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Sample records for convex surface facing

  1. Algorithm for detecting human faces based on convex-hull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Minsick; Park, Chang-Woo; Park, Mignon; Lee, Chang-Hoon

    2002-03-01

    In this paper, we proposed a new method to detect faces in color based on the convex-hull. We detect two kinds of regions that are skin and hair likeness region. After preprocessing, we apply the convex-hull to their regions and can find a face from their intersection relationship. The proposed algorithm can accomplish face detection in an image involving rotated and turned faces as well as several faces. To validity the effectiveness of the proposed method, we make experiment with various cases.

  2. Coalescence between two convex liquid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Jian, Zhen; Li, Erqiang; Thoroddsen, S. T.

    2015-11-01

    We study the coalescence of two convex surfaces of the same liquid. One of the convex free surfaces is formed at a circular opening of a closed tank by imposing a negative pressure difference. The other surface is a droplet of larger curvature, which is pendant from a concentric nozzle. The coalescence starts from near-zero velocity, so the configuration can be characterized by two dimensionless numbers: the Ohnesorge number Oh = μ /√{ ργL } and the radius ratio between the two surfaces α =rd /rs . We use high-speed video, PIV and numerical simulations, using the Gerris program, to study the dynamics of the coalescence. Our focus is on the interface shapes, the growth-rate of the neck connecting the two surfaces and the formation of a vortex ring. The growth-rate is compared to earlier models for the coalescence of drops or bubbles.

  3. Parallelized cytoindentation using convex micropatterned surfaces.

    PubMed

    Jia, Bojing; Wee, Tse-Luen; Boudreau, Colton G; Berard, Daniel J; Mallik, Adiel; Juncker, David; Brown, Claire M; Leslie, Sabrina R

    2016-01-01

    Here we present a high-throughput, parallelized cytoindentor for local compression of live cells. The cytoindentor uses convex lens-induced confinement (CLiC) to indent micrometer-sized areas in single cells and/or populations of cells with submicron precision. This is accomplished using micropatterned poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) films that are adhered to a convex lens to create arrays of extrusions referred to here as "posts." These posts caused local deformation of subcellular regions without any evidence of cell lysis upon CLiC indentation. Our micropost arrays were also functionalized with glycoproteins, such as fibronectin, to both pull and compress cells under customized confinement geometries. Measurements of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cell migration trajectories and oxidative stress showed that the CLiC device did not damage or significantly stress the cells. Our novel tool opens a new area of investigation for visualizing mechanobiology and mechanochemistry within living cells, and the high-throughput nature of the technique will streamline investigations as current tools for mechanically probing material properties and molecular dynamics within cells, such as traditional cytoindentors and atomic force microscopy (AFM), are typically restricted to single-cell manipulation. PMID:27528072

  4. Turbulent boundary layer on a convex, curved surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis, J. C.; Johnston, J. P.; Kays, W. M.; Moffat, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of strong convex curvature on boundary layer turbulence were investigated. The data gathered on the behavior of Reynolds stress suggested the formulation of a simple turbulence model. Three sets of data were taken on two separate facilities. Both rigs had flow from a flat surface, over a convex surface with 90 deg of turning, and then onto a flat recovery surface. The geometry was adjusted so that, for both rigs, the pressure gradient along the test surface was zero - thus avoiding any effects of streamwise acceleration on the wall layers. Results show that after a sudden introduction of curvature, the shear stress in the outer part of the boundary layer is sharply diminished and is even slightly negative near the edge. The wall shear also drops off quickly downstream. In contrast, when the surface suddenly becomes flat again, the wall shear and shear stress profiles recover very slowly towards flat wall conditions.

  5. Approximating convex Pareto surfaces in multiobjective radiotherapy planning

    SciTech Connect

    Craft, David L.; Halabi, Tarek F.; Shih, Helen A.; Bortfeld, Thomas R.

    2006-09-15

    Radiotherapy planning involves inherent tradeoffs: the primary mission, to treat the tumor with a high, uniform dose, is in conflict with normal tissue sparing. We seek to understand these tradeoffs on a case-to-case basis, by computing for each patient a database of Pareto optimal plans. A treatment plan is Pareto optimal if there does not exist another plan which is better in every measurable dimension. The set of all such plans is called the Pareto optimal surface. This article presents an algorithm for computing well distributed points on the (convex) Pareto optimal surface of a multiobjective programming problem. The algorithm is applied to intensity-modulated radiation therapy inverse planning problems, and results of a prostate case and a skull base case are presented, in three and four dimensions, investigating tradeoffs between tumor coverage and critical organ sparing.

  6. Discrete-hole film cooling characteristics over concave and convex surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Shao-Yen; Yao, Yong-Qing; Xia, Bin; Tsou, Fu-Kang

    The local film-cooling effectiveness and local pressure distribution for single-row discrete holes were measured over the whole areas of concave and convex surfaces, using a plexiglass test section with curvature radii of 140 mm and 70 mm for the concave and the convex surfaces and film-cooling holes (34 on the convex surface and 22 on the concave surface) 8 mm in diameter. The results indicate that the concave surface has the widest film-cooling coverage area in the z-direction (perpendicular to the x-flow direction), while the highest film-cooling effectiveness of the convex surface is near the ejection hole. High blowing ratios at holes have an adverse effect on film cooling. The weakest cooling region is near the center line between holes; such a poorly cooled region is larger on convex surfaces than on the concave ones. Optimal design characteristics for turbine blades surfaces are discussed.

  7. DESIGN NOTE: Design of convex-surface gradient coils for a vertical-field open MRI system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, C. H.; Park, H. W.; Cho, M. H.; Lee, S. Y.

    2000-08-01

    Open MRI systems usually use vertical-field magnets because interventional studies can be performed more conveniently with them. In this paper, we have designed convex-surface gradient coils for a vertical-field open MRI system. To obtain stronger gradient field strength with a smaller coil inductance while maintaining enough space for interventional operations, we have designed gradient coils on convex, rather than planar, surfaces. The convex-surface gradient coils are designed using the finite element method where the convex surfaces are defined at the prolate spheroidal coordinate. We present evaluation results of the convex-surface gradient coils designed with various rates of convexity.

  8. Six-month-old infants' perception of the hollow face illusion: evidence for a general convexity bias.

    PubMed

    Corrow, Sherryse L; Mathison, Jordan; Granrud, Carl E; Yonas, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Corrow, Granrud, Mathison, and Yonas (2011, Perception, 40, 1376-1383) found evidence that 6-month-old infants perceive the hollow face illusion. In the present study we asked whether 6-month-old infants perceive illusory depth reversal for a nonface object and whether infants' perception of the hollow face illusion is affected by mask orientation inversion. In experiment 1 infants viewed a concave bowl, and their reaches were recorded under monocular and binocular viewing conditions. Infants reached to the bowl as if it were convex significantly more often in the monocular than in the binocular viewing condition. These results suggest that infants perceive illusory depth reversal with a nonface stimulus and that the infant visual system has a bias to perceive objects as convex. Infants in experiment 2 viewed a concave face-like mask in upright and inverted orientations. Infants reached to the display as if it were convex more in the monocular than in the binocular condition; however, mask orientation had no effect on reaching. Previous findings that adults' perception of the hollow face illusion is affected by mask orientation inversion have been interpreted as evidence of stored-knowledge influences on perception. However, we found no evidence of such influences in infants, suggesting that their perception of this illusion may not be affected by stored knowledge, and that perceived depth reversal is not face-specific in infants.

  9. Twist-bulge derivatives and deformations of convex real projective structures on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Terence

    Let S be a closed orientable surface with genus g > 1 equipped with a convex RP2 structure. A basic example of such a convex $RP2 structure on a surface S is the one associated to a hyperbolic structure on S, and in this special case Wolpert proved formulas for computing the Lie derivatives talpha lbeta and tgamma talphal, where t alpha is the Fenchel-Nielsen twist vector field associated to the twist along a geodesic alpha, and l* is the hyperbolic geodesic length function. In this dissertation, we extend Wolpert's calculation of talphal beta and tgammat alphabeta in the hyperbolic setting to the case of convex real projective surfaces; in particular, our t alpha is the twist-bulge vector field along geodesic alpha coming from the parametrization of the deformation space of convex RP 2 structures on a surface due to Goldman, and our geodesic length function l* is in terms of a generalized cross-ratio in the sense of Labourie. To this end, we use results due to Labourie and Fock-Goncharov on the existence of an equivariant flag curve associated to Hitchin representations, of which convex real projective surfaces are an example. This flag curve allows us to extend the notions arising in the hyperbolic case to that of convex real projective structures and to complete our generalization of Wolpert's formulas.

  10. Calculating and controlling the error of discrete representations of Pareto surfaces in convex multi-criteria optimization.

    PubMed

    Craft, David

    2010-10-01

    A discrete set of points and their convex combinations can serve as a sparse representation of the Pareto surface in multiple objective convex optimization. We develop a method to evaluate the quality of such a representation, and show by example that in multiple objective radiotherapy planning, the number of Pareto optimal solutions needed to represent Pareto surfaces of up to five dimensions grows at most linearly with the number of objectives. The method described is also applicable to the representation of convex sets.

  11. Rationally convex domains and singular Lagrangian surfaces in $mathbb {C}(2) $ C 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemirovski, Stefan; Siegel, Kyler

    2016-01-01

    We give a complete characterization of those disk bundles over surfaces which embed as rationally convex strictly pseudoconvex domains in $\\mathbb{C}^2$. We recall some classical obstructions and prove some deeper ones related to symplectic and contact topology. We explain the close connection to Lagrangian surfaces with isolated singularities and develop techniques for constructing such surfaces. Our proof also gives a complete characterization of Lagrangian surfaces with open Whitney umbrellas, answering a question first posed by Givental in 1986.

  12. Heat transfer and fluid mechanics measurements in transitional boundary layers on convex-curved surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T.; Simon, T. W.

    1987-01-01

    The test section of the present experiment to ascertain the effects of convex curvature and freestream turbulence on boundary layer momentum and heat transfer during natural transition provided a two-dimensional boundary layer flow on a uniformly heated curved surface, with bending to various curvature radii, R. Attention is given to results for the cases of R = infinity, 180 cm, and 90 cm, each with two freestream turbulence intensity levels. While the mild convex curvature of R = 180 cm delays transition, further bending to R = 90 cm leads to no signifucant further delay of transition. Cases with both curvature and higher freestream disturbance effects exhibit the latter's pronounced dominance. These data are pertinent to the development of transition prediction models for gas turbine blade design.

  13. A simple device for sub-aperture stitching of fast convex surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre-Aguirre, D.; Izazaga-Pérez, R.; Villalobos-Mendoza, B.; Carrasco-Licea, E.; Granados-Agustin, F. S.; Percino-Zacarías, M. E.; Salazar-Morales, M. F.; Cruz-Zavala, E.

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we show a simple device that helps in the use of the sub-aperture stitching method for testing convex surfaces with large diameter and a small f/#. This device was designed at INAOE's Optical work shop to solve the problem that exists when a Newton Interferometer and the sub-aperture stitching method are used. It is well known that if the f/# of a surface is small, the slopes over the surface increases rapidly and this is critical for points far from the vertex. Therefore, if we use a reference master in the Newton interferometer to test a convex surface with a large diameter and an area far from the vertex, the master tends to slide causing scratches over the surface under test. To solve this problem, a device for mounting the surface under test with two freedom degrees, a rotating axis and a lever to tilt the surface, was designed. As result, the optical axis of the master can be placed in vertical position avoiding undesired movements of the master and making the sub-aperture stitching easier. We describe the proposed design and the results obtained with this device.

  14. Experimental data and model for the turbulent boundary layer on a convex, curved surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis, J. C.; Johnson, J. P.; Moffat, R. J.; Kays, W. M.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine how boundary layer turbulence is affected by strong convex curvature. The data gathered on the behavior of the Reynolds stress suggested the formulation of a simple turbulence model. Data were taken on two separate facilities. Both rigs had flow from a flat surface, over a convex surface with 90 deg of turning and then onto a flat recovery surface. The geometry was adjusted so that, for both rigs, the pressure gradient along the test surface was zero. Two experiments were performed at delta/R approximately 0.10, and one at weaker curvature with delta/R approximately 0.05. Results show that after a sudden introduction of curvature the shear stress in the outer part of the boundary layer is sharply diminished and is even slightly negative near the edge. The wall shear also drops off quickly downstream. When the surface suddenly becomes flat again, the wall shear and shear stress profiles recover very slowly towards flat wall conditions. A simple turbulence model, which was based on the theory that the Prandtl mixing length in the outer layer should scale on the velocity gradient layer, was shown to account for the slow recovery.

  15. Advanced Face Gear Surface Durability Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Heath, Gregory F.

    2016-01-01

    The surface durability life of helical face gears and isotropic super-finished (ISF) face gears was investigated. Experimental fatigue tests were performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Endurance tests were performed on 10 sets of helical face gears in mesh with tapered involute helical pinions, and 10 sets of ISF-enhanced straight face gears in mesh with tapered involute spur pinions. The results were compared to previous tests on straight face gears. The life of the ISF configuration was slightly less than that of previous tests on straight face gears. The life of the ISF configuration was slightly greater than that of the helical configuration.

  16. A DNS Study on the Effects of Streamwise Convex Surface Curvature on Coherent Structures in Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dave, Nikunj

    Direct numerical simulation results are used to establish the effect of streamwise convex surface curvature on the development of turbulent boundary layers, and the effect of such curvature on the forced-convection heat transfer variations observed at certain supercritical thermodynamic states. The results illustrate the stabilizing effects of this flow geometry through modification of the structure and distribution of hairpin-like vortical flow structures in the boundary layer. Specifically, the radial equilibrium mechanism existing on the streamwise convex surface acts to decrease the streamwise spacing of hairpin-like structures within a wave packet and increase the spanwise spacing of the hairpin-like structures in comparison to the behaviour of such structures within the boundary layer on a flat surface. Furthermore, enhancement of convective heat transfer realized at a particular heat flux-to-mass flux ratio with the working fluid at a supercritical thermodynamic state is observed to be reduced by the stabilizing effect of convex surface curvature.

  17. Smart, passive sun facing surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Hively, Lee M.

    1996-01-01

    An article adapted for selectively utilizing solar radiation comprises an absorptive surface and a reflective surface, the absorptive surface and the reflective surface oriented to absorb solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively low position, and to reflect solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively high position.

  18. Smart, passive sun facing surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Hively, L.M.

    1996-04-30

    An article adapted for selectively utilizing solar radiation comprises an absorptive surface and a reflective surface, the absorptive surface and the reflective surface oriented to absorb solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively low position, and to reflect solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively high position. 17 figs.

  19. Streamwise Vortices on the Convex Surfaces of Circular Cylinders and Turbomachinery Blading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gostelow, Paul

    2010-01-01

    In assessing the results please recall that the Mach number regimes and model geometries differ considerably. Selection of the radius of curvature at the 10% chord location is consistent but arbitrary, although it does seem representative for most blades and gives a good fit for the results. Measured spanwise wavelengths of the periodic vortex arrays on blading are predicted well by the Kestin and Wood theory. If this behavior is at all common it could have implications for turbine aerodynamic and blade cooling design. The outcome is to establish that organized streamwise vorticity may occur more frequently on convex surfaces, such as turbine blade suction surfaces, than hitherto appreciated. Investigations and predictions of flow behavior should be extended to encompass that possibility.

  20. Laser differential confocal ultra-large radius measurement for convex spherical surface.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhigang; Qiu, Lirong; Zhao, Weiqian; Yang, Shuai

    2016-08-22

    A new laser differential confocal ultra-large radius measurement (LDCRM) method is proposed for high-precision measurement of ultra-large radii. Based on the property that the zero point of a differential confocal axial intensity curve precisely corresponds to the focus points of focusing beam, LDCRM measures the vertex positions of the test lens and the last optical surface of objective lens to obtain position difference L1, and then measures the vertex positions of the reflector and the last optical surface of objective lens to obtain the position difference L2, finally uses the measured L1 and L2 to calculate the radius of test lens. This method does not require the identification of confocal position. Preliminary experimental results and theoretical analyses indicate that the relative uncertainty is 0.03% for a convex spherical lens with a radius of approximately 20 m. LDCRM provides a novel approach for high-precision ultra-large radius measurement. PMID:27557251

  1. Fiber coupler end face wavefront surface metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compertore, David C.; Ignatovich, Filipp V.; Marcus, Michael A.

    2015-09-01

    Despite significant technological advances in the field of fiber optic communications, one area remains surprisingly `low-tech': fiber termination. In many instances it involves manual labor and subjective visual inspection. At the same time, high quality fiber connections are one of the most critical parameters in constructing an efficient communication link. The shape and finish of the fiber end faces determines the efficiency of a connection comprised of coupled fiber end faces. The importance of fiber end face quality becomes even more critical for fiber connection arrays and for in the field applications. In this article we propose and demonstrate a quantitative inspection method for the fiber connectors using reflected wavefront technology. The manufactured and polished fiber tip is illuminated by a collimated light from a microscope objective. The reflected light is collected by the objective and is directed to a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. A set of lenses is used to create the image of the fiber tip on the surface of the sensor. The wavefront is analyzed by the sensor, and the measured parameters are used to obtain surface properties of the fiber tip, and estimate connection loss. For example, defocus components in the reflected light indicate the presence of bow in the fiber end face. This inspection method provides a contact-free approach for quantitative inspection of fiber end faces and for estimating the connection loss, and can potentially be integrated into a feedback system for automated inspection and polishing of fiber tips and fiber tip arrays.

  2. A Cutting Surface Algorithm for Semi-Infinite Convex Programming with an Application to Moment Robust Optimization

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mehrotra, Sanjay; Papp, Dávid

    2014-01-01

    We present and analyze a central cutting surface algorithm for general semi-infinite convex optimization problems and use it to develop a novel algorithm for distributionally robust optimization problems in which the uncertainty set consists of probability distributions with given bounds on their moments. Moments of arbitrary order, as well as nonpolynomial moments, can be included in the formulation. We show that this gives rise to a hierarchy of optimization problems with decreasing levels of risk-aversion, with classic robust optimization at one end of the spectrum and stochastic programming at the other. Although our primary motivation is to solve distributionally robustmore » optimization problems with moment uncertainty, the cutting surface method for general semi-infinite convex programs is also of independent interest. The proposed method is applicable to problems with nondifferentiable semi-infinite constraints indexed by an infinite dimensional index set. Examples comparing the cutting surface algorithm to the central cutting plane algorithm of Kortanek and No demonstrate the potential of our algorithm even in the solution of traditional semi-infinite convex programming problems, whose constraints are differentiable, and are indexed by an index set of low dimension. After the rate of convergence analysis of the cutting surface algorithm, we extend the authors' moment matching scenario generation algorithm to a probabilistic algorithm that finds optimal probability distributions subject to moment constraints. The combination of this distribution optimization method and the central cutting surface algorithm yields a solution to a family of distributionally robust optimization problems that are considerably more general than the ones proposed to date.« less

  3. A Cutting Surface Algorithm for Semi-Infinite Convex Programming with an Application to Moment Robust Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Mehrotra, Sanjay; Papp, Dávid

    2014-01-01

    We present and analyze a central cutting surface algorithm for general semi-infinite convex optimization problems and use it to develop a novel algorithm for distributionally robust optimization problems in which the uncertainty set consists of probability distributions with given bounds on their moments. Moments of arbitrary order, as well as nonpolynomial moments, can be included in the formulation. We show that this gives rise to a hierarchy of optimization problems with decreasing levels of risk-aversion, with classic robust optimization at one end of the spectrum and stochastic programming at the other. Although our primary motivation is to solve distributionally robust optimization problems with moment uncertainty, the cutting surface method for general semi-infinite convex programs is also of independent interest. The proposed method is applicable to problems with nondifferentiable semi-infinite constraints indexed by an infinite dimensional index set. Examples comparing the cutting surface algorithm to the central cutting plane algorithm of Kortanek and No demonstrate the potential of our algorithm even in the solution of traditional semi-infinite convex programming problems, whose constraints are differentiable, and are indexed by an index set of low dimension. After the rate of convergence analysis of the cutting surface algorithm, we extend the authors' moment matching scenario generation algorithm to a probabilistic algorithm that finds optimal probability distributions subject to moment constraints. The combination of this distribution optimization method and the central cutting surface algorithm yields a solution to a family of distributionally robust optimization problems that are considerably more general than the ones proposed to date.

  4. Run-up of surface waves on a sea wall built on a convex bottom profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenkulova, I. I.; Pelinovsky, E. N.; Rodin, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    Wave run-up on a sea wall built on a convex bottom profile is studied in the framework of linear shallow water theory. When the wall is located in "deeper water," a wave is reflected from the wall without changing its shape and phase, which is fully consistent with classical considerations. If the wall is shifted towards the shore, the shape of the wave changes in a complex way. Note that the wave phase changes to the opposite in the limiting case when the wall is located right on the shore. The role of nonlinear effects is studied by means of numerical simulations using nonlinear shallow water theory. It is shown that the contribution of nonlinear effects and breaking is high on a convex-shaped beach, which makes the structure of the wave field rather complicated.

  5. The influence of tool path strategies on cutting force and surface texture during ball end milling of low curvature convex surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shajari, Shaghayegh; Sadeghi, Mohammad Hossein; Hassanpour, Hamed

    2014-01-01

    Advancement in machining technology of curved surfaces for various engineering applications is increasing. Various methodologies and computer tools have been developed by the manufacturers to improve efficiency of freeform surface machining. Selection of the right sets of cutter path strategies and appropriate cutting conditions is extremely important in ensuring high productivity rate, meeting the better quality level, and lower cutting forces. In this paper, cutting force as a new decision criterion for the best selection of tool paths on convex surfaces is presented. Therefore, this work aims at studying and analyzing different finishing strategies to assess their influence on surface texture, cutting forces, and machining time. Design and analysis of experiments are performed by means of Taguchi technique and analysis of variance. In addition, the significant parameters affecting the cutting force in each strategy are introduced. Machining strategies employed include raster, 3D-offset, radial, and spiral. The cutting parameters were feed rate, cutting speed, and step over. The experiments were carried out on low curvature convex surfaces of stainless steel 1.4903. The conclusion is that radial strategy provokes the best surface texture and the lowest cutting forces and spiral strategy signifies the worst surface texture and the highest cutting forces. PMID:24701163

  6. The Influence of Tool Path Strategies on Cutting Force and Surface Texture during Ball End Milling of Low Curvature Convex Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Mohammad Hossein; Hassanpour, Hamed

    2014-01-01

    Advancement in machining technology of curved surfaces for various engineering applications is increasing. Various methodologies and computer tools have been developed by the manufacturers to improve efficiency of freeform surface machining. Selection of the right sets of cutter path strategies and appropriate cutting conditions is extremely important in ensuring high productivity rate, meeting the better quality level, and lower cutting forces. In this paper, cutting force as a new decision criterion for the best selection of tool paths on convex surfaces is presented. Therefore, this work aims at studying and analyzing different finishing strategies to assess their influence on surface texture, cutting forces, and machining time. Design and analysis of experiments are performed by means of Taguchi technique and analysis of variance. In addition, the significant parameters affecting the cutting force in each strategy are introduced. Machining strategies employed include raster, 3D-offset, radial, and spiral. The cutting parameters were feed rate, cutting speed, and step over. The experiments were carried out on low curvature convex surfaces of stainless steel 1.4903. The conclusion is that radial strategy provokes the best surface texture and the lowest cutting forces and spiral strategy signifies the worst surface texture and the highest cutting forces. PMID:24701163

  7. 3D face recognition based on matching of facial surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echeagaray-Patrón, Beatriz A.; Kober, Vitaly

    2015-09-01

    Face recognition is an important task in pattern recognition and computer vision. In this work a method for 3D face recognition in the presence of facial expression and poses variations is proposed. The method uses 3D shape data without color or texture information. A new matching algorithm based on conformal mapping of original facial surfaces onto a Riemannian manifold followed by comparison of conformal and isometric invariants computed in the manifold is suggested. Experimental results are presented using common 3D face databases that contain significant amount of expression and pose variations.

  8. RDS-21 Face-Gear Surface Durability Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Heath, Gregory F.; Filler, Robert R.; Slaughter, Stephen C.; Fetty, Jason

    2007-01-01

    Experimental fatigue tests were performed to determine the surface durability life of a face gear in mesh with a tapered spur involute pinion. Twenty-four sets of gears were tested at three load levels: 7200, 8185, and 9075 lb-in face gear torque, and 2190 to 3280 rpm face gear speed. The gears were carburized and ground, shot-peened and vibro-honed, and made from VIM-VAR Pyrowear 53 steel per AMS 6308. The tests produced 17 gear tooth spalling failures and 7 suspensions. For all the failed sets, spalling occurred on at least one tooth of all the pinions. In some cases, the spalling initiated a crack in the pinion teeth which progressed to tooth fracture. Also, spalling occurred on some face gear teeth. The AGMA endurance allowable stress for a tapered spur involute pinion in mesh with a face gear was determined to be 275 ksi for the material tested. For the application of a tapered spur involute pinion in mesh with a face gear, proper face gear shim controlled the desired gear tooth contact pattern while proper pinion shim was an effective way of adjusting backlash without severely affecting the contact pattern.

  9. Observations of quenching of downward-facing surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.Y.; Bainbridge, B.L.; Bentz, J.H.; Simpson, R.B.

    1994-01-01

    This report documents results of a series of scoping experiments on boiling from downward-facing surfaces in support of the Sandia New Production Reactor, Vessel-Pool Boiling Heat Transfer task. Quenching experiments have been performed to examine the boiling processes from downward-facing surfaces using two 61-centimeter diameter test masses, one with a flat test surface and one with a curved test surface having a radius of curvature of 335 cm, matching that of the Cylindrical Boiling facility test vessel. Boiling curves were obtained for both test surfaces facing horizontally downward. The critical beat flux was found to be essentially the same, having an average value of approximately 0.5 MW/m{sup 2}. This value is substantially higher than current estimates of the heat dissipation rates required for in-vessel retention of core debris in the Heavy Water New Production Reactor as well as some of the advanced light water reactors under design. The nucleate boiling process was found to be cyclic with four relatively distinct phases: direct liquid/solid contact, nucleation and growth of bubbles, coalescence, and ejection.

  10. CONVEX mini manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennille, Geoffrey M.; Howser, Lona M.

    1993-01-01

    The use of the CONVEX computers that are an integral part of the Supercomputing Network Subsystems (SNS) of the Central Scientific Computing Complex of LaRC is briefly described. Features of the CONVEX computers that are significantly different than the CRAY supercomputers are covered, including: FORTRAN, C, architecture of the CONVEX computers, the CONVEX environment, batch job submittal, debugging, performance analysis, utilities unique to CONVEX, and documentation. This revision reflects the addition of the Applications Compiler and X-based debugger, CXdb. The document id intended for all CONVEX users as a ready reference to frequently asked questions and to more detailed information contained with the vendor manuals. It is appropriate for both the novice and the experienced user.

  11. Free surface stability of liquid metal plasma facing components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiflis, P.; Christenson, M.; Szott, M.; Kalathiparambil, K.; Ruzic, D. N.

    2016-10-01

    An outstanding concern raised over the implementation of liquid metal plasma facing components in fusion reactors is the potential for ejection of liquid metal into the fusion plasma. The influences of Rayleigh-Taylor-like and Kelvin-Helmholtz-like instabilities were experimentally observed and quantified on the thermoelectric-driven liquid-metal plasma-facing structures (TELS) chamber at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. To probe the stability boundary, plasma currents and velocities were first characterized with a flush probe array. Subsequent observations of lithium ejection under exposure in the TELS chamber exhibited a departure from previous theory based on linear perturbation analysis. The stability boundary is mapped experimentally over the range of plasma impulses of which TELS is capable to deliver, and a new theory based on a modified set of the shallow water equations is presented which accurately predicts the stability of the lithium surface under plasma exposure.

  12. Convex Discriminative Multitask Clustering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Lei

    2015-01-01

    Multitask clustering tries to improve the clustering performance of multiple tasks simultaneously by taking their relationship into account. Most existing multitask clustering algorithms fall into the type of generative clustering, and none are formulated as convex optimization problems. In this paper, we propose two convex Discriminative Multitask Clustering (DMTC) objectives to address the problems. The first one aims to learn a shared feature representation, which can be seen as a technical combination of the convex multitask feature learning and the convex Multiclass Maximum Margin Clustering (M3C). The second one aims to learn the task relationship, which can be seen as a combination of the convex multitask relationship learning and M3C. The objectives of the two algorithms are solved in a uniform procedure by the efficient cutting-plane algorithm and further unified in the Bayesian framework. Experimental results on a toy problem and two benchmark data sets demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms. PMID:26353206

  13. Surface Acoustic Wave Duplexer Composed of SiO2/Cu Electrode/LiNbO3 Structure Having Convex and Concave Portions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, Yasuharu; Nakao, Takeshi; Nishiyama, Kenji; Kadota, Michio

    2009-07-01

    The transition bandwidth of 20 MHz between the transmission (Tx: 1850-1910 MHz) and the receiving (Rx: 1930-1990 MHz) bands of personal communication service (PCS) handy phones in the United States (US) is very narrow compared with those of other systems. We have already realized surface acoustic wave (SAW) duplexers with sizes of 5.0×5.0×1.7 and 3.0×2.5×1.2 mm3 for PCS handy phones in the US with an excellent temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF) by using a shear horizontal (SH) wave on a flattened SiO2/Cu electrode/36-48° YX-LiTaO3 structure and a Rayleigh wave on a SiO2/Cu electrode/120-128° YX-LiNbO3 structure. Although the surface of the above-mentioned structures is flattened SiO2, we have also studied the shape of the SiO2 surface. As a result, in addition to increasing the stop-band width, which corresponds to the reflection coefficient, the TCF and power durability have been improved by forming convex portions on the surface of the SiO2 over the interdigital transducer (IDT) gaps.

  14. Critical adsorption of polyelectrolytes onto planar and convex highly charged surfaces: the nonlinear Poisson–Boltzmann approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Carvalho, Sidney J.; Metzler, Ralf; Cherstvy, Andrey G.

    2016-08-01

    We study the adsorption–desorption transition of polyelectrolyte chains onto planar, cylindrical and spherical surfaces with arbitrarily high surface charge densities by massive Monte Carlo computer simulations. We examine in detail how the well known scaling relations for the threshold transition—demarcating the adsorbed and desorbed domains of a polyelectrolyte near weakly charged surfaces—are altered for highly charged interfaces. In virtue of high surface potentials and large surface charge densities, the Debye–Hückel approximation is often not feasible and the nonlinear Poisson–Boltzmann approach should be implemented. At low salt conditions, for instance, the electrostatic potential from the nonlinear Poisson–Boltzmann equation is smaller than the Debye–Hückel result, such that the required critical surface charge density for polyelectrolyte adsorption {σ }{{c}} increases. The nonlinear relation between the surface charge density and electrostatic potential leads to a sharply increasing critical surface charge density with growing ionic strength, imposing an additional limit to the critical salt concentration above which no polyelectrolyte adsorption occurs at all. We contrast our simulations findings with the known scaling results for weak critical polyelectrolyte adsorption onto oppositely charged surfaces for the three standard geometries. Finally, we discuss some applications of our results for some physical–chemical and biophysical systems.

  15. Qhull: Quickhull algorithm for computing the convex hull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, C. Bradford; Dobkin, David P.; Huhdanpaa, Hannu

    2013-04-01

    Qhull computes the convex hull, Delaunay triangulation, Voronoi diagram, halfspace intersection about a point, furthest-site Delaunay triangulation, and furthest-site Voronoi diagram. The source code runs in 2-d, 3-d, 4-d, and higher dimensions. Qhull implements the Quickhull algorithm for computing the convex hull. It handles roundoff errors from floating point arithmetic. It computes volumes, surface areas, and approximations to the convex hull.

  16. Localized surface plasmons in face to face dimer silver triangular prism nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarian, Abas; Babaei, Ferydon

    2016-05-01

    Using the discrete dipole approximation method, all plasmonic bands in 80 nm silver face to face dimer triangular prism nanoparticles were reported. The characteristics of plasmonics peaks were investigated with variations of dimer gap and refractive index of the surrounding medium of dimer. We found that there are three and four plasmonic bands, respectively, for dimer separation 2 and 4 nm. The extinction spectra and electric field distribution showed that the dipole-dipole interaction creates strong plasmonic band, but the quadrupole-quadrupole interaction relates to weak plasmonic band. The results revealed that the strong plasmonic bands have high sensitivity factors with respect to weak plasmonic bands. This study may be used in the synthesis of asymmetric dimers made of metal nanoparticles with new plasmonics properties.

  17. Statistical properties of convex clustering

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Kean Ming; Witten, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    In this manuscript, we study the statistical properties of convex clustering. We establish that convex clustering is closely related to single linkage hierarchical clustering and k-means clustering. In addition, we derive the range of the tuning parameter for convex clustering that yields a non-trivial solution. We also provide an unbiased estimator of the degrees of freedom, and provide a finite sample bound for the prediction error for convex clustering. We compare convex clustering to some traditional clustering methods in simulation studies.

  18. Convex geometry analysis method of hyperspectral data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yanjun; Wang, XiChang; Qi, Hongxing; Yu, BingXi

    2003-06-01

    We present matrix expression of convex geometry analysis method of hyperspectral data by linear mixing model and establish a mathematic model of endmembers. A 30-band remote sensing image is applied to testify the model. The results of analysis reveal that the method can analyze mixed pixel questions. The targets that are smaller than earth surface pixel can be identified by applying the method.

  19. Effects of surface materials on polarimetric-thermal measurements: applications to face recognition.

    PubMed

    Short, Nathaniel J; Yuffa, Alex J; Videen, Gorden; Hu, Shuowen

    2016-07-01

    Materials, such as cosmetics, applied to the face can severely inhibit biometric face-recognition systems operating in the visible spectrum. These products are typically made up of materials having different spectral properties and color pigmentation that distorts the perceived shape of the face. The surface of the face emits thermal radiation, due to the living tissue beneath the surface of the skin. The emissivity of skin is approximately 0.99; in comparison, oil- and plastic-based materials, commonly found in cosmetics and face paints, have an emissivity range of 0.9-0.95 in the long-wavelength infrared part of the spectrum. Due to these properties, all three are good thermal emitters and have little impact on the heat transferred from the face. Polarimetric-thermal imaging provides additional details of the face and is also dependent upon the thermal radiation from the face. In this paper, we provide a theoretical analysis on the thermal conductivity of various materials commonly applied to the face using a metallic sphere. Additionally, we observe the impact of environmental conditions on the strength of the polarimetric signature and the ability to recover geometric details. Finally, we show how these materials degrade the performance of traditional face-recognition methods and provide an approach to mitigating this effect using polarimetric-thermal imaging.

  20. Effects of surface materials on polarimetric-thermal measurements: applications to face recognition.

    PubMed

    Short, Nathaniel J; Yuffa, Alex J; Videen, Gorden; Hu, Shuowen

    2016-07-01

    Materials, such as cosmetics, applied to the face can severely inhibit biometric face-recognition systems operating in the visible spectrum. These products are typically made up of materials having different spectral properties and color pigmentation that distorts the perceived shape of the face. The surface of the face emits thermal radiation, due to the living tissue beneath the surface of the skin. The emissivity of skin is approximately 0.99; in comparison, oil- and plastic-based materials, commonly found in cosmetics and face paints, have an emissivity range of 0.9-0.95 in the long-wavelength infrared part of the spectrum. Due to these properties, all three are good thermal emitters and have little impact on the heat transferred from the face. Polarimetric-thermal imaging provides additional details of the face and is also dependent upon the thermal radiation from the face. In this paper, we provide a theoretical analysis on the thermal conductivity of various materials commonly applied to the face using a metallic sphere. Additionally, we observe the impact of environmental conditions on the strength of the polarimetric signature and the ability to recover geometric details. Finally, we show how these materials degrade the performance of traditional face-recognition methods and provide an approach to mitigating this effect using polarimetric-thermal imaging. PMID:27409214

  1. Thermal expansion compensator having an elastic conductive element bonded to two facing surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Determan, William (Inventor); Matejczyk, Daniel Edward (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A thermal expansion compensator is provided and includes a first electrode structure having a first surface, a second electrode structure having a second surface facing the first surface and an elastic element bonded to the first and second surfaces and including a conductive element by which the first and second electrode structures electrically and/or thermally communicate, the conductive element having a length that is not substantially longer than a distance between the first and second surfaces.

  2. More Realistic Face Model Surface Improves Relevance of Pediatric In-Vitro Aerosol Studies

    PubMed Central

    Amirav, Israel; Halamish, Asaf; Gorenberg, Miguel; Omar, Hamza; Newhouse, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Various hard face models are commonly used to evaluate the efficiency of aerosol face masks. Softer more realistic “face” surface materials, like skin, deform upon mask application and should provide more relevant in-vitro tests. Studies that simultaneously take into consideration many of the factors characteristic of the in vivo face are lacking. These include airways, various application forces, comparison of various devices, comparison with a hard-surface model and use of a more representative model face based on large numbers of actual faces. Aim To compare mask to “face” seal and aerosol delivery of two pediatric masks using a soft vs. a hard, appropriately representative, pediatric face model under various applied forces. Methods Two identical face models and upper airways replicas were constructed, the only difference being the suppleness and compressibility of the surface layer of the “face.” Integrity of the seal and aerosol delivery of two different masks [AeroChamber (AC) and SootherMask (SM)] were compared using a breath simulator, filter collection and realistic applied forces. Results The soft “face” significantly increased the delivery efficiency and the sealing characteristics of both masks. Aerosol delivery with the soft “face” was significantly greater for the SM compared to the AC (p< 0.01). No statistically significant difference between the two masks was observed with the hard “face.” Conclusions The material and pliability of the model “face” surface has a significant influence on both the seal and delivery efficiency of face masks. This finding should be taken into account during in-vitro aerosol studies. PMID:26090661

  3. Surface reconstruction and graphene formation on face-to-face 6H-SiC at 2000 ^oC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmquist, Randolph E.; Real, Mariano; Bush, Brian G.; Shen, Tian; Stiles, Mark D.; Lass, Eric A.

    2012-02-01

    Improved epitaxial graphene films have been widely reported when the sublimation rate of Si is reduced by ambient Ar gas, vapor phase silane, or confined Si vapor. We describe graphene growth on (0001) 6H-SiC samples annealed ``face-to-face'' [1]; in our modified method the separation is limited only by the flatness of the surfaces. After annealing in 100 kPa Ar gas at 2000 ^oC for 300 s, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) show graphene coverage is typically between one and a few layers. Samples without prior hydrogen etching undergo surface reconstruction in the graphitization process, resulting in atomically flat terraces with step bunching. Estimates of the sequestered carbon in the form of graphene are compared to calculated levels due to sublimation and diffusion rates where the sublimated gas is dominated by Si atoms below 2100 ^oC. The 2000 ^oC samples are contrasted against samples processed between 1700 ^oC and 1900 ^oC and transport results on large-scale graphene devices are presented.[4pt] [1] X.Z Yu, C.G. Hwang, C.M. Jozwiak, A. Kohl, A.K. Schmid and A. Lanzara, New synthesis method for the growth of epitaxial graphene, Journal of Electron Spectroscopy and Related Phenomena 184 (2011) 100-106.

  4. Computing Surface Coordinates Of Face-Milled Spiral-Bevel Gear Teeth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Litvin, Faydor L.

    1995-01-01

    Surface coordinates of face-milled spiral-bevel gear teeth computed by method involving numerical solution of governing equations. Needed to generate mathematical models of tooth surfaces for use in finite-element analyses of stresses, strains, and vibrations in meshing spiral-bevel gears.

  5. Multiview stereo and silhouette consistency via convex functionals over convex domains.

    PubMed

    Cremers, Daniel; Kolev, Kalin

    2011-06-01

    We propose a convex formulation for silhouette and stereo fusion in 3D reconstruction from multiple images. The key idea is to show that the reconstruction problem can be cast as one of minimizing a convex functional, where the exact silhouette consistency is imposed as convex constraints that restrict the domain of feasible functions. As a consequence, we can retain the original stereo-weighted surface area as a cost functional without heuristic modifications of this energy by balloon terms or other strategies, yet still obtain meaningful (non-empty) reconstructions which are guaranteed to be silhouette-consistent. We prove that the proposed convex relaxation approach provides solutions that lie within a bound of the optimal solution. Compared to existing alternatives, the proposed method does not depend on initialization and leads to a simpler and more robust numerical scheme for imposing silhouette consistency obtained by projection onto convex sets. We show that this projection can be solved exactly using an efficient algorithm. We propose a parallel implementation of the resulting convex optimization problem on a graphics card. Given a photo-consistency map and a set of image silhouettes, we are able to compute highly accurate and silhouette-consistent reconstructions for challenging real-world data sets. In particular, experimental results demonstrate that the proposed silhouette constraints help to preserve fine-scale details of the reconstructed shape. Computation times depend on the resolution of the input imagery and vary between a few seconds and a couple of minutes for all experiments in this paper.

  6. Convex polytopes and quantum separability

    SciTech Connect

    Holik, F.; Plastino, A.

    2011-12-15

    We advance a perspective of the entanglement issue that appeals to the Schlienz-Mahler measure [Phys. Rev. A 52, 4396 (1995)]. Related to it, we propose a criterium based on the consideration of convex subsets of quantum states. This criterium generalizes a property of product states to convex subsets (of the set of quantum states) that is able to uncover an interesting geometrical property of the separability property.

  7. Convex polytopes and quantum separability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holik, F.; Plastino, A.

    2011-12-01

    We advance a perspective of the entanglement issue that appeals to the Schlienz-Mahler measure [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.52.4396 52, 4396 (1995)]. Related to it, we propose a criterium based on the consideration of convex subsets of quantum states. This criterium generalizes a property of product states to convex subsets (of the set of quantum states) that is able to uncover an interesting geometrical property of the separability property.

  8. The Convex Coordinates of the Symmedian Point

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, J. N.; Raychowdhury, P. N.

    2006-01-01

    In this note, we recall the convex (or barycentric) coordinates of the points of a closed triangular region. We relate the convex and trilinear coordinates of the interior points of the triangular region. We use the relationship between convex and trilinear coordinates to calculate the convex coordinates of the symmedian point of the triangular…

  9. 3D face recognition using simulated annealing and the surface interpenetration measure.

    PubMed

    Queirolo, Chauã C; Silva, Luciano; Bellon, Olga R P; Segundo, Maurício Pamplona

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents a novel automatic framework to perform 3D face recognition. The proposed method uses a Simulated Annealing-based approach (SA) for range image registration with the Surface Interpenetration Measure (SIM), as similarity measure, in order to match two face images. The authentication score is obtained by combining the SIM values corresponding to the matching of four different face regions: circular and elliptical areas around the nose, forehead, and the entire face region. Then, a modified SA approach is proposed taking advantage of invariant face regions to better handle facial expressions. Comprehensive experiments were performed on the FRGC v2 database, the largest available database of 3D face images composed of 4,007 images with different facial expressions. The experiments simulated both verification and identification systems and the results compared to those reported by state-of-the-art works. By using all of the images in the database, a verification rate of 96.5 percent was achieved at a False Acceptance Rate (FAR) of 0.1 percent. In the identification scenario, a rank-one accuracy of 98.4 percent was achieved. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest rank-one score ever achieved for the FRGC v2 database when compared to results published in the literature. PMID:20075453

  10. Computational redesign of the lipid-facing surface of the outer membrane protein OmpA.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, James A; Whitehead, Timothy A; Nanda, Vikas

    2015-08-01

    Advances in computational design methods have made possible extensive engineering of soluble proteins, but designed β-barrel membrane proteins await improvements in our understanding of the sequence determinants of folding and stability. A subset of the amino acid residues of membrane proteins interact with the cell membrane, and the design rules that govern this lipid-facing surface are poorly understood. We applied a residue-level depth potential for β-barrel membrane proteins to the complete redesign of the lipid-facing surface of Escherichia coli OmpA. Initial designs failed to fold correctly, but reversion of a small number of mutations indicated by backcross experiments yielded designs with substitutions to up to 60% of the surface that did support folding and membrane insertion.

  11. Computational redesign of the lipid-facing surface of the outer membrane protein OmpA

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, James A.; Whitehead, Timothy A.; Nanda, Vikas

    2015-01-01

    Advances in computational design methods have made possible extensive engineering of soluble proteins, but designed β-barrel membrane proteins await improvements in our understanding of the sequence determinants of folding and stability. A subset of the amino acid residues of membrane proteins interact with the cell membrane, and the design rules that govern this lipid-facing surface are poorly understood. We applied a residue-level depth potential for β-barrel membrane proteins to the complete redesign of the lipid-facing surface of Escherichia coli OmpA. Initial designs failed to fold correctly, but reversion of a small number of mutations indicated by backcross experiments yielded designs with substitutions to up to 60% of the surface that did support folding and membrane insertion. PMID:26199411

  12. Convex dynamics: Unavoidable difficulties in bounding some greedy algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowicki, Tomasz; Tresser, Charles

    2004-03-01

    A greedy algorithm for scheduling and digital printing with inputs in a convex polytope, and vertices of this polytope as successive outputs, has recently been proven to be bounded for any convex polytope in any dimension. This boundedness property follows readily from the existence of some invariant region for a dynamical system equivalent to the algorithm, which is what one proves. While the proof, and some constructions of invariant regions that can be made to depend on a single parameter, are reasonably simple for convex polygons in the plane, the proof of boundedness gets quite complicated in dimension three and above. We show here that such complexity is somehow justified by proving that the most natural generalization of the construction that works for polygons does not work in any dimension above two, even if we allow for as many parameters as there are faces. We first prove that some polytopes in dimension greater than two admit no invariant region to which they are combinatorially equivalent. We then modify these examples to get polytopes such that no invariant region can be obtained by pushing out the borders of the half spaces that intersect to form the polytope. We also show that another mechanism prevents some simplices (the simplest polytopes in any dimension) from admitting invariant regions to which they would be similar. By contrast in dimension two, one can always get an invariant region by pushing these borders far enough in some correlated way; for instance, pushing all borders by the same distance builds an invariant region for any polygon if the push is at a distance big enough for that polygon. To motivate the examples that we provide, we discuss briefly the bifurcations of polyhedra associated with pushing half spaces in parallel to themselves. In dimension three, the elementary codimension one bifurcation resembles the unfolding of the elementary degenerate singularity for codimension one foliations on surfaces. As the subject of this

  13. Convex dynamics: unavoidable difficulties in bounding some greedy algorithms.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, Tomasz; Tresser, Charles

    2004-03-01

    A greedy algorithm for scheduling and digital printing with inputs in a convex polytope, and vertices of this polytope as successive outputs, has recently been proven to be bounded for any convex polytope in any dimension. This boundedness property follows readily from the existence of some invariant region for a dynamical system equivalent to the algorithm, which is what one proves. While the proof, and some constructions of invariant regions that can be made to depend on a single parameter, are reasonably simple for convex polygons in the plane, the proof of boundedness gets quite complicated in dimension three and above. We show here that such complexity is somehow justified by proving that the most natural generalization of the construction that works for polygons does not work in any dimension above two, even if we allow for as many parameters as there are faces. We first prove that some polytopes in dimension greater than two admit no invariant region to which they are combinatorially equivalent. We then modify these examples to get polytopes such that no invariant region can be obtained by pushing out the borders of the half spaces that intersect to form the polytope. We also show that another mechanism prevents some simplices (the simplest polytopes in any dimension) from admitting invariant regions to which they would be similar. By contrast in dimension two, one can always get an invariant region by pushing these borders far enough in some correlated way; for instance, pushing all borders by the same distance builds an invariant region for any polygon if the push is at a distance big enough for that polygon. To motivate the examples that we provide, we discuss briefly the bifurcations of polyhedra associated with pushing half spaces in parallel to themselves. In dimension three, the elementary codimension one bifurcation resembles the unfolding of the elementary degenerate singularity for codimension one foliations on surfaces. As the subject of this

  14. Convex analysis and ideal tensegrities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maceri, Franco; Marino, Michele; Vairo, Giuseppe

    2011-11-01

    A theoretical framework based on convex analysis is formulated and developed to study tensegrity structures under steady-state loads. Many classical results for ideal tensegrities are rationally deduced from subdifferentiable models in a novel mechanical perspective. Novel energy-based criteria for rigidity and pre-stressability are provided, allowing to formulate numerical algorithms for computations.

  15. Simulated plasma facing component measurements for an in situ surface diagnostic on Alcator C-Moda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, Z. S.; Whyte, D. G.

    2010-10-01

    The ideal in situ plasma facing component (PFC) diagnostic for magnetic fusion devices would perform surface element and isotope composition measurements on a shot-to-shot (˜10 min) time scale with ˜1 μm depth and ˜1 cm spatial resolution over large areas of PFCs. To this end, the experimental adaptation of the customary laboratory surface diagnostic—nuclear scattering of MeV ions—to the Alcator C-Mod tokamak is being guided by ACRONYM, a Geant4 synthetic diagnostic. The diagnostic technique and ACRONYM are described, and synthetic measurements of film thickness for boron-coated PFCs are presented.

  16. High-speed surface temperature measurements on plasma facing materials for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, M.; Kobayashi, M.

    1996-01-01

    For the lifetime evaluation of plasma facing materials in fusion experimental machines, it is essential to investigate their surface behavior and their temperature responses during an off-normal event such as the plasma disruptions. An infrared thermometer with a sampling speed as fast as 1{times}10{sup {minus}6} s/data, namely, the high-speed infrared thermometer (HSIR), has been developed by the National Research Laboratory of Metrology in Japan. To evaluate an applicability of the newly developed HSIR on the surface temperature measurement of plasma facing materials, high heat flux beam irradiation experiments have been performed with three different materials under the surface heat fluxes up to 170 MW/m{sup 2} for 0.04 s in a hydrogen ion beam test facility at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. As for the results, HSIR can be applicable for measuring the surface temperature responses of the armor tile materials with a little modification. It is also confirmed that surface temperatures measured with the HSIR thermometer show good agreement with the analytical results for stainless steel and carbon based materials at a temperature range of up to 2500{degree}C. However, for aluminum the HSIR could measure the temperature of the high dense vapor cloud which was produced during the heating due to lower melting temperature. Based on the result, a multichannel arrayed HSIR thermometer has been designed and fabricated. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Detection of Convexity and Concavity in Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertamini, Marco

    2008-01-01

    Sensitivity to shape changes was measured, in particular detection of convexity and concavity changes. The available data are contradictory. The author used a change detection task and simple polygons to systematically manipulate convexity/concavity. Performance was high for detecting a change of sign (a new concave vertex along a convex contour…

  18. Revisiting separation properties of convex fuzzy sets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Separation of convex sets by hyperplanes has been extensively studied on crisp sets. In a seminal paper separability and convexity are investigated, however there is a flaw on the definition of degree of separation. We revisited separation on convex fuzzy sets that have level-wise (crisp) disjointne...

  19. Experiments on High-Speed Liquid Films Over Downward-Facing Wetting and Nonwetting Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.K.; Yoda, M.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.; Sadowski, D.L.

    2003-07-15

    The fusion event in inertial fusion energy reactors can damage the chamber first walls. The Prometheus design study used a high-speed tangentially injected thin film of molten lead to protect the upper endcap of the reactor chamber. To assure full chamber coverage, the film must remain attached. Film detachment due to gravitational effects is most likely to occur on downward-facing surfaces.Experiments were therefore conducted on turbulent water films with initial thicknessess and speeds up to 2 mm and 11 m/s, respectively, onto the downward-facing surface of a flat plate 0-45 deg. below the horizontal. Average film detachment and lateral extent along the plate were measured. Detachment length appears to be a linear function of Froude number. Results for film flows over wetting and nonwetting surfaces show that surface wettability has a major impact. The data are used to establish conservative 'design windows' for film detachment. Film flow around cylindrical obstacles, modeling protective dams around chamber penetrations, was also studied. The results suggest that cylindrical dams cannot be used to protect penetrations, and that new chamber penetration geometries that avoid flow separation are a major design issue for this type of thin liquid protection.

  20. Goethite surface reactivity: III. Unifying arsenate adsorption behavior through a variable crystal face - Site density model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar-Camacho, Carlos; Villalobos, Mario

    2010-04-01

    We developed a model that describes quantitatively the arsenate adsorption behavior for any goethite preparation as a function of pH and ionic strength, by using one basic surface arsenate stoichiometry, with two affinity constants. The model combines a face distribution-crystallographic site density model for goethite with tenets of the Triple Layer and CD-MUSIC surface complexation models, and is self-consistent with its adsorption behavior towards protons, electrolytes, and other ions investigated previously. Five different systems of published arsenate adsorption data were used to calibrate the model spanning a wide range of chemical conditions, which included adsorption isotherms at different pH values, and adsorption pH-edges at different As(V) loadings, both at different ionic strengths and background electrolytes. Four additional goethite-arsenate systems reported with limited characterization and adsorption data were accurately described by the model developed. The adsorption reaction proposed is: lbond2 FeOH +lbond2 SOH +AsO43-+H→lbond2 FeOAsO3[2-]…SOH+HO where lbond2 SOH is an adjacent surface site to lbond2 FeOH; with log K = 21.6 ± 0.7 when lbond2 SOH is another lbond2 FeOH, and log K = 18.75 ± 0.9, when lbond2 SOH is lbond2 Fe 2OH. An additional small contribution of a protonated complex was required to describe data at low pH and very high arsenate loadings. The model considered goethites above 80 m 2/g as ideally composed of 70% face (1 0 1) and 30% face (0 0 1), resulting in a site density for lbond2 FeOH and for lbond2 Fe 3OH of 3.125/nm 2 each. Below 80 m 2/g surface capacity increases progressively with decreasing area, which was modeled by considering a progressively increasing proportion of faces (0 1 0)/(1 0 1), because face (0 1 0) shows a much higher site density of lbond2 FeOH groups. Computation of the specific proportion of faces, and thus of the site densities for the three types of crystallographic surface groups present in

  1. Non-uniform Erosion and Surface Evolution of Plasma-Facing Materials for Electric Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthes, Christopher Stanley Rutter

    A study regarding the surface evolution of plasma-facing materials is presented. Experimental efforts were performed in the UCLA Pi Facility, designed to explore the physics of plasma-surface interactions. The influence of micro-architectured surfaces on the effects of plasma sputtering is compared with the response of planar samples. Ballistic deposition of sputtered atoms as a result of geometric re-trapping is observed. This provides a self-healing mechanism of micro-architectured surfaces during plasma exposure. This result is quantified using a QCM to demonstrate the evolution of surface features and the corresponding influence on the instantaneous sputtering yield. The sputtering yield of textured molybdenum samples exposed to 300 eV Ar plasma is found to be roughly 1 of the 2 corresponding value of flat samples, and increases with ion fluence. Mo samples exhibited a sputtering yield initially as low as 0.22+/-8%, converging to 0.4+/-8% at high fluence. Although the yield is dependent on the initial surface structure, it is shown to be transient, reaching a steady-state value that is independent of initial surface conditions. A continuum model of surface evolution resulting from sputtering, deposition and surface diffusion is also derived to resemble the damped Kuramoto-Sivashinsky (KS) equation of non-linear dynamics. Linear stability analysis of the evolution equation provides an estimate of the selected wavelength, and its dependence on the ion energy and angle of incidence. The analytical results are confirmed by numerical simulations of the equation with a Fast Fourier Transform method. It is shown that for an initially flat surface, small perturbations lead to the evolution of a selected surface pattern that has nano- scale wavelength. When the surface is initially patterned by other means, the final resulting pattern is a competition between the "templated" pattern and the "self-organized" structure. Potential future routes of research are also

  2. Simulation of a free-surface and seepage face using boundary-fitted coordinate system method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kang-Kun; Leap, Darrell I.

    1997-09-01

    The boundary-fitted coordinate (BFC) system method is applied to simulate steady groundwater seepage with a free-surface and seepage face using the finite-difference method. The BFC system method eliminates the difficulty of fitting finite-difference grids to a changeable free-surface which is not known a priori but will be obtained as part of a solution. Also, grid generation with this approach is simpler than with the finite-element method. At each iterative sweep, the changeable free-surface becomes a part of the boundary-fitted grid lines, making boundary condition implementation easy and accurate. An example problem demonstrating the simulation procedure and numerical results compares very well with the analytical solution.

  3. Evaluating convex roof entanglement measures.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Géza; Moroder, Tobias; Gühne, Otfried

    2015-04-24

    We show a powerful method to compute entanglement measures based on convex roof constructions. In particular, our method is applicable to measures that, for pure states, can be written as low order polynomials of operator expectation values. We show how to compute the linear entropy of entanglement, the linear entanglement of assistance, and a bound on the dimension of the entanglement for bipartite systems. We discuss how to obtain the convex roof of the three-tangle for three-qubit states. We also show how to calculate the linear entropy of entanglement and the quantum Fisher information based on partial information or device independent information. We demonstrate the usefulness of our method by concrete examples.

  4. Convex profiles from asteroid lightcurves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostro, S. J.; Connelly, R.

    1984-03-01

    A lightcurve inversion method that yields a two-dimensional convex profile is introduced. The number of parameters that characterize the profile is limited only by the number of Fourier harmonics used to represent the parent lightcurve. The implementation of the method is outlined by a recursive quadratic programming algorithm, and its application to photoelectric lightcurves and radar measurements is discussed. Special properties of the lightcurves of geometrically scattering ellipsoids are pointed out, and those properties are used to test the inversion method and obtain a criterion for judging whether any lightcurve could actually be due to such an object. Convex profiles for several asteroids are shown, and the method's validity is discussed from a physical as well as purely statistical point of view.

  5. Convex accelerated maximum entropy reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worley, Bradley

    2016-04-01

    Maximum entropy (MaxEnt) spectral reconstruction methods provide a powerful framework for spectral estimation of nonuniformly sampled datasets. Many methods exist within this framework, usually defined based on the magnitude of a Lagrange multiplier in the MaxEnt objective function. An algorithm is presented here that utilizes accelerated first-order convex optimization techniques to rapidly and reliably reconstruct nonuniformly sampled NMR datasets using the principle of maximum entropy. This algorithm - called CAMERA for Convex Accelerated Maximum Entropy Reconstruction Algorithm - is a new approach to spectral reconstruction that exhibits fast, tunable convergence in both constant-aim and constant-lambda modes. A high-performance, open source NMR data processing tool is described that implements CAMERA, and brief comparisons to existing reconstruction methods are made on several example spectra.

  6. Convex Diffraction Grating Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chrisp, Michael P. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A 1:1 Offner mirror system for imaging off-axis objects is modified by replacing a concave spherical primary mirror that is concentric with a convex secondary mirror with two concave spherical mirrors M1 and M2 of the same or different radii positioned with their respective distances d1 and d2 from a concentric convex spherical diffraction grating having its grooves parallel to the entrance slit of the spectrometer which replaces the convex secondary mirror. By adjusting their distances d1 and d2 and their respective angles of reflection alpha and beta, defined as the respective angles between their incident and reflected rays, all aberrations are corrected without the need to increase the spectrometer size for a given entrance slit size to reduce astigmatism, thus allowing the imaging spectrometer volume to be less for a given application than would be possible with conventional imaging spectrometers and still give excellent spatial and spectral imaging of the slit image spectra over the focal plane.

  7. Effects of Lithium Plasma-Facing Surfaces on Particle Confinement in CDX-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, T.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Maingi, R.

    2005-10-01

    Recent experiments on the CDX-U spherical torus have successfully achieved a significant reduction in recycling with large-area liquid lithium plasma-facing surfaces. The effects of a liquid lithium toroidal limiter and evaporative lithium coatings on overall density and τp^* will be presented. Such conditions have also demonstrated the need to improve plasma fueling. To address this challenge, a supersonic gas injector, based on a Mach 8 Laval nozzle design,[1] has been installed on CDX-U. The fueling efficiency of the nozzle compared to standard gas puffing will be compared. [1] M. Baumgartner, Ph. D. thesis, Princeton University (1997)

  8. Natural and orbital debris particles on LDEF's trailing and forward-facing surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoerz, Friedrich; See, Thomas H.; Bernhard, Ronald P.; Brownlee, Donald E.

