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Sample records for convex surface facing

  1. Null testing convex optical surfaces.

    PubMed

    Szulc, A

    1997-09-01

    A new test for convex optical surfaces is presented. It makes use of an auxiliary ellipsoidal mirror that is of approximately the same diameter as the convex mirror tested. The test is a null test of excellent precision. The auxiliary ellipsoid used is also tested in a null fashion, permitting good precision to be obtained.

  2. Algorithm for detecting human faces based on convex-hull.

    PubMed

    Park, Minsick; Park, Chang-Woo; Park, Mignon; Lee, Chang-Hoon

    2002-03-25

    In this paper, we proposed a new method to detect faces in color based on the convex-hull. We detect two kinds of regions that are skin and hair likeness region. After preprocessing, we apply the convex-hull to their regions and can find a face from their intersection relationship. The proposed algorithm can accomplish face detection in an image involving rotated and turned faces as well as several faces. To validity the effectiveness of the proposed method, we make experiment with various cases.

  3. Uniform Magnetic Field Between Face-to-Face HTS Bulk Magnets Combining Concave and Convex Magnetic Field Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Yaginuma, S.; Ogawa, J.; Fukui, S.; Sato, T.; Yokoyama, K.; Nakamura, T.

    The authors have been attempting to obtain the uniform magnetic field distribution in the space between the face-to-face HTS bulk magnets. The magnetic poles containing the HTS bulk magnets are usually characterized as non-uniform magnetic field distribution. Since the distributions show the conical or convex shapes, it is difficult to obtain the uniform magnetic field spaces even when the magnetic poles would be placed face-to-face. The authors have modified the shape of the distribution of one-side magnetic pole by attaching an iron plate on the surface, and formed the concave magnetic field distribution on the pole surface. The steep concave or convex distributions at each pole surface change to be flat with increasing distance from the pole surface. After the experimental result recording the best uniformity of 358 ppm by combining the concave and convex field distributions face-to-face, we attempted to simulate the feasible performance in this configuration. In the numerical simulation, the concave field distribution modified by attaching an imaginary spiral coil on the pole surface was coupled with the original convex field. We succeeded in obtaining the best uniformity of 30 ppm at 1.1 T in 4 x 4 mm2x-y plane at 7 mm distant from the pole surface in the gap of 30 mm. This result suggests that the concave and convex magnetic field distributions compensate the field uniformity with each other with keeping the magnetic field strength in the gap, and also suggests the novel compact NMR/MRI devices in the future.

  4. Convexity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Marcel

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are the idea, examples, problems, and applications of convexity. Topics include historical examples, definitions, the John-Loewner ellipsoid, convex functions, polytopes, the algebraic operation of duality and addition, and topology of convex bodies. (KR)

  5. Convex Aspherical Surface Testing Using Catadioptric Partial Compensating System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingxian; Hao, Qun; Hu, Yao; Wang, Shaopu; Li, Tengfei; Tian, Yuhan; Li, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Aspheric optical components are the indispensable part of modern optics systems. With the constant development of aspheric optical fabrication technique, the systems with large aperture convex aspheric optical components are widely used in astronomy and space optics. Thus, the measurement of the figure error of the whole convex aspherical surface with high precision comes to be a challenge in the area of optical surface manufacture, and surface testing method is also very important. This paper presents a new partial compensating system by the combination of a refractive lens and a reflective mirror for testing convex aspherical surface. The refractive lens is used to compensate the aberration of the tested convex asphere partially. The reflective mirror is a spherical mirror which is coaxial to the refractive lens and reflecting the lights reflected by the tested convex asphere back to the convex asphere itself. With the long focal length and large aperture system we can realize a lighter and more compact system than the refractive partial compensating system because the spheric reflective mirror is more easily to realize and can bending the light conveniently.

  6. Turbulent boundary layer on a convex, curved surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis, J. C.; Johnston, J. P.; Kays, W. M.; Moffat, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of strong convex curvature on boundary layer turbulence were investigated. The data gathered on the behavior of Reynolds stress suggested the formulation of a simple turbulence model. Three sets of data were taken on two separate facilities. Both rigs had flow from a flat surface, over a convex surface with 90 deg of turning, and then onto a flat recovery surface. The geometry was adjusted so that, for both rigs, the pressure gradient along the test surface was zero - thus avoiding any effects of streamwise acceleration on the wall layers. Results show that after a sudden introduction of curvature, the shear stress in the outer part of the boundary layer is sharply diminished and is even slightly negative near the edge. The wall shear also drops off quickly downstream. In contrast, when the surface suddenly becomes flat again, the wall shear and shear stress profiles recover very slowly towards flat wall conditions.

  7. Interferometric test method for testing convex aspheric mirror surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKechnie, T. Stewart

    2010-07-01

    An interferometric null Test Method is described for testing convex aspheric surfaces, such as found in secondary mirrors of Cassegrain telescopes or variations thereof such as Mersenne and Ritchey-Chrétien. A family of test designs is described covering a wide range of mirror diameters, radii of curvature, and aspheric shapes as described by conic constants and/or polynomials. The Test Method has been used successfully for testing the convex hyperboloid surface of the 244-mm diameter secondary mirror of the NASA 3-meter IRTF telescope. The Test Method is currently being used to test the 120-mm diameter, convex paraboloid secondary mirrors of the Magdalena Ridge Observatory Interferometer (MROI). Test designs exist on paper for both Keck secondary mirrors (0.53-m and 1.4-m diameter), the HST secondary (0.3-meter diameter), and secondary mirrors of some of the extremely large telescopes of the future, such as the TMT secondary (3.2-m diameter). In typical test embodiments, the simplicity of the Test enables rapid implementation at a fraction of the cost of comparable Hindle-Sphere or Hindle-Simpson tests.

  8. Analysis of backtrack algorithms for listing all vertices and all faces of a convex polyhedron

    SciTech Connect

    Margot, F.; Fukuda, K.; Liebling, T.

    1994-12-31

    We investigate the applicability of backtrack technique for solving the vertex enumeration problem and the face enumeration problem for a convex polyhedron given by a system of linear inequalities. We show that there is a linear-time backtrack algorithm for the face enumeration problem whose space complexity is polynomial in the input size, but the vertex enumeration problem requires a backtrack algorithm to solve a decision problem, called the restricted vertex problem, for each output, which is shown to be NP-complete. Some related NP-complete problems associated with a system of linear inequalities are also discussed, including the optimal vertex problems for polyhedra and arrangements of hyperplanes.

  9. Approximating convex Pareto surfaces in multiobjective radiotherapy planning

    SciTech Connect

    Craft, David L.; Halabi, Tarek F.; Shih, Helen A.; Bortfeld, Thomas R.

    2006-09-15

    Radiotherapy planning involves inherent tradeoffs: the primary mission, to treat the tumor with a high, uniform dose, is in conflict with normal tissue sparing. We seek to understand these tradeoffs on a case-to-case basis, by computing for each patient a database of Pareto optimal plans. A treatment plan is Pareto optimal if there does not exist another plan which is better in every measurable dimension. The set of all such plans is called the Pareto optimal surface. This article presents an algorithm for computing well distributed points on the (convex) Pareto optimal surface of a multiobjective programming problem. The algorithm is applied to intensity-modulated radiation therapy inverse planning problems, and results of a prostate case and a skull base case are presented, in three and four dimensions, investigating tradeoffs between tumor coverage and critical organ sparing.

  10. Design of a novel hologram for full measurement of large and deep convex aspheric surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hua; Lu, Zhenwu; Li, Fengyou; Sun, Qiang

    2007-03-19

    We proposed a valid method with a novel computer-generated hologram (CGH) to test large-aperture convex aspheric. The CGH consisted of two zones with different amounts of power: the central zone has a larger amount of power than the marginal zone. Compared with other CGHs used for convex aspheric testing [SPIE.2576.258 (1995)], it could overcome the difficulty of measuring the central region of the convex surface under test, while relaxing the requirement for the illumination optics and CGH of the test system. We have designed an optical test system with the novel CGH to test a 150 mm-diameter convex surface with full aperture by using optical design software Zemax. The simulated result verified the efficiency of the novel CGH. It is believed that this kind of CGHs can be used to measure any large and deep convex surface with full aperture.

  11. Six-month-old infants' perception of the hollow face illusion: evidence for a general convexity bias.

    PubMed

    Corrow, Sherryse L; Mathison, Jordan; Granrud, Carl E; Yonas, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Corrow, Granrud, Mathison, and Yonas (2011, Perception, 40, 1376-1383) found evidence that 6-month-old infants perceive the hollow face illusion. In the present study we asked whether 6-month-old infants perceive illusory depth reversal for a nonface object and whether infants' perception of the hollow face illusion is affected by mask orientation inversion. In experiment 1 infants viewed a concave bowl, and their reaches were recorded under monocular and binocular viewing conditions. Infants reached to the bowl as if it were convex significantly more often in the monocular than in the binocular viewing condition. These results suggest that infants perceive illusory depth reversal with a nonface stimulus and that the infant visual system has a bias to perceive objects as convex. Infants in experiment 2 viewed a concave face-like mask in upright and inverted orientations. Infants reached to the display as if it were convex more in the monocular than in the binocular condition; however, mask orientation had no effect on reaching. Previous findings that adults' perception of the hollow face illusion is affected by mask orientation inversion have been interpreted as evidence of stored-knowledge influences on perception. However, we found no evidence of such influences in infants, suggesting that their perception of this illusion may not be affected by stored knowledge, and that perceived depth reversal is not face-specific in infants.

