decrease the Rates of Surgical Margin Involvement and Reoperation?: A Case-Control Comparative Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lai, Hung-Wen; Chen, Chih-Jung; Lin, Ying-Jen; Chen, Shu-Ling; Wu, Hwa-Koon; Wu, Yu-Ting; Kuo, Shou-Jen; Chen, Shou-Tung; Chen, Dar-Ren

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to assess whether preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) combined with conventional breast imaging techniques decreases the rates of margin involvement and reexcision.Data on patients who underwent surgery for primary operable breast cancer were obtained from the Changhua Christian Hospital (CCH) breast cancer database. The rate of surgical margin involvement and the rate of reoperation were compared between patients who underwent conventional breast imaging modalities (Group A: mammography and sonography) and those who received breast MRI in addition to conventional imaging (Group B: mammography, sonography, and MRI).A total of 1468 patients were enrolled in this study. Among the 733 patients in Group A, 377 (51.4%) received breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and 356 (48.6%) received mastectomy. Among the 735 patients in Group B, 348 (47.3%) received BCS and 387 (52.7%) received mastectomy. There were no significant differences in operative method between patients who received conventional imaging alone and those that received MRI and conventional imaging (P = 0.13). The rate of detection of pathological multifocal/multicentric breast cancer was markedly higher in patients who received preoperative MRI than in those who underwent conventional imaging alone (14.3% vs 8.6%, P < 0.01). The overall rate of surgical margin involvement was significantly lower in patients who received MRI (5.0%) than in those who received conventional imaging alone (9.0%) (P < 0.01). However, a significant reduction in rate of surgical margin positivity was only observed in patients who received BCS (Group A, 14.6%; Group B, 6.6%, P < 0.01). The overall BCS reoperation rates were 11.7% in the conventional imaging group and 3.2% in the combined MRI group (P < 0.01). There were no significant differences in rate of residual cancer in specimens obtained during reoperation between the 2 preoperative imaging groups (Group A, 50

  19. Comparison of magnetic wire navigation with the conventional wire technique for percutaneous coronary intervention of chronic total occlusions: a randomised, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Roth, Christian; Berger, Rudolf; Scherzer, Sabine; Krenn, Lisa; Gangl, Clemens; Dalos, Daniel; Delle-Karth, Georg; Neunteufl, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Wire crossing of a chronic total coronary occlusion (CTO) is time consuming and limited by the amount of contrast agent and time of radiation exposure. Magnetic wire navigation (MWN) might accelerate wire crossing by maintaining a coaxial vessel orientation. This study compares MWN with the conventional approach for recanalization of CTOs. Forty symptomatic patients with CTO were randomised to MWN (n = 20) or conventional approach (n = 20) for antegrade crossing of the occlusion. In the intention-to-treat analysis, MWN showed a shorter crossing time (412 versus 1131 s; p = 0.001), and, consequently, lower usage of contrast agent (primary endpoint 42 versus 116 ml; p = 0.01), and lower radiation exposure (dose-area product: 29 versus 80 Gy*cm(2); p = 0.002) during wire crossing compared to the conventional approach. Accordingly, in the per-protocol analysis, the wire-crossing rate was, in trend, higher using the conventional approach (17 of 31) compared to MWN (9 of 28; p = 0.08). The use of MWN for revascularisation of CTOs is feasible and reduces crossing time, use of contrast agent, and radiation exposure. However, due to a broader selection of wires, the conventional approach enables wire crossing in cases failed by MWN and seems to be the more successful choice.

  20. Highly Mismatched Alloys for Intermediate Band Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Walukiewicz, W.; Yu, K.M.; Wu, J.; Ager III, J.W.; Shan, W.; Scrapulla, M.A.; Dubon, O.D.; Becla, P.

    2005-03-21

    It has long been recognized that the introduction of a narrow band of states in a semiconductor band gap could be used to achieve improved power conversion efficiency in semiconductor-based solar cells. The intermediate band would serve as a ''stepping stone'' for photons of different energy to excite electrons from the valence to the conduction band. An important advantage of this design is that it requires formation of only a single p-n junction, which is a crucial simplification in comparison to multijunction solar cells. A detailed balance analysis predicts a limiting efficiency of more than 50% for an optimized, single intermediate band solar cell. This is higher than the efficiency of an optimized two junction solar cell. Using ion beam implantation and pulsed laser melting we have synthesized Zn{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}O{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} alloys with x<0.03. These highly mismatched alloys have a unique electronic structure with a narrow oxygen-derived intermediate band. The width and the location of the band is described by the Band Anticrossing model and can be varied by controlling the oxygen content. This provides a unique opportunity to optimize the absorption of solar photons for best solar cell performance. We have carried out systematic studies of the effects of the intermediate band on the optical and electrical properties of Zn{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}O{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} alloys. We observe an extension of the photovoltaic response towards lower photon energies, which is a clear indication of optical transitions from the valence to the intermediate band.

  1. Iterative dual energy material decomposition from spatial mismatched raw data sets.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xing; Hu, Jing-Jing; Zhao, Yun-Song; Zhang, Hui-Tao; Zhang, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Today's clinical dual energy computed tomography (DECT) scanners generally measure different rays for different energy spectra and acquire spatial mismatched raw data sets. The deficits in clinical DECT technologies suggest that mainly image based material decomposition methods are in use nowadays. However, the image based material decomposition is an approximate technique, and beam hardening artifacts remain in decomposition results. A recently developed image based iterative method for material decomposition from inconsistent rays (MDIR) can achieve much better image quality than the conventional image based methods. Inspired by the MDIR method, this paper proposes an iterative method to indirectly perform raw data based DECT even with completely mismatched raw data sets. The iterative process is initialized by density images that were obtained from an image based material decomposition. Then the density images are iteratively corrected by comparing the estimated polychromatic projections and the measured polychromatic projections. Only three iterations of the method are sufficient to greatly improve the qualitative and quantitative information in material density images. Compared with the MDIR method, the proposed method needs not to perform additional water precorrection. The advantages of the method are verified with numerical experiments from inconsistent noise free and noisy raw data.

  2. Computing highly specific and mismatch tolerant oligomers efficiently.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tomoyuki; Morishita, Shinichi

    2003-01-01

    The sequencing of the genomes of a variety of species and the growing databases containing expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and complementary DNAs (cDNAs) facilitate the design of highly specific oligomers for use as genomic markers, PCR primers, or DNA oligo microarrays. The first step in evaluating the specificity of short oligomers of about twenty units in length is to determine the frequencies at which the oligomers occur. However, for oligomers longer than about fifty units this is not efficient, as they usually have a frequency of only 1. A more suitable procedure is to consider the mismatch tolerance of an oligomer, that is, the minimum number of mismatches that allows a given oligomer to match a sub-sequence other than the target sequence anywhere in the genome or the EST database. However, calculating the exact value of mismatch tolerance is computationally costly and impractical. Therefore, we studied the problem of checking whether an oligomer meets the constraint that its mismatch tolerance is no less than a given threshold. Here, we present an efficient dynamic programming algorithm solution that utilizes suffix and height arrays. We demonstrated the effectiveness of this algorithm by efficiently computing a dense list of oligo-markers applicable to the human genome. Experimental results show that the algorithm runs faster than well-known Abrahamson's algorithm by orders of magnitude and is able to enumerate 63% to approximately 79% of qualified oligomers.

  3. Minority Students and Research Universities: How to Overcome the "Mismatch"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tapia, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    A controversial theory much in the news lately claims that affirmative action is often unfair to the very students it is intended to help. Called the "mismatch" theory, it suggests that underrepresented minority students are more likely to leave science, math, and engineering when, because of affirmative action, they attend colleges for which they…

  4. Educational Mismatch and Spatial Flexibility in Italian Local Labour Markets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croce, Giuseppe; Ghignoni, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    According to recent literature, this paper highlights the relevance of spatial mobility as an explanatory factor of the individual risk of job-education mismatch. To investigate this causal link, we use individual information about daily home-to-work commuting time and choices to relocate in a different local area to get a job. Our model takes…

  5. ABO-Mismatched Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Worel, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Summary Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a curative option for a variety of malignant and non-malignant hematological and congenital diseases. Due to the fact that the human leukocyte antigen system is inherited independently of the blood group system, approximately 40-50% of all HSCTs are performed across the ABO blood group barrier. The expected immune-hematological consequences after transplantation of an ABO-mismatched stem cell graft are immediate and delayed hemolytic complications due to presence of isohemagglutinins or passenger lymphocyte syndrome. The risks of these complications can partially be prevented by graft manipulation and appropriate transfusion support. Dependent on the kind of ABO mismatch, different effects on engraftment have been observed, e.g. delayed red blood cell recovery and pure red cell aplasia. Data on incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), non-relapse mortality, relapse, and overall survival are inconsistent as most studies include limited patient numbers, various graft sources, and different conditioning and GVHD prophylaxis regimens. This makes it difficult to detect a consistent effect of ABO-mismatched transplantation in the literature. However, knowledge of expectable complications and close monitoring of patients helps to detect problems early and to treat patients efficiently, thus reducing the number of fatal or life-threatening events caused by ABO-mismatched HSCT. PMID:27022317

  6. Avalanching mutations in biallelic mismatch repair deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Waterfall, Joshua J; Meltzer, Paul S

    2015-03-01

    Tumors from pediatric patients generally contain relatively few somatic mutations. A new study reports a striking exception in individuals in whom biallelic germline deficiency for mismatch repair is compounded by somatic loss of function in DNA proofreading polymerases, resulting in 'ultra-hypermutated' malignant brain tumors.

  7. A mishmash of methods for mitigating the model mismatch mess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ker, Andrew D.; Pevný, Tomáš

    2014-02-01

    The model mismatch problem occurs in steganalysis when a binary classifier is trained on objects from one cover source and tested on another: an example of domain adaptation. It is highly realistic because a steganalyst would rarely have access to much or any training data from their opponent, and its consequences can be devastating to classifier accuracy. This paper presents an in-depth study of one particular instance of model mismatch, in a set of images from Flickr using one fixed steganography and steganalysis method, attempting to separate different effects of mismatch in feature space and find methods of mitigation where possible. We also propose new benchmarks for accuracy, which are more appropriate than mean error rates when there are multiple actors and multiple images, and consider the case of 3-valued detectors which also output `don't know'. This pilot study demonstrates that some simple feature-centering and ensemble methods can reduce the mismatch penalty considerably, but not completely remove it.

  8. Supply and Demand Mismatches in Training: Can Anything Be Done?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castro, Claudio de Moura; de Andrade, Antonio Cabral

    1990-01-01

    Vocational training often fails to provide what employers need and students want. To correct supply/demand mismatches requires improving feedback from employers, increasing the flow of information, bringing schools closer to businesses, rewarding institutions for successful employment of graduates, and providing incentives for entrepreneurs. (SK)

  9. Skills Mismatch among University Graduates in the Nigeria Labor Market

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitan, Oluyomi S.; Adedeji, S. O.

    2012-01-01

    University graduates in Nigeria have been reported to be poorly prepared for work in recent years. This has implications on the relevance of university education, the employability and productivity of university graduates. One of the reasons suggested for this condition by previous studies was skill mismatch--a situation where there is a disparity…

  10. Mismatch Negativity in Children with Autism and Typical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Michelle A.; Gomes, Hilary; Gravel, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Children with autism are often characterized as having abnormalities in auditory processing. This study examined automatic and active processing of simple auditory stimuli in children using a component of event related potentials, the mismatch negativity (MMN). Amplitude of MMN in children with autism was significantly smaller than in children…

  11. Mismatch of Vocational Graduates: What Penalty on French Labour Market?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beduwe, Catherine; Giret, Jean-Francois

    2011-01-01

    This study explores individual effects of educational mismatch on wages, job satisfaction and on-the-job-search on French labour market. We distinguish between horizontal matches (job matches with field of studies) and vertical matches (job matches the level of qualification) on the one hand and skills matches (worker's assessment) on the other…

  12. Recent advances on the use of natural and safe alternatives to conventional methods to control postharvest gray mold of table grapes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gray mold, caused by Botrytis cinerea, is the main postharvest decay of table grapes. It can develop in the vineyard and spread rapidly among berries after harvest, during long distant transport, cold storage and shelf life. In conventional agriculture, bunches are sprayed with fungicides after flow...

  13. Decomposing Composing Conventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beers, Terry

    Recent research has invited critiques of the authoritative descriptions of composing found in many rhetoric textbooks. The concept of "convention" may be especially useful in rethinking the teleological basis of these textbook descriptions. Conventions found in composition textbooks need to be unmasked as arbitrary concepts which serve…

  14. The Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 complex interacts with the mismatch repair system and contributes to temozolomide-induced G2 arrest and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Mirzoeva, Olga K; Kawaguchi, Tomohiro; Pieper, Russell O

    2006-11-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent temozolomide produces O(6)-methylguanine (O6MG) in DNA, which triggers futile DNA mismatch repair, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), G(2) arrest, and ultimately cell death. Because the protein complex consisting of Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1 (MRN complex) plays a key role in DNA damage detection and signaling, we asked if this complex also played a role in the cellular response to temozolomide. Temozolomide exposure triggered the assembly of MRN complex into chromatin-associated nuclear foci. MRN foci formed significantly earlier than gamma-H2AX and 53BP1 foci that assembled in response to temozolomide-induced DNA DSBs. MRN foci formation was suppressed in cells that incurred lower levels of temozolomide-induced O6MG lesions and/or had decreased mismatch repair capabilities, suggesting that the MRN foci formed not in response to temozolomide-induced DSB but rather in response to mismatch repair processing of mispaired temozolomide-induced O6MG lesions. Consistent with this idea, the MRN foci colocalized with those of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (a component of the mismatch repair complex), and the MRN complex component Nbs1 coimmunoprecipitated with the mismatch repair protein Mlh1 specifically in response to temozolomide treatment. Furthermore, small inhibitory RNA-mediated suppression of Mre11 levels decreased temozolomide-induced G(2) arrest and cytotoxicity in a manner comparable to that achieved by suppression of mismatch repair. These data show that temozolomide-induced O6MG lesions, acted upon by the mismatch repair system, drive formation of the MRN complex foci and the interaction of this complex with the mismatch repair machinery. The MRN complex in turn contributes to the control of temozolomide-induced G(2) arrest and cytotoxicity, and as such is an additional determining factor in glioma sensitivity to DNA methylating chemotherapeutic drugs such as temozolomide.

  15. Matches, Mismatches, and Methods: Multiple-View Workflows for Energy Portfolio Analysis.

    PubMed

    Brehmer, Matthew; Ng, Jocelyn; Tate, Kevin; Munzner, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    The energy performance of large building portfolios is challenging to analyze and monitor, as current analysis tools are not scalable or they present derived and aggregated data at too coarse of a level. We conducted a visualization design study, beginning with a thorough work domain analysis and a characterization of data and task abstractions. We describe generalizable visual encoding design choices for time-oriented data framed in terms of matches and mismatches, as well as considerations for workflow design. Our designs address several research questions pertaining to scalability, view coordination, and the inappropriateness of line charts for derived and aggregated data due to a combination of data semantics and domain convention. We also present guidelines relating to familiarity and trust, as well as methodological considerations for visualization design studies. Our designs were adopted by our collaborators and incorporated into the design of an energy analysis software application that will be deployed to tens of thousands of energy workers in their client base.

  16. Strain analysis by mismatch moire method and grid method using Fourier transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Y.; Seguchi, Y.; Higashi, T.

    1990-01-01

    We have formerly presented a new method of the moire analysis of strain using the Fourier transform. It uses the phase information of the moire fringe brightness. By shifting the Fourier spectrum of the image of deformed grating lines, we obtain the “complex moire pattern”. Strain distribution is given as the derivatives of the phases of the complex moire fringes. The analysis is completely automated by digital image processing. All of the laborious and subjective procedures required in the conventional analysis such as fringe sign determination, fringe ordering and fringe interpolation are thus eliminated, and objective, fast and accurate analysis can be made. In this paper, we develop the method to a mismatch method and a grid method. We show some applications for analyzing strain distribution by using this method.

  17. Human DNA Polymerase Kappa Encircles DNA: Implicatins for Mismatch Extension and Lesion Bypass

    SciTech Connect

    Lone,S.; Townson, S.; Uljon, S.; Johnson, R.; Brahma, A.; Nair, D.; Prakash, S.; Prakash, L.; Aggarwal, A.

    2007-01-01

    Human DNA polymerase (Pol ) is a proficient extender of mispaired primer termini on undamaged DNAs and is implicated in the extension step of lesion bypass. We present here the structure of Pol catalytic core in ternary complex with DNA and an incoming nucleotide. The structure reveals encirclement of the DNA by a unique 'N-clasp' at the N terminus of Pol , which augments the conventional right-handed grip on the DNA by the palm, fingers, and thumb domains and the PAD and provides additional thermodynamic stability. The structure also reveals an active-site cleft that is constrained by the close apposition of the N-clasp and the fingers domain, and therefore can accommodate only a single Watson-Crick base pair. Together, DNA encirclement and other structural features help explain Pol 's ability to extend mismatches and to promote replication through various minor groove DNA lesions, by extending from the nucleotide incorporated opposite the lesion by another polymerase.

  18. Meniscus regeneration by syngeneic, minor mismatched, and major mismatched transplantation of synovial mesenchymal stem cells in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Makiko; Muneta, Takeshi; Koga, Hideyuki; Ozeki, Nobutake; Nakagawa, Yusuke; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Yoshiya, Shinichi; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2014-07-01

    We compared the effect of syngeneic and allogeneic transplantation of synovial mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for meniscus regeneration in a rat model. Synovium was harvested from the knee joints of three strains of rats. The anterior half of the medial meniscus in both knees of F344 rats was removed and 5 million synovial MSCs derived from F344 (syngeneic transplantation), Lewis (minor mismatched transplantation), and ACI (major mismatched transplantation) were injected into the knee of the F344 rats. At 4 weeks, the area of the regenerated meniscus in the F344 group was significantly larger than that in the ACI group. Histological score was significantly better in the F344 and Lewis groups than in the ACI group at 8 weeks. DiI labeled cells could be observed in the knee joint in the F344 group, but were hardly detected in the ACI group at 1 week. The number of macrophages and CD8 T cells at synovium around the meniscus defect was significantly lower in the F344 group than in the ACI group at 1 week. Syngeneic and minor mismatched transplantation of synovial MSCs promoted meniscus regeneration better than major mismatched transplantation in a rat meniscectmized model.

  19. A Quiet Convention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suggs, Welch

    2003-01-01

    Describes how discussion of governance and academic standards dominated the proceedings at the first NCAA convention of Myles Brand's presidency. The new president also offered a qualified endorsement of Title IX. (EV)

  20. Minamata Convention on Mercury

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    On November 6, 2013 the United States signed the Minamata Convention on Mercury, a new multilateral environmental agreement that addresses specific human activities which are contributing to widespread mercury pollution

  1. Mismatch Responses to Lexical Tone, Initial Consonant, and Vowel in Mandarin-Speaking Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Chia-Ying; Yen, Huei-ling; Yeh, Pei-wen; Lin, Wan-Hsuan; Cheng, Ying-Ying; Tzeng, Yu-Lin; Wu, Hsin-Chi

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigates how age, phonological saliency, and deviance size affect the presence of mismatch negativity (MMN) and positive mismatch response (P-MMR). This work measured the auditory mismatch responses to Mandarin lexical tones, initial consonants, and vowels in 4- to 6-year-old preschoolers using the multiple-deviant oddball…

  2. Formal Education, Mismatch and Wages after Transition: Assessing the Impact of Unobserved Heterogeneity Using Matching Estimators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamo, Ana; Messina, Julian

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the incidence and consequences of the mismatch between formal education and the educational requirements of jobs in Estonia during the years 1997-2003. We find large wage penalties associated with the phenomenon of educational mismatch. Moreover, the incidence and wage penalty of mismatches increase with age. This suggests that…

  3. New insights into the mechanism of DNA mismatch repair

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Gloria X.; Schmidt, Tobias T.; Kolodner, Richard D.; Hombauer, Hans

    2015-01-01

    The genome of all organisms is constantly being challenged by endogenous and exogenous sources of DNA damage. Errors like base:base mismatches or small insertions and deletions, primarily introduced by DNA polymerases during DNA replication are repaired by an evolutionary conserved DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system. The MMR system, together with the DNA replication machinery, promote repair by an excision and resynthesis mechanism during or after DNA replication, increasing replication fidelity by upto-three orders of magnitude. Consequently, inactivation of MMR genes results in elevated mutation rates that can lead to increased cancer susceptibility in humans. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of MMR with a focus on the different MMR protein complexes, their function and structure. We also discuss how recent findings have provided new insights in the spatio-temporal regulation and mechanism of MMR. PMID:25862369

  4. Mismatch repair system proteins in oral benign and malignant lesions.

    PubMed

    Amaral-Silva, Gleyson Kleber do; Martins, Manoela Domingues; Pontes, Hélder Antônio Rebelo; Fregnani, Eduardo Rodrigues; Lopes, Márcio Ajudarte; Fonseca, Felipe Paiva; Vargas, Pablo Agustin

    2017-04-01

    Different environmental agents may cause DNA mutations by disrupting its double-strand structure; however, even normal DNA polymerase function may synthesize mismatch nucleotide bases, occasionally demonstrating failure in its proofreading activity. To overcome this issue, mismatch repair (MMR) system, a group of proteins specialized in finding mispairing bases and small loops of insertion or deletion, works to avoid the occurrence of mutations that could ultimately lead to innumerous human diseases. In the last decades, the role of MMR proteins in oral carcinogenesis and in the development of other oral cavity neoplasms has grown, but their importance in the pathogenesis and their prognostic potential for patients affected by oral malignancies, especially oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), remain unclear. Therefore, in this manuscript we aimed to review and critically discuss the currently available data on MMR proteins expression in oral potentially malignant lesions, in OSCC, and in other oral neoplasms to better understand their relevance in these lesions.

  5. A new acoustic mismatch theory for Kapitsa resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budaev, Bair V.; Bogy, David B.

    2010-10-01

    This paper generalizes the well-known acoustic mismatch theory of Kapitsa interface thermal resistance by taking into consideration a broad class of thermal vibrations that were excluded from that theory by the imposition of the Sommerfeld radiation condition, which is required for the theory of sound but is not relevant for the analysis of heat transport. This extension preserves the main ideas of the acoustic mismatch theory but provides much more reasonable estimates for the interface resistance. The predictions of the new theory are compared with various published experimental results for the thermal resistance between liquid helium at low temperatures and several different metals (Ag, Au, Cu, Pb and Pt). The computations are straightforward and require only well-known material parameters. The predictions agree with the experiments to within their stated range of accuracy.

  6. Mismatch between classroom furniture and anthropometric measures in Chilean schools.

    PubMed

    Castellucci, H I; Arezes, P M; Viviani, C A

    2010-07-01

    Children spend about five hours per day sitting down while doing their school work. Considering this as well as the potential inadequate use of school furniture, it is likely that some anatomical-functional changes and problems in the learning process may occur. The aim of this study was to compare furniture sizes within three different schools with the anthropometric characteristics of Chilean students in the Valparaíso region, in order to evaluate the potential mismatch between them. The sample consisted of 195 volunteer students (94 male, 101 female) of the 8th grade, ranging from 12.5 to 14.5 years of age from 3 different schools. Regarding the methodology, 6 anthropometric measures (Stature, Popliteal height, Buttock-popliteal length, Elbow height while sitting, Hip width, Thigh thickness and Subscapular height) were gathered, as well as 8 dimensions from the school furniture. For the evaluation of classroom furniture a match criterion equation was defined. After considering the existing classroom furniture dimensions in each match criterion equation, the anthropometric characteristics of the considered population were compared in order to determine the mismatch between them. Results indicated that seat height, which should be considered as the starting point for the design of classroom furniture, was appropriate for students' popliteal height in only 14% of the 2 out of the 3 schools, and 28% in the third. Seat to desk height was too high and mismatched 99% of the students in one school and 100% in the others. Therefore, it was possible to conclude that the classroom's furniture was inadequate in almost all the analyzed cases and subjects. It is possible that the high mismatch percentage found between furniture and students' anthropometry can be associated to the fact that the acquisition and selection of the furniture was made without any ergonomic concern or criteria.