    1995-01-01

    Approximately 1000 impact craters on the Chemistry of Meteoroid Experiment (CME) have been analyzed by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDXA) to determine the compositional make-up of projectile residues. This report completes our systematic survey of gold and aluminum surfaces exposed at the trailing-edge (A03) and forward-facing (A11) LDEF sites, respectively. The major categories for the projectile residues were (1) natural, with diverse subgroups such as chondritic, monomineralic silicates, and sulfides, and (2) man made, that were classified into aluminum (metallic or oxide) and miscellaneous materials (such as stainless steel, paint flakes, etc). On CME gold collectors on LDEF's trailing edge approximately 11 percent of all craters greater than 100 micron in diameter were due to man-made debris, the majority (8.6 percent) caused by pure aluminum, approximately 31.4 percent were due to cosmic dust, while the remaining 58 percent were indeterminate via the analytical techniques utilized in this study. The aluminum surfaces located at the A11 forward-facing site did not permit analysis of aluminum impactors, but approximately 9.4 percent of all craters were demonstratably caused by miscellaneous debris materials and approximately 39.2 percent were the result of natural particles, leaving approximately 50 percent which were indeterminate. Model considerations and calculations are presented that focus on the crater-production rates for features greater than 100 micron in diameter, and on assigning the intermediate crater population to man-made or natural particles. An enhancement factor of 6 in the crater-production rate of natural impactors for the 'forward-facing' versus the 'trailing-edge' CME collectors was found to best explain all observations (i.e., total crater number(s), as well as their computational characteristics). Enhancement factors of 10 and 4 are either too high or too low. It is also suggested that

  9. The Many Faces of Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation: Interplay Between Surface Morphology and Hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Fitzner, Martin; Sosso, Gabriele C; Cox, Stephen J; Michaelides, Angelos

    2015-10-28

    What makes a material a good ice nucleating agent? Despite the importance of heterogeneous ice nucleation to a variety of fields, from cloud science to microbiology, major gaps in our understanding of this ubiquitous process still prevent us from answering this question. In this work, we have examined the ability of generic crystalline substrates to promote ice nucleation as a function of the hydrophobicity and the morphology of the surface. Nucleation rates have been obtained by brute-force molecular dynamics simulations of coarse-grained water on top of different surfaces of a model fcc crystal, varying the water-surface interaction and the surface lattice parameter. It turns out that the lattice mismatch of the surface with respect to ice, customarily regarded as the most important requirement for a good ice nucleating agent, is at most desirable but not a requirement. On the other hand, the balance between the morphology of the surface and its hydrophobicity can significantly alter the ice nucleation rate and can also lead to the formation of up to three different faces of ice on the same substrate. We have pinpointed three circumstances where heterogeneous ice nucleation can be promoted by the crystalline surface: (i) the formation of a water overlayer that acts as an in-plane template; (ii) the emergence of a contact layer buckled in an ice-like manner; and (iii) nucleation on compact surfaces with very high interaction strength. We hope that this extensive systematic study will foster future experimental work aimed at testing the physiochemical understanding presented herein. PMID:26434775

  10. Surface roughness of rock faces through the curvature of triangulated meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, P.; Samson, C.; Bose, P.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we examine three different measures of roughness based on a geometric property of surfaces known as curvature. These methods were demonstrated using an image of a large rock face made up of a smooth blocky limestone in contact with a rough friable dolostone. The point cloud analysed contained 10,334,288 points and was acquired at a distance of 3 m from the rock face. The point cloud was first decimated using an epsilon-net and then meshed using the Poisson surface reconstruction method before the proposed measures of roughness were applied. The first measure of roughness is defined as the difference in curvature between a mesh and a smoothed version of the same mesh. The second measure of roughness is a voting system applied to each vertex which identifies the subset of vertices which represent rough regions within the mesh. The third measure of roughness uses a combination of spatial partitioning data structures and data clustering in order to define roughness for a region in the mesh. The spatial partitioning data structure allows for a hierarchy of roughness values which is related to the size of the region being considered. All of the proposed measures of roughness are visualised using colour-coded displays which allows for an intuitive interpretation.

  11. The virtual human face: superimposing the simultaneously captured 3D photorealistic skin surface of the face on the untextured skin image of the CBCT scan.

    PubMed

    Naudi, K B; Benramadan, R; Brocklebank, L; Ju, X; Khambay, B; Ayoub, A

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of simultaneous capture of the three-dimensional (3D) surface of the face and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan of the skull on the accuracy of their registration and superimposition. 3D facial images were acquired in 14 patients using the Di3d (Dimensional Imaging, UK) imaging system and i-CAT CBCT scanner. One stereophotogrammetry image was captured at the same time as the CBCT and another 1h later. The two stereophotographs were individually superimposed over the CBCT using VRmesh. Seven patches were isolated on the final merged surfaces. For the whole face and each individual patch: maximum and minimum range of deviation between surfaces; absolute average distance between surfaces; and standard deviation for the 90th percentile of the distance errors were calculated. The superimposition errors of the whole face for both captures revealed statistically significant differences (P=0.00081). The absolute average distances in both separate and simultaneous captures were 0.47 and 0.27mm, respectively. The level of superimposition accuracy in patches from separate captures was 0.3-0.9mm, while that of simultaneous captures was 0.4mm. Simultaneous capture of Di3d and CBCT images significantly improved the accuracy of superimposition of these image modalities.

  12. 2D surface temperature measurement of plasma facing components with modulated active pyrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Amiel, S.; Loarer, T.; Pocheau, C.; Roche, H.; Gauthier, E.; Aumeunier, M.-H.; Courtois, X.; Jouve, M.; Balorin, C.; Moncada, V.; Le Niliot, C.; Rigollet, F.

    2014-10-01

    In nuclear fusion devices, such as Tore Supra, the plasma facing components (PFC) are in carbon. Such components are exposed to very high heat flux and the surface temperature measurement is mandatory for the safety of the device and also for efficient plasma scenario development. Besides this measurement is essential to evaluate these heat fluxes for a better knowledge of the physics of plasma-wall interaction, it is also required to monitor the fatigue of PFCs. Infrared system (IR) is used to manage to measure surface temperature in real time. For carbon PFCs, the emissivity is high and known (ε ~ 0.8), therefore the contribution of the reflected flux from environment and collected by the IR cameras can be neglected. However, the future tokamaks such as WEST and ITER will be equipped with PFCs in metal (W and Be/W, respectively) with low and variable emissivities (ε ~ 0.1–0.4). Consequently, the reflected flux will contribute significantly in the collected flux by IR camera. The modulated active pyrometry, using a bicolor camera, proposed in this paper allows a 2D surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected fluxes and the emissivity. Experimental results with Tungsten sample are reported and compared with simultaneous measurement performed with classical pyrometry (monochromatic and bichromatic) with and without reflective flux demonstrating the efficiency of this method for surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected flux and the emissivity.

  13. Nitrogen retention mechanisms in tokamaks with beryllium and tungsten plasma-facing surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberkofler, M.; Meisl, G.; Hakola, A.; Drenik, A.; Alegre, D.; Brezinsek, S.; Craven, R.; Dittmar, T.; Keenan, T.; Romanelli, S. G.; Smith, R.; Douai, D.; Herrmann, A.; Krieger, K.; Kruezi, U.; Liang, G.; Linsmeier, Ch; Mozetic, M.; Rohde, V.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team; Contributors, JET

    2016-02-01

    Global gas balance experiments at ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) and JET have shown that a considerable fraction of nitrogen injected for radiative cooling is not recovered as N2 upon regeneration of the liquid helium cryo pump. The most probable loss channels are ion implantation into plasma-facing materials, co-deposition and ammonia formation. These three mechanisms are investigated in laboratory and tokamak experiments and by numerical simulations. Laboratory experiments have shown that implantation of nitrogen ions into beryllium and tungsten leads to the formation of surface nitrides, which may decompose under thermal loads. On beryllium the presence of nitrogen at the surface has been seen to reduce the sputtering yield. On tungsten surfaces it has been observed that the presence of nitrogen can increase hydrogen retention. The global nitrogen retention in AUG by implantation into the tungsten surfaces saturates. At JET the steady state nitrogen retention is increased by co-deposition with beryllium. The tokamak experiments are interpreted in detail by simulations of the global migration with WallDYN. Mass spectrometry of the exhaust gas of AUG and JET has revealed the conversion of nitrogen to ammonia at percent-levels. Conclusions are drawn on the potential implications of nitrogen seeding on the operation of a reactor in a deuterium-tritium mix.

  14. Consecutive projections onto convex sets.

    PubMed

    Degenhard, A; Hayes, C; Leach, M O

    2002-03-21

    In this note we describe and evaluate the performance of a novel approach to information recovery that involves consecutive projection onto convex sets (POCS). The method is applied to a time series of medical image data and the results are compared to images reconstructed using the standard POCS reconstruction method. The consecutive POCS method converges in a desired step-wise manner producing reconstructed images of superior quality compared to the standard scheme and can speed up the reconstruction process. The proposed method is of value for many finite sampling imaging problems including, in particular, fast-scan magnetic resonance imaging applications.

  15. Hybrid analysis of EM radiation and scattering by composite slot-blade cavity-backed antennas on the surface of electrically large smooth convex cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Huan-Wan

    1998-07-01

    In the first part of this work, a hybrid approach is developed, which combines the asymptotic high-frequency based uniform geometrical theory of diffraction (UTD) ray technique with a numerical method of moments (MM), to analyze the EM scattering of blade, slot, and composite slot-blade cavity backed antenna structures, respectively residing on the surface of electrically large circular cylinders. The MM is used to solve an integral equation formulation for the unknown equivalent current distributions over the blade and the slot. In that MM solution of the integral equation formulation, a UTD approximation for the dyadic Green's function for a perfectly conducting circular cylinder is employed to calculate the excitation vector by an incoming local plane wave. After these equivalent current distributions become known via the MM solutions, the UTD dyadic Green's functions are next also used to calculate the radiation from these equivalent current distributions in the presence of the circular cylinder. The UTD can describe the effects of the large cylinder in a rather simple closed form fashion while the MM is used essentially to deal with the much smaller blade and slot antennas which cannot directly be analyzed by the UTD. In the second part of this work, this hybrid MM/UTD technique is employed to analyze the radiation from a composite slot-blade cavity backed antenna located on realistic aircraft configurations. The excitation of the antenna is due to a delta gap generator in a thin-wire probe feed that is placed inside a rectangular cavity. The MM procedure is used first to solve coupled integral equations that are formulated for the unknown equivalent electric current distribution on the blade and the unknown equivalent magnetic current distribution on the slot, when this composite slot-blade antenna configuration resides on an infinite ground plane. Finally the UTD is used to efficiently and accurately calculate the radiation from these equivalent current

  16. From face to interface recognition: a differential geometric approach to distinguish DNA from RNA binding surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shazman, Shula; Elber, Gershon; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2011-09-01

    Protein nucleic acid interactions play a critical role in all steps of the gene expression pathway. Nucleic acid (NA) binding proteins interact with their partners, DNA or RNA, via distinct regions on their surface that are characterized by an ensemble of chemical, physical and geometrical properties. In this study, we introduce a novel methodology based on differential geometry, commonly used in face recognition, to characterize and predict NA binding surfaces on proteins. Applying the method on experimentally solved three-dimensional structures of proteins we successfully classify double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) from single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) binding proteins, with 83% accuracy. We show that the method is insensitive to conformational changes that occur upon binding and can be applicable for de novo protein-function prediction. Remarkably, when concentrating on the zinc finger motif, we distinguish successfully between RNA and DNA binding interfaces possessing the same binding motif even within the same protein, as demonstrated for the RNA polymerase transcription-factor, TFIIIA. In conclusion, we present a novel methodology to characterize protein surfaces, which can accurately tell apart dsDNA from an ssRNA binding interfaces. The strength of our method in recognizing fine-tuned differences on NA binding interfaces make it applicable for many other molecular recognition problems, with potential implications for drug design.

  17. From face to interface recognition: a differential geometric approach to distinguish DNA from RNA binding surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shazman, Shula; Elber, Gershon; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2011-09-01

    Protein nucleic acid interactions play a critical role in all steps of the gene expression pathway. Nucleic acid (NA) binding proteins interact with their partners, DNA or RNA, via distinct regions on their surface that are characterized by an ensemble of chemical, physical and geometrical properties. In this study, we introduce a novel methodology based on differential geometry, commonly used in face recognition, to characterize and predict NA binding surfaces on proteins. Applying the method on experimentally solved three-dimensional structures of proteins we successfully classify double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) from single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) binding proteins, with 83% accuracy. We show that the method is insensitive to conformational changes that occur upon binding and can be applicable for de novo protein-function prediction. Remarkably, when concentrating on the zinc finger motif, we distinguish successfully between RNA and DNA binding interfaces possessing the same binding motif even within the same protein, as demonstrated for the RNA polymerase transcription-factor, TFIIIA. In conclusion, we present a novel methodology to characterize protein surfaces, which can accurately tell apart dsDNA from an ssRNA binding interfaces. The strength of our method in recognizing fine-tuned differences on NA binding interfaces make it applicable for many other molecular recognition problems, with potential implications for drug design. PMID:21693557

  18. Artificial Neural Networks for Surface Roughness Prediction when Face Milling Al 7075-T7351

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Escalona, Patricia; Maropoulos, Paul G.

    2010-03-01

    In this work, different artificial neural networks (ANN) are developed for the prediction of surface roughness ( R a ) values in Al alloy 7075-T7351 after face milling machining process. The radial base (RBNN), feed forward (FFNN), and generalized regression (GRNN) networks were selected, and the data used for training these networks were derived from experiments conducted using a high-speed milling machine. The Taguchi design of experiment was applied to reduce the time and cost of the experiments. From this study, the performance of each ANN used in this research was measured with the mean square error percentage and it was observed that FFNN achieved the best results. Also the Pearson correlation coefficient was calculated to analyze the correlation between the five inputs (cutting speed, feed per tooth, axial depth of cut, chip’s width, and chip’s thickness) selected for the network with the selected output (surface roughness). Results showed a strong correlation between the chip thickness and the surface roughness followed by the cutting speed.

  19. From face to interface recognition: a differential geometric approach to distinguish DNA from RNA binding surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Shazman, Shula; Elber, Gershon; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2011-01-01

    Protein nucleic acid interactions play a critical role in all steps of the gene expression pathway. Nucleic acid (NA) binding proteins interact with their partners, DNA or RNA, via distinct regions on their surface that are characterized by an ensemble of chemical, physical and geometrical properties. In this study, we introduce a novel methodology based on differential geometry, commonly used in face recognition, to characterize and predict NA binding surfaces on proteins. Applying the method on experimentally solved three-dimensional structures of proteins we successfully classify double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) from single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) binding proteins, with 83% accuracy. We show that the method is insensitive to conformational changes that occur upon binding and can be applicable for de novo protein-function prediction. Remarkably, when concentrating on the zinc finger motif, we distinguish successfully between RNA and DNA binding interfaces possessing the same binding motif even within the same protein, as demonstrated for the RNA polymerase transcription-factor, TFIIIA. In conclusion, we present a novel methodology to characterize protein surfaces, which can accurately tell apart dsDNA from an ssRNA binding interfaces. The strength of our method in recognizing fine-tuned differences on NA binding interfaces make it applicable for many other molecular recognition problems, with potential implications for drug design. PMID:21693557

  20. Critical heat flux (CHF) phenomenon on a downward facing curved surface

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, F.B.; Haddad, K.H.; Liu, Y.C.

    1997-06-01

    This report describes a theoretical and experimental study of the boundary layer boiling and critical heat flux phenomena on a downward facing curved heating surface, including both hemispherical and toroidal surfaces. A subscale boundary layer boiling (SBLB) test facility was developed to measure the spatial variation of the critical heat flux and observe the underlying mechanisms. Transient quenching and steady-state boiling experiments were performed in the SBLB facility under both saturated and subcooled conditions to obtain a complete database on the critical heat flux. To complement the experimental effort, an advanced hydrodynamic CHF model was developed from the conservation laws along with sound physical arguments. The model provides a clear physical explanation for the spatial variation of the CHF observed in the SBLB experiments and for the weak dependence of the CHF data on the physical size of the vessel. Based upon the CHF model, a scaling law was established for estimating the local critical heat flux on the outer surface of a heated hemispherical vessel that is fully submerged in water. The scaling law, which compares favorably with all the available local CHF data obtained for various vessel sizes, can be used to predict the local CHF limits on large commercial-size vessels. This technical information represents one of the essential elements that is needed in assessing the efficacy of external cooling of core melt by cavity flooding as a severe accident management strategy. 83 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Experimental studies of lithium-based surface chemistry for fusion plasma-facing materials applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allain, J. P.; Rokusek, D. L.; Harilal, S. S.; Nieto-Perez, M.; Skinner, C. H.; Kugel, H. W.; Heim, B.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.

    2009-06-01

    Lithium has enhanced the operational performance of fusion devices such as: TFTR, CDX-U, FTU, T-11 M, and NSTX. Lithium in the solid and liquid state has been studied extensively in laboratory experiments including its erosion and hydrogen-retaining properties. Reductions in physical sputtering up to 40-60% have been measured for deuterated solid and liquid lithium surfaces. Computational modeling indicates that up to a 1:1 deuterium volumetric retention in lithium is possible. This paper presents the results of systematic in situ laboratory experimental studies on the surface chemistry evolution of ATJ graphite under lithium deposition. Results are compared to post-mortem analysis of similar lithium surface coatings on graphite exposed to deuterium discharge plasmas in NSTX. Lithium coatings on plasma-facing components in NSTX have shown substantial reduction of hydrogenic recycling. Questions remain on the role lithium surface chemistry on a graphite substrate has on particle sputtering (physical and chemical) as well as hydrogen isotope recycling. This is particularly due to the lack of in situ measurements of plasma-surface interactions in tokamaks such as NSTX. Results suggest that the lithium bonding state on ATJ graphite is lithium peroxide and with sufficient exposure to ambient air conditions, lithium carbonate is generated. Correlation between both results is used to assess the role of lithium chemistry on the state of lithium bonding and implications on hydrogen pumping and lithium sputtering. In addition, reduction of factors between 10 and 30 reduction in physical sputtering from lithiated graphite compared to pure lithium or carbon is also measured.

  2. How to name and order convex polyhedra.

    PubMed

    Voytekhovsky, Yury L

    2016-09-01

    In this paper a method is suggested for naming any convex polyhedron by a numerical code arising from the adjacency matrix of its edge graph. A polyhedron is uniquely fixed by its name and can be built using it. Classes of convex n-acra (i.e. n-vertex polyhedra) are strictly ordered by their names. PMID:27580206

  3. The Band around a Convex Body

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, David

    2011-01-01

    We give elementary proofs of formulas for the area and perimeter of a planar convex body surrounded by a band of uniform thickness. The primary tool is a integral formula for the perimeter of a convex body which describes the perimeter in terms of the projections of the body onto lines in the plane.

  4. Tracer techniques for the assessment of material migration and surface modification of plasma-facing components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubel, M.; Weckmann, A.; Ström, P.; Petersson, P.; Garcia-Carrasco, A.; Brezinsek, S.; Coenen, J.; Kreter, A.; Möller, S.; Wienhold, P.; Wauters, T.; Fortuna-Zaleśna, E.

    2015-08-01

    Tracer techniques were used in the TEXTOR tokamak to determine high-Z metal migration and the deposition of species used for plasma edge cooling or wall conditioning under different types of operation conditions. Volatile molybdenum hexa-fluoride, nitrogen-15 and oxygen-18 were used as markers in tokamak or ion cyclotron wall conditioning discharges (ICWC). The objective was to obtain qualitative and quantitative of a global and local deposition pattern and material mixing effects. The deposition and retention was studied on plasma-facing components, collector probes and test limiters. Optical spectroscopy and ex-situ analysis techniques were used to determine the plasma response to tracer injection and the modification of surface composition. Molybdenum and light isotopes were detected on all types of limiters and short-term probes retrieved from the vessel showing that both helium and nitrogen are trapped following wall conditioning and edge cooling. Only small amounts below 1 × 1019 m-2 of 18O were detected on surfaces treated by oxygen-assisted ICWC.

  5. Surface Potentials of (001), (012), (113) Hematite (α-Fe2O3) Crystal Faces in Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Chatman, Shawn ME; Zarzycki, Piotr P.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2013-09-05

    Hematite (α-Fe2O3) is an important candidate electrode for energy system technologies such as photoelectrochemical water splitting. Conversion efficiency issues with this material are presently being addressed through nanostructuring, doping, and surface modification. However, key electrochemical properties of hematite/electrolyte interfaces remain poorly understood at a fundamental level, in particular those of crystallographically well-defined hematite faces likely present as interfacial components at the grain scale. We report a combined measurement and theory study that isolates and evaluates the equilibrium surface potentials of three nearly defect-free single crystal faces of hematite, titrated from pH 3 to 11.25. We link measured surface potentials with atomic-scale surface topology, namely the ratio and distributions of surface protonation/deprotonation site types expected from the bulk structure. The data reveal face-specific points of zero potential (PZP) relatable to points of zero net charge (PZC) that lie within a small pH window (8.35-8.85). Over the entire pH range the surface potentials show strong non-Nernstian charging at pH extremes separated by a wide central plateau in agreement with surface complexation modeling predictions, but with important face-specific distinctions. We introduce a new surface complexation model based on fitting the entire data set that depends primarily only on the proton affinities of two site types and the two associated electrical double layer capacitances. The data and model show that magnitudes of surface potential biases at the pH extremes are on the order of 100 mV, similar to the activation energy for electron hopping mobility. An energy band diagram for hematite crystallites with specific face expression and pH effects is proposed that could provide a baseline for understanding water splitting performance enhancement effects from nanostructuring, and guide morphology targets and pH for systematic improvements in

  6. Effect of Surface Site Interactions on Potentiometric Titration of Hematite (α-Fe2O3) Crystal Faces

    SciTech Connect

    Chatman, Shawn ME; Zarzycki, Piotr P.; Preocanin, Tajana; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2013-02-01

    Time dependent potentiometric pH titrations were used to study the effect of atomic scale surface structure on the protonation behavior of the structurally well defined hematite/aqueous electrolyte interfaces. Our recently proposed thermodynamic model [1,23] was applied to measured acidimetric and alkalimetric titration hysteresis loops, collected from highly organized (001), (012), and (113) crystal face terminations using pH equilibration times ranging from 15 to 30 mins. Hysteresis loop areas indicate that (001) faces equilibrate faster than the (012) and (113) faces, consistent with the different expected ensembles of singly, doubly, and triply coordinated surface sites on each face. Strongly non-linear hysteretic pH-potential relationships were found, with slopes exceeding Nernstian, collectively indicating that protonation and deprotonation is much more complex than embodied in present day surface complexation models. The asymmetrical shape of the acidimetric and alkalimetric titration branches were used to illustrate a proposed steric "leaky screen" repulsion/trapping interaction mechanism that stems from high affinity singly-coordinated sites electrostatically and sterically screening lower affinity doubly and triply coordinated sites. Our data indicate that site interaction is the dominant phenomenon defining surface potential accumulation behavior on single crystal faces of metal oxide minerals.

  7. Noah, Joseph and Convex Hulls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, N. W.; Chau, Y.; Chapman, S. C.

    2010-12-01

    The idea of describing animal movement by mathematical models based on diffusion and Brownian motion has a long heritage. It has thus been natural to account for those aspects of motion that depart from the Brownian by the use of models incorporating long memory & subdiffusion (“the Joseph effect”) and/or heavy tails & superdiffusion (“the Noah effect”). My own interest in this problem was originally from a geoscience perspective, and was triggered by the need to model time series in space physics where both effects coincide. Subsequently I have been involved in animal foraging studies [e.g. Edwards et al, Nature, 2007]. I will describe some recent work [Watkins et al, PRE, 2009] which studies how fixed-timestep and variable-timestep formulations of anomalous diffusion are related in the presence of heavy tails and long range memory (stable processes versus the CTRW). Quantities for which different scaling relations are predicted between the two approaches are of particular interest, to aid testability. I will also present some of work in progress on the convex hull of anomalously diffusing walkers, inspired by its possible relevance to the idea of home range in biology, and by Randon-Furling et al’s recent analytical results in the Brownian case [PRL, 2009].

  8. Surface acoustic load sensing using a face-shear PIN-PMN-PT single-crystal resonator.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyungrim; Zhang, Shujun; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2012-11-01

    Pb(In(0.5)Nb(0.5))O(3)-Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))O(3)-PbTiO(3) (PIN-PMN-PT) resonators for surface acoustic load sensing are presented in this paper. Different acoustic loads are applied to thickness mode, thickness-shear mode, and face-shear mode resonators, and the electrical impedances at resonance and anti-resonance frequencies are recorded. More than one order of magnitude higher sensitivity (ratio of electrical impedance change to surface acoustic impedance change) at the resonance is achieved for the face-shear-mode resonator compared with other resonators with the same dimensions. The Krimholtz, Leedom, and Matthaei (KLM) model is used to verify the surface acoustic loading effect on the electrical impedance spectrum of face-shear PIN-PMN-PT single-crystal resonators. The demonstrated high sensitivity of face-shear mode resonators to surface loads is promising for a broad range of applications, including artificial skin, biological and chemical sensors, touch screens, and other touch-based sensors. PMID:23192819

  9. Shock Excursion in Transonic Convex-Corner Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Kung-Ming; Chang, Po-Hsiung; Chang, Keh-Chin

    2016-06-01

    A typical feature on a transonic airfoil is associated with a quasi-normal shock on the upper surface. When a shock is strong enough, development of a separation bubble changes the flowfield significantly. High intensity of pressure fluctuations is associated with unsteady shock wave. An experimental study was conducted to investigate transonic convex-corner flows, including single- and round-convex corners. Peak pressure fluctuations and zero-crossing frequency are associated with incoming Mach number, total turning angle, and separation length. In the cases of R100 and R200, the level of zero-crossing frequency decreases with increasing turning angle as observed in the single convex-corner flows. An increase in the level of pressure fluctuations corresponds to lower zero-cross frequency. In the cases of R300, there is a roughly constant level of surface pressure fluctuations or the variation of pressure fluctuations with the turning angle is less significant. The zero-crossing frequency would be independent of turning angle in the cases of R300.

  10. Geometric-Harmonic convexity and integral inequalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akdemir, Ahmet Ocak; Yalçin, Abdüllatif; Polat, Fatma; Kavurmaci-Önalan, Havva

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, some new integral inequalities have been proved for functions whose absolute value of derivatives are GH-convex functions by using integral equalities that have been obtained previously.

  11. Recent characterizations of generalized convexity in convexity in cooperative game thoery

    SciTech Connect

    Driessen, T.

    1994-12-31

    The notion of convexity for a real-valued function on the power set of the finite set N (the so-called cooperative game with player set N) is defined as in other mathematical fields. The study of convexity plays an important role within the field of cooperative game theory because the application of the solution part of game theory to convex games provides elegant results for the solution concepts involved. Especially, the well known solution concept called core is, for convex games, very well characterized. The current paper focuses on a notion of generalized convexity, called k- convexity, for cooperative n-person games. Due to very recent characterizations of convexity for cooperative games, the goal is to provide similar new characterizations of k-convexity. The main characterization states that for the k-convexity of an n-person game it is both necessary and sufficient that half of all the so-called marginal worth vectors belong to the core of the game. Here it is taken into account whether a marginal worth vector corresponds to an even or odd ordering of k elements of the n-person player set N. Another characterization of k-convexity is presented in terms of a so-called finite min-modular decomposition. That is, some specific cover game of a k-convex game can be decomposed as the minimum of a finite number of modular (or additive) games. Finally it is established that the k-convexity of a game can be characterized in terms of the second order partial derivates of the so-called multilinear extension of the game.

  12. Univalent harmonic mappings convex in one direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponnusamy, S.; Kaliraj, A. Sairam

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we present a criterion for a harmonic function to be convex in one direction. Also, we discuss the class of harmonic functions starlike in one direction in the unit disk and obtain a method to construct univalent harmonic functions convex in one direction. Although the converse of classical Alexander's theorem for harmonic functions was proved to be false, we obtain a version of converse of it under a suitable additional condition.

  13. On equivalent characterizations of convexity of functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkioulekas, Eleftherios

    2013-04-01

    A detailed development of the theory of convex functions, not often found in complete form in most textbooks, is given. We adopt the strict secant line definition as the definitive definition of convexity. We then show that for differentiable functions, this definition becomes logically equivalent with the first derivative monotonicity definition and the tangent line definition. Consequently, for differentiable functions, all three characterizations are logically equivalent.

  14. Effects of an aft facing step on the surface of a laminar flow glider wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandlin, Doral R.; Saiki, Neal

    1993-01-01

    A motor glider was used to perform a flight test study on the effects of aft facing steps in a laminar boundary layer. This study focuses on two dimensional aft facing steps oriented spanwise to the flow. The size and location of the aft facing steps were varied in order to determine the critical size that will force premature transition. Transition over a step was found to be primarily a function of Reynolds number based on step height. Both of the step height Reynolds numbers for premature and full transition were determined. A hot film anemometry system was used to detect transition.

  15. An algorithm for linearizing convex extremal problems

    SciTech Connect

    Gorskaya, Elena S

    2010-06-09

    This paper suggests a method of approximating the solution of minimization problems for convex functions of several variables under convex constraints is suggested. The main idea of this approach is the approximation of a convex function by a piecewise linear function, which results in replacing the problem of convex programming by a linear programming problem. To carry out such an approximation, the epigraph of a convex function is approximated by the projection of a polytope of greater dimension. In the first part of the paper, the problem is considered for functions of one variable. In this case, an algorithm for approximating the epigraph of a convex function by a polygon is presented, it is shown that this algorithm is optimal with respect to the number of vertices of the polygon, and exact bounds for this number are obtained. After this, using an induction procedure, the algorithm is generalized to certain classes of functions of several variables. Applying the suggested method, polynomial algorithms for an approximate calculation of the L{sub p}-norm of a matrix and of the minimum of the entropy function on a polytope are obtained. Bibliography: 19 titles.

  16. An algorithm for linearizing convex extremal problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorskaya, Elena S.

    2010-06-01

    This paper suggests a method of approximating the solution of minimization problems for convex functions of several variables under convex constraints is suggested. The main idea of this approach is the approximation of a convex function by a piecewise linear function, which results in replacing the problem of convex programming by a linear programming problem. To carry out such an approximation, the epigraph of a convex function is approximated by the projection of a polytope of greater dimension. In the first part of the paper, the problem is considered for functions of one variable. In this case, an algorithm for approximating the epigraph of a convex function by a polygon is presented, it is shown that this algorithm is optimal with respect to the number of vertices of the polygon, and exact bounds for this number are obtained. After this, using an induction procedure, the algorithm is generalized to certain classes of functions of several variables. Applying the suggested method, polynomial algorithms for an approximate calculation of the L_p-norm of a matrix and of the minimum of the entropy function on a polytope are obtained. Bibliography: 19 titles.

  17. What causes the facing-the-viewer bias in biological motion?

    PubMed

    Weech, Séamas; McAdam, Matthew; Kenny, Sophie; Troje, Nikolaus F

    2014-10-13

    Orthographically projected biological motion point-light displays are generally ambiguous with respect to their orientation in depth, yet observers consistently prefer the facing-the-viewer interpretation. There has been discussion as to whether this bias can be attributed to the social relevance of biological motion stimuli or relates to local, low-level stimulus properties. In the present study we address this question. In Experiment 1, we compared the facing-the-viewer bias produced by a series of four stick figures and three human silhouettes that differed in posture, gender, and the presence versus absence of walking motion. Using a paradigm in which we asked observers to indicate the spinning direction of these figures, we found no bias when participants observed silhouettes, whereas a pronounced degree of bias was elicited by most stick figures. We hypothesized that the ambiguous surface normals on the lines and dots that comprise stick figures are prone to a visual bias that assumes surfaces to be convex. The local surface orientations of the occluding contours of silhouettes are unambiguous, and as such the convexity bias does not apply. In Experiment 2, we tested the role of local features in ambiguous surface perception by adding dots to the elbows and knees of silhouettes. We found biases consistent with the facing directions implied by a convex body surface. The results unify a number of findings regarding the facing-the-viewer bias. We conclude that the facing-the-viewer bias is established at the level of surface reconstruction from local image features rather than on a semantic level.

  18. The hollow-face illusion: object-specific knowledge, general assumptions or properties of the stimulus?

    PubMed

    Hill, Harold; Johnston, Alan

    2007-01-01

    The hollow-face illusion, in which a mask appears as a convex face, is a powerful example of binocular depth inversion occurring with a real object under a wide range of viewing conditions. Explanations of the illusion are reviewed and six experiments reported. In experiment 1 the detrimental effect of figural inversion, evidence for the importance of familiarity, was found for other oriented objects. The inversion effect held for masks lit from the side (experiment 2). The illusion was stronger for a mask rotated by 90 degrees lit from its forehead than from its chin, suggesting that familiar patterns of shading enhance the illusion (experiment 2). There were no effects of light source visibility or any left/right asymmetry (experiment 3). In experiments 4-6 we used a 'virtual' hollow face, with illusion strength quantified by the proportion of noise texture needed to eliminate the illusion. Adding characteristic surface colour enhanced the illusion, consistent with the familiar face pigmentation outweighing additional bottom-up cues (experiment 4). There was no difference between perspective and orthographic projection. Photographic negation reduced, but did not eliminate, the illusion, suggesting shading is important but not essential (experiment 5). Absolute depth was not critical, although a shallower mask was given less extreme convexity ratings (experiment 6). We argue that the illusion arises owing to a convexity preference when the raw data have ambiguous interpretations. However, using a familiar object with typical orientation, shading, and pigmentation greatly enhances the effect. PMID:17402664

  19. Fission Surface Power Systems (FSPS) Project Final Report for the Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP): Fission Surface Power, Transition Face to Face

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palac, Donald T.

    2011-01-01

    The Fission Surface Power Systems Project became part of the ETDP on October 1, 2008. Its goal was to demonstrate fission power system technology readiness in an operationally relevant environment, while providing data on fission system characteristics pertinent to the use of a fission power system on planetary surfaces. During fiscal years 08 to 10, the FSPS project activities were dominated by hardware demonstrations of component technologies, to verify their readiness for inclusion in the fission surface power system. These Pathfinders demonstrated multi-kWe Stirling power conversion operating with heat delivered via liquid metal NaK, composite Ti/H2O heat pipe radiator panel operations at 400 K input water temperature, no-moving-part electromagnetic liquid metal pump operation with NaK at flight-like temperatures, and subscale performance of an electric resistance reactor simulator capable of reproducing characteristics of a nuclear reactor for the purpose of system-level testing, and a longer list of component technologies included in the attached report. Based on the successful conclusion of Pathfinder testing, work began in 2010 on design and development of the Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU), a full-scale 1/4 power system-level non-nuclear assembly of a reactor simulator, power conversion, heat rejection, instrumentation and controls, and power management and distribution. The TDU will be developed and fabricated during fiscal years 11 and 12, culminating in initial testing with water cooling replacing the heat rejection system in 2012, and complete testing of the full TDU by the end of 2014. Due to its importance for Mars exploration, potential applicability to missions preceding Mars missions, and readiness for an early system-level demonstration, the Enabling Technology Development and Demonstration program is currently planning to continue the project as the Fission Power Systems project, including emphasis on the TDU completion and testing.

  20. Convex-relaxed kernel mapping for image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Ben Salah, Mohamed; Ben Ayed, Ismail; Jing Yuan; Hong Zhang

    2014-03-01

    This paper investigates a convex-relaxed kernel mapping formulation of image segmentation. We optimize, under some partition constraints, a functional containing two characteristic terms: 1) a data term, which maps the observation space to a higher (possibly infinite) dimensional feature space via a kernel function, thereby evaluating nonlinear distances between the observations and segments parameters and 2) a total-variation term, which favors smooth segment surfaces (or boundaries). The algorithm iterates two steps: 1) a convex-relaxation optimization with respect to the segments by solving an equivalent constrained problem via the augmented Lagrange multiplier method and 2) a convergent fixed-point optimization with respect to the segments parameters. The proposed algorithm can bear with a variety of image types without the need for complex and application-specific statistical modeling, while having the computational benefits of convex relaxation. Our solution is amenable to parallelized implementations on graphics processing units (GPUs) and extends easily to high dimensions. We evaluated the proposed algorithm with several sets of comprehensive experiments and comparisons, including: 1) computational evaluations over 3D medical-imaging examples and high-resolution large-size color photographs, which demonstrate that a parallelized implementation of the proposed method run on a GPU can bring a significant speed-up and 2) accuracy evaluations against five state-of-the-art methods over the Berkeley color-image database and a multimodel synthetic data set, which demonstrates competitive performances of the algorithm. PMID:24723519

  1. Corrosion behavior of cast titanium with reduced surface reaction layer made by a face-coating method.

    PubMed

    Koike, M; Cai, Z; Fujii, H; Brezner, M; Okabe, T

    2003-11-01

    This study characterized the corrosion behavior of cast CP titanium made with a face-coating method. Wax patterns were coated with oxide slurry of Y(2)O(3) or ZrO(2) before investing with a MgO-based investment. Three surface preparations were tested: ground, sandblasted, and as-cast. Uncoated castings served as controls. Sixteen-hour open circuit potential (OCP) measurement, linear polarization and potentiodynamic cathodic polarization were performed in an aerated modified Tani-Zucchi synthetic saliva at 37 degrees C. Anodic polarization was conducted in the same deaerated medium. Polarization resistance (R(p)) and Tafel slopes were determined. Corrosion current density was calculated for each specimen. Results (n=4) were subjected to nonparametric statistical analysis (alpha=0.05). Cross sections of cast specimens were examined by optical microscopy. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) spot analysis was performed at various depths below the surface. The OCP stabilized within several hours for all the specimens. Apparent differences in anodic polarization behavior were observed among the different surfaces. A distinctive wide passive region followed by breakdown was seen on specimens with ground and sandblasted surfaces. There were no significant differences in the corrosion resistance among the control and the two face-coating groups for each group. The Mann-Whitney test showed significantly lower OCP and higher R(p) values for ground surfaces. The surface condition significantly affected the corrosion behavior more than the face coating methods. In most cases, specimens with as-cast surfaces exhibited the least corrosion resistance during the potentiodynamic anodic polarization. PMID:12950996

  2. Random Convex Hulls and Extreme Value Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Satya N.; Comtet, Alain; Randon-Furling, Julien

    2009-12-01

    In this paper we study the statistical properties of convex hulls of N random points in a plane chosen according to a given distribution. The points may be chosen independently or they may be correlated. After a non-exhaustive survey of the somewhat sporadic literature and diverse methods used in the random convex hull problem, we present a unifying approach, based on the notion of support function of a closed curve and the associated Cauchy’s formulae, that allows us to compute exactly the mean perimeter and the mean area enclosed by the convex polygon both in case of independent as well as correlated points. Our method demonstrates a beautiful link between the random convex hull problem and the subject of extreme value statistics. As an example of correlated points, we study here in detail the case when the points represent the vertices of n independent random walks. In the continuum time limit this reduces to n independent planar Brownian trajectories for which we compute exactly, for all n, the mean perimeter and the mean area of their global convex hull. Our results have relevant applications in ecology in estimating the home range of a herd of animals. Some of these results were announced recently in a short communication [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103:140602, 2009].

  3. Experimental Studies of High-Speed Liquid Films on Downward-Facing Surfaces for Inertial Fusion Energy Wet Wall Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Jonathan K.; Durbin, Samuel G. II; Sadowski, Dennis L.; Yoda, Minami; Abdel-Khalik, Said I.

    2003-05-15

    The fusion event in inertial fusion energy (IFE) reactors creates neutrons, photons, and charged particles that can damage the chamber first walls. The Prometheus design study used a high-speed thin film of molten lead injected tangential to the wall to protect the upper endcap of the reactor chamber from damaging X rays and target debris. To assure full chamber coverage, the film must remain attached. Film detachment under the influence of gravity is most likely to occur on the downward-facing surfaces over the upper endcap of the reactor chamber. Accurate numerical predictions of detachment length are effectively impossible in this turbulent flow because of difficulties in determining appropriate boundary conditions near the detachment point.As part of the ARIES-IFE study, experimental investigations of high-speed water films injected onto downward-facing planar surfaces at angles of inclination up to 45 deg below the horizontal were therefore performed. The initial growth and subsequent detachment of films with initial thickness up to 2 mm and injection speed up to 11 m/s were measured. To our knowledge, these experiments are the first to investigate the detachment of turbulent liquid films on downward-facing surfaces. The implications of these initial results on thin liquid protection and the 'wet wall' concept are discussed.

  4. In-situ surface debris inspection and removal system for upward-facing transport mirrors of the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gourdin, W H; Dzenitis, E; Martin, D; Listiyo, K; Sherman, G; Kent, W; Butlin, R; Stolz, C J; Pryatel, J

    2004-11-10

    We describe a system to inspect and remove surface debris in-situ from the surfaces of upward-facing mirrors that transport 1053 nm laser light to the target chamber of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Grazing angle (2-5{sup o}) illumination with a bar light highlights debris {approx}10 {micro}m in size and larger, which is then viewed through windows in the enclosures of selected mirrors. Debris is removed with 1-second bursts of high velocity (76 m/s) clean air delivered across the optic surfaces by a commercially available linear nozzle (''gas knife''). Experiments with aluminum, stainless steel, glass and polystyrene particles of various sizes >30 {micro}m show that particle removal efficiency is near 100% over most of the mirror surfaces for all sizes tested.

  5. Face-dependent Auger neutralization and ground-state energy shift for He in front of Al surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wethekam, S.; Winter, H.; Valdes, Diego; Monreal, R. C.

    2008-08-15

    He atoms and ions with keV energies are scattered under grazing angles of incidence from Al(111), Al(100), and Al(110) surfaces. Fractions of surviving ions and normal energy gains of He{sup +} ions prior to neutralization, derived from shifts of angular distributions for incident atoms and ions, are compared to results from three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations based on theoretically calculated Auger neutralization rates and He ground-state energy shifts. From the good agreement of experimental data with simulations, we conclude a detailed microscopic understanding for a model system of ion-surface interactions. Our work provides further evidence for the recently reported surface Miller index dependence for the neutralization of He{sup +} ions at metal surfaces. The study is extended to the face dependence of the He ground-state energy shift.

  6. A Convex Approach to Fault Tolerant Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maghami, Peiman G.; Cox, David E.; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The design of control laws for dynamic systems with the potential for actuator failures is considered in this work. The use of Linear Matrix Inequalities allows more freedom in controller design criteria than typically available with robust control. This work proposes an extension of fault-scheduled control design techniques that can find a fixed controller with provable performance over a set of plants. Through convexity of the objective function, performance bounds on this set of plants implies performance bounds on a range of systems defined by a convex hull. This is used to incorporate performance bounds for a variety of soft and hard failures into the control design problem.

  7. Convex Regression with Interpretable Sharp Partitions

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Ashley; Simon, Noah; Witten, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    We consider the problem of predicting an outcome variable on the basis of a small number of covariates, using an interpretable yet non-additive model. We propose convex regression with interpretable sharp partitions (CRISP) for this task. CRISP partitions the covariate space into blocks in a data-adaptive way, and fits a mean model within each block. Unlike other partitioning methods, CRISP is fit using a non-greedy approach by solving a convex optimization problem, resulting in low-variance fits. We explore the properties of CRISP, and evaluate its performance in a simulation study and on a housing price data set.

  8. Convex Regression with Interpretable Sharp Partitions

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Ashley; Simon, Noah; Witten, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    We consider the problem of predicting an outcome variable on the basis of a small number of covariates, using an interpretable yet non-additive model. We propose convex regression with interpretable sharp partitions (CRISP) for this task. CRISP partitions the covariate space into blocks in a data-adaptive way, and fits a mean model within each block. Unlike other partitioning methods, CRISP is fit using a non-greedy approach by solving a convex optimization problem, resulting in low-variance fits. We explore the properties of CRISP, and evaluate its performance in a simulation study and on a housing price data set. PMID:27635120

  9. Strain responsive concave and convex microlens arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Dinesh; Yang, Shu; Lin, Pei-Chun

    2007-12-01

    We report the fabrication of single-component, strain responsive microlens arrays with real-time tunability. The concave lens array is fabricated by patterning hard oxide layer on a bidirectionally prestretched soft elastomer, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) followed by confined buckling upon release of the prestrain. The convex microlens array is replica molded from the concave lenses in PDMS. Due to difference in lens formation mechanisms, the two types of lenses show different tunable range of focal length in response to the applied strain: large focal length change is observed from the concave microlens array, whereas that from the convex microlens array is much smaller.

  10. Endotoxin deposits on the inner surfaces of closed-face cassettes during bioaerosol sampling: a field investigation at composting facilities.

    PubMed

    Duquenne, Philippe; Simon, Xavier; Demange, Valérie; Harper, Martin; Wild, Pascal

    2015-05-01

    A set of 270 bioaerosol samples was taken from 15 composting facilities using polystyrene closed-face filter cassettes (CFCs). The objective was to measure the quantity of endotoxin deposits on the inner surfaces of the cassettes (sometimes referred to as 'wall deposits'). The results show that endotoxins are deposited on the inner surfaces of the CFCs through sampling and/or handling of samples. The quantity of endotoxins measured on inner surfaces range between 0.05 (the limit of detection of the method) and 3100 endotoxin units per cassette. The deposits can represent a large and variable percentage of the endotoxins sampled. More than a third of the samples presented a percentage of inner surface deposits >40% of the total quantity of endotoxins collected (filter + inner surfaces). Omitting these inner surface deposits in the analytical process lead to measurement errors relative to sampling all particles entering the CFC sampler, corresponding to a developing consensus on matching the inhalable particulate sampling convention. The result would be underestimated exposures and could affect the decision as to whether or not a result is acceptable in comparison to airborne concentration limits defined in terms of the inhalability convention. The results of this study suggest including the endotoxins deposited on the inner surfaces of CFCs during analysis. Further researches are necessary to investigate endotoxin deposits on the inner cassette surfaces in other working sectors.

  11. Impurity concentrations and surface charge densities on the heavily doped face of a silicon solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Hsu, L. C.

    1977-01-01

    Increased solar cell efficiencies are attained by reduction of surface recombination and variation of impurity concentration profiles at the n(+) surface of silicon solar cells. Diagnostic techniques are employed to evaluate the effects of specific materials preparation methodologies on surface and near surface concentrations. It is demonstrated that the MOS C-V method, when combined with a bulk measurement technique, yields more complete concentration data than are obtainable by either method alone. Specifically, new solar cell MOS C-V measurements are combined with bulk concentrations obtained by a successive layer removal technique utilizing measurements of sheet resistivity and Hall coefficient.

  12. Face-related segregation reversal at Pt 50Ni 50 surfaces studied with the embedded atom method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deurinck, P.; Creemers, C.

    1999-11-01

    The segregation to the three low-index surfaces of a Pt50Ni50 single crystal is modelled by Monte Carlo simulations combined with the embedded atom method (EAM). Using the best fit EAM parameters from the literature for the six transition metals of the Ni and Cu groups does not yield satisfactory results. In this work the EAM parameters are recalculated and optimised exclusively for the Pt-Ni alloy system under study. Only then does EAM reliably reproduce the driving forces for segregation. The experimental results [Y. Gauthier et al., Phys. Rev. B 31 (1985) 6216; Y. Gauthier et al., Phys. Rev. B 35 (1987) 7867; S.M. Foiles, in: P.A. Dobson, A. Miller (Eds.), Surface Segregation Phenomena, CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, 1990, p. 79] reveal a face-related segregation reversal for the Pt50Ni50 single crystal. It appears from the simulations that this is caused by a relatively small difference in surface energy in close competition with the elastic strain release. At the open (110) surface the difference in surface energy dominates causing Ni segregation. At the (100) and (111) surfaces the difference in surface energy is overpowered by the elastic strain leading to Pt segregation. The simulations are in good agreement with the experimental results and reproduce quantitatively the Ni segregation to the (110) surface and the Pt segregation to the (100) and (111) surfaces. Only at the (110) surface significant relaxations are predicted in good agreement with experimental evidence. Atomic vibrations can be included by allowing a large number of very small displacements or with a more classical treatment of vibrational entropy. Both approaches yield the same results and show that the inclusion of atomic vibrations is important only for the (110) surface and tend to attenuate the Ni segregation profile.

  13. Thermal ablation of plasma-facing surfaces in tokamak disruptions: Sensitivity to particle kinetic energy

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A.; Hassanein, A.

    1996-02-01

    Ablation damage to solid targets with high heat flux impulses is generally greater high-energy electron beam heat sources compared to low-energy plasma guns. This sensitivity to incoming particle kinetic energy is explored with computer modelling; a fast-running routine (DESIRE) is developed for initial scoping analysis and is found to be in reasonable agreement with several experiments on graphite and tungsten targets. If tokamak disruptions are characterized by particle energies less than {approximately}1 keV, then we expect plasma guns are a better analogue than electron beams for simulating disruption behavior and testing candidate plasma-facing materials.

  14. Robust Utility Maximization Under Convex Portfolio Constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Matoussi, Anis; Mezghani, Hanen Mnif, Mohamed

    2015-04-15

    We study a robust maximization problem from terminal wealth and consumption under a convex constraints on the portfolio. We state the existence and the uniqueness of the consumption–investment strategy by studying the associated quadratic backward stochastic differential equation. We characterize the optimal control by using the duality method and deriving a dynamic maximum principle.

  15. On strongly GA-convex functions and stochastic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Bekar, Nurgül Okur; Akdemir, Hande Günay; İşcan, İmdat

    2014-08-20

    In this study, we introduce strongly GA-convex functions and stochastic processes. We provide related well-known Kuhn type results and Hermite-Hadamard type inequality for strongly GA-convex functions and stochastic processes.

  16. Diffusion of adatoms on face-centered cubic transition metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, L.

    1994-05-10

    Mechanisms and associated energetics for adatom diffusion on the (100) and (110) surfaces of Ni, Cu, Rh, Pd, and Ag are investigated. Self-diffusion was studied on (100) and (I 10) surfaces of Ni, Cu, Pd and Ag using corrected effective medium method (CEM) and approximation to CEM used for molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo studies (MD/MC-CEM). Self-diffusion on Pd(100), Ag(100), Ni(110), Cu(110), Pd(110), and Ag(110) is accomplished by classical diffusion: the adatom hops from its equilibrium adsorption site over an intervening bridge site to an adjacent equilibrium site. Self-diffusion on Ni(100) and Cu(100) proceeds by atomic-exchange diffusion: the adatom on the surface displaces an atom in the first surface layer. Aside from explicit inclusion of the kinetic-exchange-correlation energy, it is critical to include enough movable atoms in the calculation to insure correct energetics. Distortions induced by these diffusion mechanisms, especially atomic exchange, are long ranged in surface plane, owing to small distortions of many atoms being energetically favored over large distortions of few atoms. Energetics and rates of heterogeneous adatom diffusion on the (100) surfaces of Ni, Cu, Rh, Pd, and Ag show that the final state energies differ due to variation of metallic bonding with coordination for different types of metal atoms. The surface energies of the 2 metals can be used to correlate the amount of energy gained or released when the adatom displaces a surface atom. This difference in energetic stability of final configurations determines whether bridge hopping diffusion or atomic displacement is the dominant kinetic process in these heterogeneous systems.

  17. Fourth class of convex equilateral polyhedron with polyhedral symmetry related to fullerenes and viruses.

    PubMed

    Schein, Stan; Gayed, James Maurice

    2014-02-25

    The three known classes of convex polyhedron with equal edge lengths and polyhedral symmetry--tetrahedral, octahedral, and icosahedral--are the 5 Platonic polyhedra, the 13 Archimedean polyhedra--including the truncated icosahedron or soccer ball--and the 2 rhombic polyhedra reported by Johannes Kepler in 1611. (Some carbon fullerenes, inorganic cages, icosahedral viruses, geodesic structures, and protein complexes resemble these fundamental shapes.) Here we add a fourth class, "Goldberg polyhedra," which are also convex and equilateral. We begin by decorating each of the triangular facets of a tetrahedron, an octahedron, or an icosahedron with the T vertices and connecting edges of a "Goldberg triangle." We obtain the unique set of internal angles in each planar face of each polyhedron by solving a system of n equations and n variables, where the equations set the dihedral angle discrepancy about different types of edge to zero, and the variables are a subset of the internal angles in 6gons. Like the faces in Kepler's rhombic polyhedra, the 6gon faces in Goldberg polyhedra are equilateral and planar but not equiangular. We show that there is just a single tetrahedral Goldberg polyhedron, a single octahedral one, and a systematic, countable infinity of icosahedral ones, one for each Goldberg triangle. Unlike carbon fullerenes and faceted viruses, the icosahedral Goldberg polyhedra are nearly spherical. The reasoning and techniques presented here will enable discovery of still more classes of convex equilateral polyhedra with polyhedral symmetry.

  18. Convex quadratic optimization on artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, I.; Verma, S.

    1994-12-31

    We present continuous-valued Hopfield recurrent neural networks on which we map convex quadratic optimization problems. We consider two different convex quadratic programs, each of which is mapped to a different neural network. Activation functions are shown to play a key role in the mapping under each model. The class of activation functions which can be used in this mapping is characterized in terms of the properties needed. It is shown that the first derivatives of penalty as well as barrier functions belong to this class. The trajectories of dynamics under the first model are shown to be closely related to affine-scaling trajectories of interior-point methods. On the other hand, the trajectories of dynamics under the second model correspond to projected steepest descent pathways.

  19. Solving ptychography with a convex relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Richard Y; Ou, Xiaoze; Ames, Brendan; Tropp, Joel A; Yang, Changhuei

    2015-01-01

    Ptychography is a powerful computational imaging technique that transforms a collection of low-resolution images into a high-resolution sample reconstruction. Unfortunately, algorithms that currently solve this reconstruction problem lack stability, robustness, and theoretical guarantees. Recently, convex optimization algorithms have improved the accuracy and reliability of several related reconstruction efforts. This paper proposes a convex formulation of the ptychography problem. This formulation has no local minima, it can be solved using a wide range of algorithms, it can incorporate appropriate noise models, and it can include multiple a priori constraints. The paper considers a specific algorithm, based on low-rank factorization, whose runtime and memory usage are near-linear in the size of the output image. Experiments demonstrate that this approach offers a 25% lower background variance on average than alternating projections, the ptychographic reconstruction algorithm that is currently in widespread use. PMID:26146480

  20. Rapid Generation of Optimal Asteroid Powered Descent Trajectories Via Convex Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinson, Robin; Lu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates a convex optimization based method that can rapidly generate the fuel optimal asteroid powered descent trajectory. The ultimate goal is to autonomously design the optimal powered descent trajectory on-board the spacecraft immediately prior to the descent burn. Compared to a planetary powered landing problem, the major difficulty is the complex gravity field near the surface of an asteroid that cannot be approximated by a constant gravity field. This paper uses relaxation techniques and a successive solution process that seeks the solution to the original nonlinear, nonconvex problem through the solutions to a sequence of convex optimal control problems.

  1. Hardy Uncertainty Principle, Convexity and Parabolic Evolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escauriaza, L.; Kenig, C. E.; Ponce, G.; Vega, L.

    2016-09-01

    We give a new proof of the L 2 version of Hardy's uncertainty principle based on calculus and on its dynamical version for the heat equation. The reasonings rely on new log-convexity properties and the derivation of optimal Gaussian decay bounds for solutions to the heat equation with Gaussian decay at a future time.We extend the result to heat equations with lower order variable coefficient.

  2. Manufacturing and testing of a convex aspherical mirror for ASSIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ter Horst, Rik; Stuik, Remko

    2012-09-01

    ASSIST is the testbed for the ESO Adaptive Optics Facility. The main objective of ASSIST is the characterization of the 1.2 meter deformable mirror which will replace the existing secondary of one of the 8 meter VLT telescopes. A large concave 1.65 meter diameter aspherical primary mirror combined with a 140 mm diameter convex aspherical secondary forms the main optical system of ASSIST. Two additional optical units provide the light sources and the wave front analyzing optics. Without having the possibility for checking the entire optical system as a whole, each individual mirror had to be manufactured and tested using reliable techniques. The secondary mirror for ASSIST (AM2) is made of an optically transparent material (BK7) with a specific and accurate backside radius in order to achieve a null test in transmission. Furthermore, not only the overall RMS surface error of AM2 is important, but due to the fact that it will be used in a setup that measures specific spatial frequencies, also the spatial frequencies of the surface error of AM2 is important. The aspherical surface is tested in double pass using an optical flat and an interferometer with a transmission sphere. Manufacturing of this asphere is mainly done by hand at the optical lab of NOVA-ASTRON. The final accuracy of the reflecting surface is within the required 50 nm RMS with a surface roughness of less than 2 nm RMS. This paper reports in more detail on manufacturing and testing of the a-spherical convex mirror.

  3. Generalized vector calculus on convex domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Om P.; Xu, Yufeng

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we apply recently proposed generalized integral and differential operators to develop generalized vector calculus and generalized variational calculus for problems defined over a convex domain. In particular, we present some generalization of Green's and Gauss divergence theorems involving some new operators, and apply these theorems to generalized variational calculus. For fractional power kernels, the formulation leads to fractional vector calculus and fractional variational calculus for problems defined over a convex domain. In special cases, when certain parameters take integer values, we obtain formulations for integer order problems. Two examples are presented to demonstrate applications of the generalized variational calculus which utilize the generalized vector calculus developed in the paper. The first example leads to a generalized partial differential equation and the second example leads to a generalized eigenvalue problem, both in two dimensional convex domains. We solve the generalized partial differential equation by using polynomial approximation. A special case of the second example is a generalized isoperimetric problem. We find an approximate solution to this problem. Many physical problems containing integer order integrals and derivatives are defined over arbitrary domains. We speculate that future problems containing fractional and generalized integrals and derivatives in fractional mechanics will be defined over arbitrary domains, and therefore, a general variational calculus incorporating a general vector calculus will be needed for these problems. This research is our first attempt in that direction.

  4. Convex relaxations for gas expansion planning

    SciTech Connect

    Borraz-Sanchez, Conrado; Bent, Russell Whitford; Backhaus, Scott N.; Hijazi, Hassan; Van Hentenryck, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Expansion of natural gas networks is a critical process involving substantial capital expenditures with complex decision-support requirements. Here, given the non-convex nature of gas transmission constraints, global optimality and infeasibility guarantees can only be offered by global optimisation approaches. Unfortunately, state-of-the-art global optimisation solvers are unable to scale up to real-world size instances. In this study, we present a convex mixed-integer second-order cone relaxation for the gas expansion planning problem under steady-state conditions. The underlying model offers tight lower bounds with high computational efficiency. In addition, the optimal solution of the relaxation can often be used to derive high-quality solutions to the original problem, leading to provably tight optimality gaps and, in some cases, global optimal solutions. The convex relaxation is based on a few key ideas, including the introduction of flux direction variables, exact McCormick relaxations, on/off constraints, and integer cuts. Numerical experiments are conducted on the traditional Belgian gas network, as well as other real larger networks. The results demonstrate both the accuracy and computational speed of the relaxation and its ability to produce high-quality solution

  5. Convex relaxations for gas expansion planning

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Borraz-Sanchez, Conrado; Bent, Russell Whitford; Backhaus, Scott N.; Hijazi, Hassan; Van Hentenryck, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Expansion of natural gas networks is a critical process involving substantial capital expenditures with complex decision-support requirements. Here, given the non-convex nature of gas transmission constraints, global optimality and infeasibility guarantees can only be offered by global optimisation approaches. Unfortunately, state-of-the-art global optimisation solvers are unable to scale up to real-world size instances. In this study, we present a convex mixed-integer second-order cone relaxation for the gas expansion planning problem under steady-state conditions. The underlying model offers tight lower bounds with high computational efficiency. In addition, the optimal solution of the relaxation can often be used to derive high-quality solutionsmore » to the original problem, leading to provably tight optimality gaps and, in some cases, global optimal solutions. The convex relaxation is based on a few key ideas, including the introduction of flux direction variables, exact McCormick relaxations, on/off constraints, and integer cuts. Numerical experiments are conducted on the traditional Belgian gas network, as well as other real larger networks. The results demonstrate both the accuracy and computational speed of the relaxation and its ability to produce high-quality solution« less

  6. Primary Breakup in Turbulent Liquid Films on Downward-Facing Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Shellabarger, B.T.; Durbin, S.G.; Yoda, M.; Abdel Khalik, S.I.; Sadowski, D.L.

    2004-12-15

    A number of thin liquid protection schemes involving a sacrificial thin liquid layer have been proposed to protect the first walls of inertial fusion energy reactor chambers from excessive radiation and energetic ion damage. The Prometheus study used a tangentially injected high-speed film of molten lead attached to the first wall to protect the upper endcap of the chamber reactor. Minimizing droplet formation and detachment from this film to avoid interference with beam propagation is a major design issue for such flows.Experiments were conducted on turbulent films of water injected tangentially with a rectangular nozzle into ambient air onto the underside of a horizontal flat plate. Previous efforts were focused on the effect of various design and operational parameters on the film detachment distance. This study focuses on measurement of the ''hydrodynamic source term,'' i.e., the rate of droplet formation due to primary turbulent breakup at the film surface. Droplet mass flux was measured using a simple collection technique at various standoff distances measured with respect to the plate surface and downstream distances measured from the nozzle exit. The data show that the ejected droplet mass flux increases as the standoff distance decreases and as both downstream distance and Weber number increase. Comparisons of the experimental data on the estimated ejected droplet mass flux with previously published correlations suggest that the correlations overpredict the ejected droplet mass flux by more than three orders of magnitude.