  12. Twist-bulge derivatives and deformations of convex real projective structures on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Terence

    Let S be a closed orientable surface with genus g > 1 equipped with a convex RP2 structure. A basic example of such a convex $RP2 structure on a surface S is the one associated to a hyperbolic structure on S, and in this special case Wolpert proved formulas for computing the Lie derivatives talpha lbeta and tgamma talphal, where t alpha is the Fenchel-Nielsen twist vector field associated to the twist along a geodesic alpha, and l* is the hyperbolic geodesic length function. In this dissertation, we extend Wolpert's calculation of talphal beta and tgammat alphabeta in the hyperbolic setting to the case of convex real projective surfaces; in particular, our t alpha is the twist-bulge vector field along geodesic alpha coming from the parametrization of the deformation space of convex RP 2 structures on a surface due to Goldman, and our geodesic length function l* is in terms of a generalized cross-ratio in the sense of Labourie. To this end, we use results due to Labourie and Fock-Goncharov on the existence of an equivariant flag curve associated to Hitchin representations, of which convex real projective surfaces are an example. This flag curve allows us to extend the notions arising in the hyperbolic case to that of convex real projective structures and to complete our generalization of Wolpert's formulas.

  13. A Uniform GTD Analysis of the Scattering of Electromagnetic Waves by a Smooth Convex Surface.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-04-01

    optical electromagnetic field, an arbitrary convex surface, and a near zone field point (for which the field point may be sev- eral wavelengths from...of an arbitrary ray optical electromagnetic field by an edge in an otherwise smooth surface. Let P SB denote a field point on SB. The continuity of...surface when it is excited by a ray optical electromagnetic field. This asymptotic solution is uniform in the sense that it is valid within the

  14. Advanced Face Gear Surface Durability Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Heath, Gregory F.

    2016-01-01

    The surface durability life of helical face gears and isotropic super-finished (ISF) face gears was investigated. Experimental fatigue tests were performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Endurance tests were performed on 10 sets of helical face gears in mesh with tapered involute helical pinions, and 10 sets of ISF-enhanced straight face gears in mesh with tapered involute spur pinions. The results were compared to previous tests on straight face gears. The life of the ISF configuration was slightly less than that of previous tests on straight face gears. The life of the ISF configuration was slightly greater than that of the helical configuration.

  15. Indirect methods to measure wetting and contact angles on spherical convex and concave surfaces.

    PubMed

    Extrand, C W; Moon, Sung In

    2012-05-22

    In this work, a method was developed for indirectly estimating contact angles of sessile liquid drops on convex and concave surfaces. Assuming that drops were sufficiently small that no gravitational distortion occurred, equations were derived to compute intrinsic contact angles from the radius of curvature of the solid surface, the volume of the liquid drop, and its contact diameter. These expressions were tested against experimental data for various liquids on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polycarbonate (PC) in the form of flat surfaces, spheres, and concave cavities. Intrinsic contact angles estimated indirectly using dimensions and volumes generally agreed with the values measured directly from flat surfaces using the traditional tangent method.

  16. Encapsulation and convex-face thiozonolysis of triatomic sulfur (S3) with carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Álvaro; Lee, Leda; Greer, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Nanotubes are a class of host cavities increasingly used to encapsulate unstable molecules, yet none have been exploited to host reactive sulfur species, such as thiozone (S3). In this paper, density functional theory and (ONIOM) calculations were used to compute single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)–thiozone combinations for the inclusion of S3 into the hollow nanotube space and to rationalize when 1,2,3-thiozonide formation can take place. Nanotube diameter selectivity for the isomerization of the C2v form of S3 to the D3h form proved to be elusive. Acyclic C2v S3 was ~6 kcal/mol more stable than cyclic D3h S3 whether it was free or encapsulated within an SWNT. 1,2,3-Thiozonide formation took place on the convex side of nanotubes of low tube radii, such as the armchair (4,4) and (5,5) SWNTs. In terms of the reaction mode of C2v S3, the 1,3-dipolar addition reaction was preferred compared with the [2 + 2] cycloaddition and chelotrope paths. PMID:22701272

  17. Smart, passive sun facing surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Hively, Lee M.

    1996-01-01

    An article adapted for selectively utilizing solar radiation comprises an absorptive surface and a reflective surface, the absorptive surface and the reflective surface oriented to absorb solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively low position, and to reflect solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively high position.

  18. Smart, passive sun facing surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Hively, L.M.

    1996-04-30

    An article adapted for selectively utilizing solar radiation comprises an absorptive surface and a reflective surface, the absorptive surface and the reflective surface oriented to absorb solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively low position, and to reflect solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively high position. 17 figs.

  19. Heat transfer and fluid mechanics measurements in transitional boundary layers on convex-curved surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T.; Simon, T. W.

    1987-01-01

    The test section of the present experiment to ascertain the effects of convex curvature and freestream turbulence on boundary layer momentum and heat transfer during natural transition provided a two-dimensional boundary layer flow on a uniformly heated curved surface, with bending to various curvature radii, R. Attention is given to results for the cases of R = infinity, 180 cm, and 90 cm, each with two freestream turbulence intensity levels. While the mild convex curvature of R = 180 cm delays transition, further bending to R = 90 cm leads to no signifucant further delay of transition. Cases with both curvature and higher freestream disturbance effects exhibit the latter's pronounced dominance. These data are pertinent to the development of transition prediction models for gas turbine blade design.

  20. Experimental data and model for the turbulent boundary layer on a convex, curved surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis, J. C.; Johnson, J. P.; Moffat, R. J.; Kays, W. M.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine how boundary layer turbulence is affected by strong convex curvature. The data gathered on the behavior of the Reynolds stress suggested the formulation of a simple turbulence model. Data were taken on two separate facilities. Both rigs had flow from a flat surface, over a convex surface with 90 deg of turning and then onto a flat recovery surface. The geometry was adjusted so that, for both rigs, the pressure gradient along the test surface was zero. Two experiments were performed at delta/R approximately 0.10, and one at weaker curvature with delta/R approximately 0.05. Results show that after a sudden introduction of curvature the shear stress in the outer part of the boundary layer is sharply diminished and is even slightly negative near the edge. The wall shear also drops off quickly downstream. When the surface suddenly becomes flat again, the wall shear and shear stress profiles recover very slowly towards flat wall conditions. A simple turbulence model, which was based on the theory that the Prandtl mixing length in the outer layer should scale on the velocity gradient layer, was shown to account for the slow recovery.

  1. EyeSys corneal topography measurement applied to calibrated ellipsoidal convex surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Douthwaite, W A

    1995-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND--This study was carried out to assess the accuracy of the EyeSys videokeratoscope by using convex ellipsoidal surfaces of known form. METHODS--PMMA convex ellipsoidal buttons were calibrated using Form Talysurf analysis which allowed subsequent calculation of the vertex radius and p value of the surface. The EyeSys videokeratoscope was used to examine the same ellipsoids. The tabular data provided by the instrument software were used to plot a graph of r2 versus y2 where r is the measured radius at y, the distance from the corneal point being measured to the surface vertex. The intercept on the ordinate of this graph gives the vertex radius and the slope the p value. The results arising from the Talysurf and the EyeSys techniques were compared. RESULTS--The EyeSys videokeratoscope gave readings for both vertex radius and p value that were higher than those of the Talysurf analysis. The vertex radius was around 0.1 mm greater. The p value results were similar by the two methods for p values around unity but the EyeSys results were higher and the discrepancy increased as the p value approached that of a paraboloid. CONCLUSIONS--Although the videokeratoscope may be useful in comparative studies of the cornea, there must be some doubt about the absolute values displayed. The disagreement is sufficiently large to suggest that the instrument may not be accurate enough for contact lens fitting purposes. PMID:7488595

  2. Effect of Convex Longitudinal Curvature on the Planing Characteristics of a Surface Without Dead Rise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mottard, Elmo J.

    1959-01-01

    A hydrodynamic investigation was made in Langley tank no. 1 of a planing surface which was curved longitudinally in the shape of a circular arc with the center of curvature above the model and had a beam of inches and a radius of curvature of 20 beams. The planing surface had length-beam ratio of 9 and an angle of dead rise of 0 deg. Wetted length, resistance, and trimming moment were determined for values of load coefficient C(sub Delta) from -4.2 to 63.9 and values of speed coefficient C(sub V) from 6 to 25. The effects of convexity were to increase the wetted length-beam ratio (for a given lift), to decrease the lift-drag ratio, to move the center of pressure forward, and ta increase the trim for maximum lift-drag ratio as compared with values for a flat surface. The effects were greatest at low trims and large drafts. The maximum negative lift coefficient C(sub L,b) obtainable with a ratio of the radius of curvature to the beam of 20 was -0.02. The effects of camber were greater in magnitude for convexity than for the same amount of concavity.

  3. Explicit integration scheme for a non-isothermal elastoplastic model with convex and nonconvex subloading surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Annan; Zhang, Yue

    2015-05-01

    An adaptive substepping explicit integration scheme with a novel loading-unloading decision method is developed here for the non-isothermal unified hardening (UH) model. The non-isothermal UH model includes a convex subloading surface in the - plane and a nonconvex subloading surface in the - plane. Because of the convex/nonconvex subloading surfaces, the conventional loading-unloading decision method used in stress integration schemes may lead to incorrect elasticity/elastoplasticity judgements. In addition, the conventional loading-unloading decision method is unable to determine the division point that separates the elastic segment from the elastoplastic segment. A simple but robust method, the double cosine (DC) method, is proposed in this paper to solve loading-unloading decision problems. The proposed DC method is then embedded into an adaptive substepping explicit integration scheme to implement the non-isothermal UH model. The accuracy and efficiency of the DC method are discussed by comparing the method with the conventional loading-unloading decision method (the CV method) and the root-finding loading-unloading decision method (the RF method). The performance of the proposed scheme with the DC method is also discussed.