  7. Quantifying the Displacement of Mismatches in Multiple Sequence Alignment Benchmarks

    PubMed Central

    Bawono, Punto; van der Velde, Arjan; Abeln, Sanne; Heringa, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    Multiple Sequence Alignment (MSA) methods are typically benchmarked on sets of reference alignments. The quality of the alignment can then be represented by the sum-of-pairs (SP) or column (CS) scores, which measure the agreement between a reference and corresponding query alignment. Both the SP and CS scores treat mismatches between a query and reference alignment as equally bad, and do not take the separation into account between two amino acids in the query alignment, that should have been matched according to the reference alignment. This is significant since the magnitude of alignment shifts is often of relevance in biological analyses, including homology modeling and MSA refinement/manual alignment editing. In this study we develop a new alignment benchmark scoring scheme, SPdist, that takes the degree of discordance of mismatches into account by measuring the sequence distance between mismatched residue pairs in the query alignment. Using this new score along with the standard SP score, we investigate the discriminatory behavior of the new score by assessing how well six different MSA methods perform with respect to BAliBASE reference alignments. The SP score and the SPdist score yield very similar outcomes when the reference and query alignments are close. However, for more divergent reference alignments the SPdist score is able to distinguish between methods that keep alignments approximately close to the reference and those exhibiting larger shifts. We observed that by using SPdist together with SP scoring we were able to better delineate the alignment quality difference between alternative MSA methods. With a case study we exemplify why it is important, from a biological perspective, to consider the separation of mismatches. The SPdist scoring scheme has been implemented in the VerAlign web server (http://www.ibi.vu.nl/programs/veralignwww/). The code for calculating SPdist score is also available upon request. PMID:25993129

  8. Phenotypic Mismatches Reveal Escape from Arms-Race Coevolution

    PubMed Central

    Hanifin, Charles T; Brodie, Edmund D; Brodie, Edmund D

    2008-01-01

    Because coevolution takes place across a broad scale of time and space, it is virtually impossible to understand its dynamics and trajectories by studying a single pair of interacting populations at one time. Comparing populations across a range of an interaction, especially for long-lived species, can provide insight into these features of coevolution by sampling across a diverse set of conditions and histories. We used measures of prey traits (tetrodotoxin toxicity in newts) and predator traits (tetrodotoxin resistance of snakes) to assess the degree of phenotypic mismatch across the range of their coevolutionary interaction. Geographic patterns of phenotypic exaggeration were similar in prey and predators, with most phenotypically elevated localities occurring along the central Oregon coast and central California. Contrary to expectations, however, these areas of elevated traits did not coincide with the most intense coevolutionary selection. Measures of functional trait mismatch revealed that over one-third of sampled localities were so mismatched that reciprocal selection could not occur given current trait distributions. Estimates of current locality-specific interaction selection gradients confirmed this interpretation. In every case of mismatch, predators were “ahead” of prey in the arms race; the converse escape of prey was never observed. The emergent pattern suggests a dynamic in which interacting species experience reciprocal selection that drives arms-race escalation of both prey and predator phenotypes at a subset of localities across the interaction. This coadaptation proceeds until the evolution of extreme phenotypes by predators, through genes of large effect, allows snakes to, at least temporarily, escape the arms race. PMID:18336073

  9. Role of mismatch repair in the Escherichia coli UVM response.

    PubMed

    Murphy, H S; Palejwala, V A; Rahman, M S; Dunman, P M; Wang, G; Humayun, M Z

    1996-12-01

    Mutagenesis at 3,N4-ethenocytosine (epsilonC), a nonpairing mutagenic lesion, is significantly enhanced in Escherichia coli cells pretreated with UV, alkylating agents, or H2O2. This effect, termed UVM (for UV modulation of mutagenesis), is distinct from known DNA damage-inducible responses, such as the SOS response, the adaptive response to alkylating agents, or the oxyR-mediated response to oxidative agents. Here, we have addressed the hypothesis that UVM results from transient depletion of a mismatch repair activity that normally acts to reduce mutagenesis. To test whether the loss of mismatch repair activities results in the predicted constitutive UVM phenotype, E. coli cells defective for methyl-directed mismatch repair, for very-short-patch repair, or for the N-glycosylase activities MutY and MutM were treated with the UVM-inducing agent 1-methyl-3-nitro-1-nitrosoguanidine, with subsequent transfection of M13 viral single-stranded DNA bearing a site-specific epsilonC lesion. Survival of the M13 DNA was measured as transfection efficiency, and mutation fixation at the lesion was characterized by multiplex sequencing technology. The results showed normal UVM induction patterns in all the repair-defective strains tested. In addition, normal UVM induction was observed in cells overexpressing MutH, MutL, or MutS. All strains displayed UVM reactivation, the term used to describe the increased survival of epsilonC-containing DNA in UVM-induced cells. Taken together, these results indicate that the UVM response is independent of known mismatch repair systems in E. coli and may thus represent a previously unrecognized misrepair or misreplication pathway.

  10. Blood pressure control and treatment adherence in hypertensive patients with metabolic syndrome: protocol of a randomized controlled study based on home blood pressure telemonitoring vs. conventional management and assessment of psychological determinants of adherence (TELEBPMET Study)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Inadequate blood pressure control and poor adherence to treatment remain among the major limitations in the management of hypertensive patients, particularly of those at high risk of cardiovascular events. Preliminary evidence suggests that home blood pressure telemonitoring (HBPT) might help increasing the chance of achieving blood pressure targets and improve patient’s therapeutic adherence. However, all these potential advantages of HBPT have not yet been fully investigated. Methods/design The purpose of this open label, parallel group, randomized, controlled study is to assess whether, in patients with high cardiovascular risk (treated or untreated essential arterial hypertension - both in the office and in ambulatory conditions over 24 h - and metabolic syndrome), long-term (48 weeks) blood pressure control is more effective when based on HBPT and on the feedback to patients by their doctor between visits, or when based exclusively on blood pressure determination during quarterly office visits (conventional management (CM)). A total of 252 patients will be enrolled and randomized to usual care (n=84) or HBPT (n=168). The primary study endpoint will be the rate of subjects achieving normal daytime ambulatory blood pressure targets (<135/85 mmHg) 24 weeks and 48 weeks after randomization. In addition, the study will assess the psychological determinants of adherence and persistence to drug therapy, through specific psychological tests administered during the course of the study. Other secondary study endpoints will be related to the impact of HBPT on additional clinical and economic outcomes (number of additional medical visits, direct costs of patient management, number of antihypertensive drugs prescribed, level of cardiovascular risk, degree of target organ damage and rate of cardiovascular events, regression of the metabolic syndrome). Discussion The TELEBPMET Study will show whether HBPT is effective in improving blood pressure control and

  11. Infra-red parametric generation: Phase mismatch condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S.; Dubey, Swati; Jain, Kamal

    2015-07-01

    An analytical investigation is made for the Infrared parametric generation in doped semiconductor plasma under phase mismatch condition. Theoretical formulations are undertaken to determine induced polarization and threshold pump field for the onset of parametric generation in semiconductor plasma medium. The origin of this nonlinear interaction lies in the second order optical susceptibility arising due to the induced nonlinear current density in piezoelectric medium. Numerical estimations are made for n- type InSb at 77 K duly irradiated by a pulsed 10.6µm CO2 laser. It is very difficult to attain exact phase matching in experimental frame so we have considered a tolerable small phase mismatch in order to attain a new result. Its effect on the Infrared parametric generation in compound semiconductor is examined through induced polarization. Transmitted intensity is determined to have an idea about conversion efficiency of the said process. Phase mismatch tends to raise the required pump field to stimulate the parametric generation. Transmitted intensity is found to decrease with coherence length lc and increase carrier concentration n0, which is favorable for improved conversion efficiency.

  12. Infra-red parametric generation: Phase mismatch condition

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.; Dubey, Swati; Jain, Kamal

    2015-07-31

    An analytical investigation is made for the Infrared parametric generation in doped semiconductor plasma under phase mismatch condition. Theoretical formulations are undertaken to determine induced polarization and threshold pump field for the onset of parametric generation in semiconductor plasma medium. The origin of this nonlinear interaction lies in the second order optical susceptibility arising due to the induced nonlinear current density in piezoelectric medium. Numerical estimations are made for n- type InSb at 77 K duly irradiated by a pulsed 10.6µm CO{sub 2} laser. It is very difficult to attain exact phase matching in experimental frame so we have considered a tolerable small phase mismatch in order to attain a new result. Its effect on the Infrared parametric generation in compound semiconductor is examined through induced polarization. Transmitted intensity is determined to have an idea about conversion efficiency of the said process. Phase mismatch tends to raise the required pump field to stimulate the parametric generation. Transmitted intensity is found to decrease with coherence length lc and increase carrier concentration n{sub 0}, which is favorable for improved conversion efficiency.

  13. Semiblind Hyperspectral Unmixing in the Presence of Spectral Library Mismatches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiao; Ma, Wing-Kin; Bioucas-Dias, Jose M.; Chan, Tsung-Han

    2016-09-01

    The dictionary-aided sparse regression (SR) approach has recently emerged as a promising alternative to hyperspectral unmixing (HU) in remote sensing. By using an available spectral library as a dictionary, the SR approach identifies the underlying materials in a given hyperspectral image by selecting a small subset of spectral samples in the dictionary to represent the whole image. A drawback with the current SR developments is that an actual spectral signature in the scene is often assumed to have zero mismatch with its corresponding dictionary sample, and such an assumption is considered too ideal in practice. In this paper, we tackle the spectral signature mismatch problem by proposing a dictionary-adjusted nonconvex sparsity-encouraging regression (DANSER) framework. The main idea is to incorporate dictionary correcting variables in an SR formulation. A simple and low per-iteration complexity algorithm is tailor-designed for practical realization of DANSER. Using the same dictionary correcting idea, we also propose a robust subspace solution for dictionary pruning. Extensive simulations and real-data experiments show that the proposed method is effective in mitigating the undesirable spectral signature mismatch effects.

  14. Halo formation from mismatched beam-beam interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji

    2003-05-23

    In this paper, we report on the halo formation and emittance growth driven by a parametric resonance during mismatched beam-beam collisions. In the regime of the weak-strong beam-beam interaction, if two beams have the same machine tunes, on-axis head-on collisions between a mismatched strong beam and a weak beam will not cause the formation of halo. However, if the two beams collide with an initial offset, the beam-beam force from the mismatched strong beam can cause halo formation and emittance growth in the weak beam. Meanwhile, if two beams have different machine tunes, for opposite charged colliding beams, when the machine tune of the weak beam is smaller than that of strong beam, there is emittance growth in the weak beam. When the machine tune of the weak beam is larger than that of the strong beam, there is little emittance growth. In the regime of strong-strong beam-beam interaction, halo is formed in both beams even when the two beams collide head-on on the axis with equal machine tunes. This puts a strong requirement for a good beam match during the injection to colliders in order to avoid the emittance growth.

  15. Current status of the Scandiatransplant acceptable mismatch program.

    PubMed

    Weinreich, I D; Pedersen, F; Grunnet, N

    2013-04-01

    This article describes the Scandiatransplant Acceptable Mismatch Program (STAMP), which was set into action in 2009. The aim of STAMP is to define human leukocyte antigens (HLA) toward which the potential kidney recipient has not developed antibodies, as "acceptable mismatches" in the Scandiatransplant database. In many cases this may improve the probability for a highly immunized recipient to receive a suitable kidney graft from a deceased donor. Using data extracted from the Scandiatransplant database on the outcomes of the program after the first 3 years, 31/115 recipients included in the program have undergone transplantation. From 2008 to 2011 the mean waiting time for highly immunized patients has decreased from 42 to 37 months. Continuous evaluation and follow-up of the program is essential to improve the procedures and outcomes. Calculation of transplantability based on a given set of acceptable mismatches was added to the program in 2011, based on the historical deceased donor pool providing the possibility of a specific patient to receive a kidney through STAMP. It is still a challenge for the tissue typing laboratories to determine which detected HLA antibodies are clinical relevant. We concluded that STAMP has had the intended effects, however adjustments and improvements is an ongoing process. As an improvment of the program HLA-C was added to the STAMP search algorithm in September 2012.

  16. Investigating Interaural Frequency-Place Mismatches via Bimodal Vowel Integration

    PubMed Central

    Santurette, Sébastien; Chalupper, Josef; Dau, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    For patients having residual hearing in one ear and a cochlear implant (CI) in the opposite ear, interaural place-pitch mismatches might be partly responsible for the large variability in individual benefit. Behavioral pitch-matching between the two ears has been suggested as a way to individualize the fitting of the frequency-to-electrode map but is rather tedious and unreliable. Here, an alternative method using two-formant vowels was developed and tested. The interaural spectral shift was inferred by comparing vowel spaces, measured by presenting the first formant (F1) to the nonimplanted ear and the second (F2) on either side. The method was first evaluated with eight normal-hearing listeners and vocoder simulations, before being tested with 11 CI users. Average vowel distributions across subjects showed a similar pattern when presenting F2 on either side, suggesting acclimatization to the frequency map. However, individual vowel spaces with F2 presented to the implant did not allow a reliable estimation of the interaural mismatch. These results suggest that interaural frequency-place mismatches can be derived from such vowel spaces. However, the method remains limited by difficulties in bimodal fusion of the two formants. PMID:25421087

  17. [The need for tobacco control in Japan based on Articles 9 and 10 of the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC), regulation of the contents of tobacco products, and regulation of tobacco product disclosures].

    PubMed

    Inaba, Yohei; Uchiyama, Shigehisa; Kunugita, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    In Japan, ultralow-nicotine cigarette brands with ventilation holes on the cigarette filters have been widely marketed to smokers. The use of these cigarette brands leads to compensation smoking. Menthol cigarette brands that have a cooling and numbing effect are also sold. In 2013, smokeless tobacco products similar to the Swedish snus, which is banned for sale in the European Union except in Sweden, were released in Japanese markets. These tobacco products have "toxicity," have a "ventilation filter," are "attractive," and promote "dependence." Tobacco smoke and smokeless tobacco are classified into "Group 1: Carcinogenic to humans" by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). The purpose of Articles 9 and 10 of the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC) is to regulate the contents of tobacco products as well as to regulate tobacco product disclosures. The implementation of some other articles has gradually advanced in Japan. However, that of Articles 9 and 10 is late. Japanese governmental authorities are being urged to immediately implement Articles 9 and 10.

  18. Method for reducing or eliminating interface defects in mismatched semiconductor eiplayers

    DOEpatents

    Fitzgerald, Jr., Eugene A.; Ast, Dieter G.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention and process relates to crystal lattice mismatched semiconductor composite having a first semiconductor layer and a second semiconductor growth layer deposited thereon to form an interface wherein the growth layer can be deposited at thicknesses in excess of the critical thickness, even up to about 10x critical thickness. Such composite has an interface which is substantially free of interface defects. For example, the size of the growth areas in a mismatched In.sub.0.05 Ga.sub.0.95 As/(001)GaAs interface was controlled by fabricating 2-.mu.m high pillars of various lateral geometries and lateral dimensions before the epitaxial deposition of 3500.ANG. of In.sub.0.05 Ga.sub.0.95 As. The linear dislocation density at the interface was reduced from >5000 dislocations/cm to about zero for 25-.mu.m lateral dimensions and to less than 800 dislocations/cm for lateral dimensions as large as 100 .mu.m. The fabricated pillars control the lateral dimensions of the growth layer and block the glide of misfit dislocations with the resultant decrease in dislocation density.

  19. Method for reducing or eliminating interface defects in mismatched semiconductor epilayers

    DOEpatents

    Fitzgerald, Jr., Eugene A.; Ast, Dieter G.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention and process relates to crystal lattice mismatched semiconductor composite having a first semiconductor layer and a second semiconductor growth layer deposited thereon to form an interface wherein the growth layer can be deposited at thicknesses in excess of the critical thickness, even up to about 10.times. critical thickness. Such composite has an interface which is substantially free of interface defects. For example, the size of the growth areas in a mismatched In.sub.0.05 Ga.sub.0.95 As/(001)GaAs interface was controlled by fabricating 2-.mu.m high pillars of various lateral geometries and lateral dimensions before the epitaxial deposition of 3500.ANG. of In.sub.0.05 Ga.sub.0.95 As. The linear dislocation density at the interface was reduced from >5000 dislocations/cm to about zero for 25-.mu.m lateral dimensions and to less than 800 dislocations/cm for lateral dimensions as large as 100 .mu.m. The fabricated pillars control the lateral dimensions of the growth layer and block the glide of misfit dislocations with the resultant decrease in dislocation density.

  20. Method for reducing or eliminating interface defects in mismatched semiconductor epilayers

    DOEpatents

    Fitzgerald, E.A. Jr.; Ast, D.G.

    1992-10-20

    The present invention and process relates to crystal lattice mismatched semiconductor composite having a first semiconductor layer and a second semiconductor growth layer deposited thereon to form an interface wherein the growth layer can be deposited at thicknesses in excess of the critical thickness, even up to about 10[times] critical thickness. Such composite has an interface which is substantially free of interface defects. For example, the size of the growth areas in a mismatched In[sub 0.05]Ga[sub 0.95]As/(001)GaAs interface was controlled by fabricating 2-[mu]m high pillars of various lateral geometries and lateral dimensions before the epitaxial deposition of 3500 [angstrom] of In[sub 0.05]Ga[sub 0.95]As. The linear dislocation density at the interface was reduced from >5000 dislocations/cm to about zero for 25-[mu]m lateral dimensions and to less than 800 dislocations/cm for lateral dimensions as large as 100 [mu]m. The fabricated pillars control the lateral dimensions of the growth layer and block the glide of misfit dislocations with the resultant decrease in dislocation density. 7 figs.

  1. On compensation of mismatched recording conditions in the Bayesian approach for forensic automatic speaker recognition.

    PubMed

    Botti, F; Alexander, A; Drygajlo, A

    2004-12-02

    This paper deals with a procedure to compensate for mismatched recording conditions in forensic speaker recognition, using a statistical score normalization. Bayesian interpretation of the evidence in forensic automatic speaker recognition depends on three sets of recordings in order to perform forensic casework: reference (R) and control (C) recordings of the suspect, and a potential population database (P), as well as a questioned recording (QR) . The requirement of similar recording conditions between suspect control database (C) and the questioned recording (QR) is often not satisfied in real forensic cases. The aim of this paper is to investigate a procedure of normalization of scores, which is based on an adaptation of the Test-normalization (T-norm) [2] technique used in the speaker verification domain, to compensate for the mismatch. Polyphone IPSC-02 database and ASPIC (an automatic speaker recognition system developed by EPFL and IPS-UNIL in Lausanne, Switzerland) were used in order to test the normalization procedure. Experimental results for three different recording condition scenarios are presented using Tippett plots and the effect of the compensation on the evaluation of the strength of the evidence is discussed.

  2. Cryoplasty Versus Conventional Balloon Angioplasty of the Femoropopliteal Artery in Diabetic Patients: Long-Term Results from a Prospective Randomized Single-Center Controlled Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Spiliopoulos, Stavros Katsanos, Konstantinos; Karnabatidis, Dimitris; Diamantopoulos, Athanasios; Kagadis, George C.; Christeas, Nikolaos; Siablis, Dimitris

    2010-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the immediate and long-term results of cryoplasty versus conventional balloon angioplasty in the femoropopliteal artery of diabetic patients. Fifty diabetic patients (41 men, mean age 68 years) were randomized to cryoplasty (group CRYO; 24 patients with 31 lesions) or conventional balloon angioplasty (group COBA; 26 patients with 34 lesions) of the femoropopliteal artery. Technical success was defined as <30% residual stenosis without any adjunctive stenting. Primary end points included technical success, primary patency, binary in-lesion restenosis (>50%), and freedom from target lesion recanalization. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was performed to adjust for confounding factors of heterogeneity. In total, 61.3% (19 of 31) in group CRYO and 52.9% (18 of 34) in group COBA were de novo lesions. More than 70% of the lesions were Transatlantic Inter-Society Consensus (TASC) B and C in both groups, and 41.4% of the patients in group CRYO and 38.7% in group COBA suffered from critical limb ischemia. Immediate technical success rate was 58.0% in group CRYO versus 64.0% in group COBA (p = 0.29). According to 3-year Kaplan-Meier estimates, there were no significant differences with regard to patient survival (86.8% in group CRYO vs. 87.0% in group COBA, p = 0.54) and limb salvage (95.8 vs. 92.1% in groups CRYO and COBA, respectively, p = 0.60). There was a nonsignificant trend of increased binary restenosis in group CRYO (hazard ratio [HR] 1.3; 95% CI 0.6-2.6, p = 0.45). Primary patency was significantly lower in group CRYO compared with group COBA (HR 2.2; 95% CI 1.1-4.3, p = 0.02). Significantly more repeat intervention events because of recurrent symptoms were required in group CRYO (HR 2.5; 95% CI 1.2-5.3, p = 0.01). Cryoplasty was associated with lower primary patency and more clinically driven repeat procedures after long-term follow-up compared with conventional balloon angioplasty.

  3. Slow conformational changes in MutS and DNA direct ordered transitions between mismatch search, recognition and signaling of DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anushi; Doucette, Christopher; Biro, F Noah; Hingorani, Manju M

    2013-11-15

    MutS functions in mismatch repair (MMR) to scan DNA for errors, identify a target site and trigger subsequent events in the pathway leading to error removal and DNA re-synthesis. These actions, enabled by the ATPase activity of MutS, are now beginning to be analyzed from the perspective of the protein itself. This study provides the first ensemble transient kinetic data on MutS conformational dynamics as it works with DNA and ATP in MMR. Using a combination of fluorescence probes (on Thermus aquaticus MutS and DNA) and signals (intensity, anisotropy and resonance energy transfer), we have monitored the timing of key conformational changes in MutS that are coupled to mismatch binding and recognition, ATP binding and hydrolysis, as well as sliding clamp formation and signaling of repair. Significant findings include (a) a slow step that follows weak initial interaction between MutS and DNA, in which concerted conformational changes in both macromolecules control mismatch recognition, and (b) rapid, binary switching of MutS conformations that is concerted with ATP binding and hydrolysis and (c) is stalled after mismatch recognition to control formation of the ATP-bound MutS sliding clamp. These rate-limiting pre- and post-mismatch recognition events outline the mechanism of action of MutS on DNA during initiation of MMR.

  4. Unicompartmental knee prosthesis implantation with a non-image-based navigation system: rationale, technique, case-control comparative study with a conventional instrumented implantation.

    PubMed

    Jenny, Jean-Yves; Boeri, Cyril

    2003-01-01

    The accuracy of implantation is an accepted prognostic factor for the long-term survival of unicompartmental knee prostheses (UKP). We developed a non-image-guided navigation system for UKP implantation without any extramedullary or intramedullary guiding device. The 30 patients operated on with the navigation system (group A) were matched to 30 patients operated on with the conventional technique (group B) using age, sex, body mass index, preoperative coronal mechanical femorotibial angle, and severity of the preoperative degenerative changes. All patients had a complete radiological examination in the first 3 months after the index procedure, with anteroposterior and lateral plain knee radiographs and anteroposterior and lateral long leg radiographs. Coronal femorotibial mechanical angle and both coronal and sagittal orientations of the femoral and tibial components were measured. There were no significant differences in the mean numerical values of all measured angles except for the sagittal orientation of the tibial component, with a significant excessive posterior tibial slope in group B. There was a significant increase in the rate of prostheses implanted in the desired angular range for all criteria except the coronal mechanical femorotibial angle in group A. An optimal implantation with all optimal items was obtained by 18 cases in group A and 6 cases in group B. Navigated implantation of a UKP with the used, non-image-based system improved the accuracy of the radiological implantation without any significant inconvenience and with little change in the conventional operative technique. The only inconvenience was a 20-min longer operative time. This improvement could be related to a longer survival of such implanted prostheses.

  5. Digital Full-Scope Simulation of a Conventional Nuclear Power Plant Control Room, Phase 2: Installation of a Reconfigurable Simulator to Support Nuclear Plant Sustainability

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald L. Boring; Vivek Agarwal; Kirk Fitzgerald; Jacques Hugo; Bruce Hallbert

    2013-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability program has developed a control room simulator in support of control room modernization at nuclear power plants in the U.S. This report highlights the recent completion of this reconfigurable, full-scale, full-scope control room simulator buildout at the Idaho National Laboratory. The simulator is fully reconfigurable, meaning it supports multiple plant models developed by different simulator vendors. The simulator is full-scale, using glasstop virtual panels to display the analog control boards found at current plants. The present installation features 15 glasstop panels, uniquely achieving a complete control room representation. The simulator is also full-scope, meaning it uses the same plant models used for training simulators at actual plants. Unlike in the plant training simulators, the deployment on glasstop panels allows a high degree of customization of the panels, allowing the simulator to be used for research on the design of new digital control systems for control room modernization. This report includes separate sections discussing the glasstop panels, their layout to mimic control rooms at actual plants, technical details on creating a multi-plant and multi-vendor reconfigurable simulator, and current efforts to support control room modernization at U.S. utilities. The glasstop simulator provides an ideal testbed for prototyping and validating new control room concepts. Equally importantly, it is helping create a standardized and vetted human factors engineering process that can be used across the nuclear industry to ensure control room upgrades maintain and even improve current reliability and safety.