  7. Chemisorption on the (111) and (100) faces of platinum-tin bimetallic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panja, Chameli

    2000-10-01

    Chemisorption and reaction of CH3OH (methanol), C2H 5OH (ethanol), and H2O (water) on Pt(111) and Sn/Pt(111) alloys, and CO (carbon monoxide), NO (nitric oxide), and C2D 2 (acetylene) on Pt(100) and Sn/Pt(100) have been studied under ultrahigh vacuum conditions using temperature programmed desorption (TPD), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), low energy electron diffraction (LEED), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS). Small organic molecules like CH3OH and C2H5OH are potential fuels for low-temperature hydrocarbon fuel cells and it is important to understand the role of tin as a promoter in electrooxidation of these molecules. Also, the catalytic reactions of CO, NO and C2H2 are of considerable interest for improving of automotive exhaust-gas catalytic converters and other heterogeneous catalysts. Ordered Pt-Sn alloys can be prepared by vapor deposition of Sn on Pt surfaces. A (2 x 2) structure (theta Sn = 0.25) and a (√3x√/3)R30° structure are formed on Pt(111), and a c(2 x 2) and (3√2x√2)R45° structures with theta Sn = 0.5 and 0.67, respectively, are formed on Pt(100). CH3OH, C2H5OH and H2O are all weakly bound and reversibly adsorbed on Pt(111) and both of the Sn/Pt(111) alloys under UHV conditions. Alloying Sn into the Pt(111) surface weakens the adsorption of these molecules from that on Pt(111) and leads to a lower reactivity as the surface concentration of Sn increases. TPD measurements reveal a reduction in the saturation coverage and chemisorption bond energy for CO, NO and C2HL chemisorption, on the two Sn/Pt(100)alloys compared to that on Pt(100). CO chemisorption is completely reversible on these two Sn/Pt(100) alloys. However, NO is partially reduced to form N2O on these alloys, so that N2O along with NO and O2 desorption was observed. We propose that dinitrosyl species, i.e., two NO molecules bound to one Pt atom, are intermediates in N2O formation from adsorbed NO on these Sn

  8. Application of the MOS-C-V technique to determine impurity concentrations and surface parameters on the diffused face of silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of using the MOS C-V technique to obtain information regarding impurity and surface state concentrations on the diffused face of silicon solar cells with Ta2O5 coatings is studied. Results indicate that the MOS C-V technique yields useful information concerning surface parameters which contribute to the high, efficiency limiting, surface recombination velocities on the n+ surface of silicon solar cells.

  9. On the embedding of convex spaces in stratified L-convex spaces.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qiu; Li, Lingqiang

    2016-01-01

    Consider L being a continuous lattice, two functors from the category of convex spaces (denoted by CS) to the category of stratified L-convex spaces (denoted by SL-CS) are defined. The first functor enables us to prove that the category CS can be embedded in the category SL-CS as a reflective subcategory. The second functor enables us to prove that the category CS can be embedded in the category SL-CS as a coreflective subcategory when L satisfying a multiplicative condition. By comparing the two functors and the well known Lowen functor (between topological spaces and stratified L-topological spaces), we exhibit the difference between (stratified L-)topological spaces and (stratified L-)convex spaces. PMID:27652183

  10. Steady-state observations and theoretical modeling of critical heat flux phenomena on a downward facing hemispherical surface

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, F.B.; Haddad, K.H.

    1996-03-01

    Steady-state boiling experiments were performed in the SBLB test facility to observe the two-phase boundary layer flow behavior on the outer surface of a heated hemispherical vessel near the critical heat flux (CHF) limit and to measure the spatial variation of the local CHF along the vessel outer surface. Based upon the flow observations, an advanced hydrodynamic CHF model was developed. The model considers the existence of a micro-layer underneath an elongated vapor slug on the downward facing curved heating surface. The micro-layer is treated as a thin liquid film with numerous micro-vapor jets penetrating through it. The micro-jets have the characteristic size dictated by Helmholtz instability. Local dryout is considered to occur when the supply of fresh liquid from the two phase boundary layer to the micro-layer is not sufficient to prevent depletion of the liquid film by boiling. A boundary layer analysis, treating the two-phase motion as a separated flow, is performed to determine the liquid supply rate and thus the local critical heat flux. The model provides a clear physical explanation for the spatial variation of the CHF observed in the SBLB experiments and for the weak dependence of the CHF data on the physical size of the vessel.

  11. Effect of subcooling and wall thickness on pool boiling from downward-facing curved surfaces in water

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, M.S.; Glebov, A.G.

    1995-09-01

    Quenching experiments were performed to investigate the effects of water subcooling and wall thickness on pool boiling from a downward-facing curved surface. Experiments used three copper sections of the same diameter (50.8 mm) and surface radius (148 mm), but different thickness (12.8, 20 and 30 mm). Local and average pool boiling curves were obtained at saturation and 5 K, 10 K, and 14 K subcooling. Water subcooling increased the maximum heat flux, but decreased the corresponding wall superheat. The minimum film boiling heat flux and the corresponding wall superheat, however, increased with increased subcooling. The maximum and minimum film boiling heat fluxes were independent of wall thickness above 20 mm and Biot Number > 0.8, indicating that boiling curves for the 20 and 30 thick sections were representative of quasi steady-state, but not those for the 12.8 mm thick section. When compared with that for a flat surface section of the same thickness, the data for the 12.8 mm thick section showed significant increases in both the maximum heat flux (from 0.21 to 0.41 MW/m{sup 2}) and the minimum film boiling heat flux (from 2 to 13 kW/m{sup 2}) and about 11.5 K and 60 K increase in the corresponding wall superheats, respectively.

  12. Focused Weathering Control of Convex Waterfalls Along the Niobrara River in Cherry and Brown Counties, Nebraska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, L. J.; Pederson, D. T.; Goble, R. J.

    2004-12-01

    More than 200 waterfalls exist along the southern spring branch tributaries that feed an approximately twenty-five mile section of the Niobrara River, east of Valentine, Nebraska. Many of these waterfalls posses a convex shape in the horizontal plane and are buttressed. This morphology is controlled by focused, season-specific weathering along the escarpments adjacent to the waterfall face and a lack of stream erosion on the actual waterfall face. The waterfalls are composed of the Rosebud Formation, a poorly indurated siltstone that should be easily eroded by stream flow. The spring creeks are ineffective at significantly eroding the waterfall face mainly due to their relatively low discharge, three to five cubic feet per second, and low sediment load. The erosive power of the streams is further reduced at the site of the waterfall by the buttressed shape spreading the flow into a thin sheet. The buttressed shape of the waterfall develops in response to stress relief. The only areas of the waterfall face showing stream erosion and lack of diatom cover is where free falling water is impacting the waterfall face. Large, loose talus slopes at the base of the waterfall escarpments further support that the weathering processes operate at a faster rate than stream erosion. Observable groundwater seepage from the escarpments on either side of the waterfalls exposes the faces to season-specific weathering processes. The moisture content of the escarpments varies with exposure to sunlight and changes in air temperature. Cyclic differential expansion and contraction of clays and minerals as well as precipitation and hydration of salts operate on a daily and seasonal basis. These repeated stresses give the escarpments a flaky, shingle like appearance and can cause rapid deterioration of the escarpment. During the winter, the seeping groundwater and waterfall spray form large ice flows on either side of the waterfall face. Freeze-thaw processes operate on a seasonal and

  13. Fundamental mechanisms of deuterium retention in lithiated graphite plasma facing surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Chase N.

    at a deuterium fluence of ˜ 2.9×10 17 cm-2. This implies that the NSTX deuterium flux of 1017 - 1018 cm-2 s-1 saturates the typical 10-100 nm lithium evaporations after a single plasma discharge. Atomistic simulations synergistically corroborate the above experimental findings. Experiments show significant influence of oxygen in retaining deuterium. Density functional theory simulations were updated to include oxygen and lithium in a carbon matrix at concentrations observed in experiments (˜20%). Results show that deuterium preferentially chooses to be near and bind with oxygen. Later experiments demonstrate the role of oxygen in retaining deuterium, but also show that lithium is required to attract sucient quantities of oxygen to the surface and to retain the oxygen. This dissertation conclusively demonstrates that the mechanism by which deuterium is retained in lithiated graphite is through a lithium-catalyzed oxygen-deuterium bond..

  14. CVXPY: A Python-Embedded Modeling Language for Convex Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, Steven; Boyd, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    CVXPY is a domain-specific language for convex optimization embedded in Python. It allows the user to express convex optimization problems in a natural syntax that follows the math, rather than in the restrictive standard form required by solvers. CVXPY makes it easy to combine convex optimization with high-level features of Python such as parallelism and object-oriented design. CVXPY is available at http://www.cvxpy.org/ under the GPL license, along with documentation and examples. PMID:27375369

  15. Material ejection and surface morphology changes during transient heat loading of tungsten as plasma-facing component in fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suslova, A.; El-Atwani, O.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the effect of edge-localized mode like transient heat events on pristine samples for two different grades of deformed tungsten with ultrafine and nanocrystalline grains as potential candidates for plasma-facing components. Pulses from a laser beam with durations ∼1 ms and operating in the near infrared wavelength were used for simulating transient heat loading in fusion devices. We specifically focused on investigating and analysis of different mechanisms for material removal from the sample surface under repetitive transient heat loads. Several techniques were applied for analysing different mechanisms leading to material removal from the W surface under repetitive transient heat loads which include witness plates for collected ejected material, and subsequent analysis using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, visible imaging using fast-gated camera, and evaluating thermal emission from the particles using optical emission spectroscopy. Our results show a significantly improved performance of polycrystalline cold-rolled tungsten compared to tungsten produced using an orthogonal machining process under repetitive transient loads for a wide range of the power densities.

  16. A study of hydrogenic retention in a tokamak with reactor-like plasma-facing surfaces; Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipschultz, Bruce

    2008-11-01

    Tritium retention is an important safety concern for ITER; Operation for 1000 discharges without a major stoppage will require the fraction of ion fluence to Plasma Facing Components (PFCs) that is retained, R, to be < 0.001%. One year operation of a reactor, where tungsten (W) PFCs are envisioned, requires R to be 100x smaller! Co-deposition of H with carbon projects to unacceptably high T retention in ITER. We present the results of the first in-depth study of fuel retention for high-Z PFCs with ITER divertor ne, Te, particle and heat fluxes. We utilize molybdenum (Mo, with a small fraction of W), which is very similar to tungsten in terms of hydrogenic retention. The retention observed in a series of disruption-free C-Mod discharges is high, R˜1%, 1000x than expected from inherent Mo properties. These retention characteristics are exhibited regardless if the Mo surfaces are bare or partially covered by B films; D co-deposition with B is not contributing significantly to retention. Retention appears linear in fluence up to the limit of the discharge sequence, ˜20s, approaching one ITER discharge. Comparison of He- and D-fueled discharges gives support to a model of retention site creation in the lattice (`traps') due to D neutral buildup and accompanying lattice distortion driven by recombination-limited release (D->D2) from the front surface. Disruptions can be used to rapidly heat surfaces, releasing the H/D for recovery, potentially applicable to ITER. Naturally-occurring disruptions appear to balance single-discharge retention reducing the campaign-integrated retention by at least 100. Comparisons to laboratory-based retention studies indicate that the tokamak environment leads to additional enhancements of retention. This work is supported by U.S. Dept. of Energy Coop. Agreement DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  17. Natural-scene statistics predict how the figure-ground cue of convexity affects human depth perception.

    PubMed

    Burge, Johannes; Fowlkes, Charless C; Banks, Martin S

    2010-05-26

    The shape of the contour separating two regions strongly influences judgments of which region is "figure" and which is "ground." Convexity and other figure-ground cues are generally assumed to indicate only which region is nearer, but nothing about how much the regions are separated in depth. To determine the depth information conveyed by convexity, we examined natural scenes and found that depth steps across surfaces with convex silhouettes are likely to be larger than steps across surfaces with concave silhouettes. In a psychophysical experiment, we found that humans exploit this correlation. For a given binocular disparity, observers perceived more depth when the near surface's silhouette was convex rather than concave. We estimated the depth distributions observers used in making those judgments: they were similar to the natural-scene distributions. Our findings show that convexity should be reclassified as a metric depth cue. They also suggest that the dichotomy between metric and nonmetric depth cues is false and that the depth information provided many cues should be evaluated with respect to natural-scene statistics. Finally, the findings provide an explanation for why figure-ground cues modulate the responses of disparity-sensitive cells in visual cortex.

  18. Study on the method to test large-aperture hyperboloid convex mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiaohui; Dong, Huiwen; Guo, Wen; Wang, Huijun

    2014-08-01

    There are numerous reflecting optical system designs that call for large-aperture convex surfaces, such as secondary mirror in on-axis three mirror anastigmatic (TMA). Several methods to test high accuracy hyperboloid convex surfaces are introduced separately in this paper. A kind of arrangement is chosen to test a surface with diameter of 420mm, radius of 1371mm, and conic K -2.1229. The CGH compensator for testing is designed, which is made up of illumination lens and hologram test plate with designed residual wavefront aberration less than 0.001λ (RMS). The second transmitted method that is equipped with a technical flat surface coating by Ag film in the bottom of surface mirror under test, which form an auto-collimation optical system to eliminate the aberration. The Hindle-Simpson test that requires a larger meniscus lens to compensate the optical aberration, and the designed result of optical test system is less than 0.0016λ. Contrasting the CGH compensator and the second transmitted method, the Hindle-Simpson testing method has the advantage of it is easily to manufacture and adjust; meanwhile the test result is stable and has been less affected by the environment. It has been found that the method is rational and reliable, and it can fulfill the requirement of manufacturing and testing process for hyperboloid convex mirrors.

  19. Infants' Perception of Information along Object Boundaries: Concavities versus Convexities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatt, Ramesh S.; Hayden, Angela; Reed, Andrea; Bertin, Evelin; Joseph, Jane

    2006-01-01

    Object parts are signaled by concave discontinuities in shape contours. In seven experiments, we examined whether 5- and 6 1/2-month-olds are sensitive to concavities as special aspects of contours. Infants of both ages detected discrepant concave elements amid convex distractors but failed to discriminate convex elements among concave…

  20. On some interpolation properties in locally convex spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Pater, Flavius

    2015-03-10

    The aim of this paper is to introduce the notion of interpolation between locally convex spaces, the real method, and to present some elementary results in this setting. This represents a generalization from the Banach spaces framework to the locally convex spaces sequentially complete one, where the operators acting on them are locally bounded.

  1. Active Batch Selection via Convex Relaxations with Guaranteed Solution Bounds.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Shayok; Balasubramanian, Vineeth; Sun, Qian; Panchanathan, Sethuraman; Ye, Jieping

    2015-10-01

    Active learning techniques have gained popularity to reduce human effort in labeling data instances for inducing a classifier. When faced with large amounts of unlabeled data, such algorithms automatically identify the exemplar instances for manual annotation. More recently, there have been attempts towards a batch mode form of active learning, where a batch of data points is simultaneously selected from an unlabeled set. In this paper, we propose two novel batch mode active learning (BMAL) algorithms: BatchRank and BatchRand. We first formulate the batch selection task as an NP-hard optimization problem; we then propose two convex relaxations, one based on linear programming and the other based on semi-definite programming to solve the batch selection problem. Finally, a deterministic bound is derived on the solution quality for the first relaxation and a probabilistic bound for the second. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first research effort to derive mathematical guarantees on the solution quality of the BMAL problem. Our extensive empirical studies on 15 binary, multi-class and multi-label challenging datasets corroborate that the proposed algorithms perform at par with the state-of-the-art techniques, deliver high quality solutions and are robust to real-world issues like label noise and class imbalance.

  2. Convex Lower Bounds for Free Energy Minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, Jonathan

    We construct lower bounds on free energy with convex relaxations from the nonlinear minimization over probabilities to linear programs over expectation values. Finite-temperature expectation values are further resolved into distributions over energy. A superset of valid expectation values is delineated by an incomplete set of linear constraints. Free energy bounds can be improved systematically by adding constraints, which also increases their computational cost. We compute several free energy bounds of increasing accuracy for the triangular-lattice Ising model to assess the utility of this method. This work was supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Imaging spectrometer/camera having convex grating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reininger, Francis M. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An imaging spectrometer has fore-optics coupled to a spectral resolving system with an entrance slit extending in a first direction at an imaging location of the fore-optics for receiving the image, a convex diffraction grating for separating the image into a plurality of spectra of predetermined wavelength ranges; a spectrometer array for detecting the spectra; and at least one concave sperical mirror concentric with the diffraction grating for relaying the image from the entrance slit to the diffraction grating and from the diffraction grating to the spectrometer array. In one embodiment, the spectrometer is configured in a lateral mode in which the entrance slit and the spectrometer array are displaced laterally on opposite sides of the diffraction grating in a second direction substantially perpendicular to the first direction. In another embodiment, the spectrometer is combined with a polychromatic imaging camera array disposed adjacent said entrance slit for recording said image.

  4. Fabrication of ф 160 mm convex hyperbolic mirror for remote sensing instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Ching-Hsiang; Yu, Zong-Ru; Ho, Cheng-Fang; Hsu, Wei-Yao; Chen, Fong-Zhi

    2012-10-01

    In this study, efficient polishing processes with inspection procedures for a large convex hyperbolic mirror of Cassegrain optical system are presented. The polishing process combines the techniques of conventional lapping and CNC polishing. We apply the conventional spherical lapping process to quickly remove the sub-surface damage (SSD) layer caused by grinding process and to get the accurate radius of best-fit sphere (BFS) of aspheric surface with fine surface texture simultaneously. Thus the removed material for aspherization process can be minimized and the polishing time for SSD removal can also be reduced substantially. The inspection procedure was carried out by using phase shift interferometer with CGH and stitching technique. To acquire the real surface form error of each sub aperture, the wavefront errors of the reference flat and CGH flat due to gravity effect of the vertical setup are calibrated in advance. Subsequently, we stitch 10 calibrated sub-aperture surface form errors to establish the whole irregularity of the mirror in 160 mm diameter for correction polishing. The final result of the In this study, efficient polishing processes with inspection procedures for a large convex hyperbolic mirror of Cassegrain optical system are presented. The polishing process combines the techniques of conventional lapping and CNC polishing. We apply the conventional spherical lapping process to quickly remove the sub-surface damage (SSD) layer caused by grinding process and to get the accurate radius of best-fit sphere (BFS) of aspheric surface with fine surface texture simultaneously. Thus the removed material for aspherization process can be minimized and the polishing time for SSD removal can also be reduced substantially. The inspection procedure was carried out by using phase shift interferometer with CGH and stitching technique. To acquire the real surface form error of each sub aperture, the wavefront errors of the reference flat and CGH flat due to

  5. CPU timing routines for a CONVEX C220 computer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bynum, Mary Ann

    1989-01-01

    The timing routines available on the CONVEX C220 computer system in the Structural Mechanics Division (SMD) at NASA Langley Research Center are examined. The function of the timing routines, the use of the timing routines in sequential, parallel, and vector code, and the interpretation of the results from the timing routines with respect to the CONVEX model of computing are described. The timing routines available on the SMD CONVEX fall into two groups. The first group includes standard timing routines generally available with UNIX 4.3 BSD operating systems, while the second group includes routines unique to the SMD CONVEX. The standard timing routines described in this report are /bin/csh time,/bin/time, etime, and ctime. The routines unique to the SMD CONVEX are getinfo, second, cputime, toc, and a parallel profiling package made up of palprof, palinit, and palsum.

  6. In-situ erosion and deposition measurements of plasma-facing surfaces in Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, Harold S.

    2014-10-01

    The Accelerator Based In-situ Materials Surveillance (AIMS) diagnostic was recently developed to demonstrate the novel application of ion beam analysis (IBA) to in-vessel studies of plasma materials interactions in Alcator C-Mod. The AIMS diagnostic injects a 900 keV deuterium ion beam into the tokamak's vacuum vessel between plasma discharges while magnetic fields are used to steer the ion beam to plasma facing component (PFC) surfaces. Spectroscopic analysis of neutrons and gamma rays from the induced nuclear reactions provides a quantitative, spatially resolved map of the PFC surface composition that includes boron (B) and deuterium (D) content. Since AIMS is sensitive to low-Z elements and C-Mod regularly boronizes PFCs, the evolution of B and D on PFCs can be used to directly study erosion, deposition, and fuel retention in response to plasma operations and wall conditioning processes. AIMS analysis of 18 lower single null I-mode discharges show a net boron deposition rate of 6 +/- 2 nm/s on the inner wall while subsequent inner wall limited discharges and a disruption did not show significant changes in B. Measurements of D content showed relative changes of >2.5 following a similar trend. This suggests high D retention rates and net B deposition rates of ~18 cm/year of plasma exposure are possible and depend strongly on the plasma conditions. Ex-situ IBA was also performed on the same PFCs after removal from C-Mod, successfully validating the AIMS technique. These IBA measurements also show that the B content on the inner wall varied toroidally and poloidally from 0 to 3000 nm, demonstrating the importance of the spatial resolution provided by AIMS and the sensitivity of PFCs to B-field alignment. AIMS upgrades are underway for operation in 2014 and we anticipate new measurements correlating the evolution of PFC surfaces to plasma configuration, RF heating, and current drive scenarios. This work is supported by U.S. DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-94ER54235 and

  7. From concave to convex: capillary bridges in slit pore geometry.

    PubMed

    Broesch, David J; Frechette, Joelle

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the morphological evolution of nonaxisymmetric capillary bridges in slit-pore geometry as the height of the pore and aspect ratio of the bridge are varied. The liquid bridges are formed between two hydrophobic surfaces patterned with hydrophilic strips. The aspect ratio of the capillary bridges (length/width) is varied from 2.5 to 120 by changing the separation between the surfaces, the width of the strips, or the fluid volume. As the bridge height is increased, the aspect ratio decreases and we observe a large increase in the mean curvature of the bridge. More specifically, the following counterintuitive result is observed: the mean curvature of the bridges changes sign and goes from negative (concave bridge) to positive (convex bridge) when the height is increased at constant volume. These experimental observations are in quantitative agreement with Surface Evolver simulations. Scaling shows a collapse of the data indicating that this transition in the sign of the Laplace pressure is universal for capillary bridges with high aspect ratios. Finally, we show that the morphology diagrams obtained from our 3D analysis are considerably different from those expected from a 2D analysis.

  8. From concave to convex: capillary bridges in slit pore geometry.

    PubMed

    Broesch, David J; Frechette, Joelle

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the morphological evolution of nonaxisymmetric capillary bridges in slit-pore geometry as the height of the pore and aspect ratio of the bridge are varied. The liquid bridges are formed between two hydrophobic surfaces patterned with hydrophilic strips. The aspect ratio of the capillary bridges (length/width) is varied from 2.5 to 120 by changing the separation between the surfaces, the width of the strips, or the fluid volume. As the bridge height is increased, the aspect ratio decreases and we observe a large increase in the mean curvature of the bridge. More specifically, the following counterintuitive result is observed: the mean curvature of the bridges changes sign and goes from negative (concave bridge) to positive (convex bridge) when the height is increased at constant volume. These experimental observations are in quantitative agreement with Surface Evolver simulations. Scaling shows a collapse of the data indicating that this transition in the sign of the Laplace pressure is universal for capillary bridges with high aspect ratios. Finally, we show that the morphology diagrams obtained from our 3D analysis are considerably different from those expected from a 2D analysis. PMID:23061424

  9. A scalable projective scaling algorithm for l(p) loss with convex penalizations.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongbo; Cheng, Qiang

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents an accurate, efficient, and scalable algorithm for minimizing a special family of convex functions, which have a lp loss function as an additive component. For this problem, well-known learning algorithms often have well-established results on accuracy and efficiency, but there exists rarely any report on explicit linear scalability with respect to the problem size. The proposed approach starts with developing a second-order learning procedure with iterative descent for general convex penalization functions, and then builds efficient algorithms for a restricted family of functions, which satisfy the Karmarkar's projective scaling condition. Under this condition, a light weight, scalable message passing algorithm (MPA) is further developed by constructing a series of simpler equivalent problems. The proposed MPA is intrinsically scalable because it only involves matrix-vector multiplication and avoids matrix inversion operations. The MPA is proven to be globally convergent for convex formulations; for nonconvex situations, it converges to a stationary point. The accuracy, efficiency, scalability, and applicability of the proposed method are verified through extensive experiments on sparse signal recovery, face image classification, and over-complete dictionary learning problems. PMID:25608289

  10. Insulated face brick

    SciTech Connect

    Cromrich, J.; Cromrich, L.B.

    1990-10-16

    This patent describes a method for forming insulated brick intended solely for use in building walls and having superior insulation qualities and lighter weight consonant with the load bearing capabilities of building bricks and the appearance of facing brick. It comprises dry mixing two parts of vermiculite and one part of brick clay, thereby forming a dry mixture having a vermiculite to clay ratio of approximately two-to-one by volume; adding water to the dry mixture and mixing, so that a substantially dry admixture having expanded vermiculite and brick clay is formed; forming a facing layer solely from brick clay; molding and compressing the substantially dry admixture, so as to form a generally rectangular main body layer having parallel top and bottom faces, a pair of parallel side faces and a pair of parallel end faces, respectively, the top and bottom faces being substantially larger in area than the respective side faces, and the side faces being substantially larger in area than the respective end faces, the body layer further having at least one bore formed therein, the bore running from the top face to the bottom face perpendicularly thereto and substantially parallel to the side surfaces thereof, the bore being substantially centrally disposed and wherein the facing layer is disposed on one of the side surfaces of the body portion; curing the molded admixture having the facing layer disposed thereon; whereby a cured brick is formed; and firing the cured brick and the facing layer disposed thereon, whereby an integral brick is formed having top and bottom faces of the brick which are entirely devoid of facing layers, wherein the brick has the desired load bearing capability substantially between its top and bottom faces, whereby the outer facing layer only provides the desired appearance and weather resistance, and further whereby the weight of the brick is substantially reduced.

  11. Application of orthogonal array technique and particle swarm optimization approach in surface roughness modification when face milling AISI1045 steel parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azadi Moghaddam, Masoud; Kolahan, Farhad

    2016-12-01

    Face milling is an important and common machining operation because of its versatility and capability to produce various surfaces. Face milling is a machining process of removing material by the relative motion between a work piece and rotating cutter with multiple cutting edges. It is an interrupted cutting operation in which the teeth of the milling cutter enter and exit the work piece during each revolution. This paper is concerned with the experimental and numerical study of face milling of AISI1045. The proposed approach is based on statistical analysis on the experimental data gathered using Taguchi design matrix. Surface roughness is the most important performance characteristics of the face milling process. In this study the effect of input face milling process parameters on surface roughness of AISI1045 steel milled parts have been studied. The input parameters are cutting speed ( v), feed rate ( f z ) and depth of cut ( a p ). The experimental data are gathered using Taguchi L9 design matrix. In order to establish the relations between the input and the output parameters, various regression functions have been fitted on the data based on output characteristics. The significance of the process parameters on the quality characteristics of the process was also evaluated quantitatively using the analysis of variance method. Then, statistical analysis and validation experiments have been carried out to compare and select the best and most fitted models. In the last section of this research, mathematical model has been developed for surface roughness prediction using particle swarm optimization (PSO) on the basis of experimental results. The model developed for optimization has been validated by confirmation experiments. It has been found that the predicted roughness using PSO is in good agreement with the actual surface roughness.

  12. General and mechanistic optimal relationships for tensile strength of doubly convex tablets under diametrical compression.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Sonia M; Gonzalez, Marcial; Cuitiño, Alberto M

    2015-04-30

    We propose a general framework for determining optimal relationships for tensile strength of doubly convex tablets under diametrical compression. This approach is based on the observation that tensile strength is directly proportional to the breaking force and inversely proportional to a non-linear function of geometric parameters and materials properties. This generalization reduces to the analytical expression commonly used for flat faced tablets, i.e., Hertz solution, and to the empirical relationship currently used in the pharmaceutical industry for convex-faced tablets, i.e., Pitt's equation. Under proper parametrization, optimal tensile strength relationship can be determined from experimental results by minimizing a figure of merit of choice. This optimization is performed under the first-order approximation that a flat faced tablet and a doubly curved tablet have the same tensile strength if they have the same relative density and are made of the same powder, under equivalent manufacturing conditions. Furthermore, we provide a set of recommendations and best practices for assessing the performance of optimal tensile strength relationships in general. Based on these guidelines, we identify two new models, namely the general and mechanistic models, which are effective and predictive alternatives to the tensile strength relationship currently used in the pharmaceutical industry.

  13. Application of Analytical Model of the Electric Potential Distribution for Calculation of Charged Particle Dynamics in a Near-Wall Layer and Sputtering of the Plasma Facing Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodkina, I. E.; Komm, M.; Tsvetkov, I. V.

    2015-08-01

    Simple analytical formulas are derived for calculation of the electric field potential distribution in the magnetic pre-layer and the Debye layer near the plasma facing surfaces. It is shown that the calculated potential profiles are in good agreement with the dependences of the potential distribution on the magnetic field inclination obtained by solving the magnetic hydrodynamic (MHD) equations and modeling using the PIC code SPICE2. Dependences of the angular distribution of ions incident on the surface of plasma facing elements on the magnetic field inclination are obtained. Results of calculations demonstrate that the surface areas, on which the magnetic field is incident at sliding angles, are critical from the viewpoint of the increase of sputtering.

  14. Application of the MOS C-V technique to determine impurity concentrations and surface parameters on the diffused face of silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of the feasibility of using the MOS C-V (capacitance-voltage) technique to determine impurity and surface state concentrations on the diffused face of Si solar cells with Ta2O5 coatings. Impurity concentration 10 A from the diffused surface is found to be 2.9 times 10 to the 20th power per cu cm. Charge density in surface and oxide states is 2.1 times 10 to the 13th power per sq cm. These data agree with theoretical predictions.-

  15. Faceted Gold Nanorods: Nanocuboids, Convex Nanocuboids, and Concave Nanocuboids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingfeng; Zhou, Yadong; Villarreal, Esteban; Lin, Ye; Zou, Shengli; Wang, Hui

    2015-06-10

    Au nanorods are optically tunable anisotropic nanoparticles with built-in catalytic activities. The state-of-the-art seed-mediated nanorod synthesis offers excellent control over the aspect ratios of cylindrical Au nanorods, which enables fine-tuning of plasmon resonances over a broad spectral range. However, facet control of Au nanorods with atomic-level precision remains significantly more challenging. The coexistence of various types of low-index and high-index facets on the highly curved nanorod surfaces makes it extremely challenging to quantitatively elucidate the atomic-level structure-property relationships that underpin the catalytic competence of Au nanorods. Here we demonstrate that cylindrical Au nanorods undergo controlled facet evolution during their overgrowth in the presence of Cu(2+) and cationic surfactants, resulting in the formation of anisotropic nanostructures enclosed by well-defined facets, such as low-index faceting nanocuboids and high-index faceting convex nanocuboids and concave nanocuboids. These faceted Au nanorods exhibit enriched optical extinction spectral features, broader plasmonic tuning range, and enhanced catalytic tunability in comparison to the conventional cylindrical Au nanorods. The capabilities to both fine-tailor the facets and fine-tune the plasmon resonances of anisotropic Au nanoparticles open up unique opportunities for us to study, in great detail, the facet-dependent interfacial molecular transformations on Au nanocatalysts using surface-enhanced Raman scattering as a time-resolved spectroscopic tool. PMID:25927399

  16. Convex weighting criteria for speaking rate estimation

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yishan; Berisha, Visar; Tu, Ming; Liss, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Speaking rate estimation directly from the speech waveform is a long-standing problem in speech signal processing. In this paper, we pose the speaking rate estimation problem as that of estimating a temporal density function whose integral over a given interval yields the speaking rate within that interval. In contrast to many existing methods, we avoid the more difficult task of detecting individual phonemes within the speech signal and we avoid heuristics such as thresholding the temporal envelope to estimate the number of vowels. Rather, the proposed method aims to learn an optimal weighting function that can be directly applied to time-frequency features in a speech signal to yield a temporal density function. We propose two convex cost functions for learning the weighting functions and an adaptation strategy to customize the approach to a particular speaker using minimal training. The algorithms are evaluated on the TIMIT corpus, on a dysarthric speech corpus, and on the ICSI Switchboard spontaneous speech corpus. Results show that the proposed methods outperform three competing methods on both healthy and dysarthric speech. In addition, for spontaneous speech rate estimation, the result show a high correlation between the estimated speaking rate and ground truth values. PMID:26167516

  17. Convex Image Orientation from Relative Orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, M.; Heipke, C.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we propose a novel workflow for the estimation of global image orientations given relative orientations between pairs of overlapping images. Our approach is convex and independent on initial values. First, global rotations are estimated in a relaxed semidefinite program (SDP) and refined in an iterative least squares adjustment in the tangent space of SO(3). A critical aspect is the handling of outliers in the relative orientations. We present a novel heuristic graph based approach for filtering the relative rotations that outperforms state-of-the-art robust rotation averaging algorithms. In a second part we make use of point-observations, tracked over a set of overlapping images and formulate a linear homogeneous system of equations to transfer the scale information between triplets of images, using estimated global rotations and relative translation directions. The final step consists of refining the orientation parameters in a robust bundle adjustment. The proposed approach handles outliers in the homologous points and relative orientations in every step of the processing chain. We demonstrate the robustness of the procedure on synthetic data. Moreover, the performance of our approach is illustrated on real world benchmark data.

  18. Effects of different crystal faces on the surface charge of colloidal goethite (α-FeOOH) particles: an experimental and modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaboriaud, Fabien; Ehrhardt, Jean-Jacques

    2003-03-01

    The surface charge of colloidal particles is usually determined by potentiometric titration. These acid-base titrations make it possible to measure the pH of point-of-zero charge (pzc) for oxide minerals. This macroscopic property is the most important parameter used in surface complexation modeling to reproduce experimental data. The pzc values of goethite reported in the literature vary between 7.0 and 9.5. Carbonate adsorption and/or surface morphology are thought to account for this wide range. We demonstrate a procedure for the removal of the carbonate ions that initially adsorb on goethite and strongly affect the titration curves and pzc determination. We also investigated the crystal-face-specific reactivity of two morphologically different goethites. The z-profiles obtained from atomic force microscopy (AFM) images showed that the goethite with the smallest specific surface area ( S = 49 m 2/g, denoted G49) exhibits 70% of the (001) face, whereas this value is only 30% for the goethite with largest specific surface area ( S = 95 m 2/g, denoted G95). This morphologic difference results in slightly different pzc values: 9.0 for G49 goethite and 9.1 for G95 geothite. These experimental pzc values have been correlated with multisite complexation calculations using both the full-site and the 1-pK approaches. We used the full-site approach to consider all of the configurations of hydrogen bond interactions with surface site. The resulting mean charges gave estimated pzc values of 8.9 and 9.2 for the (001) and (101) faces, respectively. Considering these theoretical pzc values for individual faces and the face distributions obtained from AFM analysis, the calculated pzc values are in full agreement with the experimental pzc values. However, this morphologic difference is more expressed in surface charge values than in the pzc values. Indeed, the surface charge of G49 goethite is much higher than that of G95 goethite, and the 1-pK calculations make it possible to

  19. Surface aggregation of urinary proteins and aspartic acid-rich peptides on the faces of calcium oxalate monohydrate investigated by in situ force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, M L; Qiu, S R; Hoyer, J R; Casey, W H; Nancollas, G H; De Yoreo, J J

    2008-05-28

    The growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate in the presence of Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP), osteopontin (OPN), and the 27-residue synthetic peptides (DDDS){sub 6}DDD and (DDDG){sub 6}DDD [where D = aspartic acid and X = S (serine) or G (glycine)] was investigated via in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that these three growth modulators create extensive deposits on the crystal faces. Depending on the modulator and crystal face, these deposits can occur as discrete aggregates, filamentary structures, or uniform coatings. These proteinaceous films can lead to either the inhibition or increase of the step speeds (with respect to the impurity-free system) depending on a range of factors that include peptide or protein concentration, supersaturation and ionic strength. While THP and the linear peptides act, respectively, to exclusively increase and inhibit growth on the (-101) face, both exhibit dual functionality on the (010) face, inhibiting growth at low supersaturation or high modulator concentration and accelerating growth at high supersaturation or low modulator concentration. Based on analyses of growth morphologies and dependencies of step speeds on supersaturation and protein or peptide concentration, we argue for a picture of growth modulation that accounts for the observations in terms of the strength of binding to the surfaces and steps and the interplay of electrostatic and solvent-induced forces at crystal surface.

  20. Convex Lens-induced Confinement to Visualize Biopolymers and Interaction Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stabile, Frank; Berard, Daniel; Henkin, Gil; Shayegan, Marjan; Michaud, François; Leslie, Sabrina

    In this poster, we present a versatile CLiC (Convex Lens-induced Confinement) microscopy system to access a broad range of biopolymer visualization and interaction parameters. In the CLiC technique, the curved surface of a convex lens is used to deform a flexible coverslip above a glass substrate, creating a nanoscale gap that can be tuned during an experiment to load and confine molecules into nanoscale features, both linear and circular, embedded in the bottom substrate. We demonstrate and characterize massively parallel DNA nanochannel-based stretching, building on prior work. Further, we demonstrate controlled insertion of reagent molecules within the CLiC imaging chamber. We visualize real-time reaction dynamics of nanoconfined species, including dye/DNA intercalation and DNA/DNA ligation reactions, demonstrating the versatility of this nanoscale microscopy platform.

  1. Non-parametric Single View Reconstruction of Curved Objects Using Convex Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswald, Martin R.; Töppe, Eno; Kolev, Kalin; Cremers, Daniel

    We propose a convex optimization framework delivering intuitive and reasonable 3D meshes from a single photograph. For a given input image, the user can quickly obtain a segmentation of the object in question. Our algorithm then automatically generates an admissible closed surface of arbitrary topology without the requirement of tedious user input. Moreover we provide a tool by which the user is able to interactively modify the result afterwards through parameters and simple operations in a 2D image space. The algorithm targets a limited but relevant class of real world objects. The object silhouette and the additional user input enter a functional which can be optimized globally in a few seconds using recently developed convex relaxation techniques parallelized on state-of-the-art graphics hardware.

  2. Analytical model of a laser range profile from rough convex quadric bodies of revolution.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanhui; Wu, Zhensen; Gong, Yanjun; Zhang, Geng

    2012-07-01

    Profile information about a three-dimensional target can be obtained directly by analyzing two-dimensional data of the pulse laser range profile (LRP). The profile, shape, and posture of the target can be detected using LRPs. An analytical LRP model from rough convex quadric bodies of revolution is presented. This model can be used to analyze the effects of geometric parameters, surface material, and orientation on LRPs. The numerical results of the effects on LRPs of four typical targets are given. Based on the results of the simulated model and theoretical analysis, the rough convex quadric bodies of revolution can be identified. The analytical expressions of this model are significant in the application of LiDAR imaging. PMID:22751404

  3. Entropy and convexity for nonlinear partial differential equations.

    PubMed

    Ball, John M; Chen, Gui-Qiang G

    2013-12-28

    Partial differential equations are ubiquitous in almost all applications of mathematics, where they provide a natural mathematical description of many phenomena involving change in physical, chemical, biological and social processes. The concept of entropy originated in thermodynamics and statistical physics during the nineteenth century to describe the heat exchanges that occur in the thermal processes in a thermodynamic system, while the original notion of convexity is for sets and functions in mathematics. Since then, entropy and convexity have become two of the most important concepts in mathematics. In particular, nonlinear methods via entropy and convexity have been playing an increasingly important role in the analysis of nonlinear partial differential equations in recent decades. This opening article of the Theme Issue is intended to provide an introduction to entropy, convexity and related nonlinear methods for the analysis of nonlinear partial differential equations. We also provide a brief discussion about the content and contributions of the papers that make up this Theme Issue.

  4. Entropy and convexity for nonlinear partial differential equations

    PubMed Central

    Ball, John M.; Chen, Gui-Qiang G.

    2013-01-01

    Partial differential equations are ubiquitous in almost all applications of mathematics, where they provide a natural mathematical description of many phenomena involving change in physical, chemical, biological and social processes. The concept of entropy originated in thermodynamics and statistical physics during the nineteenth century to describe the heat exchanges that occur in the thermal processes in a thermodynamic system, while the original notion of convexity is for sets and functions in mathematics. Since then, entropy and convexity have become two of the most important concepts in mathematics. In particular, nonlinear methods via entropy and convexity have been playing an increasingly important role in the analysis of nonlinear partial differential equations in recent decades. This opening article of the Theme Issue is intended to provide an introduction to entropy, convexity and related nonlinear methods for the analysis of nonlinear partial differential equations. We also provide a brief discussion about the content and contributions of the papers that make up this Theme Issue. PMID:24249768

  5. A novel neural network for nonlinear convex programming.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xing-Bao

    2004-05-01

    In this paper, we present a neural network for solving the nonlinear convex programming problem in real time by means of the projection method. The main idea is to convert the convex programming problem into a variational inequality problem. Then a dynamical system and a convex energy function are constructed for resulting variational inequality problem. It is shown that the proposed neural network is stable in the sense of Lyapunov and can converge to an exact optimal solution of the original problem. Compared with the existing neural networks for solving the nonlinear convex programming problem, the proposed neural network has no Lipschitz condition, no adjustable parameter, and its structure is simple. The validity and transient behavior of the proposed neural network are demonstrated by some simulation results.

  6. Dissolution of quartz in aqueous basic solution, 106-236 C - Surface kinetics of 'perfect' crystallographic faces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gratz, Andrew J.; Bird, Peter; Quiro, Glenn B.

    1990-01-01

    A highly accurate method, called the negative crystal method, for determining the rate of dissolution on specific crystallographic faces of crystals was developed, in which the dissolution rates of nominally perfect crystal faces are obtained by measuring the size of individual negative crystals during a sequence of dissolution steps. The method was applied to determine the apparent activation energy and rate constants for the dissolution of quartz in 0.01 M KOH solutions at temperatures from 106 to 236 C. Also investigated were the effects of hydroxyl activity and ionic strength. The apparent activation energies for the dissolution of the prism and of the rhomb were determined.

  7. Shape recognition: convexities, concavities and things in between

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtmann, Gunnar; Jennings, Ben J.; Kingdom, Frederick A. A.

    2015-01-01

    Visual objects are effortlessly recognized from their outlines, largely irrespective of viewpoint. Previous studies have drawn different conclusions regarding the importance to shape recognition of specific shape features such as convexities and concavities. However, most studies employed familiar objects, or shapes without curves, and did not measure shape recognition across changes in scale and position. We present a novel set of random shapes with well-defined convexities, concavities and inflections (intermediate points), segmented to isolate each feature type. Observers matched the segmented reference shapes to one of two subsequently presented whole-contour shapes (target or distractor) that were re-scaled and re-positioned. For very short segment lengths, performance was significantly higher for convexities than for concavities or intermediate points and for convexities remained constant with increasing segment length. For concavities and intermediate points, performance improved with increasing segment length, reaching convexity performance only for long segments. No significant differences between concavities and intermediates were found. These results show for the first time that closed curvilinear shapes are encoded using the positions of convexities, rather than concavities or intermediate regions. A shape-template model with no free parameters gave an excellent account of the data. PMID:26598139

  8. Spectral calibration for convex grating imaging spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiankang; Chen, Xinhua; Ji, Yiqun; Chen, Yuheng; Shen, Weimin

    2013-12-01

    Spectral calibration of imaging spectrometer plays an important role for acquiring target accurate spectrum. There are two spectral calibration types in essence, the wavelength scanning and characteristic line sampling. Only the calibrated pixel is used for the wavelength scanning methods and he spectral response function (SRF) is constructed by the calibrated pixel itself. The different wavelength can be generated by the monochromator. The SRF is constructed by adjacent pixels of the calibrated one for the characteristic line sampling methods. And the pixels are illuminated by the narrow spectrum line and the center wavelength of the spectral line is exactly known. The calibration result comes from scanning method is precise, but it takes much time and data to deal with. The wavelength scanning method cannot be used in field or space environment. The characteristic line sampling method is simple, but the calibration precision is not easy to confirm. The standard spectroscopic lamp is used to calibrate our manufactured convex grating imaging spectrometer which has Offner concentric structure and can supply high resolution and uniform spectral signal. Gaussian fitting algorithm is used to determine the center position and the Full-Width-Half-Maximum(FWHM)of the characteristic spectrum line. The central wavelengths and FWHMs of spectral pixels are calibrated by cubic polynomial fitting. By setting a fitting error thresh hold and abandoning the maximum deviation point, an optimization calculation is achieved. The integrated calibration experiment equipment for spectral calibration is developed to enhance calibration efficiency. The spectral calibration result comes from spectral lamp method are verified by monochromator wavelength scanning calibration technique. The result shows that spectral calibration uncertainty of FWHM and center wavelength are both less than 0.08nm, or 5.2% of spectral FWHM.

  9. Convexity Bias and Perspective Cues in the Reverse-Perspective Illusion

    PubMed Central

    Papathomas, Thomas V.; Vlajnic, Vanja M.

    2016-01-01

    The present experiment was designed to examine the roles of painted linear perspective cues, and the convexity bias that are known to influence human observers’ perception of three-dimensional (3D) objects and scenes. Reverse-perspective stimuli were used to elicit a depth-inversion illusion, in which far points on the stimulus appear to be closer than near points and vice versa, with a 2 (Type of stimulus) × 2 (Fixation mark position) design. To study perspective, two types of stimuli were used: a version with painted linear perspective cues and a version with blank (unpainted) surfaces. To examine the role of convexity, two locations were used for the fixation mark: either in a locally convex or a locally concave part of each stimulus (painted and unpainted versions). Results indicated that the reverse-perspective illusion was stronger when the stimulus contained strong perspective cues and when observers fixated a locally concave region within the scene. PMID:27482372

  10. [A case of solitary fibrous tumor in the cerebral convexity indicating its non-dural origin].

    PubMed

    Sano, Masakazu; Saito, Akihiko; Nishihira, Yasushi; Oishi, Makoto; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Fujii, Yukihiko

    2007-07-01

    We report a case of solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) in the cerebral convexity, and present characteristic radiological and surgical findings to determine its origin. The patient was a 59-year-old man with mental dullness and mild gait disturbance. CT scan and MR images showed a highly enhanced large mass lesion mimicking a meningioma in the left parietal convexity. However, neither dural enhancement nor tail sign indicative of meningioma was observed. Angiography showed prominent feedings from branches of the internal carotid and basilar arteries rather than the external carotid artery. For this reason, presurgically, we suggested hemangiopericytoma or other specific meningiomas as a differential diagnoses. Surgery confirmed that the tumor had no attachment to the dura mater and was covered by the arachnoid membrane. The bottom of the tumor adhered tightly to brain tissue. The origin was considered to be the brain surface, pia mater or a part of the arachnoid membrane. Histopathologically, the tumor was diagnosed as a SFT with findings of "attemless pattern" and diffuse CD34 staining. The radiological and surgical findings of the present case indicated in the cerebral convexity as a unique site of origin of SFT.

  11. Convexity Bias and Perspective Cues in the Reverse-Perspective Illusion.

    PubMed

    Dobias, Joshua J; Papathomas, Thomas V; Vlajnic, Vanja M

    2016-01-01

    The present experiment was designed to examine the roles of painted linear perspective cues, and the convexity bias that are known to influence human observers' perception of three-dimensional (3D) objects and scenes. Reverse-perspective stimuli were used to elicit a depth-inversion illusion, in which far points on the stimulus appear to be closer than near points and vice versa, with a 2 (Type of stimulus) × 2 (Fixation mark position) design. To study perspective, two types of stimuli were used: a version with painted linear perspective cues and a version with blank (unpainted) surfaces. To examine the role of convexity, two locations were used for the fixation mark: either in a locally convex or a locally concave part of each stimulus (painted and unpainted versions). Results indicated that the reverse-perspective illusion was stronger when the stimulus contained strong perspective cues and when observers fixated a locally concave region within the scene. PMID:27482372

  12. Modeling of soft interfacial volume fraction in composite materials with complex convex particles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenxiang; Chen, Wen; Chen, Huisu

    2014-01-21

    The influence of the soft interfacial volume fraction on physical properties of composite materials has been found to be significant. However, the soft interfacial volume fraction is difficultly determined by traditional experimental methods and simple models proposed so far. This article addresses the problem by means of theoretical and numerical approaches that start at a microscopic scale of composite materials, which are regarded as a three-phase composite structure with polydisperse convex particles, soft interfaces, and a matrix. A theoretical scheme for the soft interfacial volume fraction is proposed by a theory of the nearest-surface distribution functions and geometrical configurations of polydisperse convex particles. The theoretical scheme represents a generalized model for the soft interfacial volume fraction in that it cannot only determine the interfacial volume fraction around convex polyhedral particles but also to derive that around ellipsoidal and spherical particles. In order to test the theoretical scheme, a numerical model that adopts the three-phase composite structure and a numerical Monte Carlo integration scheme is presented. Also, theoretical and numerical results of the soft interfacial volume fraction around ellipsoidal and spherical particles in the literature are further compared. By way of application, it is shown that the developed model provides a quantitative means to evaluate the dependence of the soft interfacial volume fraction on various factors, such as geometrical configurations of particles and the interfacial thickness.

  13. Visual Adaptation to Convexity in Macaque Area V4

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Kai-Markus; Wilke, Melanie; Leopold, David A.

    2009-01-01

    After-effects are perceptual illusions caused by visual adaptation to one or more stimulus attribute, such as orientation, motion, or shape, and are generally characterized by a repulsive shift in the perception of the adapted features in a corresponding test stimulus. Neurophysiological studies seeking to understand the basis of adaptation have observed firing rate reduction and changes in tuning of sensory neurons during periods of prolonged stimulation. In the domain of shape, recent psychophysical work has shown that adaptation to a convex pattern induces a subsequently seen rectangle to appear slightly concave. In the present study, we investigate the possible contribution of V4 neurons, which are thought to be involved in the coding of convexity, to such shape-specific adaptation. Visually responsive neurons were monitored during the brief presentation of simple shapes varying in their convexity level. Each test presentation was preceded by either a blank period or several seconds of adaptation to a convex or concave stimulus, presented in two different sizes. Adaptation consistently changed the tuning of neurons away from the convex or concave adaptor, shifting the response to the neutral rectangle in the direction of the opposite convexity. This repulsive shift was consistent with the known perceptual distortion associated with adaptation to such stimuli. Adaptation also caused a nonspecific decrease in firing, as well as the shape-selective suppression for the repeated presentation of the adaptor stimulus. The latter effects were observed whether or not the adapting and test stimuli matched closely in their size. Taken together, these results provide evidence for shape-specific adaptation of neurons in area V4, which may contribute to the perception of the convexity aftereffect. PMID:19345725

  14. Recognizing faces.

    PubMed

    Ellis, H D

    1975-11-01

    Following a review of the stimulus and subject factors which have been found to affect recognition faces, the question of whether this process can be considered a special one is dealt with. Evidence from studies involving the development of face recognition, the recognition of inverted faces, and the clinical condition prosopagnosia is considered, and in each case found to be inadequate for the unequivocal conclusion that the processes underlying face recognition are qualitatively different from those employed in recognizing other pictorial material.

  15. Game Face

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiner, Jill

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses "Game Face: Life Lessons Across the Curriculum", a teaching kit that challenges assumptions and builds confidence. Game Face, which is derived from a book and art exhibition, "Game Face: What Does a Female Athlete Look Like?", uses layered and powerful images of women and girls participating in sports to teach…

  16. Convex unwraps its first grown-up supercomputer

    SciTech Connect

    Manuel, T.

    1988-03-03

    Convex Computer Corp.'s new supercomputer family is even more of an industry blockbuster than its first system. At a tenfold jump in performance, it's far from just an incremental upgrade over its first minisupercomputer, the C-1. The heart of the new family, the new C-2 processor, churning at 50 million floating-point operations/s, spawns a group of systems whose performance could pass for some fancy supercomputers-namely those of the Cray Research Inc. family. When added to the C-1, Convex's five new supercomputers create the C series, a six-member product group offering a performance range from 20 to 200 Mflops. They mark an important transition for Convex from a one-product high-tech startup to a multinational company with a wide-ranging product line. It's a tough transition but the Richardson, Texas, company seems to be doing it. The extended product line propels Convex into the upper end of the minisupercomputer class and nudges it into the low end of the big supercomputers. It positions Convex in an uncrowded segment of the market in the $500,000 to $1 million range offering 50 to 200 Mflops of performance. The company is making this move because the minisuper area, which it pioneered, quickly became crowded with new vendors, causing prices and gross margins to drop drastically.

  17. Surface band bending and band alignment of plasma enhanced atomic layer deposited dielectrics on Ga- and N-face gallium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jialing; Eller, Brianna S.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2014-09-01

    The effects of surface pretreatment, dielectric growth, and post deposition annealing on interface electronic structure and polarization charge compensation of Ga- and N-face bulk GaN were investigated. The cleaning process consisted of an ex-situ wet chemical NH4OH treatment and an in-situ elevated temperature NH3 plasma process to remove carbon contamination, reduce oxygen coverage, and potentially passivate N-vacancy related defects. After the cleaning process, carbon contamination decreased below the x-ray photoemission spectroscopy detection limit, and the oxygen coverage stabilized at ˜1 monolayer on both Ga- and N-face GaN. In addition, Ga- and N-face GaN had an upward band bending of 0.8 ± 0.1 eV and 0.6 ± 0.1 eV, respectively, which suggested the net charge of the surface states and polarization bound charge was similar on Ga- and N-face GaN. Furthermore, three dielectrics (HfO2, Al2O3, and SiO2) were prepared by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition on Ga- or N-face GaN and annealed in N2 ambient to investigate the effect of the polarization charge on the interface electronic structure and band offsets. The respective valence band offsets of HfO2, Al2O3, and SiO2 with respect to Ga- and N-face GaN were 1.4 ± 0.1, 2.0 ± 0.1, and 3.2 ± 0.1 eV, regardless of dielectric thickness. The corresponding conduction band offsets were 1.0 ± 0.1, 1.3 ± 0.1, and 2.3 ± 0.1 eV, respectively. Experimental band offset results were consistent with theoretical calculations based on the charge neutrality level model. The trend of band offsets for dielectric/GaN interfaces was related to the band gap and/or the electronic part of the dielectric constant. The effect of polarization charge on band offset was apparently screened by the dielectric-GaN interface states.

  18. Research into preparation and properties of graded cemented carbides with face center cubic-rich surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian; Deng, Xin; Gong, Manfeng; Liu, Wei; Wu, Shanghua

    2016-09-01

    This paper systematically investigated a set of functionally graded WC-TiC-Mo-Co cemented carbides with modified surface layer (called fcc-rich surface layer in this study), which is mainly composed of fcc phases (Ti(CN) and TiN) and WC. Nitridation at liquid phase sintering temperature is the key process making this fcc-rich surface layer. The functionally graded WC-TiC-Mo-Co cemented carbides synthesized in this study show 3 layer structure: the outer layer, i.e. the fcc-rich surface layer; the intermediate layer, which is characterized by abnormally large WC and high Co content; and the inner layer. It was found that TiC is the most critical component for the formation of fcc-rich surface layer. The higher content of TiC results in the thicker fcc-rich outer layer, higher (Ti(CN) and TiN) content in the outer layer, and higher hardness of the fcc-rich outer layer. The formation of this fcc-rich surface layer is mainly due to the nitridation process between Ti and N, which leads to the diffusion of Ti outwards (from the inside of the sample to the surface) and the subsequent migration of liquid cobalt inwards (from surface to the inside of the sample). The three-layer structure developed in this study provides the excellent combination of high wear resistance and high toughness, which is favorable for some applications.

  19. Use of a variable exposure photographic pyrometer to measure surface temperatures on a hemispherical-face model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantsios, A. G.; Henley, W. C., Jr.; Snow, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    The use of a photographic pyrometer for nonintrusive measurement of high temperature surfaces in a wind tunnel test is described. The advantages of the pyrometer for measuring surfaces whose unique shape makes use of thermocouples difficult are pointed out. The use of computer operated densitometers or optical processors for the data reduction is recommended.

  20. Entanglement Quantification Made Easy: Polynomial Measures Invariant under Convex Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Regula, Bartosz; Adesso, Gerardo

    2016-02-19

    Quantifying entanglement in composite systems is a fundamental challenge, yet exact results are available in only a few special cases. This is because hard optimization problems are routinely involved, such as finding the convex decomposition of a mixed state with the minimal average pure-state entanglement, the so-called convex roof. We show that under certain conditions such a problem becomes trivial. Precisely, we prove by a geometric argument that polynomial entanglement measures of degree 2 are independent of the choice of pure-state decomposition of a mixed state, when the latter has only one pure unentangled state in its range. This allows for the analytical evaluation of convex roof extended entanglement measures in classes of rank-2 states obeying such a condition. We give explicit examples for the square root of the three-tangle in three-qubit states, and we show that several representative classes of four-qubit pure states have marginals that enjoy this property.

  1. Dose evaluation from multiple detector outputs using convex optimisation.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Makoto; Iimoto, Takeshi; Kosako, Toshiso

    2011-07-01

    A dose evaluation using multiple radiation detectors can be improved by the convex optimisation method. It enables flexible dose evaluation corresponding to the actual radiation energy spectrum. An application to the neutron ambient dose equivalent evaluation is investigated using a mixed-gas proportional counter. The convex derives the certain neutron ambient dose with certain width corresponding to the true neutron energy spectrum. The range of the evaluated dose is comparable to the error of conventional neutron dose measurement equipments. An application to the neutron individual dose equivalent measurement is also investigated. Convexes of particular dosemeter combinations evaluate the individual dose equivalent better than the dose evaluation of a single dosemeter. The combinations of dosemeters with high orthogonality of their response characteristics tend to provide a good suitability for dose evaluation.

  2. Design of quasi-phasematching gratings via convex optimization.

    PubMed

    Phillips, C R; Gallmann, L; Fejer, M M

    2013-04-22

    We propose a new approach to quasi-phasematching (QPM) design based on convex optimization. We show that with this approach, globally optimum solutions to several important QPM design problems can be determined. The optimization framework is highly versatile, enabling the user to trade-off different objectives and constraints according to the particular application. The convex problems presented consist of simple objective and constraint functions involving a few thousand variables, and can therefore be solved quite straightforwardly. We consider three examples: (1) synthesis of a target pulse profile via difference frequency generation (DFG) from two ultrashort input pulses, (2) the design of a custom DFG transfer function, and (3) a new approach enabling the suppression of spectral gain narrowing in chirped-QPM-based optical parametric chirped pulse amplification (OPCPA). These examples illustrate the power and versatility of convex optimization in the context of QPM devices. PMID:23609719

  3. Point-in-convex polygon and point-in-convex polyhedron algorithms with O(1) complexity using space subdivision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skala, Vaclav

    2016-06-01

    There are many space subdivision and space partitioning techniques used in many algorithms to speed up computations. They mostly rely on orthogonal space subdivision, resp. using hierarchical data structures, e.g. BSP trees, quadtrees, octrees, kd-trees, bounding volume hierarchies etc. However in some applications a non-orthogonal space subdivision can offer new ways for actual speed up. In the case of convex polygon in E2 a simple Point-in-Polygon test is of the O(N) complexity and the optimal algorithm is of O(log N) computational complexity. In the E3 case, the complexity is O(N) even for the convex polyhedron as no ordering is defined. New Point-in-Convex Polygon and Point-in-Convex Polyhedron algorithms are presented based on space subdivision in the preprocessing stage resulting to O(1) run-time complexity. The presented approach is simple to implement. Due to the principle of duality, dual problems, e.g. line-convex polygon, line clipping, can be solved in a similarly.

  4. Turbulent Boundary Layer Separation Control on a Convex Ramp using Plasma Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schatzman, David M.

    2005-11-01

    This work is focused toward the development of active feedback control of turbulent boundary layer separation from a convex ramp surface. The work reported here is performed in a subsonic wind tunnel facility and utilizes single dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators for separation control. Smoke and oil surface flow visualization are used to characterize the separation in the absence of actuation. The surface mounted plasma actuators are positioned upstream of the flow separation locations. Plasma-induced blowing transfers additional momentum to the boundary layer along the ramp surface and has a beneficial effect on flow reattachment. Experimental results are presented which demonstrate the effects of both steady and unsteady actuation. The effectiveness of the active flow control is documented through surface pressure measurements, LDV measurements, and downstream wake surveys.