  4. Fabrication of micro-lens array on convex surface by meaning of micro-milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Du, Yunlong; Wang, Bo; Shan, Debin

    2014-08-01

    In order to develop the application of the micro-milling technology, and to fabricate ultra-precision optical surface with complex microstructure, in this paper, the primary experimental research on micro-milling complex microstructure array is carried out. A complex microstructure array surface with vary parameters is designed, and the mathematic model of the surface is set up and simulated. For the fabrication of the designed microstructure array surface, a micro three-axis ultra-precision milling machine tool is developed, aerostatic guideway drove directly by linear motor is adopted in order to guarantee the enough stiffness of the machine, and novel numerical control strategy with linear encoders of 5nm resolution used as the feedback of the control system is employed to ensure the extremely high motion control accuracy. With the help of CAD/CAM technology, convex micro lens array on convex spherical surface with different scales on material of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and pure copper is fabricated using micro tungsten carbide ball end milling tool based on the ultra-precision micro-milling machine. Excellent nanometer-level micro-movement performance of the axis is proved by motion control experiment. The fabrication is nearly as the same as the design, the characteristic scale of the microstructure is less than 200μm and the accuracy is better than 1μm. It prove that ultra-precision micro-milling technology based on micro ultra-precision machine tool is a suitable and optional method for micro manufacture of microstructure array surface on different kinds of materials, and with the development of micro milling cutter, ultraprecision micro-milling complex microstructure surface will be achieved in future.

  5. Streamwise Vortices on the Convex Surfaces of Circular Cylinders and Turbomachinery Blading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gostelow, Paul

    2010-01-01

    In assessing the results please recall that the Mach number regimes and model geometries differ considerably. Selection of the radius of curvature at the 10% chord location is consistent but arbitrary, although it does seem representative for most blades and gives a good fit for the results. Measured spanwise wavelengths of the periodic vortex arrays on blading are predicted well by the Kestin and Wood theory. If this behavior is at all common it could have implications for turbine aerodynamic and blade cooling design. The outcome is to establish that organized streamwise vorticity may occur more frequently on convex surfaces, such as turbine blade suction surfaces, than hitherto appreciated. Investigations and predictions of flow behavior should be extended to encompass that possibility.

  6. Experimental and numerical investigation of liquid jet impingement on superhydrophobic and hydrophobic convex surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibar, Ali

    2017-02-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations were carried out to examine the vertical impingement a round liquid jet on the edges of horizontal convex surfaces that were either superhydrophobic or hydrophobic. The experiments examine the effects on the flow behaviour of curvature, wettability, inertia of the jet, and the impingement rate. Three copper pipes with outer diameters of 15, 22, and 35 mm were investigated. The pipes were wrapped with a piece of a Brassica oleracea leaf or a smooth Teflon sheet, which have apparent contact angles of 160° and 113°. The Reynolds number ranged from 1000 to 4500, and the impingement rates of the liquid jets were varied. Numerical results show good agreement with the experimental results for explaining flow and provide detailed information about the impingement on the surfaces. The liquid jet reflected off the superhydrophobic surfaces for all conditions. However, the jet reflected or deflected off the hydrophobic surface, depending on the inertia of the jet, the curvature of the surface, and the impingement rate. The results suggest that pressure is not the main reason for the bending of the jet around the curved hydrophobic surface.

  7. Fiber coupler end face wavefront surface metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compertore, David C.; Ignatovich, Filipp V.; Marcus, Michael A.

    2015-09-01

    Despite significant technological advances in the field of fiber optic communications, one area remains surprisingly `low-tech': fiber termination. In many instances it involves manual labor and subjective visual inspection. At the same time, high quality fiber connections are one of the most critical parameters in constructing an efficient communication link. The shape and finish of the fiber end faces determines the efficiency of a connection comprised of coupled fiber end faces. The importance of fiber end face quality becomes even more critical for fiber connection arrays and for in the field applications. In this article we propose and demonstrate a quantitative inspection method for the fiber connectors using reflected wavefront technology. The manufactured and polished fiber tip is illuminated by a collimated light from a microscope objective. The reflected light is collected by the objective and is directed to a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. A set of lenses is used to create the image of the fiber tip on the surface of the sensor. The wavefront is analyzed by the sensor, and the measured parameters are used to obtain surface properties of the fiber tip, and estimate connection loss. For example, defocus components in the reflected light indicate the presence of bow in the fiber end face. This inspection method provides a contact-free approach for quantitative inspection of fiber end faces and for estimating the connection loss, and can potentially be integrated into a feedback system for automated inspection and polishing of fiber tips and fiber tip arrays.

  8. Three dimensional surface analyses of pubic symphyseal faces of contemporary Japanese reconstructed with 3D digitized scanner.

    PubMed

    Biwasaka, Hitoshi; Sato, Kei; Aoki, Yasuhiro; Kato, Hideaki; Maeno, Yoshitaka; Tanijiri, Toyohisa; Fujita, Sachiko; Dewa, Koji

    2013-09-01

    Three dimensional pubic bone images were analyzed to quantify some age-dependent morphological changes of the symphyseal faces of contemporary Japanese residents. The images were synthesized from 145 bone specimens with 3D measuring device. Phases of Suchey-Brooks system were determined on the 3D pubic symphyseal images without discrepancy from those carried out on the real bones because of the high fidelity. Subsequently, mean curvatures of the pubic symphyseal faces to examine concavo-convex condition of the surfaces were analyzed on the 3D images. Average values of absolute mean curvatures of phase 1 and 2 groups were higher than those of phase 3-6 ones, whereas the values were approximately constant over phase 3 presumably reflecting the inactivation of pubic faces over phase 3. Ratio of the concave areas increased gradually with progressing phase or age classes, although convex areas were predominant in every phase.

  9. Perceptual convexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupeev, Konstantin Y.; Wolfson, Haim J.

    1995-08-01

    Often objects which are not convex in the mathematical sense are treated as `perceptually convex'. We present an algorithm for recognition of the perceptual convexity of a 2D contour. We start by reducing the notion of `a contour is perceptually convex' to the notion of `a contour is Y-convex'. The latter reflects an absence of large concavities in the OY direction of an XOY frame. Then we represented a contour by a G-graph and modify the slowest descent-- the small leaf trimming procedure recently introduced for the estimation of shape similarity. We prove that executing the slowest descent dow to a G-graph consisting of 3 vertices allows us to detect large concavities in the OY direction. This allows us to recognize the perceptual convexity of an input contour.

  10. Development of twin-illumination and subtraction technique for detection of concave and convex defects on steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Hiroaki; Ogawa, Akihiro; Yamasaki, Takahiro; Koshihara, Takahiro; Kodama, Toshifumi; Iizuka, Yukinori; Oshige, Takahiko

    2016-09-01

    Optical surface inspection of steel mill products such as pipes, plates and slabs usually has the problem of overdetection, which is caused by signals from harmless parts such as scale and surface texture. The authors propose a new inspection technique based on the experience that most harmful defects on these products have a concave or convex shape, whereas most harmless parts that might be overdetected have flat shapes. The proposed technique is called the `twin-illumination and subtraction technique'. In this technique, firstly, two images of the target area on a steel surface illuminated from the two sides are captured, respectively. A subtraction image is then calculated from these images. Comparing the images illuminated from the different sides, the images from concave or convex defects look different due to their different shadows, while images from harmless flat parts look the same because illumination does not cause any shadow. As a result, two images with the same appearances from a harmless part are canceled by subtraction, and two images with different appearances from a concave or convex defect remain even after subtraction. Finally, it is possible to detect only concave or convex defects without overdetecting flat patterns. In this manuscript, first, we explain the proposed technique and confirmation experiments in the laboratory. We also explain a new optical inspection system based on the concept described above and its application to moving hot pipes in a steel manufacturing plant to prove the effectiveness of the technique. We concluded that the inspection system has sufficient performance for use as a practical system.

  11. [3-D endocardial surface modelling based on the convex hull algorithm].

    PubMed

    Lu, Ying; Xi, Ri-hui; Shen, Hai-dong; Ye, You-li; Zhang, Yong

    2006-11-01

    In this paper, a method based on the convex hull algorithm is presented for extracting modelling data from the locations of catheter electrodes within a cardiac chamber, so as to create a 3-D model of the heart chamber during diastole and to obtain a good result in the 3-D reconstruction of the chamber based on VTK.

  12. A Cutting Surface Algorithm for Semi-Infinite Convex Programming with an Application to Moment Robust Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Mehrotra, Sanjay; Papp, Dávid

    2014-01-01

    We present and analyze a central cutting surface algorithm for general semi-infinite convex optimization problems and use it to develop a novel algorithm for distributionally robust optimization problems in which the uncertainty set consists of probability distributions with given bounds on their moments. Moments of arbitrary order, as well as nonpolynomial moments, can be included in the formulation. We show that this gives rise to a hierarchy of optimization problems with decreasing levels of risk-aversion, with classic robust optimization at one end of the spectrum and stochastic programming at the other. Although our primary motivation is to solve distributionally robust optimization problems with moment uncertainty, the cutting surface method for general semi-infinite convex programs is also of independent interest. The proposed method is applicable to problems with nondifferentiable semi-infinite constraints indexed by an infinite dimensional index set. Examples comparing the cutting surface algorithm to the central cutting plane algorithm of Kortanek and No demonstrate the potential of our algorithm even in the solution of traditional semi-infinite convex programming problems, whose constraints are differentiable, and are indexed by an index set of low dimension. After the rate of convergence analysis of the cutting surface algorithm, we extend the authors' moment matching scenario generation algorithm to a probabilistic algorithm that finds optimal probability distributions subject to moment constraints. The combination of this distribution optimization method and the central cutting surface algorithm yields a solution to a family of distributionally robust optimization problems that are considerably more general than the ones proposed to date.