  6. Design and numerical evaluation of full-authority flight control systems for conventional and thruster-augmented helicopters employed in NOE operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perri, Todd A.; Mckillip, R. M., Jr.; Curtiss, H. C., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The development and methodology is presented for development of full-authority implicit model-following and explicit model-following optimal controllers for use on helicopters operating in the Nap-of-the Earth (NOE) environment. Pole placement, input-output frequency response, and step input response were used to evaluate handling qualities performance. The pilot was equipped with velocity-command inputs. A mathematical/computational trajectory optimization method was employed to evaluate the ability of each controller to fly NOE maneuvers. The method determines the optimal swashplate and thruster input histories from the helicopter's dynamics and the prescribed geometry and desired flying qualities of the maneuver. Three maneuvers were investigated for both the implicit and explicit controllers with and without auxiliary propulsion installed: pop-up/dash/descent, bob-up at 40 knots, and glideslope. The explicit controller proved to be superior to the implicit controller in performance and ease of design.

  7. Convention Problems - 1787.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Deroy L.

    Designed to motivate eighth-grade civics students in the study of the United States Constitution, this game is intended to simulate the basic problems faced by the delegates to the Philadelphia Convention of 1787. The four parts of the game introduce the governmental concepts of the bicameral legislature, the executive branch, the judicial branch,…

  8. A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Conventional Technique Versus the No-touch Isolation Technique for Primary Tumor Resection in Patients with Colorectal Cancer: Japan Clinical Oncology Group Study JCOG1006

    PubMed Central

    Takii, Yasumasa; Shimada, Yasuhiro; Moriya, Yoshihiro; Nakamura, Kenichi; Katayama, Hiroshi; Kimura, Aya; Shibata, Taro; Fukuda, Haruhiko

    2014-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial is currently being conducted in Japan to demonstrate the superiority of the no-touch isolation technique over the conventional technique for patients with potentially curative colon and rectosigmoid cancer. The conventional technique procedure gives first priority to mobilization of the tumor-bearing segment of the colon, which is followed by central vascular ligation and ligation of other vasculature. Conversely, the no-touch isolation technique gives first priority to central vascular ligation, which is followed by mobilization of the tumor-bearing segment of the colon. A total of 850 patients will be enrolled in this trial. The primary endpoint is disease-free survival. Secondary endpoints are overall survival, relapse-free survival, liver metastasis-free survival, mode of recurrence, surgical morbidity, adverse events due to postoperative chemotherapy, serious adverse events and short-term clinical outcomes. PMID:24211857

  9. Expectation mismatch: differences between self-generated and cue-induced expectations.

    PubMed

    Gaschler, R; Schwager, S; Umbach, V J; Frensch, P A; Schubert, T

    2014-10-01

    Expectation of upcoming stimuli and tasks can lead to improved performance, if the anticipated situation occurs, while expectation mismatch can lead to less efficient processing. Researchers have used methodological approaches that rely on either self-generated expectations (predictions) or cue-induced expectations to investigate expectation mismatch effects. Differentiating these two types of expectations for different contents of expectation such as stimuli, responses, task sets and conflict level, we review evidence suggesting that self-generated expectations lead to larger facilitating effects and conflict effects on the behavioral and neural level - as compared to cue-based expectations. On a methodological level, we suggest that self-generated as compared to cue-induced expectations allow for a higher amount of experimental control in many experimental designs on expectation effects. On a theoretical level, we argue for qualitative differences in how cues vs. self-generated expectations influence performance. While self-generated expectations might generally involve representing the expected event in the focus of attention in working memory, cues might only lead to such representations under supportive circumstances (i.e., cue of high validity and attended).

  10. Femtomolar detection of single mismatches by discriminant analysis of DNA hybridization events using gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xingyi; Sim, Sang Jun

    2013-03-21

    Even though DNA-based nanosensors have been demonstrated for quantitative detection of analytes and diseases, hybridization events have never been numerically investigated for further understanding of DNA mediated interactions. Here, we developed a nanoscale platform with well-designed capture and detection gold nanoprobes to precisely evaluate the hybridization events. The capture gold nanoprobes were mono-laid on glass and the detection probes were fabricated via a novel competitive conjugation method. The two kinds of probes combined in a suitable orientation following the hybridization with the target. We found that hybridization efficiency was markedly dependent on electrostatic interactions between DNA strands, which can be tailored by adjusting the salt concentration of the incubation solution. Due to the much lower stability of the double helix formed by mismatches, the hybridization efficiencies of single mismatched (MMT) and perfectly matched DNA (PMT) were different. Therefore, we obtained an optimized salt concentration that allowed for discrimination of MMT from PMT without stringent control of temperature or pH. The results indicated this to be an ultrasensitive and precise nanosensor for the diagnosis of genetic diseases.

  11. Comparison of broiler performance and carcass parameters when fed diets containing combined trait insect-protected and glyphosate-tolerant corn (MON 89034 x NK603), control, or conventional reference corn.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M; Lucas, D; Nemeth, M; Davis, S; Hartnell, G

    2007-09-01

    A 42-d floor pen study was conducted to compare broiler (Ross x Ross 308) performance and carcass measurements when fed diets containing lepidopteran-protected corn combined with glyphosate-tolerant corn (MON 89034 x NK603) with those of broilers fed diets containing corn grain from the conventional control (similar genetic background to the test corn) and 6 conventional corn hybrids. It has been found that MON 89034 produces the Cry1A.105 and Cry2Ab2 insecticidal proteins that protect corn plants from feeding damage caused by European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis) and other lepidopteran insect pests. In addition, NK603 produces the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase protein from Agrobacterium sp. strain CP4 (CP4 EPSPS), which confers tolerance to glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup agricultural herbicides. The traditional breeding of plants that express the individual traits produced MON 89034 x NK603. Broilers were fed starter diets (approximately 57% wt/wt corn grain) from d 0 to 21 and grower-finisher diets (approximately 59% wt/wt corn grain) from d 21 to 42. The study utilized a randomized complete block design with 8 dietary treatments assigned randomly within 5 blocks of 16 pens each (8 male and 8 female) with 10 birds per pen. There were 10 pens per treatment group (5 male and 5 female). Weight at d 0 and 42, feed intake, feed conversion, and all measured carcass and meat quality parameters were not different (P > 0.05) for birds fed MON 89034 x NK603 and control corn diets. In addition, comparisons of the MON 89034 x NK603 diet to the population of the control and 6 reference corn diets showed no difference (P > 0.05) in any performance, carcass, or meat quality parameter measured. In conclusion, the diets containing MON 89034 x NK603 were nutritionally equivalent to diets containing the control or conventional reference corn grain when fed to broilers.

  12. Climate change can cause spatial mismatch of trophically interacting species.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Oliver; Settele, Josef; Kudrna, Otakar; Klotz, Stefan; Kühn, Ingolf

    2008-12-01

    Climate change is one of the most influential drivers of biodiversity. Species-specific differences in the reaction to climate change can become particularly important when interacting species are considered. Current studies have evidenced temporal mismatching of interacting species at single points in space, and recently two investigations showed that species interactions are relevant for their future ranges. However, so far we are not aware that the ranges of interacting species may become substantially spatially mismatched. We developed separate ecological-niche models for a monophagous butterfly (Boloria titania) and its larval host plant (Polygonum bistorta) based on monthly interpolated climate data, land-cover classes, and soil data at a 10'-grid resolution. We show that all of three chosen global-change scenarios, which cover a broad range of potential developments in demography, socio-economics, and technology during the 21st century from moderate to intermediate to maximum change, will result in a pronounced spatial mismatch between future niche spaces of these species. The butterfly may expand considerably its future range (by 124-258%) if the host plant has unlimited dispersal, but it could lose 52-75% of its current range if the host plant is not able to fill its projected ecological niche space, and 79-88% if the butterfly also is assumed to be highly dispersal limited. These findings strongly suggest that climate change has the potential to disrupt trophic interactions because co-occurring species do not necessarily react in a similar manner to global change, having important consequences at ecological and evolutionary time scales.

  13. Mismatch Negativity Recording in Children With Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: A Preliminary Study Integrating Neurophysiological and Neuropsychological Results.

    PubMed

    Filippini, Melissa; Guerra, Angelo; Negosanti, Alessandra; Santi, Sara; Sarajlija, Jasenka; Musti, Muriel Assunta; Gobbi, Giuseppe; Lassonde, Maryse; Pini, Antonella

    2016-11-01

    Many studies on Duchenne muscular dystrophy children support the hypothesis of a specific neuropsychological phenotype affecting mostly phonological skills. This prospective study aimed to shed light on the role of phonological abilities. Fourteen Duchenne muscular dystrophy children and 7 healthy children underwent mismatch negativity. Moreover, verbal intelligence, visuospatial attention, immediate verbal memory, working memory, grammar, vocabulary, visuomotor skills, reading, text comprehension, writing, and arithmetic were tested in Duchenne muscular dystrophy children. No significant difference between control and Duchenne muscular dystrophy children was found neither for mismatch negativity amplitude (P = .191 and .116, respectively) nor for latency (P = .135). Eight (57.14%) patients showed an impairment of immediate verbal memory and of visuomotor skills, 7 (63.64%) patients had a deficit in writing and arithmetic skills, even with a mean normal intelligence quotient. Taken together, the results put in evidence a heterogeneous neuropsychological profile not explainable on the basis of a phonological deficit.

  14. A novel conception for spontaneous transversions caused by homo-pyrimidine DNA mismatches: a QM/QTAIM highlight.

    PubMed

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2015-09-07

    We have firstly shown that the T·T(w) and C·C(w) DNA mismatches with wobble (w) geometry stay in slow tautomeric equilibrium with short T·T*(WC) and C·C*(WC) Watson-Crick (WC) mispairs. These non-dissociative tautomeric rearrangements are controlled by the plane-symmetric, highly stable, highly polar and zwitterionic transition states. The obtained results allow us to understand in what way the T·T(w) and C·C(w) mismatches acquire enzymatically competent T·T*(WC) and C·C*(WC) conformations directly in the hydrophobic recognition pocket of a high-fidelity DNA-polymerase, thereby producing thermodynamically non-equilibrium spontaneous transversions. The simplest numerical estimation of the frequency ratio of the TT to CC spontaneous transversions satisfactorily agrees with experimental data.

  15. Delivery performance of conventional aircraft by terminal-area, time-based air traffic control: A real-time simulation evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Credeur, Leonard; Houck, Jacob A.; Capron, William R.; Lohr, Gary W.

    1990-01-01

    A description and results are presented of a study to measure the performance and reaction of airline flight crews, in a full workload DC-9 cockpit, flying in a real-time simulation of an air traffic control (ATC) concept called Traffic Intelligence for the Management of Efficient Runway-scheduling (TIMER). Experimental objectives were to verify earlier fast-time TIMER time-delivery precision results and obtain data for the validation or refinement of existing computer models of pilot/airborne performance. Experimental data indicated a runway threshold, interarrival-time-error standard deviation in the range of 10.4 to 14.1 seconds. Other real-time system performance parameters measured include approach speeds, response time to controller turn instructions, bank angles employed, and ATC controller message delivery-time errors.

  16. Visual-Functional Mismatch Between Coronary Angiography, Fractional Flow Reserve, and Quantitative Coronary Angiography.

    PubMed

    Safi, Morteza; Eslami, Vahid; Namazi, Mohammad Hasan; Vakili, Hossain; Saadat, Habib; Alipourparsa, Saeid; Adibi, Ali; Movahed, Mohammad Reza

    2016-12-01

    Anatomical and functional mismatches are not uncommon in the assessment of coronary lesions. The aim of this study was to identify clinical and lesion-specific factors affecting angiographic, anatomical, and functional mismatch in intermediate coronary lesions. In patients who underwent coronary angiography for clinical reasons, fractional flow reserve (FFR), and quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) analyses for intermediate stenotic lesions were performed simultaneously. Mismatches between the measured values were analyzed. A total of 95 intermediate lesions were assessed simultaneously by visual angiography, FFR, and QCA. The visual-FFR mismatch was found in 40% of the lesions while reverse visual-FFR mismatch was determined in nearly 14% of the lesions. Mismatch and reverse mismatch between FFR and QCA parameters were observed in 10 and 23% of the lesions. FFR value was significant in 32% of the lesions while visually significant stenosis was shown in 61% of the lesions. Among the visual-FFR reverse mismatch group, the prevalence of culprit lesions within the left anterior descending (LAD) was significantly higher than other vessels (p value < 0.02). There were high frequencies of angiographic, QCA, and functional mismatches in analyses of intermediate coronary lesions. LAD lesions showed the highest mismatch. Angiographic or QCA estimation of lesion severity has consistently resulted in inappropriate stenting of functionally nonsignificant lesions or undertreatment of significant lesions based on FFR.

  17. Fast damping in mismatched high intensity beam transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Variale, V.

    2001-08-01

    A very fast damping of beam envelope oscillation amplitudes was recently observed in simulations of high intensity beam transport, through periodic FODO cells, in mismatched conditions [V. Variale, Nuovo Cimento Soc. Ital. Fis. 112A, 1571-1582 (1999) and T. Clauser et al., in Proceedings of the Particle Accelerator Conference, New York, 1999 (IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, 1999), p. 1779]. A Landau damping mechanism was proposed at the origin of observed effect. In this paper, to further investigate the source of this fast damping, extensive simulations have been carried out. The results presented here support the interpretation of the mechanism at the origin of the fast damping as a Landau damping effect.

  18. Absolute gain measurement by the image method under mismatched condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.; Baddour, Maurice F.

    1987-01-01

    Purcell's image method for measuring the absolute gain of an antenna is particularly attractive for small test antennas. The method is simple to use and utilizes only one antenna with a reflecting plane to provide an image for the receiving antenna. However, the method provides accurate results only if the antenna is matched to its waveguide. In this paper, a waveguide junction analysis is developed to determine the gain of an antenna under mismatched condition. Absolute gain measurements for two standard gain horn antennas have been carried out. Experimental results agree closely with published data.

  19. Conventional Strategic Deterrence

    SciTech Connect

    Latter, A.L.; Martinelli, E.A.; Speed, R.D.

    1992-08-01

    The Bush Administration argues that the US, as the world's only remaining superpower, must be prepared to intervene militarily in regional conflicts. However, the traditional American way of fighting-relying on ground forces with heavy equipment, supported by naval and air forces--could prove too expensive, both monetarily and in terms of expected American casualties, to garner the support of the American public or Congress. This paper argues that the revolution in conventional weaponry demonstrated in the Persian Gulf War opens up the possibility of a new strategy--called Conventional Strategic Deterrence--that could reduce both financial costs and casualties (if it were necessary to implement the strategy) while still being a strong and credible deterrent to regional conflict.

  20. Laparoscopic versus conventional appendectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Vallina, V L; Velasco, J M; McCulloch, C S

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to prospectively define the impact of laparoscopy on the management of patients with a presumed diagnosis of appendicitis. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: While the role of laparoscopy in the management of cholelithiasis is well established, its impact on the management of acute appendicitis needs to be objectively defined and compared to that of conventional management. Several authors have predicted that laparoscopic appendectomy will become the preferred treatment for appendicitis. METHODS: Two groups of consecutive patients with similar clinical characteristics of acute appendicitis were compared. Data on the laparoscopic group were compiled prospectively on standardized forms; data on the conventional group were collected retrospectively. Operative time, hospital stay, analgesia, cost, and return to normal activities were noted. RESULTS: Seventeen consecutive patients who underwent appendectomy were compared to 18 consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopy (16 of these 18 had laparoscopic appendectomy). There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of clinical characteristics and appendiceal histopathology. The mean operative times were 61 +/- 4.1 minutes and 46 +/- 2.9 minutes for the laparoscopy and conventional groups, respectively (p < 0.01). Hospital stay was significantly shorter in the laparoscopic appendectomy group, with 81% of patients being discharged on their first postoperative day (p < 0.001). The laparoscopic appendectomy patients required significantly less narcotic analgesia (p < 0.02). Return to normal activity was not significantly different between the two groups. The average total cost of laparoscopic appendectomy was 30% greater than that of conventional appendectomy. CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopy is a useful adjunct to the management of patients with a presumed clinical diagnosis of acute appendicitis. PMID:8239785

  1. IERS Conventions (2003)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    3), are the respective resonance frequencies associated with the Chandler wobble (CW), the retrograde free core nutation (FCN), and the pro- grade...Soc., 64, pp. 747–765. Zschau, J., 1983, “Rheology of the Earth’s mantle at tidal and Chandler Wobble periods,” Proc. Ninth Int. Symp. Earth Tides, New...Reference Frame CTRS Conventional Terrestrial Reference System CW Chandler Wobble DOMES Directory Of MERIT Sites DORIS Doppler Orbit determination

  2. Convention, Confirmation, and Credibility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    4 It was Pierre Duhem , a physicist, who made the strongest claim regarding the conventionality of what most people think of as empirical theory near...Mach, op. cit. p. 306. 5. Pierre Duhem , The Aim and Structure of Physical Theory Princeton University Press, Princeton, 1954. In French, it appeared as...examine in detail the ideas of Mach, Poincare, and Duhem . That they had the idea that it could be philosophically respectable to regard scientific

  3. [Neonatal conventional ventilation guidelines].

    PubMed

    2001-09-01

    Respiratory pathology is a frequent problem in Neonatal Intensive Care Units; the last few years, our knowledge about its management has improved enormously. Conventional Ventilatory support is a high-specialized technique that maintains a correct alveolar gas exchange while the primary aetiology is to present some clinical guidelines for every professional working with newborns who have respiratory failure improves. The aim of this document is to present some clinical guidelines for every professional working with newborns who have respiratory pathology

  4. Mismatch in microbial food webs: predators but not prey perform better in their local biotic and abiotic conditions.

    PubMed

    Parain, Elodie C; Gravel, Dominique; Rohr, Rudolf P; Bersier, Louis-Félix; Gray, Sarah M

    2016-07-01

    Understanding how trophic levels respond to changes in abiotic and biotic conditions is key for predicting how food webs will react to environmental perturbations. Different trophic levels may respond disproportionately to change, with lower levels more likely to react faster, as they typically consist of smaller-bodied species with higher reproductive rates. This response could cause a mismatch between trophic levels, in which predators and prey will respond differently to changing abiotic or biotic conditions. This mismatch between trophic levels could result in altered top-down and bottom-up control and changes in interaction strength. To determine the possibility of a mismatch, we conducted a reciprocal-transplant experiment involving Sarracenia purpurea food webs consisting of bacterial communities as prey and a subset of six morphologically similar protozoans as predators. We used a factorial design with four temperatures, four bacteria and protozoan biogeographic origins, replicated four times. This design allowed us to determine how predator and prey dynamics were altered by abiotic (temperature) conditions and biotic (predators paired with prey from either their local or non-local biogeographic origin) conditions. We found that prey reached higher densities in warmer temperature regardless of their temperature of origin. Conversely, predators achieved higher densities in the temperature condition and with the prey from their origin. These results confirm that predators perform better in abiotic and biotic conditions of their origin while their prey do not. This mismatch between trophic levels may be especially significant under climate change, potentially disrupting ecosystem functioning by disproportionately affecting top-down and bottom-up control.

  5. Temporal characterization of protein production levels from baculovirus vectors coding for GFP and RFP genes under non-conventional promoter control.

    PubMed

    George, Steve; Jauhar, Altamash M; Mackenzie, Jennifer; Kieβlich, Sascha; Aucoin, Marc G

    2015-09-01

    The ease of use and versatility of the Baculovirus Expression Vector System (BEVS) has made it one of the most widely used systems for recombinant protein production However, co-expression systems currently in use mainly make use of the very strong very late p10 and polyhedron (polh) promoters to drive expression of foreign genes, which does not provide much scope for tailoring expression ratios within the cell. This work demonstrates the use of different Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) promoters to control the timing and expression of two easily traceable fluorescent proteins, the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), and a red fluorescent protein (DsRed2) in a BEVS co-expression system. Our results show that gene expression levels can easily be controlled using this strategy, and also that modulating the expression level of one protein can influence the level of expression of the other protein within the system, thus confirming the concept of genes "competing" for limited cellular resources. Plots of "expression ratios" of the two model genes over time were obtained, and may be used in future work to tightly control timing and levels of foreign gene expression in an insect cell co-expression system.

  6. A non-canonical mismatch repair pathway in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Castañeda-García, A; Prieto, A I; Rodríguez-Beltrán, J; Alonso, N; Cantillon, D; Costas, C; Pérez-Lago, L; Zegeye, E D; Herranz, M; Plociński, P; Tonjum, T; García de Viedma, D; Paget, M; Waddell, S J; Rojas, A M; Doherty, A J; Blázquez, J

    2017-01-27

    Mismatch repair (MMR) is a near ubiquitous pathway, essential for the maintenance of genome stability. Members of the MutS and MutL protein families perform key steps in mismatch correction. Despite the major importance of this repair pathway, MutS-MutL are absent in almost all Actinobacteria and many Archaea. However, these organisms exhibit rates and spectra of spontaneous mutations similar to MMR-bearing species, suggesting the existence of an alternative to the canonical MutS-MutL-based MMR. Here we report that Mycobacterium smegmatis NucS/EndoMS, a putative endonuclease with no structural homology to known MMR factors, is required for mutation avoidance and anti-recombination, hallmarks of the canonical MMR. Furthermore, phenotypic analysis of naturally occurring polymorphic NucS in a M. smegmatis surrogate model, suggests the existence of M. tuberculosis mutator strains. The phylogenetic analysis of NucS indicates a complex evolutionary process leading to a disperse distribution pattern in prokaryotes. Together, these findings indicate that distinct pathways for MMR have evolved at least twice in nature.

  7. Predictable patterns of trait mismatches between interacting plants and insects

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There are few predictions about the directionality or extent of morphological trait (mis)matches between interacting organisms. We review and analyse studies on morphological trait complementarity (e.g. floral tube length versus insect mouthpart length) at the population and species level. Results Plants have consistently more exaggerated morphological traits than insects at high trait magnitudes and in some cases less exaggerated traits than insects at smaller trait magnitudes. This result held at the population level, as well as for phylogenetically adjusted analyses at the species-level and for both pollination and host-parasite interactions, perhaps suggesting a general pattern. Across communities, the degree of trait mismatch between one specialist plant and its more generalized pollinator was related to the level of pollinator specialization at each site; the observed pattern supports the "life-dinner principle" of selection acting more strongly on species with more at stake in the interaction. Similarly, plant mating system also affected the degree of trait correspondence because selfing reduces the reliance on pollinators and is analogous to pollination generalization. Conclusions Our analyses suggest that there are predictable "winners" and "losers" of evolutionary arms races and the results of this study highlight the fact that breeding system and the degree of specialization can influence the outcome. PMID:20604973

  8. Case Report: Prothesis-patient mismatch after aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Ospina, Luis; Garcia-Morell, Juan; Rodriguez-Monserrate, Carla P; Valentin-Nieves, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Valve replacement is the standard surgical treatment of diseased valves that cannot be repaired. The main goal of replacement is to exchange the diseased valve with one that has the engineering and hemodynamics as close as possible to the disease free native valve. However due to mechanical and fluid dynamic constraints all prosthetic heart valves (PHVs) are smaller than normal and thus are inherently stenotic. This represents a challenge when it comes time to replace a valve. The correct valve with the correct and matching profile has to be selected before the procedure to avoid possible complications. It is well recognized that patients are also prone to patient-prosthesis mismatch at long term which could have consequences in the clinical outcomes (1). The evaluation of patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) has not been sufficiently emphasized in common practice. Failure to recognize this fact may lead to significant hemodynamic impairment and worsening of the clinical status over the time. Making efforts to identifying patients at risk may decrease the prevalence of PPM, the economic impact to our health system, the morbidity and mortality involved in these cases as well as creates efforts to standardized pre-operative protocols to minimized risk of PPM. We present a case of a 78 years old male patient who underwent aortic valve replacement due severe aortic stenosis, afterwards his clinical course got complicated with several admissions for shortness of breath and decompensated congestive heart failure (CHF).

  9. Predicting χ for polymers with stiffness mismatch from simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozuch, Daniel; Zhang, Wenlin; Gomez, Enrique; Milner, Scott

    The Flory-Huggins χ parameter describes the excess free energy of mixing and governs phase behavior for polymer blends and block copolymers. For chemically distinct polymers, the value of χ is dominated by the mismatch in cohesive energy densities of the monomers. For blends of chemically similar polymers, the entropic portion of χ, arising from non-ideal local packing, becomes more significant. Using polymer field theory, Fredrickson, Liu, and Bates predict that a difference in backbone stiffness can result in a positive χ for chains consisting of chemically identical monomers. To quantitatively investigate this phenomenon, we perform molecular dynamic (MD) simulations for bead-spring chains which differ only in stiffness. From the simulations, we apply a novel thermodynamic integration to extract χ as low as 10-3 per monomer for blends with mild stiffness mismatch. By introducing a standardized effective monomer, we map real polymers to our bead-spring chains and show that the predicted entropic portion of χ are consistent with experimental data.