  5. Interpolation Error Estimates for Mean Value Coordinates over Convex Polygons.

    PubMed

    Rand, Alexander; Gillette, Andrew; Bajaj, Chandrajit

    2013-08-01

    In a similar fashion to estimates shown for Harmonic, Wachspress, and Sibson coordinates in [Gillette et al., AiCM, to appear], we prove interpolation error estimates for the mean value coordinates on convex polygons suitable for standard finite element analysis. Our analysis is based on providing a uniform bound on the gradient of the mean value functions for all convex polygons of diameter one satisfying certain simple geometric restrictions. This work makes rigorous an observed practical advantage of the mean value coordinates: unlike Wachspress coordinates, the gradient of the mean value coordinates does not become large as interior angles of the polygon approach π.

  6. Non-convex entropies for conservation laws with involutions.

    PubMed

    Dafermos, Constantine M

    2013-12-28

    The paper discusses systems of conservation laws endowed with involutions and contingent entropies. Under the assumption that the contingent entropy function is convex merely in the direction of a cone in state space, associated with the involution, it is shown that the Cauchy problem is locally well posed in the class of classical solutions, and that classical solutions are unique and stable even within the broader class of weak solutions that satisfy an entropy inequality. This is on a par with the classical theory of solutions to hyperbolic systems of conservation laws endowed with a convex entropy. The equations of elastodynamics provide the prototypical example for the above setting.

  7. Laser micromilling of convex microfluidic channels onto glassy carbon for glass molding dies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Shih-Feng; Chen, Ming-Fei; Hsiao, Wen-Tse; Huang, Chien-Yao; Yang, Chung-Heng; Chen, Yu-Sheng

    2014-06-01

    This study reports the fabrication of convex microfluidic channels on glassy carbon using an ultraviolet laser processing system to produce glass molding dies. The laser processing parameters, including various laser fluences and scanning speeds of galvanometers, were adjusted to mill a convex microchannel on a glassy carbon substrate to identify the effects of material removal. The machined glassy carbon substrate was then applied as a glass molding die to fabricate a glass-based microfluidic biochip. The surface morphology, milled width and depth, and surface roughness of the microchannel die after laser micromilling were examined using a three-dimensional confocal laser scanning microscope. This study also investigates the transcription rate of microchannels after the glass molding process. To produce a 180 μm high microchannel on the GC substrate, the optimal number of milled cycles, laser fluence, and scanning speed were 25, 4.9 J/cm2, and 200 mm/s, respectively. The width, height, and surface roughness of milled convex microchannels were 119.6±0.217 μm, 180.26±0.01 μm, and 0.672±0.08 μm, respectively. These measured values were close to the predicted values and suitable for a glass molding die. After the glass molding process, a typical glass-based microchannel chip was formed at a molding temperature of 660 °C and the molding force of 0.45 kN. The transcription rates of the microchannel width and depth were 100% and 99.6%, respectively. Thus, the proposed approach is suitable for performing in chemical, biochemical, or medical reactions.

  8. Face Painting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Diana

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the use of face painting as a technique for making the endangered species issue tangible for children while addressing the complexity of the issue. Children are "given" an animal of their own and are educated about the animal while having their faces painted to resemble the animal. (LZ)

  9. Three-Dimensional Structure of a Simple Liquid at a Face-Centered-Cubic (001) Solid Surface Interface.

    PubMed

    Bao, Luyao; Hu, Haibao; Wen, Jun; Sepri, Paavo; Luo, Kai

    2016-07-19

    A liquid in the vicinity of a solid-liquid interface (SLI) may exhibit complex structures. In this study, we used molecular dynamics simulations demonstrating for the first time that the liquid adjacent to the SLI can have a two-level structure in some cases: a major structure and a minor structure. Through a time-averaging process of molecular motions, we identified the type of the liquid structure by calculating positions of the maximum liquid density in three spatial dimensions, and these positions were found to distribute in many dispersed zones (called high-density zones (HDZs)). The major structure appears throughout the SLI, while the minor structure only occurs significantly within the third layer. Instead of the previously reported body-centered cubic (BCC) or face-centered-cubic (FCC) types, the major structure was found to show a body-centered tetragonal (BCT) type. The adjacent HDZs are connected by specific junctions, demonstrating that atoms diffuse along some particular high probability paths from one HDZ to another. By considering the three-dimensional liquid density distribution from the continuum point of view, more complete details of the structure and diffusive behavior of liquids in the SLI are also possible to be revealed.

  10. Three-Dimensional Structure of a Simple Liquid at a Face-Centered-Cubic (001) Solid Surface Interface

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Luyao; Hu, Haibao; Wen, Jun; Sepri, Paavo; Luo, Kai

    2016-01-01

    A liquid in the vicinity of a solid-liquid interface (SLI) may exhibit complex structures. In this study, we used molecular dynamics simulations demonstrating for the first time that the liquid adjacent to the SLI can have a two-level structure in some cases: a major structure and a minor structure. Through a time-averaging process of molecular motions, we identified the type of the liquid structure by calculating positions of the maximum liquid density in three spatial dimensions, and these positions were found to distribute in many dispersed zones (called high-density zones (HDZs)). The major structure appears throughout the SLI, while the minor structure only occurs significantly within the third layer. Instead of the previously reported body-centered cubic (BCC) or face-centered-cubic (FCC) types, the major structure was found to show a body-centered tetragonal (BCT) type. The adjacent HDZs are connected by specific junctions, demonstrating that atoms diffuse along some particular high probability paths from one HDZ to another. By considering the three-dimensional liquid density distribution from the continuum point of view, more complete details of the structure and diffusive behavior of liquids in the SLI are also possible to be revealed. PMID:27430188

  11. Three-Dimensional Structure of a Simple Liquid at a Face-Centered-Cubic (001) Solid Surface Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Luyao; Hu, Haibao; Wen, Jun; Sepri, Paavo; Luo, Kai

    2016-07-01

    A liquid in the vicinity of a solid-liquid interface (SLI) may exhibit complex structures. In this study, we used molecular dynamics simulations demonstrating for the first time that the liquid adjacent to the SLI can have a two-level structure in some cases: a major structure and a minor structure. Through a time-averaging process of molecular motions, we identified the type of the liquid structure by calculating positions of the maximum liquid density in three spatial dimensions, and these positions were found to distribute in many dispersed zones (called high-density zones (HDZs)). The major structure appears throughout the SLI, while the minor structure only occurs significantly within the third layer. Instead of the previously reported body-centered cubic (BCC) or face-centered-cubic (FCC) types, the major structure was found to show a body-centered tetragonal (BCT) type. The adjacent HDZs are connected by specific junctions, demonstrating that atoms diffuse along some particular high probability paths from one HDZ to another. By considering the three-dimensional liquid density distribution from the continuum point of view, more complete details of the structure and diffusive behavior of liquids in the SLI are also possible to be revealed.

  12. Three-Dimensional Structure of a Simple Liquid at a Face-Centered-Cubic (001) Solid Surface Interface.

    PubMed

    Bao, Luyao; Hu, Haibao; Wen, Jun; Sepri, Paavo; Luo, Kai

    2016-01-01

    A liquid in the vicinity of a solid-liquid interface (SLI) may exhibit complex structures. In this study, we used molecular dynamics simulations demonstrating for the first time that the liquid adjacent to the SLI can have a two-level structure in some cases: a major structure and a minor structure. Through a time-averaging process of molecular motions, we identified the type of the liquid structure by calculating positions of the maximum liquid density in three spatial dimensions, and these positions were found to distribute in many dispersed zones (called high-density zones (HDZs)). The major structure appears throughout the SLI, while the minor structure only occurs significantly within the third layer. Instead of the previously reported body-centered cubic (BCC) or face-centered-cubic (FCC) types, the major structure was found to show a body-centered tetragonal (BCT) type. The adjacent HDZs are connected by specific junctions, demonstrating that atoms diffuse along some particular high probability paths from one HDZ to another. By considering the three-dimensional liquid density distribution from the continuum point of view, more complete details of the structure and diffusive behavior of liquids in the SLI are also possible to be revealed. PMID:27430188

  13. ConvexLAR: An Extension of Least Angle Regression*

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Wei; Zhou, Hua

    2016-01-01

    The least angle regression (LAR) was proposed by Efron, Hastie, Johnstone and Tibshirani (2004) for continuous model selection in linear regression. It is motivated by a geometric argument and tracks a path along which the predictors enter successively and the active predictors always maintain the same absolute correlation (angle) with the residual vector. Although it gains popularity quickly, its extensions seem rare compared to the penalty methods. In this expository article, we show that the powerful geometric idea of LAR can be generalized in a fruitful way. We propose a ConvexLAR algorithm that works for any convex loss function and naturally extends to group selection and data adaptive variable selection. After simple modification it also yields new exact path algorithms for certain penalty methods such as a convex loss function with lasso or group lasso penalty. Variable selection in recurrent event and panel count data analysis, Ada-Boost, and Gaussian graphical model is reconsidered from the ConvexLAR angle. PMID:27114697

  14. Parametric R-norm directed-divergence convex function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Dhanesh; Kumar, Satish

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we define parametric R-norm directed-divergence convex function and discuss their special cases and prove some properties similar to Kullback-Leibler information measure. From R-norm divergence measure new information measures have also been derived and their relations with different measures of entropy have been obtained and give its application in industrial engineering.

  15. Equation of state for hard convex body fluid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrio, C.; Solana, J. R.

    A model previously developed for the equation of state of pure fluids consisting of hard convex body molecules is extended to mixtures. The parameters of the model can be determined from the geometrical characteristics of the molecules which form the mixture. The equation of state is in excellent agreement with simulation data for mixtures of hard spheres with hard spherocylinders.

  16. Preconditioning 2D Integer Data for Fast Convex Hull Computations.

    PubMed

    Cadenas, José Oswaldo; Megson, Graham M; Luengo Hendriks, Cris L

    2016-01-01

    In order to accelerate computing the convex hull on a set of n points, a heuristic procedure is often applied to reduce the number of points to a set of s points, s ≤ n, which also contains the same hull. We present an algorithm to precondition 2D data with integer coordinates bounded by a box of size p × q before building a 2D convex hull, with three distinct advantages. First, we prove that under the condition min(p, q) ≤ n the algorithm executes in time within O(n); second, no explicit sorting of data is required; and third, the reduced set of s points forms a simple polygonal chain and thus can be directly pipelined into an O(n) time convex hull algorithm. This paper empirically evaluates and quantifies the speed up gained by preconditioning a set of points by a method based on the proposed algorithm before using common convex hull algorithms to build the final hull. A speedup factor of at least four is consistently found from experiments on various datasets when the condition min(p, q) ≤ n holds; the smaller the ratio min(p, q)/n is in the dataset, the greater the speedup factor achieved. PMID:26938221

  17. Convexity preserving C2 rational quadratic trigonometric spline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dube, Mridula; Tiwari, Preeti

    2012-09-01

    A C2 rational quadratic trigonometric spline interpolation has been studied using two kind of rational quadratic trigonometric splines. It is shown that under some natural conditions the solution of the problem exits and is unique. The necessary and sufficient condition that constrain the interpolation curves to be convex in the interpolating interval or subinterval are derived.

  18. Systematization of problems on ball estimates of a convex compactum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudov, S. I.

    2015-09-01

    We consider a class of finite-dimensional problems on the estimation of a convex compactum by a ball of an arbitrary norm in the form of extremal problems whose goal function is expressed via the function of the distance to the farthest point of the compactum and the function of the distance to the nearest point of the compactum or its complement. Special attention is devoted to the problem of estimating (approximating) a convex compactum by a ball of fixed radius in the Hausdorff metric. It is proved that this problem plays the role of the canonical problem: solutions of any problem in the class under consideration can be expressed via solutions of this problem for certain values of the radius. Based on studying and using the properties of solutions of this canonical problem, we obtain ranges of values of the radius in which the canonical problem expresses solutions of the problems on inscribed and circumscribed balls, the problem of uniform estimate by a ball in the Hausdorff metric, the problem of asphericity of a convex body, the problems of spherical shells of the least thickness and of the least volume for the boundary of a convex body. This makes it possible to arrange the problems in increasing order of the corresponding values of the radius. Bibliography: 34 titles.

  19. Preconditioning 2D Integer Data for Fast Convex Hull Computations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In order to accelerate computing the convex hull on a set of n points, a heuristic procedure is often applied to reduce the number of points to a set of s points, s ≤ n, which also contains the same hull. We present an algorithm to precondition 2D data with integer coordinates bounded by a box of size p × q before building a 2D convex hull, with three distinct advantages. First, we prove that under the condition min(p, q) ≤ n the algorithm executes in time within O(n); second, no explicit sorting of data is required; and third, the reduced set of s points forms a simple polygonal chain and thus can be directly pipelined into an O(n) time convex hull algorithm. This paper empirically evaluates and quantifies the speed up gained by preconditioning a set of points by a method based on the proposed algorithm before using common convex hull algorithms to build the final hull. A speedup factor of at least four is consistently found from experiments on various datasets when the condition min(p, q) ≤ n holds; the smaller the ratio min(p, q)/n is in the dataset, the greater the speedup factor achieved. PMID:26938221

  20. Double face sealing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce C. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A double face sealing device for mounting between two surfaces to provide an airtight and fluid-tight seal between a closure member bearing one of the surfaces and a structure or housing bearing the other surface which extends around the opening or hatchway to be closed. The double face sealing device includes a plurality of sections or segments mounted to one of the surfaces, each having a main body portion, a pair of outwardly extending and diverging, cantilever, spring arms, and a pair of inwardly extending and diverging, cantilever, spring arms, an elastomeric cover on the distal, free, ends of the outwardly extending and diverging spring arms, and an elastomeric cover on the distal, free, ends of the inwardly extending and diverging spring arms. The double face sealing device has application or use in all environments requiring a seal, but is particularly useful to seal openings or hatchways between compartments of spacecraft or aircraft.

  1. Face pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... gets worse when you bend forward) Tic douloureux Temporomandibular joint dysfunction syndrome Sometimes the reason for the face pain ... is persistent, unexplained, or accompanied by other unexplained symptoms. Call your primary provider. What to Expect at ...

  2. Convex hull matching and hierarchical decomposition for multimodality medical image registration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Fan, Jingfan; Fu, Tianyu; Ai, Danni; Zhu, Jianjun; Li, Qin; Wang, Yongtian

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes a novel hierarchical pyramid strategy for 3D registration of multimodality medical images. The surfaces of the source and target volume data are first extracted, and the surface point clouds are then aligned roughly using convex hull matching. The convex hull matching registration procedure could align images with large-scale transformations. The original images are divided into blocks and the corresponding blocks in the two images are registered by affine and non-rigid registration procedures. The sub-blocks are iteratively smoothed by the Gaussian kernel with different sizes during the registration procedure. The registration result of the large kernel is taken as the input of the small kernel registration. The fine registration of the two volume data sets is achieved by iteratively increasing the number of blocks, in which increase in similarity measure is taken as a criterion for acceptation of each iteration level. Results demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method in registering the multiple modalities of medical images.

  3. Effects of Ultrasonics-Assisted Face Milling on Surface Integrity and Fatigue Life of Ni-Alloy 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez, Alfredo; Veiga, Fernando; de Lacalle, Luis N. López; Polvorosa, Roberto; Lutze, Steffen; Wretland, Anders

    2016-09-01

    This work investigates the effects of ultrasonic vibration-assisted milling on important aspects such us material surface integrity, tool wear, cutting forces and fatigue resistance. As an alternative to natural application of ultrasonic milling in brittle materials, in this study, ultrasonics have been applied to a difficult-to-cut material, Alloy 718, very common in high-temperature applications. Results show alterations in the sub-superficial part of the material which could influence fatigue resistance of the material, as it has been observed in a fatigue test campaign of specimens obtained with the application of ultrasonic milling in comparison with another batch obtained applying conventional milling. Tool wear pattern was found to be very similar for both milling technologies, concluding the study with the analysis of cutting forces, exhibiting certain improvement in case of the application of ultrasonic milling with a more stable evolution.

  4. Climate Influences on Groundwater Recharge: Implications for Western Groundwater and Surface Water Resources in the Face of Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earman, S.; Dettinger, M.

    2007-12-01

    Groundwater is a vital resource in the western USA, accounting for over a quarter of total supplies and irrigation uses. In addition, groundwater is a major contributor to surface-water resources, sustaining baseflows throughout the year, and contributes important fractions of streamflows even during high-flow periods following rainfall and snowmelt. Because mountains are generally cooler and wetter than adjacent basins, groundwater in the West is derived mostly from mountain precipitation. Large infiltrations of water are required to break through the region's thick unsaturated zones. Because snowpacks store and then release precipitation from several storms at once, snowmelt contributes disproportionately more recharge than does rain. Warming temperatures have already caused declines in Western snowpacks and earlier flows in melt-fed streams. Current projections of future climate suggest that these trends will continue. Snowline elevations are expected to rise, reducing snow-covered areas in western mountains, and decreasing the amount of snow in areas where snowpacks remain. If so, mountain-block recharge also may also decline, as recharge areas shrink and snow available for melt generation dwindles. Declines in mountain recharge triggered by loss of snowpack would have immediate impacts on mountain water resources, including low flows and stream temperatures, and may also have serious impacts on long-term ground-water supplies in surrounding basins. Although recharge that supplies mountain groundwater may decline, much of this unrecharged water may run off onto fans and basins, increasing recharge beyond the mountains. However, if the water that is not recharged in the mountains is mostly evapotranspired from the mountain soils, the overall recharge (mountain plus basin) may decline. Changes in temperature will bring concomitant changes in water temperatures, and thus in streambed conductance and leakance; changes in dominant vegetation may also occur. All

  5. Laser-induced removal of co-deposits from graphitic plasma-facing components: Characterization of irradiated surfaces and dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gąsior, P.; Irrek, F.; Petersson, P.; Penkalla, H. J.; Rubel, M.; Schweer, B.; Sundelin, P.; Wessel, E.; Linke, J.; Philipps, V.; Emmoth, B.; Wolowski, J.; Hirai, T.

    2009-06-01

    Laser-induced fuel desorption and ablation of co-deposited layers on limiter plates from the TEXTOR tokamak have been studied. Gas phase composition was monitored in situ, whereas the ex situ studies have been focused on the examination of irradiated surfaces and broad analysis of dust generated by ablation of co-deposits. The size of the dust grains is in the range of few nanometers to hundreds of micrometers. These are fuel-rich dust particles, as determined by nuclear reaction analysis. The presence of deuterium in dust indicates that not all fuel species are transferred to the gas phase during irradiation. This also suggests that photonic removal of fuel and the ablation of co-deposit from plasma-facing components may lead to the redistribution of fuel-containing dust to surrounding areas.

  6. Convex half-quadratic criteria and interacting auxiliary variables for image restoration.

    PubMed

    Idier, J

    2001-01-01

    This paper deals with convex half-quadratic criteria and associated minimization algorithms for the purpose of image restoration. It brings a number of original elements within a unified mathematical presentation based on convex duality. Firstly, the Geman and Yang's and Geman and Reynolds's constructions are revisited, with a view to establishing the convexity properties of the resulting half-quadratic augmented criteria, when the original nonquadratic criterion is already convex. Secondly, a family of convex Gibbsian energies that incorporate interacting auxiliary variables is revealed as a potentially fruitful extension of the Geman and Reynolds's construction.

  7. On Rank One Convex Functions that are Homogeneous of Degree One

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchheim, Bernd; Kristensen, Jan

    2016-07-01

    We show that positively 1-homogeneous rank one convex functions are convex at 0 and at matrices of rank one. The result is a special case of an abstract convexity result that we establish for positively 1-homogeneous directionally convex functions defined on an open convex cone in a finite dimensional vector space. From these results we derive a number of consequences including various generalizations of the Ornstein L1 non inequalities. Most of the results were announced in ( C R Acad Sci Paris Ser I 349:407-409, 2011).

  8. Delivering Sound Energy along an Arbitrary Convex Trajectory

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Sipei; Hu, Yuxiang; Lu, Jing; Qiu, Xiaojun; Cheng, Jianchun; Burnett, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Accelerating beams have attracted considerable research interest due to their peculiar properties and various applications. Although there have been numerous research on the generation and application of accelerating light beams, few results have been published on the generation of accelerating acoustic beams. Here we report on the experimental observation of accelerating acoustic beams along arbitrary convex trajectories. The desired trajectory is projected to the spatial phase profile on the boundary which is discretized and sampled spatially. The sound field distribution is formulated with the Green function and the integral equation method. Both the paraxial and the non-paraxial regimes are examined and observed in the experiments. The effect of obstacle scattering in the sound field is also investigated and the results demonstrate that the approach is robust against obstacle scattering. The realization of accelerating acoustic beams will have an impact on various applications where acoustic information and energy are required to be delivered along an arbitrary convex trajectory. PMID:25316353

  9. Recognition of Graphs with Convex Quadratic Stability Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Maria F.; Cardoso, Domingos M.

    2009-09-01

    A stable set of a graph is a set of mutually non-adjacent vertices. The determination of a maximum size stable set, which is called maximum stable set, and the determination of its size, which is called stability number, are central combinatorial optimization problems. However, given a nonnegative integer k, to determine if a graph G has a stable set of size k is NP-complete. In this paper we deal with graphs for which the stability number can be determined by solving a convex quadratic programming problem. Such graphs were introduced in [13] and are called graphs with convex-QP stability number. A few algorithmic techniques for the recognition of this type of graphs in particular families are presented.

  10. Convexity properties of images under nonlinear integral operators

    SciTech Connect

    Kokurin, M Yu

    2014-12-31

    Conditions are obtained for the image of a given set under a general completely continuous nonlinear integral operator to have convex closure. These results are used to establish the uniqueness of quasi-solutions of nonlinear integral equations of the first kind and to prove the solvability of equations of the first kind on a dense subset of the right-hand sides. Bibliography: 11 titles.

  11. A convex penalty for switching control of partial differential equations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Clason, Christian; Rund, Armin; Kunisch, Karl; Barnard, Richard C.

    2016-01-19

    A convex penalty for promoting switching controls for partial differential equations is introduced; such controls consist of an arbitrary number of components of which at most one should be simultaneously active. Using a Moreau–Yosida approximation, a family of approximating problems is obtained that is amenable to solution by a semismooth Newton method. In conclusion, the efficiency of this approach and the structure of the obtained controls are demonstrated by numerical examples.

  12. Convex Clustering: An Attractive Alternative to Hierarchical Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gary K.; Chi, Eric C.; Ranola, John Michael O.; Lange, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    The primary goal in cluster analysis is to discover natural groupings of objects. The field of cluster analysis is crowded with diverse methods that make special assumptions about data and address different scientific aims. Despite its shortcomings in accuracy, hierarchical clustering is the dominant clustering method in bioinformatics. Biologists find the trees constructed by hierarchical clustering visually appealing and in tune with their evolutionary perspective. Hierarchical clustering operates on multiple scales simultaneously. This is essential, for instance, in transcriptome data, where one may be interested in making qualitative inferences about how lower-order relationships like gene modules lead to higher-order relationships like pathways or biological processes. The recently developed method of convex clustering preserves the visual appeal of hierarchical clustering while ameliorating its propensity to make false inferences in the presence of outliers and noise. The solution paths generated by convex clustering reveal relationships between clusters that are hidden by static methods such as k-means clustering. The current paper derives and tests a novel proximal distance algorithm for minimizing the objective function of convex clustering. The algorithm separates parameters, accommodates missing data, and supports prior information on relationships. Our program CONVEXCLUSTER incorporating the algorithm is implemented on ATI and nVidia graphics processing units (GPUs) for maximal speed. Several biological examples illustrate the strengths of convex clustering and the ability of the proximal distance algorithm to handle high-dimensional problems. CONVEXCLUSTER can be freely downloaded from the UCLA Human Genetics web site at http://www.genetics.ucla.edu/software/ PMID:25965340

  13. Constrained spacecraft reorientation using mixed integer convex programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Margaret; Glenn Lightsey, E.

    2016-10-01

    A constrained attitude guidance (CAG) system is developed using convex optimization to autonomously achieve spacecraft pointing objectives while meeting the constraints imposed by on-board hardware. These constraints include bounds on the control input and slew rate, as well as pointing constraints imposed by the sensors. The pointing constraints consist of inclusion and exclusion cones that dictate permissible orientations of the spacecraft in order to keep objects in or out of the field of view of the sensors. The optimization scheme drives a body vector towards a target inertial vector along a trajectory that consists solely of permissible orientations in order to achieve the desired attitude for a given mission mode. The non-convex rotational kinematics are handled by discretization, which also ensures that the quaternion stays unity norm. In order to guarantee an admissible path, the pointing constraints are relaxed. Depending on how strict the pointing constraints are, the degree of relaxation is tuneable. The use of binary variables permits the inclusion of logical expressions in the pointing constraints in the case that a set of sensors has redundancies. The resulting mixed integer convex programming (MICP) formulation generates a steering law that can be easily integrated into an attitude determination and control (ADC) system. A sample simulation of the system is performed for the Bevo-2 satellite, including disturbance torques and actuator dynamics which are not modeled by the controller. Simulation results demonstrate the robustness of the system to disturbances while meeting the mission requirements with desirable performance characteristics.

  14. Stochastic Homogenization of Nonconvex Unbounded Integral Functionals with Convex Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerinckx, Mitia; Gloria, Antoine

    2016-09-01

    We consider the well-trodden ground of the problem of the homogenization of random integral functionals. When the integrand has standard growth conditions, the qualitative theory is well-understood. When it comes to unbounded functionals, that is, when the domain of the integrand is not the whole space and may depend on the space-variable, there is no satisfactory theory. In this contribution we develop a complete qualitative stochastic homogenization theory for nonconvex unbounded functionals with convex growth. We first prove that if the integrand is convex and has p-growth from below (with p > d, the dimension), then it admits homogenization regardless of growth conditions from above. This result, that crucially relies on the existence and sublinearity at infinity of correctors, is also new in the periodic case. In the case of nonconvex integrands, we prove that a similar homogenization result holds provided that the nonconvex integrand admits a two-sided estimate by a convex integrand (the domain of which may depend on the space variable) that itself admits homogenization. This result is of interest to the rigorous derivation of rubber elasticity from polymer physics, which involves the stochastic homogenization of such unbounded functionals.

  15. The deconvolution operation in convex analysis: An introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Hiriart-Urruty, J.B.

    1995-03-01

    Performing the infimal convolution of two functions is a frequent and useful operation in Convex Analysis: it is, to great extent, the dual operation of the addition; it serves (like other {open_quotes}convolutions{close_quotes} in Analysis) to regularize functions; it has nice geometrical and economic interpretations. The deconvolution of a (convex) function by another one is a new operation, firstly defined in clear-cut manner, which is to the infimal convolution what the subtraction is to the addition for real numbers; it appears in conjugating the difference of convex functions; it serves in solving explicitly convolution equations; it has an interpretation in terms of subtraction of epigraphs. Since its introduction, the deconvolution operation has been studied more thoroughly by the author and his former students or associates. What we intend to present here is a short (and, hopefully, pedagogical) introduction to the deconvolution operation, in a simplified setting. This can be viewed as a complement to chapter IV and X in the book.

  16. Synthesis of Janus-like gold nanoparticles with hydrophilic/hydrophobic faces by surface ligand exchange and their self-assemblies in water.

    PubMed

    Iida, Ryo; Kawamura, Hitoshi; Niikura, Kenichi; Kimura, Takashi; Sekiguchi, Shota; Joti, Yasumasa; Bessho, Yoshitaka; Mitomo, Hideyuki; Nishino, Yoshinori; Ijiro, Kuniharu

    2015-04-14

    This study aims at the synthesis of Janus gold nanoparticles (Janus GNPs) with hydrophilic/hydrophobic faces by a simple ligand exchange reaction in an homogeneous system and at the elucidation of the self-assembled structures of the Janus GNPs in water. As hydrophilic surface ligands, we synthesized hexaethylene glycol (E6)-terminated thiolate ligands with C3, C7, or C11 alkyl chains, referred to as E6C3, E6C7, and E6C11, respectively. As a hydrophobic ligand, a butyl-headed thiolate ligand C4-E6C11, in which a C4 alkyl was introduced on the E6C11 terminus, was synthesized. The degree of segregation between the two ligands on the GNPs (5 nm in diameter) was examined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of fright mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis. We found that the choice of immobilization methods, one-step or two-step addition of the two ligands to the GNP solution, crucially affects the degree of segregation. The two-step addition of a hydrophilic ligand (E6C3) followed by a hydrophobic ligand (C4-E6C11) produced a large degree of segregation on the GNPs, providing Janus-like GNPs. When dispersed in water, these Janus-like GNPs formed assemblies of ∼160 nm in diameter, whereas Domain GNPs, in which the two ligands formed partial domains on the surface, were precipitated even when the molar ratio of the hydrophilic ligand and the hydrophobic ligand on the surface of the NPs was almost 1:1. The assembled structure of the Janus-like GNPs in water was directly observed by pulsed coherent X-ray solution scattering using an X-ray free-electron laser, revealing irregular spherical structures with uneven surfaces.

  17. Designing null phase screens to test a fast plano-convex aspheric lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DelOlmo-Márquez, Jesús; Castán-Ricaño, Diana; Avendaño-Alejo, Maximino; Díaz-Uribe, Rufino

    2015-08-01

    We have obtained a formula to represent the wavefront produced by a plano-convex aspheric lens with symmetry of revolution considering a plane wavefront propagating parallel to the optical axis and impinging on the refracting surface, it is called a zero-distance phase front, being it the first wavefront to be out of the optical system. Using a concept of differential geometry called parallel curves it is possible to obtain an analytic formula to represent the wavefront propagated at arbitrary distances through the optical axis. In order to evaluate qualitatively a plano-convex aspheric lens, we have modified slightly an interferometer Tywman-Green as follow: In the reference beam we use a plane mirror and the beam of test we have used a spatial light modulator (SLM) to compensate the phase produced by the lens under test. It will be called a null phase interferometer. The main idea is to recombine both wavefronts in order to get a null interferogram, otherwise we will associate the patterns of the interferogram to deformations of the lens under test. The null phase screens are formed with concentric circumferences assuming different gray levels printed on SLM.

  18. Linearithmic time sparse and convex maximum margin clustering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Lei; Wu, Ji

    2012-12-01

    Recently, a new clustering method called maximum margin clustering (MMC) was proposed and has shown promising performances. It was originally formulated as a difficult nonconvex integer problem. To make the MMC problem practical, the researchers either relaxed the original MMC problem to inefficient convex optimization problems or reformulated it to nonconvex optimization problems, which sacrifice the convexity for efficiency. However, no approaches can both hold the convexity and be efficient. In this paper, a new linearithmic time sparse and convex MMC algorithm, called support-vector-regression-based MMC (SVR-MMC), is proposed. Generally, it first uses the SVR as the core of the MMC. Then, it is relaxed as a convex optimization problem, which is iteratively solved by the cutting-plane algorithm. Each cutting-plane subproblem is further decomposed to a serial supervised SVR problem by a new global extended-level method (GELM). Finally, each supervised SVR problem is solved in a linear time complexity by a new sparse-kernel SVR (SKSVR) algorithm. We further extend the SVR-MMC algorithm to the multiple-kernel clustering (MKC) problem and the multiclass MMC (M3C) problem, which are denoted as SVR-MKC and SVR-M3C, respectively. One key point of the algorithms is the utilization of the SVR. It can prevent the MMC and its extensions meeting an integer matrix programming problem. Another key point is the new SKSVR. It provides a linear time interface to the nonlinear kernel scenarios, so that the SVR-MMC and its extensions can keep a linearthmic time complexity in nonlinear kernel scenarios. Our experimental results on various real-world data sets demonstrate the effectiveness and the efficiency of the SVR-MMC and its two extensions. Moreover, the unsupervised application of the SVR-MKC to the voice activity detection (VAD) shows that the SVR-MKC can achieve good performances that are close to its supervised counterpart, meet the real-time demand of the VAD, and need no

  19. Funny Faces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Yvonne

    2000-01-01

    Presents a torn-paper and gadget-print activity for younger students, specifically pre-kindergarten to first grade, that can be done any time over the school year or at Halloween. Discusses how the students create their funny faces and lists the materials needed. (CMK)

  20. Producing desired ice faces.

    PubMed

    Shultz, Mary Jane; Brumberg, Alexandra; Bisson, Patrick J; Shultz, Ryan

    2015-11-10

    The ability to prepare single-crystal faces has become central to developing and testing models for chemistry at interfaces, spectacularly demonstrated by heterogeneous catalysis and nanoscience. This ability has been hampered for hexagonal ice, Ih--a fundamental hydrogen-bonded surface--due to two characteristics of ice: ice does not readily cleave along a crystal lattice plane and properties of ice grown on a substrate can differ significantly from those of neat ice. This work describes laboratory-based methods both to determine the Ih crystal lattice orientation relative to a surface and to use that orientation to prepare any desired face. The work builds on previous results attaining nearly 100% yield of high-quality, single-crystal boules. With these methods, researchers can prepare authentic, single-crystal ice surfaces for numerous studies including uptake measurements, surface reactivity, and catalytic activity of this ubiquitous, fundamental solid.

  1. Millihertz quasi-periodic oscillations in 4U 1636-53 associated with bursts with positive convexity only

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Ming; Méndez, Mariano; Altamirano, Diego; Zhang, Guobao

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the convexity of all type I X-ray bursts with millihertz quasi-periodic oscillations (mHz QPOs) in 4U 1636-53 using archival observations with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We found that, at a 3.5σ confidence level, in all 39 cases in which the mHz QPOs disappeared at the time of an X-ray burst, the convexity of the burst is positive. The convexity measures the shape of the rising part of the burst light curve and, according to recent models, it is related to the ignition site of bursts on the neutron-star surface. This finding suggests that in 4U 1636-53 these 39 bursts and the marginally-stable nuclear burning process responsible for the mHz QPOs take place at the neutron-star equator. This scenario could explain the inconsistency between the high accretion rate required for triggering mHz QPOs in theoretical models and the relatively low accretion rate derived from observations.

  2. Millihertz quasi-periodic oscillations always associated with bursts with positive convexity in 4U 1636-53

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Ming; Mendez, Mariano; Zhang, Guo-Bao; Altamirano, Diego

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the convexity of all type I X-ray bursts with millihertz quasi-periodic oscillations (mHz QPOs) in 4U 1636-53 using archival observations with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We found that all 39 mHz QPOs disappeared at the time of an X-ray burst, the convexity of the burst is positive. The convexity measures the shape of the rising part of the burst light curve and, according to recent models, it is related to the ignition site of bursts on the neutron-star surface. This finding suggests that in 4U 1636-53 these 39 bursts and the marginally-stable nuclear burning process responsible for the mHz QPOs take place at the neutron-star equator. This scenario would explain the inconsistency between the high accretion rate required for triggering mHz QPOs in theoretical models and the relatively low accretion rate derived from observations.

  3. Crystal orientation effects on implantation of low-energy hydrogen, helium and hydrogen/helium mixtures in plasma-facing tungsten surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linn, Brian C.

    The development of plasma-facing materials (PFM) is one of the major challenges in. realizing fusion reactors. Materials deployed in PFMs must be capable of withstanding the high-flux of low-energy hydrogen and helium ions omitted from the plasma. while not hindering the plasma. Tungsten is considered a promising candidate material due to desirable material properties including its high melting temperature, good thermal conductivity and relatively low physical and chemical sputtering yields. This thesis uses molecular dynamic simulations to investigate helium and hydrogen bombardment of tungsten and the underlying physical effects (e.g. sputtering, erosion, blistering). Non-cumulative and cumulative bombardment simulations of helium, hydrogen, and hydrogen/helium bombardment of tungsten were modeled using the molecular dynamics code LAMMPS. Two orientations of monocrystalline bcc tungsten surfaces were considered, (001) and (111). Simulations were performed for temperatures ranging from 600K up to 1500K and helium / hydrogen incident energies of 20eV to 100eV . The results of these simulations showed the effect of temperature and incident particle energy on retention rates and implantation/deposition profiles in tungsten.

  4. Producing desired ice faces

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Mary Jane; Brumberg, Alexandra; Bisson, Patrick J.; Shultz, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    The ability to prepare single-crystal faces has become central to developing and testing models for chemistry at interfaces, spectacularly demonstrated by heterogeneous catalysis and nanoscience. This ability has been hampered for hexagonal ice, Ih––a fundamental hydrogen-bonded surface––due to two characteristics of ice: ice does not readily cleave along a crystal lattice plane and properties of ice grown on a substrate can differ significantly from those of neat ice. This work describes laboratory-based methods both to determine the Ih crystal lattice orientation relative to a surface and to use that orientation to prepare any desired face. The work builds on previous results attaining nearly 100% yield of high-quality, single-crystal boules. With these methods, researchers can prepare authentic, single-crystal ice surfaces for numerous studies including uptake measurements, surface reactivity, and catalytic activity of this ubiquitous, fundamental solid. PMID:26512102

  5. On the structure of self-affine convex bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Voynov, A S

    2013-08-31

    We study the structure of convex bodies in R{sup d} that can be represented as a union of their affine images with no common interior points. Such bodies are called self-affine. Vallet's conjecture on the structure of self-affine bodies was proved for d = 2 by Richter in 2011. In the present paper we disprove the conjecture for all d≥3 and derive a detailed description of self-affine bodies in R{sup 3}. Also we consider the relation between properties of self-affine bodies and functional equations with a contraction of an argument. Bibliography: 10 titles.

  6. Use of Convex supercomputers for flight simulation at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleveland, Jeff I., II

    1992-01-01

    The use of the Convex Computer Corporation supercomputers for flight simulation is discussed focusing on a real-time input/output system for supporting the flight simulation. The flight simulation computing system is based on two single processor control data corporation CYBER 175 computers, coupled through extended memory. The Advanced Real-Time Simulation System for digital data distribution and signal conversion is a state-of-the-art, high-speed fiber-optic-based, ring network system which is based on the computer automated measurement and control technology.

  7. Behavior of turbulent boundary layers on curved convex walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidbauer, Hans

    1936-01-01

    The system of linear differential equations which indicated the approach of separation and the so-called "boundary-layer thickness" by Gruschwitz is extended in this report to include the case where the friction layer is subject to centrifugal forces. Evaluation of the data yields a strong functional dependence of the momentum change and wall drag on the boundary-layer thickness radius of curvature ratio for the wall. It is further shown that the transition from laminar to turbulent flow occurs at somewhat higher Reynolds Numbers at the convex wall than at the flat plate, due to the stabilizing effect of the centrifugal forces.

  8. Supervised classification of protein structures based on convex hull representation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Wu, Ling-Yun; Chen, Luonan; Zhang, Xiang-Sun

    2007-01-01

    One of the central problems in functional genomics is to establish the classification schemes of protein structures. In this paper the relationship of protein structures is uncovered within the framework of supervised learning. Specifically, the novel patterns based on convex hull representation are firstly extracted from a protein structure, then the classification system is constructed and machine learning methods such as neural networks, Hidden Markov Models (HMM) and Support Vector Machines (SVMs) are applied. The CATH scheme is highlighted in the classification experiments. The results indicate that the proposed supervised classification scheme is effective and efficient.

  9. Convex aggregative modelling of infinite memory nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachel, Paweł

    2016-08-01

    The convex aggregation technique is applied for modelling general class of nonlinear systems with unknown structure and infinite memory. The finite sample size properties of the algorithm are formally established and compared to the standard least-squares counterpart of the method. The proposed algorithm demonstrates its advantages when the a-priori knowledge and the measurement data are both scarce, that is, when the information about the actual system structure is unknown or uncertain and the measurement set is small and disturbed by a noise. Numerical experiments illustrate application and practical benefits of the method for various nonlinear systems.

  10. Neural network for solving convex quadratic bilevel programming problems.

    PubMed

    He, Xing; Li, Chuandong; Huang, Tingwen; Li, Chaojie

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, using the idea of successive approximation, we propose a neural network to solve convex quadratic bilevel programming problems (CQBPPs), which is modeled by a nonautonomous differential inclusion. Different from the existing neural network for CQBPP, the model has the least number of state variables and simple structure. Based on the theory of nonsmooth analysis, differential inclusions and Lyapunov-like method, the limit equilibrium points sequence of the proposed neural networks can approximately converge to an optimal solution of CQBPP under certain conditions. Finally, simulation results on two numerical examples and the portfolio selection problem show the effectiveness and performance of the proposed neural network.

  11. Off-Grid DOA Estimation Based on Analysis of the Convexity of Maximum Likelihood Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LIU, Liang; WEI, Ping; LIAO, Hong Shu

    Spatial compressive sensing (SCS) has recently been applied to direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation owing to advantages over conventional ones. However the performance of compressive sensing (CS)-based estimation methods decreases when true DOAs are not exactly on the discretized sampling grid. We solve the off-grid DOA estimation problem using the deterministic maximum likelihood (DML) estimation method. In this work, we analyze the convexity of the DML function in the vicinity of the global solution. Especially under the condition of large array, we search for an approximately convex range around the ture DOAs to guarantee the DML function convex. Based on the convexity of the DML function, we propose a computationally efficient algorithm framework for off-grid DOA estimation. Numerical experiments show that the rough convex range accords well with the exact convex range of the DML function with large array and demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed methods in terms of accuracy, robustness and speed.

  12. Leading edge reflection patterns for cylindrical converging shock waves over convex obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignati, F.; Guardone, A.

    2016-09-01

    The unsteady reflection of cylindrical converging shock waves over convex obstacles is investigated numerically. At the leading edge, numerical simulations show the occurrence of all types of regular and irregular reflections predicted by the pseudo-steady theory for planar shock-wave reflections over planar surfaces, although for different combinations of wedge angles and incident shock Mach number. The domain of occurrence of each reflection type and its evolution in time due to shock acceleration and to the non-planar geometry is determined and it is compared to the results of the pseudo-steady theory. The dependence of the reflection pattern on the (local) values of the wedge angle is in good agreement with the pseudo-steady theory. Less complex reflection patterns are instead observed at larger values of the leading edge shock Mach number at which the pseudo-steady theory predicts the occurrence of more complex reflection patterns.

  13. On new inequalities of Hermite-Hadamard-Fejer type for harmonically convex functions via fractional integrals.

    PubMed

    Kunt, Mehmet; İşcan, İmdat; Yazıcı, Nazlı; Gözütok, Uğur

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, firstly, new Hermite-Hadamard type inequalities for harmonically convex functions in fractional integral forms are given. Secondly, Hermite-Hadamard-Fejer inequalities for harmonically convex functions in fractional integral forms are built. Finally, an integral identity and some Hermite-Hadamard-Fejer type integral inequalities for harmonically convex functions in fractional integral forms are obtained. Some results presented here provide extensions of others given in earlier works.

  14. Sharp estimates for the moduli of continuity of metric projections onto weakly convex sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, G. E.

    2015-08-01

    We study the dependence of metric projections on the following three parameters: the point projected, the set to which we are projecting, and the norm (generally speaking, non-symmetric) that determines the metric. We obtain sharp estimates for the moduli of continuity of metric projections onto convex and weakly convex sets in Banach spaces. We also estimate these moduli in terms of the moduli of convexity and smoothness of the space (or the quasi-ball).

  15. Extra-axial isolated cerebral varix misdiagnosed as convexity meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Zhi-Gang; Zhou, Qian; Cui, Yan; Yi, Lei; Ouyang, Yian; Jiang, Yugang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Isolated cerebral varix is a rare cerebrovascular anomaly, which is easily misdiagnosed as other brain tumors. A 59-year-old female patient with noncontributory medical history presented with headache and insomnia for the last 2 months. Upon admission, her neurological examination was unremarkable. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a well-demarcated extra medullary mass, 11 × 11 mm in size, within the subdural space at the right frontal lobe. The lesion was initially interpreted as a convexity meningioma. After conducting a craniotomy on the patient, an extra-axial varix was exposed and resected subsequently. The patient's headache was resolved soon after surgery and charged without neurologic sequelae. Extra-axial isolated cerebral varix is mimicking convexity meningioma on MR images and should be considered as a differential diagnosis. The focal erosion in the inner table of the skull could be an important character of extra-axial isolated cerebral varix. An extremely round shape and smooth contour of the lesion was another important character. Isolated cerebral varix is rare vascular lesion that is treated surgically in the case of rupture or compression of adjacent structures. The information obtained with noninvasive imaging techniques should include CTA to make a clinical decision. PMID:27368037

  16. Convex foundations for generalized MaxEnt models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frongillo, Rafael; Reid, Mark D.

    2014-12-01

    We present an approach to maximum entropy models that highlights the convex geometry and duality of generalized exponential families (GEFs) and their connection to Bregman divergences. Using our framework, we are able to resolve a puzzling aspect of the bijection of Banerjee and coauthors between classical exponential families and what they call regular Bregman divergences. Their regularity condition rules out all but Bregman divergences generated from log-convex generators. We recover their bijection and show that a much broader class of divergences correspond to GEFs via two key observations: 1) Like classical exponential families, GEFs have a "cumulant" C whose subdifferential contains the mean: Eo˜pθ[φ(o)]∈∂C(θ) ; 2) Generalized relative entropy is a C-Bregman divergence between parameters: DF(pθ,pθ')= D C(θ,θ') , where DF becomes the KL divergence for F = -H. We also show that every incomplete market with cost function C can be expressed as a complete market, where the prices are constrained to be a GEF with cumulant C. This provides an entirely new interpretation of prediction markets, relating their design back to the principle of maximum entropy.

  17. Supersonic cavity flows over concave and convex walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, A. Ran; Das, Rajarshi; Setoguchi, Toshiaki; Kim, Heuy Dong

    2016-04-01

    Supersonic cavity flows are characterized by compression and expansion waves, shear layer, and oscillations inside the cavity. For decades, investigations into cavity flows have been conducted, mostly with flows at zero pressure gradient entering the cavity in straight walls. Since cavity flows on curved walls exert centrifugal force, the features of these flows are likely to differ from those of straight wall flows. The aim of the present work is to study the flow physics of a cavity that is cut out on a curved wall. Steady and unsteady numerical simulations were carried out for supersonic flow through curved channels over the cavity with L/H = 1. A straight channel flow was also analyzed which serves as the base model. The velocity gradient along the width of the channel was observed to increase with increasing the channel curvature for both concave and convex channels. The pressure on the cavity floor increases with the increase in channel curvature for concave channels and decreases for convex channels. Moreover, unsteady flow characteristics are more dependent on channel curvature under supersonic free stream conditions.

  18. Mixed convection heat transfer in concave and convex channels

    SciTech Connect

    Moukalled, F.; Doughan, A.; Acharya, S.

    1997-07-01

    Mixed convection heat transfer studies in the literature have been primarily confined to pipe and rectangular channel geometry's. In some applications, however, heat transfer in curved channels may be of interest (e.g., nozzle and diffuser shaped passages in HVAC systems, fume hoods, chimneys, bell-shaped or dome-shaped chemical reactors, etc.). A numerical investigation of laminar mixed convection heat transfer of air in concave and convex channels is presented. Six different channel aspects ratios (R/L = 1.04, 1.25, 2.5, 5, 10, and {infinity}) and five different values of Gr/Re{sup 2} (Gr/Re{sup 2} = 0, 0.1, 1, 3, 5) are considered. Results are displayed in terms of streamline and isotherm plots, velocity and temperature profiles, and local and average Nusselt number estimates. Numerical predictions reveal that compared to straight channels of equal height, concave channels of low aspect ratio have lower heat transfer at relatively low values of Gr/Re{sup 2} and higher heat transfer at high values of Gr/Re{sup 2}. When compared to straight channels of equal heated length, concave channels are always found to have lower heat transfer and for all values of Gr/Re{sup 2}. On the other hand, predictions for convex channels revealed enhancement in heat transfer compared to straight channels of equal height and/or equal heated length for all values of Gr/Re{sup 2}.

  19. A convex minimization approach to data association with prior constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huimin; Kirubarajan, Thiagalingam

    2004-08-01

    In this paper we propose a new formulation for reliably solving the measurement-to-track association problem with a priori constraints. Those constraints are incorporated into the scalar objective function in a general formula. This is a key step in most target tracking problems when one has to handle the measurement origin uncertainty. Our methodology is able to formulate the measurement-to-track correspondence problem with most of the commonly used assumptions and considers target feature measurements and possibly unresolved measurements as well. The resulting constrained optimization problem deals with the whole combinatorial space of possible feature selections and measurement-to-track correspondences. To find the global optimal solution, we build a convex objective function and relax the integer constraint. The special structure of this extended problem assures its equivalence to the original one, but it can be solved optimally by efficient algorithms to avoid the cominatorial search. This approach works for any cost function with continuous second derivatives. We use a track formation example and a multisensor tracking scenario to illustrate the effectiveness of the convex programming approach.

  20. Multiband RF pulses with improved performance via convex optimization.

    PubMed

    Shang, Hong; Larson, Peder E Z; Kerr, Adam; Reed, Galen; Sukumar, Subramaniam; Elkhaled, Adam; Gordon, Jeremy W; Ohliger, Michael A; Pauly, John M; Lustig, Michael; Vigneron, Daniel B

    2016-01-01

    Selective RF pulses are commonly designed with the desired profile as a low pass filter frequency response. However, for many MRI and NMR applications, the spectrum is sparse with signals existing at a few discrete resonant frequencies. By specifying a multiband profile and releasing the constraint on "don't-care" regions, the RF pulse performance can be improved to enable a shorter duration, sharper transition, or lower peak B1 amplitude. In this project, a framework for designing multiband RF pulses with improved performance was developed based on the Shinnar-Le Roux (SLR) algorithm and convex optimization. It can create several types of RF pulses with multiband magnitude profiles, arbitrary phase profiles and generalized flip angles. The advantage of this framework with a convex optimization approach is the flexible trade-off of different pulse characteristics. Designs for specialized selective RF pulses for balanced SSFP hyperpolarized (HP) (13)C MRI, a dualband saturation RF pulse for (1)H MR spectroscopy, and a pre-saturation pulse for HP (13)C study were developed and tested. PMID:26754063

  1. A Precise Packing Sequence for Self-Assembled Convex Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ting; Zhang, Zhenli; Glotzer, Sharon

    2007-03-01

    We present molecular simulations of the self-assembly of cone-shaped particles with patchy, attractive interactions[1,2]. Upon cooling from random initial conditions, we find that the cones self assemble into clusters and that clusters comprised of particular numbers of cones have a unique and precisely packed structure that is robust over a range of cone angles. These precise clusters form precise packing sequence that for small sizes is identical to that observed in evaporation-driven assembly of colloidal spheres. This sequence is reproduced and extended in simulations of two simple models of spheres self-assembling from random initial conditions subject to convexity constraints, and contains six of the most common virus capsid structures obtained in vivo including large chiral clusters, and a cluster that may correspond to several non- icosahedral, spherical virus capsid structures obtained in vivo. For prolate spheroidal convexity conditions, we demonstrate the formation of several prolate virus structures from self-assembling hard spheres[3]. [1] Chen T, Zhang ZL, Glotzer SC, PNAS, in press (http://xxx.lanl.gov/pdf/cond-mat/ 0608592) [2] Chen T, Zhang ZL, Glotzer SC, http://xxx.lanl.gov/pdf/cond-mat/0608613 [3] Chen T, Glotzer SC http://xxx.lanl.gov/pdf/q-bio.BM/0608040

  2. Double face sealing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A double face sealing device is disclosed for mounting between two surfaces to provide an air-tight and fluid-tight seal between a closure member bearing one of the surfaces and a structure or housing bearing the other surface which extends around the opening or hatchway to be closed. The double face sealing device includes a plurality of sections or segments mounted to one of the surfaces, each having a main body portion, a pair of outwardly extending and diverging, cantilever, spring arms, and a pair of inwardly extending and diverging, cantilever, spring arms, an elastomeric cover on the distal, free ends of the outwardly extending and diverging spring arms, and an elastomeric cover on the distal, free, ends of the outwardly extending and diverging spring arms, and an elastomeric cover on the distal, free ends of the inwardly extending and diverging spring arms. The double face sealing device has application or use in all environments requiring a seal, but is particularly useful to seal openings or hatchways between compartments of spacecraft or aircraft.

  3. Chance-Constrained Guidance With Non-Convex Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ono, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    Missions to small bodies, such as comets or asteroids, require autonomous guidance for descent to these small bodies. Such guidance is made challenging by uncertainty in the position and velocity of the spacecraft, as well as the uncertainty in the gravitational field around the small body. In addition, the requirement to avoid collision with the asteroid represents a non-convex constraint that means finding the optimal guidance trajectory, in general, is intractable. In this innovation, a new approach is proposed for chance-constrained optimal guidance with non-convex constraints. Chance-constrained guidance takes into account uncertainty so that the probability of collision is below a specified threshold. In this approach, a new bounding method has been developed to obtain a set of decomposed chance constraints that is a sufficient condition of the original chance constraint. The decomposition of the chance constraint enables its efficient evaluation, as well as the application of the branch and bound method. Branch and bound enables non-convex problems to be solved efficiently to global optimality. Considering the problem of finite-horizon robust optimal control of dynamic systems under Gaussian-distributed stochastic uncertainty, with state and control constraints, a discrete-time, continuous-state linear dynamics model is assumed. Gaussian-distributed stochastic uncertainty is a more natural model for exogenous disturbances such as wind gusts and turbulence than the previously studied set-bounded models. However, with stochastic uncertainty, it is often impossible to guarantee that state constraints are satisfied, because there is typically a non-zero probability of having a disturbance that is large enough to push the state out of the feasible region. An effective framework to address robustness with stochastic uncertainty is optimization with chance constraints. These require that the probability of violating the state constraints (i.e., the probability of

  4. Regioselective Synthesis and Characterization of Multinuclear Convex-Bound Ruthenium-[n]Cycloparaphenylene (n = 5 and 6) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Kayahara, Eiichi; Patel, Vijay Kumar; Mercier, Audrey; Kündig, E Peter; Yamago, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Mono- and multinuclear complexes of ruthenium and [n]cycloparaphenylene (CPP, n = 5 and 6) were synthesized in excellent yields through ligand exchange of the cationic complex [(Cp)Ru(CH3CN)3](PF6) with CPP. In the multinuclear complexes, ruthenium selectively coordinated to alternate paraphenylene units to give bis- and tris-coordinated Ru complexes for [5] and [6]CPPs, respectively. Single-crystal X-ray analysis revealed the Ru was coordinated with η(6)-hapticity on the convex surface of CPP. PMID:26494105

  5. On some Hermite-Hadamard type inequalities for (s, QC)-convex functions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying; Qi, Feng

    2016-01-01

    In the paper, the authors introduce a new notion "[Formula: see text]-convex function on the co-ordinates" and establish some Hermite-Hadamard type integral inequalities for [Formula: see text]-convex functions on the co-ordinates.

  6. Hausdorff methods for approximating the convex Edgeworth-Pareto hull in integer problems with monotone objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pospelov, A. I.

    2016-08-01

    Adaptive methods for the polyhedral approximation of the convex Edgeworth-Pareto hull in multiobjective monotone integer optimization problems are proposed and studied. For these methods, theoretical convergence rate estimates with respect to the number of vertices are obtained. The estimates coincide in order with those for filling and augmentation H-methods intended for the approximation of nonsmooth convex compact bodies.

  7. A Fast and Accurate Sparse Continuous Signal Reconstruction by Homotopy DCD with Non-Convex Regularization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tianyun; Lu, Xinfei; Yu, Xiaofei; Xi, Zhendong; Chen, Weidong

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, various applications regarding sparse continuous signal recovery such as source localization, radar imaging, communication channel estimation, etc., have been addressed from the perspective of compressive sensing (CS) theory. However, there are two major defects that need to be tackled when considering any practical utilization. The first issue is off-grid problem caused by the basis mismatch between arbitrary located unknowns and the pre-specified dictionary, which would make conventional CS reconstruction methods degrade considerably. The second important issue is the urgent demand for low-complexity algorithms, especially when faced with the requirement of real-time implementation. In this paper, to deal with these two problems, we have presented three fast and accurate sparse reconstruction algorithms, termed as HR-DCD, Hlog-DCD and Hlp-DCD, which are based on homotopy, dichotomous coordinate descent (DCD) iterations and non-convex regularizations, by combining with the grid refinement technique. Experimental results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms and related analysis. PMID:24675758

  8. Fast inference of ill-posed problems within a convex space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-de-Cossio-Diaz, J.; Mulet, R.

    2016-07-01

    In multiple scientific and technological applications we face the problem of having low dimensional data to be justified by a linear model defined in a high dimensional parameter space. The difference in dimensionality makes the problem ill-defined: the model is consistent with the data for many values of its parameters. The objective is to find the probability distribution of parameter values consistent with the data, a problem that can be cast as the exploration of a high dimensional convex polytope. In this work we introduce a novel algorithm to solve this problem efficiently. It provides results that are statistically indistinguishable from currently used numerical techniques while its running time scales linearly with the system size. We show that the algorithm performs robustly in many abstract and practical applications. As working examples we simulate the effects of restricting reaction fluxes on the space of feasible phenotypes of a genome scale Escherichia coli metabolic network and infer the traffic flow between origin and destination nodes in a real communication network.

  9. Explicit excluded volume of cylindrically symmetric convex bodies.

    PubMed

    Piastra, Marco; Virga, Epifanio G

    2015-06-01

    We represent explicitly the excluded volume V(e){B(1),B(2)} of two generic cylindrically symmetric, convex rigid bodies, B(1) and B(2), in terms of a family of shape functionals evaluated separately on B(1) and B(2). We show that V(e){B(1),B(2)} fails systematically to feature a dipolar component, thus making illusory the assignment of any shape dipole to a tapered body in this class. The method proposed here is applied to cones and validated by a shape-reconstruction algorithm. It is further applied to spheroids (ellipsoids of revolution), for which it shows how some analytic estimates already regarded as classics should indeed be emended. PMID:26172727

  10. Laplace's equation on convex polyhedra via the unified method

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, A. C. L.

    2015-01-01

    We provide a new method to study the classical Dirichlet problem for Laplace's equation on a convex polyhedron. This new approach was motivated by Fokas’ unified method for boundary value problems. The central object in this approach is the global relation: an integral equation which couples the known boundary data and the unknown boundary values. This integral equation depends holomorphically on two complex parameters, and the resulting analysis takes place on a Banach space of complex analytic functions closely related to the classical Paley–Wiener space. We write the global relation in the form of an operator equation and prove that the relevant operator is bounded below using some novel integral identities. We give a new integral representation to the solution to the underlying boundary value problem which serves as a concrete realization of the fundamental principle of Ehrenpreis. PMID:27547079

  11. Nonparametric instrumental regression with non-convex constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasmair, M.; Scherzer, O.; Vanhems, A.

    2013-03-01

    This paper considers the nonparametric regression model with an additive error that is dependent on the explanatory variables. As is common in empirical studies in epidemiology and economics, it also supposes that valid instrumental variables are observed. A classical example in microeconomics considers the consumer demand function as a function of the price of goods and the income, both variables often considered as endogenous. In this framework, the economic theory also imposes shape restrictions on the demand function, such as integrability conditions. Motivated by this illustration in microeconomics, we study an estimator of a nonparametric constrained regression function using instrumental variables by means of Tikhonov regularization. We derive rates of convergence for the regularized model both in a deterministic and stochastic setting under the assumption that the true regression function satisfies a projected source condition including, because of the non-convexity of the imposed constraints, an additional smallness condition.

  12. Numerical optimization method for packing regular convex polygons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galiev, Sh. I.; Lisafina, M. S.

    2016-08-01

    An algorithm is presented for the approximate solution of the problem of packing regular convex polygons in a given closed bounded domain G so as to maximize the total area of the packed figures. On G a grid is constructed whose nodes generate a finite set W on G, and the centers of the figures to be packed can be placed only at some points of W. The problem of packing these figures with centers in W is reduced to a 0-1 linear programming problem. A two-stage algorithm for solving the resulting problems is proposed. The algorithm finds packings of the indicated figures in an arbitrary closed bounded domain on the plane. Numerical results are presented that demonstrate the effectiveness of the method.

  13. Convex crystal x-ray spectrometer for laser plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    May, M.; Heeter, R.; Emig, J.

    2004-10-01

    Measuring time and space-resolved spectra is important for understanding Hohlraum and Halfraum plasmas. Experiments at the OMEGA laser have used the Nova TSPEC which was not optimized for the OMEGA diagnostic space envelope or for the needed spectroscopic coverage and resolution. An improved multipurpose spectrometer snout, the MSPEC, has been constructed and fielded on OMEGA. The MSPEC provides the maximal internal volume for mounting crystals without any beam interferences at either 2x or 3x magnification. The RAP crystal is in a convex mounting geometry bent to a 20 cm radius of curvature. The spectral resolution, E/dE, is about 200 at 2.5 keV. The spectral coverage is 2 to 4.5 keV. The MSPEC can record four separate spectra on the framing camera at time intervals of up to several ns. The spectrometer design and initial field-test performance will be presented and compared to that of the TSPEC.