  13. A Cutting Surface Algorithm for Semi-Infinite Convex Programming with an Application to Moment Robust Optimization

    DOE PAGES

    Mehrotra, Sanjay; Papp, Dávid

    2014-01-01

    We present and analyze a central cutting surface algorithm for general semi-infinite convex optimization problems and use it to develop a novel algorithm for distributionally robust optimization problems in which the uncertainty set consists of probability distributions with given bounds on their moments. Moments of arbitrary order, as well as nonpolynomial moments, can be included in the formulation. We show that this gives rise to a hierarchy of optimization problems with decreasing levels of risk-aversion, with classic robust optimization at one end of the spectrum and stochastic programming at the other. Although our primary motivation is to solve distributionally robustmore » optimization problems with moment uncertainty, the cutting surface method for general semi-infinite convex programs is also of independent interest. The proposed method is applicable to problems with nondifferentiable semi-infinite constraints indexed by an infinite dimensional index set. Examples comparing the cutting surface algorithm to the central cutting plane algorithm of Kortanek and No demonstrate the potential of our algorithm even in the solution of traditional semi-infinite convex programming problems, whose constraints are differentiable, and are indexed by an index set of low dimension. After the rate of convergence analysis of the cutting surface algorithm, we extend the authors' moment matching scenario generation algorithm to a probabilistic algorithm that finds optimal probability distributions subject to moment constraints. The combination of this distribution optimization method and the central cutting surface algorithm yields a solution to a family of distributionally robust optimization problems that are considerably more general than the ones proposed to date.« less

  14. A wear simulation study of nanostructured CVD diamond-on-diamond articulation involving concave/convex mating surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Paul A.; Thompson, Raymond G.; Catledge, Shane A.

    2015-01-01

    Using microwave-plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD), a 3-micron thick nanostructured-diamond (NSD) layer was deposited onto polished, convex and concave components that were machined from Ti-6Al-4V alloy. These components had the same radius of curvature, 25.4mm. Wear testing of the surfaces was performed by rotating articulation of the diamond-deposited surfaces (diamond-on-diamond) with a load of 225N for a total of 5 million cycles in bovine serum resulting in polishing of the diamond surface and formation of very shallow, linear wear grooves of less than 50nm depth. The two diamond surfaces remained adhered to the components and polished each other to an average surface roughness that was reduced by as much as a factor of 80 for the most polished region located at the center of the condyle. Imaging of the surfaces showed that the initial wearing-in phase of diamond was only beginning at the end of the 5 million cycles. Atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and surface profilometry were used to characterize the surfaces and verify that the diamond remained intact and uniform over the surface, thereby protecting the underlying metal. These wear simulation results show that diamond deposition on Ti alloy has potential application for joint replacement devices with improved longevity over existing devices made of cobalt chrome and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). PMID:26989457

  15. LDL receptor/lipoprotein recognition: endosomal weakening of ApoB and ApoE binding to the convex face of the LR5 repeat.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Oliván, Juan; Arias-Moreno, Xabier; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrián; Millet, Oscar; Sancho, Javier

    2014-03-01

    The molecular mechanism of lipoprotein binding by the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) is poorly understood, one reason being that structures of lipoprotein-receptor complexes are not available. LDLR uses calcium-binding repeats (LRs) to interact with apolipoprotein B and apolipoprotein E (ApoB and ApoE). We have used NMR and SPR to characterize the complexes formed by LR5 and three peptides encompassing the putative binding regions of ApoB (site A and site B) and ApoE. The three peptides bind at the hydrophilic convex face of LR5, forming complexes that are weakened at low [Ca(2+) ] and low pH. Thus, endosomal conditions favour dissociation of LDLR/lipoprotein complexes regardless of whether active displacement of bound lipoproteins by the β-propeller in LDLR takes place. The multiple ApoE copies in β very low density lipoproteins (β-VLDLs), and the presence of two competent binding sites (A and B) in LDLs, suggest that LDLR chelates lipoproteins and enhances complex affinity by using more than one LR.

  16. The influence of tool path strategies on cutting force and surface texture during ball end milling of low curvature convex surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shajari, Shaghayegh; Sadeghi, Mohammad Hossein; Hassanpour, Hamed

    2014-01-01

    Advancement in machining technology of curved surfaces for various engineering applications is increasing. Various methodologies and computer tools have been developed by the manufacturers to improve efficiency of freeform surface machining. Selection of the right sets of cutter path strategies and appropriate cutting conditions is extremely important in ensuring high productivity rate, meeting the better quality level, and lower cutting forces. In this paper, cutting force as a new decision criterion for the best selection of tool paths on convex surfaces is presented. Therefore, this work aims at studying and analyzing different finishing strategies to assess their influence on surface texture, cutting forces, and machining time. Design and analysis of experiments are performed by means of Taguchi technique and analysis of variance. In addition, the significant parameters affecting the cutting force in each strategy are introduced. Machining strategies employed include raster, 3D-offset, radial, and spiral. The cutting parameters were feed rate, cutting speed, and step over. The experiments were carried out on low curvature convex surfaces of stainless steel 1.4903. The conclusion is that radial strategy provokes the best surface texture and the lowest cutting forces and spiral strategy signifies the worst surface texture and the highest cutting forces.

  17. The Influence of Tool Path Strategies on Cutting Force and Surface Texture during Ball End Milling of Low Curvature Convex Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Mohammad Hossein; Hassanpour, Hamed

    2014-01-01

    Advancement in machining technology of curved surfaces for various engineering applications is increasing. Various methodologies and computer tools have been developed by the manufacturers to improve efficiency of freeform surface machining. Selection of the right sets of cutter path strategies and appropriate cutting conditions is extremely important in ensuring high productivity rate, meeting the better quality level, and lower cutting forces. In this paper, cutting force as a new decision criterion for the best selection of tool paths on convex surfaces is presented. Therefore, this work aims at studying and analyzing different finishing strategies to assess their influence on surface texture, cutting forces, and machining time. Design and analysis of experiments are performed by means of Taguchi technique and analysis of variance. In addition, the significant parameters affecting the cutting force in each strategy are introduced. Machining strategies employed include raster, 3D-offset, radial, and spiral. The cutting parameters were feed rate, cutting speed, and step over. The experiments were carried out on low curvature convex surfaces of stainless steel 1.4903. The conclusion is that radial strategy provokes the best surface texture and the lowest cutting forces and spiral strategy signifies the worst surface texture and the highest cutting forces. PMID:24701163

  18. Experimental investigation of heat transfer efficiency on the convex surface of the annular channel of varying geometry intensifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komov, A. T.; Varava, A. V.; Zakharenkov, A. V.; Dedov, A. V.; Boltenko, E. A.; Agishev, B. Y.

    2016-10-01

    The work is a continuation of the experimental studies on the enhancement of heat transfer in the fuel assembly on the experimental stand in National Research University "Moscow Power Engineering Institute". The description of the experimental setup, construction and main geometrical parameters of intensifier are presented. The new experimental data on the pressure loss and heat transfer coefficient using an edge enhancer - twisted wire single-phase convection mode are presented. In the research, the range mode parameters and geometric characteristics of the intensifier were extended. The relation of the coefficients of hydraulic resistance and the Nusselt number of steps twist twisted wire was found, the effect of the ribs on the heat transfer coefficient was shown. It is found that for any twist pitch ranging from 20 to 100 mm corresponds to a maximum heat transfer rib height H = 0,35. An increase in the heat transfer coefficient in the convex heating surface was experimentally obtained.

  19. Convergence of the gradient projection method and Newton's method as applied to optimization problems constrained by intersection of a spherical surface and a convex closed set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyaev, Yu. A.

    2016-10-01

    The gradient projection method and Newton's method are generalized to the case of nonconvex constraint sets representing the set-theoretic intersection of a spherical surface with a convex closed set. Necessary extremum conditions are examined, and the convergence of the methods is analyzed.

  20. RDS-21 Face-Gear Surface Durability Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Heath, Gregory F.; Filler, Robert R.; Slaughter, Stephen C.; Fetty, Jason

    2007-01-01

    Experimental fatigue tests were performed to determine the surface durability life of a face gear in mesh with a tapered spur involute pinion. Twenty-four sets of gears were tested at three load levels: 7200, 8185, and 9075 lb-in face gear torque, and 2190 to 3280 rpm face gear speed. The gears were carburized and ground, shot-peened and vibro-honed, and made from VIM-VAR Pyrowear 53 steel per AMS 6308. The tests produced 17 gear tooth spalling failures and 7 suspensions. For all the failed sets, spalling occurred on at least one tooth of all the pinions. In some cases, the spalling initiated a crack in the pinion teeth which progressed to tooth fracture. Also, spalling occurred on some face gear teeth. The AGMA endurance allowable stress for a tapered spur involute pinion in mesh with a face gear was determined to be 275 ksi for the material tested. For the application of a tapered spur involute pinion in mesh with a face gear, proper face gear shim controlled the desired gear tooth contact pattern while proper pinion shim was an effective way of adjusting backlash without severely affecting the contact pattern.