  10. Mismatch Repair Proficiency and In Vitro Response to 5-Fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    CARETHERS, JOHN M.; CHAUHAN, DHARAM P.; FINK, DANIEL; NEBEL, SIBYLLE; BRESALIER, ROBERT S.; HOWELL, STEPHEN B.; BOLAND, C. RICHARD

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system recognizes certain DNA adducts caused by alkylation damage in addition to its role in recognizing and directing repair of interstrand nucleotide mismatches and slippage mistakes at microsatellite sequences. Because defects in the MMR system can confer tolerance to acquired DNA damage and, by inference, the toxic effects of certain chemotherapeutic agents, we investigated the effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on colon cancer cell lines. Methods We determined growth selection by cell enrichment assay and cloning efficiency after treatment with 5 μmol/L 5-FU, assayed nucleic 3H–5-FU incorporation, and analyzed the cell cycle by flow cytometry. Results 5-FU treatment provided a growth advantage for MMR-deficient cell lines, indicating a relative degree of tolerance to 5-FU by the MMR-deficient cell lines. Enhanced survival was statistically significant after 5 days of growth, and a 28-fold reduction in survival was noted in the MMR-proficient cells by clonagenic assays after 10 days of growth. Differences in nucleotide uptake of 5-FU did not account for the observed growth differences, and specific cell cycle checkpoint arrest was not detected. Conclusions Intact DNA MMR seems to recognize 5-FU incorporated into DNA but may do so in a different manner than other types of alkylation damage. Defective DNA MMR might be one mechanism for tumor resistance to 5-FU. PMID:10381918

  11. Toward a phenological mismatch in estuarine pelagic food web?

    PubMed Central

    Chevillot, Xavier; Drouineau, Hilaire; Lambert, Patrick; Carassou, Laure; Sautour, Benoit; Lobry, Jérémy

    2017-01-01

    Alterations of species phenology in response to climate change are now unquestionable. Until now, most studies have reported precocious occurrence of life cycle events as a major phenological response. Desynchronizations of biotic interactions, in particular predator-prey relationships, are however assumed to strongly impact ecosystems’ functioning, as formalized by the Match-Mismatch Hypothesis (MMH). Temporal synchronicity between juvenile fish and zooplankton in estuaries is therefore of essential interest since estuaries are major nursery grounds for many commercial fish species. The Gironde estuary (SW France) has suffered significant alterations over the last three decades, including two Abrupt Ecosystem Shifts (AES), and three contrasted intershift periods. The main objective of this study was to depict modifications in fish and zooplankton phenology among inter-shift periods and discuss the potential effects of the resulting mismatches at a community scale. A flexible Bayesian method was used to estimate and compare yearly patterns of species abundance in the estuary among the three pre-defined periods. Results highlighted (1) an earlier peak of zooplankton production and entrance of fish species in the estuary and (2) a decrease in residence time of both groups in the estuary. Such species-specific phenological changes led to changes in temporal overlap between juvenile fish and their zooplanktonic prey. This situation questions the efficiency and potentially the viability of nursery function of the Gironde estuary, with potential implications for coastal marine fisheries of the Bay of Biscay. PMID:28355281

  12. A non-canonical mismatch repair pathway in prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Castañeda-García, A.; Prieto, A. I.; Rodríguez-Beltrán, J.; Alonso, N.; Cantillon, D.; Costas, C.; Pérez-Lago, L.; Zegeye, E. D.; Herranz, M.; Plociński, P.; Tonjum, T.; García de Viedma, D.; Paget, M.; Waddell, S. J.; Rojas, A. M.; Doherty, A. J.; Blázquez, J.

    2017-01-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) is a near ubiquitous pathway, essential for the maintenance of genome stability. Members of the MutS and MutL protein families perform key steps in mismatch correction. Despite the major importance of this repair pathway, MutS–MutL are absent in almost all Actinobacteria and many Archaea. However, these organisms exhibit rates and spectra of spontaneous mutations similar to MMR-bearing species, suggesting the existence of an alternative to the canonical MutS–MutL-based MMR. Here we report that Mycobacterium smegmatis NucS/EndoMS, a putative endonuclease with no structural homology to known MMR factors, is required for mutation avoidance and anti-recombination, hallmarks of the canonical MMR. Furthermore, phenotypic analysis of naturally occurring polymorphic NucS in a M. smegmatis surrogate model, suggests the existence of M. tuberculosis mutator strains. The phylogenetic analysis of NucS indicates a complex evolutionary process leading to a disperse distribution pattern in prokaryotes. Together, these findings indicate that distinct pathways for MMR have evolved at least twice in nature. PMID:28128207

  13. Toward a phenological mismatch in estuarine pelagic food web?

    PubMed

    Chevillot, Xavier; Drouineau, Hilaire; Lambert, Patrick; Carassou, Laure; Sautour, Benoit; Lobry, Jérémy

    2017-01-01

    Alterations of species phenology in response to climate change are now unquestionable. Until now, most studies have reported precocious occurrence of life cycle events as a major phenological response. Desynchronizations of biotic interactions, in particular predator-prey relationships, are however assumed to strongly impact ecosystems' functioning, as formalized by the Match-Mismatch Hypothesis (MMH). Temporal synchronicity between juvenile fish and zooplankton in estuaries is therefore of essential interest since estuaries are major nursery grounds for many commercial fish species. The Gironde estuary (SW France) has suffered significant alterations over the last three decades, including two Abrupt Ecosystem Shifts (AES), and three contrasted intershift periods. The main objective of this study was to depict modifications in fish and zooplankton phenology among inter-shift periods and discuss the potential effects of the resulting mismatches at a community scale. A flexible Bayesian method was used to estimate and compare yearly patterns of species abundance in the estuary among the three pre-defined periods. Results highlighted (1) an earlier peak of zooplankton production and entrance of fish species in the estuary and (2) a decrease in residence time of both groups in the estuary. Such species-specific phenological changes led to changes in temporal overlap between juvenile fish and their zooplanktonic prey. This situation questions the efficiency and potentially the viability of nursery function of the Gironde estuary, with potential implications for coastal marine fisheries of the Bay of Biscay.

  14. Mismatch repair status may predict response to adjuvant chemotherapy in resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Riazy, Maziar; Kalloger, Steve E; Sheffield, Brandon S; Peixoto, Renata D; Li-Chang, Hector H; Scudamore, Charles H; Renouf, Daniel J; Schaeffer, David F

    2015-10-01

    Deficiencies in DNA mismatch repair have been associated with inferior response to 5-FU in colorectal cancer. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is similarly treated with pyrimidine analogs, yet the predictive value of mismatch repair status for response to these agents has not been examined in this malignancy. A tissue microarray with associated clinical outcome, comprising 254 resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients was stained for four mismatch repair proteins (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2). Mismatch repair deficiency and proficiency was determined by the absence or presence of uniform nuclear staining in tumor cells, respectively. Cases identified as mismatch repair deficient on the tissue microarray were confirmed by immunohistochemistry on whole slide sections. Of the 265 cases, 78 (29%) received adjuvant treatment with a pyrimidine analog and 41 (15%) showed a mismatch repair-deficient immunoprofile. Multivariable disease-specific survival in the mismatch repair-proficient cohort demonstrated that adjuvant chemotherapy, regional lymph-node status, gender, and the presence of tumor budding were significant independent prognostic variables (P≤0.04); however, none of the eight clinico-pathologic covariates examined in the mismatch repair-deficient cohort were of independent prognostic significance. Univariable assessment of disease-specific survival revealed an almost identical survival profile for both treated and untreated patients with a mismatch repair-deficient profile, while treatment in the mismatch repair-proficient cohort conferred a greater than 10-month median disease-specific survival advantage over their untreated counterparts (P=0.0018). In this cohort, adjuvant chemotherapy with a pyrimidine analog conferred no survival advantage to mismatch repair-deficient pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients. Mismatch repair immunoprofiling is a feasible predictive marker in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients, and further prospective

  15. Conventional treatments for ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Dougados, M; Dijkmans, B; Khan, M; Maksymowych, W; van der Linden, S.; Brandt, J

    2002-01-01

    Management of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is challenged by the progressive nature of the disease. To date, no intervention is available that alters the underlying mechanism of inflammation in AS. Currently available conventional treatments are palliative at best, and often fail to control symptoms in the long term. Current drug treatment may perhaps induce a spurious state of "disease remission," which is merely a low level of disease activity. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are first line treatment, but over time, the disease often becomes refractory to these agents. Disease modifying antirheumatic drugs are second line treatment and may offer some clinical benefit. However, conclusive evidence of the efficacy of these drugs from large placebo controlled trials is lacking. Additionally, these drugs can cause treatment-limiting adverse effects. Intra-articular corticosteroid injection guided by arthrography, computed tomography, or magnetic resonance imaging is an effective means of reducing inflammatory back pain, but controlled studies are lacking. A controlled study has confirmed moderate but significant efficacy of intravenous bisphosphonate (pamidronate) treatment in patients with AS; further evaluation of bisphosphonate treatment is warranted. Physical therapy and exercise are necessary adjuncts to pharmacotherapy; however, the paucity of controlled data makes it difficult to identify the best way to administer these interventions. Surgical intervention may be required to support severe structural damage. Thus, for patients with AS, the future of successful treatment lies in the development of pharmacological agents capable of both altering the disease course through intervention at sites of disease pathogenesis, and controlling symptoms. PMID:12381510

  16. Marrow Ablative and Immunosuppressive Effects of I-131-anti-CD45 Antibody in Congenic and H2-Mismatched Murine Transplant Models

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, D. C.; Martin, P J.; Nourigat, C.; Appelbaum, F. R.; Fisher, Darrell R. ); Bernstein, I. D.

    1998-12-01

    Targeted hematopoietic irradiation delivered by I-131-anti-CD45 antibody has been combined with conventional marrow transplant preparative regimens in an effort to decrease relapse. Before increasing the proportion of therapy delivered by radiolabeled antibody, the myeloablative and immunosuppressive effects of such low dose rate irradiation must be quantitated. We have examined the ability of I-131-anti-CD45 antibody to facilitate engraftment in Ly5-congenic and H2-mismatched murine marrow transplant models. Recipient B6-Ly5-a mice were treated with 30F11 antibody labeled with 0.1 to 1.5 mCi I-131 and/or total body irradiation (TBI), followed by T-cell-depleted marrow from Ly5-b-congenic (C57BL/6) or H2-mismatched (BALB/c) donors. Engraftment was achieved readily in the Ly5-congenic setting, with greater than 80% donor granulocytes and T cells after 0.5 mCi I-131 (estimated 17 Gy to marrow) or 8 Gy TBI. A higher TBI dose (14 Gy) was required to achieve engraftment of H2-mismatched mar row, and engraftment occurred in only 3 of 11 mice receiving 1.5 mCi I-131 delivered by anti-CD45 antibody. Engraftment of H2-mismatched marrow was achieved in 22 of 23 animals receiving 0.75 mCi I-131 delivered by anti-CD45 antibody combined with 8 Gy TBI. Thus, targeted radiation delivered via I-131-anti-CD45 antibody can enable engraftment of congenic marrow and can partially replace TBI when transplanting T-cell-depleted H2-mismatched marrow.

  17. Detection and quantification of Plectosphaerella cucumerina, a potential biological control agent of potato cyst nematodes, by using conventional PCR, real-time PCR, selective media, and baiting.

    PubMed

    Atkins, S D; Clark, I M; Sosnowska, D; Hirsch, P R; Kerry, B R

    2003-08-01

    Potato cyst nematodes (PCN) are serious pests in commercial potato production, causing yield losses valued at approximately $300 million in the European Community. The nematophagous fungus Plectosphaerella cucumerina has demonstrated its potential as a biological control agent against PCN populations by reducing field populations by up to 60% in trials. The use of biological control agents in the field requires the development of specific techniques to monitor the release, population size, spread or decline, and pathogenicity against its host. A range of methods have therefore been developed to monitor P. cucumerina. A species-specific PCR primer set (PcCF1-PcCR1) was designed that was able to detect the presence of P. cucumerina in soil, root, and nematode samples. PCR was combined with a bait method to identify P. cucumerina from infected nematode eggs, confirming the parasitic ability of the fungus. A selective medium was adapted to isolate the fungus from root and soil samples and was used to quantify the fungus from field sites. A second P. cucumerina-specific primer set (PcRTF1-PcRTR1) and a Taqman probe (PcRTP1) were designed for real-time PCR quantification of the fungus and provided a very sensitive means of detecting the fungus from soil. PCR, bait, and culture methods were combined to investigate the presence and abundance of P. cucumerina from two field sites in the United Kingdom where PCN populations were naturally declining. All methods enabled differences in the activity of P. cucumerina to be detected, and the results demonstrated the importance of using a combination of methods to investigate population size and activity of fungi.

  18. Conventional magnetic superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Wolowiec, C. T.; White, B. D.; Maple, M. B.

    2015-07-01

    We discuss several classes of conventional magnetic superconductors including the ternary rhodium borides and molybdenum chalcogenides (or Chevrel phases), and the quaternary nickel-borocarbides. These materials exhibit some exotic phenomena related to the interplay between superconductivity and long-range magnetic order including: the coexistence of superconductivity and antiferromagnetic order; reentrant and double reentrant superconductivity, magnetic field induced superconductivity, and the formation of a sinusoidally-modulated magnetic state that coexists with superconductivity. We introduce the article with a discussion of the binary and pseudobinary superconducting materials containing magnetic impurities which at best exhibit short-range “glassy” magnetic order. Early experiments on these materials led to the idea of a magnetic exchange interaction between the localized spins of magnetic impurity ions and the spins of the conduction electrons which plays an important role in understanding conventional magnetic superconductors. Furthermore, these advances provide a natural foundation for investigating unconventional superconductivity in heavy-fermion compounds, cuprates, and other classes of materials in which superconductivity coexists with, or is in proximity to, a magnetically-ordered phase.

  19. Conventional magnetic superconductors

    DOE PAGES

    Wolowiec, C. T.; White, B. D.; Maple, M. B.

    2015-07-01

    We discuss several classes of conventional magnetic superconductors including the ternary rhodium borides and molybdenum chalcogenides (or Chevrel phases), and the quaternary nickel-borocarbides. These materials exhibit some exotic phenomena related to the interplay between superconductivity and long-range magnetic order including: the coexistence of superconductivity and antiferromagnetic order; reentrant and double reentrant superconductivity, magnetic field induced superconductivity, and the formation of a sinusoidally-modulated magnetic state that coexists with superconductivity. We introduce the article with a discussion of the binary and pseudobinary superconducting materials containing magnetic impurities which at best exhibit short-range “glassy” magnetic order. Early experiments on these materials led tomore » the idea of a magnetic exchange interaction between the localized spins of magnetic impurity ions and the spins of the conduction electrons which plays an important role in understanding conventional magnetic superconductors. Furthermore, these advances provide a natural foundation for investigating unconventional superconductivity in heavy-fermion compounds, cuprates, and other classes of materials in which superconductivity coexists with, or is in proximity to, a magnetically-ordered phase.« less

  20. Mismatch and Lexical Retrieval Gestures are Associated with Visual Information Processing, Verbal Production, and Symptomatology in Youth at High Risk for Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Millman, Zachary B.; Goss, James; Schiffman, Jason; Mejias, Johana; Gupta, Tina; Mittal, Vijay A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Gesture is integrally linked with language and cognitive systems, and recent years have seen a growing attention to these movements in patients with schizophrenia. To date, however, there have been no investigations of gesture in youth at ultra high risk (UHR) for psychosis. Examining gesture in UHR individuals may help to elucidate other widely recognized communicative and cognitive deficits in this population and yield new clues for treatment development. Method In this study, mismatch (indicating semantic incongruency between the content of speech and a given gesture) and retrieval (used during pauses in speech while a person appears to be searching for a word or idea) gestures were evaluated in 42 UHR individuals and 36 matched healthy controls. Cognitive functions relevant to gesture production (i.e., speed of visual information processing and verbal production) as well as positive and negative symptomatology were assessed. Results Although the overall frequency of cases exhibiting these behaviors was low, UHR individuals produced substantially more mismatch and retrieval gestures than controls. The UHR group also exhibited significantly poorer verbal production performance when compared with controls. In the patient group, mismatch gestures were associated with poorer visual processing speed and elevated negative symptoms, while retrieval gestures were associated with higher speed of visual information-processing and verbal production, but not symptoms. Conclusions Taken together these findings indicate that gesture abnormalities are present in individuals at high risk for psychosis. While mismatch gestures may be closely related to disease processes, retrieval gestures may be employed as a compensatory mechanism. PMID:25000911

  1. Lattice-Mismatched III-V Epilayers for High-Efficiency Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrenkiel, Scott Phillip

    2013-06-30

    The project focused on development of new approaches and materials combinations to expand and improve the quality and versatility of lattice-mismatched (LMM) III-V semiconductor epilayers for use in high-efficiency multijunction photovoltaic (PV) devices. To address these goals, new capabilities for materials synthesis and characterization were established at SDSM&T that have applications in modern opto- and nano-electronics, including epitaxial crystal growth and transmission electron microscopy. Advances were made in analyzing and controlling the strain profiles and quality of compositional grades used for these technologies. In particular, quaternary compositional grades were demonstrated, and a quantitative method for characteristic X-ray analysis was developed. The project allowed enhanced collaboration between scientists at NREL and SDSM&T to address closely related research goals, including materials exchange and characterization.

  2. Somatic aphasia: Mismatch of body sensations with autonomic stress reactivity in psychopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yu; Raine, Adrian; Schug, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Although one of the main characteristics of psychopaths is a deficit in emotion, it is unknown whether they show a fundamental impairment in appropriately recognizing their own body sensations during an emotion-inducing task. Method Skin conductance and heart rate were recorded in 138 males during a social stressor together with subjective reports of body sensations. Psychopathic traits were assessed using the Psychopathy Checklist – Revised (PCL-R) 2nd edition (Hare, 2003). Results Nonpsychopathic controls who reported higher body sensations showed higher heart rate reactivity, but this verbal-autonomic consistency was not found in psychopathic individuals. This mind-body disconnection is particularly associated with the interpersonal-affective factor of psychopathy. Conclusions Findings are the first to document this body sensations– autonomic mismatch in psychopaths, and suggest that somatic aphasia the inaccurate identification and recognition of one‘s own somatic states may partly underlie the interpersonal-affective features of psychopaths. PMID:22490763

  3. Long-Term Monitoring of Waterborne Pathogens and Microbial Source Tracking Markers in Paired Agricultural Watersheds under Controlled and Conventional Tile Drainage Management

    PubMed Central

    Wilkes, Graham; Brassard, Julie; Edge, Thomas A.; Gannon, Victor; Gottschall, Natalie; Jokinen, Cassandra C.; Jones, Tineke H.; Khan, Izhar U. H.; Marti, Romain; Sunohara, Mark D.; Topp, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Surface waters from paired agricultural watersheds under controlled tile drainage (CTD) and uncontrolled tile drainage (UCTD) were monitored over 7 years in order to determine if there was an effect of CTD (imposed during the growing season) on occurrences and loadings of bacterial and viral pathogens, coliphages, and microbial source tracking markers. There were significantly lower occurrences of human, ruminant, and livestock (ruminant plus pig) Bacteroidales markers in the CTD watershed in relation to the UCTD watershed. As for pathogens, there were significantly lower occurrences of Salmonella spp. and Arcobacter spp. in the CTD watershed. There were no instances where there were significantly higher quantitative loadings of any microbial target in the CTD watershed, except for F-specific DNA (F-DNA) and F-RNA coliphages, perhaps as a result of fecal inputs from a hobby farm independent of the drainage practice treatments. There was lower loading of the ruminant marker in the CTD watershed in relation to the UCTD system, and results were significant at the level P = 0.06. The odds of Salmonella spp. occurring increased when a ruminant marker was present relative to when the ruminant marker was absent, yet for Arcobacter spp., the odds of this pathogen occurring significantly decreased when a ruminant marker was present relative to when the ruminant marker was absent (but increased when a wildlife marker was present relative to when the wildlife marker was absent). Interestingly, the odds of norovirus GII (associated with human and swine) occurring in water increased significantly when a ruminant marker was present relative to when a ruminant marker was absent. Overall, this study suggests that fecal pollution from tile-drained fields to stream could be reduced by CTD utilization. PMID:24727274

  4. Quality of Survival and Growth in Children and Young Adults in the PNET4 European Controlled Trial of Hyperfractionated Versus Conventional Radiation Therapy for Standard-Risk Medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, Colin; Bull, Kim; Chevignard, Mathilde; Culliford, David; Dörr, Helmuth G.; Doz, François; Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Lannering, Birgitta; Massimino, Maura; Navajas Gutiérrez, Aurora; Rutkowski, Stefan; Spoudeas, Helen A.; Calaminus, Gabriele

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To compare quality of survival in “standard-risk” medulloblastoma after hyperfractionated radiation therapy of the central nervous system with that after standard radiation therapy, combined with a chemotherapy regimen common to both treatment arms, in the PNET4 randomised controlled trial. Methods and Materials: Participants in the PNET4 trial and their parents/caregivers in 7 participating anonymized countries completed standardized questionnaires in their own language on executive function, health status, behavior, health-related quality of life, and medical, educational, employment, and social information. Pre- and postoperative neurologic status and serial heights and weights were also recorded. Results: Data were provided by 151 of 244 eligible survivors (62%) at a median age at assessment of 15.2 years and median interval from diagnosis of 5.8 years. Compared with standard radiation therapy, hyperfractionated radiation therapy was associated with lower (ie, better) z-scores for executive function in all participants (mean intergroup difference 0.48 SDs, 95% confidence interval 0.16-0.81, P=.004), but health status, behavioral difficulties, and health-related quality of life z-scores were similar in the 2 treatment arms. Data on hearing impairment were equivocal. Hyperfractionated radiation therapy was also associated with greater decrement in height z-scores (mean intergroup difference 0.43 SDs, 95% confidence interval 0.10-0.76, P=.011). Conclusions: Hyperfractionated radiation therapy was associated with better executive function and worse growth but without accompanying change in health status, behavior, or quality of life.

  5. Biodiesel from conventional feedstocks.

    PubMed

    Du, Wei; Liu, De-Hua

    2012-01-01

    At present, traditional fossil fuels are used predominantly in China, presenting the country with challenges that include sustainable energy supply, energy efficiency improvement, and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. In 2007, China issued The Strategic Plan of the Mid-and-Long Term Development of Renewable Energy, which aims to increase the share of clean energy in the country's energy consumption to 15% by 2020 from only 7.5% in 2005. Biodiesel, an important renewable fuel with significant advantages over fossil diesel, has attracted great attention in the USA and European countries. However, biodiesel is still in its infancy in China, although its future is promising. This chapter reviews biodiesel production from conventional feedstocks in the country, including feedstock supply and state of the art technologies for the transesterification reaction through which biodiesel is made, particularly the enzymatic catalytic process developed by Chinese scientists. Finally, the constraints and perspectives for China's biodiesel development are highlighted.

  6. HLA-Mismatched Renal Transplantation without Maintenance Immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Tatsuo; Cosimi, A. Benedict; Spitzer, Thomas R.; Tolkoff-Rubin, Nina; Suthanthiran, Manikkam; Saidman, Susan L.; Shaffer, Juanita; Preffer, Frederic I.; Ding, Ruchuang; Sharma, Vijay; Fishman, Jay A.; Dey, Bimalangshu; Ko, Dicken S.C.; Hertl, Martin; Goes, Nelson B.; Wong, Waichi; Williams, Winfred W.; Colvin, Robert B.; Sykes, Megan; Sachs, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Five patients with end-stage renal disease received combined bone marrow and kidney transplants from HLA single-haplotype mismatched living related donors, with the use of a nonmyeloablative preparative regimen. Transient chimerism and reversible capillary leak syndrome developed in all recipients. Irreversible humoral rejection occurred in one patient. In the other four recipients, it was possible to discontinue all immunosuppressive therapy 9 to 14 months after the transplantation, and renal function has remained stable for 2.0 to 5.3 years since transplantation. The T cells from these four recipients, tested in vitro, showed donor-specific unresponsiveness and in specimens from allograft biopsies, obtained after withdrawal of immunosuppressive therapy, there were high levels of P3 (FOXP3) messenger RNA (mRNA) but not granzyme B mRNA. PMID:18216355

  7. Performance of mismatched Viterbi receiver on satellite channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, D.; Omura, J. K.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of a satellite communication system using a Viterbi receiver. Here we have a bandlimited nonlinear channel where both uplink and downlink are taken into account as well as the effect of Intersymbol Interference, phase and time synchronization errors. In order that ISI can be combatted effectively, we use a Viterbi demodulator which is designed for the satellite channel when there is no uplink noise. The Viterbi demodulator for the channels with large memory is too complex to be implemented. To reduce the complexity, a Viterbi demodulator with memory shorter than the true channel memory is used. The objective of this paper is to analyze the performance degradation of this 'Mismatched Viterbi Receiver' due to the uplink noise and memory truncation, and to understand how the time and phase synchronization errors influence the performance.