  14. Convexity at finite temperature and non-extensive thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandre, J.

    2016-09-01

    Assuming that tunnel effect between two degenerate bare minima occurs, in a scalar field theory at finite volume, this article studies the consequences for the effective potential, to all loop orders. Convexity is achieved only if the two bare minima are taken into account in the path integral, and a new derivation of the effective potential is given, in the large volume limit. The effective potential then has a universal form, it is suppressed by the space time volume, and does not feature spontaneous symmetry breaking as long as the volume is finite. The finite temperature analysis leads to surprising thermal properties, following from the non-extensive expression for the free energy. Although the physical relevance of these results is not clear, the potential application to ultra-light scalar particles is discussed.

  15. Convex probe endobronchial ultrasound: applications beyond conventional indications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Zheng, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is maturing and gaining acceptance by more and more clinicians for lymph node staging of lung cancer and diagnosis of mediastinal and hilar masses or lymph node enlargement by convex probe endobronchial ultrasound (CP-EBUS). The application of CP-EBUS, however, is not limited to conventional indications. Diagnostically, elastography is a new technology for the differentiation of benign and malignant lymph nodes before aspiration. CP-EBUS can also be used for pulmonary vascular diseases, such as pulmonary embolism (PE) and non-thrombotic endovascular lesions (NELs). Therapeutically, CP-EBUS can be used for cyst drainage and drug injections. CP-EBUS is not limited to observation and aspiration of mediastinal masses and lymph nodes, but is also suitable for exploration of other tissues external to the central airway, which necessitates unprecedented skills for the bronchoscopist. PMID:26543618

  16. Path Following in the Exact Penalty Method of Convex Programming

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hua; Lange, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Classical penalty methods solve a sequence of unconstrained problems that put greater and greater stress on meeting the constraints. In the limit as the penalty constant tends to ∞, one recovers the constrained solution. In the exact penalty method, squared penalties are replaced by absolute value penalties, and the solution is recovered for a finite value of the penalty constant. In practice, the kinks in the penalty and the unknown magnitude of the penalty constant prevent wide application of the exact penalty method in nonlinear programming. In this article, we examine a strategy of path following consistent with the exact penalty method. Instead of performing optimization at a single penalty constant, we trace the solution as a continuous function of the penalty constant. Thus, path following starts at the unconstrained solution and follows the solution path as the penalty constant increases. In the process, the solution path hits, slides along, and exits from the various constraints. For quadratic programming, the solution path is piecewise linear and takes large jumps from constraint to constraint. For a general convex program, the solution path is piecewise smooth, and path following operates by numerically solving an ordinary differential equation segment by segment. Our diverse applications to a) projection onto a convex set, b) nonnegative least squares, c) quadratically constrained quadratic programming, d) geometric programming, and e) semidefinite programming illustrate the mechanics and potential of path following. The final detour to image denoising demonstrates the relevance of path following to regularized estimation in inverse problems. In regularized estimation, one follows the solution path as the penalty constant decreases from a large value. PMID:26366044

  17. Why graphene growth is very different on the C face than on the Si face of SiC: Insights from surface equilibria and the (3 ×3 )-3 C -SiC (1 ¯ ¯ ā) reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Lydia; Lazarevic, Florian; Rinke, Patrick; Scheffler, Matthias; Blum, Volker

    2015-04-01

    We address the stability of the surface phases that occur on the C side of 3 C -SiC (1 ¯1 ¯1 ¯) at the onset of graphene formation. In this growth range, experimental reports reveal a coexistence of several surface phases. This coexistence can be explained by a Si-rich model for the unknown (3 ×3 ) reconstruction, the known (2 ×2 )C adatom phase, and the graphene-covered (2 ×2)C phase. By constructing an ab initio surface phase diagram using a van der Waals corrected density functional, we show that the formation of a well defined interface structure like the "buffer layer" on the Si side is blocked by Si-rich surface reconstructions.

  18. Sparse field level set method for non-convex Hamiltonians in 3D plasma etching profile simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radjenović, Branislav; Lee, Jae Koo; Radmilović-Radjenović, Marija

    2006-01-01

    Level set method [S. Osher, J. Sethian, J. Comput. Phys. 79 (1988) 12] is a highly robust and accurate computational technique for tracking moving interfaces in various application domains. It originates from the idea to view the moving front as a particular level set of a higher dimensional function, so the topological merging and breaking, sharp gradients and cusps can form naturally, and the effects of curvature can be easily incorporated. The resulting equations, describing interface surface evolution, are of Hamilton-Jacobi type and they are solved using techniques developed for hyperbolic equations. In this paper we describe an extension of the sparse field method for solving level set equations in the case of non-convex Hamiltonians, which are common in the simulations of the profile surface evolution during plasma etching and deposition processes. Sparse field method itself, developed by Whitaker [R. Whitaker, Internat. J. Comput. Vision 29 (3) (1998) 203] and broadly used in image processing community, is an alternative to the usual combination of narrow band and fast marching procedures for the computationally effective solving of level set equations. The developed procedure is applied to the simulations of 3D feature profile surface evolution during plasma etching process, that include the effects of ion enhanced chemical etching and physical sputtering, which are the primary causes of the Hamiltonian non-convexity.

  19. Trajectory Design Employing Convex Optimization for Landing on Irregularly Shaped Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinson, Robin M.; Lu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    proposed solution for designing the asteroid powered descent trajectory is to use convex optimization, a gravity model with higher fidelity than Newtonian, and an iterative solution process to design the fuel optimal trajectory. The solution to the convex optimization problem is the thrust profile, magnitude and direction, that will yield the minimum fuel trajectory for a soft landing at the target site, subject to various mission and operational constraints. The equations of motion are formulated in a rotating coordinate system and includes a high fidelity gravity model. The vehicle's thrust magnitude can vary between maximum and minimum bounds during the burn. Also, constraints are included to ensure that the vehicle does not run out of propellant, or go below the asteroid's surface, and any vehicle pointing requirements. The equations of motion are discretized and propagated with the trapezoidal rule in order to produce equality constraints for the optimization problem. These equality constraints allow the optimization algorithm to solve the entire problem, without including a propagator inside the optimization algorithm.

  20. Investigations into the tensile failure of doubly-convex cylindrical tablets under diametral loading using finite element methodology.

    PubMed

    Podczeck, Fridrun; Drake, Kevin R; Newton, J Michael

    2013-09-15

    In the literature various solutions exist for the calculation of the diametral compression tensile strength of doubly-convex tablets and each approach is based on experimental data obtained from single materials (gypsum, microcrystalline cellulose) only. The solutions are represented by complex equations and further differ for elastic and elasto-plastic behaviour of the compacts. The aim of this work was to develop a general equation that is applicable independently of deformation behaviour and which is based on simple tablet dimensions such as diameter and total tablet thickness only. With the help of 3D-FEM analysis the tensile failure stress of doubly-convex tables with central cylinder to total tablet thickness ratios W/D between 0.06 and 0.50 and face-curvature ratios D/R between 0.25 and 1.85 were evaluated. Both elastic and elasto-plastic deformation behaviour were considered. The results of 80 individual simulations were combined and showed that the tensile failure stress σt of doubly-convex tablets can be calculated from σt=(2P/πDW)(W/T)=2P/πDT with P being the failure load, D the diameter, W the central cylinder thickness, and T the total thickness of the tablet. This equation converts into the standard Brazilian equation (σt=2P/πDW) when W equals T, i.e. is equally valid for flat cylindrical tablets. In practice, the use of this new equation removes the need for complex measurements of tablet dimensions, because it only requires values for diameter and total tablet thickness. It also allows setting of standards for the mechanical strength of doubly-convex tablets. The new equation holds both for elastic and elasto-plastic deformation behaviour of the tablets under load. It is valid for all combinations of W/D-ratios between 0.06 and 0.50 with D/R-ratios between 0.00 and 1.85 except for W/D=0.50 in combination with D/R-ratios of 1.85 and 1.43 and for W/D-ratios of 0.40 and 0.30 in combination with D/R=1.85. FEM-analysis indicated a tendency to

  1. Maximum margin classification based on flexible convex hulls for fault diagnosis of roller bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Ming; Yang, Yu; Zheng, Jinde; Cheng, Junsheng

    2016-01-01

    A maximum margin classification based on flexible convex hulls (MMC-FCH) is proposed and applied to fault diagnosis of roller bearings. In this method, the class region of each sample set is approximated by a flexible convex hull of its training samples, and then an optimal separating hyper-plane that maximizes the geometric margin between flexible convex hulls is constructed by solving a closest pair of points problem. By using the kernel trick, MMC-FCH can be extended to nonlinear cases. In addition, multi-class classification problems can be processed by constructing binary pairwise classifiers as in support vector machine (SVM). Actually, the classical SVM also can be regarded as a maximum margin classification based on convex hulls (MMC-CH), which approximates each class region with a convex hull. The convex hull is a special case of the flexible convex hull. To train a MMC-FCH classifier, time-domain and frequency-domain statistical parameters are extracted not only from raw vibration signals but also from the resulting intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) by performing empirical mode decomposition (EMD) on the raw signals, and then the distance evaluation technique (DET) is used to select salient features from the whole statistical features. The experiments on bearing datasets show that the proposed method can reliably recognize different bearing faults.

  2. Statistical Mechanics of Optimal Convex Inference in High Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Advani, Madhu; Ganguli, Surya

    2016-07-01

    A fundamental problem in modern high-dimensional data analysis involves efficiently inferring a set of P unknown model parameters governing the relationship between the inputs and outputs of N noisy measurements. Various methods have been proposed to regress the outputs against the inputs to recover the P parameters. What are fundamental limits on the accuracy of regression, given finite signal-to-noise ratios, limited measurements, prior information, and computational tractability requirements? How can we optimally combine prior information with measurements to achieve these limits? Classical statistics gives incisive answers to these questions as the measurement density α =(N /P )→∞ . However, these classical results are not relevant to modern high-dimensional inference problems, which instead occur at finite α . We employ replica theory to answer these questions for a class of inference algorithms, known in the statistics literature as M-estimators. These algorithms attempt to recover the P model parameters by solving an optimization problem involving minimizing the sum of a loss function that penalizes deviations between the data and model predictions, and a regularizer that leverages prior information about model parameters. Widely cherished algorithms like maximum likelihood (ML) and maximum-a posteriori (MAP) inference arise as special cases of M-estimators. Our analysis uncovers fundamental limits on the inference accuracy of a subclass of M-estimators corresponding to computationally tractable convex optimization problems. These limits generalize classical statistical theorems like the Cramer-Rao bound to the high-dimensional setting with prior information. We further discover the optimal M-estimator for log-concave signal and noise distributions; we demonstrate that it can achieve our high-dimensional limits on inference accuracy, while ML and MAP cannot. Intriguingly, in high dimensions, these optimal algorithms become computationally simpler than

  3. Reliable use of resistance evaporation of Pt and C for high resolution freeze-fracturing and a crystal surface image complementary to the E-face of yeast plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Steere, R L

    1982-11-01

    Freeze-fracture specimens of bakers yeast plasma membranes faces were prepared in both a modified Denton DFE-2-freeze-etch module and a modified Balzers BAF-301 freeze-etch unit. Each unit was equipped with a liquid nitrogen cooled shroud, resistance evaporators with PT-C and C sources 7 cm from the specimens and with a resistance monitor to control PT-C shadow film thickness. Optical diffraction patterns of specimens prepared in these units have fourth, fifth or sixth order spots. Therefore, on the basis of optical diffraction patterns, resolution of yeast plasma membrane specimens prepared in these units is equivalent to or better than that obtained by others with an ultrahigh vacuum system equipped with specially redesigned electron guns. A new image with tube-like particles in hexagonal arrays, each surrounded by six substructure particles, nearly perfect high-resolution complement to the hexagonal array of ring-like depressions and the six surrounding subunit depressions of the E-face, has been revealed on the surfaces of cubic crystals (presumably ice) which formed in the gap between the P- and E-faces within fissures that occurred when the samples were frozen in liquid Freon 22. When the samples were subsequently freeze-fractured at 77 K at a chamber vacuum of 13 microPa in which the specimens were protected from surface contamination by a liquid nitrogen cooled shroud, these crystals remained attached to the P-face but pulled away from the E-face against which they had apparently made molecular contact. PMID:6757442

  4. The shape of the face template: geometric distortions of faces and their detection in natural scenes.

    PubMed

    Pongakkasira, Kaewmart; Bindemann, Markus

    2015-04-01

    Human face detection might be driven by skin-coloured face-shaped templates. To explore this idea, this study compared the detection of faces for which the natural height-to-width ratios were preserved with distorted faces that were stretched vertically or horizontally. The impact of stretching on detection performance was not obvious when faces were equated to their unstretched counterparts in terms of their height or width dimension (Experiment 1). However, stretching impaired detection when the original and distorted faces were matched for their surface area (Experiment 2), and this was found with both vertically and horizontally stretched faces (Experiment 3). This effect was evident in accuracy, response times, and also observers' eye movements to faces. These findings demonstrate that height-to-width ratios are an important component of the cognitive template for face detection. The results also highlight important differences between face detection and face recognition.

  5. Analysing seismic convex topographies by a half-plane time-domain BEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panji, M.; Kamalian, M.; Asgari Marnani, J.; Jafari, M. K.

    2014-04-01

    This paper extends a method, which has been previously called half-plane time-domain boundary element method (BEM) and successfully applied to 2-D concave topographies, for analysing convex irregular sites subjected to vertically as well as obliquely propagating incident SH waves. While using this method, only interface and surface of the hill needed to be discretized. During the use of the proposed substructuring process and dividing the problem into two domains of a half-space and a surface topography totally above the half-space, the method was employed for each of them. After satisfying continuity and boundary conditions, the problem was finally solved as an original coupled domain. To validate the presented method, three different examples were examined and the results were compared with those of the published works. A semi-circular cylindrical hill, a Gaussian-shaped ridge and a semi-circular hill joined by an inside concentric full/semi-circular cavity were investigated due to antiplane waves as Ricker wavelets type. The results showed that not only capability and efficiency of the method were very good but also much shorter run time than that of full-plane BEM formulation was obtained. The proposed method can be practically used to analyse site response in substituting traditional time-domain BEM as well.

  6. Min-max identities on boundaries of convex sets around the origin

    SciTech Connect

    Grcar, Joseph F.

    2002-01-31

    Min-max and max-min identities are found for inner products on the boundaries of compact, convex sets whose interiors contain the origin. The identities resemble the minimax theorem but they are different from it. Specifically, the value of each min-max (or max-min) equals the value of a dual problem of the same type. Their solution sets can be characterized geometrically in terms of the enclosed convex sets and their polar sets. However, the solution sets need not be convex nor even connected.

  7. On the Convergence of the Iterative Shrinkage/Thresholding Algorithm With a Weakly Convex Penalty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayram, Ilker

    2016-03-01

    We consider the iterative shrinkage/thresholding algorithm (ISTA) applied to a cost function composed of a data fidelity term and a penalty term. The penalty is non-convex but the concavity of the penalty is accounted for by the data fidelity term so that the overall cost function is convex. We provide a generalization of the convergence result for ISTA viewed as a forward-backward splitting algorithm. We also demonstrate experimentally that for the current setup, using large stepsizes in ISTA can accelerate convergence more than existing schemes proposed for the convex case, like TwIST or FISTA.

  8. Analysis of surface parametrizations for modern photometric stereo modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecca, Roberto; Rodolà, Emanuele; Cremers, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Tridimensional shape recovery based on Photometric Stereo (PS) recently received a strong improvement due to new mathematical models based on partial differential irradiance equation ratios.1 This modern approach to PS faces more realistic physical effects among which light attenuation and radial light propagation from a point light source. Since the approximation of the surface is performed with single step method, accurate reconstruction is prevented by sensitiveness to noise. In this paper we analyse a well-known parametrization2 of the tridimensional surface extending it on any auxiliary convex projection functions. Experiments on synthetic data show preliminary results where more accurate reconstruction can be achieved using more suitable parametrization specially in case of noisy input images.

  9. What's in a face? The role of depth undulations in three-dimensional depth-inversion illusions.

    PubMed

    Vlajnic, Vanja M; Papathomas, Thomas V; Keane, Brian P; Zalokostas, Anna; Silverstein, Steven M

    2014-01-01

    Upright hollow human faces produce among the strongest depth-inversion illusions (DIIs), but why? We considered the role of depth undulations by comparing four types of hollow objects: an ellipsoid, a human mask, and two symmetric 'Martian'masks, which wavered in depth like the human mask but which lacked face-like features. Illusion strength was quantified either as the critical viewing distance at which the 3-D percept switched between convex and concave (experiment 1) or as the proportion of time ('predominance') that observers experienced DII from a fixed intermediate viewing distance (experiment 2). Critical distances were smallest--and hence the illusion was strongest--for the upright human mask; the remaining objects produced undifferentiated critical distance values. The predominance results were more fine-grained: illusions were experienced most often for the upright human mask, least often for the hollow ellipsoid, and to an intermediate extent for the Martian and upside-down human masks. These results suggest: (1) an upside-down human mask and a surface with nonface features undulating in depth are equivalent for the purposes of generating DIIs; (2) depth undulations contribute to DII; and (3) such undulations are most effective when structured into an upright human face.

  10. [Apixaban-Related Convexal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage:A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kiyoharu; Yuki, Kiyoshi; Sadatomo, Takashi; Hara, Takeshi; Ohba, Hideo; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2016-03-01

    The risk of anticoagulant-associated intracranial hemorrhage(ICH)is relatively low in patients treated with non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants(NOAC). The anticoagulant-associated ICH comprises mainly intraparenchimal hemorrhage. Subdural hematoma and subarachnoid hemorrhage(SAH)are rare complications after treatment with NOAC, trauma being the most common cause for these two types of ICH. We report a case of non-traumatic convexal SAH(cSAH)associated with Apixavan. A 68-year-old man with repeated history of cerebral embolism with cardiogenic cause presented with weakness of the lower limbs. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed infarctions, and treatment with apixaban(5 mg twice per day)was administered. Three days later, SAH in the right superior frontal sulcus was discovered incidentally on computed tomography(CT). NOAC-associated SAH is a rare manifestation. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy(CAA)is the most common cause of cSAH in the elderly, and cSAH is supposed to be a warning sign of cerebral hemorrhage in CAA. Patients with CAA started on NOAC require careful monitoring.

  11. Guaranteed Blind Sparse Spikes Deconvolution via Lifting and Convex Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Yuejie

    2016-06-01

    Neural recordings, returns from radars and sonars, images in astronomy and single-molecule microscopy can be modeled as a linear superposition of a small number of scaled and delayed copies of a band-limited or diffraction-limited point spread function, which is either determined by the nature or designed by the users; in other words, we observe the convolution between a point spread function and a sparse spike signal with unknown amplitudes and delays. While it is of great interest to accurately resolve the spike signal from as few samples as possible, however, when the point spread function is not known a priori, this problem is terribly ill-posed. This paper proposes a convex optimization framework to simultaneously estimate the point spread function as well as the spike signal, by mildly constraining the point spread function to lie in a known low-dimensional subspace. By applying the lifting trick, we obtain an underdetermined linear system of an ensemble of signals with joint spectral sparsity, to which atomic norm minimization is applied. Under mild randomness assumptions of the low-dimensional subspace as well as a separation condition of the spike signal, we prove the proposed algorithm, dubbed as AtomicLift, is guaranteed to recover the spike signal up to a scaling factor as soon as the number of samples is large enough. The extension of AtomicLift to handle noisy measurements is also discussed. Numerical examples are provided to validate the effectiveness of the proposed approaches.

  12. A Localization Method for Multistatic SAR Based on Convex Optimization.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xuqi; Wu, Junjie; Yang, Jianyu; Sun, Zhichao; Huang, Yuling; Li, Zhongyu

    2015-01-01

    In traditional localization methods for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), the bistatic range sum (BRS) estimation and Doppler centroid estimation (DCE) are needed for the calculation of target localization. However, the DCE error greatly influences the localization accuracy. In this paper, a localization method for multistatic SAR based on convex optimization without DCE is investigated and the influence of BRS estimation error on localization accuracy is analysed. Firstly, by using the information of each transmitter and receiver (T/R) pair and the target in SAR image, the model functions of T/R pairs are constructed. Each model function's maximum is on the circumference of the ellipse which is the iso-range for its model function's T/R pair. Secondly, the target function whose maximum is located at the position of the target is obtained by adding all model functions. Thirdly, the target function is optimized based on gradient descent method to obtain the position of the target. During the iteration process, principal component analysis is implemented to guarantee the accuracy of the method and improve the computational efficiency. The proposed method only utilizes BRSs of a target in several focused images from multistatic SAR. Therefore, compared with traditional localization methods for SAR, the proposed method greatly improves the localization accuracy. The effectivity of the localization approach is validated by simulation experiment. PMID:26566031

  13. Optimization-based mesh correction with volume and convexity constraints

    DOE PAGESBeta

    D'Elia, Marta; Ridzal, Denis; Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel; Shashkov, Mikhail

    2016-02-24

    Here, we consider the problem of finding a mesh such that 1) it is the closest, with respect to a suitable metric, to a given source mesh having the same connectivity, and 2) the volumes of its cells match a set of prescribed positive values that are not necessarily equal to the cell volumes in the source mesh. Also, this volume correction problem arises in important simulation contexts, such as satisfying a discrete geometric conservation law and solving transport equations by incremental remapping or similar semi-Lagrangian transport schemes. In this paper we formulate volume correction as a constrained optimization problemmore » in which the distance to the source mesh defines an optimization objective, while the prescribed cell volumes, mesh validity and/or cell convexity specify the constraints. We solve this problem numerically using a sequential quadratic programming (SQP) method whose performance scales with the mesh size. To achieve scalable performance we develop a specialized multigrid-based preconditioner for optimality systems that arise in the application of the SQP method to the volume correction problem. Numerical examples illustrate the importance of volume correction, and showcase the accuracy, robustness and scalability of our approach.« less

  14. A Localization Method for Multistatic SAR Based on Convex Optimization

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In traditional localization methods for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), the bistatic range sum (BRS) estimation and Doppler centroid estimation (DCE) are needed for the calculation of target localization. However, the DCE error greatly influences the localization accuracy. In this paper, a localization method for multistatic SAR based on convex optimization without DCE is investigated and the influence of BRS estimation error on localization accuracy is analysed. Firstly, by using the information of each transmitter and receiver (T/R) pair and the target in SAR image, the model functions of T/R pairs are constructed. Each model function’s maximum is on the circumference of the ellipse which is the iso-range for its model function’s T/R pair. Secondly, the target function whose maximum is located at the position of the target is obtained by adding all model functions. Thirdly, the target function is optimized based on gradient descent method to obtain the position of the target. During the iteration process, principal component analysis is implemented to guarantee the accuracy of the method and improve the computational efficiency. The proposed method only utilizes BRSs of a target in several focused images from multistatic SAR. Therefore, compared with traditional localization methods for SAR, the proposed method greatly improves the localization accuracy. The effectivity of the localization approach is validated by simulation experiment. PMID:26566031

  15. Superresolved tomography by convex projections and detector motion.

    PubMed

    Wernick, M N; Chen, C T

    1992-09-01

    If the spatial resolution of an image-acquisition system is limited by the size of its component detector elements, then scanning may be required for the signal to be fully sampled. In such cases interpolation methods are normally applied to reproduce a uniformly sampled signal from the set of observations. Alternatively, however, this step can be treated as a restoration problem, in which case the extra measurements made accessible by detector motion may contain sufficient information to superresolve the signal, i.e., to recover information beyond the limit normally associated with finite detector size. We describe the application of this concept to the problem of constructing the projection matrix from a set of noise-corrupted tomographic measurements made by a moving detector array. In particular we focus on the case encountered in many tomographic applications in which the spatial response functions are approximately stationary with object depth. The method of projections onto convex sets is used in conjunction with an underrelaxation scheme to recover the projection matrix, from which the image is reconstructed by the standard filtered backprojection algorithm. Simulation results demonstrate that this approach applied to data acquired by a wobbling positron emission tomography system can substantially enhance the quality of the reconstructed image, even in the presence of high levels of quantum noise. The projection-matrix recovery step can be performed in a matter of seconds; thus the benefits of signal recovery are gained without a significant sacrifice in computation time.

  16. Convex Crystal X-ray Spectrometer for Laser Plasma Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    May, M; Heeter, R; Emig, J

    2004-04-15

    Measuring time and space-resolved spectra is important for understanding Hohlraum and Halfraum plasmas. Experiments at the OMEGA laser have used the Nova TSPEC which was not optimized for the OMEGA diagnostic space envelope or for the needed spectroscopic coverage and resolution. An improved multipurpose spectrometer snout, the MSPEC, has been constructed and fielded on OMEGA. The MSPEC provides the maximal internal volume for mounting crystals without any beam interferences at either 2x or 3x magnification. The RAP crystal is in a convex mounting geometry bent to a 20 cm radius of curvature. The spectral resolution, E/dE, is about 200 at 2.5 keV. The spectral coverage is 2 to 4.5 keV. The MSPEC can record four separate spectra on the framing camera at time intervals of up to several ns. The spectrometer design and initial field-test performance will be presented and compared to that of the TSPEC. Work supported by U. S. DoE/UC LLNL contract W-7405-ENG-48

  17. Optimization-based mesh correction with volume and convexity constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Elia, Marta; Ridzal, Denis; Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel; Shashkov, Mikhail

    2016-05-01

    We consider the problem of finding a mesh such that 1) it is the closest, with respect to a suitable metric, to a given source mesh having the same connectivity, and 2) the volumes of its cells match a set of prescribed positive values that are not necessarily equal to the cell volumes in the source mesh. This volume correction problem arises in important simulation contexts, such as satisfying a discrete geometric conservation law and solving transport equations by incremental remapping or similar semi-Lagrangian transport schemes. In this paper we formulate volume correction as a constrained optimization problem in which the distance to the source mesh defines an optimization objective, while the prescribed cell volumes, mesh validity and/or cell convexity specify the constraints. We solve this problem numerically using a sequential quadratic programming (SQP) method whose performance scales with the mesh size. To achieve scalable performance we develop a specialized multigrid-based preconditioner for optimality systems that arise in the application of the SQP method to the volume correction problem. Numerical examples illustrate the importance of volume correction, and showcase the accuracy, robustness and scalability of our approach.

  18. Role of non-convexity in characterizing single-scattering properties for ensembles of non-spherical precipitation particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, K.; Clune, T.; Pearson, C.; Olson, W. S.; Skofronick-Jackson, G.; Gravner, J.; Griffeath, D.

    2010-12-01

    This study improves upon an earlier, preliminary study using only three size bins based on maximum diameter in which it is found that the single-scattering properties of ensembles of non-spherical precipitation particles can be better characterized by considering the non-convexity of these particles. The difficulty of retrievals involving non-spherical particles stems not only from the fact that these particles are not spherical but also the fact that the shape composition of an ensemble of particles is usually unknown and the possibility of its mixture is infinite. Being able to adequately characterize the single-scattering properties of ensembles involving these non-spherical particles with as few parameters as possible is at the heart of solving this thorny remote sensing problem. Inspired by how well three parameters, i.e. water content, effective radius, and effective variance (or their equivalent), characterize the single-scattering properties of an ensemble of spherical particles of varying sizes, we set out to find additional parameters that generalize these three for ensembles of non-spherical particles. We find that a non-convexity measure appears to be one of these additional parameters. Non-convexity is expressed as a ratio of two effective radii derived from the moments of a given particle size distribution (PSD), each of which is in essence a ratio of ensemble particle volume to area. The effective radius in the numerator (denoted as rA) of the non-convexity ratio is based on the projection area of the particle ensemble whereas the one in the denominator (denoted as rS) is based on the surface area. In the preliminary study with PSDs having only three size bins, it is found that variations in the single-scattering properties, such as the scattering and extinction coefficients, the asymmetry factor, and even the scattering phase function, of a particle ensemble with a specified water content are very limited (practically non-existent), if 1) the habit

  19. Foil Face Seal Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munson, John

    2009-01-01

    In the seal literature you can find many attempts by various researchers to adapt film riding seals to the gas turbine engine. None have been successful, potential distortion of the sealing faces is the primary reason. There is a film riding device that does accommodate distortion and is in service in aircraft applications, namely the foil bearing. More specifically a foil thrust bearing. These are not intended to be seals, and they do not accommodate large axial movement between shaft & static structure. By combining the 2 a unique type of face seal has been created. It functions like a normal face seal. The foil thrust bearing replaces the normal primary sealing surface. The compliance of the foil bearing allows the foils to track distortion of the mating seal ring. The foil seal has several perceived advantages over existing hydrodynamic designs, enumerated in the chart. Materials and design methodology needed for this application already exist. Also the load capacity requirements for the foil bearing are low since it only needs to support itself and overcome friction forces at the antirotation keys.

  20. A Face Inversion Effect without a Face

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandman, Talia; Yovel, Galit

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have attributed the face inversion effect (FIE) to configural processing of internal facial features in upright but not inverted faces. Recent findings suggest that face mechanisms can be activated by faceless stimuli presented in the context of a body. Here we asked whether faceless stimuli with or without body context may induce…

  1. Face recognition across non-uniform motion blur, illumination, and pose.

    PubMed

    Punnappurath, Abhijith; Rajagopalan, Ambasamudram Narayanan; Taheri, Sima; Chellappa, Rama; Seetharaman, Guna

    2015-07-01

    Existing methods for performing face recognition in the presence of blur are based on the convolution model and cannot handle non-uniform blurring situations that frequently arise from tilts and rotations in hand-held cameras. In this paper, we propose a methodology for face recognition in the presence of space-varying motion blur comprising of arbitrarily-shaped kernels. We model the blurred face as a convex combination of geometrically transformed instances of the focused gallery face, and show that the set of all images obtained by non-uniformly blurring a given image forms a convex set. We first propose a non-uniform blur-robust algorithm by making use of the assumption of a sparse camera trajectory in the camera motion space to build an energy function with l1 -norm constraint on the camera motion. The framework is then extended to handle illumination variations by exploiting the fact that the set of all images obtained from a face image by non-uniform blurring and changing the illumination forms a bi-convex set. Finally, we propose an elegant extension to also account for variations in pose. PMID:25775493

  2. Learning Faces from Photographs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longmore, Christopher A.; Liu, Chang Hong; Young, Andrew W.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies examining face learning have mostly used only a single exposure to 1 image of each of the faces to be learned. However, in daily life, faces are usually learned from multiple encounters. These 6 experiments examined the effects on face learning of repeated exposures to single or multiple images of a face. All experiments…

  3. A Convex Atomic-Norm Approach to Multiple Sequence Alignment and Motif Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Ian E. H.; Lin, Xin; Zhang, Jiong; Ravikumar, Pradeep; Dhillon, Inderjit S.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple Sequence Alignment and Motif Discovery, known as NP-hard problems, are two fundamental tasks in Bioinformatics. Existing approaches to these two problems are based on either local search methods such as Expectation Maximization (EM), Gibbs Sampling or greedy heuristic methods. In this work, we develop a convex relaxation approach to both problems based on the recent concept of atomic norm and develop a new algorithm, termed Greedy Direction Method of Multiplier, for solving the convex relaxation with two convex atomic constraints. Experiments show that our convex relaxation approach produces solutions of higher quality than those standard tools widely-used in Bioinformatics community on the Multiple Sequence Alignment and Motif Discovery problems. PMID:27559428

  4. SNL3dFace

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial featuresmore » of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.« less

  5. SNL3dFace

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, Trina; Koch, Mark; Koudelka, Melissa; Peters, Ralph; Little, Charles; Boehnen, Chris; Peters, Tanya

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial features of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.

  6. Imaging through a convex interface with unknown position and shape using an ultrasonic linear array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matuda, Marcelo Y.; Buiochi, Flávio; Adamowski, Julio C.

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents a technique for improving the internal imaging of a solid object immersed in water using an ultrasonic array. This technique consists in determining the position and shape of a convex object surface using a combination of synthetic transmit aperture (STA) and sign coherence factor (SCF) methods. The SCF attenuates the grating lobe noise. The technique is applied to a cylindrical aluminium object with internal holes simulating defects. The first step is the acquisition of a sequence of STA images with SCF, using a distinct group of adjacent array elements for each image. In the second step, a circle is fitted to the positions of the peak values in each image. Finally, using the Fermat's principle and this circle as the interface between the water and the metallic object, the propagation delays from the array elements to the image grid points may be calculated and used in another STA image. In this final image, the small holes in the cylindrical object can clearly be identified. The effects of the SCF for a large diameter circular reflector are simulated and compared with experimental data.

  7. Pinhole Viewing Strengthens the Hollow-Face Illusion.

    PubMed

    Koessler, Trent; Hill, Harold

    2015-08-01

    A hollow (concave) mask appears convex when viewed from beyond a certain distance even when viewed stereoscopically-this is the hollow-face illusion. At close viewing distances, the same mask is seen as hollow even when disparity information is eliminated by monocular viewing. A potential source of nonpictorial, monocular information that favors a veridical percept at close distances is accommodation in conjunction with focus blur. In this article, we used pinhole viewing to minimize this potential source of information and test whether it affects whether a hollow mask is seen as veridical (concave) or illusory (convex). Since monocular viewing also facilitates the illusory (convex) percept, it was included in the design both as a comparison and to test whether any effect of accommodation depends on vergence. Pinhole viewing was found favor the illusory percept, and its effect was at least as large as, and added to, that of monocular viewing. A control experiment using tinted glasses that attenuate illumination at least as much as the pinholes did not strengthen the illusion ruling out explanations in terms of reduced luminance. For pinhole viewing, there was no difference between monocular and binocular conditions. The results are interpreted as evidence that focus driven depth information affects perceived three-dimensional shape at close distances even when other sources of depth information are available. The lack of a difference between monocular and binocular pinhole viewing suggests that, by disrupting accommodation, pinholes may also interfere with linked vergence cues to depth. PMID:27433315

  8. Attention Capture by Faces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langton, Stephen R. H.; Law, Anna S.; Burton, A. Mike; Schweinberger, Stefan R.

    2008-01-01

    We report three experiments that investigate whether faces are capable of capturing attention when in competition with other non-face objects. In Experiment 1a participants took longer to decide that an array of objects contained a butterfly target when a face appeared as one of the distracting items than when the face did not appear in the array.…

  9. Faciotopy-A face-feature map with face-like topology in the human occipital face area.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, Linda; Mur, Marieke; Kriegeskorte, Nikolaus

    2015-11-01

    The occipital face area (OFA) and fusiform face area (FFA) are brain regions thought to be specialized for face perception. However, their intrinsic functional organization and status as cortical areas with well-defined boundaries remains unclear. Here we test these regions for "faciotopy", a particular hypothesis about their intrinsic functional organisation. A faciotopic area would contain a face-feature map on the cortical surface, where cortical patches represent face features and neighbouring patches represent features that are physically neighbouring in a face. The faciotopy hypothesis is motivated by the idea that face regions might develop from a retinotopic protomap and acquire their selectivity for face features through natural visual experience. Faces have a prototypical configuration of features, are usually perceived in a canonical upright orientation, and are frequently fixated in particular locations. To test the faciotopy hypothesis, we presented images of isolated face features at fixation to subjects during functional magnetic resonance imaging. The responses in V1 were best explained by low-level image properties of the stimuli. OFA, and to a lesser degree FFA, showed evidence for faciotopic organization. When a single patch of cortex was estimated for each face feature, the cortical distances between the feature patches reflected the physical distance between the features in a face. Faciotopy would be the first example, to our knowledge, of a cortical map reflecting the topology, not of a part of the organism itself (its retina in retinotopy, its body in somatotopy), but of an external object of particular perceptual significance. PMID:26235800

  10. Familiar face + novel face = familiar face? Representational bias in the perception of morphed faces in chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Myowa-Yamakoshi, Masako

    2016-01-01

    Highly social animals possess a well-developed ability to distinguish the faces of familiar from novel conspecifics to induce distinct behaviors for maintaining society. However, the behaviors of animals when they encounter ambiguous faces of familiar yet novel conspecifics, e.g., strangers with faces resembling known individuals, have not been well characterised. Using a morphing technique and preferential-looking paradigm, we address this question via the chimpanzee’s facial–recognition abilities. We presented eight subjects with three types of stimuli: (1) familiar faces, (2) novel faces and (3) intermediate morphed faces that were 50% familiar and 50% novel faces of conspecifics. We found that chimpanzees spent more time looking at novel faces and scanned novel faces more extensively than familiar or intermediate faces. Interestingly, chimpanzees looked at intermediate faces in a manner similar to familiar faces with regards to the fixation duration, fixation count, and saccade length for facial scanning, even though the participant was encountering the intermediate faces for the first time. We excluded the possibility that subjects merely detected and avoided traces of morphing in the intermediate faces. These findings suggest a bias for a feeling-of-familiarity that chimpanzees perceive familiarity with an intermediate face by detecting traces of a known individual, as 50% alternation is sufficient to perceive familiarity. PMID:27602275

  11. Familiar face + novel face = familiar face? Representational bias in the perception of morphed faces in chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yoshi-Taka; Myowa-Yamakoshi, Masako; Hirata, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Highly social animals possess a well-developed ability to distinguish the faces of familiar from novel conspecifics to induce distinct behaviors for maintaining society. However, the behaviors of animals when they encounter ambiguous faces of familiar yet novel conspecifics, e.g., strangers with faces resembling known individuals, have not been well characterised. Using a morphing technique and preferential-looking paradigm, we address this question via the chimpanzee's facial-recognition abilities. We presented eight subjects with three types of stimuli: (1) familiar faces, (2) novel faces and (3) intermediate morphed faces that were 50% familiar and 50% novel faces of conspecifics. We found that chimpanzees spent more time looking at novel faces and scanned novel faces more extensively than familiar or intermediate faces. Interestingly, chimpanzees looked at intermediate faces in a manner similar to familiar faces with regards to the fixation duration, fixation count, and saccade length for facial scanning, even though the participant was encountering the intermediate faces for the first time. We excluded the possibility that subjects merely detected and avoided traces of morphing in the intermediate faces. These findings suggest a bias for a feeling-of-familiarity that chimpanzees perceive familiarity with an intermediate face by detecting traces of a known individual, as 50% alternation is sufficient to perceive familiarity. PMID:27602275

  12. Familiar face + novel face = familiar face? Representational bias in the perception of morphed faces in chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Myowa-Yamakoshi, Masako

    2016-01-01

    Highly social animals possess a well-developed ability to distinguish the faces of familiar from novel conspecifics to induce distinct behaviors for maintaining society. However, the behaviors of animals when they encounter ambiguous faces of familiar yet novel conspecifics, e.g., strangers with faces resembling known individuals, have not been well characterised. Using a morphing technique and preferential-looking paradigm, we address this question via the chimpanzee’s facial–recognition abilities. We presented eight subjects with three types of stimuli: (1) familiar faces, (2) novel faces and (3) intermediate morphed faces that were 50% familiar and 50% novel faces of conspecifics. We found that chimpanzees spent more time looking at novel faces and scanned novel faces more extensively than familiar or intermediate faces. Interestingly, chimpanzees looked at intermediate faces in a manner similar to familiar faces with regards to the fixation duration, fixation count, and saccade length for facial scanning, even though the participant was encountering the intermediate faces for the first time. We excluded the possibility that subjects merely detected and avoided traces of morphing in the intermediate faces. These findings suggest a bias for a feeling-of-familiarity that chimpanzees perceive familiarity with an intermediate face by detecting traces of a known individual, as 50% alternation is sufficient to perceive familiarity.

  13. Growth morphology of vicinal hillocks on the (101) face of KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}: Evidence of surface diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Land, T.A.; De Yoreo, J.J.; Lee, J.D.; Ferguson, J.R.

    1995-01-10

    The growth morphologies of vicinal hillocks on KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} (101) surfaces have been investigated using atomic force microscopy. Both 2D and spiral dislocation growth hillocks are observed on the same crystal surface at supersaturations of {approximately}5%. Growth occurs on monomolecular 5 {Angstrom} steps both by step-flow and through layer-by-layer growth. The distribution of islands on the terraces demonstrate that surface diffusion is an important factor during growth. Terraces that are less than the diffusion length do not contain any islands. This, together with the length scale of the inter island spacing and the denuded zones provide an estimate of the diffusion length. In situ experiments at very low supersaturation ({approximately}0.l%) show that growth is a discontinuous process due to step pinning. In addition, in situ images allow for the direct determination of the fundamental growth parameters {alpha}, the step edge energy, and {beta}, the kinetic coefficient.

  14. Programmed versus Face-to-Face Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, William M.; Ewing, Thomas N.

    1971-01-01

    A comparison was made of the effectiveness of a programmed Self-Counseling Manual and a normal precollege counseling interview by experienced counselors. Findings supported the use of programmed counseling as an adjunct to or substitute for face-to-face counseling. (Author)

  15. A Shape-Based Account for Holistic Face Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Mintao; Bülthoff, Heinrich H.; Bülthoff, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Faces are processed holistically, so selective attention to 1 face part without any influence of the others often fails. In this study, 3 experiments investigated what type of facial information (shape or surface) underlies holistic face processing and whether generalization of holistic processing to nonexperienced faces requires extensive…

  16. A unified study of projection algorithms for solving Hilbertian convex feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Combettes, P.

    1994-12-31

    Numerous problems in applied mathematics, science, and engineering can be reduced to finding a common point of a collection of closed and convex sets in a Hilbert space. This abstract formulation is known as the hilbertian convex feasibility problem. The goal of this work is to study the convergence of a broad class of projection methods for solving hilbertian convex feasibility problems with a countable number of sets. A general algorithm is proposed which provides a unifying formulation for existing projection-based methods. It proceeds by extrapolated iterations of convex combinations of approximate projections onto subfamilies of sets. The relaxation parameters can vary over iteration- dependent, extrapolated ranges that extend beyond the interval [0, 2] usually used in projection methods. Various strategies are considered to control the order in which the sets are activated (cyclic, coercive, quasi-cyclic, admissible, chaotic). In addition, general regularity conditions on the sets are used (Slater condition, Levitin-Polyak condition, locally uniformly convex condition, bounded compactness, bounded and strong regularity) to study strong convergence. Weak convergence results for more general iterative schemes involving firmly nonexpansive operators instead of projections are also be presented.

  17. CudaChain: an alternative algorithm for finding 2D convex hulls on the GPU.

    PubMed

    Mei, Gang

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an alternative GPU-accelerated convex hull algorithm and a novel S orting-based P reprocessing A pproach (SPA) for planar point sets. The proposed convex hull algorithm termed as CudaChain consists of two stages: (1) two rounds of preprocessing performed on the GPU and (2) the finalization of calculating the expected convex hull on the CPU. Those interior points locating inside a quadrilateral formed by four extreme points are first discarded, and then the remaining points are distributed into several (typically four) sub regions. For each subset of points, they are first sorted in parallel; then the second round of discarding is performed using SPA; and finally a simple chain is formed for the current remaining points. A simple polygon can be easily generated by directly connecting all the chains in sub regions. The expected convex hull of the input points can be finally obtained by calculating the convex hull of the simple polygon. The library Thrust is utilized to realize the parallel sorting, reduction, and partitioning for better efficiency and simplicity. Experimental results show that: (1) SPA can very effectively detect and discard the interior points; and (2) CudaChain achieves 5×-6× speedups over the famous Qhull implementation for 20M points.

  18. CudaChain: an alternative algorithm for finding 2D convex hulls on the GPU.

    PubMed

    Mei, Gang

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an alternative GPU-accelerated convex hull algorithm and a novel S orting-based P reprocessing A pproach (SPA) for planar point sets. The proposed convex hull algorithm termed as CudaChain consists of two stages: (1) two rounds of preprocessing performed on the GPU and (2) the finalization of calculating the expected convex hull on the CPU. Those interior points locating inside a quadrilateral formed by four extreme points are first discarded, and then the remaining points are distributed into several (typically four) sub regions. For each subset of points, they are first sorted in parallel; then the second round of discarding is performed using SPA; and finally a simple chain is formed for the current remaining points. A simple polygon can be easily generated by directly connecting all the chains in sub regions. The expected convex hull of the input points can be finally obtained by calculating the convex hull of the simple polygon. The library Thrust is utilized to realize the parallel sorting, reduction, and partitioning for better efficiency and simplicity. Experimental results show that: (1) SPA can very effectively detect and discard the interior points; and (2) CudaChain achieves 5×-6× speedups over the famous Qhull implementation for 20M points. PMID:27350927

  19. Numerical algorithm for solving mathematical programming problems with a smooth surface as a constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyaev, Yu. A.

    2016-03-01

    A numerical algorithm for minimizing a convex function on a smooth surface is proposed. The algorithm is based on reducing the original problem to a sequence of convex programming problems. Necessary extremum conditions are examined, and the convergence of the algorithm is analyzed.

  20. Convex and concave successions of power-law decays in small-angle scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anitas, E. M.

    2016-08-01

    The small-angle scattering (SAS) structure factor from a new model of a 3D deterministic fractal in which the relative positions and the number of structural units vary with fractal iteration number is calculated. It is shown that, depending on the relative positions of scattering units inside the fractal, we can obtain various types of power-law successions, such as: convex/concave - when the absolute value of the scattering exponent of the first power-law decay is higher/smaller than that of the subsequent power- law decay, or any combination of them (i.e. convex-concave or concave-convex). The obtained results can explain experimental SAS (neutron or X-rays) data which are characterized by a succession of power-law decays of arbitrary length.

  1. The role of convexity for solving some shortest path problems in plane without triangulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Phan Thanh; Hai, Nguyen Ngoc; Hoai, Tran Van

    2013-09-01

    Solving shortest path problems inside simple polygons is a very classical problem in motion planning. To date, it has usually relied on triangulation of the polygons. The question: "Can one devise a simple O(n) time algorithm for computing the shortest path between two points in a simple polygon (with n vertices), without resorting to a (complicated) linear-time triangulation algorithm?" raised by J. S. B. Mitchell in Handbook of Computational Geometry (J. Sack and J. Urrutia, eds., Elsevier Science B.V., 2000), is still open. The aim of this paper is to show that convexity contributes to the design of efficient algorithms for solving some versions of shortest path problems (namely, computing the convex hull of a finite set of points and convex rope on rays in 2D, computing approximate shortest path between two points inside a simple polygon) without triangulation on the entire polygons. New algorithms are implemented in C and numerical examples are presented.

  2. A Convex Geometry-Based Blind Source Separation Method for Separating Nonnegative Sources.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zuyuan; Xiang, Yong; Rong, Yue; Xie, Kan

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a convex geometry (CG)-based method for blind separation of nonnegative sources. First, the unaccessible source matrix is normalized to be column-sum-to-one by mapping the available observation matrix. Then, its zero-samples are found by searching the facets of the convex hull spanned by the mapped observations. Considering these zero-samples, a quadratic cost function with respect to each row of the unmixing matrix, together with a linear constraint in relation to the involved variables, is proposed. Upon which, an algorithm is presented to estimate the unmixing matrix by solving a classical convex optimization problem. Unlike the traditional blind source separation (BSS) methods, the CG-based method does not require the independence assumption, nor the uncorrelation assumption. Compared with the BSS methods that are specifically designed to distinguish between nonnegative sources, the proposed method requires a weaker sparsity condition. Provided simulation results illustrate the performance of our method. PMID:25203999

  3. Lp stability for entropy solutions of scalar conservation laws with strict convex flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adimurthi; Ghoshal, Shyam Sundar; Veerappa Gowda, G. D.

    Here we consider the scalar convex conservation laws in one space dimension with strictly convex flux which is in C1. Existence, uniqueness and L1 contractivity were proved by Kružkov [14]. Using the relative entropy method, Leger showed that for a uniformly convex flux and for the shock wave solutions, the L2 norm of a perturbed solution relative to the shock wave is bounded by the L2 norm of the initial perturbation. Here we generalize the result to Lp norm for all 1⩽p<∞. Also we show that for the non-shock wave solution, Lp norm of the perturbed solution relative to the modified N-wave is bounded by the Lp norm of the initial perturbation for all 1⩽p<∞.

  4. Digital breast tomosynthesis reconstruction using spatially weighted non-convex regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jiabei; Fessler, Jeffrey A.; Chan, Heang-Ping

    2016-03-01

    Regularization is an effective strategy for reducing noise in tomographic reconstruction. This paper proposes a spatially weighted non-convex (SWNC) regularization method for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) image reconstruction. With a non-convex cost function, this method can suppress noise without blurring microcalcifications (MC) and spiculations of masses. To minimize the non-convex cost function, we apply a majorize-minimize separable quadratic surrogate algorithm (MM-SQS) that is further accelerated by ordered subsets (OS). We applied the new method to a heterogeneous breast phantom and to human subject DBT data, and observed improved image quality in both situations. A quantitative study also showed that the SWNC method can significantly enhance the contrast-to-noise ratio of MCs. By properly selecting its parameters, the SWNC regularizer can preserve the appearance of the mass margins and breast parenchyma.

  5. Improving the accuracy of convexity splitting methods for gradient flow equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasner, Karl; Orizaga, Saulo

    2016-06-01

    This paper introduces numerical time discretization methods which significantly improve the accuracy of the convexity-splitting approach of Eyre (1998) [7], while retaining the same numerical cost and stability properties. A first order method is constructed by iteration of a semi-implicit method based upon decomposing the energy into convex and concave parts. A second order method is also presented based on backwards differentiation formulas. Several extrapolation procedures for iteration initialization are proposed. We show that, under broad circumstances, these methods have an energy decreasing property, leading to good numerical stability. The new schemes are tested using two evolution equations commonly used in materials science: the Cahn-Hilliard equation and the phase field crystal equation. We find that our methods can increase accuracy by many orders of magnitude in comparison to the original convexity-splitting algorithm. In addition, the optimal methods require little or no iteration, making their computation cost similar to the original algorithm.

  6. A high-performance feedback neural network for solving convex nonlinear programming problems.

    PubMed

    Leung, Yee; Chen, Kai-Zhou; Gao, Xing-Bao

    2003-01-01

    Based on a new idea of successive approximation, this paper proposes a high-performance feedback neural network model for solving convex nonlinear programming problems. Differing from existing neural network optimization models, no dual variables, penalty parameters, or Lagrange multipliers are involved in the proposed network. It has the least number of state variables and is very simple in structure. In particular, the proposed network has better asymptotic stability. For an arbitrarily given initial point, the trajectory of the network converges to an optimal solution of the convex nonlinear programming problem under no more than the standard assumptions. In addition, the network can also solve linear programming and convex quadratic programming problems, and the new idea of a feedback network may be used to solve other optimization problems. Feasibility and efficiency are also substantiated by simulation examples.

  7. Are face representations depth cue invariant?

    PubMed

    Dehmoobadsharifabadi, Armita; Farivar, Reza

    2016-06-01

    The visual system can process three-dimensional depth cues defining surfaces of objects, but it is unclear whether such information contributes to complex object recognition, including face recognition. The processing of different depth cues involves both dorsal and ventral visual pathways. We investigated whether facial surfaces defined by individual depth cues resulted in meaningful face representations-representations that maintain the relationship between the population of faces as defined in a multidimensional face space. We measured face identity aftereffects for facial surfaces defined by individual depth cues (Experiments 1 and 2) and tested whether the aftereffect transfers across depth cues (Experiments 3 and 4). Facial surfaces and their morphs to the average face were defined purely by one of shading, texture, motion, or binocular disparity. We obtained identification thresholds for matched (matched identity between adapting and test stimuli), non-matched (non-matched identity between adapting and test stimuli), and no-adaptation (showing only the test stimuli) conditions for each cue and across different depth cues. We found robust face identity aftereffect in both experiments. Our results suggest that depth cues do contribute to forming meaningful face representations that are depth cue invariant. Depth cue invariance would require integration of information across different areas and different pathways for object recognition, and this in turn has important implications for cortical models of visual object recognition. PMID:27271993

  8. Face Validity Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevo, Baruch

    1985-01-01

    A literature review and a proposed means of measuring face validity, a test's appearance of being valid, are presented. Empirical evidence from examinees' perceptions of a college entrance examination support the reliability of measuring face validity. (GDC)

  9. Face to Face Communications in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Malcolm M.; Davon, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    It has been reported that human face-to-face communications in space are compromised by facial edema, variations in the orientations of speakers and listeners, and background noises that are encountered in the shuttle and in space stations. To date, nearly all reports have been anecdotal or subjective, in the form of post-flight interviews or questionnaires; objective and quantitative data are generally lacking. Although it is acknowledged that efficient face-to-face communications are essential for astronauts to work safely and effectively, specific ways in which the space environment interferes with non-linguistic communication cues are poorly documented. Because we have only a partial understanding of how non-linguistic communication cues may change with mission duration, it is critically important to obtain objective data, and to evaluate these cues under well-controlled experimental conditions.

  10. Tuning magnetic anisotropy of amorphous CoFeB film by depositing on convex flexible substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Xinyu; Wang, Baomin; Tang, Zhenhua; Shen, Yuan; Yang, Huali; Wang, Junling; Zhan, Qingfeng; Mao, Sining; Xu, Xiaohong; Li, Run-Wei

    2016-05-01

    We have investigated the magnetic properties of amorphous Co40Fe40B20 (CoFeB) thin films grown on flexible polyimide (PI) substrates, which were fixed on convex molds with different curvatures during the magnetron sputtering deposition. When the flexible substrates were changed from convex to flat state after fabrication, a uniaxial magnetic anisotropy was induced in the CoFeB film due to magnetostrictive effect. Furthermore, the anisotropy also depends on the thicknesses of the film and substrate. Our results demonstrate a convenient method to tune the anisotropy of magnetic thin films grown on flexible substrates.

  11. A recurrent neural network for solving a class of generalized convex optimization problems.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Alireza; Wang, Jun; Hosseini, S Mohammad

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a penalty-based recurrent neural network for solving a class of constrained optimization problems with generalized convex objective functions. The model has a simple structure described by using a differential inclusion. It is also applicable for any nonsmooth optimization problem with affine equality and convex inequality constraints, provided that the objective function is regular and pseudoconvex on feasible region of the problem. It is proven herein that the state vector of the proposed neural network globally converges to and stays thereafter in the feasible region in finite time, and converges to the optimal solution set of the problem.

  12. A Modified BFGS Formula Using a Trust Region Model for Nonsmooth Convex Minimizations

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Zengru; Yuan, Gonglin; Sheng, Zhou; Liu, Wenjie; Wang, Xiaoliang; Duan, Xiabin

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a modified BFGS formula using a trust region model for solving nonsmooth convex minimizations by using the Moreau-Yosida regularization (smoothing) approach and a new secant equation with a BFGS update formula. Our algorithm uses the function value information and gradient value information to compute the Hessian. The Hessian matrix is updated by the BFGS formula rather than using second-order information of the function, thus decreasing the workload and time involved in the computation. Under suitable conditions, the algorithm converges globally to an optimal solution. Numerical results show that this algorithm can successfully solve nonsmooth unconstrained convex problems. PMID:26501775

  13. Dynamic region-of-interest acquisition and face tracking for intelligent surveillance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Ouk; Kim, Sangjin; Park, Chang-Woo; Sung, Ha-Gyeong; Paik, Joonki

    2004-05-01

    Recently, surveillance systems gain more attraction than simple CCTV systems, especially for complicated security environment. The major purpose of the proposed system is to monitor and track intruders. More specifically, accurate identification of each intruder is more important than simply recording what they are doing. Most existing surveillance systems simply keep recording the fixed viewing area, and some others adopt the tracking technique for wider coverage. Although panning and tilting the camera can extend the viewing area, only a few automatic zoom control techniques for acquiring the optimum ROI has been proposed. This paper describes a system for tracking multiple faces from input video sequences using facial convex hull-based facial segmentation and robust hausdorff distance. The proposed algorithm adapts skin color reference map in the YCbCr color space and hair color reference map in the RGB color space for classifying face region. Then, we obtain an initial face model with preprocessing and convex hull. For tracking, this algorithm computes displacement of the point set between frames using a robust hausdorff distance and the best possible displacement is selected. Finally, the initial face model is updated using the displacement. We provide experimental result to demonstrate the performance of the proposed tracking algorithm, which efficiently tracks rotating, and zooming faces as well as multiple faces in video sequences obtained from at CCD camera.

  14. Energy efficient face seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sehnal, J.; Sedy, J.; Etsion, I.; Zobens, A.

    1982-01-01

    Torque, face temperature, leakage, and wear of a flat face seal were compared with three coned face seals at pressures up to 2758 kPa and speeds up to 8000 rpm. Axial movement of the mating seal parts was recorded by a digital data acquisition system. The coning of the tungsten carbide primary ring ranged from .51 micro-m to 5.6 micro-m. The torque of the coned face seal balanced to 76.3% was an average 42% lower, the leakage eleven times higher, than that of the standard flat face seal. The reduction of the balance of the coned face seal to 51.3% resulted by decreasing the torque by an additional 44% and increasing leakage 12 to 230 times, depending on the seal shaft speed. No measurable wear was observed on the face of the coned seals.

  15. A corresponding-states principle for the equation of state of hard-convex-body fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeso, M. J.; Solana, J. R.

    1994-09-01

    A theoretically based corresponding-states principle is developed for the equation of state of hard-convex-body fluids. For all the fluids considered, the excess compressibility factor, reduced by means of a parameter which can be determined analytically. lies on a single curve whose analytical expression can be obtained from the equation of state of the hard-sphere fluid.

  16. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related atraumatic convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage: an ARIA before the tsunami

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Lizana, Eva; Carmona-Iragui, María; Alcolea, Daniel; Gómez-Choco, Manuel; Vilaplana, Eduard; Sánchez-Saudinós, María B; Clarimón, Jordi; Hernández-Guillamon, Mar; Munuera, Josep; Gelpi, Ellen; Gómez-Anson, Beatriz; de Juan-Delago, Manel; Delgado-Mederos, Raquel; Montaner, Joan; Ois, Angel; Amaro, Sergi; Blesa, Rafael; Martí-Fàbregas, Joan; Lleó, Alberto; Fortea, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Atraumatic convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage (cSAH) in elderly patients is a rare entity that has been associated with cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) and intracerebral hematomas (ICH). To characterize this entity and to study these associations, 22 patients over 60 with cSAH were included in a multicenter ambispective cohort study. Clinical data, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, APOE genotyping, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers were evaluated. Results were compared with data from healthy controls (HC), non-cSAH CAA patients (CAAo), and Alzheimer disease patients. Convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage presented with transient sensory or motor symptoms. At follow-up (median 30.7 months), 5 patients had died, 6 survivors showed functional disability (modified Rankins Scale (mRS)>2), and 12 cognitive impairment. Four patients had prior ICH and six had an ICH during follow-up. CSF-Aß40 and Aß42 levels were lower in cSAH and CAAo compared with HC. Convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage presented an APOE-ɛ2 overrepresentation and CAAo had an APOE-ɛ4 overrepresentation. On MRI, all patients fulfilled CAA-modified Boston criteria and 9 showed cortical ischemia in the surrounding cortex or the vicinity of superficial siderosis. The neuropathologic study, available in one patient, showed severe CAA and advanced Alzheimer-type pathology. Convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage in the elderly is associated with cognitive impairment and lobar ICH occurrence. Our findings support the existence of an underlying CAA pathology. PMID:25735919

  17. Modeling IrisCode and its variants as convex polyhedral cones and its security implications.

    PubMed

    Kong, Adams Wai-Kin

    2013-03-01

    IrisCode, developed by Daugman, in 1993, is the most influential iris recognition algorithm. A thorough understanding of IrisCode is essential, because over 100 million persons have been enrolled by this algorithm and many biometric personal identification and template protection methods have been developed based on IrisCode. This paper indicates that a template produced by IrisCode or its variants is a convex polyhedral cone in a hyperspace. Its central ray, being a rough representation of the original biometric signal, can be computed by a simple algorithm, which can often be implemented in one Matlab command line. The central ray is an expected ray and also an optimal ray of an objective function on a group of distributions. This algorithm is derived from geometric properties of a convex polyhedral cone but does not rely on any prior knowledge (e.g., iris images). The experimental results show that biometric templates, including iris and palmprint templates, produced by different recognition methods can be matched through the central rays in their convex polyhedral cones and that templates protected by a method extended from IrisCode can be broken into. These experimental results indicate that, without a thorough security analysis, convex polyhedral cone templates cannot be assumed secure. Additionally, the simplicity of the algorithm implies that even junior hackers without knowledge of advanced image processing and biometric databases can still break into protected templates and reveal relationships among templates produced by different recognition methods.

  18. Simulation of deep drawing of aluminium alloy sheets using convex texture based plastic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, S.; Van Bael, A.; Van Houtte, P.

    2004-06-01

    In the present study, texture based convex plastic potentials are used to derive the yield locus for the anisotropic materials. Finite element analysis is performed on cup drawing process of aluminium alloy sheets. The predicted results are compared to the experimental data.