  1. GENERALIZED CONVEXITY CONES.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Contents: Introduction The dual cone of C (psi sub 1,..., psi sub n) Extreme rays The cone dual to an intersection of generalized convexity cones... Generalized difference quotients and multivariate convexity Miscellaneous applications of generalized convexity.

  2. Radiation by Sources on Perfectly Conducting Convex Cylinders with an Impedance Surface Patch.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    far zone) by~a unit strenth magiletic line source at Q’ on the surface s* W (Q’ or &| P1 and T’ (Q’ or Or) are the magnetic fields indu2ed at Q’ r on th...U -- = - (a to0 . 0 0 m 4- 0 4- 04 0-0 1 - .0 4’ U-- ~4- 4 0 n4- -- C_ to S~0- 4J C >1 cu S)-0’ (0 C 0)~ 00 =3 .r aCCA 50 It is observed from these...follows: Gh - - . d_ jF4I 1 2 2 P1 -~ _~_~E (k 2 _ 2 ) 2 ah (k 2 _ 2 ) 1 lahd) 1- ] (B-20) The first two terms in (B-20) can be evaluated using

  3. Growth of rutile TiO₂ on the convex surface of nanocylinders: from nanoneedles to nanorods and their electrochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Kong, Junhua; Wei, Yuefan; Zhao, Chenyang; Toh, Meng Yew; Yee, Wu Aik; Zhou, Dan; Phua, Si Lei; Dong, Yuliang; Lu, Xuehong

    2014-04-21

    In this work, bundles of rutile TiO₂ nanoneedles/nanorods are hydrothermally grown on carbon nanofibers (CNFs), forming free-standing mats consisting of three dimensional hierarchical nanostructures (TiO₂-on-CNFs). Morphologies and structures of the TiO₂-on-CNFs are studied using a field-emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). Their electrochemical properties as electrodes in lithium ion batteries (LIBs) are investigated and correlated with the morphologies and structures. It is shown that the lateral size of the TiO₂ nanoneedles/nanorods ranges from a few nanometers to tens of nanometers, and increases with the hydrothermal temperature. Small interspaces are observed between individual nanoneedles/nanorods, which are due to the diverging arrangement of nanoneedles/nanorods induced by growing on the convex surface of nanocylinders. It is found that the growth process can be divided into two stages: initial growth on the CNF surface and further growth upon re-nucleation on the TiO₂ bundles formed in the initial growth stage. In order to achieve good electrochemical performance in LIBs, the size of the TiO₂ nanostructures needs to be small enough to ensure complete alloying and fast charge transport, while the further growth stage has to be avoided to realize direct attachment of TiO₂ nanostructures on the CNFs, facilitating electron transport. The sample obtained after hydrothermal treatment at 130 °C for 2 h (TiO₂-130-2) shows the above features and hence exhibits the best cyclability and rate capacity among all samples; the cyclability and rate capacity of TiO₂-130-2 are also superior to those of other rutile TiO₂-based LIB electrodes.

  4. Facing extremes: archaeal surface-layer (glyco)proteins.

    PubMed

    Eichler, Jerry

    2003-12-01

    Archaea are best known in their capacities as extremophiles, i.e. micro-organisms able to thrive in some of the most drastic environments on Earth. The protein-based surface layer that envelopes many archaeal strains must thus correctly assemble and maintain its structural integrity in the face of the physical challenges associated with, for instance, life in high salinity, at elevated temperatures or in acidic surroundings. Study of archaeal surface-layer (glyco)proteins has thus offered insight into the strategies employed by these proteins to survive direct contact with extreme environments, yet has also served to elucidate other aspects of archaeal protein biosynthesis, including glycosylation, lipid modification and protein export. In this mini-review, recent advances in the study of archaeal surface-layer (glyco)proteins are discussed.

  5. Uniformly convex and strictly convex Orlicz spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masta, Al Azhary

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we define the new norm of Orlicz spaces on ℝn through a multiplication operator on an old Orlicz spaces. We obtain some necessary and sufficient conditions that the new norm to be a uniformly convex and strictly convex spaces.

  6. Formation of surface nanodroplets facing a structured microchannel wall.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haitao; Maheshwari, Shantanu; Zhu, Jiuyang; Lohse, Detlef; Zhang, Xuehua

    2017-04-11

    Surface nanodroplets are important units for lab-on-a-chip devices, compartmentalised catalytic reactions, high-resolution near-field imaging, and many others. Solvent exchange is a simple solution-based bottom-up approach for producing surface nanodroplets by displacing a good solvent of the droplet liquid by a poor one in a narrow channel in the laminar regime. The droplet size is controlled by the solution composition and the flow conditions during the solvent exchange. In this paper, we investigated the effects of local microfluidic structures on the formation of surface nanodroplets. The microstructures consist of a microgap with a well-defined geometry, embedded on the opposite microchannel wall, facing the substrate where nucleation takes place. For a given channel height, the dimensionless control parameters were the Peclet number of the flow, the ratio between the gap height and the channel height, and the aspect ratio between the gap length and the channel height. We found and explained three prominent features in the surface nanodroplet distribution at the surface opposite to the microgap: (i) enhanced volume of the droplets; (ii) asymmetry as compared to the location of the gap in the spatial droplet distribution with increasing Pe; (iii) reduced exponent of the effective scaling law of the droplet size with Pe. The droplet size also varied with the aspect and height ratios of the microgap at a given Pe value. Our simulations of the profile of oversaturation in the channel reveal that the droplet size distribution may be attributed to the local flow patterns induced by the gap. Finally, in a tapered microchannel, a gradient of surface nanodroplet size was obtained. Our work shows the potential for controlling nanodroplet size and spatial organization on a homogeneous surface in a bottom-up approach by simple microfluidic structures.

  7. CONVEX mini manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennille, Geoffrey M.; Howser, Lona M.

    1993-01-01

    The use of the CONVEX computers that are an integral part of the Supercomputing Network Subsystems (SNS) of the Central Scientific Computing Complex of LaRC is briefly described. Features of the CONVEX computers that are significantly different than the CRAY supercomputers are covered, including: FORTRAN, C, architecture of the CONVEX computers, the CONVEX environment, batch job submittal, debugging, performance analysis, utilities unique to CONVEX, and documentation. This revision reflects the addition of the Applications Compiler and X-based debugger, CXdb. The document id intended for all CONVEX users as a ready reference to frequently asked questions and to more detailed information contained with the vendor manuals. It is appropriate for both the novice and the experienced user.

  8. Gerrymandering and Convexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, Jonathan K.; Marshall, Emily; Patterson, Geoff

    2010-01-01

    Convexity-based measures of shape compactness provide an effective way to identify irregularities in congressional district boundaries. A low convexity coefficient may suggest that a district has been gerrymandered, or it may simply reflect irregularities in the corresponding state boundary. Furthermore, the distribution of population within a…

  9. The importance of surface-based cues for face discrimination in non-human primates

    PubMed Central

    Parr, Lisa A.; Taubert, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    Understanding how individual identity is processed from faces remains a complex problem. Contrast reversal, showing faces in photographic negative, impairs face recognition in humans and demonstrates the importance of surface-based information (shading and pigmentation) in face recognition. We tested the importance of contrast information for face encoding in chimpanzees and rhesus monkeys using a computerized face-matching task. Results showed that contrast reversal (positive to negative) selectively impaired face processing in these two species, although the impairment was greater for chimpanzees. Unlike chimpanzees, however, monkeys performed just as well matching negative to positive faces, suggesting that they retained some ability to extract identity information from negative faces. A control task showed that chimpanzees, but not rhesus monkeys, performed significantly better matching face parts compared with whole faces after a contrast reversal, suggesting that contrast reversal acts selectively on face processing, rather than general visual-processing mechanisms. These results confirm the importance of surface-based cues for face processing in chimpanzees and humans, while the results were less salient for rhesus monkeys. These findings make a significant contribution to understanding the evolution of cognitive specializations for face processing among primates, and suggest potential differences between monkeys and apes. PMID:21123266

  10. Stereotype locally convex spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbarov, S. S.

    2000-08-01

    We give complete proofs of some previously announced results in the theory of stereotype (that is, reflexive in the sense of Pontryagin duality) locally convex spaces. These spaces have important applications in topological algebra and functional analysis.

  11. Splitting Methods for Convex Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Eric C.; Lange, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Clustering is a fundamental problem in many scientific applications. Standard methods such as k-means, Gaussian mixture models, and hierarchical clustering, however, are beset by local minima, which are sometimes drastically suboptimal. Recently introduced convex relaxations of k-means and hierarchical clustering shrink cluster centroids toward one another and ensure a unique global minimizer. In this work we present two splitting methods for solving the convex clustering problem. The first is an instance of the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM); the second is an instance of the alternating minimization algorithm (AMA). In contrast to previously considered algorithms, our ADMM and AMA formulations provide simple and unified frameworks for solving the convex clustering problem under the previously studied norms and open the door to potentially novel norms. We demonstrate the performance of our algorithm on both simulated and real data examples. While the differences between the two algorithms appear to be minor on the surface, complexity analysis and numerical experiments show AMA to be significantly more efficient. This article has supplemental materials available online. PMID:27087770

  12. Thermal expansion compensator having an elastic conductive element bonded to two facing surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Determan, William (Inventor); Matejczyk, Daniel Edward (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A thermal expansion compensator is provided and includes a first electrode structure having a first surface, a second electrode structure having a second surface facing the first surface and an elastic element bonded to the first and second surfaces and including a conductive element by which the first and second electrode structures electrically and/or thermally communicate, the conductive element having a length that is not substantially longer than a distance between the first and second surfaces.