  8. DNA mismatch repair and the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhongdao; Pearlman, Alexander H.; Hsieh, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses the role of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) in the DNA damage response (DDR) that triggers cell cycle arrest and, in some cases, apoptosis. Although the focus is on findings from mammalian cells, much has been learned from studies in other organisms including bacteria and yeast [1,2]. MMR promotes a DDR mediated by a key signaling kinase, ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), in response to various types of DNA damage including some encountered in widely used chemotherapy regimes. An introduction to the DDR mediated by ATR reveals its immense complexity and highlights the many biological and mechanistic questions that remain. Recent findings and future directions are highlighted. PMID:26704428

  9. Automated effective band structures for defective and mismatched supercells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brommer, Peter; Quigley, David

    2014-12-01

    In plane-wave density functional theory codes, defects and incommensurate structures are usually represented in supercells. However, interpretation of E versus k band structures is most effective within the primitive cell, where comparison to ideal structures and spectroscopy experiments are most natural. Popescu and Zunger recently described a method to derive effective band structures (EBS) from supercell calculations in the context of random alloys. In this paper, we present bs_sc2pc, an implementation of this method in the CASTEP code, which generates an EBS using the structural data of the supercell and the underlying primitive cell with symmetry considerations handled automatically. We demonstrate the functionality of our implementation in three test cases illustrating the efficacy of this scheme for capturing the effect of vacancies, substitutions and lattice mismatch on effective primitive cell band structures.

  10. Automated effective band structures for defective and mismatched supercells.

    PubMed

    Brommer, Peter; Quigley, David

    2014-12-03

    In plane-wave density functional theory codes, defects and incommensurate structures are usually represented in supercells. However, interpretation of E versus k band structures is most effective within the primitive cell, where comparison to ideal structures and spectroscopy experiments are most natural. Popescu and Zunger recently described a method to derive effective band structures (EBS) from supercell calculations in the context of random alloys. In this paper, we present bs_sc2pc, an implementation of this method in the CASTEP code, which generates an EBS using the structural data of the supercell and the underlying primitive cell with symmetry considerations handled automatically. We demonstrate the functionality of our implementation in three test cases illustrating the efficacy of this scheme for capturing the effect of vacancies, substitutions and lattice mismatch on effective primitive cell band structures.

  11. Three perspectives on the mismatch between measures of material poverty.

    PubMed

    Hick, Rod

    2015-03-01

    The two most prominent measures of material poverty within contemporary European poverty analysis are low income and material deprivation. However, it is by now well-known that these measures identify substantially different people as being poor. In this research note, I seek to demonstrate that there are at least three ways to understand the mismatch between low income and material deprivation, relating to three different forms of identification: identifying poor households, identifying groups at risk of poverty and identifying trends in material poverty over time. Drawing on data from the British Household Panel Survey, I show that while low income and material deprivation identify very different households as being poor, and display distinct trends over time, in many cases they identify the same groups at being at risk of material poverty.

  12. Guanine- 5-carboxylcytosine base pairs mimic mismatches during DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Shibutani, Toshihiro; Ito, Shinsuke; Toda, Mariko; Kanao, Rie; Collins, Leonard B; Shibata, Marika; Urabe, Miho; Koseki, Haruhiko; Masuda, Yuji; Swenberg, James A; Masutani, Chikahide; Hanaoka, Fumio; Iwai, Shigenori; Kuraoka, Isao

    2014-06-09

    The genetic information encoded in genomes must be faithfully replicated and transmitted to daughter cells. The recent discovery of consecutive DNA conversions by TET family proteins of 5-methylcytosine into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, 5-formylcytosine, and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) suggests these modified cytosines act as DNA lesions, which could threaten genome integrity. Here, we have shown that although 5caC pairs with guanine during DNA replication in vitro, G·5caC pairs stimulated DNA polymerase exonuclease activity and were recognized by the mismatch repair (MMR) proteins. Knockdown of thymine DNA glycosylase increased 5caC in genome, affected cell proliferation via MMR, indicating MMR is a novel reader for 5caC. These results suggest the epigenetic modification products of 5caC behave as DNA lesions.

  13. Is it time to move mismatch negativity into the clinic?

    PubMed

    Schall, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    Since its inception in the 1970s, the mismatch negativity (MMN) event-related potential has improved our understanding of pre-attentive detection of rule violations, which is a fundamental cognitive process considered by some a form of "primitive intelligence". The body of research to date ranges from animal studies (i.e. when investigating the neural mechanisms and pharmacological properties of MMN generation) to researching the psychophysiological nature of human consciousness. MMN therefore offers the possibility to detect abnormal functioning in the neural system involved in MMN generation, such as it occurs in some neurodevelopmental disorders or patients in vegetative state. While the clinical research data holds considerable promise for translation into clinical practice, standardization and normative data of an optimized (i.e. disorder-specific) MMN recording algorithm is needed in order for MMN to become a valuable clinical investigation tool.

  14. Indexing a sequence for mapping reads with a single mismatch

    PubMed Central

    Crochemore, Maxime; Langiu, Alessio; Rahman, M. Sohel

    2014-01-01

    Mapping reads against a genome sequence is an interesting and useful problem in computational molecular biology and bioinformatics. In this paper, we focus on the problem of indexing a sequence for mapping reads with a single mismatch. We first focus on a simpler problem where the length of the pattern is given beforehand during the data structure construction. This version of the problem is interesting in its own right in the context of the next generation sequencing. In the sequel, we show how to solve the more general problem. In both cases, our algorithm can construct an efficient data structure in time and space and can answer subsequent queries in time. Here, n is the length of the sequence, m is the length of the read, 0<ε<1 and is the optimal output size. PMID:24751874

  15. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty complicated by mismatched implant components

    PubMed Central

    Calistri, Alessandro; Campbell, Patricia; Van Der Straeten, Catherine; De Smet, Koen Aimè

    2017-01-01

    Metal-on-metal hip resurfacing has gained popularity as a feasible treatment option for young and active patients with hip osteoarthritis and high functional expectations. This procedure should only be performed by surgeons who have trained specifically in this technique. Preoperative planning is essential for hip resurfacing in order to execute a successful operation and preview any technical problems. The authors present a case of a man who underwent a resurfacing arthroplasty for osteoarthritis of the left hip that was complicated by mismatched implant components that were revised three days afterwards for severe pain and leg length discrepancy. Such mistakes, although rare, can be prevented by educating operating room staff in the size and colour code tables provided by the companies on their prostheses or implant boxes. PMID:28361022

  16. Radiation of cylindrical duct acoustic modes with flow mismatch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savkar, S. D.; Edelfelt, I. H.

    1975-01-01

    Calculations for the radiation of spinning acoustic modes, with or without a centerbody, and with or without flow temperature and velocity discontinuity, are presented. Solutions to the appropriate convected wave equations devised around Fourier transforms and Wiener-Hopf technique are presented. The decomposition of the asymmetric kernel, resulting from a flow and temperature mismatch, is carried out in part exactly and partially using the so-called Carrier-Koiter approximation procedure. The resulting solutions offer a good approximation to the radiation of both symmetric and asymmetric modes through a flow discontinuity represented as a plug flow jet issuing from a cylindrical duct. Besides the Koiter approximation, the major limitation on the calculation program is the difficulty of calculating the high order Bessel functions with sufficient accuracy.

  17. Single-base-pair discrimination of terminal mismatches by using oligonucleotide microarrays and neural network analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urakawa, Hidetoshi; Noble, Peter A.; El Fantroussi, Said; Kelly, John J.; Stahl, David A.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of single-base-pair near-terminal and terminal mismatches on the dissociation temperature (T(d)) and signal intensity of short DNA duplexes were determined by using oligonucleotide microarrays and neural network (NN) analyses. Two perfect-match probes and 29 probes having a single-base-pair mismatch at positions 1 to 5 from the 5' terminus of the probe were designed to target one of two short sequences representing 16S rRNA. Nonequilibrium dissociation rates (i.e., melting profiles) of all probe-target duplexes were determined simultaneously. Analysis of variance revealed that position of the mismatch, type of mismatch, and formamide concentration significantly affected the T(d) and signal intensity. Increasing the concentration of formamide in the washing buffer decreased the T(d) and signal intensity, and it decreased the variability of the signal. Although T(d)s of probe-target duplexes with mismatches in the first or second position were not significantly different from one another, duplexes with mismatches in the third to fifth positions had significantly lower T(d)s than those with mismatches in the first or second position. The trained NNs predicted the T(d) with high accuracies (R(2) = 0.93). However, the NNs predicted the signal intensity only moderately accurately (R(2) = 0.67), presumably due to increased noise in the signal intensity at low formamide concentrations. Sensitivity analysis revealed that the concentration of formamide explained most (75%) of the variability in T(d)s, followed by position of the mismatch (19%) and type of mismatch (6%). The results suggest that position of the mismatch at or near the 5' terminus plays a greater role in determining the T(d) and signal intensity of duplexes than the type of mismatch.

  18. Identification of a permissible HLA mismatch in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Viña, Marcelo A.; Wang, Tao; Lee, Stephanie J.; Haagenson, Michael; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Askar, Medhat; Battiwalla, Minoo; Baxter-Lowe, Lee-Ann; Gajewski, James; Jakubowski, Ann A.; Marino, Susana; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Marsh, Steven G. E.; Petersdorf, Effie W.; Schultz, Kirk; Turner, E. Victoria; Waller, Edmund K.; Woolfrey, Ann; Umejiego, John; Spellman, Stephen R.; Setterholm, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    In subjects mismatched in the HLA alleles C*03:03/C*03:04 no allogeneic cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses are detected in vitro. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with unrelated donors (UDs) showed no association between the HLA-C allele mismatches (CAMMs) and adverse outcomes; antigen mismatches at this and mismatches other HLA loci are deleterious. The absence of effect of the CAMM may have resulted from the predominance of the mismatch C*03:03/C*03:04. Patients with hematologic malignancies receiving UD HSCT matched in 8/8 and 7/8 HLA alleles were examined. Transplants mismatched in HLA-C antigens or mismatched in HLA-A, -B, or -DRB1 presented significant differences (P < .0001) in mortality (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.37, 1.30), disease-free survival (HR = 1.33, 1.27), treatment-related mortality (HR = 1.54, 1.54), and grade 3-4 acute graft-versus-host disease (HR = 1.49, 1.77) compared with the 8/8 group; transplants mismatched in other CAMMs had similar outcomes with HR ranging from 1.34 to 172 for these endpoints. The C*03:03/C*03:04 mismatched and the 8/8 matched groups had identical outcomes (HR ranging from 0.96-1.05). The previous finding that CAMMs do not associate with adverse outcomes is explained by the predominance (69%) of the mismatch C*03:03/03:04 in this group that is better tolerated than other HLA mismatches. PMID:24408320

  19. Phenological mismatch and the effectiveness of assisted gene flow.

    PubMed

    Wadgymar, Susana M; Weis, Arthur E

    2016-12-10

    The persistence of narrowly adapted species under climate change will depend on their ability to migrate apace with their historical climatic envelope or to adapt in place to maintain fitness. This second path to persistence can only occur if there is sufficient genetic variance for response to new selection regimes. Inadequate levels of genetic variation can be remedied through assisted gene flow (AGF), that is the intentional introduction of individuals genetically adapted to localities with historic climates similar to the current or future climate experienced by the resident population. However, the timing of reproduction is frequently adapted to local conditions. Phenological mismatch between residents and migrants can reduce resident × migrant mating frequencies, slowing the introgression of migrant alleles into the resident genetic background and impeding evolutionary rescue efforts. Focusing on plants, we devised a method to estimate the frequency of resident × migrant matings based on flowering schedules and applied it in an experiment that mimicked the first generation of an AGF program with Chamaecrista fasciculata, a prairie annual, under current and expected future temperature regimes. Phenological mismatch reduced the potential for resident × migrant matings by 40-90%, regardless of thermal treatment. The most successful migrant sires were the most resident like in their flowering time, further biasing the genetic admixture between resident and migrant populations. Other loci contributing to local adaptation-heat-tolerance genes, for instance-may be in linkage disequilibrium with phenology when residents and migrants are combined into a single mating pool. Thus, introgression of potentially adaptive migrant alleles into the resident genetic background is slowed when selection acts against migrant phenology. Successful AGF programs may require sustained high immigration rates or preliminary breeding programs when phenologically matched migrant

  20. Group velocity mismatch-absent nonlinear frequency conversions for mid-infrared femtosecond pulses generation

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Haizhe; Zhang, Lifu; Li, Ying; Fan, Dianyuan

    2015-01-01

    A novel group velocity mismatch (GVM) absent scheme for nonlinear optical parametric procedure in mid-infrared was developed with type-I quasi phase matching by use of an off-digital nonlinear optical coefficient d31. This was achieved by matching of the group velocities of the pump and the signal waves, while the phase velocities were quasi phase matched. The system employs MgO-doped periodically poled LiNbO3 as the nonlinear medium. Desired group-velocity dispersion would be obtained via appropriately temperature regulation. To demonstrate its potential applications in ultrafast mid-infrared pulses generation, aiming at a typical mid-infrared wavelength of ~3.2 μm, design examples of two basic nonlinear frequency conversion procedures are studied for both the narrow-band seeding mid-IR optical parametric amplification (OPA) and the synchronously pumped femtosecond optical parametric oscillation (SPOPO). Compared with the conventional scheme of type-0 QPM, the quantum-efficiency can be more than doubled with nearly unlimited bandwidth. The proposed GVM- absent phase matching design may provide a promising route to efficient and broadband sub-100 fs mid-infrared ultrafast pulses generation without group-velocity walk-off. PMID:26099837

  1. Pseudotumour incidence, cobalt levels and clinical outcome after large head metal-on-metal and conventional metal-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasty: mid-term results of a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    van der Veen, H C; Reininga, I H F; Zijlstra, W P; Boomsma, M F; Bulstra, S K; van Raay, J J A M

    2015-11-01

    We compared the incidence of pseudotumours after large head metal-on-metal (MoM) total hip arthroplasty (THA) with that after conventional metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) THA and assessed the predisposing factors to pseudotumour formation. From a previous randomised controlled trial which compared large head (38 mm to 60 mm) cementless MoM THA with conventional head (28 mm) cementless MoP THA, 93 patients (96 THAs: 41 MoM (21 males, 20 females, mean age of 64 years, standard deviation (sd) 4) and 55 MoP (25 males, 30 females, mean age of 65 years, sd 5) were recruited after a mean follow-up of 50 months (36 to 64). The incidence of pseudotumours, measured using a standardised CT protocol was 22 (53.7%) after MoM THA and 12 (21.8%) after MoP THA. Women with a MoM THA were more likely to develop a pseudotumour than those with a MoP THA (15 vs 7, odds ratio (OR) = 13.4, p < 0.001). There was a similar incidence of pseudotumours in men with MoM THAs and those with MoP THAs (7 vs 5, OR = 2.1, p = 0.30). Elevated cobalt levels (≥ 5 microgram/L) were only associated with pseudotumours in women with a MoM THA. There was no difference in mean Oxford and Harris hip scores between patients with a pseudotumour and those without. Contrary to popular belief, pseudotumours occur frequently around MoP THAs. Women with a MoM THA and an elevated cobalt level are at greatest risk. In this study, pseudotumours had no effect on the functional outcome after either large head MoM or conventional MoP THA.

  2. Luminescence of [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)]2+ bound to RNA mismatches.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Anna J; Song, Hang; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2013-09-03

    The luminescence of rac-[Ru(bpy)2(dppz)](2+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine and dppz = dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine) was explored in the presence of RNA oligonucleotides containing a single RNA mismatch (CA and GG) in order to develop a probe for RNA mismatches. While there is minimal luminescence of [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)](2+) in the presence of matched RNA due to weak binding, the luminescence is significantly enhanced in the presence of a single CA mismatch. The luminescence differential between CA mismatched and matched RNA is substantially higher compared to the DNA analogue, and therefore, [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)](2+) appears to be also a sensitive light switch probe for a CA mismatch in duplex RNA. Although the luminescence intensity is lower in the presence of RNA than DNA, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the donor ruthenium complex and FRET acceptor SYTO 61 is successfully exploited to amplify the luminescence in the presence of the mismatch. Luminescence and quenching studies with sodium iodide suggest that [Ru(bpy)2(dppz)](2+) binds to these mismatches via metalloinsertion from the minor groove. This work provides further evidence that metalloinsertion is a general binding mode of octahedral metal complexes to thermodynamically destabilized mismatches not only in DNA but also in RNA.

  3. The Impact of Major-Job Mismatch on College Graduates' Early Career Earnings: Evidence from China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Rong

    2014-01-01

    This paper assesses the impact of the mismatch between a college major and job on college graduates' early career earnings using a sample from China. On average, a major-job mismatched college graduate is found to suffer from an income loss that is much lower than the penalty documented in previous studies. The income losses are also found to be…

  4. On the Mismatch between Multicultural Education and Its Subjects in the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mizrachi, Nissim

    2012-01-01

    This article draws attention to the growing evidence of a mismatch between sociological categorization and actors' worlds of meaning as expressed in the classroom. The mismatch is especially blatant in cases where students from disadvantaged groups are introduced to what educators and theorists presume to be the liberating discourse of…

  5. A mismatch characterization and simulation environment for weak-to-strong inversion CMOS transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velarde-Ramirez, J.; Vicente-Sanchez, G.; Serrano-Gotarredona, T.; Linares-Barranco, B.

    2005-06-01

    Mismatch analysis and simulation is crucial for modern analog design with submicron technologies, where transistors tend to be biased in weak and moderate inversion regions because of the down shrinking of power supply voltage. For optimum analog design where speed, power consumption, area, noise, and accuracy need to be carefully traded off, it is crucial to have available a precise estimation of transistor mismatch in order to avoid overdesign and consequently sacrify unnecessarily speed, power consumption, and area. In this paper we will provide experimental mismatch measurements of different 0.35um CMOS technologies. Each technology has been characterized for a large number of transistor sizes (25-30), by sweeping different width and length values. A large number of transistor curves are measured ranging over different possible biasing conditions. A recent mismatch model will be used to fit the data, and extract electrical parameters. Some of those parameters will be used to adjust the measured mismatch. As a result, a set of standard deviations and correlation coefficients result for the statistical characterization of the mismatch responsible parameters. The resulting electrical parameters, and statistical mismatch parameters are then used in the Spectre simulator of Cadence design environment, to implement the mismatch models using the AHDL behavioral level Spectre description language. The paper shows good agreement between measured data, predicted data, and simulated data.

  6. Educational Mismatch between Graduates' Possessed Skills and Market Demands in Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uzair-ul-Hassan, Muhammad; Noreen, Zahida

    2013-01-01

    Educational mismatch in skills that graduates possess and market requires creates barriers for organizations as well as for job seekers. The study was conducted to find out the educational mismatch between graduates possessed skills and market demands. Convenient sampling was carried out and data were collected from 200 graduates of economics…

  7. Are Educational Mismatches Responsible for the "Inequality Increasing Effect" of Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budria, Santiago

    2011-01-01

    This paper asks whether educational mismatches can account for the positive association between education and wage inequality found in the data. We use two different data sources, the European Community Household Panel and the Portuguese Labour Force Survey, and consider several types of mismatch, including overqualification, underqualification…

  8. Tolerance of DNA Mismatches in Dmc1 Recombinase-mediated DNA Strand Exchange.

    PubMed

    Borgogno, María V; Monti, Mariela R; Zhao, Weixing; Sung, Patrick; Argaraña, Carlos E; Pezza, Roberto J

    2016-03-04

    Recombination between homologous chromosomes is required for the faithful meiotic segregation of chromosomes and leads to the generation of genetic diversity. The conserved meiosis-specific Dmc1 recombinase catalyzes homologous recombination triggered by DNA double strand breaks through the exchange of parental DNA sequences. Although providing an efficient rate of DNA strand exchange between polymorphic alleles, Dmc1 must also guard against recombination between divergent sequences. How DNA mismatches affect Dmc1-mediated DNA strand exchange is not understood. We have used fluorescence resonance energy transfer to study the mechanism of Dmc1-mediated strand exchange between DNA oligonucleotides with different degrees of heterology. The efficiency of strand exchange is highly sensitive to the location, type, and distribution of mismatches. Mismatches near the 3' end of the initiating DNA strand have a small effect, whereas most mismatches near the 5' end impede strand exchange dramatically. The Hop2-Mnd1 protein complex stimulates Dmc1-catalyzed strand exchange on homologous DNA or containing a single mismatch. We observed that Dmc1 can reject divergent DNA sequences while bypassing a few mismatches in the DNA sequence. Our findings have important implications in understanding meiotic recombination. First, Dmc1 acts as an initial barrier for heterologous recombination, with the mismatch repair system providing a second level of proofreading, to ensure that ectopic sequences are not recombined. Second, Dmc1 stepping over infrequent mismatches is likely critical for allowing recombination between the polymorphic sequences of homologous chromosomes, thus contributing to gene conversion and genetic diversity.

  9. Novel DNA mismatch-repair activity involving YB-1 in human mitochondria.

    PubMed

    de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C; Mason, Penelope A; Hashiguchi, Kazunari; Weissman, Lior; Tian, Jingyan; Guay, David; Lebel, Michel; Stevnsner, Tinna V; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2009-06-04

    Maintenance of the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) is essential for proper cellular function. The accumulation of damage and mutations in the mtDNA leads to diseases, cancer, and aging. Mammalian mitochondria have proficient base excision repair, but the existence of other DNA repair pathways is still unclear. Deficiencies in DNA mismatch repair (MMR), which corrects base mismatches and small loops, are associated with DNA microsatellite instability, accumulation of mutations, and cancer. MMR proteins have been identified in yeast and coral mitochondria; however, MMR proteins and function have not yet been detected in human mitochondria. Here we show that human mitochondria have a robust mismatch-repair activity, which is distinct from nuclear MMR. Key nuclear MMR factors were not detected in mitochondria, and similar mismatch-binding activity was observed in mitochondrial extracts from cells lacking MSH2, suggesting distinctive pathways for nuclear and mitochondrial MMR. We identified the repair factor YB-1 as a key candidate for a mitochondrial mismatch-binding protein. This protein localizes to mitochondria in human cells, and contributes significantly to the mismatch-binding and mismatch-repair activity detected in HeLa mitochondrial extracts, which are significantly decreased when the intracellular levels of YB-1 are diminished. Moreover, YB-1 depletion in cells increases mitochondrial DNA mutagenesis. Our results show that human mitochondria contain a functional MMR repair pathway in which YB-1 participates, likely in the mismatch-binding and recognition steps.

  10. The ‘diverse, dynamic new world of global tobacco control’? An analysis of participation in the Conference of the Parties to the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control

    PubMed Central

    Plotnikova, Evgeniya; Hill, Sarah E; Collin, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The increasingly inequitable impacts of tobacco use highlight the importance of ensuring developing countries’ ongoing participation in global tobacco control. The WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) has been widely regarded as reflecting the high engagement and effective influence of developing countries. Methods We examined participation in FCTC governance based on records from the first four meetings of the Conference of the Parties (COP), comparing representation and delegate diversity across income levels and WHO regions. Results While attendance at the COP sessions is high, there are substantial disparities in the relative representation of different income levels and regions, with lower middle and low income countries contributing only 18% and 10% of total meeting delegates, respectively. In regional terms, Europe provided the single largest share of delegates at all except the Durban (2008) meeting. Thirty-nine percent of low income countries and 27% of those from Africa were only ever represented by a single person delegation compared with 10% for high income countries and 11% for Europe. Rotation of the COP meeting location outside of Europe is associated with better representation of other regions and a stronger presence of delegates from national ministries of health and focal points for tobacco control. Conclusions Developing countries face particular barriers to participating in the COP process, and their engagement in global tobacco control is likely to diminish in the absence of specific measures to support their effective participation. PMID:23152101

  11. The role of the World Trade Organization and the 'three sisters' (the World Organisation for Animal Health, the International Plant Protection Convention and the Codex Alimentarius Commission) in the control of invasive alien species and the preservation of biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Kahn, S; Pelgrim, W

    2010-08-01

    The missions of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) include the design of surveillance and control methods for infectious transboundary animal diseases (including zoonoses), the provision of guarantees concerning animal health and animal production food safety, and the setting of standards for, and promotion of, animal welfare. The OIE role in setting standards for the sanitary safety of international trade in animals and animal products is formally recognised in the World Trade Organization (WTO) Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (the SPS Agreement). While the primary focus of the OIE is on animal diseases and zoonoses, the OIE has also been working within the WTO framework to examine possible contributions the organisation can make to achieving the goals of the Convention on Biological Diversity, particularly to preventing the global spread of invasive alien species (IAS). However, at the present time, setting standards for invasive species (other than those connected to the cause and distribution of diseases listed by the OIE) is outside the OIE mandate. Any future expansion of the OIE mandate would need to be decided by its Members and resources (expertise and financial contributions) for an extended standard-setting work programme secured. The other international standard-setting organisations referenced by the SPS Agreement are the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC) and the Codex Alimentarius Commission (CAC). The IPPC mandate and work programme address IAS and the protection of biodiversity. The CAC is not involved in this field.