  19. Convex set theoretic image recovery by extrapolated iterations of parallel subgradient projections.

    PubMed

    Combettes, P L

    1997-01-01

    Solving a convex set theoretic image recovery problem amounts to finding a point in the intersection of closed and convex sets in a Hilbert space. The projection onto convex sets (POCS) algorithm, in which an initial estimate is sequentially projected onto the individual sets according to a periodic schedule, has been the most prevalent tool to solve such problems. Nonetheless, POCS has several shortcomings: it converges slowly, it is ill suited for implementation on parallel processors, and it requires the computation of exact projections at each iteration. We propose a general parallel projection method (EMOPSP) that overcomes these shortcomings. At each iteration of EMOPSP, a convex combination of subgradient projections onto some of the sets is formed and the update is obtained via relaxation. The relaxation parameter may vary over an iteration-dependent, extrapolated range that extends beyond the interval [0,2] used in conventional projection methods. EMOPSP not only generalizes existing projection-based schemes, but it also converges very efficiently thanks to its extrapolated relaxations. Theoretical convergence results are presented as well as numerical simulations.

  20. Stable anisotropic plasma confinement in magnetic configurations with convex-concave field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsventoukh, M. M.

    2014-02-01

    It is shown that a combination of the convex and the concave part of a field line provides a strong stabilizing action against convective (flute-interchange) plasma instability (Tsventoukh 2011 Nucl. Fusion 51 112002). This results in internal peaking of the stable plasma pressure profile that is calculated from the collisionless kinetic stability criterion for any magnetic confinement system with combination of mirrors and cusps. Connection of the convex and concave field line parts results in a reduction of the space charge that drives the unstable E × B motion, as there is an opposite direction of the particle drift in a non-uniform field at convex and concave field lines. The pressure peaking arises at the minimum of the second adiabatic invariant J that takes place at the ‘middle’ of a tandem mirror-cusp transverse cross-section. The position of the minimum in J varies with the particle pitch angle that results in a shift of the peaking position depending on plasma anisotropy. This allows one to improve a stable peaked pressure profile at a convex-concave field by changing the plasma anisotropy over the trap cross-section. Examples of such anisotropic distribution functions are found that give an additional substantial enhancement in the maximal central pressure. Furthermore, the shape of new calculated stable profiles has a wide central plasma layer instead of a narrow peak.

  1. Support-type properties of convex functions of higher order and Hadamard-type inequalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasowicz, Szymon

    2007-08-01

    It is well known that every convex function (where is an interval) admits an affine support at every interior point of I (i.e. for any x0[set membership, variant]IntI there exists an affine function such that a(x0)=f(x0) and a[less-than-or-equals, slant]f on I). Convex functions of higher order (precisely of an odd order) have a similar property: they are supported by the polynomials of degree no greater than the order of convexity. In this paper the attaching method is developed. It is applied to obtain the general result--Theorem 2, from which the mentioned above support theorem and some related properties of convex functions of higher (both odd and even) order are derived. They are applied to obtain some known and new Hadamard-type inequalities between the quadrature operators and the integral approximated by them. It is also shown that the error bounds of quadrature rules follow by inequalities of this kind.

  2. Convexity of Energy-Like Functions: Theoretical Results and Applications to Power System Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Dvijotham, Krishnamurthy; Chertkov, Michael; Low, Steven

    2015-01-22

    Power systems are undergoing unprecedented transformations with increased adoption of renewables and distributed generation, as well as the adoption of demand response programs. All of these changes, while making the grid more responsive and potentially more efficient, pose significant challenges for power systems operators. Conventional operational paradigms are no longer sufficient as the power system may no longer have big dispatchable generators with sufficient positive and negative reserves. This increases the need for tools and algorithms that can efficiently predict safe regions of operation of the power system. In this paper, we study energy functions as a tool to design algorithms for various operational problems in power systems. These have a long history in power systems and have been primarily applied to transient stability problems. In this paper, we take a new look at power systems, focusing on an aspect that has previously received little attention: Convexity. We characterize the domain of voltage magnitudes and phases within which the energy function is convex in these variables. We show that this corresponds naturally with standard operational constraints imposed in power systems. We show that power of equations can be solved using this approach, as long as the solution lies within the convexity domain. We outline various desirable properties of solutions in the convexity domain and present simple numerical illustrations supporting our results.

  3. A note on two identities arising from enumeration of convex polyominoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Victor J. W.; Zeng, Jiang

    2005-08-01

    Motivated by some binomial coefficients identities encountered in our approach to the enumeration of convex polyominoes, we prove some more general identities of the same type, one of which turns out to be related to a strange evaluation of of Gessel and Stanton.

  4. Modeling IrisCode and its variants as convex polyhedral cones and its security implications.

    PubMed

    Kong, Adams Wai-Kin

    2013-03-01

    IrisCode, developed by Daugman, in 1993, is the most influential iris recognition algorithm. A thorough understanding of IrisCode is essential, because over 100 million persons have been enrolled by this algorithm and many biometric personal identification and template protection methods have been developed based on IrisCode. This paper indicates that a template produced by IrisCode or its variants is a convex polyhedral cone in a hyperspace. Its central ray, being a rough representation of the original biometric signal, can be computed by a simple algorithm, which can often be implemented in one Matlab command line. The central ray is an expected ray and also an optimal ray of an objective function on a group of distributions. This algorithm is derived from geometric properties of a convex polyhedral cone but does not rely on any prior knowledge (e.g., iris images). The experimental results show that biometric templates, including iris and palmprint templates, produced by different recognition methods can be matched through the central rays in their convex polyhedral cones and that templates protected by a method extended from IrisCode can be broken into. These experimental results indicate that, without a thorough security analysis, convex polyhedral cone templates cannot be assumed secure. Additionally, the simplicity of the algorithm implies that even junior hackers without knowledge of advanced image processing and biometric databases can still break into protected templates and reveal relationships among templates produced by different recognition methods. PMID:23193454

  5. An illumination planner for convex and concave lambertian polyhedral objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Fredic; Ikeuchi, Katsushi

    1995-03-01

    The measurement of shape is a basic object inspection task. We use a noncontact method to determine shape called photometric stereo. The method uses three light sources which sequentially illuminate the object under inspection and a video camera for taking intensity images of the object. A significant problem with using photometric stereo is determining where to place the three light sources and the video camera. In order to solve this problem, we have developed an illumination planner that determines how to position the three light sources and the video camera around the object. The planner determines how to position light sources around an object so that we illuminate a specified set of faces in an efficient manner, and so that we obtain an accurate measurement. We predict the uncertainty in our measurements due to sensor noise by performing a statistical simulation in our planner. This gives us the capability to determine when a measured shape differs in a statistically significant way from what we expect. From a high level, our planner has three major inputs: the CAD (computer aided design) model of the object to be inspected, a noise model for our sensor, and a reflectance model for the object to be inspected. We have experimentally verified that the plans generated by the planner are valid and accurate.

  6. Plasmonic black metals via radiation absorption by two-dimensional arrays of ultra-sharp convex grooves

    PubMed Central

    Beermann, Jonas; Eriksen, René L.; Holmgaard, Tobias; Pedersen, Kjeld; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonic black surfaces formed by two-dimensional arrays of ultra-sharp convex metal grooves, in which the incident radiation is converted into gap surface plasmon polaritons (GSPPs) and subsequently absorbed (via adiabatic nanofocusing), are fabricated and investigated experimentally for gold, nickel, and palladium, using scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, and reflection spectroscopy for their characterization. Absolute reflectivity spectra obtained for all fabricated arrays demonstrate very efficient and broadband absorption of unpolarized light exceeding the level of 95%, averaged over the investigated wavelength range of 400–985 nm. The highest averaged absorption level (~97%) is achieved with 250-nm-period arrays in palladium that also has the highest melting temperature (~1552°C), promising thereby potential applications for broadband absorption, e.g., within thermophotovoltaics. For one-dimensional arrays, GSPPs are excited only with the electric field polarized perpendicular to the groove orientation, resulting in 94–96% absorption of the appropriately polarized light for the arrays in nickel and palladium while featuring practically flat surface reflectivity spectra for the orthogonal polarization. The largest ratio (~10.7) between averaged reflectivities for orthogonal polarizations is achieved with the groove arrays in palladium, pointing thereby towards applications as broadband and low-dispersion linear polarizers operating in reflection, e.g., within ultra-fast optics. PMID:25365991

  7. Non-convex shape models of asteroids based on photometric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartczak, P.; Santana-Ros, T.; Michalowski, T.

    2014-07-01

    We present the SAGE algorithm (Shaping Asteroids with Genetic Evolution) able to derive 3D non-convex shapes of asteroids and solving for their spin parameters using only disk-integrated photometry. A triangular mesh of 62 vertices is used as a seed during the parameters minimization, and the Catmull-Clark method (Catmull-Clark 1978) is applied to generate bodies with higher resolution. The subroutines search for the sidereal period of rotation in a given range, and the spin-axis orientation on the whole celestial sphere. A step-iterative algorithm is used to make the shape evolve under the minimization constraints between the synthetic generated photometry and the real observations. In order to generate the simulated lightcurves, we propose the virtual frames algorithm. The algorithm simulates the pictures visible on hypothetical CCD frames and, using only elementary vector operations or quadratic algebraic equations, it takes into account all phase-angle effects. Publicly available lightcurve data has been used to obtain a new non-convex model for (9) Metis, (21) Lutetia, and (433) Eros. The resulting body shapes are compared with the ones obtained using other observational techniques, such as adaptive optics and stellar occultations (Timerson et al. 2009) or the NEAR Shoemaker observations of Eros during its rendezvous (Zuber et al. 2000). We also assess the problem of the solution uniqueness for non-convex models, generating a family of shape solutions and studying the stability of the model features. Moreover, following the investigations presented in Kaasalainen & Torppa (2001) we study the discrepancy on the lightcurves between a non-convex shape model and its convex hull as a function of the phase angle. Finally, we compare the lightcurve fits obtained with other existing models for both ''classic'' and sparse-in-time photometry.

  8. First-order convex feasibility algorithms for x-ray CT

    SciTech Connect

    Sidky, Emil Y.; Pan Xiaochuan; Jorgensen, Jakob S.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Iterative image reconstruction (IIR) algorithms in computed tomography (CT) are based on algorithms for solving a particular optimization problem. Design of the IIR algorithm, therefore, is aided by knowledge of the solution to the optimization problem on which it is based. Often times, however, it is impractical to achieve accurate solution to the optimization of interest, which complicates design of IIR algorithms. This issue is particularly acute for CT with a limited angular-range scan, which leads to poorly conditioned system matrices and difficult to solve optimization problems. In this paper, we develop IIR algorithms which solve a certain type of optimization called convex feasibility. The convex feasibility approach can provide alternatives to unconstrained optimization approaches and at the same time allow for rapidly convergent algorithms for their solution-thereby facilitating the IIR algorithm design process. Methods: An accelerated version of the Chambolle-Pock (CP) algorithm is adapted to various convex feasibility problems of potential interest to IIR in CT. One of the proposed problems is seen to be equivalent to least-squares minimization, and two other problems provide alternatives to penalized, least-squares minimization. Results: The accelerated CP algorithms are demonstrated on a simulation of circular fan-beam CT with a limited scanning arc of 144 Degree-Sign . The CP algorithms are seen in the empirical results to converge to the solution of their respective convex feasibility problems. Conclusions: Formulation of convex feasibility problems can provide a useful alternative to unconstrained optimization when designing IIR algorithms for CT. The approach is amenable to recent methods for accelerating first-order algorithms which may be particularly useful for CT with limited angular-range scanning. The present paper demonstrates the methodology, and future work will illustrate its utility in actual CT application.

  9. New determinations and simplified representations of macromolecular surfaces.

    PubMed

    Perrot, G; Maigret, B

    1990-09-01

    Several new methods or improvements of older algorithms determining the different pieces of molecular surface are presented. Their improvement in time and their complexity are discussed. Only the indexes of the atoms on which the pieces are relying are, in fact, determined, since their explicit representation from these numbers varies according to the 3D capabilities of the graphic workstation (dots, grid, etc.), and this generation is not C.P.U. consuming. To have a simplified representation of the surface of macromolecules, a polyhedron with planar triangular faces is then introduced: Each concave triangular surface piece is replaced with planar triangles relying on its three atomic centers, while saddle-shaped rectangles and convex pieces are wholly ignored. A minimal data structure of the polyhedron is then proposed, which contains only topological informations, since no coordinates have been generated. If the atomic radius is then considered to be constant (independent of atomic type), the surface of a set of N points is now defined by the choice of a subset with a topology. This choice is controlled by a parameter of rugosity (the atomic radius). Contrary to Voronoi polyhedrons partition, which gives a topology for a set of N points, our approach gives a topology only for the exterior points of this set. A few applications of this very simple definition of molecular surface are then discussed: the 3D interactive manipulation of macromolecules, the steric intermolecular recognition, and the determination of local and global properties of the surface. PMID:2279010

  10. Extended surface parallel coating inspection method

    DOEpatents

    Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2006-03-21

    Techniques for rapidly characterizing reflective surfaces and especially multi-layer EUV reflective surfaces of optical components involve illuminating the entire reflective surface instantaneously and detecting the image far field. The technique provides a mapping of points on the reflective surface to corresponding points on a detector, e.g., CCD. This obviates the need to scan a probe over the entire surface of the optical component. The reflective surface can be flat, convex, or concave.

  11. Still-to-video face recognition in unconstrained environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haoyu; Liu, Changsong; Ding, Xiaoqing

    2015-02-01

    Face images from video sequences captured in unconstrained environments usually contain several kinds of variations, e.g. pose, facial expression, illumination, image resolution and occlusion. Motion blur and compression artifacts also deteriorate recognition performance. Besides, in various practical systems such as law enforcement, video surveillance and e-passport identification, only a single still image per person is enrolled as the gallery set. Many existing methods may fail to work due to variations in face appearances and the limit of available gallery samples. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for still-to-video face recognition in unconstrained environments. By assuming that faces from still images and video frames share the same identity space, a regularized least squares regression method is utilized to tackle the multi-modality problem. Regularization terms based on heuristic assumptions are enrolled to avoid overfitting. In order to deal with the single image per person problem, we exploit face variations learned from training sets to synthesize virtual samples for gallery samples. We adopt a learning algorithm combining both affine/convex hull-based approach and regularizations to match image sets. Experimental results on a real-world dataset consisting of unconstrained video sequences demonstrate that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art methods impressively.

  12. A shape-based account for holistic face processing.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mintao; Bülthoff, Heinrich H; Bülthoff, Isabelle

    2016-04-01

    Faces are processed holistically, so selective attention to 1 face part without any influence of the others often fails. In this study, 3 experiments investigated what type of facial information (shape or surface) underlies holistic face processing and whether generalization of holistic processing to nonexperienced faces requires extensive discrimination experience. Results show that facial shape information alone is sufficient to elicit the composite face effect (CFE), 1 of the most convincing demonstrations of holistic processing, whereas facial surface information is unnecessary (Experiment 1). The CFE is eliminated when faces differ only in surface but not shape information, suggesting that variation of facial shape information is necessary to observe holistic face processing (Experiment 2). Removing 3-dimensional (3D) facial shape information also eliminates the CFE, indicating the necessity of 3D shape information for holistic face processing (Experiment 3). Moreover, participants show similar holistic processing for faces with and without extensive discrimination experience (i.e., own- and other-race faces), suggesting that generalization of holistic processing to nonexperienced faces requires facial shape information, but does not necessarily require further individuation experience. These results provide compelling evidence that facial shape information underlies holistic face processing. This shape-based account not only offers a consistent explanation for previous studies of holistic face processing, but also suggests a new ground-in addition to expertise-for the generalization of holistic processing to different types of faces and to nonface objects.

  13. Faciotopy—A face-feature map with face-like topology in the human occipital face area

    PubMed Central

    Henriksson, Linda; Mur, Marieke; Kriegeskorte, Nikolaus

    2015-01-01

    The occipital face area (OFA) and fusiform face area (FFA) are brain regions thought to be specialized for face perception. However, their intrinsic functional organization and status as cortical areas with well-defined boundaries remains unclear. Here we test these regions for “faciotopy”, a particular hypothesis about their intrinsic functional organisation. A faciotopic area would contain a face-feature map on the cortical surface, where cortical patches represent face features and neighbouring patches represent features that are physically neighbouring in a face. The faciotopy hypothesis is motivated by the idea that face regions might develop from a retinotopic protomap and acquire their selectivity for face features through natural visual experience. Faces have a prototypical configuration of features, are usually perceived in a canonical upright orientation, and are frequently fixated in particular locations. To test the faciotopy hypothesis, we presented images of isolated face features at fixation to subjects during functional magnetic resonance imaging. The responses in V1 were best explained by low-level image properties of the stimuli. OFA, and to a lesser degree FFA, showed evidence for faciotopic organization. When a single patch of cortex was estimated for each face feature, the cortical distances between the feature patches reflected the physical distance between the features in a face. Faciotopy would be the first example, to our knowledge, of a cortical map reflecting the topology, not of a part of the organism itself (its retina in retinotopy, its body in somatotopy), but of an external object of particular perceptual significance. PMID:26235800

  14. Generalization of affective learning about faces to perceptually similar faces.

    PubMed

    Verosky, Sara C; Todorov, Alexander

    2010-06-01

    Different individuals have different (and different-looking) significant others, friends, and foes. The objective of this study was to investigate whether these social face environments can shape individual face preferences. First, participants learned to associate faces with positive, neutral, or negative behaviors. Then, they evaluated morphs combining novel faces with the learned faces. The morphs (65% and 80% novel faces) were within the categorical boundary of the novel faces: They were perceived as those faces in a preliminary study. Moreover, a second preliminary study showed that following the learning, the morphs' categorization as similar to the learned faces was indistinguishable from the categorization of actual novel faces. Nevertheless, in the main experiment, participants evaluated morphs of "positive" faces more positively than morphs of "negative" faces. This learning generalization effect increased as a function of the similarity of the novel faces to the learned faces. The findings suggest that general learning mechanisms based on similarity can account for idiosyncratic face preferences.

  15. Generalization of affective learning about faces to perceptually similar faces.

    PubMed

    Verosky, Sara C; Todorov, Alexander

    2010-06-01

    Different individuals have different (and different-looking) significant others, friends, and foes. The objective of this study was to investigate whether these social face environments can shape individual face preferences. First, participants learned to associate faces with positive, neutral, or negative behaviors. Then, they evaluated morphs combining novel faces with the learned faces. The morphs (65% and 80% novel faces) were within the categorical boundary of the novel faces: They were perceived as those faces in a preliminary study. Moreover, a second preliminary study showed that following the learning, the morphs' categorization as similar to the learned faces was indistinguishable from the categorization of actual novel faces. Nevertheless, in the main experiment, participants evaluated morphs of "positive" faces more positively than morphs of "negative" faces. This learning generalization effect increased as a function of the similarity of the novel faces to the learned faces. The findings suggest that general learning mechanisms based on similarity can account for idiosyncratic face preferences. PMID:20483821

  16. Time-Resolved Visualization of Görtler Vortices in a Pulsed Convex Wall Jet using Fast Pressure-Sensitive Paint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, James; Danon, Ron; Greenblatt, David

    2015-11-01

    The time-resolved formation and structure of Görtler vortices in a pulsed convex wall jet are studied in this work. While the presence of Görtler vortices in laminar boundary layers on concave surfaces can be clearly observed, their presence in wall jets flowing over convex surfaces is difficult to discern due to transition to turbulence in the outer part of the jet. This work employed fast-response pressure-sensitive paint (PSP), which has a documented flat frequency response greater than 5 kHz, to visualize the time-resolved formation of the wall jet and the details of the Görtler vortices. The radius of curvature of the wall jet was 8 cm, and the Reynolds number (based on slot height and jet exit velocity) was varied between 5 ×102 and 4 ×104 . The characteristic spanwise wavelength of the vortices was studied as a function of jet Reynolds number. Furthermore, as the Reynolds number was increased, various secondary instabilities were observed that led to laminar-turbulent transition. Funding provided by the U.S. Fulbright Scholar Program.

  17. Best face forward: crystal-face competition at the ice-water interface.

    PubMed

    Shultz, Mary Jane; Bisson, Patrick J; Brumberg, Alexandra

    2014-07-17

    The ice-water interface plays an important role in determining the outcome of both biological and environmental processes. Under ambient pressure, the most stable form of ice is hexagonal ice (Ih). Experimentally probing the surface free energy between each of the major faces of Ih ice and the liquid is both experimentally and theoretically challenging. The basis for the challenge is the near-equality of the surface free energy for the major faces along with the tendency of water to supercool. As a result, morphology from crystallization initiated below 0 °C is kinetically controlled. The reported work circumvents supercooling consequences by providing a polycrystalline seed, followed by isothermal, equilibrium growth. Natural selection among seeded faces results in a single crystal. A record of the growth front is preserved in the frozen boule. Crystal orientation at the front is revealed by examining the boule cross section with two techniques: (1) viewing between crossed polarizers to locate the optical axis and (2) etching to distinguish the primary-prism face from the secondary-prism face. Results suggest that the most stable ice-water interface at 0 °C is the secondary-prism face, followed by the primary-prism face. The basal face that imparts the characteristic hexagonal shape to snowflakes is a distant third. The results contrast with those from freezing the vapor where the basal and primary-prism faces have comparable free energy followed by the secondary-prism face. PMID:24784996

  18. Social judgments from faces.

    PubMed

    Todorov, Alexander; Mende-Siedlecki, Peter; Dotsch, Ron

    2013-06-01

    People make rapid and consequential social judgments from minimal (non-emotional) facial cues. There has been rapid progress in identifying the perceptual basis of these judgments using data-driven, computational models. In contrast, our understanding of the neural underpinnings of these judgments is rather limited. Meta-analyses of neuroimaging studies find a wide range of seemingly inconsistent responses in the amygdala that co-vary with social judgments from faces. Guided by computational models of social judgments, these responses can be accounted by positing that the amygdala (and posterior face selective regions) tracks face typicality. Atypical faces, whether positively or negatively evaluated, elicit stronger responses in the amygdala. We conclude with the promise of data-driven methods for modeling neural responses to social judgments from faces.

  19. Faces in commonly experienced configurations enter awareness faster due to their curvature relative to fixation

    PubMed Central

    Wagemans, Johan; de-Wit, Lee

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which perceptually suppressed face stimuli are still processed has been extensively studied using the continuous flash suppression paradigm (CFS). Studies that rely on breaking CFS (b-CFS), in which the time it takes for an initially suppressed stimulus to become detectable is measured, have provided evidence for relatively complex processing of invisible face stimuli. In contrast, adaptation and neuroimaging studies have shown that perceptually suppressed faces are only processed for a limited set of features, such as its general shape. In this study, we asked whether perceptually suppressed face stimuli presented in their commonly experienced configuration would break suppression faster than when presented in an uncommonly experienced configuration. This study was motivated by a recent neuroimaging study showing that commonly experienced face configurations are more strongly represented in the fusiform face area. Our findings revealed that faces presented in commonly experienced configurations indeed broke suppression faster, yet this effect did not interact with face inversion suggesting that, in a b-CFS context, perceptually suppressed faces are potentially not processed by specialized (high-level) face processing mechanisms. Rather, our pattern of results is consistent with an interpretation based on the processing of more basic visual properties such as convexity. PMID:26839746

  20. Stable face representations

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Rob; Burton, A. Mike

    2011-01-01

    Photographs are often used to establish the identity of an individual or to verify that they are who they claim to be. Yet, recent research shows that it is surprisingly difficult to match a photo to a face. Neither humans nor machines can perform this task reliably. Although human perceivers are good at matching familiar faces, performance with unfamiliar faces is strikingly poor. The situation is no better for automatic face recognition systems. In practical settings, automatic systems have been consistently disappointing. In this review, we suggest that failure to distinguish between familiar and unfamiliar face processing has led to unrealistic expectations about face identification in applied settings. We also argue that a photograph is not necessarily a reliable indicator of facial appearance, and develop our proposal that summary statistics can provide more stable face representations. In particular, we show that image averaging stabilizes facial appearance by diluting aspects of the image that vary between snapshots of the same person. We review evidence that the resulting images can outperform photographs in both behavioural experiments and computer simulations, and outline promising directions for future research. PMID:21536553

  1. String-averaging incremental subgradients for constrained convex optimization with applications to reconstruction of tomographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massambone de Oliveira, Rafael; Salomão Helou, Elias; Fontoura Costa, Eduardo

    2016-11-01

    We present a method for non-smooth convex minimization which is based on subgradient directions and string-averaging techniques. In this approach, the set of available data is split into sequences (strings) and a given iterate is processed independently along each string, possibly in parallel, by an incremental subgradient method (ISM). The end-points of all strings are averaged to form the next iterate. The method is useful to solve sparse and large-scale non-smooth convex optimization problems, such as those arising in tomographic imaging. A convergence analysis is provided under realistic, standard conditions. Numerical tests are performed in a tomographic image reconstruction application, showing good performance for the convergence speed when measured as the decrease ratio of the objective function, in comparison to classical ISM.

  2. Octupolar approximation for the excluded volume of axially symmetric convex bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piastra, Marco; Virga, Epifanio G.

    2013-09-01

    We propose a simply computable formula for the excluded volume of convex, axially symmetric bodies, based on the classical Brunn-Minkoski theory for convex bodies, which is briefly outlined in an Appendix written in a modern mathematical language. This formula is applied to cones and spherocones, which are regularized cones; a shape-reconstruction algorithm is able to generate the region in space inaccessible to them and to compute their excluded volume, which is found to be in good agreement with our approximate analytical formula. Finally, for spherocones with an appropriately tuned amplitude, we predict the occurrence of a relative deep minimum of the excluded volume in a configuration lying between the parallel alignment (where the excluded volume is maximum) and the antiparallel alignment (where the excluded volume is minimum).

  3. Fast multiscale Gaussian beam methods for wave equations in bounded convex domains

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Gang; Lai, Jun; Qian, Jianliang

    2014-03-15

    Motivated by fast multiscale Gaussian wavepacket transforms and multiscale Gaussian beam methods which were originally designed for pure initial-value problems of wave equations, we develop fast multiscale Gaussian beam methods for initial boundary value problems of wave equations in bounded convex domains in the high frequency regime. To compute the wave propagation in bounded convex domains, we have to take into account reflecting multiscale Gaussian beams, which are accomplished by enforcing reflecting boundary conditions during beam propagation and carrying out suitable reflecting beam summation. To propagate multiscale beams efficiently, we prove that the ratio of the squared magnitude of beam amplitude and the beam width is roughly conserved, and accordingly we propose an effective indicator to identify significant beams. We also prove that the resulting multiscale Gaussian beam methods converge asymptotically. Numerical examples demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the method.

  4. A trait-based test for habitat filtering: Convex hull volume

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cornwell, W.K.; Schwilk, D.W.; Ackerly, D.D.

    2006-01-01

    Community assembly theory suggests that two processes affect the distribution of trait values within communities: competition and habitat filtering. Within a local community, competition leads to ecological differentiation of coexisting species, while habitat filtering reduces the spread of trait values, reflecting shared ecological tolerances. Many statistical tests for the effects of competition exist in the literature, but measures of habitat filtering are less well-developed. Here, we present convex hull volume, a construct from computational geometry, which provides an n-dimensional measure of the volume of trait space occupied by species in a community. Combined with ecological null models, this measure offers a useful test for habitat filtering. We use convex hull volume and a null model to analyze California woody-plant trait and community data. Our results show that observed plant communities occupy less trait space than expected from random assembly, a result consistent with habitat filtering. ?? 2006 by the Ecological Society of America.

  5. A Genealogy of Convex Solids Via Local and Global Bifurcations of Gradient Vector Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domokos, Gábor; Holmes, Philip; Lángi, Zsolt

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional convex bodies can be classified in terms of the number and stability types of critical points on which they can balance at rest on a horizontal plane. For typical bodies, these are non-degenerate maxima, minima, and saddle points, the numbers of which provide a primary classification. Secondary and tertiary classifications use graphs to describe orbits connecting these critical points in the gradient vector field associated with each body. In previous work, it was shown that these classifications are complete in that no class is empty. Here, we construct 1- and 2-parameter families of convex bodies connecting members of adjacent primary and secondary classes and show that transitions between them can be realized by codimension 1 saddle-node and saddle-saddle (heteroclinic) bifurcations in the gradient vector fields. Our results indicate that all combinatorially possible transitions can be realized in physical shape evolution processes, e.g., by abrasion of sedimentary particles.

  6. CELL TRACKING USING PARTICLE FILTERS WITH IMPLICIT CONVEX SHAPE MODEL IN 4D CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY IMAGES

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Nisha; Tasdizen, Tolga

    2016-01-01

    Bayesian frameworks are commonly used in tracking algorithms. An important example is the particle filter, where a stochastic motion model describes the evolution of the state, and the observation model relates the noisy measurements to the state. Particle filters have been used to track the lineage of cells. Propagating the shape model of the cell through the particle filter is beneficial for tracking. We approximate arbitrary shapes of cells with a novel implicit convex function. The importance sampling step of the particle filter is defined using the cost associated with fitting our implicit convex shape model to the observations. Our technique is capable of tracking the lineage of cells for nonmitotic stages. We validate our algorithm by tracking the lineage of retinal and lens cells in zebrafish embryos. PMID:27403085

  7. Dynamic Face Seal Arrangement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A radial face seal arrangement is disclosed comprising a stationary seal ring that is spring loaded against a seal seat affixed to a rotating shaft. The radial face seal arrangement further comprises an arrangement that not only allows for preloading of the stationary seal ring relative to the seal seat, but also provides for dampening yielding a dynamic seating response for the radial face seal arrangement. The overall seal system, especially regarding the selection of the material for the stationary seal ring, is designed to operate over a wide temperature range from below ambient up to 900 C.

  8. Maximally dense packings of two-dimensional convex and concave noncircular particles.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Steven; Jiao, Yang; Torquato, Salvatore

    2012-09-01

    Dense packings of hard particles have important applications in many fields, including condensed matter physics, discrete geometry, and cell biology. In this paper, we employ a stochastic search implementation of the Torquato-Jiao adaptive-shrinking-cell (ASC) optimization scheme [Nature (London) 460, 876 (2009)] to find maximally dense particle packings in d-dimensional Euclidean space R(d). While the original implementation was designed to study spheres and convex polyhedra in d≥3, our implementation focuses on d=2 and extends the algorithm to include both concave polygons and certain complex convex or concave nonpolygonal particle shapes. We verify the robustness of this packing protocol by successfully reproducing the known putative optimal packings of congruent copies of regular pentagons and octagons, then employ it to suggest dense packing arrangements of congruent copies of certain families of concave crosses, convex and concave curved triangles (incorporating shapes resembling the Mercedes-Benz logo), and "moonlike" shapes. Analytical constructions are determined subsequently to obtain the densest known packings of these particle shapes. For the examples considered, we find that the densest packings of both convex and concave particles with central symmetry are achieved by their corresponding optimal Bravais lattice packings; for particles lacking central symmetry, the densest packings obtained are nonlattice periodic packings, which are consistent with recently-proposed general organizing principles for hard particles. Moreover, we find that the densest known packings of certain curved triangles are periodic with a four-particle basis, and we find that the densest known periodic packings of certain moonlike shapes possess no inherent symmetries. Our work adds to the growing evidence that particle shape can be used as a tuning parameter to achieve a diversity of packing structures.

  9. Maximally dense packings of two-dimensional convex and concave noncircular particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, Steven; Jiao, Yang; Torquato, Salvatore

    2012-09-01

    Dense packings of hard particles have important applications in many fields, including condensed matter physics, discrete geometry, and cell biology. In this paper, we employ a stochastic search implementation of the Torquato-Jiao adaptive-shrinking-cell (ASC) optimization scheme [Nature (London)NATUAS0028-083610.1038/nature08239 460, 876 (2009)] to find maximally dense particle packings in d-dimensional Euclidean space Rd. While the original implementation was designed to study spheres and convex polyhedra in d≥3, our implementation focuses on d=2 and extends the algorithm to include both concave polygons and certain complex convex or concave nonpolygonal particle shapes. We verify the robustness of this packing protocol by successfully reproducing the known putative optimal packings of congruent copies of regular pentagons and octagons, then employ it to suggest dense packing arrangements of congruent copies of certain families of concave crosses, convex and concave curved triangles (incorporating shapes resembling the Mercedes-Benz logo), and “moonlike” shapes. Analytical constructions are determined subsequently to obtain the densest known packings of these particle shapes. For the examples considered, we find that the densest packings of both convex and concave particles with central symmetry are achieved by their corresponding optimal Bravais lattice packings; for particles lacking central symmetry, the densest packings obtained are nonlattice periodic packings, which are consistent with recently-proposed general organizing principles for hard particles. Moreover, we find that the densest known packings of certain curved triangles are periodic with a four-particle basis, and we find that the densest known periodic packings of certain moonlike shapes possess no inherent symmetries. Our work adds to the growing evidence that particle shape can be used as a tuning parameter to achieve a diversity of packing structures.

  10. [Super-resolution image reconstruction algorithm based on projection onto convex sets and wavelet fusion].

    PubMed

    Cao, Yuzhen; Liu, Xiaoting; Wang, Wei; Xing, Zhanfeng

    2009-10-01

    In this paper a new super-resolution image reconstruction algorithm was proposed. With the improvement of the classical projection onto convex sets (POCS) algorithm, as ground work, and with the combined use of POCS and wavelet fusion, a high resolution CT image was restored by using a group of low resolution CT images. The experimental results showed: the proposed algorithm improves the ability of fusing different information, the detail of the image is more prominent, and the image quality is better.

  11. Image restoration by the method of convex projections: part 2 applications and numerical results.

    PubMed

    Sezan, M I; Stark, H

    1982-01-01

    The image restoration theory discussed in a previous paper by Youla and Webb [1] is applied to a simulated image and the results compared with the well-known method known as the Gerchberg-Papoulis algorithm. The results show that the method of image restoration by projection onto convex sets, by providing a convenient technique for utilizing a priori information, performs significantly better than the Gerchberg-Papoulis method.

  12. Concave grating and convex mirror double dispersion spectrograph for optical network applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churin, Evgeny G.; Bayvel, Polina; Smirnitskii, Vladimir B.; Timofeev, Fedor N.; Midwinter, John E.

    1997-10-01

    The concave grating stationary anastigmatic spectrograph has been modified into a novel retroreflective scheme by introducing a convex mirror concentric to the intermediate image. This provides double dispersion, diffraction-limited imaging of a long entrance slit, and substantial compensation of the stationary chromatic astigmatism. One can realize 140 independent multi demultiplexers with 160 channels each simultaneously in the described device for optical network applications. Ray-tracing spot diagrams are presented.

  13. Maximally dense packings of two-dimensional convex and concave noncircular particles.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Steven; Jiao, Yang; Torquato, Salvatore

    2012-09-01

    Dense packings of hard particles have important applications in many fields, including condensed matter physics, discrete geometry, and cell biology. In this paper, we employ a stochastic search implementation of the Torquato-Jiao adaptive-shrinking-cell (ASC) optimization scheme [Nature (London) 460, 876 (2009)] to find maximally dense particle packings in d-dimensional Euclidean space R(d). While the original implementation was designed to study spheres and convex polyhedra in d≥3, our implementation focuses on d=2 and extends the algorithm to include both concave polygons and certain complex convex or concave nonpolygonal particle shapes. We verify the robustness of this packing protocol by successfully reproducing the known putative optimal packings of congruent copies of regular pentagons and octagons, then employ it to suggest dense packing arrangements of congruent copies of certain families of concave crosses, convex and concave curved triangles (incorporating shapes resembling the Mercedes-Benz logo), and "moonlike" shapes. Analytical constructions are determined subsequently to obtain the densest known packings of these particle shapes. For the examples considered, we find that the densest packings of both convex and concave particles with central symmetry are achieved by their corresponding optimal Bravais lattice packings; for particles lacking central symmetry, the densest packings obtained are nonlattice periodic packings, which are consistent with recently-proposed general organizing principles for hard particles. Moreover, we find that the densest known packings of certain curved triangles are periodic with a four-particle basis, and we find that the densest known periodic packings of certain moonlike shapes possess no inherent symmetries. Our work adds to the growing evidence that particle shape can be used as a tuning parameter to achieve a diversity of packing structures. PMID:23030907

  14. Gaze cueing by pareidolia faces

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kohske; Watanabe, Katsumi

    2013-01-01

    Visual images that are not faces are sometimes perceived as faces (the pareidolia phenomenon). While the pareidolia phenomenon provides people with a strong impression that a face is present, it is unclear how deeply pareidolia faces are processed as faces. In the present study, we examined whether a shift in spatial attention would be produced by gaze cueing of face-like objects. A robust cueing effect was observed when the face-like objects were perceived as faces. The magnitude of the cueing effect was comparable between the face-like objects and a cartoon face. However, the cueing effect was eliminated when the observer did not perceive the objects as faces. These results demonstrated that pareidolia faces do more than give the impression of the presence of faces; indeed, they trigger an additional face-specific attentional process. PMID:25165505

  15. Gaze cueing by pareidolia faces.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kohske; Watanabe, Katsumi

    2013-01-01

    Visual images that are not faces are sometimes perceived as faces (the pareidolia phenomenon). While the pareidolia phenomenon provides people with a strong impression that a face is present, it is unclear how deeply pareidolia faces are processed as faces. In the present study, we examined whether a shift in spatial attention would be produced by gaze cueing of face-like objects. A robust cueing effect was observed when the face-like objects were perceived as faces. The magnitude of the cueing effect was comparable between the face-like objects and a cartoon face. However, the cueing effect was eliminated when the observer did not perceive the objects as faces. These results demonstrated that pareidolia faces do more than give the impression of the presence of faces; indeed, they trigger an additional face-specific attentional process.

  16. Cotton fabrics with single-faced superhydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuyang; Xin, J H; Choi, Chang-Hwan

    2012-12-18

    This article reports on the fabrication of cotton fabrics with single-faced superhydrophobicity using a simple foam finishing process. Unlike most commonly reported superhydrophobic fabrics, the fabrics developed in this study exhibit asymmetric wettability on their two faces: one face showing superhydrophobic behavior (highly nonwetting or water-repellent characteristics) and the other face retaining the inherent hydrophilic nature of cotton. The superhydrophobic face exhibits a low contact angle hysteresis of θ(a)/θ(r) = 151°/144° (θ(a), advancing contact angle; θ(r), receding contact angle), which enables water drops to roll off the surface easily so as to endow the surface with well-known self-cleaning properties. The untreated hydrophilic face preserves its water-absorbing capability, resulting in 44% of the water-absorbing capacity compared to that of the original cotton samples with both sides untreated (hydrophilic). The single-faced superhydrophobic fabrics also retain moisture transmissibility that is as good as that of the original untreated cotton fabrics. They also show robust washing fastness with the chemical cross-linking process of hydrophobic fluoropolymer to fabric fibers. Fabric materials with such asymmetric or gradient wettability will be of great use in many applications such as unidirectional liquid transporting, moisture management, microfluidic systems, desalination of seawater, flow management in fuel cells, and water/oil separation.

  17. Sparse representations and convex optimization as tools for LOFAR radio interferometric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, J. N.; Garsden, H.; Starck, J. L.; Corbel, S.; Woiselle, A.; Tasse, C.; McKean, J. P.; Bobin, J.

    2015-08-01

    Compressed sensing theory is slowly making its way to solve more and more astronomical inverse problems. We address here the application of sparse representations, convex optimization and proximal theory to radio interferometric imaging. First, we expose the theory behind interferometric imaging, sparse representations and convex optimization, and second, we illustrate their application with numerical tests with SASIR, an implementation of the FISTA, a Forward-Backward splitting algorithm hosted in a LOFAR imager. Various tests have been conducted in Garsden et al., 2015. The main results are: i) an improved angular resolution (super resolution of a factor ≈ 2) with point sources as compared to CLEAN on the same data, ii) correct photometry measurements on a field of point sources at high dynamic range and iii) the imaging of extended sources with improved fidelity. SASIR provides better reconstructions (five time less residuals) of the extended emission as compared to CLEAN. With the advent of large radiotelescopes, there is scope for improving classical imaging methods with convex optimization methods combined with sparse representations.

  18. Non-convex compressed sensing CT reconstruction based on tensor discrete Fourier slice theorem.

    PubMed

    Chun, Il Yong; Adcock, Ben; Talavage, Thomas M

    2014-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanners provide clinical value through high resolution and fast imaging. However, achievement of higher signal-to-noise ratios generally requires emission of more X-rays, resulting in greater dose delivered to the body of the patient. This is of concern, as higher dose leads to greater risk of cancer, particularly for those exposed at a younger age. Therefore, it is desirable to achieve comparable scan quality while limiting X-ray dose. One means to achieve this compound goal is the use of compressed sensing (CS). A novel framework is presented to combine CS theory with X-ray CT. According to the tensor discrete Fourier slice theorem, the 1-D DFT of discrete Radon transform data is exactly mapped on a Cartesian 2-D DFT grid. The nonuniform random density sampling of Fourier coefficients is made feasible by uniformly sampling projection angles at random. Application of the non-convex CS model further reduces the sufficient number of measurements by enhancing sparsity. The numerical results show that, with limited projection data, the non-convex CS model significantly improves reconstruction performance over the convex model.

  19. Hard convex lens-shaped particles: Densest-known packings and phase behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Cinacchi, Giorgio; Torquato, Salvatore

    2015-12-14

    By using theoretical methods and Monte Carlo simulations, this work investigates dense ordered packings and equilibrium phase behavior (from the low-density isotropic fluid regime to the high-density crystalline solid regime) of monodisperse systems of hard convex lens-shaped particles as defined by the volume common to two intersecting congruent spheres. We show that, while the overall similarity of their shape to that of hard oblate ellipsoids is reflected in a qualitatively similar phase diagram, differences are more pronounced in the high-density crystal phase up to the densest-known packings determined here. In contrast to those non-(Bravais)-lattice two-particle basis crystals that are the densest-known packings of hard (oblate) ellipsoids, hard convex lens-shaped particles pack more densely in two types of degenerate crystalline structures: (i) non-(Bravais)-lattice two-particle basis body-centered-orthorhombic-like crystals and (ii) (Bravais) lattice monoclinic crystals. By stacking at will, regularly or irregularly, laminae of these two crystals, infinitely degenerate, generally non-periodic in the stacking direction, dense packings can be constructed that are consistent with recent organizing principles. While deferring the assessment of which of these dense ordered structures is thermodynamically stable in the high-density crystalline solid regime, the degeneracy of their densest-known packings strongly suggests that colloidal convex lens-shaped particles could be better glass formers than colloidal spheres because of the additional rotational degrees of freedom.

  20. Hard convex lens-shaped particles: Densest-known packings and phase behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinacchi, Giorgio; Torquato, Salvatore

    2015-12-01

    By using theoretical methods and Monte Carlo simulations, this work investigates dense ordered packings and equilibrium phase behavior (from the low-density isotropic fluid regime to the high-density crystalline solid regime) of monodisperse systems of hard convex lens-shaped particles as defined by the volume common to two intersecting congruent spheres. We show that, while the overall similarity of their shape to that of hard oblate ellipsoids is reflected in a qualitatively similar phase diagram, differences are more pronounced in the high-density crystal phase up to the densest-known packings determined here. In contrast to those non-(Bravais)-lattice two-particle basis crystals that are the densest-known packings of hard (oblate) ellipsoids, hard convex lens-shaped particles pack more densely in two types of degenerate crystalline structures: (i) non-(Bravais)-lattice two-particle basis body-centered-orthorhombic-like crystals and (ii) (Bravais) lattice monoclinic crystals. By stacking at will, regularly or irregularly, laminae of these two crystals, infinitely degenerate, generally non-periodic in the stacking direction, dense packings can be constructed that are consistent with recent organizing principles. While deferring the assessment of which of these dense ordered structures is thermodynamically stable in the high-density crystalline solid regime, the degeneracy of their densest-known packings strongly suggests that colloidal convex lens-shaped particles could be better glass formers than colloidal spheres because of the additional rotational degrees of freedom.

  1. Application Of The Phase Shifting Diffraction Interferometer For Measuring Convex Mirrors And Negative Lenses

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.; Campbell, Eugene W.

    2005-06-21

    To measure a convex mirror, a reference beam and a measurement beam are both provided through a single optical fiber. A positive auxiliary lens is placed in the system to give a converging wavefront onto the convex mirror under test. A measurement is taken that includes the aberrations of the convex mirror as well as the errors due to two transmissions through the positive auxiliary lens. A second measurement provides the information to eliminate this error. A negative lens can also be measured in a similar way. Again, there are two measurement set-ups. A reference beam is provided from a first optical fiber and a measurement beam is provided from a second optical fiber. A positive auxiliary lens is placed in the system to provide a converging wavefront from the reference beam onto the negative lens under test. The measurement beam is combined with the reference wavefront and is analyzed by standard methods. This measurement includes the aberrations of the negative lens, as well as the errors due to a single transmission through the positive auxiliary lens. A second measurement provides the information to eliminate this error.

  2. Application of the phase shifting diffraction interferometer for measuring convex mirrors and negative lenses

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.; Campbell, Eugene W.

    2004-03-09

    To measure a convex mirror, a reference beam and a measurement beam are both provided through a single optical fiber. A positive auxiliary lens is placed in the system to give a converging wavefront onto the convex mirror under test. A measurement is taken that includes the aberrations of the convex mirror as well as the errors due to two transmissions through the positive auxiliary lens. A second, measurement provides the information to eliminate this error. A negative lens can also be measured in a similar way. Again, there are two measurement set-ups. A reference beam is provided from a first optical fiber and a measurement beam is provided from a second optical fiber. A positive auxiliary lens is placed in the system to provide a converging wavefront from the reference beam onto the negative lens under test. The measurement beam is combined with the reference wavefront and is analyzed by standard methods. This measurement includes the aberrations of the negative lens, as well as the errors due to a single transmission through the positive auxiliary lens. A second measurement provides the information to eliminate this error.

  3. Dynamical tunneling versus fast diffusion for a non-convex Hamiltonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittman, S. M.; Tannenbaum, E.; Heller, E. J.

    2016-08-01

    This paper attempts to resolve the issue of the nature of the 0.01-0.1 cm-1 peak splittings observed in high-resolution IR spectra of polyatomic molecules. One hypothesis is that these splittings are caused by dynamical tunneling, a quantum-mechanical phenomenon whereby energy flows between two disconnected regions of phase-space across dynamical barriers. However, a competing classical mechanism for energy flow is Arnol'd diffusion, which connects different regions of phase-space by a resonance network known as the Arnol'd web. The speed of diffusion is bounded by the Nekhoroshev theorem, which guarantees stability on exponentially long time scales if the Hamiltonian is steep. Here we consider a non-convex Hamiltonian that contains the characteristics of a molecular Hamiltonian, but does not satisfy the Nekhoroshev theorem. The diffusion along the Arnol'd web is expected to be fast for a non-convex Hamiltonian. While fast diffusion is an unlikely competitor for longtime energy flow in molecules, we show how dynamical tunneling dominates compared to fast diffusion in the nearly integrable regime for a non-convex Hamiltonian, as well as present a new kind of dynamical tunneling.

  4. A two-layer recurrent neural network for nonsmooth convex optimization problems.

    PubMed

    Qin, Sitian; Xue, Xiaoping

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a two-layer recurrent neural network is proposed to solve the nonsmooth convex optimization problem subject to convex inequality and linear equality constraints. Compared with existing neural network models, the proposed neural network has a low model complexity and avoids penalty parameters. It is proved that from any initial point, the state of the proposed neural network reaches the equality feasible region in finite time and stays there thereafter. Moreover, the state is unique if the initial point lies in the equality feasible region. The equilibrium point set of the proposed neural network is proved to be equivalent to the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker optimality set of the original optimization problem. It is further proved that the equilibrium point of the proposed neural network is stable in the sense of Lyapunov. Moreover, from any initial point, the state is proved to be convergent to an equilibrium point of the proposed neural network. Finally, as applications, the proposed neural network is used to solve nonlinear convex programming with linear constraints and L1 -norm minimization problems.

  5. Derivative-free generation and interpolation of convex Pareto optimal IMRT plans.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Aswin L; Siem, Alex Y D; den Hertog, Dick; Kaanders, Johannes H A M; Huizenga, Henk

    2006-12-21

    In inverse treatment planning for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), beamlet intensity levels in fluence maps of high-energy photon beams are optimized. Treatment plan evaluation criteria are used as objective functions to steer the optimization process. Fluence map optimization can be considered a multi-objective optimization problem, for which a set of Pareto optimal solutions exists: the Pareto efficient frontier (PEF). In this paper, a constrained optimization method is pursued to iteratively estimate the PEF up to some predefined error. We use the property that the PEF is convex for a convex optimization problem to construct piecewise-linear upper and lower bounds to approximate the PEF from a small initial set of Pareto optimal plans. A derivative-free Sandwich algorithm is presented in which these bounds are used with three strategies to determine the location of the next Pareto optimal solution such that the uncertainty in the estimated PEF is maximally reduced. We show that an intelligent initial solution for a new Pareto optimal plan can be obtained by interpolation of fluence maps from neighbouring Pareto optimal plans. The method has been applied to a simplified clinical test case using two convex objective functions to map the trade-off between tumour dose heterogeneity and critical organ sparing. All three strategies produce representative estimates of the PEF. The new algorithm is particularly suitable for dynamic generation of Pareto optimal plans in interactive treatment planning.

  6. Hard convex lens-shaped particles: Densest-known packings and phase behavior.

    PubMed

    Cinacchi, Giorgio; Torquato, Salvatore

    2015-12-14

    By using theoretical methods and Monte Carlo simulations, this work investigates dense ordered packings and equilibrium phase behavior (from the low-density isotropic fluid regime to the high-density crystalline solid regime) of monodisperse systems of hard convex lens-shaped particles as defined by the volume common to two intersecting congruent spheres. We show that, while the overall similarity of their shape to that of hard oblate ellipsoids is reflected in a qualitatively similar phase diagram, differences are more pronounced in the high-density crystal phase up to the densest-known packings determined here. In contrast to those non-(Bravais)-lattice two-particle basis crystals that are the densest-known packings of hard (oblate) ellipsoids, hard convex lens-shaped particles pack more densely in two types of degenerate crystalline structures: (i) non-(Bravais)-lattice two-particle basis body-centered-orthorhombic-like crystals and (ii) (Bravais) lattice monoclinic crystals. By stacking at will, regularly or irregularly, laminae of these two crystals, infinitely degenerate, generally non-periodic in the stacking direction, dense packings can be constructed that are consistent with recent organizing principles. While deferring the assessment of which of these dense ordered structures is thermodynamically stable in the high-density crystalline solid regime, the degeneracy of their densest-known packings strongly suggests that colloidal convex lens-shaped particles could be better glass formers than colloidal spheres because of the additional rotational degrees of freedom. PMID:26671389

  7. Protective Face Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Mask to protect the physically impaired from injuries to the face and head has been developed by Langley Research Center. It is made of composite materials, usually graphite or boron fibers woven into a matrix. Weighs less than three ounces.

  8. Mechanization of face ends

    SciTech Connect

    Singhal, R.K.

    1984-10-01

    The author reviews developments in face-end machinery in the UK, West Germany and US. Automatic control systems such as MIDAS and MINOS are considered, as well as water-jet assisted cutting and machine health monitoring.

  9. Toward hyperspectral face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robila, Stefan A.

    2008-02-01

    Face recognition continues to meet significant challenges in reaching accurate results and still remains one of the activities where humans outperform technology. An attractive approach in improving face identification is provided by the fusion of multiple imaging sources such as visible and infrared images. Hyperspectral data, i.e. images collected over hundreds of narrow contiguous light spectrum intervals constitute a natural choice for expanding face recognition image fusion, especially since it may provide information beyond the normal visible range, thus exceeding the normal human sensing. In this paper we investigate the efficiency of hyperspectral face recognition through an in house experiment that collected data in over 120 bands within the visible and near infrared range. The imagery was produced using an off the shelf sensor in both indoors and outdoors with the subjects being photographed from various angles. Further processing included spectra collection and feature extraction. Human matching performance based on spectral properties is discussed.

  10. Performance of the coned-face end seal with regard to energy conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sehnal, J.; Sedy, J.; Zobens, A.; Etsion, I.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of face coning on seal performance are evaluated with particular regard to the energy saving potential of convex conedface end seals as indicated by torque reduction. Experiments were conducted using a conventional carbon flat-face pusher-type seal, a coned-face pusher-type seal, coned-face bellows-type seal, and a modified coned-face pusher-type seal intended for dynamically unstable operation, with shaft rotation at up to 8000 rpm, pressures of up to 2758 kPa, and a petroleum-based turbine oil as lubricant. Torque at the seal interface is found to be reduced by 42% when the standard flat-face seal is replaced by a coned seal, although the leakage of the cone-face seal was 11 times greater. Reduction of seal balance from 76.1 to 51.3% resulted in an additional 44% reduction in torque, although at the expense of excessive leakage, but did not produce unstable operation. Face temperatures were reduced by 33-56 C and wear was also reduced greatly on the cone face seals. Seal performance is noted to be in agreement with analytical calculations.

  11. Analysis of detected signal performance in multi-tracks of optical disk memory using convex-shaped recording mark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otani, Yousuke; Nitta, Kouichi; Matoba, Osamu

    2014-09-01

    The possibility of multi-valued optical disk memory by using a convex-shaped recording mark fabricated by two-photon absorption is investigated. We fabricate a numerical model for convex-shaped recording marks and evaluate the signal characteristics in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The numerical results show that 6 bit data can be realized when the acceptable average SNR is 2 and a length of the mark is 4T.

  12. Computer aided surface representation

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhill, R E

    1987-11-01

    The aims of this research are the creation of new surface forms and the determination of geometric and physical properties of surfaces. The full sweep from constructive mathematics through the implementation of algorithms and the interactive computer graphics display of surfaces is utilized. Both three-dimensional and multi- dimensional surfaces are considered. Particular emphasis is given to the scientific computing solution of Department of Energy problems. The methods that we have developed and that we are proposing to develop allow applications such as: Producing smooth contour maps from measured data, such as weather maps. Modeling the heat distribution inside a furnace from sample measurements. Terrain modeling based on satellite pictures. The investigation of new surface forms includes the topics of triangular interpolants, multivariate interpolation, surfaces defined on surfaces and monotone and/or convex surfaces. The geometric and physical properties considered include contours, the intersection of surfaces, curvatures as a interrogation tool, and numerical integration.

  13. Is Face Distinctiveness Gender Based?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baudouin, Jean-Yves; Gallay, Mathieu

    2006-01-01

    Two experiments were carried out to study the role of gender category in evaluations of face distinctiveness. In Experiment 1, participants had to evaluate the distinctiveness and the femininity-masculinity of real or artificial composite faces. The composite faces were created by blending either faces of the same gender (sexed composite faces,…

  14. Flat-ramp vs. convex-concave thrust geometries in a deformable hanging wall: new insights from analogue modeling experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Pedro; Tomas, Ricardo; Rosas, Filipe; Duarte, Joao; Terrinha, Pedro

    2015-04-01

    Different modes of strain accommodation affecting a deformable hanging-wall in a flat-ramp-flat thrust system were previously addressed through several (sandbox) analog modeling studies, focusing on the influence of different variables, such as: a) thrust ramp dip angle and friction (Bonini et al, 2000); b) prescribed thickness of the hanging-wall (Koy and Maillot, 2007); and c) sin-thrust erosion (compensating for topographic thrust edification, e.g. Persson and Sokoutis, 2002). In the present work we reproduce the same experimental procedure to investigate the influence of two different parameters on hanging-wall deformation: 1) the geometry of the thrusting surface; and 2) the absence of a velocity discontinuity (VD) that is always present in previous similar analogue modeling studies. Considering the first variable we use two end member ramp geometries, flat-ramp-flat and convex-concave, to understand the control exerted by the abrupt ramp edges in the hanging-wall stress-strain distribution, comparing the obtain results with the situation in which such edge singularities are absent (convex-concave thrust ramp). Considering the second investigated parameter, our motivation was the recognition that the VD found in the different analogue modeling settings simply does not exist in nature, despite the fact that it has a major influence on strain accommodation in the deformable hanging-wall. We thus eliminate such apparatus artifact from our models and compare the obtained results with the previous ones. Our preliminary results suggest that both investigated variables play a non-negligible role on the structural style characterizing the hanging-wall deformation of convergent tectonic settings were such thrust-ramp systems were recognized. Acknowledgments This work was sponsored by the Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia (FCT) through project MODELINK EXPL/GEO-GEO/0714/2013. Pedro Almeida wants to thank to FCT for the Ph.D. grant (SFRH/BD/52556/2014) under the

  15. L2CXCV: A Fortran 77 package for least squares convex/concave data smoothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demetriou, I. C.

    2006-04-01

    Fortran 77 software is given for least squares smoothing to data values contaminated by random errors subject to one sign change in the second divided differences of the smoothed values, where the location of the sign change is also unknown of the optimization problem. A highly useful description of the constraints is that they follow from the assumption of initially increasing and subsequently decreasing rates of change, or vice versa, of the process considered. The underlying algorithm partitions the data into two disjoint sets of adjacent data and calculates the required fit by solving a strictly convex quadratic programming problem for each set. The piecewise linear interpolant to the fit is convex on the first set and concave on the other one. The partition into suitable sets is achieved by a finite iterative algorithm, which is made quite efficient because of the interactions of the quadratic programming problems on consecutive data. The algorithm obtains the solution by employing no more quadratic programming calculations over subranges of data than twice the number of the divided differences constraints. The quadratic programming technique makes use of active sets and takes advantage of a B-spline representation of the smoothed values that allows some efficient updating procedures. The entire code required to implement the method is 2920 Fortran lines. The package has been tested on a variety of data sets and it has performed very efficiently, terminating in an overall number of active set changes over subranges of data that is only proportional to the number of data. The results suggest that the package can be used for very large numbers of data values. Some examples with output are provided to help new users and exhibit certain features of the software. Important applications of the smoothing technique may be found in calculating a sigmoid approximation, which is a common topic in various contexts in applications in disciplines like physics, economics

  16. How Well Do Computer-Generated Faces Tap Face Expertise?

    PubMed Central

    Crookes, Kate; Ewing, Louise; Gildenhuys, Ju-dith; Kloth, Nadine; Hayward, William G.; Oxner, Matt; Pond, Stephen; Rhodes, Gillian

    2015-01-01

    The use of computer-generated (CG) stimuli in face processing research is proliferating due to the ease with which faces can be generated, standardised and manipulated. However there has been surprisingly little research into whether CG faces are processed in the same way as photographs of real faces. The present study assessed how well CG faces tap face identity expertise by investigating whether two indicators of face expertise are reduced for CG faces when compared to face photographs. These indicators were accuracy for identification of own-race faces and the other-race effect (ORE)–the well-established finding that own-race faces are recognised more accurately than other-race faces. In Experiment 1 Caucasian and Asian participants completed a recognition memory task for own- and other-race real and CG faces. Overall accuracy for own-race faces was dramatically reduced for CG compared to real faces and the ORE was significantly and substantially attenuated for CG faces. Experiment 2 investigated perceptual discrimination for own- and other-race real and CG faces with Caucasian and Asian participants. Here again, accuracy for own-race faces was significantly reduced for CG compared to real faces. However the ORE was not affected by format. Together these results signal that CG faces of the type tested here do not fully tap face expertise. Technological advancement may, in the future, produce CG faces that are equivalent to real photographs. Until then caution is advised when interpreting results obtained using CG faces. PMID:26535910

  17. Face distortion aftereffects in personally familiar, famous, and unfamiliar faces.

    PubMed

    Walton, Billy Ronald Peter; Hills, Peter James

    2012-01-01

    The internal face prototype is thought to be a construction of the average of every previously viewed face (Schwaninger et al., 2003). However, the influence of the most frequently encountered faces (i.e., personally familiar faces) has been generally understated. The current research explored the face distortion aftereffect in unfamiliar, famous, and personally familiar (each subject's parent) faces. Forty-eight adult participants reported whether faces were distorted or not (distorted by shifting the eyes in the vertical axis) of a series of images that included unfamiliar, famous, and personally familiar faces. The number of faces perceived to be "odd" was measured pre- and post-adaptation to the most extreme distortion. Participants were adapted to either an unfamiliar, famous, or personally familiar face. The results indicate that adaptation transferred from unfamiliar faces to personally familiar faces more so than the converse and aftereffects did not transfer from famous faces to unfamiliar faces. These results are indicative of representation differences between unfamiliar, famous, and personally familiar faces, whereby personally familiar faces share representations of both unfamiliar and famous faces.