  13. Microscopic theory of electron absorption by plasma-facing surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronold, F. X.; Fehske, H.

    2017-01-01

    We describe a method for calculating the probability with which the wall of a plasma absorbs an electron at low energy. The method, based on an invariant embedding principle, expresses the electron absorption probability as the probability for transmission through the wall’s long-range surface potential times the probability to stay inside the wall despite of internal backscattering. To illustrate the approach we apply it to a SiO2 surface. Besides emission of optical phonons inside the wall we take elastic scattering at imperfections of the plasma-wall interface into account and obtain absorption probabilities significantly less than unity in accordance with available electron-beam scattering data but in disagreement with the widely used perfect absorber model.

  14. Surface Stereo Imager on Mars, Face-On

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image is a view of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) as seen by the lander's Robotic Arm Camera. This image was taken on the afternoon of the 116th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (September 22, 2008). The mast-mounted SSI, which provided the images used in the 360 degree panoramic view of Phoenix's landing site, is about 4 inches tall and 8 inches long. The two 'eyes' of the SSI seen in this image can take photos to create three-dimensional views of the landing site.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  15. Computing Surface Coordinates Of Face-Milled Spiral-Bevel Gear Teeth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Litvin, Faydor L.

    1995-01-01

    Surface coordinates of face-milled spiral-bevel gear teeth computed by method involving numerical solution of governing equations. Needed to generate mathematical models of tooth surfaces for use in finite-element analyses of stresses, strains, and vibrations in meshing spiral-bevel gears.

  16. Convex Graph Invariants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-02

    evaluating the function ΘP (A) for any fixed A,P is equivalent to solving the so-called Quadratic Assignment Problem ( QAP ), and thus we can employ various...tractable linear programming, spectral, and SDP relaxations of QAP [40, 11, 33]. In particular we discuss recent work [14] on exploiting group...symmetry in SDP relaxations of QAP , which is useful for approximately computing elementary convex graph invariants in many interesting cases. Finally in

  17. Computational redesign of the lipid-facing surface of the outer membrane protein OmpA.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, James A; Whitehead, Timothy A; Nanda, Vikas

    2015-08-04

    Advances in computational design methods have made possible extensive engineering of soluble proteins, but designed β-barrel membrane proteins await improvements in our understanding of the sequence determinants of folding and stability. A subset of the amino acid residues of membrane proteins interact with the cell membrane, and the design rules that govern this lipid-facing surface are poorly understood. We applied a residue-level depth potential for β-barrel membrane proteins to the complete redesign of the lipid-facing surface of Escherichia coli OmpA. Initial designs failed to fold correctly, but reversion of a small number of mutations indicated by backcross experiments yielded designs with substitutions to up to 60% of the surface that did support folding and membrane insertion.

  18. Simulated plasma facing component measurements for an in situ surface diagnostic on Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwig, Z. S.; Whyte, D. G.

    2010-10-15

    The ideal in situ plasma facing component (PFC) diagnostic for magnetic fusion devices would perform surface element and isotope composition measurements on a shot-to-shot ({approx}10 min) time scale with {approx}1 {mu}m depth and {approx}1 cm spatial resolution over large areas of PFCs. To this end, the experimental adaptation of the customary laboratory surface diagnostic - nuclear scattering of MeV ions - to the Alcator C-Mod tokamak is being guided by ACRONYM, a Geant4 synthetic diagnostic. The diagnostic technique and ACRONYM are described, and synthetic measurements of film thickness for boron-coated PFCs are presented.

  19. Simulated plasma facing component measurements for an in situ surface diagnostic on Alcator C-Moda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, Z. S.; Whyte, D. G.

    2010-10-01

    The ideal in situ plasma facing component (PFC) diagnostic for magnetic fusion devices would perform surface element and isotope composition measurements on a shot-to-shot (˜10 min) time scale with ˜1 μm depth and ˜1 cm spatial resolution over large areas of PFCs. To this end, the experimental adaptation of the customary laboratory surface diagnostic—nuclear scattering of MeV ions—to the Alcator C-Mod tokamak is being guided by ACRONYM, a Geant4 synthetic diagnostic. The diagnostic technique and ACRONYM are described, and synthetic measurements of film thickness for boron-coated PFCs are presented.

  20. High-speed surface temperature measurements on plasma facing materials for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, M.; Kobayashi, M.

    1996-01-01

    For the lifetime evaluation of plasma facing materials in fusion experimental machines, it is essential to investigate their surface behavior and their temperature responses during an off-normal event such as the plasma disruptions. An infrared thermometer with a sampling speed as fast as 1{times}10{sup {minus}6} s/data, namely, the high-speed infrared thermometer (HSIR), has been developed by the National Research Laboratory of Metrology in Japan. To evaluate an applicability of the newly developed HSIR on the surface temperature measurement of plasma facing materials, high heat flux beam irradiation experiments have been performed with three different materials under the surface heat fluxes up to 170 MW/m{sup 2} for 0.04 s in a hydrogen ion beam test facility at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. As for the results, HSIR can be applicable for measuring the surface temperature responses of the armor tile materials with a little modification. It is also confirmed that surface temperatures measured with the HSIR thermometer show good agreement with the analytical results for stainless steel and carbon based materials at a temperature range of up to 2500{degree}C. However, for aluminum the HSIR could measure the temperature of the high dense vapor cloud which was produced during the heating due to lower melting temperature. Based on the result, a multichannel arrayed HSIR thermometer has been designed and fabricated. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Experiments on High-Speed Liquid Films Over Downward-Facing Wetting and Nonwetting Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.K.; Yoda, M.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.; Sadowski, D.L.

    2003-07-15

    The fusion event in inertial fusion energy reactors can damage the chamber first walls. The Prometheus design study used a high-speed tangentially injected thin film of molten lead to protect the upper endcap of the reactor chamber. To assure full chamber coverage, the film must remain attached. Film detachment due to gravitational effects is most likely to occur on downward-facing surfaces.Experiments were therefore conducted on turbulent water films with initial thicknessess and speeds up to 2 mm and 11 m/s, respectively, onto the downward-facing surface of a flat plate 0-45 deg. below the horizontal. Average film detachment and lateral extent along the plate were measured. Detachment length appears to be a linear function of Froude number. Results for film flows over wetting and nonwetting surfaces show that surface wettability has a major impact. The data are used to establish conservative 'design windows' for film detachment. Film flow around cylindrical obstacles, modeling protective dams around chamber penetrations, was also studied. The results suggest that cylindrical dams cannot be used to protect penetrations, and that new chamber penetration geometries that avoid flow separation are a major design issue for this type of thin liquid protection.

  2. Non-uniform Erosion and Surface Evolution of Plasma-Facing Materials for Electric Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthes, Christopher Stanley Rutter

    A study regarding the surface evolution of plasma-facing materials is presented. Experimental efforts were performed in the UCLA Pi Facility, designed to explore the physics of plasma-surface interactions. The influence of micro-architectured surfaces on the effects of plasma sputtering is compared with the response of planar samples. Ballistic deposition of sputtered atoms as a result of geometric re-trapping is observed. This provides a self-healing mechanism of micro-architectured surfaces during plasma exposure. This result is quantified using a QCM to demonstrate the evolution of surface features and the corresponding influence on the instantaneous sputtering yield. The sputtering yield of textured molybdenum samples exposed to 300 eV Ar plasma is found to be roughly 1 of the 2 corresponding value of flat samples, and increases with ion fluence. Mo samples exhibited a sputtering yield initially as low as 0.22+/-8%, converging to 0.4+/-8% at high fluence. Although the yield is dependent on the initial surface structure, it is shown to be transient, reaching a steady-state value that is independent of initial surface conditions. A continuum model of surface evolution resulting from sputtering, deposition and surface diffusion is also derived to resemble the damped Kuramoto-Sivashinsky (KS) equation of non-linear dynamics. Linear stability analysis of the evolution equation provides an estimate of the selected wavelength, and its dependence on the ion energy and angle of incidence. The analytical results are confirmed by numerical simulations of the equation with a Fast Fourier Transform method. It is shown that for an initially flat surface, small perturbations lead to the evolution of a selected surface pattern that has nano- scale wavelength. When the surface is initially patterned by other means, the final resulting pattern is a competition between the "templated" pattern and the "self-organized" structure. Potential future routes of research are also

  3. A convex hull inclusion test.

    PubMed

    Bailey, T; Cowles, J

    1987-02-01

    A new characterization of the interior of the convex hull of a finite point set is given. An inclusion test based on this characterization is, on average, almost linear in the number of points times the dimensionality.

  4. Crack-face displacements for embedded elliptic and semi-elliptical surface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.

    1989-01-01

    Analytical expressions for the crack-face displacements of an embedded elliptic crack in infinite solid subjected to arbitrary tractions are obtained. The tractions on the crack faces are assumed to be expressed in a polynomial form. These displacements expressions complete the exact solution of Vijayakumar and Atluri, and Nishioki and Atluri. For the special case of an embedded crack in an infinite solid subjected to uniform pressure loading, the present displacements agree with those by Green and Sneddon. The displacement equations derived were used with the finite-element alternating method (FEAM) for the analysis of a semi-elliptic surface crack in a finite solid subjected to remote tensile loading. The maximum opening displacements obtained with FEAM are compared to those with the finite-element method with singularity elements. The maximum crack opening displacements by the two methods showed good agreement.

  5. Convex polytopes and quantum separability

    SciTech Connect

    Holik, F.; Plastino, A.