  12. Conventional mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Tobias, Joseph D.

    2010-01-01

    The provision of mechanical ventilation for the support of infants and children with respiratory failure or insufficiency is one of the most common techniques that are performed in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). Despite its widespread application in the PICUs of the 21st century, before the 1930s, respiratory failure was uniformly fatal due to the lack of equipment and techniques for airway management and ventilatory support. The operating rooms of the 1950s and 1960s provided the arena for the development of the manual skills and the refinement of the equipment needed for airway management, which subsequently led to the more widespread use of endotracheal intubation thereby ushering in the era of positive pressure ventilation. Although there seems to be an ever increasing complexity in the techniques of mechanical ventilation, its successful use in the PICU should be guided by the basic principles of gas exchange and the physiology of respiratory function. With an understanding of these key concepts and the use of basic concepts of mechanical ventilation, this technique can be successfully applied in both the PICU and the operating room. This article reviews the basic physiology of gas exchange, principles of pulmonary physiology, and the concepts of mechanical ventilation to provide an overview of the knowledge required for the provision of conventional mechanical ventilation in various clinical arenas. PMID:20927268

  13. Effects of suppressing the DNA mismatch repair system on homeologous recombination in tomato.

    PubMed

    Tam, Sheh May; Hays, John B; Chetelat, Roger T

    2011-12-01

    In plant breeding, the ability to manipulate genetic (meiotic) recombination would be beneficial for facilitating gene transfer from wild relatives of crop plants. The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system helps maintain genetic integrity by correcting base mismatches that arise via DNA synthesis or damage, and antagonizes recombination between homeologous (divergent) DNA sequences. Previous studies have established that the genomes of cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and the wild relative S. lycopersicoides are substantially diverged (homeologous) such that recombination between their chromosomes is strongly reduced. Here, we report the effects on homeologous recombination of suppressing endogenous MMR genes in S. lycopersicum via RNAi-induced silencing of SlMSH2 and SlMSH7 or overexpressing dominant negatives of Arabidopsis MSH2 (AtMSH2-DN) in an alien substitution line (SL-8) of S. lycopersicoides in tomato. We show that certain inhibitions of MMR (RNAi of SlMSH7, AtMSH2-DN) are associated with modest increases in homeologous recombination, ranging from 3.8 to 29.2% (average rate of 17.8%) compared to controls. Unexpectedly, only the AtMSH2-DN proteins but not RNAi-induced silencing of MSH2 was found to increase homeologous recombination. The ratio of single to double crossovers (SCO:DCO ratio) decreased by approximately 50% in progeny of the AtMSH2-DN parents. An increase in the frequency of heterozygous SL-8 plants was also observed in the progeny of the SlMSH7-RNAi parents. Our findings may contribute to acceleration of introgression in cultivated tomato.

  14. Kinking in polymer composites and wood, and, Crack growth in mismatched welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Peter Malcolm

    This thesis is written in two parts; the first deals with compressive kinking in uniaxial carbon fiber PEEK composites and wood, and the second concerns ductile/brittle fracture in mismatched welds. The parts are dealt with separately below. Kinking. This is the first time that kink band formation and propagation has been video taped. The pictures reveal that kinking in ductile matrix fiber composites occurs in three distinct stages; incipient kinking, transient kinking and steady-state band broadening. Based on these observations a new kinematic model for kinking is proposed. Unlike previous models the present model is able to explain how angled kink bands are formed without violating compatibility or volume preserving constraints. Theoretical predictions for kink band orientation and compression strength under steady-state band broadening are made. Further experiments were conducted that verified the predictions. The steady-state band broadening stress is a very useful design parameter. It is a material parameter and forms a lower bound to the peak stress. Therefore it may be used in the same way as plastic limit loads are used for metals. It is also useful in determining the damage tolerance of a specimen. Mismatched welds. In the ductile/brittle transition regime, the fracture resistance of steel weldments is controlled by the competition between ductile tearing and cleavage fracture. Under typical conditions, a crack in a weld initiates and grows by ductile tearing but, ultimately, failure occurs by catastrophic cleavage fracture. In this study ductile tearing is modeled using Gurson cell elements embedded in an elastic-plastic body. Cleavage fracture is based on a weakest link mechanism in conjunction with brittle microcrack statistics. This model is applied to compute the behavior of undermatched and overmatched welds. The fracture resistance and onset of cleavage fracture are calculated for different crack lengths, specimen geometries and weld widths.

  15. Bifunctional rhodium intercalator conjugates as mismatch-directing DNA alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Schatzschneider, Ulrich; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2004-07-21

    A conjugate of a DNA mismatch-specific rhodium intercalator, containing the bulky chrysenediimine ligand, and an aniline mustard has been prepared, and targeting of mismatches in DNA by this conjugate has been examined. The preferential alkylation of mismatched over fully matched DNA is found by a mobility shift assay at concentrations where untethered organic mustards show little reaction. The binding site of the Rh intercalator was determined by DNA photocleavage, and the position of covalent modification was established on the basis of the enhanced depurination associated with N-alkylation. The site-selective alkylation at mismatched DNA renders these conjugates useful tools for the covalent tagging of DNA base pair mismatches and new chemotherapeutic design.

  16. The Shape Interaction Matrix-Based Affine Invariant Mismatch Removal for Partial-Duplicate Image Search.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yang; Lin, Zhouchen; Zha, Hongbin

    2017-02-01

    Mismatch removal is a key step in many computer vision problems. In this paper, we handle the mismatch removal problem by adopting shape interaction matrix (SIM). Given the homogeneous coordinates of the two corresponding point sets, we first compute the SIMs of the two point sets. Then, we detect the mismatches by picking out the most different entries between the two SIMs. Even under strong affine transformations, outliers, noises, and burstiness, our method can still work well. Actually, this paper is the first non-iterative mismatch removal method that achieves affine invariance. Extensive results on synthetic 2D points matching data sets and real image matching data sets verify the effectiveness, efficiency, and robustness of our method in removing mismatches. Moreover, when applied to partial-duplicate image search, our method reaches higher retrieval precisions with shorter time cost compared with the state-of-the-art geometric verification methods.

  17. Effects of refractive index mismatch in optical CT imaging of polymer gel dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Manjappa, Rakesh; Makki S, Sharath; Kanhirodan, Rajan; Kumar, Rajesh

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Proposing an image reconstruction technique, algebraic reconstruction technique-refraction correction (ART-rc). The proposed method takes care of refractive index mismatches present in gel dosimeter scanner at the boundary, and also corrects for the interior ray refraction. Polymer gel dosimeters with high dose regions have higher refractive index and optical density compared to the background medium, these changes in refractive index at high dose results in interior ray bending. Methods: The inclusion of the effects of refraction is an important step in reconstruction of optical density in gel dosimeters. The proposed ray tracing algorithm models the interior multiple refraction at the inhomogeneities. Jacob’s ray tracing algorithm has been modified to calculate the pathlengths of the ray that traverses through the higher dose regions. The algorithm computes the length of the ray in each pixel along its path and is used as the weight matrix. Algebraic reconstruction technique and pixel based reconstruction algorithms are used for solving the reconstruction problem. The proposed method is tested with numerical phantoms for various noise levels. The experimental dosimetric results are also presented. Results: The results show that the proposed scheme ART-rc is able to reconstruct optical density inside the dosimeter better than the results obtained using filtered backprojection and conventional algebraic reconstruction approaches. The quantitative improvement using ART-rc is evaluated using gamma-index. The refraction errors due to regions of different refractive indices are discussed. The effects of modeling of interior refraction in the dose region are presented. Conclusions: The errors propagated due to multiple refraction effects have been modeled and the improvements in reconstruction using proposed model is presented. The refractive index of the dosimeter has a mismatch with the surrounding medium (for dry air or water scanning). The algorithm

  18. Rapid Recovery from Chronic PRCA by MSC Infusion in Patient after Major ABO-Mismatched alloSCT.

    PubMed

    Sergeevicheva, Vera; Kruchkova, Irina; Chernykh, Elena; Shevela, Ekaterina; Kulagin, Alexander; Gilevich, Andrey; Lisukov, Igor; Sergeevichev, David; Kozlov, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is a rare complication in recipients of allogenic stem cell from ABO incompatible donors. It is characterized by reticulocytopenia and by an absence of red cell cell precursors in the bone marrow. Despite close isohemagglutinins monitoring and standard immunosupressive treatment in these patients prolong PRCA are still associated with severe transfusion dependence. We report the case of a 31 yr old male patient who underwent HLA-matched ABO-mismatched allo-SCT and developed resistance PRCA despite conventional immunosupressive therapy and prophylaxis cotrasplantation of bone marrow derived MSC at day 0. He responded dramatically to therapy with adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells from HSC donors and continued to be transfusion-independent and AML-disease free. This method of the PRCA therapy of deserves further investigation.

  19. Rapid Recovery from Chronic PRCA by MSC Infusion in Patient after Major ABO-Mismatched alloSCT

    PubMed Central

    Sergeevicheva, Vera; Kruchkova, Irina; Chernykh, Elena; Shevela, Ekaterina; Kulagin, Alexander; Gilevich, Andrey; Lisukov, Igor; Sergeevichev, David; Kozlov, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is a rare complication in recipients of allogenic stem cell from ABO incompatible donors. It is characterized by reticulocytopenia and by an absence of red cell cell precursors in the bone marrow. Despite close isohemagglutinins monitoring and standard immunosupressive treatment in these patients prolong PRCA are still associated with severe transfusion dependence. We report the case of a 31 yr old male patient who underwent HLA-matched ABO-mismatched allo-SCT and developed resistance PRCA despite conventional immunosupressive therapy and prophylaxis cotrasplantation of bone marrow derived MSC at day 0. He responded dramatically to therapy with adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells from HSC donors and continued to be transfusion-independent and AML-disease free. This method of the PRCA therapy of deserves further investigation. PMID:22778753

  20. ESD and the Rio Conventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarabhai, Kartikeya V.; Ravindranath, Shailaja; Schwarz, Rixa; Vyas, Purvi

    2012-01-01

    Chapter 36 of Agenda 21, a key document of the 1992 Earth Summit, emphasised reorienting education towards sustainable development. While two of the Rio conventions, the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), developed communication, education and public awareness (CEPA)…

  1. Single-molecule views of MutS on mismatched DNA

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Bong; Cho, Won-Ki; Park, Jonghyun; Jeon, Yongmoon; Kim, Daehyung; Lee, Seung Hwan; Fishel, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Base-pair mismatches that occur during DNA replication or recombination can reduce genetic stability or conversely increase genetic diversity. The genetics and biophysical mechanism of mismatch repair (MMR) has been extensively studied since its discovery nearly 50 years ago. MMR is a strand-specific excision-resynthesis reaction that is initiated by MutS homolog (MSH) binding to the mismatched nucleotides. The MSH mismatch-binding signal is then transmitted to the immediate downstream MutL homolog (MLH/PMS) MMR components and ultimately to a distant strand scission site where excision begins. The mechanism of signal transmission has been controversial for decades. We have utilized single molecule Forster Resonance Energy Transfer (smFRET), Fluorescence Tracking (smFT) and Polarization Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (smP-TIRF) to examine the interactions and dynamic behaviors of single Thermus aquaticus MutS (TaqMutS) particles on mismatched DNA. We determined that Taq-MutS forms an incipient clamp to search for a mismatch in ∼1 s intervals by 1-dimensional (1D) thermal fluctuation-driven rotational diffusion while in continuous contact with the helical duplex DNA. When MutS encounters a mismatch it lingers for ∼3 s to exchange bound ADP for ATP (ADP → ATP exchange). ATP binding by TaqMutS induces an extremely stable clamp conformation (∼10 min) that slides off the mismatch and moves along the adjacent duplex DNA driven simply by 1D thermal diffusion. The ATP-bound sliding clamps rotate freely while in discontinuous contact with the DNA. The visualization of a train of MSH proteins suggests that dissociation of ATP-bound sliding clamps from the mismatch permits multiple mismatch-dependent loading events. These direct observations have provided critical clues into understanding the molecular mechanism of MSH proteins during MMR. PMID:24629484

  2. Modeling of integrated environmental control systems for coal-fired power plants: Conventional froth flotation for the IEC coal cleaning plant model. Quarterly progress report, [October 1, 1988--December 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, E.S.

    1989-01-01

    This report describes the addition of a conventional froth flotation circuit into the FORTRAN coal cleaning module of the Integrated Environmental Control (IEC) model. The purpose of this modification is to include froth flotation as an option to clean the coal fines. The current model has three beneficiation: levels (2, 3, and 4) in which different streams are washed by specific gravity equipment. Level 2 washes only the coarse stream. Level 3 washes the coarse and medium streams. Level 4 washes the coarse, medium, and fine streams. This modification adds a fifth level, which uses specific gravity equipment to wash the coarse and medium streams and froth flotation equipment for the fine stream. The specific size fractions in each stream are specified by the model user. As before, the model optimizes the yield of each circuit in order to achieve a target coal quality for the cleaned coal product.

  3. Future of the Renal Biopsy: Time to Change the Conventional Modality Using Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Khosroshahi, Hamid Tayebi; Sarbaz, Yashar; Shakeri Bavil, Abolhassan

    2017-01-01

    At the present time, imaging guided renal biopsy is used to provide diagnoses in most types of primary and secondary renal diseases. It has been claimed that renal biopsy can provide a link between diagnosis of renal disease and its pathological conditions. However, sometimes there is a considerable mismatch between patient renal outcome and pathological findings in renal biopsy. This is the time to address some new diagnostic methods to resolve the insufficiency of conventional percutaneous guided renal biopsy. Nanotechnology is still in its infancy in renal imaging; however, it seems that it is the next step in renal biopsy, providing solutions to the limitations of conventional modalities. PMID:28316612

  4. Security loophole in free-space quantum key distribution due to spatial-mode detector-efficiency mismatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajeed, Shihan; Chaiwongkhot, Poompong; Bourgoin, Jean-Philippe; Jennewein, Thomas; Lütkenhaus, Norbert; Makarov, Vadim

    2015-06-01

    In free-space quantum key distribution (QKD), the sensitivity of the receiver's detector channels may depend differently on the spatial mode of incoming photons. Consequently, an attacker can control the spatial mode to break security. We experimentally investigate a standard polarization QKD receiver and identify sources of efficiency mismatch in its optical scheme. We model a practical intercept-and-resend attack and show that it would break security in most situations. We show experimentally that adding an appropriately chosen spatial filter at the receiver's entrance may be an effective countermeasure.

  5. Enhanced thermal stability and mismatch discrimination of mutation-carrying DNA duplexes and their kinetic and thermodynamic properties in microchannel laminar flow.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Maria Portia B; Yamashita, Kenichi; Miyazaki, Masaya; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Maeda, Hideaki

    2009-07-01

    This article reports the enhancement of thermal stability involving normal duplex and mutation-carrying DNA duplexes in microchannel laminar flow. The application of an in-house temperature-controllable microchannel-type flow cell is demonstrated for improved discrimination of mismatch base pairs such as A-G and T-G that are difficult to distinguish due to the rather small thermal destabilizations. Enhancement in thermal stability is reflected by an increased thermal melting temperature achieved in microchannel laminar flow as compared with batch reactions. To examine the kinetics and thermodynamics of duplex-coil equilibrium of DNA oligomers, denaturation-renaturation hysteresis curves were measured. The influence of microchannel laminar flow on DNA base mismatch analysis was described from the kinetic and thermodynamic perspectives. An increasing trend was observed for association rate constant as flow rate increased. In contrast, an apparent decrease in dissociation rate constant was observed with increasing flow rate. The magnitudes of the activation energies of dissociation were nearly constant for both the batch and microchannel laminar flow systems at all flow rates. In contrast, the magnitudes of activation energies of association decreased as flow rate increased. These results clearly show how microchannel laminar flow induces change in reaction rate by effecting change in activation energy. We anticipate, therefore, that this approach based on microchannel laminar flow system holds great promise for improved mismatch discrimination in DNA analyses, particularly on single-base-pair mismatch, by pronouncedly enhancing thermal stability.

  6. Deficient mismatch repair: Read all about it (Review)

    PubMed Central

    RICHMAN, SUSAN

    2015-01-01

    Defects in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) proteins, result in a phenotype called microsatellite instability (MSI), occurring in up to 15% of sporadic colorectal cancers. Approximately one quarter of colon cancers with deficient MMR (dMMR) develop as a result of an inherited predisposition syndrome, Lynch syndrome (formerly known as HNPCC). It is essential to identify patients who potentially have Lynch syndrome, as not only they, but also family members, may require screening and monitoring. Diagnostic criteria have been developed, based primarily on Western populations, and several methodologies are available to identify dMMR tumours, including immunohistochemistry and microsatellite testing. These criteria have provided evidence supporting the introduction of reflex testing. Yet, it is becoming increasingly clear that tests have a limited sensitivity and specificity and may yet be superseded by next generation sequencing. In this review, the limitations of diagnostic criteria are discussed, and current and emerging screening technologies explained. There is now useful evidence supporting the prognostic and predictive value of dMMR status in colorectal tumours, but much less is known about their value in extracolonic tumours, that may also feature in Lynch syndrome. This review assesses current literature relating to dMMR in endometrial, ovarian, gastric and melanoma cancers, which it would seem, may benefit from large-scale clinical trials in order to further close the gap in knowledge between colorectal and extracolonic tumours. PMID:26315971

  7. Effect of contralateral white noise masking on the mismatch negativity.

    PubMed

    Salo, S K; Lang, A H; Salmivalli, A J

    1995-01-01

    Mismatch negativity (MMN), an auditive event-related potential (ERP) component, evoked by deviant stimuli in a homogeneous stream of standard stimuli was studied in a unilateral stimulation and contralateral white noise masking condition. Eleven subjects (Ss) with normal hearing (aged 20-35 years) were examined using sine tone stimuli (70 dB HL, interstimulus interval 300 ms, duration 40 ms with 5 ms rise and fall times). Three blocks of standard (std)/deviant (dev) series of stimuli were used: std 500/dev 600 Hz, std 2000/dev 1900 Hz, and std 2000/dev 1600 Hz. The first block was repeated for another group of 11 Ss with normal hearing (aged 17-27 years). The MMN was analysed from the difference curves recorded at Fz, Cz and Pz. The stimuli were delivered unilaterally, either with or without 50 dB effective masking level white noise to the contralateral ear. The MMN amplitude attenuated significantly when contralateral masking was used. In addition, there was interaction between noise masking and the stimulated ear. The MMN latencies were not affected by white noise masking.

  8. Modeling cross-hatch surface morphology in growing mismatched layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, A. M.; Speck, J. S.; Romanov, A. E.; Bobeth, M.; Pompe, W.

    2002-02-01

    We propose and investigate a model for the development of cross-hatch surface morphology in growing mismatched layers. The model incorporates two important elements: (i) strain relaxation due to dislocation glide in the layer (film) interior that is also associated with misfit dislocation formation at the film/substrate interface and (ii) lateral surface transport that eliminates surface steps that originated from dislocation glide. A combination of dislocation-assisted strain relaxation and surface step flow leads to the appearance of surface height undulations during layer growth. A Monte Carlo simulation technique was applied to model dislocation nucleation events in the course of strain relaxation. The simulation was used to model the influence of dislocations on film surface height profiles. The surface height displacement was calculated from the analytic elasticity solutions for edge dislocations near a free surface. The results of the modeling predict that the average amplitude of the surface undulations and their apparent wavelength both increase with increasing film relaxation and film thickness. The developed cross-hatch pattern is characterized by an atomically smooth but mesoscopically (lateral dimensions ˜0.1-10 μm) rough surface morphology. The conclusions of the model are in agreement with atomic force microscopy observations of cross-hatch surface relief in In0.25Ga0.75As/GaAs samples grown well beyond the critical thickness for misfit dislocation formation.

  9. Modelling Trial-by-Trial Changes in the Mismatch Negativity

    PubMed Central

    Lieder, Falk; Daunizeau, Jean; Garrido, Marta I.; Friston, Karl J.; Stephan, Klaas E.

    2013-01-01

    The mismatch negativity (MMN) is a differential brain response to violations of learned regularities. It has been used to demonstrate that the brain learns the statistical structure of its environment and predicts future sensory inputs. However, the algorithmic nature of these computations and the underlying neurobiological implementation remain controversial. This article introduces a mathematical framework with which competing ideas about the computational quantities indexed by MMN responses can be formalized and tested against single-trial EEG data. This framework was applied to five major theories of the MMN, comparing their ability to explain trial-by-trial changes in MMN amplitude. Three of these theories (predictive coding, model adjustment, and novelty detection) were formalized by linking the MMN to different manifestations of the same computational mechanism: approximate Bayesian inference according to the free-energy principle. We thereby propose a unifying view on three distinct theories of the MMN. The relative plausibility of each theory was assessed against empirical single-trial MMN amplitudes acquired from eight healthy volunteers in a roving oddball experiment. Models based on the free-energy principle provided more plausible explanations of trial-by-trial changes in MMN amplitude than models representing the two more traditional theories (change detection and adaptation). Our results suggest that the MMN reflects approximate Bayesian learning of sensory regularities, and that the MMN-generating process adjusts a probabilistic model of the environment according to prediction errors. PMID:23436989

  10. Mammalian mismatches in nucleotide metabolism: implications for xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Khalpey, Zain; Yuen, Ada H Y; Lavitrano, Marialuisa; McGregor, Christopher G A; Kalsi, Kameljit K; Yacoub, Magdi H; Smolenski, Ryszard T

    2007-10-01

    Acute humoral rejection (AHR) limits the clinical application of animal organs for xenotransplantation. Mammalian disparities in nucleotide metabolism may contribute significantly to the microvascular component in AHR; these, however remain ill-defined. We evaluated the extent of species-specific differences in nucleotide metabolism. HPLC analysis was performed on venous blood samples (nucleotide metabolites) and heart biopsies (purine enzymes) from wild type mice, rats, pigs, baboons, and human donors.Ecto-5'-nucleotidase (E5'N) activities were 4-fold lower in pigs and baboon hearts compared to human and mice hearts while rat activity was highest. Similar differences between pigs and humans were also observed with kidneys and endothelial cells. More than 10-fold differences were observed with other purine enzymes. AMP deaminase (AMPD) activity was exceptionally high in mice but very low in pig and baboon hearts. Adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity was highest in baboons. Adenosine kinase (AK) activity was more consistent across different species. Pig blood had the highest levels of hypoxanthine, inosine and adenine. Human blood uric acid concentration was almost 100 times higher than in other species studied. We conclude that species-specific differences in nucleotide metabolism may affect compatibility of pig organs within a human metabolic environment. Furthermore, nucleotide metabolic mismatches may affect clinical relevance of animal organ transplant models. Supplementation of deficient precursors or application of inhibitors of nucleotide metabolism (e.g., allopurinol) or transgenic upregulation of E5'N may overcome some of these differences.

  11. Mouse models of DNA mismatch repair in cancer research

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyeryoung; Tosti, Elena; Edelmann, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes are the cause of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer/Lynch syndrome (HNPCC/LS) one of the most common cancer predisposition syndromes, and defects in MMR are also prevalent in sporadic colorectal cancers. In the past, the generation and analysis of mouse lines with knockout mutations in all of the known MMR genes has provided insight into how loss of individual MMR genes affects genome stability and contributes to cancer susceptibility. These studies also revealed essential functions for some of the MMR genes in B cell maturation and fertility. In this review, we will provide a brief overview of the cancer predisposition phenotypes of recently developed mouse models with targeted mutations in MutS and MutL homologs (Msh and Mlh, respectively) and their utility as preclinical models. The focus will be on mouse lines with conditional MMR mutations that have allowed more accurate modeling of human cancer syndromes in mice and that together with new technologies in gene targeting, hold great promise for the analysis of MMR-deficient intestinal tumors and other cancers which will drive the development of preventive and therapeutic treatment strategies. PMID:26708047

  12. Mouse models of DNA mismatch repair in cancer research.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyeryoung; Tosti, Elena; Edelmann, Winfried

    2016-02-01

    Germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes are the cause of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer/Lynch syndrome (HNPCC/LS) one of the most common cancer predisposition syndromes, and defects in MMR are also prevalent in sporadic colorectal cancers. In the past, the generation and analysis of mouse lines with knockout mutations in all of the known MMR genes has provided insight into how loss of individual MMR genes affects genome stability and contributes to cancer susceptibility. These studies also revealed essential functions for some of the MMR genes in B cell maturation and fertility. In this review, we will provide a brief overview of the cancer predisposition phenotypes of recently developed mouse models with targeted mutations in MutS and MutL homologs (Msh and Mlh, respectively) and their utility as preclinical models. The focus will be on mouse lines with conditional MMR mutations that have allowed more accurate modeling of human cancer syndromes in mice and that together with new technologies in gene targeting, hold great promise for the analysis of MMR-deficient intestinal tumors and other cancers which will drive the development of preventive and therapeutic treatment strategies.