  18. Stimulus factors affecting the categorisation of faces and scrambled faces.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, N; Humphreys, G W; Sawyer, J

    1994-05-01

    Three experiments are reported which investigate the categorisation of faces and scrambled faces in a face/scrambled face decision task. Three kinds of stimuli were presented in upright and inverted orientations; faces, highly scrambled faces (all features out of position) and moderately scrambled faces (two features out of position). Experiment 1 demonstrated that faces and highly scrambled faces are categorised equally quickly and both types of stimulus were categorised faster than moderately scrambled faces. These results held for both upright and inverted presentations. It is argued that for both upright and inverted presentations, faces are categorised by being matched in parallel to a stored mental representation of a face. In contrast scrambled faces are categorised following a serial search of facial features which is probably self-terminating. Experiment 2 demonstrates that the results of Experiment 1 hold when facial features are replaced by other objects which retain the same global shape as facial features and suggest that faces are categorised using a coarsely coded visual description. Experiment 3 demonstrates the importance of stimulus outline on the categorisation of both moderately and highly scrambled faces but not real faces. The results are discussed in terms of the stimulus information used, and the effect of inversion, on face categorisation.

  19. An equine pain face

    PubMed Central

    Gleerup, Karina B; Forkman, Björn; Lindegaard, Casper; Andersen, Pia H

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the existence of an equine pain face and to describe this in detail. Study design Semi-randomized, controlled, crossover trial. Animals Six adult horses. Methods Pain was induced with two noxious stimuli, a tourniquet on the antebrachium and topical application of capsaicin. All horses participated in two control trials and received both noxious stimuli twice, once with and once without an observer present. During all sessions their pain state was scored. The horses were filmed and the close-up video recordings of the faces were analysed for alterations in behaviour and facial expressions. Still images from the trials were evaluated for the presence of each of the specific pain face features identified from the video analysis. Results Both noxious challenges were effective in producing a pain response resulting in significantly increased pain scores. Alterations in facial expressions were observed in all horses during all noxious stimulations. The number of pain face features present on the still images from the noxious challenges were significantly higher than for the control trial (p = 0.0001). Facial expressions representative for control and pain trials were condensed into explanatory illustrations. During pain sessions with an observer present, the horses increased their contact-seeking behavior. Conclusions and clinical relevance An equine pain face comprising ‘low’ and/or ‘asymmetrical’ ears, an angled appearance of the eyes, a withdrawn and/or tense stare, mediolaterally dilated nostrils and tension of the lips, chin and certain facial muscles can be recognized in horses during induced acute pain. This description of an equine pain face may be useful for improving tools for pain recognition in horses with mild to moderate pain. PMID:25082060

  20. Convex Tangrams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Paul

    2006-01-01

    The Chinese tangram puzzle was known as far back as 1813. It has remained popular ever since. It consists of seven simple polygonal pieces of card which can be assembled in the form of a square. The reader is presented with some popular shape such as the man or cat above, and then asked to construct this using the tangram pieces. There are whole…

  1. Ondes de surface transverses sur plaques piézoélectriques avec réseaux de bandes metalliques déposés sur les 2 faces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballandras, S.; Gavignet, E.; Bigler, E.

    1995-09-01

    A theoretical model has been implemented to study surface transverse waves propagating on piezoelectric plates of finite thickness with thin metal strip gratings on both sides. Calculations have been performed for AT-cuts of quartz of thickness varying from 140 to 120 μm. The spatial period of the gratings was fixed to 20 μm (acoustic wavelength equal to 40 μm). The dispersion curve relating the angular frequency to the wavenumber presents more than one stopband as found in the usual analyses on semi-infinite substrates. These multiple high-frequency stopbands allow to design and realize high stability resonators or highly sensitive sensors for gravimetry, accelerometer applications, etc. Un modèle théorique a été mis en œuvre pour l'étude des propriétés des ondes de surface transverses se propageant sur des plaques piézoélectriques d'épaisseur finie avec des réseaux de fines bandes métalliques déposés sur chaque face. Les calculs ont été effectués pour des plaques de quartz voisines de la coupe AT et d'épaisseur variant de 140 à 120 μm. La périodicité des réseaux en regard a été fixée à 20 μm (longueur d'onde acoustique 40 μm). La courbe de dispersion reliant la pulsation au nombre d'ondes présente plusieurs bandes d'arrêt incluant celle habituellement mise en évidence pour un substrat semi-infini. L'existence de ces multiples bandes d'arrêt haute fréquence ouvre de nouvelles perspectives pour la réalisation de résonateurs ultrastables ou de capteurs de très grande sensibilité gravimétrique, accélérométrique, etc.

  2. Dimpled/grooved face on a fuel injection nozzle body for flame stabilization and related method

    DOEpatents

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Kim, Kwanwoo; Zuo, Baifang

    2013-08-20

    A fuel injection head for a fuel nozzle used in a gas turbine combustor includes a substantially hollow body formed with an upstream end face, a downstream end face and a peripheral wall extending therebetween. A plurality of pre-mix tubes or passages extend axially through the hollow body with inlets at the upstream end face and outlets at the downstream end face. An exterior surface of the downstream end face is formed with three-dimensional surface features that increase a total surface area of the exterior surface as compared to a substantially flat, planar downstream end face.

  3. Bayesian Face Recognition and Perceptual Narrowing in Face-Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balas, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    During the first year of life, infants' face recognition abilities are subject to "perceptual narrowing", the end result of which is that observers lose the ability to distinguish previously discriminable faces (e.g. other-race faces) from one another. Perceptual narrowing has been reported for faces of different species and different races, in…

  4. Holistic processing of faces: learning effects with Mooney faces.

    PubMed

    Latinus, Marianne; Taylor, Margot J

    2005-08-01

    The specialness of faces is seen in the face inversion effect, which disrupts the configural, but not the analytic, processing of faces. Mooney faces, which are processed holistically, allowed us to determine the contribution of holistic processing to the face inversion effect. As inverted Mooney faces are difficult to recognize as faces, we also included an intermediary training period for Mooney face recognition for half of the subjects. Early face-sensitive ERPs (N170 and P1) and P2 were measured. Behavioral data showed an increase in correct responses to inverted and upright Mooney faces after the learning phase for the experimental group. No effects were seen on P1. N170 latency did not vary with stimulus type before the intermediary phase, however, N170 amplitude was consistently larger for upright than inverted Mooney faces. After the intermediary exercise, N170 was delayed for inverted compared to upright Mooney faces. In contrast, for both groups of subjects P2 amplitude was larger for nonface stimuli, and P2 amplitude decreased after the intermediate task only for the subjects trained to recognize Mooney faces. As the usual inversion effect seen with photographic faces (delayed and larger N170) was not seen with Mooney faces, these data suggest that this effect on N170 is due to the recruitment of analytic processing. P2 reflected learning and a deeper processing of the stimuli that were not identifiable as faces.

  5. Study of cellular behaviors on concave and convex microstructures fabricated from elastic PDMS membranes.

    PubMed

    Park, Joong Yull; Lee, Dae Ho; Lee, Eun Joong; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2009-07-21

    Cells respond to geometrical cues, as well as to biochemical and mechanical stimuli. Recent progress in micro- and nano-technology has allowed researchers to create microbeads, micro-circular islands, and microposts, that can be used to examine the effect of geometrical cues on cellular behavior. Knowledge of changes in cell mechanics and morphology in response to geometric cues is important for understanding the basic behavior of cells during development and pathological processes. Most previous research in this area has focused on cell responses to two-dimensional planar or rectilinear structures. Very few studies have examined cell responses to three-dimensional curved structures because of the difficulty of fabricating such microstructures. Here we describe a novel method for the fabrication of convex and concave microstructures by use of a thin poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) membrane, SU-8 shadow mask, and negative air pressure without using any complicated silicon processes. We successfully fabricated concave and convex microstructures, with base diameters of 200-300 microm and depth (or height) of 50-150 microm (aspect ratios up to 1 : 0.5), and used these microstructures to study the responses of cultured L929 mouse fibroblast cells and human mesenchymal stem cells. These cells clearly sensed the three-dimensional microscale curvature and actively "escaped" from concave patterns, but not from those which were convex. Thus, it appears that microscale concave structures suppress cell adhesion and proliferation. We hypothesized that this might relate to deformation of the plasma membrane and subsequent opening of membrane channels. We anticipate that our system will be useful for various bio-MEMS (micro electro mechanical system) applications, including formation of uniformly-sized embryoid bodies, embryonic stem cell differentiation, and the fabrication of cell docking devices, microbioreactors, and microlenses as well as cell mechanics study. PMID:19568673

  6. The CONVEX Liner Add-On to the DIAMOND-FORTUNE event

    SciTech Connect

    Heuze, F.E.; Swift, R.P.; Hill, L.R.; Barrett, W.H.

    1993-11-15

    This report describes the execution of the CONVEX Liner Add-On to the DIAMOND FORTUNE low-yield cavity test of the Defense Nuclear Agency. CONVEX stands for COntained Nuclear Vessel EXperiment. It concerns the design of underground chambers where repeated low-yield nuclear explosions could be conducted. The approach proposed by the first author in the early 1980`s was to engineer a steel-lined rock cavern where the steel liner would be prestressed against the rock by tendons and/or bolts. These would daylight in tunnels surrounding the main cavity. From there, they could be initially tensioned and retensioned, if needed, after each test. The CONVEX Liner Add-On to DIAMOND FORTUNE consisted of anchoring a 1.4-m square, 2.5-cm thick steel plate to the wall of the cavity, using a 5-cm diameter center bolt, and four 2.5-cm diameter comer bolts. The bolts daylighted in a drift surrounding the gallery, and separated from it by a 9-m thick rock pillar. The liner plate, the bolts, and the rock pillar were equipped with 23 gages to describe the thermal and mechanical response of the system during pretensioning, during the dynamic loading phase, and post-test. Particular emphasis was given to obtaining the response both upon loading and during the rebound of the system, in order to determine whether the plate ever separated from the rock. So, the main operational objectives of this project were to acquire response data of the system under nuclear loading and to ascertain the status of contact between the steel plate and the rock, as shown by toadstool data and bolt tension data. The instrumentation and data acquisition system performed extremely well. Data were recorded during the dynamic phase; plate temperature was monitored for several hours after the test; and the remaining tension was obtained for several bolts more than three months after the test, upon re-entry in the runaround drift.

  7. Convex-Optimization-Based Compartmental Pharmacokinetic Analysis for Prostate Tumor Characterization Using DCE-MRI.

    PubMed

    Ambikapathi, ArulMurugan; Chan, Tsung-Han; Lin, Chia-Hsiang; Yang, Fei-Shih; Chi, Chong-Yung; Wang, Yue

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is a powerful imaging modality to study the pharmacokinetics in a suspected cancer/tumor tissue. The pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis of prostate cancer includes the estimation of time activity curves (TACs), and thereby, the corresponding kinetic parameters (KPs), and plays a pivotal role in diagnosis and prognosis of prostate cancer. In this paper, we endeavor to develop a blind source separation algorithm, namely convex-optimization-based KPs estimation (COKE) algorithm for PK analysis based on compartmental modeling of DCE-MRI data, for effective prostate tumor detection and its quantification. The COKE algorithm first identifies the best three representative pixels in the DCE-MRI data, corresponding to the plasma, fast-flow, and slow-flow TACs, respectively. The estimation accuracy of the flux rate constants (FRCs) of the fast-flow and slow-flow TACs directly affects the estimation accuracy of the KPs that provide the cancer and normal tissue distribution maps in the prostate region. The COKE algorithm wisely exploits the matrix structure (Toeplitz, lower triangular, and exponential decay) of the original nonconvex FRCs estimation problem, and reformulates it into two convex optimization problems that can reliably estimate the FRCs. After estimation of the FRCs, the KPs can be effectively estimated by solving a pixel-wise constrained curve-fitting (convex) problem. Simulation results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed COKE algorithm. The COKE algorithm is also evaluated with DCE-MRI data of four different patients with prostate cancer and the obtained results are consistent with clinical observations. PMID:26292336

  8. Convex-Optimization-Based Compartmental Pharmacokinetic Analysis for Prostate Tumor Characterization Using DCE-MRI.

    PubMed

    Ambikapathi, ArulMurugan; Chan, Tsung-Han; Lin, Chia-Hsiang; Yang, Fei-Shih; Chi, Chong-Yung; Wang, Yue

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is a powerful imaging modality to study the pharmacokinetics in a suspected cancer/tumor tissue. The pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis of prostate cancer includes the estimation of time activity curves (TACs), and thereby, the corresponding kinetic parameters (KPs), and plays a pivotal role in diagnosis and prognosis of prostate cancer. In this paper, we endeavor to develop a blind source separation algorithm, namely convex-optimization-based KPs estimation (COKE) algorithm for PK analysis based on compartmental modeling of DCE-MRI data, for effective prostate tumor detection and its quantification. The COKE algorithm first identifies the best three representative pixels in the DCE-MRI data, corresponding to the plasma, fast-flow, and slow-flow TACs, respectively. The estimation accuracy of the flux rate constants (FRCs) of the fast-flow and slow-flow TACs directly affects the estimation accuracy of the KPs that provide the cancer and normal tissue distribution maps in the prostate region. The COKE algorithm wisely exploits the matrix structure (Toeplitz, lower triangular, and exponential decay) of the original nonconvex FRCs estimation problem, and reformulates it into two convex optimization problems that can reliably estimate the FRCs. After estimation of the FRCs, the KPs can be effectively estimated by solving a pixel-wise constrained curve-fitting (convex) problem. Simulation results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed COKE algorithm. The COKE algorithm is also evaluated with DCE-MRI data of four different patients with prostate cancer and the obtained results are consistent with clinical observations.

  9. The concave versus convex approach for minimally invasive lateral lumbar interbody fusion for thoracolumbar degenerative scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Scheer, Justin K; Khanna, Ryan; Lopez, Alejandro J; Fessler, Richard G; Koski, Tyler R; Smith, Zachary A; Dahdaleh, Nader S

    2015-10-01

    We retrospectively reviewed patient charts to compare the approach-related (convex versus concave) neurological complications and magnitude of correction in patients undergoing lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF). It is yet to be quantitatively determined if correction of adult degenerative scoliosis from either side of the curve apex using a LLIF results in a reduction in complications and/or improved corrective ability. The inclusion criteria for this study were patients who underwent a LLIF for adult degenerative thoracolumbar scoliosis and had the LLIF prior to any other supplemental procedures. Patients were grouped based on the approach toward the curve apex concavity (CAVE) or the convexity (VEX). Standard coronal and sagittal radiographic measurements were made. Neurological complications and reoperation indications were also recorded. We included 32 patients for review (CAVE: 17; VEX: 15) with a mean age of 65.5 years±a standard deviation of 10.2, and mean follow-up of 17.0 months±15.7. There were eight postoperative neurological complications in eight patients (25.0%), and seven reoperations for six patients (18.8%; CAVE: 4/17 [23.5%]; VEX: 2/15 [13.3%]). The CAVE group had 6/17 neurological complications (35.3%; four ipsilateral and two contralateral to approach side) and VEX had 2/15 (13.3%; one ipsilateral and one bilateral to approach side; p>0.05). All patients significantly improved in the mean regional and segmental Cobb angles (p<0.05), except for T11-T12 (p>0.05). There were no significant differences between the groups for any of the radiographic parameters measured (p>0.05). Approaching the curve apex from either the concave or convex side resulted in significant improvements. The concave approach was associated with more postoperative neurological complications.

  10. Image restoration by the method of convex projections: part 1 theory.

    PubMed

    Youla, D C; Webb, H

    1982-01-01

    A projection operator onto a closed convex set in Hilbert space is one of the few examples of a nonlinear map that can be defined in simple abstract terms. Moreover, it minimizes distance and is nonexpansive, and therefore shares two of the more important properties of ordinary linear orthogonal projections onto closed linear manifolds. In this paper, we exploit the properties of these operators to develop several iterative algorithms for image restoration from partial data which permit any number of nonlinear constraints of a certain type to be subsumed automatically. Their common conceptual basis is as follows. Every known property of an original image f is envisaged as restricting it to lie in a well-defined closed convex set. Thus, m such properties place f in the intersection E(0) = E(i) of the corresponding closed convex sets E(1),E(2),...EE(m). Given only the projection operators PE(i) onto the individual E(i)'s, i = 1 --> m, we restore f by recursive means. Clearly, in this approach, the realization of the P(i)'s in a Hilbert space setting is one of the major synthesis problems. Section I describes the geometrical significance of the three main theorems in considerable detail, and most of the underlying ideas are illustrated with the aid of simple diagrams. Section II presents rules for the numerical implementation of 11 specific projection operators which are found to occur frequently in many signal-processing applications, and the Appendix contains proofs of all the major results.

  11. Dissipative issue of high-order shock capturing schemes with non-convex equations of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuzé, Olivier; Jaouen, Stéphane; Jourdren, Hervé

    2009-02-01

    It is well known that, closed with a non-convex equation of state (EOS), the Riemann problem for the Euler equations allows non-standard waves, such as split shocks, sonic isentropic compressions or rarefaction shocks, to occur. Loss of convexity then leads to non-uniqueness of entropic or Lax solutions, which can only be resolved via the Liu-Oleinik criterion (equivalent to the existence of viscous profiles for all admissible shock waves). This suggests that in order to capture the physical solution, a numerical scheme must provide an appropriate level of dissipation. A legitimate question then concerns the ability of high-order shock capturing schemes to naturally select such a solution. To investigate this question and evaluate modern as well as future high-order numerical schemes, there is therefore a crucial need for well-documented benchmarks. A thermodynamically consistent C∞ non-convex EOS that can be easily introduced in Eulerian as well as Lagrangian hydrocodes for test purposes is here proposed, along with a reference solution for an initial value problem exhibiting a complex composite wave pattern (the Bizarrium test problem). Two standard Lagrangian numerical approaches, both based on a finite volume method, are then reviewed (vNR and Godunov-type schemes) and evaluated on this Riemann problem. In particular, a complete description of several state-of-the-art high-order Godunov-type schemes applicable to general EOSs is provided. We show that this particular test problem reveals quite severe when working on high-order schemes, and recommend it as a benchmark for devising new limiters and/or next-generation highly accurate schemes.

  12. Face recognition system and method using face pattern words and face pattern bytes

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Yufeng

    2014-12-23

    The present invention provides a novel system and method for identifying individuals and for face recognition utilizing facial features for face identification. The system and method of the invention comprise creating facial features or face patterns called face pattern words and face pattern bytes for face identification. The invention also provides for pattern recognitions for identification other than face recognition. The invention further provides a means for identifying individuals based on visible and/or thermal images of those individuals by utilizing computer software implemented by instructions on a computer or computer system and a computer readable medium containing instructions on a computer system for face recognition and identification.

  13. Two Faces of Japan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beasley, Conger, Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the inconsistency between Japanese exploitation of world natural resources and gestures to provide leadership in ecologically innovative technology. Explores Japanese culture, power structure, population trends, environmental ethics, industrialism, and international business practices as they relate to the philosophical face of…

  14. Problems Facing Rural Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, C. E.; And Others

    Problems facing rural Scottish schools range from short term consideration of daily operation to long term consideration of organizational alternatives. Addressed specifically, such problems include consideration of: (1) liaison between a secondary school and its feeder primary schools; (2) preservice teacher training for work in small, isolated…

  15. Lightweight Face Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cason, W. E. I.; Baucom, R. M.; Evans, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    Lightweight face mask originally developed to protect epileptic patients during seizures could have many other medical and nonmedical applications such as muscular distrophy patients, football linesmen and riot-control police. Masks are extremely lightweight, the lightest of the configurations weighing only 136 grams.

  16. Challenges Facing Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyen, Edward L., Ed.; And Others

    This book presents 17 selected papers from recent issues of the journal, "Focus on Exceptional Children," concerning current and emerging challenges facing the field of special education. The book is organized in two parts. Part 1, "Contemporary Challenges," includes the following articles: "Transitions in Early Childhood Special Education: Issues…

  17. Facing the Not Knowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennant, Roy

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about how to face the not knowing and offers a strategy to fill the gap of not knowing. In coping with constant change, he describes a strategy for library staff that might help in the absence of certainty. This includes: (a) guarding the data with one's life; (b) build not for longevity, but obsolescence; (c)…

  18. A Wall of Faces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Lori

    2008-01-01

    Visitors to the campus of Orland High School (OHS) will never question that they have stepped into a world of the masses: kids, activity, personalities, busyness, and playfulness--a veritable cloud of mild bedlam. The wall of ceramic faces that greets a visitor in the school office is another reminder of the organized chaos that the teachers…

  19. High-frequency electromagnetic scarring in three-dimensional axisymmetric convex cavities

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Warne, Larry K.; Jorgenson, Roy E.

    2016-04-13

    Here, this article examines the localization of high-frequency electromagnetic fields in three-dimensional axisymmetric cavities along periodic paths between opposing sides of the cavity. When these orbits lead to unstable localized modes, they are known as scars. This article treats the case where the opposing sides, or mirrors, are convex. Particular attention is focused on the normalization through the electromagnetic energy theorem. Both projections of the field along the scarred orbit as well as field point statistics are examined. Statistical comparisons are made with a numerical calculation of the scars run with an axisymmetric simulation.

  20. Forward light scattering for arbitrary sharp-edged convex crystals in Fraunhofer and anomalous diffraction approximations.

    PubMed

    Heffels, C; Heitzmann, D; Hirleman, E D; Scarlett, B

    1995-10-01

    Fraunhofer diffraction is a well-known physical model for describing forward light scattering from opaque particles much larger than the wavelength of the light. Analytical expressions exist for diffraction from circular- or rectangular-shaped apertures. An expression is derived for diffraction by apertures of a general polygonal shape. From this expression the exact solution for anomalous diffraction by arbitrary convex crystals is calculated. These expressions are useful in characterizing crystal size and shape, by laser diffraction instruments, when measured in a solution.

  1. Matrix coefficient identification in an elliptic equation with the convex energy functional method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinze, Michael; Nhan Tam Quyen, Tran

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we study the inverse problem of identifying the diffusion matrix in an elliptic PDE from measurements. The convex energy functional method with Tikhonov regularization is applied to tackle this problem. For the discretization we use the variational discretization concept, where the PDE is discretized with piecewise linear, continuous finite elements. We show the convergence of approximations. Using a suitable source condition, we prove an error bound for discrete solutions. For the numerical solution we propose a gradient-projection algorithm and prove the strong convergence of its iterates to a solution of the identification problem. Finally, we present a numerical experiment which illustrates our theoretical results.

  2. Fabrication of concave and convex potassium bromide lens arrays by compression molding.

    PubMed

    de la Barrière, Florence; Druart, Guillaume; Guèrineau, Nicolas; Taboury, Jean; Gueugnot, Alain; Huc, Vincent

    2012-07-20

    A new simple and cost-effective method has been developed for the fabrication of both plano-convex and plano-concave lens arrays with potentially important sag heights. The process is based on the use of potassium bromide (KBr) powder. At ambient temperature and under pressure, KBr powder is compressed on a molding die with the desired shape to form a solid lens array. The quality of the lens arrays has been assessed, and we present the first image produced by a converging KBr lens array.

  3. The discrete one-sided Lipschitz condition for convex scalar conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenier, Yann; Osher, Stanley

    1986-01-01

    Physical solutions to convex scalar conservation laws satisfy a one-sided Lipschitz condition (OSLC) that enforces both the entropy condition and their variation boundedness. Consistency with this condition is therefore desirable for a numerical scheme and was proved for both the Godunov and the Lax-Friedrichs scheme--also, in a weakened version, for the Roe scheme, all of them being only first order accurate. A new, fully second order scheme is introduced here, which is consistent with the OSLC. The modified equation is considered and shows interesting features. Another second order scheme is then considered and numerical results are discussed.

  4. Projection Onto Convex Sets (POCS) method for photoacoustic tomography with a non negative constraint.

    PubMed

    Salehin, S M Akramus; Huang, Shaochun; Abhayapala, Thushara D

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is a biomedical imaging modality capable of early cancer detection. In this paper, we proposed a novel iterative Projections Onto Convex Sets (POCS) method for improving photoacoustic reconstruction. This method aims to obtain a non negative pressure distribution satisfying the measured signals. This POCS method is performed in the Fourier Bessel space avoiding matrix inversions in the projections, speeding up projections and is capable of handling the large data sets present in photoacoustic imaging. The numerical experiments performed showed that improved reconstruction was obtained with a few iterations together with the recovery of some lost information.

  5. Convexity of Ruin Probability and Optimal Dividend Strategies for a General Lévy Process

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Chuancun; Yuen, Kam Chuen; Shen, Ying

    2015-01-01

    We consider the optimal dividends problem for a company whose cash reserves follow a general Lévy process with certain positive jumps and arbitrary negative jumps. The objective is to find a policy which maximizes the expected discounted dividends until the time of ruin. Under appropriate conditions, we use some recent results in the theory of potential analysis of subordinators to obtain the convexity properties of probability of ruin. We present conditions under which the optimal dividend strategy, among all admissible ones, takes the form of a barrier strategy. PMID:26351655

  6. Block clustering based on difference of convex functions (DC) programming and DC algorithms.

    PubMed

    Le, Hoai Minh; Le Thi, Hoai An; Dinh, Tao Pham; Huynh, Van Ngai

    2013-10-01

    We investigate difference of convex functions (DC) programming and the DC algorithm (DCA) to solve the block clustering problem in the continuous framework, which traditionally requires solving a hard combinatorial optimization problem. DC reformulation techniques and exact penalty in DC programming are developed to build an appropriate equivalent DC program of the block clustering problem. They lead to an elegant and explicit DCA scheme for the resulting DC program. Computational experiments show the robustness and efficiency of the proposed algorithm and its superiority over standard algorithms such as two-mode K-means, two-mode fuzzy clustering, and block classification EM.

  7. Face aftereffects predict individual differences in face recognition ability.

    PubMed

    Dennett, Hugh W; McKone, Elinor; Edwards, Mark; Susilo, Tirta

    2012-01-01

    Face aftereffects are widely studied on the assumption that they provide a useful tool for investigating face-space coding of identity. However, a long-standing issue concerns the extent to which face aftereffects originate in face-level processes as opposed to earlier stages of visual processing. For example, some recent studies failed to find atypical face aftereffects in individuals with clinically poor face recognition. We show that in individuals within the normal range of face recognition abilities, there is an association between face memory ability and a figural face aftereffect that is argued to reflect the steepness of broadband-opponent neural response functions in underlying face-space. We further show that this correlation arises from face-level processing, by reporting results of tests of nonface memory and nonface aftereffects. We conclude that face aftereffects can tap high-level face-space, and that face-space coding differs in quality between individuals and contributes to face recognition ability.

  8. The Caledonian face test: A new test of face discrimination.

    PubMed

    Logan, Andrew J; Wilkinson, Frances; Wilson, Hugh R; Gordon, Gael E; Loffler, Gunter

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to develop a clinical test of face perception which is applicable to a wide range of patients and can capture normal variability. The Caledonian face test utilises synthetic faces which combine simplicity with sufficient realism to permit individual identification. Face discrimination thresholds (i.e. minimum difference between faces required for accurate discrimination) were determined in an "odd-one-out" task. The difference between faces was controlled by an adaptive QUEST procedure. A broad range of face discrimination sensitivity was determined from a group (N=52) of young adults (mean 5.75%; SD 1.18; range 3.33-8.84%). The test is fast (3-4 min), repeatable (test-re-test r(2)=0.795) and demonstrates a significant inversion effect. The potential to identify impairments of face discrimination was evaluated by testing LM who reported a lifelong difficulty with face perception. While LM's impairment for two established face tests was close to the criterion for significance (Z-scores of -2.20 and -2.27) for the Caledonian face test, her Z-score was -7.26, implying a more than threefold higher sensitivity. The new face test provides a quantifiable and repeatable assessment of face discrimination ability. The enhanced sensitivity suggests that the Caledonian face test may be capable of detecting more subtle impairments of face perception than available tests.

  9. Finding Faces Among Faces: Human Faces are Located More Quickly and Accurately than Other Primate and Mammal Faces

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Elizabeth A.; Buchin, Zachary; Werner, Katie; Worrell, Rey; Jakobsen, Krisztina V.

    2014-01-01

    We tested the specificity of human face search efficiency by examining whether there is a broad window of detection for various face-like stimuli—human and animal faces—or whether own-species faces receive greater attentional allocation. We assessed the strength of the own-species face detection bias by testing whether human faces are located more efficiently than other animal faces, when presented among various other species’ faces, in heterogeneous 16-, 36-, and 64-item arrays. Across all array sizes, we found that, controlling for distractor type, human faces were located faster and more accurately than primate and mammal faces, and that, controlling for target type, searches were faster when distractors were human faces compared to animal faces, revealing more efficient processing of human faces regardless of their role as targets or distractors (Experiment 1). Critically, these effects remained when searches were for specific species’ faces (human, chimpanzee, otter), ruling out a category-level explanation (Experiment 2). Together, these results suggest that human faces may be processed more efficiently than animal faces, both when task-relevant (targets), and when task-irrelevant (distractors), even when in direct competition with other faces. These results suggest that there is not a broad window of detection for all face-like patterns, but that human adults process own-species’ faces more efficiently than other species’ faces. Such own-species search efficiencies may arise through experience with own-species faces throughout development, or may be privileged early in development, due to the evolutionary importance of conspecifics’ faces. PMID:25113852

  10. Human Faces Are Slower than Chimpanzee Faces

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, Anne M.; Parr, Lisa A.; Durham, Emily L.; Matthews, Lea C.; Smith, Timothy D.

    2014-01-01

    Background While humans (like other primates) communicate with facial expressions, the evolution of speech added a new function to the facial muscles (facial expression muscles). The evolution of speech required the development of a coordinated action between visual (movement of the lips) and auditory signals in a rhythmic fashion to produce “visemes” (visual movements of the lips that correspond to specific sounds). Visemes depend upon facial muscles to regulate shape of the lips, which themselves act as speech articulators. This movement necessitates a more controlled, sustained muscle contraction than that produced during spontaneous facial expressions which occur rapidly and last only a short period of time. Recently, it was found that human tongue musculature contains a higher proportion of slow-twitch myosin fibers than in rhesus macaques, which is related to the slower, more controlled movements of the human tongue in the production of speech. Are there similar unique, evolutionary physiologic biases found in human facial musculature related to the evolution of speech? Methodology/Prinicipal Findings Using myosin immunohistochemistry, we tested the hypothesis that human facial musculature has a higher percentage of slow-twitch myosin fibers relative to chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). We sampled the orbicularis oris and zygomaticus major muscles from three cadavers of each species and compared proportions of fiber-types. Results confirmed our hypothesis: humans had the highest proportion of slow-twitch myosin fibers while chimpanzees had the highest proportion of fast-twitch fibers. Conclusions/significance These findings demonstrate that the human face is slower than that of rhesus macaques and our closest living relative, the chimpanzee. They also support the assertion that human facial musculature and speech co-evolved. Further, these results suggest a unique set of evolutionary selective pressures on human facial

  11. Nursing student experiences with face-to-face learning.

    PubMed

    Gruendemann, Barbara J

    2011-12-01

    Face-to-face learning has been the mainstay of nursing student learning. Despite moves to online learning, face-to-face learning persists. This study focuses on how nursing students experience face-to-face learning and why it not only survives, but thrives. This study was anchored in a hermeneutic phenomenological approach, with Gadamerian concepts and van Manen's lifeworlds as frameworks to understand students' experiences of face-to-face learning. Patterns and themes were extracted from audiore-corded face-to-face interviews. Participants confirmed that face-to-face learning continues to be valued as a strong methodology in nursing education. Their experiences focused on humanism, the importance of "presence," physical proximity, classroom as "the real thing," immediacy of feedback, and learning and knowing by human connections and interaction. The study findings were a rich source for understanding how nursing students process learning experiences. Increased understanding of the meaning and essence of face-to-face learning is essential as we decide how nursing content will be taught. PMID:21956259

  12. Dense nuclei segmentation based on graph cut and convexity-concavity analysis.

    PubMed

    Qi, J

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid advancement of 3D confocal imaging technology, more and more 3D cellular images will be available. However, robust and automatic extraction of nuclei shape may be hindered by a highly cluttered environment, as for example, in fly eye tissues. In this paper, we present a novel and efficient nuclei segmentation algorithm based on the combination of graph cut and convex shape assumption. The main characteristic of the algorithm is that it segments nuclei foreground using a graph-cut algorithm with our proposed new initialization method and splits overlapping or touching cell nuclei by simple convexity and concavity analysis. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can segment complicated nuclei clumps effectively in our fluorescent fruit fly eye images. Evaluation on a public hand-labelled 2D benchmark demonstrates substantial quantitative improvement over other methods. For example, the proposed method achieves a 3.2 Hausdorff distance decrease and a 1.8 decrease in the merged nuclei error per slice.

  13. Trajectory Design Employing Convex Optimization for Landing on Irregularly Shaped Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinson, Robin M.; Lu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Mission proposals that land spacecraft on asteroids are becoming increasingly popular. However, in order to have a successful mission the spacecraft must reliably and softly land at the intended landing site with pinpoint precision. The problem under investigation is how to design a propellant optimal powered descent trajectory that can be quickly computed onboard the spacecraft, without interaction from the ground control. The propellant optimal control problem in this work is to determine the optimal finite thrust vector to land the spacecraft at a specified location, in the presence of a highly nonlinear gravity field, subject to various mission and operational constraints. The proposed solution uses convex optimization, a gravity model with higher fidelity than Newtonian, and an iterative solution process for a fixed final time problem. In addition, a second optimization method is wrapped around the convex optimization problem to determine the optimal flight time that yields the lowest propellant usage over all flight times. Gravity models designed for irregularly shaped asteroids are investigated. Success of the algorithm is demonstrated by designing powered descent trajectories for the elongated binary asteroid Castalia.

  14. An interface reconstruction method based on an analytical formula for 3D arbitrary convex cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Diot, Steven; François, Marianne M.

    2015-10-22

    In this study, we are interested in an interface reconstruction method for 3D arbitrary convex cells that could be used in multi-material flow simulations for instance. We assume that the interface is represented by a plane whose normal vector is known and we focus on the volume-matching step that consists in finding the plane constant so that it splits the cell according to a given volume fraction. We follow the same approach as in the recent authors' publication for 2D arbitrary convex cells in planar and axisymmetrical geometries, namely we derive an analytical formula for the volume of the specificmore » prismatoids obtained when decomposing the cell using the planes that are parallel to the interface and passing through all the cell nodes. This formula is used to bracket the interface plane constant such that the volume-matching problem is rewritten in a single prismatoid in which the same formula is used to find the final solution. Finally, the proposed method is tested against an important number of reproducible configurations and shown to be at least five times faster.« less

  15. Airborne gravimetry data sparse reconstruction via L1-norm convex quadratic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ya-Peng; Wu, Mei-Ping; Tang, Gang

    2015-06-01

    In practice, airborne gravimetry is a sub-Nyquist sampling method because of the restrictions imposed by national boundaries, financial cost, and database size. In this study, we analyze the sparsity of airborne gravimetry data by using the discrete Fourier transform and propose a reconstruction method based on the theory of compressed sensing for large-scale gravity anomaly data. Consequently, the reconstruction of the gravity anomaly data is transformed to a L1-norm convex quadratic programming problem. We combine the preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm (PCG) and the improved interior-point method (IPM) to solve the convex quadratic programming problem. Furthermore, a flight test was carried out with the homegrown strapdown airborne gravimeter SGA-WZ. Subsequently, we reconstructed the gravity anomaly data of the flight test, and then, we compared the proposed method with the linear interpolation method, which is commonly used in airborne gravimetry. The test results show that the PCG-IPM algorithm can be used to reconstruct large-scale gravity anomaly data with higher accuracy and more effectiveness than the linear interpolation method.

  16. A new volume conservation enforcement method for PLIC reconstruction in general convex grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, J.; Hernández, J.; Gómez, P.; Faura, F.

    2016-07-01

    A comprehensive study is made of methods for resolving the volume conservation enforcement problem in the PLIC reconstruction of an interface in general 3D convex grids. Different procedures to bracket the solution when solving the problem using previous standard methods are analyzed in detail. A new interpolation bracketing procedure and an improved analytical method to find the interface plane constant are proposed. These techniques are combined in a new method to enforce volume conservation, which does not require the sequential polyhedra truncation operations typically used in standard methods. The new methods have been implemented into existing geometrical routines described in López and Hernández [15], which are further improved by using more efficient formulae to compute areas and volumes of general convex 2 and 3D polytopes. Different tests using regular and irregular cell geometries are carried out to demonstrate the robustness and substantial improvement in computational efficiency of the proposed techniques, which increase the computation speed of the mentioned routines by up to 3 times for the 3D problems considered in this work.

  17. An Intriguing Convex Break in the EGRET SED of Mrk 421

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nandikotkur, Giridhar; Jahoda, Keith M.; Georganopoulos, M.; Hartman, R. C.; Mukherjee, R.; Thompson, D. J.; Swank, Jean H.

    2007-01-01

    Based upon analysis of the entire EGRET data from Mrk 421, it is found that the time-averaged spectra are inconsistent with the predictions of current theoretical models that have had success in describing simultaneous X-ray/TeV observations, and suggest additional components in the GeV band, as well as complex time variability. Current theoretical pictures explain the GeV emission as comptonization of the synchrotron photons in the jet, and predict hard spectra that should join smoothly with the TeV emission. Our analysis shows that the situation is more complex. The spectrum ranges from hard to soft during individual epochs, and shows a convext break in the aggregated data. We also present the mission-averaged EGRET spectrum for PKS 2155-304, which shows a similar (but not as pronounced) convex curvature. We discuss a series of possible explanations for the 10(exp 22) - 10(exp 23) HZ declining part of the EGRET nu F(sub nu), spectrum for Mrk 421, and suggest that it is synchrotron emission from the high energy tail of the electron population that produces the X-rays during the highest X-ray states. Such multi-MeV photons are produced by electrons accelerated close to the limit of diffusive shock acceleration. Simultaneous GLAST and X-ray observations of high X-ray states will address the issue of the convex curvature in the future.

  18. Arnold diffusion for smooth convex systems of two and a half degrees of freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaloshin, V.; Zhang, K.

    2015-08-01

    In the present note we announce a proof of a strong form of Arnold diffusion for smooth convex Hamiltonian systems. Let { T}2 be a 2-dimensional torus and B2 be the unit ball around the origin in { R}2 . Fix ρ > 0. Our main result says that for a ‘generic’ time-periodic perturbation of an integrable system of two degrees of freedom H_0(p)+\\varepsilon H_1(θ,p,t),\\quad θ\\in { T}^2, p\\in B^2, t\\in { T}={ R}/{ Z} , with a strictly convex H0, there exists a ρ-dense orbit (θε, pε, t)(t) in { T}2 × B2 × { T} , namely, a ρ-neighborhood of the orbit contains { T}2 × B2 × { T} . Our proof is a combination of geometric and variational methods. The fundamental elements of the construction are the usage of crumpled normally hyperbolic invariant cylinders from [9], flower and simple normally hyperbolic invariant manifolds from [36] as well as their kissing property at a strong double resonance. This allows us to build a ‘connected’ net of three-dimensional normally hyperbolic invariant manifolds. To construct diffusing orbits along this net we employ a version of the Mather variational method [41] equipped with weak KAM theory [28], proposed by Bernard in [7].

  19. CONCOLOR: Constrained Non-Convex Low-Rank Model for Image Deblocking.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Xiong, Ruiqin; Zhao, Chen; Zhang, Yongbing; Ma, Siwei; Gao, Wen

    2016-03-01

    Due to independent and coarse quantization of transform coefficients in each block, block-based transform coding usually introduces visually annoying blocking artifacts at low bitrates, which greatly prevents further bit reduction. To alleviate the conflict between bit reduction and quality preservation, deblocking as a post-processing strategy is an attractive and promising solution without changing existing codec. In this paper, in order to reduce blocking artifacts and obtain high-quality image, image deblocking is formulated as an optimization problem within maximum a posteriori framework, and a novel algorithm for image deblocking using constrained non-convex low-rank model is proposed. The ℓ(p) (0 < p < 1) penalty function is extended on singular values of a matrix to characterize low-rank prior model rather than the nuclear norm, while the quantization constraint is explicitly transformed into the feasible solution space to constrain the non-convex low-rank optimization. Moreover, a new quantization noise model is developed, and an alternatively minimizing strategy with adaptive parameter adjustment is developed to solve the proposed optimization problem. This parameter-free advantage enables the whole algorithm more attractive and practical. Experiments demonstrate that the proposed image deblocking algorithm outperforms the current state-of-the-art methods in both the objective quality and the perceptual quality. PMID:26761774

  20. Enhancements on the Convex Programming Based Powered Descent Guidance Algorithm for Mars Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acikmese, Behcet; Blackmore, Lars; Scharf, Daniel P.; Wolf, Aron

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present enhancements on the powered descent guidance algorithm developed for Mars pinpoint landing. The guidance algorithm solves the powered descent minimum fuel trajectory optimization problem via a direct numerical method. Our main contribution is to formulate the trajectory optimization problem, which has nonconvex control constraints, as a finite dimensional convex optimization problem, specifically as a finite dimensional second order cone programming (SOCP) problem. SOCP is a subclass of convex programming, and there are efficient SOCP solvers with deterministic convergence properties. Hence, the resulting guidance algorithm can potentially be implemented onboard a spacecraft for real-time applications. Particularly, this paper discusses the algorithmic improvements obtained by: (i) Using an efficient approach to choose the optimal time-of-flight; (ii) Using a computationally inexpensive way to detect the feasibility/ infeasibility of the problem due to the thrust-to-weight constraint; (iii) Incorporating the rotation rate of the planet into the problem formulation; (iv) Developing additional constraints on the position and velocity to guarantee no-subsurface flight between the time samples of the temporal discretization; (v) Developing a fuel-limited targeting algorithm; (vi) Initial result on developing an onboard table lookup method to obtain almost fuel optimal solutions in real-time.

  1. An interface reconstruction method based on an analytical formula for 3D arbitrary convex cells

    SciTech Connect

    Diot, Steven; François, Marianne M.

    2015-10-22

    In this study, we are interested in an interface reconstruction method for 3D arbitrary convex cells that could be used in multi-material flow simulations for instance. We assume that the interface is represented by a plane whose normal vector is known and we focus on the volume-matching step that consists in finding the plane constant so that it splits the cell according to a given volume fraction. We follow the same approach as in the recent authors' publication for 2D arbitrary convex cells in planar and axisymmetrical geometries, namely we derive an analytical formula for the volume of the specific prismatoids obtained when decomposing the cell using the planes that are parallel to the interface and passing through all the cell nodes. This formula is used to bracket the interface plane constant such that the volume-matching problem is rewritten in a single prismatoid in which the same formula is used to find the final solution. Finally, the proposed method is tested against an important number of reproducible configurations and shown to be at least five times faster.

  2. Infarct topography and hemiparesis profiles with cerebral convexity infarction: the Stroke Data Bank.

    PubMed

    Mohr, J P; Foulkes, M A; Polis, A T; Hier, D B; Kase, C S; Price, T R; Tatemichi, T K; Wolf, P A

    1993-04-01

    For the 183 of 1276 patients in the NINDS Stroke Data Bank with convexity infarction in the middle cerebral artery territory, the size of the infarct did not differ between the two sides but the location of the main site of the infarct differed: on the left side, it was centred in the inferior parietal region, and was mid-frontal on the right. There was a good correlation between infarct size and weakness severity whether estimated by overall motor function on one side, arm, or hand alone. There was a poor correlation, however, for lesion location (lower third, middle third or upper third on either side of the Rolandic fissure) and any of the specific syndromes of focal weakness, no two cases sharing the same lesion for the same syndrome and several cases sharing the same lesion with a different syndrome. The findings indicated a difference in weakness syndromes between the two hemispheres and great individual variation of the acute syndrome caused by a given site of focal infarction along the Rolandic convexity. These variations may explain some of the difficulties showing effects of a given therapeutic agent in studies of acute ischaemic stroke. Large sample sizes will be required for the reliable assessment of any treatment using currently popular clinical stroke scales.

  3. A STRICTLY CONTRACTIVE PEACEMAN–RACHFORD SPLITTING METHOD FOR CONVEX PROGRAMMING

    PubMed Central

    BINGSHENG, HE; LIU, HAN; WANG, ZHAORAN; YUAN, XIAOMING

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on the application of the Peaceman–Rachford splitting method (PRSM) to a convex minimization model with linear constraints and a separable objective function. Compared to the Douglas–Rachford splitting method (DRSM), another splitting method from which the alternating direction method of multipliers originates, PRSM requires more restrictive assumptions to ensure its convergence, while it is always faster whenever it is convergent. We first illustrate that the reason for this difference is that the iterative sequence generated by DRSM is strictly contractive, while that generated by PRSM is only contractive with respect to the solution set of the model. With only the convexity assumption on the objective function of the model under consideration, the convergence of PRSM is not guaranteed. But for this case, we show that the first t iterations of PRSM still enable us to find an approximate solution with an accuracy of O(1/t). A worst-case O(1/t) convergence rate of PRSM in the ergodic sense is thus established under mild assumptions. After that, we suggest attaching an underdetermined relaxation factor with PRSM to guarantee the strict contraction of its iterative sequence and thus propose a strictly contractive PRSM. A worst-case O(1/t) convergence rate of this strictly contractive PRSM in a nonergodic sense is established. We show the numerical efficiency of the strictly contractive PRSM by some applications in statistical learning and image processing. PMID:25620862

  4. Multiview face recognition: from TensorFace to V-TensorFace and K-TensorFace.

    PubMed

    Tian, Chunna; Fan, Guoliang; Gao, Xinbo; Tian, Qi

    2012-04-01

    Face images under uncontrolled environments suffer from the changes of multiple factors such as camera view, illumination, expression, etc. Tensor analysis provides a way of analyzing the influence of different factors on facial variation. However, the TensorFace model creates a difficulty in representing the nonlinearity of view subspace. In this paper, to break this limitation, we present a view-manifold-based TensorFace (V-TensorFace), in which the latent view manifold preserves the local distances in the multiview face space. Moreover, a kernelized TensorFace (K-TensorFace) for multiview face recognition is proposed to preserve the structure of the latent manifold in the image space. Both methods provide a generative model that involves a continuous view manifold for unseen view representation. Most importantly, we propose a unified framework to generalize TensorFace, V-TensorFace, and K-TensorFace. Finally, an expectation-maximization like algorithm is developed to estimate the identity and view parameters iteratively for a face image of an unknown/unseen view. The experiment on the PIE database shows the effectiveness of the manifold construction method. Extensive comparison experiments on Weizmann and Oriental Face databases for multiview face recognition demonstrate the superiority of the proposed V- and K-TensorFace methods over the view-based principal component analysis and other state-of-the-art approaches for such purpose. PMID:22318490

  5. CRYSTAL/FACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgardner, Darrel; Kok, Greg; Anderson, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    Droplet Measurement Technologies (DMT), under funding from NASA, participated in the CRYSTAL/FACE field campaign in July, 2002 with measurements of cirrus cloud hydrometeors in the size range from 0.5 to 1600 microns. The measurements were made with the DMT Cloud, Aerosol and Precipitation Spectrometer (CAPS) that was flown on NASA's WB57F. With the exception of the first research flight when the data system failed two hours into the mission, the measurement system performed almost flawlessly during the thirteen flights. The measurements from the CAPS have been essential for interpretation of cirrus cloud properties and their impact on climate. The CAPS data set has been used extensively by the CRYSTAL/FACE investigators and as of the date of this report, have been included in five published research articles, 10 conference presentations and six other journal articles currently in preparation.

  6. Beyond Faces and Expertise

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Mintao; Bülthoff, Heinrich H.; Bülthoff, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Holistic processing—the tendency to perceive objects as indecomposable wholes—has long been viewed as a process specific to faces or objects of expertise. Although current theories differ in what causes holistic processing, they share a fundamental constraint for its generalization: Nonface objects cannot elicit facelike holistic processing in the absence of expertise. Contrary to this prevailing view, here we show that line patterns with salient Gestalt information (i.e., connectedness, closure, and continuity between parts) can be processed as holistically as faces without any training. Moreover, weakening the saliency of Gestalt information in these patterns reduced holistic processing of them, which indicates that Gestalt information plays a crucial role in holistic processing. Therefore, holistic processing can be achieved not only via a top-down route based on expertise, but also via a bottom-up route relying merely on object-based information. The finding that facelike holistic processing can extend beyond the domains of faces and objects of expertise poses a challenge to current dominant theories. PMID:26674129

  7. Hyperfamiliarity for faces

    PubMed Central

    Devinsky, O.; Davachi, L.; Santchi, C.; Quinn, B. T.; Staresina, B. P.; Thesen, T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To report 4 cases of hyperfamiliarity for faces (HFF) and review 5 previously reported cases. Methods: We identified cases of HFF from PubMed search and references in prior reports. Results: Three of our 4 cases had pathologic findings that were most extensive in the left temporal lobe. HFF occurred after a tonic-clonic seizure (cases 1 and 3), during simple partial seizures (case 2), and in the setting of an increase in simple partial seizure frequency but not during seizures (case 4). All 9 cases were adults with 1 or more seizures; symptoms first occurred after seizures in 5 cases and during seizures in 1 case. Ictal symptoms lasted from seconds to minutes and from 2 days to more than 7 years in the other 6 cases. The duration of HFF was not associated with the presence or extent of a structural lesion. While in several cases HFF appears to result from a postictal Todd paralysis, the mechanism underlying persistent cases is uncertain. Conclusions: This modality (visual)–specific and stimulus (face)–specific syndrome is associated with diverse structural, functional imaging, and neurophysiologic findings. Lesions are more often left-sided and involve the temporal lobe. Epilepsy and seizures were present in all 9 cases, suggesting a pathophysiologic relationship, which likely varies among cases. Although only reported in 9 patients, HFF is probably much more common than it is diagnosed. GLOSSARY HFF = hyperfamiliarity for faces. PMID:20308681

  8. Synthesis and characterization of "face-to-face" porphyrins.

    PubMed Central

    Collman, J P; Elliott, C M; Halbert, T R; Tovrog, B S

    1977-01-01

    The syntheses of four binary porphyrins, two of which are constrained to a "face-to-face" conformation, and their Co2+ and Cu2+ derivatives are described. Electron spin resonance indicates that the intermetallic separation in the binuclear "face-to-face" porphyrins is about 6.5-6.8 A. Electronic spectra and proton magnetic resonance spectra support the postulated "face-to-face" conformations. A hypothesis that related compounds may serve as multielectron redox catalysts for O2 and N2 is presented. PMID:189304

  9. Visual Search of Mooney Faces.

    PubMed

    Goold, Jessica E; Meng, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Faces spontaneously capture attention. However, which special attributes of a face underlie this effect is unclear. To address this question, we investigate how gist information, specific visual properties and differing amounts of experience with faces affect the time required to detect a face. Three visual search experiments were conducted investigating the rapidness of human observers to detect Mooney face images. Mooney images are two-toned, ambiguous images. They were used in order to have stimuli that maintain gist information but limit low-level image properties. Results from the experiments show: (1) Although upright Mooney faces were searched inefficiently, they were detected more rapidly than inverted Mooney face targets, demonstrating the important role of gist information in guiding attention toward a face. (2) Several specific Mooney face identities were searched efficiently while others were not, suggesting the involvement of specific visual properties in face detection. (3) By providing participants with unambiguous gray-scale versions of the Mooney face targets prior to the visual search task, the targets were detected significantly more efficiently, suggesting that prior experience with Mooney faces improves the ability to extract gist information for rapid face detection. However, a week of training with Mooney face categorization did not lead to even more efficient visual search of Mooney face targets. In summary, these results reveal that specific local image properties cannot account for how faces capture attention. On the other hand, gist information alone cannot account for how faces capture attention either. Prior experience facilitates the effect of gist on visual search of faces; making faces a special object category for guiding attention.

  10. A fast adaptive convex hull algorithm on two-dimensional processor arrays with a reconfigurable BUS system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olariu, S.; Schwing, J.; Zhang, J.

    1991-01-01

    A bus system that can change dynamically to suit computational needs is referred to as reconfigurable. We present a fast adaptive convex hull algorithm on a two-dimensional processor array with a reconfigurable bus system (2-D PARBS, for short). Specifically, we show that computing the convex hull of a planar set of n points taken O(log n/log m) time on a 2-D PARBS of size mn x n with 3 less than or equal to m less than or equal to n. Our result implies that the convex hull of n points in the plane can be computed in O(1) time in a 2-D PARBS of size n(exp 1.5) x n.

  11. Gradient flipping algorithm: introducing non-convex constraints in wavefront reconstructions with the transport of intensity equation.

    PubMed

    Parvizi, A; Van den Broek, W; Koch, C T

    2016-04-18

    The transport of intensity equation (TIE) is widely applied for recovering wave fronts from an intensity measurement and a measurement of its variation along the direction of propagation. In order to get around the problem of non-uniqueness and ill-conditionedness of the solution of the TIE in the very common case of unspecified boundary conditions or noisy data, additional constraints to the solution are necessary. Although from a numerical optimization point of view, convex constraint as imposed to by total variation minimization is preferable, we will show that in many cases non-convex constraints are necessary to overcome the low-frequency artifacts so typical for convex constraints. We will provide simulated and experimental examples that demonstrate the superiority of solutions to the TIE obtained by our recently introduced gradient flipping algorithm over a total variation constrained solution. PMID:27137272

  12. Strict convexity and C 1, α regularity of potential functions in optimal transportation under condition A3w

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shibing; Wang, Xu-Jia

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we prove the strict c-convexity and the C 1, α regularity for potential functions in optimal transportation under condition (A3w). These results were obtained by Caffarelli [1,3,4] for the cost c (x, y) =| x - y | 2, by Liu [11], Loeper [15], Trudinger and Wang [20] for costs satisfying the condition (A3). For costs satisfying the condition (A3w), the results have also been proved by Figalli, Kim, and McCann [6], assuming that the initial and target domains are uniformly c-convex, see also [21]; and by Guillen and Kitagawa [8], assuming the cost function satisfies A3w in larger domains. In this paper we prove the strict c-convexity and the C 1, α regularity assuming either the support of source density is compactly contained in a larger domain where the cost function satisfies A3w, or the dimension 2 ≤ n ≤ 4.

  13. Face-space: A unifying concept in face recognition research.

    PubMed

    Valentine, Tim; Lewis, Michael B; Hills, Peter J

    2016-10-01

    The concept of a multidimensional psychological space, in which faces can be represented according to their perceived properties, is fundamental to the modern theorist in face processing. Yet the idea was not clearly expressed until 1991. The background that led to the development of face-space is explained, and its continuing influence on theories of face processing is discussed. Research that has explored the properties of the face-space and sought to understand caricature, including facial adaptation paradigms, is reviewed. Face-space as a theoretical framework for understanding the effect of ethnicity and the development of face recognition is evaluated. Finally, two applications of face-space in the forensic setting are discussed. From initially being presented as a model to explain distinctiveness, inversion, and the effect of ethnicity, face-space has become a central pillar in many aspects of face processing. It is currently being developed to help us understand adaptation effects with faces. While being in principle a simple concept, face-space has shaped, and continues to shape, our understanding of face perception.

  14. Age-Dependent Face Detection and Face Categorization Performance

    PubMed Central

    Carbon, Claus-Christian; Grüter, Martina; Grüter, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Empirical studies on the development of face processing skills with age show inconsistent patterns concerning qualitative vs. quantitative changes over time or the age range for peak cognitive performance. In the present study, we tested the proficiency in face detection and face categorization with a large sample of participants (N = 312; age range: 2-88 yrs). As test objects, we used so-called Mooney faces, two-tone (black and white) images of faces lacking critical information of a local, featural and relational nature, reflecting difficult real world face processing conditions. We found that performance in the assessment of gender and age from Mooney faces increases up to about age 15, and decreases from 65 years on. The implications of these findings are discussed in the light of classic and recent findings from face development literature. PMID:24116236

  15. Bayesian face recognition and perceptual narrowing in face-space.

    PubMed

    Balas, Benjamin

    2012-07-01

    During the first year of life, infants' face recognition abilities are subject to 'perceptual narrowing', the end result of which is that observers lose the ability to distinguish previously discriminable faces (e.g. other-race faces) from one another. Perceptual narrowing has been reported for faces of different species and different races, in developing humans and primates. Though the phenomenon is highly robust and replicable, there have been few efforts to model the emergence of perceptual narrowing as a function of the accumulation of experience with faces during infancy. The goal of the current study is to examine how perceptual narrowing might manifest as statistical estimation in 'face-space', a geometric framework for describing face recognition that has been successfully applied to adult face perception. Here, I use a computer vision algorithm for Bayesian face recognition to study how the acquisition of experience in face-space and the presence of race categories affect performance for own and other-race faces. Perceptual narrowing follows from the establishment of distinct race categories, suggesting that the acquisition of category boundaries for race is a key computational mechanism in developing face expertise.

  16. Development of Face Processing: The Effect of Face Inversion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwarzer, Gudrun

    2000-01-01

    Examined degree to which analytic and holistic modes of processing play a role in children's and adults' categorization of faces. Found a developmental trend from analytic to holistic processing and an effect of face inversion with increasing age. Seven-year-olds processed faces comparably to nonfacial visual stimuli, whereas a growing proportion…

  17. Face-to-Face Interference in Typical and Atypical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riby, Deborah M.; Doherty-Sneddon, Gwyneth; Whittle, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Visual communication cues facilitate interpersonal communication. It is important that we look at faces to retrieve and subsequently process such cues. It is also important that we sometimes look away from faces as they increase cognitive load that may interfere with online processing. Indeed, when typically developing individuals hold face gaze…

  18. The aeronautics face-gear NC hobbing machining technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Canhui; Wang, Yanzhong

    2013-03-01

    Face-gear drives become the main direction of research for aeronautical drives because of their special advantages. Face-gear machining problems have became to baffle the embedded research for face-gear. The basal coordinate systems of face-gear hobbing were setted up according to the face-gear hobbing theory. The hobbing surface equation of facegear was established by using the equation of pinion tooth surface and matrix for coordinate transform based on the gear geometry and applied theory, then the hobbing tooth surface constrain conditions for dedendum undercutting were analyzed, at the same time, the hobbing nodal points were used to construct the three-dimensional basal worm model of face-gear hob by recurring to the three-dimensional software. Furthermore, the special hob for face-gear machining was designed and manufactured. The exact assembly and machining simulation were finished by using the program development software VC++6.0 and the UG customization function in the light of the face-gear hobbing theory. It validates the hob correctness and gets the gear hobbing program. According to the result of machining simulation, facegear numerical control(NC) hob machining was realized in the four-axis NC machine tool. It improves the cutting efficiency and establishs the base for face-gear grinding.

  19. Challenges facing production grids

    SciTech Connect

    Pordes, Ruth; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Today's global communities of users expect quality of service from distributed Grid systems equivalent to that their local data centers. This must be coupled to ubiquitous access to the ensemble of processing and storage resources across multiple Grid infrastructures. We are still facing significant challenges in meeting these expectations, especially in the underlying security, a sustainable and successful economic model, and smoothing the boundaries between administrative and technical domains. Using the Open Science Grid as an example, I examine the status and challenges of Grids operating in production today.

  20. Face the Fats Quiz 2

    MedlinePlus

    Face the Fats Quiz II Do you know your fats by heart? Ready to make informed choices about the foods you ... to fried chicken, test your knowledge about the fats in some familiar foods. Welcome to Face the ...

  1. IntraFace

    PubMed Central

    De la Torre, Fernando; Chu, Wen-Sheng; Xiong, Xuehan; Vicente, Francisco; Ding, Xiaoyu; Cohn, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Within the last 20 years, there has been an increasing interest in the computer vision community in automated facial image analysis algorithms. This has been driven by applications in animation, market research, autonomous-driving, surveillance, and facial editing among others. To date, there exist several commercial packages for specific facial image analysis tasks such as facial expression recognition, facial attribute analysis or face tracking. However, free and easy-to-use software that incorporates all these functionalities is unavailable. This paper presents IntraFace (IF), a publicly-available software package for automated facial feature tracking, head pose estimation, facial attribute recognition, and facial expression analysis from video. In addition, IFincludes a newly develop technique for unsupervised synchrony detection to discover correlated facial behavior between two or more persons, a relatively unexplored problem in facial image analysis. In tests, IF achieved state-of-the-art results for emotion expression and action unit detection in three databases, FERA, CK+ and RU-FACS; measured audience reaction to a talk given by one of the authors; and discovered synchrony for smiling in videos of parent-infant interaction. IF is free of charge for academic use at http://www.humansensing.cs.cmu.edu/intraface/. PMID:27346987

  2. A Generalized Hopfield Network for Nonsmooth Constrained Convex Optimization: Lie Derivative Approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Chaojie; Yu, Xinghuo; Huang, Tingwen; Chen, Guo; He, Xing

    2016-02-01

    This paper proposes a generalized Hopfield network for solving general constrained convex optimization problems. First, the existence and the uniqueness of solutions to the generalized Hopfield network in the Filippov sense are proved. Then, the Lie derivative is introduced to analyze the stability of the network using a differential inclusion. The optimality of the solution to the nonsmooth constrained optimization problems is shown to be guaranteed by the enhanced Fritz John conditions. The convergence rate of the generalized Hopfield network can be estimated by the second-order derivative of the energy function. The effectiveness of the proposed network is evaluated on several typical nonsmooth optimization problems and used to solve the hierarchical and distributed model predictive control four-tank benchmark.