    2011-12-15

    We advance a perspective of the entanglement issue that appeals to the Schlienz-Mahler measure [Phys. Rev. A 52, 4396 (1995)]. Related to it, we propose a criterium based on the consideration of convex subsets of quantum states. This criterium generalizes a property of product states to convex subsets (of the set of quantum states) that is able to uncover an interesting geometrical property of the separability property.

  6. Fabrication of micro-convex domes using long pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingsheng; Zhang, Yongnian; Wang, Ling; Xian, Jieyu; Jin, Meifu; Kang, Min

    2017-01-01

    Micro-convex domes inspired from nature can be machined by chemical and physical routes to achieve specific functions. Laser surface texturing (LST) is the front runner among the current material micro-processing technologies. However, most of the studies relating to LST dealt with the formation of micro-dimples. In this paper, LST using long pulse laser was used to create micro-convex domes on 304L stainless steel. Spherical-cap-shaped domes with diameters of 30-75 μm and height of 0.9-5.5 μm were created through LST. The effects of laser-processing parameters on surface morphologies of the created convex domes were investigated. The height of the convex dome increased at first and then decreased with the increasing laser power. The change tendency of the height with the pulse duration varied at different laser powers. The diameter of the convex dome increased almost linearly with the laser power or pulse duration. The superior micro-convex domes were achieved at a pulse energy of 5.6 mJ with a laser power of 80 W and pulse duration of 70 μs.

  7. Supra-additive contribution of shape and surface information to individual face discrimination as revealed by fast periodic visual stimulation.

    PubMed

    Dzhelyova, Milena; Rossion, Bruno

    2014-12-24

    Face perception depends on two main sources of information--shape and surface cues. Behavioral studies suggest that both of them contribute roughly equally to discrimination of individual faces, with only a small advantage provided by their combination. However, it is difficult to quantify the respective contribution of each source of information to the visual representation of individual faces with explicit behavioral measures. To address this issue, facial morphs were created that varied in shape only, surface only, or both. Electrocephalogram (EEG) were recorded from 10 participants during visual stimulation at a fast periodic rate, in which the same face was presented four times consecutively and the fifth face (the oddball) varied along one of the morphed dimensions. Individual face discrimination was indexed by the periodic EEG response at the oddball rate (e.g., 5.88 Hz/5 = 1.18 Hz). While shape information was discriminated mainly at right occipitotemporal electrode sites, surface information was coded more bilaterally and provided a larger response overall. Most importantly, shape and surface changes alone were associated with much weaker responses than when both sources of information were combined in the stimulus, revealing a supra-additive effect. These observations suggest that the two kinds of information combine nonlinearly to provide a full individual face representation, face identity being more than the sum of the contribution of shape and surface cues.

  8. The identification of molecular surfaces' feature regions based on spherical mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meiling; Zhang, Jingqiao

    2017-02-01

    As possible active sites, the concave and convex feature regions of the molecule are the locations where the molecular docking will happen more possibly. Then how to search for those regions is valuable to study. In this paper, a new method is proposed for identifying concave and convex regions. Based on the established spherical mapping between molecular surfaces and its bounding-sphere surfaces, the concave and convex vertices of local areas can be determined according to the expansion distance defined by the spherical mapping. Then through mesh growing, a feature region can be firmed by a concave point or a convex point, also called center point, and its neighboring faces, whose normal vector has an angle in a specified range with the center point. After that, areas and volumes of feature regions are calculated. The experimental results indicate that the method can well identify the concave and convex characteristics of the molecule.

  9. Experimental measurements of surface damage and residual stresses in micro-engineered plasma facing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, David; Wirz, Richard E.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    2017-04-01

    The thermomechanical damage and residual stresses in plasma-facing materials operating at high heat flux are experimentally investigated. Materials with micro-surfaces are found to be more resilient, when exposed to cyclic high heat flux generated by an arc-jet plasma. An experimental facility, dedicated to High Energy Flux Testing (HEFTY), is developed for testing cyclic heat flux in excess of 10 MW/m2. We show that plastic deformation and subsequent fracture of the surface can be controlled by sample cooling. We demonstrate that W surfaces with micro-pillar type surface architecture have significantly reduced residual thermal stresses after plasma exposure, as compared to those with flat surfaces. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra of the W-(110) peak reveal that broadening of the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) for micro-engineered samples is substantially smaller than corresponding flat surfaces. Spectral shifts of XRD signals indicate that residual stresses due to plasma exposure of micro-engineered surfaces build up in the first few cycles of exposure. Subsequent cyclic plasma heat loading is shown to anneal out most of the built-up residual stresses in micro-engineered surfaces. These findings are consistent with relaxation of residual thermal stresses in surfaces with micro-engineered features. The initial residual stress state of highly polished flat W samples is compressive (≈ -1.3 GPa). After exposure to 50 plasma cycles, the surface stress relaxes to -1.0 GPa. Micro-engineered samples exposed to the same thermal cycling show that the initial residual stress state is compressive at (- 250 MPa), and remains largely unchanged after plasma exposure.

  10. Natural and orbital debris particles on LDEF's trailing and forward-facing surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoerz, Friedrich; See, Thomas H.; Bernhard, Ronald P.; Brownlee, Donald E.

    1995-01-01

    Approximately 1000 impact craters on the Chemistry of Meteoroid Experiment (CME) have been analyzed by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDXA) to determine the compositional make-up of projectile residues. This report completes our systematic survey of gold and aluminum surfaces exposed at the trailing-edge (A03) and forward-facing (A11) LDEF sites, respectively. The major categories for the projectile residues were (1) natural, with diverse subgroups such as chondritic, monomineralic silicates, and sulfides, and (2) man made, that were classified into aluminum (metallic or oxide) and miscellaneous materials (such as stainless steel, paint flakes, etc). On CME gold collectors on LDEF's trailing edge approximately 11 percent of all craters greater than 100 micron in diameter were due to man-made debris, the majority (8.6 percent) caused by pure aluminum, approximately 31.4 percent were due to cosmic dust, while the remaining 58 percent were indeterminate via the analytical techniques utilized in this study. The aluminum surfaces located at the A11 forward-facing site did not permit analysis of aluminum impactors, but approximately 9.4 percent of all craters were demonstratably caused by miscellaneous debris materials and approximately 39.2 percent were the result of natural particles, leaving approximately 50 percent which were indeterminate. Model considerations and calculations are presented that focus on the crater-production rates for features greater than 100 micron in diameter, and on assigning the intermediate crater population to man-made or natural particles. An enhancement factor of 6 in the crater-production rate of natural impactors for the 'forward-facing' versus the 'trailing-edge' CME collectors was found to best explain all observations (i.e., total crater number(s), as well as their computational characteristics). Enhancement factors of 10 and 4 are either too high or too low. It is also suggested that

  11. Partwise cross-parameterization via nonregular convex hull domains.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huai-Yu; Pan, Chunhong; Zha, Hongbin; Yang, Qing; Ma, Songde

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel partwise framework for cross-parameterization between 3D mesh models. Unlike most existing methods that use regular parameterization domains, our framework uses nonregular approximation domains to build the cross-parameterization. Once the nonregular approximation domains are constructed for 3D models, different (and complex) input shapes are transformed into similar (and simple) shapes, thus facilitating the cross-parameterization process. Specifically, a novel nonregular domain, the convex hull, is adopted to build shape correspondence. We first construct convex hulls for each part of the segmented model, and then adopt our convex-hull cross-parameterization method to generate compatible meshes. Our method exploits properties of the convex hull, e.g., good approximation ability and linear convex representation for interior vertices. After building an initial cross-parameterization via convex-hull domains, we use compatible remeshing algorithms to achieve an accurate approximation of the target geometry and to ensure a complete surface matching. Experimental results show that the compatible meshes constructed are well suited for shape blending and other geometric applications.

  12. Natural and orbital debris particles on LDEF`s trailing and forward-facing surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hoerz, F.; See, T.H.; Bernhard, R.P.; Brownlee, D.E. |

    1995-02-01

    Approximately 1000 impact craters on the Chemistry of Meteoroid Experiment (CME) have been analyzed by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDXA) to determine the compositional make-up of projectile residues. This report completes the authors systematic survey of gold and aluminum surfaces exposed at the trailing-edge (A03) and forward-facing (A11) LDEF sites, respectively. The major categories for the projectile residues were (1) natural, with diverse subgroups such as chondritic, monomineralic silicates, and sulfides, and (2) man made, that were classified into aluminum (metallic or oxide) and miscellaneous materials (such as stainless steel, paint flakes, etc). On CME gold collectors on LDEF`s trailing edge approximately 11 percent of all craters greater than 100 micron in diameter were due to man-made debris, the majority (8.6 percent) caused by pure aluminum, approximately 31.4 percent were due to cosmic dust, while the remaining 58 percent were indeterminate via the analytical techniques utilized in this study. The aluminum surfaces located at the A11 forward-facing site did not permit analysis of aluminum impactors, but approximately 9.4 percent of all craters were demonstratably caused by miscellaneous debris materials and approximately 39.2 percent were the result of natural particles, leaving approximately 50 percent which were indeterminate. Model considerations and calculations are presented that focus on the crater-production rates for features greater than 100 micron in diameter, and on assigning the intermediate crater population to man-made or natural particles. An enhancement factor of 6 in the crater-production rate of natural impactors for the `forward-facing` versus the `trailing-edge` CME collectors was found to best explain all observations (i.e., total crater number(s), as well as their computational characteristics). Enhancement factors of 10 and 4 are either too high or too low.