  13. Snowshoe hares display limited phenotypic plasticity to mismatch in seasonal camouflage

    PubMed Central

    Zimova, Marketa; Mills, L. Scott; Lukacs, Paul M.; Mitchell, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    As duration of snow cover decreases owing to climate change, species undergoing seasonal colour moults can become colour mismatched with their background. The immediate adaptive solution to this mismatch is phenotypic plasticity, either in phenology of seasonal colour moults or in behaviours that reduce mismatch or its consequences. We observed nearly 200 snowshoe hares across a wide range of snow conditions and two study sites in Montana, USA, and found minimal plasticity in response to mismatch between coat colour and background. We found that moult phenology varied between study sites, likely due to differences in photoperiod and climate, but was largely fixed within study sites with only minimal plasticity to snow conditions during the spring white-to-brown moult. We also found no evidence that hares modify their behaviour in response to colour mismatch. Hiding and fleeing behaviours and resting spot preference of hares were more affected by variables related to season, site and concealment by vegetation, than by colour mismatch. We conclude that plasticity in moult phenology and behaviours in snowshoe hares is insufficient for adaptation to camouflage mismatch, suggesting that any future adaptation to climate change will require natural selection on moult phenology or behaviour. PMID:24619446

  14. Repair of Single- and Multiple-Substitution Mismatches during Recombination in Streptococcus Pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Gasc, A. M.; Sicard, A. M.; Claverys, J. P.

    1989-01-01

    The use as genetic markers, during transformation of Streptococcus pneumoniae, of 19 sequences differing from wild type, located throughout the amiA locus, enabled us to examine the fate of 24 single- and 11 multiple-mismatches during recombination. Tentative mismatch ranking as a function of decreasing repair efficiency by the Hex mismatch repair system is G/T = A/C = G/G (maximum repair: 90-95%) > C/T (mostly 75 to 90% repair) > A/A (from 50 to 90% repair) > T/T (50-65% repair) > A/G (from 0 to 20% repair) > C/C. No indication of correction of the latter has been obtained. Over the limited number of samples examined, we observed no influence of the base composition of the surrounding sequence on correction efficiency for both transition mismatches and for G/G and C/C. Variations in the surrounding sequence affect repair of A/G and C/T, and, even more strongly, of A/A and T/T. No simple correlation to the G:C content of the surrounding sequence is apparent from our results, in contrast to the conclusion drawn for the Mut mismatch repair system of Escherichia coli. Examination of the fate of multiple mismatches suggests that C/C may sometimes impede recognition of otherwise corrected mismatches. PMID:2645195

  15. Snowshoe hares display limited phenotypic plasticity to mismatch in seasonal camouflage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zimova, Marketa; Mills, L. Scott; Lukacs, Paul M.; Mitchell, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    As duration of snow cover decreases owing to climate change, species undergoing seasonal colour moults can become colour mismatched with their background. The immediate adaptive solution to this mismatch is phenotypic plasticity, either in phenology of seasonal colour moults or in behaviours that reduce mismatch or its consequences. We observed nearly 200 snowshoe hares across a wide range of snow conditions and two study sites in Montana, USA, and found minimal plasticity in response to mismatch between coat colour and background. We found that moult phenology varied between study sites, likely due to differences in photoperiod and climate, but was largely fixed within study sites with only minimal plasticity to snow conditions during the spring white-to-brown moult. We also found no evidence that hares modify their behaviour in response to colour mismatch. Hiding and fleeing behaviours and resting spot preference of hares were more affected by variables related to season, site and concealment by vegetation, than by colour mismatch. We conclude that plasticity in moult phenology and behaviours in snowshoe hares is insufficient for adaptation to camouflage mismatch, suggesting that any future adaptation to climate change will require natural selection on moult phenology or behaviour.

  16. Impact of ABO blood group mismatch in alemtuzumab-based reduced-intensity conditioned haematopoietic SCT.

    PubMed

    Brierley, C K; Littlewood, T J; Peniket, A J; Gregg, R; Ward, J; Clark, A; Parker, A; Malladi, R; Medd, P

    2015-07-01

    The impact of ABO incompatibility on clinical outcomes following haematopoietic SCT (HSCT) remains controversial. This retrospective study assessed the effect of ABO mismatch on transplant outcomes and transfusion requirements in 594 patients undergoing reduced-intensity conditioned (RIC) HSCT with alemtuzumab in three UK transplant centres. We found no significant effects of minor, major or bidirectional ABO mismatch on overall survival, relapse-free survival, nonrelapse mortality or relapse incidence. Although the rate of acute GVHD was unaffected by ABO mismatch, the incidence of extensive chronic GVHD was higher in patients with minor and major mismatch compared with those who were ABO matched (hazard ratio (HR) 1.74, P=0.032 for minor, HR 1.69 P=0.0036 for major mismatch). Red cell and platelet transfusion requirements in the first 100 days post transplant did not differ by ABO mismatch. In this large UK series, ABO mismatch in RIC HSCT has no clinically significant effect on survival outcomes but appears to modify susceptibility to extensive chronic GVHD.

  17. Ventromedial prefrontal cortex drives hippocampal theta oscillations induced by mismatch computations.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Marta I; Barnes, Gareth R; Kumaran, Dharshan; Maguire, Eleanor A; Dolan, Raymond J

    2015-10-15

    Detecting environmental change is fundamental for adaptive behavior in an uncertain world. Previous work indicates the hippocampus supports the generation of novelty signals via implementation of a match-mismatch detector that signals when an incoming sensory input violates expectations based on past experience. While existing work has emphasized the particular contribution of the hippocampus, here we ask which other brain structures also contribute to match-mismatch detection. Furthermore, we leverage the fine-grained temporal resolution of magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate whether mismatch computations are spectrally confined to the theta range, based on the prominence of this range of oscillations in models of hippocampal function. By recording MEG activity while human subjects perform a task that incorporates conditions of match-mismatch novelty we show that mismatch signals are confined to the theta band and are expressed in both the hippocampus and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). Effective connectivity analyses (dynamic causal modeling) show that the hippocampus and vmPFC work as a functional circuit during mismatch detection. Surprisingly, our results suggest that the vmPFC drives the hippocampus during the generation and processing of mismatch signals. Our findings provide new evidence that the hippocampal-vmPFC circuit is engaged during novelty processing, which has implications for emerging theories regarding the role of vmPFC in memory.

  18. Snowshoe hares display limited phenotypic plasticity to mismatch in seasonal camouflage.

    PubMed

    Zimova, Marketa; Mills, L Scott; Lukacs, Paul M; Mitchell, Michael S

    2014-05-07

    As duration of snow cover decreases owing to climate change, species undergoing seasonal colour moults can become colour mismatched with their background. The immediate adaptive solution to this mismatch is phenotypic plasticity, either in phenology of seasonal colour moults or in behaviours that reduce mismatch or its consequences. We observed nearly 200 snowshoe hares across a wide range of snow conditions and two study sites in Montana, USA, and found minimal plasticity in response to mismatch between coat colour and background. We found that moult phenology varied between study sites, likely due to differences in photoperiod and climate, but was largely fixed within study sites with only minimal plasticity to snow conditions during the spring white-to-brown moult. We also found no evidence that hares modify their behaviour in response to colour mismatch. Hiding and fleeing behaviours and resting spot preference of hares were more affected by variables related to season, site and concealment by vegetation, than by colour mismatch. We conclude that plasticity in moult phenology and behaviours in snowshoe hares is insufficient for adaptation to camouflage mismatch, suggesting that any future adaptation to climate change will require natural selection on moult phenology or behaviour.

  19. Native mass spectrometry provides direct evidence for DNA mismatch-induced regulation of asymmetric nucleotide binding in mismatch repair protein MutS.

    PubMed

    Monti, Maria Chiara; Cohen, Serge X; Fish, Alexander; Winterwerp, Herrie H K; Barendregt, Arjan; Friedhoff, Peter; Perrakis, Anastassis; Heck, Albert J R; Sixma, Titia K; van den Heuvel, Robert H H; Lebbink, Joyce H G

    2011-10-01

    The DNA mismatch repair protein MutS recognizes mispaired bases in DNA and initiates repair in an ATP-dependent manner. Understanding of the allosteric coupling between DNA mismatch recognition and two asymmetric nucleotide binding sites at opposing sides of the MutS dimer requires identification of the relevant MutS.mmDNA.nucleotide species. Here, we use native mass spectrometry to detect simultaneous DNA mismatch binding and asymmetric nucleotide binding to Escherichia coli MutS. To resolve the small differences between macromolecular species bound to different nucleotides, we developed a likelihood based algorithm capable to deconvolute the observed spectra into individual peaks. The obtained mass resolution resolves simultaneous binding of ADP and AMP.PNP to this ABC ATPase in the absence of DNA. Mismatched DNA regulates the asymmetry in the ATPase sites; we observe a stable DNA-bound state containing a single AMP.PNP cofactor. This is the first direct evidence for such a postulated mismatch repair intermediate, and showcases the potential of native MS analysis in detecting mechanistically relevant reaction intermediates.

  20. Differentiation of Schizophrenia Patients from Healthy Subjects by Mismatch Negativity and Neuropsychological Tests

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Ting; Liu, Chih-Min; Chiu, Ming-Jang; Liu, Chen-Chung; Chien, Yi-Ling; Hwang, Tzung-Jeng; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Shan, Jia-Chi; Hsieh, Ming H.; Hwu, Hai-Gwo

    2012-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia is a heterogeneous disorder with diverse presentations. The current and the proposed DSM-V diagnostic system remains phenomenologically based, despite the fact that several neurobiological and neuropsychological markers have been identified. A multivariate approach has better diagnostic utility than a single marker method. In this study, the mismatch negativity (MMN) deficit of schizophrenia was first replicated in a Han Chinese population, and then the MMN was combined with several neuropsychological measurements to differentiate schizophrenia patients from healthy subjects. Methodology/Principal Findings 120 schizophrenia patients and 76 healthy controls were recruited. Each subject received examinations for duration MMN, Continuous Performance Test, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale Third Edition (WAIS-III). The MMN was compared between cases and controls, and important covariates were investigated. Schizophrenia patients had significantly reduced MMN amplitudes, and MMN decreased with increasing age in both patient and control groups. None of the neuropsychological indices correlated with MMN. Predictive multivariate logistic regression models using the MMN and neuropsychological measurements as predictors were developed. Four predictors, including MMN at electrode FCz and three scores from the WAIS-III (Arithmetic, Block Design, and Performance IQ) were retained in the final predictive model. The model performed well in differentiating patients from healthy subjects (percentage of concordant pairs: 90.5%). Conclusions/Significance MMN deficits were found in Han Chinese schizophrenia patients. The multivariate approach combining biomarkers from different modalities such as electrophysiology and neuropsychology had a better diagnostic utility. PMID:22496807

  1. Social, Spatial, and Skill Mismatch among Immigrants and Native-Born Workers in Los Angeles. Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pastor, Manuel, Jr.; Marcelli, Enrico A.

    Racially different economic outcomes stem from multiple causes, including various "mismatches" between minority employees and available jobs. A skill mismatch occurs when individuals' education and job skills do not qualify them for existing jobs. A spatial mismatch means that people live far from the work for which they qualify. A…

  2. Re-Examining Risk of Repeated HLA Mismatch in Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tinckam, Kathryn J; Rose, Caren; Hariharan, Sundaram; Gill, John

    2016-09-01

    Kidney retransplantation is a risk factor for decreased allograft survival. Repeated mismatched HLA antigens between first and second transplant may be a stimulus for immune memory responses and increased risk of alloimmune damage to the second allograft. Historical data identified a role of repeated HLA mismatches in allograft loss. However, evolution of HLA testing methods and a modern transplant era necessitate re-examination of this role to more accurately risk-stratify recipients. We conducted a contemporary registry analysis of data from 13,789 patients who received a second kidney transplant from 1995 to 2011, of which 3868 had one or more repeated mismatches. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards modeling revealed no effect of repeated mismatches on all-cause or death-censored graft loss. Analysis of predefined subgroups, however, showed that any class 2 repeated mismatch increased the hazard of death-censored graft loss, particularly in patients with detectable panel-reactive antibody before second transplant (hazard ratio [HR], 1.15; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.02 to 1.29). Furthermore, in those who had nephrectomy of the first allograft, class 2 repeated mismatches specifically associated with all-cause (HR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.58) and death-censored graft loss (HR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.12 to 1.78). These updated data redefine the effect of repeated mismatches in retransplantation and challenge the paradigm that repeated mismatches in isolation confer increased immunologic risk. We also defined clear recipient categories for which repeated mismatches may be of greater concern in a contemporary cohort. Additional studies are needed to determine appropriate interventions for these recipients.

  3. Dead space closure with quilting suture versus conventional closure with drainage for the prevention of seroma after mastectomy for breast cancer (QUISERMAS): protocol for a multicentre randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Ouldamer, Lobna; Bonastre, Julia; Brunet-Houdard, Solène; Body, Gilles; Giraudeau, Bruno; Caille, Agnès

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Postoperative wound seroma is common after mastectomy. This complication is associated with significant impact on patient outcomes and healthcare costs. The optimal closure approach for seroma prevention remains unknown but some evidence suggests that quilting suture of the dead space could lower the incidence of seroma. The aim of this trial is to compare seroma formation using quilting suture versus conventional closure with drainage in patients undergoing mastectomy. Methods and analysis This is a multicentre, superiority, randomised controlled trial in women undergoing mastectomy with or without axillary involvement. Exclusion criteria include indication of bilateral mastectomy or immediate reconstruction and any physical or psychiatric condition that could impair patient's ability to cooperate with postoperative data collection or that do not allow an informed consent. 320 participants will be randomised in a 1:1 ratio to receive either quilting suture or conventional wound closure with drain. The primary outcome is seroma requiring either aspiration or surgical intervention within 21 days following mastectomy. Secondary outcomes include seroma regardless of whether or not it requires an intervention, surgical site infection, pain score, cosmetic result, patient's quality of life, costs and cost-effectiveness. The primary analysis will be an intention-to treat analysis performed with a χ2 test (or Fisher's exact test). Ethics and dissemination Written informed consent will be obtained from all participants. This study was approved by Tours Research ethics committee (CPP TOURS—Region Centre—Ouest 1, 2014-R20, 16 December 2014). Study findings will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at relevant national and international breast cancer conferences. Trial registration number NCT02263651. PMID:27044574

  4. Band anticrossing effects in highly mismatched semiconductor alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Junqiao

    2002-01-01

    The first five chapters of this thesis focus on studies of band anticrossing (BAC) effects in highly electronegativity- mismatched semiconductor alloys. The concept of bandgap bowing has been used to describe the deviation of the alloy bandgap from a linear interpolation. Bowing parameters as large as 2.5 eV (for ZnSTe) and close to zero (for AlGaAs and ZnSSe) have been observed experimentally. Recent advances in thin film deposition techniques have allowed the growth of semiconductor alloys composed of significantly different constituents with ever- improving crystalline quality (e.g., GaAs1-xNx and GaP1-xNx with x ~< 0.05). These alloys exhibit many novel and interesting properties including, in particular, a giant bandgap bowing (bowing parameters > 14 eV). A band anticrossing model has been developed to explain these properties. The model shows that the predominant bowing mechanism in these systems is driven by the anticrossing interaction between the localized level associated with the minority component and the band states of the host. In this thesis I discuss my studies of the BAC effects in these highly mismatched semiconductors. It will be shown that the results of the physically intuitive BAC model can be derived from the Hamiltonian of the many-impurity Anderson model. The band restructuring caused by the BAC interaction is responsible for a series of experimental observations such as a large bandgap reduction, an enhancement of the electron effective mass, and a decrease in the pressure coefficient of the fundamental gap energy. Results of further experimental investigations of the optical properties of quantum wells based on these materials will be also presented. It will be shown that the BAC interaction occurs not only between localized states and conduction band states at the Brillouin zone center, but also exists over all of k-space. Finally, taking ZnSTe and ZnSeTe as examples, I show that BAC also

  5. Band Anticrossing in Highly Mismatched Compound Semiconductor Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Kin Man; Wu, J.; Walukiewicz, W.; Ager, J. W.; Haller, E. E.; Miotkowski, I.; Su, Ching-Hua; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Compound semiconductor alloys in which metallic anions are partially replaced with more electronegative isoelectronic atoms have recently attracted significant attention. Group IIIN(sub x)V(sub 1-x) alloys with a small amount of the electronegative N substituting more metallic column V elements has been the most extensively studied class of such Highly Mismatched Alloys (HMAs). We have shown that many of the unusual properties of the IIIN(sub x)V(sub 1-x) alloys can be well explained by the Band Anticrossing (BAC) model that describes the electronic structure in terms of an interaction between highly localized levels of substitutional N and the extended states of the host semiconductor matrix. Most recently the BAC model has been also used to explain similar modifications of the electronic band structure observed in Te-rich ZnS(sub x)Te(sub 1-x) and ZnSe(sub y)Te(sub 1-y) alloys. To date studies of HMAs have been limited to materials with relatively small concentrations of highly electronegative atoms. Here we report investigations of the electronic structure of ZnSe(sub y)Te(sub 1-y) alloys in the entire composition range, y between 0 and 1. The samples used in this study are bulk ZnSe(sub y)Te(sub 1-y) crystals grown by either a modified Bridgman method or by physical vapor transport. Photomodulated reflection (PR) spectroscopy was used to measure the composition dependence of optical transitions from the valence band edge and from the spin-orbit split off band to the conduction band. The pressure dependence of the band gap was measured using optical absorption in a diamond anvil cell. We find that the energy of the spin-orbit split off valence band edge does not depend on composition and is located at about 3 eV below the conduction band edge of ZnSe. On the Te-rich side the pressure and the composition dependence of the optical transitions are well explained by the BAC model which describes the downward shift of the conduction band edge in terms of the

  6. Band Anticrossing in Highly Mismatched Compound Semiconductor Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Kin Man; Wu, J.; Walukiewicz, W.; Ager, J. W.; Haller, E. E.; Miotkowski, I.; Ramdas, A.; Su, Ching-Hua; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Compound semiconductor alloys in which metallic anions are partially replaced with more electronegative isoelectronic atoms have recently attracted significant attention. Group IIIN(x)V(1-x), alloys with a small amount of the electronegative N substituting more metallic column V elements has been the most extensively studied class of such Highly Mismatched Alloys (HMAs). We have shown that many of the unusual properties of the IIIN(x),V(1-x) alloys can be well explained by the Band Anticrossing (BAC) model that describes the electronic structure in terms of an interaction between highly localized levels of substitutional N and the extended states of the host semiconductor matrix. Most recently the BAC model has been also used to explain similar modifications of the electronic band structure observed in Te-rich ZnS(x)Te(l-x) and ZnSe(Y)Te(1-y) alloys. To date studies of HMAs have been limited to materials with relatively small concentrations of highly electronegative atoms. Here we report investigations of the electronic structure of ZnSe(y)Te(1-y) alloys in the entire composition range, 0 less than or equal to y less than or equal to 1. The samples used in this study are bulk ZnSe(y)Te(1-y) crystals grown by either a modified Bridgman method or by physical vapor transport. Photomodulated reflection (PR) spectroscopy was used to measure the composition dependence of optical transitions from the valence band edge and from the spin-orbit split off band to the conduction band. The pressure dependence of the band gap was measured using optical absorption in a diamond anvil cell. We find that the energy of the spin-orbit split off valence band edge does not depend on composition and is located at about 3 eV below the conduction band edge of ZnSe. On the Te-rich side the pressure and the composition dependence of the optical transitions are well explained by the BAC model which describes the downward shift of the conduction band edge in terms of the interaction between

  7. Mismatched racial identities, colourism, and health in Toronto and Vancouver.

    PubMed

    Veenstra, Gerry

    2011-10-01

    Using original telephone survey data collected from adult residents of Toronto (n = 685) and Vancouver (n = 814) in 2009, I investigate associations between mental and physical health and variously conceived racial identities. An 'expressed racial identity' is a self-identification with a racial grouping that a person will readily express to others when asked to fit into official racial classifications presented by Census forms, survey researchers, insurance forms, and the like. Distinguishing between Asian, Black, South Asian, and White expressed racial identities, I find that survey respondents expressing Black identity are the most likely to report high blood pressure or hypertension, a risk that is slightly attenuated by socioeconomic status, and that respondents expressing Asian identity are the most likely to report poorer self-rated mental health and self-rated overall health, risks that are not explained by socioeconomic status. I also find that darker-skinned Black respondents are more likely than lighter-skinned Black respondents to report poor health outcomes, indicating that colourism, processes of discrimination which privilege lighter-skinned people of colour over their darker-skinned counterparts, exists and has implications for well-being in Canada as it does in the United States. Finally, 'reflected racial identity' refers to the racial identity that a person believes that others tend to perceive him or her to be. I find that expressed and reflected racial identities differ from one another for large proportions of self-expressed Black and South Asian respondents and relatively few self-expressed White and Asian respondents. I also find that mismatched racial identities correspond with relatively high risks of various poor health outcomes, especially for respondents who consider themselves White but believe that others tend to think they are something else. I conclude by presenting a framework for conceptualizing multifaceted suites of racial

  8. Ventilation/perfusion mismatch during lung aeration at birth.

    PubMed

    Lang, Justin A R; Pearson, James T; te Pas, Arjan B; Wallace, Megan J; Siew, Melissa L; Kitchen, Marcus J; Fouras, Andreas; Lewis, Robert A; Wheeler, Kevin I; Polglase, Graeme R; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Sonobe, Takashi; Hooper, Stuart B

    2014-09-01

    At birth, the transition to newborn life is triggered by lung aeration, which stimulates a large increase in pulmonary blood flow (PBF). Current theories predict that the increase in PBF is spatially related to ventilated lung regions as they aerate after birth. Using simultaneous phase-contrast X-ray imaging and angiography we investigated the spatial relationships between lung aeration and the increase in PBF after birth. Six near-term (30-day gestation) rabbits were delivered by caesarean section, intubated and an intravenous catheter inserted, before they were positioned for X-ray imaging. During imaging, iodine was injected before ventilation onset, after ventilation of the right lung only, and after ventilation of both lungs. Unilateral ventilation increased iodine levels entering both left and right pulmonary arteries (PAs) and significantly increased heart rate, iodine ejection per beat, diameters of both left and right PAs, and number of visible vessels in both lungs. Within the 6th intercostal space, the mean gray level (relative measure of iodine level) increased from 68.3 ± 11.6 and 70.3 ± 7.5%·s to 136.3 ± 22.6 and 136.3 ± 23.7%·s in the left and right PAs, respectively. No differences were observed between vessels in the left and right lungs, despite the left lung not initially being ventilated. The increase in PBF at birth is not spatially related to lung aeration allowing a large ventilation/perfusion mismatch, or pulmonary shunting, to occur in the partially aerated lung at birth.

  9. Disease-associated repeat instability and mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Monika H M; Pearson, Christopher E

    2016-02-01

    Expanded tandem repeat sequences in DNA are associated with at least 40 human genetic neurological, neurodegenerative, and neuromuscular diseases. Repeat expansion can occur during parent-to-offspring transmission, and arise at variable rates in specific tissues throughout the life of an affected individual. Since the ongoing somatic repeat expansions can affect disease age-of-onset, severity, and progression, targeting somatic expansion holds potential as a therapeutic target. Thus, understanding the factors that regulate this mutation is crucial. DNA repair, in particular mismatch repair (MMR), is the major driving force of disease-associated repeat expansions. In contrast to its anti-mutagenic roles, mammalian MMR curiously drives the expansion mutations of disease-associated (CAG)·(CTG) repeats. Recent advances have broadened our knowledge of both the MMR proteins involved in disease repeat expansions, including: MSH2, MSH3, MSH6, MLH1, PMS2, and MLH3, as well as the types of repeats affected by MMR, now including: (CAG)·(CTG), (CGG)·(CCG), and (GAA)·(TTC) repeats. Mutagenic slipped-DNA structures have been detected in patient tissues, and the size of the slip-out and their junction conformation can determine the involvement of MMR. Furthermore, the formation of other unusual DNA and R-loop structures is proposed to play a key role in MMR-mediated instability. A complex correlation is emerging between tissues showing varying amounts of repeat instability and MMR expression levels. Notably, naturally occurring polymorphic variants of DNA repair genes can have dramatic effects upon the levels of repeat instability, which may explain the variation in disease age-of-onset, progression and severity. An increasing grasp of these factors holds prognostic and therapeutic potential.

  10. [Usefulness of clinical pathway for community-acquired pneumonia as both an educational and a cost-management tool--an intervention study to compare the usefulness of management with a critical pathway to historical control of conventional management].