  3. Detection of Hopf bifurcations in chemical reaction networks using convex coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errami, Hassan; Eiswirth, Markus; Grigoriev, Dima; Seiler, Werner M.; Sturm, Thomas; Weber, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    We present efficient algorithmic methods to detect Hopf bifurcation fixed points in chemical reaction networks with symbolic rate constants, thereby yielding information about the oscillatory behavior of the networks. Our methods use the representations of the systems on convex coordinates that arise from stoichiometric network analysis. One of our methods then reduces the problem of determining the existence of Hopf bifurcation fixed points to a first-order formula over the ordered field of the reals that can be solved using computational logic packages. The second method uses ideas from tropical geometry to formulate a more efficient method that is incomplete in theory but worked very well for the examples that we have attempted; we have shown it to be able to handle systems involving more than 20 species.

  4. SINDA'85/FLUINT - SYSTEMS IMPROVED NUMERICAL DIFFERENCING ANALYZER AND FLUID INTEGRATOR (CONVEX VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullimore, B.

    1994-01-01

    , capillary devices, user defined fluids, gravity and acceleration body forces on a fluid, and variable volumes. SINDA'85/FLUINT offers the following numerical solution techniques. The Finite difference formulation of the explicit method is the Forward-difference explicit approximation. The formulation of the implicit method is the Crank-Nicolson approximation. The program allows simulation of non-uniform heating and facilitates modeling thin-walled heat exchangers. The ability to model non-equilibrium behavior within two-phase volumes is included. Recent improvements to the program were made in modeling real evaporator-pumps and other capillary-assist evaporators. SINDA'85/FLUINT is available by license for a period of ten (10) years to approved licensees. The licensed program product includes the source code and one copy of the supporting documentation. Additional copies of the documentation may be purchased separately at any time. SINDA'85/FLUINT is written in FORTRAN 77. Version 2.3 has been implemented on Cray series computers running UNICOS, CONVEX computers running CONVEX OS, and DEC RISC computers running ULTRIX. Binaries are included with the Cray version only. The Cray version of SINDA'85/FLUINT also contains SINGE, an additional graphics program developed at Johnson Space Flight Center. Both source and executable code are provided for SINGE. Users wishing to create their own SINGE executable will also need the NASA Device Independent Graphics Library (NASADIG, previously known as SMDDIG; UNIX version, MSC-22001). The Cray and CONVEX versions of SINDA'85/FLUINT are available on 9-track 1600 BPI UNIX tar format magnetic tapes. The CONVEX version is also available on a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge in UNIX tar format. The DEC RISC ULTRIX version is available on a TK50 magnetic tape cartridge in UNIX tar format. SINDA was developed in 1971, and first had fluid capability added in 1975. SINDA'85/FLUINT version 2.3 was released in 1990.

  5. Shock Formation and Disintegration in Fluids with Non-Convex Equations of State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahmani, Fatemeh; Cramer, Mark

    2013-03-01

    We consider the steady, two-dimensional, inviscid, high-speed, flow around thin turbine blade profiles with special attention given to fluids having a non-convex equation of state; such fluids are commonly known as Bethe-Zel'dovich-Thompson (BZT) fluids. We show that the essential flow physics can be described by an inviscid Burgers equation having quartic nonlinearity rather than the quadratic nonlinearity of perfect gases. In order to illustrate the flow behavior, a fifth-order WENO (weighted essentially non-oscillatory) numerical scheme is employed. New results of interest include the formation of oblique expansion shocks, shock-splitting induced by the interaction of a single shock with Mach waves, the capture of shock-fan combinations, and the collision of oblique compression and expansion shocks. NSF grant CBET-0625015

  6. A Convex Formulation for Magnetic Particle Imaging X-Space Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Konkle, Justin J.; Goodwill, Patrick W.; Hensley, Daniel W.; Orendorff, Ryan D.; Lustig, Michael; Conolly, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (mpi) is an emerging imaging modality with exceptional promise for clinical applications in rapid angiography, cell therapy tracking, cancer imaging, and inflammation imaging. Recent publications have demonstrated quantitative mpi across rat sized fields of view with x-space reconstruction methods. Critical to any medical imaging technology is the reliability and accuracy of image reconstruction. Because the average value of the mpi signal is lost during direct-feedthrough signal filtering, mpi reconstruction algorithms must recover this zero-frequency value. Prior x-space mpi recovery techniques were limited to 1d approaches which could introduce artifacts when reconstructing a 3d image. In this paper, we formulate x-space reconstruction as a 3d convex optimization problem and apply robust a priori knowledge of image smoothness and non-negativity to reduce non-physical banding and haze artifacts. We conclude with a discussion of the powerful extensibility of the presented formulation for future applications. PMID:26495839

  7. Implementation of a Point Algorithm for Real-Time Convex Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acikmese, Behcet; Motaghedi, Shui; Carson, John

    2007-01-01

    The primal-dual interior-point algorithm implemented in G-OPT is a relatively new and efficient way of solving convex optimization problems. Given a prescribed level of accuracy, the convergence to the optimal solution is guaranteed in a predetermined, finite number of iterations. G-OPT Version 1.0 is a flight software implementation written in C. Onboard application of the software enables autonomous, real-time guidance and control that explicitly incorporates mission constraints such as control authority (e.g. maximum thrust limits), hazard avoidance, and fuel limitations. This software can be used in planetary landing missions (Mars pinpoint landing and lunar landing), as well as in proximity operations around small celestial bodies (moons, asteroids, and comets). It also can be used in any spacecraft mission for thrust allocation in six-degrees-of-freedom control.

  8. A Convex Formulation for Magnetic Particle Imaging X-Space Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Konkle, Justin J; Goodwill, Patrick W; Hensley, Daniel W; Orendorff, Ryan D; Lustig, Michael; Conolly, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (mpi) is an emerging imaging modality with exceptional promise for clinical applications in rapid angiography, cell therapy tracking, cancer imaging, and inflammation imaging. Recent publications have demonstrated quantitative mpi across rat sized fields of view with x-space reconstruction methods. Critical to any medical imaging technology is the reliability and accuracy of image reconstruction. Because the average value of the mpi signal is lost during direct-feedthrough signal filtering, mpi reconstruction algorithms must recover this zero-frequency value. Prior x-space mpi recovery techniques were limited to 1d approaches which could introduce artifacts when reconstructing a 3d image. In this paper, we formulate x-space reconstruction as a 3d convex optimization problem and apply robust a priori knowledge of image smoothness and non-negativity to reduce non-physical banding and haze artifacts. We conclude with a discussion of the powerful extensibility of the presented formulation for future applications.

  9. Experimental study of laminar natural convection in cells with various convex and concave bottoms

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowski, W.M.; Khubeiz, M.J. )

    1992-02-01

    The subject of this work is connected with experimental explanation of influence of bottom shape on free convective heat transfer in cylindrical closed space. Heat transfer and free convective motion in limited space from the bottoms of different hemispherical convex or concave shapes have been studied experimentally. The ratio of the diameter of the hemisphere (d) to the diameter of the bottom (D) (0 < d/D < 1) has been tested for a range of Rayleigh numbers (10{sup 5} < Ra < 10{sup 7}). In comparison with a flat bottom (d/D = O), about 40 percent inhibition or about 50 percent intensification depending on the bottom configuration (d/D) have been observed. The mechanism of the phenomenon based on dead space, local overheating, and shape influence effects has been proposed.

  10. Designing convex repulsive pair potentials that favor assembly of kagome and snub square lattices.

    PubMed

    Piñeros, William D; Baldea, Michael; Truskett, Thomas M

    2016-08-01

    Building on a recently introduced inverse strategy, isotropic and convex repulsive pair potentials were designed that favor assembly of particles into kagome and equilateral snub square lattices. The former interactions were obtained by a numerical solution of a variational problem that maximizes the range of density for which the ground state of the potential is the kagome lattice. Similar optimizations targeting the snub square lattice were also carried out, employing a constraint that required a minimum chemical potential advantage of the target over select competing structures. This constraint helped to discover isotropic interactions that meaningfully favored the snub square lattice as the ground state structure despite the asymmetric spatial distribution of particles in its coordination shells and the presence of tightly competing structures. Consistent with earlier published results [W. Piñeros et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 084502 (2016)], enforcement of greater chemical potential advantages for the target lattice in the interaction optimization led to assemblies with enhanced thermal stability.

  11. Signs of divided differences yield least squares data fitting with constrained monotonicity or convexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demetriou, I. C.

    2002-09-01

    Methods are presented for least squares data smoothing by using the signs of divided differences of the smoothed values. Professor M.J.D. Powell initiated the subject in the early 1980s and since then, theory, algorithms and FORTRAN software make it applicable to several disciplines in various ways. Let us consider n data measurements of a univariate function which have been altered by random errors. Then it is usual for the divided differences of the measurements to show sign alterations, which are probably due to data errors. We make the least sum of squares change to the measurements, by requiring the sequence of divided differences of order m to have at most q sign changes for some prescribed integer q. The positions of the sign changes are integer variables of the optimization calculation, which implies a combinatorial problem whose solution can require about O(nq) quadratic programming calculations in n variables and n-m constraints. Suitable methods have been developed for the following cases. It has been found that a dynamic programming procedure can calculate the global minimum for the important cases of piecewise monotonicity m=1,q[greater-or-equal, slanted]1 and piecewise convexity/concavity m=2,q[greater-or-equal, slanted]1 of the smoothed values. The complexity of the procedure in the case of m=1 is O(n2+qn log2 n) computer operations, while it is reduced to only O(n) when q=0 (monotonicity) and q=1 (increasing/decreasing monotonicity). The case m=2,q[greater-or-equal, slanted]1 requires O(qn2) computer operations and n2 quadratic programming calculations, which is reduced to one and n-2 quadratic programming calculations when m=2,q=0, i.e. convexity, and m=2,q=1, i.e. convexity/concavity, respectively. Unfortunately, the technique that receives this efficiency cannot generalize for the highly nonlinear case m[greater-or-equal, slanted]3,q[greater-or-equal, slanted]2. However, the case m[greater-or-equal, slanted]3,q=0 is solved by a special strictly

  12. Posterior convex release and interbody fusion for thoracic scoliosis: technical note.

    PubMed

    Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc; Asghar, Jahangir; Parent, Stefan; Shufflebarger, Harry L; Samdani, Amer; Labelle, Hubert

    2016-09-01

    Anterior release and fusion is sometimes required in pediatric patients with thoracic scoliosis. Typically, a formal anterior approach is performed through open thoracotomy or video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery. The authors recently developed a technique for anterior release and fusion in thoracic scoliosis referred to as "posterior convex release and interbody fusion" (PCRIF). This technique is performed via the posterior-only approach typically used for posterior instrumentation and fusion and thus avoids a formal anterior approach. In this article the authors describe the technique and its use in 9 patients-to prevent a crankshaft phenomenon in 3 patients and to optimize the correction in 6 patients with a severe thoracic curve showing poor reducibility. After Ponte osteotomies at the levels requiring anterior release and fusion, intervertebral discs are approached from the convex side of the scoliosis. The annulus on the convex side of the scoliosis is incised from the lateral border of the pedicle to the lateral annulus while visualizing and protecting the pleura and spinal cord. The annulus in contact with the pleura and the anterior longitudinal ligament are removed before completing the discectomies and preparing the endplates. The PCRIF was performed at 3 levels in 4 patients and at 4 levels in 5 patients. Mean correction of the main thoracic curve, blood loss, and length of stay were 74.9%, 1290 ml, and 7.6 days, respectively. No neurological deficit, implant failure, or pseudarthrosis was observed at the last follow-up. Two patients had pleural effusion postoperatively, with 1 of them requiring placement of a chest tube. One patient had pulmonary edema secondary to fluid overload, while another patient underwent reoperation for a deep wound infection 3 weeks after the initial surgery. The technique is primarily indicated in skeletally immature patients with open triradiate cartilage and/or severe scoliosis. It can be particularly useful if there is

  13. Designing convex repulsive pair potentials that favor assembly of kagome and snub square lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piñeros, William D.; Baldea, Michael; Truskett, Thomas M.

    2016-08-01

    Building on a recently introduced inverse strategy, isotropic and convex repulsive pair potentials were designed that favor assembly of particles into kagome and equilateral snub square lattices. The former interactions were obtained by a numerical solution of a variational problem that maximizes the range of density for which the ground state of the potential is the kagome lattice. Similar optimizations targeting the snub square lattice were also carried out, employing a constraint that required a minimum chemical potential advantage of the target over select competing structures. This constraint helped to discover isotropic interactions that meaningfully favored the snub square lattice as the ground state structure despite the asymmetric spatial distribution of particles in its coordination shells and the presence of tightly competing structures. Consistent with earlier published results [W. Piñeros et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 084502 (2016)], enforcement of greater chemical potential advantages for the target lattice in the interaction optimization led to assemblies with enhanced thermal stability.

  14. Automated segmentation of CBCT image using spiral CT atlases and convex optimization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Chen, Ken Chung; Shi, Feng; Liao, Shu; Li, Gang; Gao, Yaozong; Shen, Steve G F; Yan, Jin; Lee, Philip K M; Chow, Ben; Liu, Nancy X; Xia, James J; Shen, Dinggang

    2013-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an increasingly utilized imaging modality for the diagnosis and treatment planning of the patients with craniomaxillofacial (CMF) deformities. CBCT scans have relatively low cost and low radiation dose in comparison to conventional spiral CT scans. However, a major limitation of CBCT scans is the widespread image artifacts such as noise, beam hardening and inhomogeneity, causing great difficulties for accurate segmentation of bony structures from soft tissues, as well as separating mandible from maxilla. In this paper, we presented a novel fully automated method for CBCT image segmentation. In this method, we first estimated a patient-specific atlas using a sparse label fusion strategy from predefined spiral CT atlases. This patient-specific atlas was then integrated into a convex segmentation framework based on maximum a posteriori probability for accurate segmentation. Finally, the performance of our method was validated via comparisons with manual ground-truth segmentations. PMID:24505768

  15. Reduced Complexity HMM Filtering With Stochastic Dominance Bounds: A Convex Optimization Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Vikram; Rojas, Cristian R.

    2014-12-01

    This paper uses stochastic dominance principles to construct upper and lower sample path bounds for Hidden Markov Model (HMM) filters. Given a HMM, by using convex optimization methods for nuclear norm minimization with copositive constraints, we construct low rank stochastic marices so that the optimal filters using these matrices provably lower and upper bound (with respect to a partially ordered set) the true filtered distribution at each time instant. Since these matrices are low rank (say R), the computational cost of evaluating the filtering bounds is O(XR) instead of O(X2). A Monte-Carlo importance sampling filter is presented that exploits these upper and lower bounds to estimate the optimal posterior. Finally, using the Dobrushin coefficient, explicit bounds are given on the variational norm between the true posterior and the upper and lower bounds.

  16. Aberration analysis of a concentric imaging spectrometer with a convex grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seo Hyun; Kong, Hong Jin; Chang, Soo

    2014-12-01

    We analyze the ray-optical aberrations in a concentric imaging spectrometer composed of one convex grating and two concave mirrors of different radii. We assume that the system is generally not telecentric. First we derive aberration functions of Seidel and Buchdahl types for a bundle of rays converging to dispersed Gaussian images. Next we discuss the conditions in which the third and fifth-order ray aberrations are balanced. Finally we show that a concentric imaging spectrometer for use with a CCD detector can be optimized effectively in the neighborhood of a stigmatic condition. The stigmatic condition derived here can be useful in rapidly creating an initial design of a concentric imaging spectrometer with minimal aberrations.

  17. FaceID: A face detection and recognition system

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, M.B.; Rao, N.S.V.; Olman, V.; Uberbacher, E.C.; Mann, R.C.

    1996-12-31

    A face detection system that automatically locates faces in gray-level images is described. Also described is a system which matches a given face image with faces in a database. Face detection in an Image is performed by template matching using templates derived from a selected set of normalized faces. Instead of using original gray level images, vertical gradient images were calculated and used to make the system more robust against variations in lighting conditions and skin color. Faces of different sizes are detected by processing the image at several scales. Further, a coarse-to-fine strategy is used to speed up the processing, and a combination of whole face and face component templates are used to ensure low false detection rates. The input to the face recognition system is a normalized vertical gradient image of a face, which is compared against a database using a set of pretrained feedforward neural networks with a winner-take-all fuser. The training is performed by using an adaptation of the backpropagation algorithm. This system has been developed and tested using images from the FERET database and a set of images obtained from Rowley, et al and Sung and Poggio.

  18. A novel thermal face recognition approach using face pattern words

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yufeng

    2010-04-01

    A reliable thermal face recognition system can enhance the national security applications such as prevention against terrorism, surveillance, monitoring and tracking, especially at nighttime. The system can be applied at airports, customs or high-alert facilities (e.g., nuclear power plant) for 24 hours a day. In this paper, we propose a novel face recognition approach utilizing thermal (long wave infrared) face images that can automatically identify a subject at both daytime and nighttime. With a properly acquired thermal image (as a query image) in monitoring zone, the following processes will be employed: normalization and denoising, face detection, face alignment, face masking, Gabor wavelet transform, face pattern words (FPWs) creation, face identification by similarity measure (Hamming distance). If eyeglasses are present on a subject's face, an eyeglasses mask will be automatically extracted from the querying face image, and then masked with all comparing FPWs (no more transforms). A high identification rate (97.44% with Top-1 match) has been achieved upon our preliminary face dataset (of 39 subjects) from the proposed approach regardless operating time and glasses-wearing condition.e

  19. Disrupting perceptual grouping of face parts impairs holistic face processing.

    PubMed

    Curby, Kim M; Goldstein, Rebecca R; Blacker, Kara

    2013-01-01

    Face perception is widely believed to involve integration of facial features into a holistic perceptual unit, but the mechanisms underlying this integration are relatively unknown. We examined whether perceptual grouping cues influence a classic marker of holistic face perception, the "composite-face effect." Participants made same-different judgments about a cued part of sequentially presented chimeric faces, and holistic processing was indexed as the degree to which the task-irrelevant face halves impacted performance. Grouping was encouraged or discouraged by adjusting the backgrounds behind the face halves: Although the face halves were always aligned, their respective backgrounds could be misaligned and of different colors. Holistic processing of face, but not of nonface, stimuli was significantly reduced when the backgrounds were misaligned and of different colors, cues that discouraged grouping of the face halves into a cohesive unit (Exp. 1). This effect was sensitive to stimulus orientation at short (200 ms) but not at long (2,500 ms) encoding durations, consistent with the previously documented temporal properties of the holistic processing of upright and inverted faces (Exps. 2 and 3). These results suggest that grouping mechanisms, typically involved in the perception of objecthood more generally, might contribute in important ways to the holistic perception of faces.

  20. Automated bone segmentation from dental CBCT images using patch-based sparse representation and convex optimization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Chen, Ken Chung; Gao, Yaozong; Shi, Feng; Liao, Shu; Li, Gang; Shen, Steve G. F.; Yan, Jin; Lee, Philip K. M.; Chow, Ben; Liu, Nancy X.; Xia, James J.; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an increasingly utilized imaging modality for the diagnosis and treatment planning of the patients with craniomaxillofacial (CMF) deformities. Accurate segmentation of CBCT image is an essential step to generate three-dimensional (3D) models for the diagnosis and treatment planning of the patients with CMF deformities. However, due to the poor image quality, including very low signal-to-noise ratio and the widespread image artifacts such as noise, beam hardening, and inhomogeneity, it is challenging to segment the CBCT images. In this paper, the authors present a new automatic segmentation method to address these problems. Methods: To segment CBCT images, the authors propose a new method for fully automated CBCT segmentation by using patch-based sparse representation to (1) segment bony structures from the soft tissues and (2) further separate the mandible from the maxilla. Specifically, a region-specific registration strategy is first proposed to warp all the atlases to the current testing subject and then a sparse-based label propagation strategy is employed to estimate a patient-specific atlas from all aligned atlases. Finally, the patient-specific atlas is integrated into a maximum a posteriori probability-based convex segmentation framework for accurate segmentation. Results: The proposed method has been evaluated on a dataset with 15 CBCT images. The effectiveness of the proposed region-specific registration strategy and patient-specific atlas has been validated by comparing with the traditional registration strategy and population-based atlas. The experimental results show that the proposed method achieves the best segmentation accuracy by comparison with other state-of-the-art segmentation methods. Conclusions: The authors have proposed a new CBCT segmentation method by using patch-based sparse representation and convex optimization, which can achieve considerably accurate segmentation results in CBCT

  1. Film cooling on a convex wall: Heat transfer and hydrodynamic measurements for full and partial coverage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furuhama, K.; Moffat, R. J.; Johnston, J. P.; Kays, W. M.

    1985-01-01

    Turbine-blade cooling is an important issue for high-efficiency turbine engines, and discrete-hole injection is widely used as a cooling method. In the present study, detailed measurements were made of the heat transfer and hydrodynamics of a film-cooled flow on a convex wall, both for full and partial coverage. Two important parameters were altered: the blowing ratio, m, and the number of rows of injection holes. Three values of m were tested: m = 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6. In the blown region, m = 0.4 results in the lowest Stanton numbers of the three blowing ratios tested. This indicates that the value of m = 0.4 is near optimum on the convex wall from the point of view of cooling effect by injection. In the recovery region, Stanton numbers gradually approach the no injection values. Although the heat-transfer behavior during recovery from injection looks relatively complicated, the behavior of Stanton number can be explained in terms of two mechanisms: recovery from the thermal effect of injection and recovery from the turbulence augmentation. This interpretation of the data is supported by the hydrodynamic and temperture-profile measurements. For partial blowing cases, the data follow the full-coverage values inside the blown region. In the unblown region, both in the curved and in the flat plate, the effect of the number of blown rows is clearly seen. Hydrodynamic boundary-layer profiles were measured with the aid of a triple hot-water probe. Three mean-velocity components and six turbulence quantities were simultaneously measured, and inside the blown region strong three-dimensionality was observed.

  2. Automated bone segmentation from dental CBCT images using patch-based sparse representation and convex optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Li; Gao, Yaozong; Shi, Feng; Liao, Shu; Li, Gang; Chen, Ken Chung; Shen, Steve G. F.; Yan, Jin; Lee, Philip K. M.; Chow, Ben; Liu, Nancy X.; Xia, James J.; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an increasingly utilized imaging modality for the diagnosis and treatment planning of the patients with craniomaxillofacial (CMF) deformities. Accurate segmentation of CBCT image is an essential step to generate three-dimensional (3D) models for the diagnosis and treatment planning of the patients with CMF deformities. However, due to the poor image quality, including very low signal-to-noise ratio and the widespread image artifacts such as noise, beam hardening, and inhomogeneity, it is challenging to segment the CBCT images. In this paper, the authors present a new automatic segmentation method to address these problems. Methods: To segment CBCT images, the authors propose a new method for fully automated CBCT segmentation by using patch-based sparse representation to (1) segment bony structures from the soft tissues and (2) further separate the mandible from the maxilla. Specifically, a region-specific registration strategy is first proposed to warp all the atlases to the current testing subject and then a sparse-based label propagation strategy is employed to estimate a patient-specific atlas from all aligned atlases. Finally, the patient-specific atlas is integrated into amaximum a posteriori probability-based convex segmentation framework for accurate segmentation. Results: The proposed method has been evaluated on a dataset with 15 CBCT images. The effectiveness of the proposed region-specific registration strategy and patient-specific atlas has been validated by comparing with the traditional registration strategy and population-based atlas. The experimental results show that the proposed method achieves the best segmentation accuracy by comparison with other state-of-the-art segmentation methods. Conclusions: The authors have proposed a new CBCT segmentation method by using patch-based sparse representation and convex optimization, which can achieve considerably accurate segmentation results in CBCT

  3. Iterating the Number of Intersection Points of the Diagonals of Irregular Convex Polygons, or C (n, 4) the Hard Way!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathout, Leith

    2007-01-01

    Counting the number of internal intersection points made by the diagonals of irregular convex polygons where no three diagonals are concurrent is an interesting problem in discrete mathematics. This paper uses an iterative approach to develop a summation relation which tallies the total number of intersections, and shows that this total can be…

  4. Electrostatic Potential of Specific Mineral Faces

    SciTech Connect

    Zarzycki, Piotr P.; Chatman, Shawn ME; Preocanin, Tajana; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2011-07-05

    Reaction rates of environmental processes occurring at hydrated mineral surfaces are primarily controlled by the electrostatic potential that develops at the interface. This potential depends on the structure of exposed crystal faces, as well as the pH and the type of ions and their interactions with these faces. Despite its importance, experimental methods for determining fundamental electrostatic properties of specific crystal faces such as the point of zero charge are few. Here we show that this information may be obtained from simple, cyclic potentiometric titration using a well characterized single-crystal electrode exposing the face of interest. The method exploits the presence of a hysteresis loop in the titration measurements that allows extraction of key electrostatic descriptors using the Maxwell construction. The approach is demonstrated for hematite (α-Fe2O3) (001), and a thermodynamic proof is provided for the resulting estimate of its point of zero charge. Insight gained from this method will aid in predicting the fate of migrating contaminants, mineral growth/dissolution processes, mineral-microbiological interactions, and in testing surface complexation theories.

  5. Face Processing: Models For Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turk, Matthew A.; Pentland, Alexander P.

    1990-03-01

    The human ability to process faces is remarkable. We can identify perhaps thousands of faces learned throughout our lifetime and read facial expression to understand such subtle qualities as emotion. These skills are quite robust, despite sometimes large changes in the visual stimulus due to expression, aging, and distractions such as glasses or changes in hairstyle or facial hair. Computers which model and recognize faces will be useful in a variety of applications, including criminal identification, human-computer interface, and animation. We discuss models for representing faces and their applicability to the task of recognition, and present techniques for identifying faces and detecting eye blinks.

  6. Face lift postoperative recovery.

    PubMed

    Mottura, A Aldo

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe what I have studied and experienced, mainly regarding the control and prediction of the postoperative edema; how to achieve an agreeable recovery and give positive support to the patient, who in turn will receive pleasant sensations that neutralize the negative consequences of the surgery.After the skin is lifted, the drainage flow to the flaps is reversed abruptly toward the medial part of the face, where the flap bases are located. The thickness and extension of the flap determines the magnitude of the post-op edema, which is also augmented by medial surgeries (blepharo, rhino) whose trauma obstruct their natural drainage, increasing the congestion and edema. To study the lymphatic drainage, the day before an extended face lift (FL) a woman was infiltrated in the cheek skin with lynfofast (solution of tecmesio) and the absorption was observed by gamma camera. Seven days after the FL she underwent the same study; we observed no absorption by the lymphatic, concluding that a week after surgery, the lymphatic network was still damaged. To study the venous return during surgery, a fine catheter was introduced into the external jugular vein up to the mandibular border to measure the peripheral pressure. Following platysma plication the pressure rose, and again after a simple bandage, but with an elastic bandage it increased even further, diminishing considerably when it was released. Hence, platysma plication and the elastic bandage on the neck augment the venous congestion of the face. There are diseases that produce and can prolong the surgical edema: cardiac, hepatic, and renal insufficiencies, hypothyroidism, malnutrition, etc. According to these factors, the post-op edema can be predicted, the surgeon can choose between a wide dissection or a medial surgery, depending on the social or employment compromises the patient has, or the patient must accept a prolonged recovery if a complex surgery is necessary. Operative

  7. Influence of Surface Radius Curvature on Laser Plasma Propulsion with Ablation Water Propellant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Tian; Zheng, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Siqi; Tang, Weichong; Xiao, Ke; Liang, Wenfei; Gao, Lu; Gao, Hua

    2016-10-01

    The surface shape of liquid water is well controlled during nanosecond pulse laser ablation plasma propulsion. In this study, we measured the effect of the shape on the coupling coefficient and the specific impulse. We found that the coupling coefficient and specific impulse could be optimized by varying the surface convexity. Based on the analysis of the surface radius curvature, we demonstrate that the convex surface changes the laser focal positions to achieve high efficiency. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 10905049) and Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (Nos. 53200859165, 2562010050)

  8. Energy conservation using face detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deotale, Nilesh T.; Kalbande, Dhananjay R.; Mishra, Akassh A.

    2011-10-01

    Computerized Face Detection, is concerned with the difficult task of converting a video signal of a person to written text. It has several applications like face recognition, simultaneous multiple face processing, biometrics, security, video surveillance, human computer interface, image database management, digital cameras use face detection for autofocus, selecting regions of interest in photo slideshows that use a pan-and-scale and The Present Paper deals with energy conservation using face detection. Automating the process to a computer requires the use of various image processing techniques. There are various methods that can be used for Face Detection such as Contour tracking methods, Template matching, Controlled background, Model based, Motion based and color based. Basically, the video of the subject are converted into images are further selected manually for processing. However, several factors like poor illumination, movement of face, viewpoint-dependent Physical appearance, Acquisition geometry, Imaging conditions, Compression artifacts makes Face detection difficult. This paper reports an algorithm for conservation of energy using face detection for various devices. The present paper suggests Energy Conservation can be done by Detecting the Face and reducing the brightness of complete image and then adjusting the brightness of the particular area of an image where the face is located using histogram equalization.

  9. Face recognition performance with superresolution.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shuowen; Maschal, Robert; Young, S Susan; Hong, Tsai Hong; Phillips, P Jonathon

    2012-06-20

    With the prevalence of surveillance systems, face recognition is crucial to aiding the law enforcement community and homeland security in identifying suspects and suspicious individuals on watch lists. However, face recognition performance is severely affected by the low face resolution of individuals in typical surveillance footage, oftentimes due to the distance of individuals from the cameras as well as the small pixel count of low-cost surveillance systems. Superresolution image reconstruction has the potential to improve face recognition performance by using a sequence of low-resolution images of an individual's face in the same pose to reconstruct a more detailed high-resolution facial image. This work conducts an extensive performance evaluation of superresolution for a face recognition algorithm using a methodology and experimental setup consistent with real world settings at multiple subject-to-camera distances. Results show that superresolution image reconstruction improves face recognition performance considerably at the examined midrange and close range. PMID:22722306

  10. Face recognition based tensor structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, De-qiang; Ye, Zhi-xia; Zhao, Yang; Liu, Li-mei

    2012-01-01

    Face recognition has broad applications, and it is a difficult problem since face image can change with photographic conditions, such as different illumination conditions, pose changes and camera angles. How to obtain some invariable features for a face image is the key issue for a face recognition algorithm. In this paper, a novel tensor structure of face image is proposed to represent image features with eight directions for a pixel value. The invariable feature of the face image is then obtained from gradient decomposition to make up the tensor structure. Then the singular value decomposition (SVD) and principal component analysis (PCA) of this tensor structure are used for face recognition. The experimental results from this study show that many difficultly recognized samples can correctly be recognized, and the recognition rate is increased by 9%-11% in comparison with same type of algorithms.

  11. Face recognition performance with superresolution.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shuowen; Maschal, Robert; Young, S Susan; Hong, Tsai Hong; Phillips, P Jonathon

    2012-06-20

    With the prevalence of surveillance systems, face recognition is crucial to aiding the law enforcement community and homeland security in identifying suspects and suspicious individuals on watch lists. However, face recognition performance is severely affected by the low face resolution of individuals in typical surveillance footage, oftentimes due to the distance of individuals from the cameras as well as the small pixel count of low-cost surveillance systems. Superresolution image reconstruction has the potential to improve face recognition performance by using a sequence of low-resolution images of an individual's face in the same pose to reconstruct a more detailed high-resolution facial image. This work conducts an extensive performance evaluation of superresolution for a face recognition algorithm using a methodology and experimental setup consistent with real world settings at multiple subject-to-camera distances. Results show that superresolution image reconstruction improves face recognition performance considerably at the examined midrange and close range.

  12. [Comparative studies of face recognition].

    PubMed

    Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2012-07-01

    Every human being is proficient in face recognition. However, the reason for and the manner in which humans have attained such an ability remain unknown. These questions can be best answered-through comparative studies of face recognition in non-human animals. Studies in both primates and non-primates show that not only primates, but also non-primates possess the ability to extract information from their conspecifics and from human experimenters. Neural specialization for face recognition is shared with mammals in distant taxa, suggesting that face recognition evolved earlier than the emergence of mammals. A recent study indicated that a social insect, the golden paper wasp, can distinguish their conspecific faces, whereas a closely related species, which has a less complex social lifestyle with just one queen ruling a nest of underlings, did not show strong face recognition for their conspecifics. Social complexity and the need to differentiate between one another likely led humans to evolve their face recognition abilities.

  13. Formation of a plano-convex micro-lens array in fused silica glass by using a CO2 laser-assisted reshaping technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Ik-Bu; Yoo, Dongyoon; Noh, Young-Chul; Sung, Jae-Hee; Lee, Seong-Ku; Choi, Hun-Kook; Ahsan, Md. Shamim

    2016-08-01

    We report on fabricating high-fill-factor plano-convex spherical and square micro-lens arrays on fused silica glass surface by using a CO2 laser-assisted reshaping technique. Initially, periodic micro-pillars are encoded on glass surfaces by means of a femtosecond laser beam, afterwards, the micro-pillars are polished several times by irradiating a CO2 laser beam on top of the micro-pillars. Consequently, a spherical micro-lens array with micro-lens size of 50 μm × 50 μm and a square micro-lens array with micro-lens size of 100 μm × 100 μm are formed on the surface of the fused silica glass. We also study the intensity distribution of light passing through the glass sample engraved with a spherical micro-lens array. The simulation result shows that the focal length of the spherical micro-lens array is 35 μm. Furthermore, we investigate the optical properties of glass samples with engraved micro-lens arrays. The proposed CO2-laser-based reshaping technique is simple and fast and shows promises for fabricating arrays of smooth micro-lenses in various transparent materials.

  14. The Face that Launched a Thousand Slips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. M.; Howard, A. D.; Schenk, P.; Thomas, P. C.

    2013-01-01

    formative processes been active in the recent past? 5) Finally, is the surface accreting or eroding? The smooth character of the leading edge hemisphere of Helene and the dominance of mass wasting suggest that the surface is composed of fine-grained debris, probably dominated by dust-size to small gravel particles. The Lagrangian points of saturnian satellites are locations where planetesimals might have accreted to form co-orbital satellites such as and they may capture ejecta from their master moon. Published models suggest that Helene is a site of net accretion, but we find no extant explanation for the dominance of fine grain sizes for the surface (and probable subsurface) composition of Helene and the other Lagrangian satellites. Observation of the mass wasting tracks on Helene suggests the presence of well-defined streams of debris with low bordering levees that may be depositional features or remnants of the dissected higher surface. Some flows in grazing illumination appear to have a convex cross-section. This mass-flow morphology might be consistent with the occurrence of large-scale flow events, but which might have occurred through rapid emplacement or slow glacier-like creep. On the other hand, small craters appear to have been "softened" by creep-like processes, indicating ongoing mass wasting.

  15. Recognising faces: effects of lighting direction, inversion, and brightness reversal.

    PubMed

    Johnston, A; Hill, H; Carman, N

    1992-01-01

    When information about three-dimensional shape obtained from shading and shadows is ambiguous, the visual system favours an interpretation of surface geometry which is consistent with illumination from above. If pictures of top-lit faces are rotated the resulting stimulus is both figurally inverted and illuminated from below. In this study the question of whether the effects of figural inversion and lighting orientation on face recognition are independent or interactive is addressed. Although there was a clear inversion effect for faces illuminated from the front and above, the inversion effect was found to be reduced or eliminated for faces illuminated from below. A strong inversion effect for photographic negatives was also found but in this case the effect was not dependent on the direction of illumination. These findings are interpreted as evidence to suggest that lighting faces from below disrupts the formation of surface-based representations of facial shape. PMID:1437456

  16. Recognising faces: effects of lighting direction, inversion, and brightness reversal.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Alan; Hill, Harold; Carman, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    When information about three-dimensional shape obtained from shading and shadows is ambiguous, the visual system favours an interpretation of surface geometry which is consistent with illumination from above. If pictures of top-lit faces are rotated the resulting stimulus is both figurally inverted and illuminated from below. In this study the question of whether the effects of figural inversion and lighting orientation on face recognition are independent or interactive is addressed. Although there was a clear inversion effect for faces illuminated from the front and above, the inversion effect was found to be reduced or eliminated for faces illuminated from below. A strong inversion effect for photographic negatives was also found but in this case the effect was not dependent on the direction of illumination. These findings are interpreted as evidence to suggest that lighting faces from below disrupts the formation of surface-based representations of facial shape. PMID:24601034

  17. [A review of face illusions].

    PubMed

    Kitaoka, Akiyoshi

    2012-07-01

    A variety of "face illusions," including the gaze illusion, face inversion effects, geometrical illusions, reversible figures, and other interesting phenomena related to face perception, are reviewed in the present report, with many sample images. The "gaze illusion" or the illusion of eye direction includes the Wollaston illusion, the luminance-induced gaze shift, the Bogart illusion, the eye-shadow-dependent gaze illusion, the Mona Lisa effect, etc. "Face inversion effects" refer to the Thatcher illusion, the fat face-thin illusion, underestimation of the upright face, the nose-shortening illusion of the inverted face, etc. "Geometrical illusions" include the Lee-Freire illusion, Yang's iris illusion, overestimation of the farther eye, the eye-shadow-dependent eye-size illusion, etc. "Reversible figures" contain the whole-part reversible figure, Rubin's vase-face illusion, or hybrid images. "Other interesting phenomena" include the flashed face distortion effect, the presidential illusion, predominance of the mouth or eyebrows over eye expression, the eye direction aftereffect, etc. It is suggested that some of these phenomena are highly specific to face perception.

  18. Holistic crowding of Mooney faces.

    PubMed

    Farzin, Faraz; Rivera, Susan M; Whitney, David

    2009-06-29

    An object or feature is generally more difficult to identify when other objects are presented nearby, an effect referred to as crowding. Here, we used Mooney faces to examine whether crowding can also occur within and between holistic face representations (C. M. Mooney, 1957). Mooney faces are ideal stimuli for this test because no cues exist to distinguish facial features in a Mooney face; to find any facial feature, such as an eye or a nose, one must first holistically perceive the image as a face. Through a series of six experiments we tested the effect of crowding on Mooney face recognition. Our results demonstrate crowding between and within Mooney faces and fulfill the diagnostic criteria for crowding, including eccentricity dependence and lack of crowding in the fovea, critical flanker spacing consistent with less than half the eccentricity of the target, and inner-outer flanker asymmetry. Further, our results show that recognition of an upright Mooney face is more strongly impaired by upright Mooney face flankers than inverted ones. Taken together, these results suggest crowding can occur selectively between high-level representations of faces and that crowding must occur at multiple levels in the visual system.

  19. Face-n-Food: Gender Differences in Tuning to Faces

    PubMed Central

    Pavlova, Marina A.; Scheffler, Klaus; Sokolov, Alexander N.

    2015-01-01

    Faces represent valuable signals for social cognition and non-verbal communication. A wealth of research indicates that women tend to excel in recognition of facial expressions. However, it remains unclear whether females are better tuned to faces. We presented healthy adult females and males with a set of newly created food-plate images resembling faces (slightly bordering on the Giuseppe Arcimboldo style). In a spontaneous recognition task, participants were shown a set of images in a predetermined order from the least to most resembling a face. Females not only more readily recognized the images as a face (they reported resembling a face on images, on which males still did not), but gave on overall more face responses. The findings are discussed in the light of gender differences in deficient face perception. As most neuropsychiatric, neurodevelopmental and psychosomatic disorders characterized by social brain abnormalities are sex specific, the task may serve as a valuable tool for uncovering impairments in visual face processing. PMID:26154177

  20. About-face on face recognition ability and holistic processing.

    PubMed

    Richler, Jennifer J; Floyd, R Jackie; Gauthier, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Previous work found a small but significant relationship between holistic processing measured with the composite task and face recognition ability measured by the Cambridge Face Memory Test (CFMT; Duchaine & Nakayama, 2006). Surprisingly, recent work using a different measure of holistic processing (Vanderbilt Holistic Face Processing Test [VHPT-F]; Richler, Floyd, & Gauthier, 2014) and a larger sample found no evidence for such a relationship. In Experiment 1 we replicate this unexpected result, finding no relationship between holistic processing (VHPT-F) and face recognition ability (CFMT). A key difference between the VHPT-F and other holistic processing measures is that unique face parts are used on each trial in the VHPT-F, unlike in other tasks where a small set of face parts repeat across the experiment. In Experiment 2, we test the hypothesis that correlations between the CFMT and holistic processing tasks are driven by stimulus repetition that allows for learning during the composite task. Consistent with our predictions, CFMT performance was correlated with holistic processing in the composite task when a small set of face parts repeated over trials, but not when face parts did not repeat. A meta-analysis confirms that relationships between the CFMT and holistic processing depend on stimulus repetition. These results raise important questions about what is being measured by the CFMT, and challenge current assumptions about why faces are processed holistically.

  1. The CONVEX project - Using Observational Evidence and Process Understanding to Improve Predictions of Extreme Rainfall Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, Hayley; Kendon, Elizabeth; Blenkinsop, Stephen; Chan, Steven; Ferro, Christopher; Roberts, Nigel; Stephenson, David; Jones, Richard; Sessford, Pat

    2013-04-01

    During the last decade, widespread major flood events in the UK and across the rest of Europe have focussed attention on perceived increases in rainfall intensities. Whilst Regional Climate Models (RCMs) are able to simulate the magnitude and spatial pattern of observed daily extreme rainfall events more reliably than Global Circulation Models (GCMs), they still underestimate extreme rainfall in relation to observations. Particularly during the summer a large proportion of the precipitation comes from convective storms that are typically too small to be explicitly represented by climate models. Instead, convection parameterisation schemes are necessary to represent the larger-scale effect of unresolved convective cells. Given the deficiencies in the simulation of extreme rainfall by climate models, even in the current generation of high-resolution RCMs, the CONVEX project (CONVective EXtremes) argues that an integrated approach is needed that brings together observations, basic understanding and models. This should go hand in hand with a change from a focus on traditional validation exercises (comparing modelled and observed extremes) to an understanding and quantification of the causes of model deficiencies in the simulation of extreme rainfall processes on different spatial and temporal scales. It is particularly true for localised intense summer convection. CONVEX therefore aims to contribute to the goals of enabling society to respond to global climate change and predicting the regional and local impacts of environmental change. In addition to an improved understanding of the spatial-temporal characteristics of extreme rainfall processes (principally in the UK) the project is also assessing the influence of model parameterisations and resolution on the simulation of extreme rainfall events and processes. This includes the running of new RCM simulations undertaken by the UK Meteorological Office at 50km and 12km resolutions (parameterised convection) and

  2. The CONVEX project - Using Observational Evidence and Process Understanding to Improve Projections of Extreme Rainfall Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blenkinsop, Stephen; Fowler, Hayley; Kendon, Elizabeth; Chan, Steven; Ferro, Chris; Roberts, Nigel; Sessford, Pat

    2014-05-01

    During the last decade, widespread major flood events in the UK and across Europe have focussed attention on perceived increases in rainfall intensities. Whilst Regional Climate Models (RCMs) are able to simulate the magnitude and spatial pattern of observed daily extreme rainfall events more reliably than Global Circulation Models (GCMs), they still underestimate extreme rainfall in relation to observations and do not capture the properties of sub-daily events that may lead to flooding in urban areas. In the UK and Europe, particularly during the summer, a large proportion of precipitation comes from convective storms that are typically too small to be explicitly represented by climate models. Instead, convection parameterisation schemes are necessary to represent the larger-scale effect of unresolved convective cells. The CONVEX project (CONVective EXtremes) argues that an integrated approach is needed to provide improvements in estimates of change in extreme rainfall, particularly for summer convective events. As usable predictions require the synthesis of observations, understanding of atmospheric processes and models, a change in focus from traditional validation exercises (comparing modelled and observed extremes) to an understanding and quantification of the causes for model deficiencies in the simulation of extreme rainfall processes on different spatial and temporal scales is needed. By adopting this new focus CONVEX aims to contribute to the goals of enabling society to respond to global climate change and predicting the regional and local impacts of environmental change on timescales from days to decades. In addition to an improved understanding of the spatial-temporal characteristics of extreme rainfall processes (principally in the UK) the project is also assessing the influence of model parameterisations and resolution on the simulation of extreme rainfall events and processes. Under the project the UK Meteorological Office has run new RCM simulations

  3. Holistic face training enhances face processing in developmental prosopagnosia

    PubMed Central

    Cohan, Sarah; Nakayama, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Prosopagnosia has largely been regarded as an untreatable disorder. However, recent case studies using cognitive training have shown that it is possible to enhance face recognition abilities in individuals with developmental prosopagnosia. Our goal was to determine if this approach could be effective in a larger population of developmental prosopagnosics. We trained 24 developmental prosopagnosics using a 3-week online face-training program targeting holistic face processing. Twelve subjects with developmental prosopagnosia were assessed before and after training, and the other 12 were assessed before and after a waiting period, they then performed the training, and were then assessed again. The assessments included measures of front-view face discrimination, face discrimination with view-point changes, measures of holistic face processing, and a 5-day diary to quantify potential real-world improvements. Compared with the waiting period, developmental prosopagnosics showed moderate but significant overall training-related improvements on measures of front-view face discrimination. Those who reached the more difficult levels of training (‘better’ trainees) showed the strongest improvements in front-view face discrimination and showed significantly increased holistic face processing to the point of being similar to that of unimpaired control subjects. Despite challenges in characterizing developmental prosopagnosics’ everyday face recognition and potential biases in self-report, results also showed modest but consistent self-reported diary improvements. In summary, we demonstrate that by using cognitive training that targets holistic processing, it is possible to enhance face perception across a group of developmental prosopagnosics and further suggest that those who improved the most on the training task received the greatest benefits. PMID:24691394

  4. Holistic face training enhances face processing in developmental prosopagnosia.

    PubMed

    DeGutis, Joseph; Cohan, Sarah; Nakayama, Ken

    2014-06-01

    Prosopagnosia has largely been regarded as an untreatable disorder. However, recent case studies using cognitive training have shown that it is possible to enhance face recognition abilities in individuals with developmental prosopagnosia. Our goal was to determine if this approach could be effective in a larger population of developmental prosopagnosics. We trained 24 developmental prosopagnosics using a 3-week online face-training program targeting holistic face processing. Twelve subjects with developmental prosopagnosia were assessed before and after training, and the other 12 were assessed before and after a waiting period, they then performed the training, and were then assessed again. The assessments included measures of front-view face discrimination, face discrimination with view-point changes, measures of holistic face processing, and a 5-day diary to quantify potential real-world improvements. Compared with the waiting period, developmental prosopagnosics showed moderate but significant overall training-related improvements on measures of front-view face discrimination. Those who reached the more difficult levels of training ('better' trainees) showed the strongest improvements in front-view face discrimination and showed significantly increased holistic face processing to the point of being similar to that of unimpaired control subjects. Despite challenges in characterizing developmental prosopagnosics' everyday face recognition and potential biases in self-report, results also showed modest but consistent self-reported diary improvements. In summary, we demonstrate that by using cognitive training that targets holistic processing, it is possible to enhance face perception across a group of developmental prosopagnosics and further suggest that those who improved the most on the training task received the greatest benefits.

  5. Digital 'faces' of synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Kathrin

    2013-06-01

    In silicio design plays a fundamental role in the endeavour to synthesise biological systems. In particular, computer-aided design software enables users to manage the complexity of biological entities that is connected to their construction and reconfiguration. The software's graphical user interface bridges the gap between the machine-readable data on the algorithmic subface of the computer and its human-amenable surface represented by standardised diagrammatic elements. Notations like the Systems Biology Graphical Notation (SBGN), together with interactive operations such as drag & drop, allow the user to visually design and simulate synthetic systems as 'bio-algorithmic signs'. Finally, the digital programming process should be extended to the wet lab to manufacture the designed synthetic biological systems. By exploring the different 'faces' of synthetic biology, I argue that in particular computer-aided design (CAD) is pushing the idea to automatically produce de novo objects. Multifaceted software processes serve mutually aesthetic, epistemic and performative purposes by simultaneously black-boxing and bridging different data sources, experimental operations and community-wide standards. So far, synthetic biology is mainly a product of digital media technologies that structurally mimic the epistemological challenge to take both qualitative as well as quantitative aspects of biological systems into account in order to understand and produce new and functional entities.

  6. The stereographic analysis of facing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdsworth, Robert E.

    Facing directions represent an accurate means by which tectonic structure and sedimentary way-up may be related. A simple method is presented for determining facing directions accurately, using a stereonet. Once determined, larger amounts of facing data can be quickly collated and analysed using similar techniques to those employed for other lineations. An example is given for some sheath fold structures in the Moine rocks of Sutherland, N. Scotland.

  7. Face relighting from a single image under arbitrary unknown lighting conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Zicheng; Hua, Gang; Wen, Zhen; Zhang, Zhengyou; Samaras, Dimitris

    2009-11-01

    In this paper, we present a new method to modify the appearance of a face image by manipulating the illumination condition, when the face geometry and albedo information is unknown. This problem is particularly difficult when there is only a single image of the subject available. Recent research demonstrates that the set of images of a convex Lambertian object obtained under a wide variety of lighting conditions can be approximated accurately by a low-dimensional linear subspace using a spherical harmonic representation. Moreover, morphable models are statistical ensembles of facial properties such as shape and texture. In this paper, we integrate spherical harmonics into the morphable model framework by proposing a 3D spherical harmonic basis morphable model (SHBMM). The proposed method can represent a face under arbitrary unknown lighting and pose simply by three low-dimensional vectors, i.e., shape parameters, spherical harmonic basis parameters, and illumination coefficients, which are called the SHBMM parameters. However, when the image was taken under an extreme lighting condition, the approximation error can be large, thus making it difficult to recover albedo information. In order to address this problem, we propose a subregion-based framework that uses a Markov random field to model the statistical distribution and spatial coherence of face texture, which makes our approach not only robust to extreme lighting conditions, but also insensitive to partial occlusions. The performance of our framework is demonstrated through various experimental results, including the improved rates for face recognition under extreme lighting conditions.

  8. Turbulent boundary layers with high turbulence: Experimental heat transfer and structure on flat and convex walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahm, Michael Kenneth

    1992-09-01

    Experimental measurements of the effects of high levels of free stream turbulence on convex wall boundary layers were made. Using three different means of turbulence generation, intensities from 6 percent to 30 percent and length scales, L sub u/delta from 0.2 to 3 were achieved. The degree of curvature was strong for all cases, ranging from 0.12 to 0.15. Both the attenuating effects of convex wall curvature and the augmenting effects of turbulence were observed for all cases. The augmentation in Stanton number is about two or three times the local turbulence intensity present. The exponential Reynolds number dependence in the upstream flat plate flow maintains a -0.25 slope and in the curve maintains a -1 slope. Skin friction is also augmented by free stream turbulence. Increases in skin friction are comparable to those in heat transfer but do not correspond exactly for each case. Based on length scales determined, it is concluded that smaller relative scales are more effective in augmenting skin friction and larger scales are more effective in augmenting heat transfer. Careful flow field control upstream of the curve resulted in typical curved potential core behavior. An important effect of turbulence on the velocity profile in the curve is the broadening of the transition between the boundary layer and the potential core profile. This transition grows wider and flatter as the turbulence level is increased. With the highest level of turbulence achieved, the outer region profile, transition becomes very wide and flat and a previously unreported viscid/inviscid interaction takes place which leads to rapid boundary layer growth in the curve. The correlation of the present data was examined. The Ludwieg-Tillmann correlation for skin friction was found to predict the present baseline data and the data for all three turbulence cases to about +/- 6 percent including the effects of curvature. A thermal analogy to the LT correlation was developed for use with free stream

  9. libCreme: An optimization library for evaluating convex-roof entanglement measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röthlisberger, Beat; Lehmann, Jörg; Loss, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    We present the software library libCreme which we have previously used to successfully calculate convex-roof entanglement measures of mixed quantum states appearing in realistic physical systems. Evaluating the amount of entanglement in such states is in general a non-trivial task requiring to solve a highly non-linear complex optimization problem. The algorithms provided here are able to achieve to do this for a large and important class of entanglement measures. The library is mostly written in the MATLAB programming language, but is fully compatible to the free and open-source OCTAVE platform. Some inefficient subroutines are written in C/C++ for better performance. This manuscript discusses the most important theoretical concepts and workings of the algorithms, focusing on the actual implementation and usage within the library. Detailed examples in the end should make it easy for the user to apply libCreme to specific problems. Program summaryProgram title:libCreme Catalogue identifier: AEKD_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKD_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU GPL version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 4323 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 70 542 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Matlab/Octave and C/C++ Computer: All systems running Matlab or Octave Operating system: All systems running Matlab or Octave Classification: 4.9, 4.15 Nature of problem: Evaluate convex-roof entanglement measures. This involves solving a non-linear (unitary) optimization problem. Solution method: Two algorithms are provided: A conjugate-gradient method using a differential-geometric approach and a quasi-Newton method together with a mapping to Euclidean space. Running time: Typically seconds to minutes for a density matrix of a few low-dimensional systems and a decent implementation of the

  10. Scaling of Convex Hull Volume to Body Mass in Modern Primates, Non-Primate Mammals and Birds

    PubMed Central

    Brassey, Charlotte A.; Sellers, William I.

    2014-01-01

    The volumetric method of ‘convex hulling’ has recently been put forward as a mass prediction technique for fossil vertebrates. Convex hulling involves the calculation of minimum convex hull volumes (volCH) from the complete mounted skeletons of modern museum specimens, which are subsequently regressed against body mass (Mb) to derive predictive equations for extinct species. The convex hulling technique has recently been applied to estimate body mass in giant sauropods and fossil ratites, however the biomechanical signal contained within volCH has remained unclear. Specifically, when volCH scaling departs from isometry in a group of vertebrates, how might this be interpreted? Here we derive predictive equations for primates, non-primate mammals and birds and compare the scaling behaviour of Mb to volCH between groups. We find predictive equations to be characterised by extremely high correlation coefficients (r2 = 0.97–0.99) and low mean percentage prediction error (11–20%). Results suggest non-primate mammals scale body mass to volCH isometrically (b = 0.92, 95%CI = 0.85–1.00, p = 0.08). Birds scale body mass to volCH with negative allometry (b = 0.81, 95%CI = 0.70–0.91, p = 0.011) and apparent density (volCH/Mb) therefore decreases with mass (r2 = 0.36, p<0.05). In contrast, primates scale body mass to volCH with positive allometry (b = 1.07, 95%CI = 1.01–1.12, p = 0.05) and apparent density therefore increases with size (r2 = 0.46, p = 0.025). We interpret such departures from isometry in the context of the ‘missing mass’ of soft tissues that are excluded from the convex hulling process. We conclude that the convex hulling technique can be justifiably applied to the fossil record when a large proportion of the skeleton is preserved. However we emphasise the need for future studies to quantify interspecific variation in the distribution of soft tissues such as muscle, integument and body fat

  11. Holistic processing predicts face recognition.

    PubMed

    Richler, Jennifer J; Cheung, Olivia S; Gauthier, Isabel

    2011-04-01

    The concept of holistic processing is a cornerstone of face-recognition research. In the study reported here, we demonstrated that holistic processing predicts face-recognition abilities on the Cambridge Face Memory Test and on a perceptual face-identification task. Our findings validate a large body of work that relies on the assumption that holistic processing is related to face recognition. These findings also reconcile the study of face recognition with the perceptual-expertise work it inspired; such work links holistic processing of objects with people's ability to individuate them. Our results differ from those of a recent study showing no link between holistic processing and face recognition. This discrepancy can be attributed to the use in prior research of a popular but flawed measure of holistic processing. Our findings salvage the central role of holistic processing in face recognition and cast doubt on a subset of the face-perception literature that relies on a problematic measure of holistic processing.

  12. Cyber- and Face-to-Face Bullying: Who Crosses Over?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Hwayeon Helene; Braithwaite, Valerie; Ahmed, Eliza

    2016-01-01

    A total of 3956 children aged 12-13 years who completed the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC Wave 5) were studied about their experiences of traditional face-to-face bullying and cyberbullying in the last month. In terms of prevalence, sixty percent of the sample had been involved in traditional bullying as the victim and/or the…

  13. Teaching On-Line versus Face-to-Face.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Glenn Gordon; Ferguson, David; Caris, Mieke

    2002-01-01

    Investigates and describes the current instructor experience of teaching college courses over the Web versus in face-to-face formats in terms of teaching strategies, social issues, and media effects. Discusses communication styles, relationship between students and instructors, instructor workload, and discussion patterns, and proposes a model…

  14. Effects of aging on face identification and holistic face processing.

    PubMed

    Konar, Yaroslav; Bennett, Patrick J; Sekuler, Allison B

    2013-08-01

    Several studies have shown that face identification accuracy is lower in older than younger adults. This effect of aging might be due to age differences in holistic processing, which is thought to be an important component of human face processing. Currently, however, there is conflicting evidence as to whether holistic face processing is impaired in older adults. The current study therefore re-examined this issue by measuring response accuracy in a 1-of-4 face identification task and the composite face effect (CFE), a common index of holistic processing, in older adults. Consistent with previous reports, we found that face identification accuracy was lower in older adults than in younger adults tested in the same task. We also found a significant CFE in older adults that was similar in magnitude to the CFE measured in younger subjects with the same task. Finally, we found that there was a significant positive correlation between the CFE and face identification accuracy. This last result differs from the results obtained in a previous study that used the same tasks and which found no evidence of an association between the CFE and face identification accuracy in younger adults. Furthermore, the age difference was found with subtraction-, regression-, and ratio-based estimates of the CFE. The current findings are consistent with previous claims that older adults rely more heavily on holistic processing to identify objects in conditions of limited processing resources.

  15. Blended Outreach: Face-to-Face and Remote Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poeppelmeyer, Diana

    2011-01-01

    The Texas School for the Deaf (TSD) has two missions. One is to provide educational services to deaf and hard of hearing students and their families on the Austin campus--this is the traditional, face-to-face, center-based service model. The other is to serve as a resource center for the state, providing information, referral, programs, and…

  16. Comparative Analysis of Online vs. Face-to-Face Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Scott D.; Aragon, Steven R.; Shaik, Najmuddin; Palma-Rivas, Nilda

    This empirical study compared a graduate online course with an equivalent course taught in a traditional face-to-face format. Comparisons included student ratings of instructor and course quality; assessment of course interaction, structure, and support; and learning outcomes such as course grades and student self-assessment of ability to perform…

  17. View of Face A and Face B Arrays, looking northeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Face A and Face B Arrays, looking northeast - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Techinical Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  18. Looking northwest, Face B Array to left, Face C (rear) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking northwest, Face B Array to left, Face C (rear) center, Power Plant (Building 5761), to right - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Techinical Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  19. Analysis of the Face Milling Process Based on the Imitation Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomenko, V. A.; Cherdancev, A. O.; Cherdancev, P. O.; Goncharov, V. D.; Kulawik, A.

    2016-04-01

    The results of simulation modeling of the face milling process allowed to analyze the surface finish dependence on cutting conditions. It is noted that the surface irregularity in the form of unevenness appears in face milling. Besides, the ratio of feed rate to spindle revolutions speed influences dimensions of surface roughness. The data received are experimentally confirmed.

  20. Cellobiohydrolase Hydrolyzes Crystalline Cellulose on Hydrophobic Faces*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-San; Baker, John O.; Zeng, Yining; Himmel, Michael E.; Haas, Thomas; Ding, Shi-You

    2011-01-01

    Biodegradation of plant biomass is a slow process in nature, and hydrolysis of cellulose is also widely considered to be a rate-limiting step in the proposed industrial process of converting lignocellulosic materials to biofuels. It is generally known that a team of enzymes including endo- and exocellulases as well as cellobiases are required to act synergistically to hydrolyze cellulose to glucose. The detailed molecular mechanisms of these enzymes have yet to be convincingly elucidated. In this report, atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to image in real-time the structural changes in Valonia cellulose crystals acted upon by the exocellulase cellobiohydrolase I (CBH I) from Trichoderma reesei. Under AFM, single enzyme molecules could be observed binding only to one face of the cellulose crystal, apparently the hydrophobic face. The surface roughness of cellulose began increasing after adding CBH I, and the overall size of cellulose crystals decreased during an 11-h period. Interestingly, this size reduction apparently occurred only in the width of the crystal, whereas the height remained relatively constant. In addition, the measured cross-section shape of cellulose crystal changed from asymmetric to nearly symmetric. These observed changes brought about by CBH I action may constitute the first direct visualization supporting the idea that the exocellulase selectively hydrolyzes the hydrophobic faces of cellulose. The limited accessibility of the hydrophobic faces in native cellulose may contribute significantly to the rate-limiting slowness of cellulose hydrolysis. PMID:21282110