    PubMed

    Aoshima, Masahiro; Satoh, Tadashi; Uchiyama, Noboru; Chonabayashi, Naohiko

    2002-08-01

    To delineate the usefulness of a clinical pathway for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) as an educational tool as well as a cost management tool, we conducted a prospective controlled trial including a historical control group. Consecutive CAP patients classified under Category 3 of the American Thoracic Society and admitted to our hospital were evaluated. Using the clinical pathway method, 42 patients were managed between April and December 2000 as the intervention group, and 33 patients received conventional management between April and December 1999 as a historical control. For the intervention group, the clinical pathway, which was a time-task matrix formatted with consideration for guidance for disease treatment, laboratory tests, physical examinations, oxygen saturation monitoring, ambulation, diet, education for the patient and clinical outcomes, was implemented. We determined (1) educational effect, measured using reduction of delay caused by physicians; (2) quality of clinical practice, measured using the success rate of the initial antimicrobial therapy and readmission rate; and (3) economic efficacy, measured using health care cost and length of hospital stay. The delay caused by physicians was reduced by 16% in the Intervention Group (5% vs. 21%; p = 0.045). The success rates of initial antimicrobial therapy in the two groups were similar (85.7% vs. 84.8%). In the intention-to-treat set, the median value of health care cost was reduced by yen 48,055 (yen 277,460 vs. yen 325,515; p = 0.017) and the median length of a hospital stay was shortened by 3 days (8 vs. 11 days; p = 0.0007) in the Intervention Group. In conclusion, the clinical pathway had an educational effect on physicians regarding the management of hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia as well as on the cost management.

  11. Mismatch repair genes of Streptococcus pneumoniae: HexA confers a mutator phenotype in Escherichia coli by negative complementation.

    PubMed

    Prudhomme, M; Méjean, V; Martin, B; Claverys, J P

    1991-11-01

    DNA repair systems able to correct base pair mismatches within newly replicated DNA or within heteroduplex molecules produced during recombination are widespread among living organisms. Evidence that such generalized mismatch repair systems evolved from a common ancestor is particularly strong for two of them, the Hex system of the gram-positive Streptococcus pneumoniae and the Mut system of the gram-negative Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. The homology existing between HexA and MutS and between HexB and MutL prompted us to investigate the effect of expressing hex genes in E. coli. Complementation of mutS or mutL mutations, which confer a mutator phenotype, was assayed by introducing on a multicopy plasmid the hexA and hexB genes, under the control of an inducible promoter, either individually or together in E. coli strains. No decrease in mutation rate was conferred by either hexA or hexB gene expression. However, a negative complementation effect was observed in wild-type E. coli cells: expression of hexA resulted in a typical Mut- mutator phenotype. hexB gene expression did not increase the mutation rate either individually or in conjunction with hexA. Since expression of hexA did not affect the mutation rate in mutS mutant cells and the hexA-induced mutator effect was recA independent, it is concluded that this effect results from inhibition of the Mut system. We suggest that HexA, like its homolog MutS, binds to mismatches resulting from replication errors, but in doing so it protects them from repair by the Mut system. In agreement with this hypothesis, an increase in mutS gene copy number abolished the hexA-induced mutator phenotype. HexA protein could prevent repair either by being unable to interact with Mut proteins or by producing nonfunctional repair complexes.

  12. Universal and blocking primer mismatches limit the use of high-throughput DNA sequencing for the quantitative metabarcoding of arthropods.

    PubMed

    Piñol, J; Mir, G; Gomez-Polo, P; Agustí, N

    2015-07-01

    The quantification of the biological diversity in environmental samples using high-throughput DNA sequencing is hindered by the PCR bias caused by variable primer-template mismatches of the individual species. In some dietary studies, there is the added problem that samples are enriched with predator DNA, so often a predator-specific blocking oligonucleotide is used to alleviate the problem. However, specific blocking oligonucleotides could coblock nontarget species to some degree. Here, we accurately estimate the extent of the PCR biases induced by universal and blocking primers on a mock community prepared with DNA of twelve species of terrestrial arthropods. We also compare universal and blocking primer biases with those induced by variable annealing temperature and number of PCR cycles. The results show that reads of all species were recovered after PCR enrichment at our control conditions (no blocking oligonucleotide, 45 °C annealing temperature and 40 cycles) and high-throughput sequencing. They also show that the four factors considered biased the final proportions of the species to some degree. Among these factors, the number of primer-template mismatches of each species had a disproportionate effect (up to five orders of magnitude) on the amplification efficiency. In particular, the number of primer-template mismatches explained most of the variation (~3/4) in the amplification efficiency of the species. The effect of blocking oligonucleotide concentration on nontarget species relative abundance was also significant, but less important (below one order of magnitude). Considering the results reported here, the quantitative potential of the technique is limited, and only qualitative results (the species list) are reliable, at least when targeting the barcoding COI region.

  13. Subgroup differences in the lexical tone mismatch negativity (MMN) among Mandarin speakers with congenital amusia.

    PubMed

    Nan, Yun; Huang, Wan-ting; Wang, Wen-jing; Liu, Chang; Dong, Qi

    2016-01-01

    The association/dissociation of pitch processing between music and language is a long lasting debate. We examined this music-language relationship by investigating to what extent pitch deficits in these two domains were dissociable. We focused on a special neurodevelopmental pitch disorder - congenital amusia, which primarily affects musical pitch processing. Recent research has also revealed lexical tone deficits in speech among amusics. Approximately one-third of Mandarin amusics exhibits behavioural difficulties in lexical tone perception, which is known as tone agnosia. Using mismatch negativities (MMNs), our current work probed lexical tone encoding at the pre-attentive level among the Mandarin amusics with (tone agnosics) and without (pure amusics) behavioural lexical tone deficits compared with age- and IQ-matched controls. Relative to the controls and the pure amusics, the tone agnosics exhibited reduced MMNs specifically in response to lexical tone changes. Their tone-consonant MMNs were intact and similar to those of the other two groups. Moreover, the tone MMN reduction over the left hemisphere was tightly linked to behavioural insensitivity to lexical tone changes. The current study thus provides the first psychophysiological evidence of subgroup differences in lexical tone processing among Mandarin amusics and links amusics' behavioural tone deficits to impaired pre-attentive tone processing. Despite the overall music pitch deficits, the subgroup differences in lexical tone processing in Mandarin-speaking amusics suggest dissociation of pitch deficits between music and speech.

  14. Task difficulty affects the predictive process indexed by visual mismatch negativity.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Motohiro; Takeda, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    Visual mismatch negativity (MMN) is an event-related brain potential (ERP) component that is elicited by prediction-incongruent events in successive visual stimulation. Previous oddball studies have shown that visual MMN in response to task-irrelevant deviant stimuli is insensitive to the manipulation of task difficulty, which supports the notion that visual MMN reflects attention-independent predictive processes. In these studies, however, visual MMN was evaluated in deviant-minus-standard difference waves, which may lead to an underestimation of the effects of task difficulty due to the possible superposition of N1-difference reflecting refractory effects. In the present study, we investigated the effects of task difficulty on visual MMN, less contaminated by N1-difference. While the participant performed a size-change detection task regarding a continuously-presented central fixation circle, we presented oddball sequences consisting of deviant and standard bar stimuli with different orientations (9.1 and 90.9%) and equiprobable sequences consisting of 11 types of control bar stimuli with different orientations (9.1% each) at the surrounding visual fields. Task difficulty was manipulated by varying the magnitude of the size-change. We found that the peak latencies of visual MMN evaluated in the deviant-minus-control difference waves were delayed as a function of task difficulty. Therefore, in contrast to the previous understanding, the present findings support the notion that visual MMN is associated with attention-demanding predictive processes.

  15. Mismatch Negativity in First-Episode Schizophrenia: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Haigh, Sarah M; Coffman, Brian A; Salisbury, Dean F

    2017-01-01

    Mismatch negativity (MMN) to deviant stimuli is robustly smaller in individuals with chronic schizophrenia compared with healthy controls (Cohen's d > 1.0 or more), leading to the possibility of MMN being used as a biomarker for schizophrenia. However, there is some debate in the literature as to whether MMN is reliably reduced in first-episode schizophrenia patients. For the biomarker to be used as a predictive marker for schizophrenia, it should be reduced in the majority of cases known to have the disease, particularly at disease onset. We conducted a meta-analysis on the fourteen studies that measured MMN to pitch or duration deviants in healthy controls and patients within 12 months of their first episode of schizophrenia. The overall effect size showed no MMN reduction in first-episode patients to pitch-deviants (Cohen's d < 0.04), and a small-to-medium reduction to duration-deviants (Cohen's d = 0.47). Together, this indicates that pitch-deviant MMN is not a candidate biomarker for schizophrenia prediction, while duration-deviant MMN may hold some promise, albeit nearly a third as large an effect as in chronic schizophrenia. Potential causes for discrepancies between studies are discussed.

  16. High stable, high efficient ultraviolet laser with angle-phase-mismatching compensation by adjusting temperature of the nonlinear crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Houwen; Wang, Bo; Wang, Junhua; Li, Xiaofang; Liu, Zhaojun; Cheng, Wenyong

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrated an ultraviolet laser at 355 nm using a type-I and a type-II phase-matching nonlinear optical crystal of LiB3O5 (LBO). A method of adjusting temperature for compensation is presented. The crystal temperature is controlled by proportional integral derivative (PID) thermal controllers with a  ±0.01 °C resolution. The value of wave vector mismatch, distance of light propagation in nonlinear crystals, effective nonlinear coefficient, theoretical analysis and calculation of conversion efficiency versus temperature are discussed. The experimental results show that the average output power of the 355 nm laser is 1.24 W with the pump power of 13.33 W, when the repetition frequency is 15 kHz. The pulse duration is 9.8 ns, and the beam quality factors are of Mx2   =  1.8, My2   =  1.7. The conversion efficiency from 808 nm to 355 nm laser is 9.3%, which nearly reaches the optimum value reported so far and is limited by the wavelength mismatch between the pumping and absorbing lasers. The 355 nm output power instability of the laser device is 0.45% in 2 h. A compact no-water-cooling ultraviolet laser with high stability and high efficiency is obtained.

  17. Velocity synchronization of multi-agent systems with mismatched parameters via sampled position data.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wen; Huang, Chunli; Lü, Jinhu; Li, Xiong; Chen, Shihua

    2016-02-01

    Power systems are special multi-agent systems with nonlinear coupling function and symmetric structures. This paper extends these systems to a class of multi-agent systems with mismatched parameters, linear coupling function, and asymmetric structures and investigates their velocity synchronization via sampled position data. The dynamics of the agents is adopted as that of generators with mismatched parameters, while the system structures are supposed to be complex. Two distributed linear consensus protocols are designed, respectively, for multi-agent systems without or with communication delay. Necessary and sufficient conditions based on the sampling period, the mismatched parameters, the delay, and the nonzero eigenvalues of the Laplacian matrix are established. It is shown that velocity synchronization of multi-agent systems with mismatched parameters can be achieved if the sampled period is chosen appropriately. Simulations are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  18. Effects of electrode array length on frequency-place mismatch and speech perception with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Venail, Frederic; Mathiolon, Caroline; Menjot de Champfleur, Sophie; Piron, Jean Pierre; Sicard, Marielle; Villemus, Françoise; Vessigaud, Marie Aude; Sterkers-Artieres, Françoise; Mondain, Michel; Uziel, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Frequency-place mismatch often occurs after cochlear implantation, yet its effect on speech perception outcome remains unclear. In this article, we propose a method, based on cochlea imaging, to determine the cochlear place-frequency map. We evaluated the effect of frequency-place mismatch on speech perception outcome in subjects implanted with 3 different lengths of electrode arrays. A deeper insertion was responsible for a larger frequency-place mismatch and a decreased and delayed speech perception improvement by comparison with a shallower insertion, for which a similar but slighter effect was noticed. Our results support the notion that selecting an electrode array length adapted to each individual's cochlear anatomy may reduce frequency-place mismatch and thus improve speech perception outcome.

  19. New Spectral Method for Halo Particle Definition in Intense Mis-matched Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, Mikhail A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Startsev, Edward A.

    2011-04-27

    An advanced spectral analysis of a mis-matched charged particle beam propagating through a periodic focusing transport lattice is utilized in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. It is found that the betatron frequency distribution function of a mismatched space-charge-dominated beam has a bump-on-tail structure attributed to the beam halo particles. Based on this observation, a new spectral method for halo particle definition is proposed that provides the opportunity to carry out a quantitative analysis of halo particle production by a beam mismatch. In addition, it is shown that the spectral analysis of the mismatch relaxation process provides important insights into the emittance growth attributed to the halo formation and the core relaxation processes. Finally, the spectral method is applied to the problem of space-charge transport limits.

  20. Human errors are symptoms of a mismatch between pilots, machines and the operating environment.

    PubMed

    Sarter, N B

    1996-10-01

    The author suggests that errors should be the starting point for analysis of aviation mishaps. The analysis should focus on human, automation, and environment interaction and determine any mismatch among these factors.

  1. A spectral method for halo particle definition in intense mismatched beams

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, Mikhail A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Startsev, Edward A.

    2011-04-15

    An advanced spectral analysis of a mismatched charged particle beam propagating through a periodic focusing transport lattice is utilized in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. It is found that the betatron frequency distribution function of a mismatched space-charge-dominated beam has a bump-on-tail structure attributed to the beam halo particles. Based on this observation, a new spectral method for halo particle definition is proposed that provides the opportunity to carry out a quantitative analysis of halo particle production by a beam mismatch. In addition, it is shown that the spectral analysis of the mismatch relaxation process provides important insights into the emittance growth attributed to the halo formation and the core relaxation processes. Finally, the spectral method is applied to the problem of space-charge transport limits.

  2. The Emergence of Conventional Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Maria

    Children in the emergent writing stage write in pre-conventional or emergent forms (scribbling, drawing, non-phonetic letterings, and phonetic spelling) before they write conventionally. A special education teacher in a kindergarten inclusion setting in the Bronx, New York, noticing that her students did not particularly like to write, decided and…

  3. Patient - implant dimension mismatch in total knee arthroplasty: Is it worth worrying? An Indian scenario

    PubMed Central

    Thilak, Jai; George, Melvin J

    2016-01-01

    Background: The correct sizing of the components in both anteroposterior and mediolateral (ML) dimensions is crucial for the success of a total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The size of the implants selected is based on the intraoperative measurements. The currently used TKA implants available to us are based on morphometric measurements obtained from a Western/Caucasian population. Hence, the risk of component ML mismatch is more common in Asian sub-population, as they are of a smaller built and stature. This study aims to look into the following aspects agnitude of the ML mismatch between the femoral component and the patient's anatomical dimension, evaluation of gender variations in distal femur dimensions, and gender-wise and implant-wise correlation of ML mismatch. Materials and Methods: Intraoperatively, the distal femoral dimensions were measured using sterile calipers after removing the osteophytes and compared with the ML dimension of the implant used. ML mismatch length thus obtained is correlated with the various parameters. Results: Males showed larger distal femoral dimensions when compared to females. Males had larger ML mismatch. None of the implants used perfectly matched the patient's anatomical dimensions. Patients with larger mismatch had lower scorings at 2 years postoperative followup. Conclusion: Implant manufacturers need to design more options of femoral implants for a better fit in our subset of patients. The exact magnitude of mismatch which can cause functional implications need to be made out. The mismatch being one of the important factors for the success of the surgery, we should focus more on this aspect. PMID:27746494

  4. The incidence and etiology of the ventilation/perfusion reverse mismatch defect

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, P.; Lavender, J.P. )

    1989-08-01

    Kr-81m ventilation and Tc-99m perfusion images of 392 patients were examined retrospectively for the incidence and etiology of the reverse mismatch defect, which is characterized by a region of lung where the perfusion defect exceeds the ventilation defect. Forty-six patients (11.7%) showed such defects. The most frequent causes were pneumonia (15%), atelactasis (15%), pleural effusions (15%), chronic obstructive airway disease (24%), and bronchial obstruction (31%). The significance of the reverse mismatch defect is discussed.

  5. Nonpermissive HLA-DPB1 mismatch increases mortality after myeloablative unrelated allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Stephanie J.; Ahn, Kwang Woo; Spellman, Stephen; Wang, Hai-Lin; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Askar, Medhat; Dehn, Jason; Fernandez Viña, Marcelo; Gratwohl, Alois; Gupta, Vikas; Hanna, Rabi; Horowitz, Mary M.; Hurley, Carolyn K.; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Kassim, Adetola A.; Nishihori, Taiga; Mueller, Carlheinz; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Petersdorf, Effie W.; Prasad, Vinod; Robinson, James; Saber, Wael; Schultz, Kirk R.; Shaw, Bronwen; Storek, Jan; Wood, William A.; Woolfrey, Ann E.; Anasetti, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    We examined current outcomes of unrelated donor allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) to determine the clinical implications of donor-recipient HLA matching. Adult and pediatric patients who had first undergone myeloablative-unrelated bone marrow or peripheral blood HCT for acute myelogenous leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, and myelodysplastic syndrome between 1999 and 2011 were included. All had high-resolution typing for HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DRB1. Of the total (n = 8003), cases were 8/8 (n = 5449), 7/8 (n = 2071), or 6/8 (n = 483) matched. HLA mismatch (6-7/8) conferred significantly increased risk for grades II to IV and III to IV acute graft vs host disease (GVHD), chronic GVHD, transplant-related mortality (TRM), and overall mortality compared with HLA-matched cases (8/8). Type (allele/antigen) and locus (HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DRB1) of mismatch were not associated with overall mortality. Among 8/8 matched cases, HLA-DPB1 and -DQB1 mismatch resulted in increased acute GVHD, and HLA-DPB1 mismatch had decreased relapse. Nonpermissive HLA-DPB1 allele mismatch was associated with higher TRM compared with permissive HLA-DPB1 mismatch or HLA-DPB1 match and increased overall mortality compared with permissive HLA-DPB1 mismatch in 8/8 (and 10/10) matched cases. Full matching at HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DRB1 is required for optimal unrelated donor HCT survival, and avoidance of nonpermissive HLA-DPB1 mismatches in otherwise HLA-matched pairs is indicated. PMID:25161269

  6. How reliable is immunohistochemical staining for DNA mismatch repair proteins performed after neoadjuvant chemoradiation?

    PubMed

    Vilkin, Alex; Halpern, Marisa; Morgenstern, Sara; Brazovski, Eli; Gingold-Belfer, Rachel; Boltin, Doron; Purim, Ofer; Kundel, Yulia; Welinsky, Sara; Brenner, Baruch; Niv, Yaron; Levi, Zohar

    2014-10-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) testing for mismatch repair proteins (MMRP) is currently being used primarily in colorectal cancer resection specimens. We aimed to compare the results of IHC staining performed on biopsy specimens obtained at endoscopy with that performed on surgical specimens after neoadjuvant therapy. Thirty-two rectal cancer subjects had paired preneoadjuvant and postneoadjuvant tissue available for IHC staining (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2), whereas 39 rectosigmoid cancer patients who did not receive neoadjuvant treatment served as controls. Each slide received a qualitative (absent, focal, and strong) and quantitative score (immunoreactivity [0-3] × percent positivity [0-4]). The quantitative scores of MMRP from the operative material were significantly lower in the neoadjuvant group than in the control (P < .05 for all).The scores of all MMRP from endoscopic biopsies were not significantly different between the neoadjuvant and the control groups. Disagreement between the endoscopic biopsy and the operative material was evident in 23 of 128 stains (18.5%) in the neoadjuvant group and in 12 of 156 stains (7.7%) in the control group (P = .009). In the neoadjuvant group, a disagreement pattern of "endoscopic strong operative focal" was observed in 28.1% for PMS2, 12.5% for MSH6, 12.5% for MLH1, and 6.3% for MSH2, and in the control group, this same disagreement pattern was found in 12.8% for PMS2, 7.7% for MSH6, 7.7% for MLH1, and 0% for MSH2. Based on our findings, we suggest that for rectal cancer, the endoscopic material rather than the operative material should serve as the primary material for IHC staining.

  7. Detecting mismatches of bird migration stopover and tree phenology in response to changing climate.

    PubMed

    Kellermann, Jherime L; van Riper, Charles

    2015-08-01

    Migratory birds exploit seasonal variation in resources across latitudes, timing migration to coincide with the phenology of food at stopover sites. Differential responses to climate in phenology across trophic levels can result in phenological mismatch; however, detecting mismatch is sensitive to methodology. We examined patterns of migrant abundance and tree flowering, phenological mismatch, and the influence of climate during spring migration from 2009 to 2011 across five habitat types of the Madrean Sky Islands in southeastern Arizona, USA. We used two metrics to assess phenological mismatch: synchrony and overlap. We also examined whether phenological overlap declined with increasing difference in mean event date of phenophases. Migrant abundance and tree flowering generally increased with minimum spring temperature but depended on annual climate by habitat interactions. Migrant abundance was lowest and flowering was highest under cold, snowy conditions in high elevation montane conifer habitat while bird abundance was greatest and flowering was lowest in low elevation riparian habitat under the driest conditions. Phenological synchrony and overlap were unique and complementary metrics and should both be used when assessing mismatch. Overlap declined due to asynchronous phenologies but also due to reduced migrant abundance or flowering when synchrony was actually maintained. Overlap declined with increasing difference in event date and this trend was strongest in riparian areas. Montane habitat specialists may be at greatest risk of mismatch while riparian habitat could provide refugia during dry years for phenotypically plastic species. Interannual climate patterns that we observed match climate change projections for the arid southwest, altering stopover habitat condition.

  8. Detecting mismatches of bird migration stopover and tree phenology in response to changing climate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kellermann, Jherime L.; Van Riper, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Migratory birds exploit seasonal variation in resources across latitudes, timing migration to coincide with the phenology of food at stopover sites. Differential responses to climate in phenology across trophic levels can result in phenological mismatch; however, detecting mismatch is sensitive to methodology. We examined patterns of migrant abundance and tree flowering, phenological mismatch, and the influence of climate during spring migration from 2009 to 2011 across five habitat types of the Madrean Sky Islands in southeastern Arizona, USA. We used two metrics to assess phenological mismatch: synchrony and overlap. We also examined whether phenological overlap declined with increasing difference in mean event date of phenophases. Migrant abundance and tree flowering generally increased with minimum spring temperature but depended on annual climate by habitat interactions. Migrant abundance was lowest and flowering was highest under cold, snowy conditions in high elevation montane conifer habitat while bird abundance was greatest and flowering was lowest in low elevation riparian habitat under the driest conditions. Phenological synchrony and overlap were unique and complementary metrics and should both be used when assessing mismatch. Overlap declined due to asynchronous phenologies but also due to reduced migrant abundance or flowering when synchrony was actually maintained. Overlap declined with increasing difference in event date and this trend was strongest in riparian areas. Montane habitat specialists may be at greatest risk of mismatch while riparian habitat could provide refugia during dry years for phenotypically plastic species. Interannual climate patterns that we observed match climate change projections for the arid southwest, altering stopover habitat condition.

  9. Mismatch repair regulates homologous recombination, but has little influence on antigenic variation, in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Bell, Joanna S; McCulloch, Richard

    2003-11-14

    Antigenic variation is critical in the life of the African trypanosome, as it allows the parasite to survive in the face of host immunity and enhance its transmission to other hosts. Much of trypanosome antigenic variation uses homologous recombination of variant surface glycoprotein (VSG)-encoding genes into specialized transcription sites, but little is known about the processes that regulate it. Here we describe the effects on VSG switching when two central mismatch repair genes, MSH2 and MLH1, are mutated. We show that disruption of the parasite mismatch repair system causes an increased frequency of homologous recombination, both between perfectly matched DNA molecules and between DNA molecules with divergent sequences. Mismatch repair therefore provides an important regulatory role in homologous recombination in this ancient eukaryote. Despite this, the mismatch repair system has no detectable role in regulating antigenic variation, meaning that VSG switching is either immune to mismatch selection or that mismatch repair acts in a subtle manner, undetectable by current assays.

  10. Profiling single-guide RNA specificity reveals a mismatch sensitive core sequence

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ting; Hou, Yingzi; Zhang, Pingjing; Zhang, Zhenxi; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Letian; Niu, Leilei; Yang, Yi; Liang, Da; Yi, Fan; Peng, Wei; Feng, Wenjian; Yang, Ying; Chen, Jianxin; Zhu, York Yuanyuan; Zhang, Li-He; Du, Quan

    2017-01-01

    Targeting specificity is an essential issue in the development of CRISPR-Cas technology. Using a luciferase activation assay, off-target cleavage activity of sgRNA was systematically investigated on single nucleotide-mismatched targets. In addition to confirming that PAM-proximal mismatches are less tolerated than PAM-distal mismatches, our study further identified a “core” sequence that is highly sensitive to target-mismatch. This sequence is of 4-nucleotide long, located at +4 to +7 position upstream of PAM, and positioned in a steric restriction region when assembled into Cas9 endonuclease. Our study also found that, single or multiple target mismatches at this region abolished off-target cleavage mediated by active sgRNAs, thus proposing a principle for gene-specific sgRNA design. Characterization of a mismatch sensitive “core” sequence not only enhances our understanding of how this elegant system functions, but also facilitates our efforts to improve targeting specificity of a sgRNA. PMID:28098181

  11. Comparison of the performance of conventional, temperature-controlled, and ultrasound-assisted ionic liquid dispersive liquid-liquid microextr