  13. Multilayer surface albedo for face recognition with reference images in bad lighting conditions.

    PubMed

    Lai, Zhao-Rong; Dai, Dao-Qing; Ren, Chuan-Xian; Huang, Ke-Kun

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a multilayer surface albedo (MLSA) model to tackle face recognition in bad lighting conditions, especially with reference images in bad lighting conditions. Some previous researches conclude that illumination variations mainly lie in the large-scale features of an image and extract small-scale features in the surface albedo (or surface texture). However, this surface albedo is not robust enough, which still contains some detrimental sharp features. To improve robustness of the surface albedo, MLSA further decomposes it as a linear sum of several detailed layers, to separate and represent features of different scales in a more specific way. Then, the layers are adjusted by separate weights, which are global parameters and selected for only once. A criterion function is developed to select these layer weights with an independent training set. Despite controlled illumination variations, MLSA is also effective to uncontrolled illumination variations, even mixed with other complicated variations (expression, pose, occlusion, and so on). Extensive experiments on four benchmark data sets show that MLSA has good receiver operating characteristic curve and statistical discriminating capability. The refined albedo improves recognition performance, especially with reference images in bad lighting conditions.

  14. The Many Faces of Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation: Interplay Between Surface Morphology and Hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Fitzner, Martin; Sosso, Gabriele C; Cox, Stephen J; Michaelides, Angelos

    2015-10-28

    What makes a material a good ice nucleating agent? Despite the importance of heterogeneous ice nucleation to a variety of fields, from cloud science to microbiology, major gaps in our understanding of this ubiquitous process still prevent us from answering this question. In this work, we have examined the ability of generic crystalline substrates to promote ice nucleation as a function of the hydrophobicity and the morphology of the surface. Nucleation rates have been obtained by brute-force molecular dynamics simulations of coarse-grained water on top of different surfaces of a model fcc crystal, varying the water-surface interaction and the surface lattice parameter. It turns out that the lattice mismatch of the surface with respect to ice, customarily regarded as the most important requirement for a good ice nucleating agent, is at most desirable but not a requirement. On the other hand, the balance between the morphology of the surface and its hydrophobicity can significantly alter the ice nucleation rate and can also lead to the formation of up to three different faces of ice on the same substrate. We have pinpointed three circumstances where heterogeneous ice nucleation can be promoted by the crystalline surface: (i) the formation of a water overlayer that acts as an in-plane template; (ii) the emergence of a contact layer buckled in an ice-like manner; and (iii) nucleation on compact surfaces with very high interaction strength. We hope that this extensive systematic study will foster future experimental work aimed at testing the physiochemical understanding presented herein.

  15. Surface roughness of rock faces through the curvature of triangulated meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, P.; Samson, C.; Bose, P.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we examine three different measures of roughness based on a geometric property of surfaces known as curvature. These methods were demonstrated using an image of a large rock face made up of a smooth blocky limestone in contact with a rough friable dolostone. The point cloud analysed contained 10,334,288 points and was acquired at a distance of 3 m from the rock face. The point cloud was first decimated using an epsilon-net and then meshed using the Poisson surface reconstruction method before the proposed measures of roughness were applied. The first measure of roughness is defined as the difference in curvature between a mesh and a smoothed version of the same mesh. The second measure of roughness is a voting system applied to each vertex which identifies the subset of vertices which represent rough regions within the mesh. The third measure of roughness uses a combination of spatial partitioning data structures and data clustering in order to define roughness for a region in the mesh. The spatial partitioning data structure allows for a hierarchy of roughness values which is related to the size of the region being considered. All of the proposed measures of roughness are visualised using colour-coded displays which allows for an intuitive interpretation.

  16. Convex Digital Solids.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    where each face F. of 11(R) is represented by a sequence of its1 vertices. A lo)rithm CONVEXHULL(S,H(S) ,k) 2.1. Obtain CP(S), the set of corner...two. A chain is a finite sequence of digital points such that every element of the sequence except the first is a 6-neighbor of its predecessor. A set R...tno Lube wnosu edge is o1 length n. S is represented by a run lenqth code [121 such that RC(i,j) is a finite sequence of run lkLjntns of U’s

  17. Nitrogen retention mechanisms in tokamaks with beryllium and tungsten plasma-facing surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberkofler, M.; Meisl, G.; Hakola, A.; Drenik, A.; Alegre, D.; Brezinsek, S.; Craven, R.; Dittmar, T.; Keenan, T.; Romanelli, S. G.; Smith, R.; Douai, D.; Herrmann, A.; Krieger, K.; Kruezi, U.; Liang, G.; Linsmeier, Ch; Mozetic, M.; Rohde, V.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team; Contributors, JET

    2016-02-01

    Global gas balance experiments at ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) and JET have shown that a considerable fraction of nitrogen injected for radiative cooling is not recovered as N2 upon regeneration of the liquid helium cryo pump. The most probable loss channels are ion implantation into plasma-facing materials, co-deposition and ammonia formation. These three mechanisms are investigated in laboratory and tokamak experiments and by numerical simulations. Laboratory experiments have shown that implantation of nitrogen ions into beryllium and tungsten leads to the formation of surface nitrides, which may decompose under thermal loads. On beryllium the presence of nitrogen at the surface has been seen to reduce the sputtering yield. On tungsten surfaces it has been observed that the presence of nitrogen can increase hydrogen retention. The global nitrogen retention in AUG by implantation into the tungsten surfaces saturates. At JET the steady state nitrogen retention is increased by co-deposition with beryllium. The tokamak experiments are interpreted in detail by simulations of the global migration with WallDYN. Mass spectrometry of the exhaust gas of AUG and JET has revealed the conversion of nitrogen to ammonia at percent-levels. Conclusions are drawn on the potential implications of nitrogen seeding on the operation of a reactor in a deuterium-tritium mix.

  18. 2D surface temperature measurement of plasma facing components with modulated active pyrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Amiel, S.; Loarer, T.; Pocheau, C.; Roche, H.; Gauthier, E.; Aumeunier, M.-H.; Courtois, X.; Jouve, M.; Balorin, C.; Moncada, V.; Le Niliot, C.; Rigollet, F.

    2014-10-01

    In nuclear fusion devices, such as Tore Supra, the plasma facing components (PFC) are in carbon. Such components are exposed to very high heat flux and the surface temperature measurement is mandatory for the safety of the device and also for efficient plasma scenario development. Besides this measurement is essential to evaluate these heat fluxes for a better knowledge of the physics of plasma-wall interaction, it is also required to monitor the fatigue of PFCs. Infrared system (IR) is used to manage to measure surface temperature in real time. For carbon PFCs, the emissivity is high and known (ε ~ 0.8), therefore the contribution of the reflected flux from environment and collected by the IR cameras can be neglected. However, the future tokamaks such as WEST and ITER will be equipped with PFCs in metal (W and Be/W, respectively) with low and variable emissivities (ε ~ 0.1–0.4). Consequently, the reflected flux will contribute significantly in the collected flux by IR camera. The modulated active pyrometry, using a bicolor camera, proposed in this paper allows a 2D surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected fluxes and the emissivity. Experimental results with Tungsten sample are reported and compared with simultaneous measurement performed with classical pyrometry (monochromatic and bichromatic) with and without reflective flux demonstrating the efficiency of this method for surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected flux and the emissivity.

  19. Bi-convex aspheric optical lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Abhijit Chandra; Yadav, Mridul; Khanna, Anubhav; Ghatak, Animangsu

    2017-03-01

    Aspheric optical lenses are important for a variety of optical applications but are difficult to fabricate in conventional top-down processes. Here, we have presented a bottom-up approach involving controlled spreading of a thermally crosslinkable polymeric liquid dispensed on specially prepared substrates for making aspheric bi-convex lenses. In particular, the substrate is a solid film with a tiny hole drilled on it through which the liquid can flow in and out from the top to the bottom side of the substrate. In addition, the two surfaces of the substrate are made to have similar or different wettabilities so that the combined effect of gravity and surface wettability determines the distribution of the liquid between its two sides. The substrate is maintained at an elevated temperature, so that the liquid spreads on its surfaces but only to a limited extent because of rapid crosslinking at the vicinity of the moving front. This process leads to bi-convex, hyperboloids and prolate spheroids, which yield aberration free images with optical resolution that far exceeds that generated by conventional microscope objectives.

  20. From face to interface recognition: a differential geometric approach to distinguish DNA from RNA binding surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Shazman, Shula; Elber, Gershon; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2011-01-01

    Protein nucleic acid interactions play a critical role in all steps of the gene expression pathway. Nucleic acid (NA) binding proteins interact with their partners, DNA or RNA, via distinct regions on their surface that are characterized by an ensemble of chemical, physical and geometrical properties. In this study, we introduce a novel methodology based on differential geometry, commonly used in face recognition, to characterize and predict NA binding surfaces on proteins. Applying the method on experimentally solved three-dimensional structures of proteins we successfully classify double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) from single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) binding proteins, with 83% accuracy. We show that the method is insensitive to conformational changes that occur upon binding and can be applicable for de novo protein-function prediction. Remarkably, when concentrating on the zinc finger motif, we distinguish successfully between RNA and DNA binding interfaces possessing the same binding motif even within the same protein, as demonstrated for the RNA polymerase transcription-factor, TFIIIA. In conclusion, we present a novel methodology to characterize protein surfaces, which can accurately tell apart dsDNA from an ssRNA binding interfaces. The strength of our method in recognizing fine-tuned differences on NA binding interfaces make it applicable for many other molecular recognition problems, with potential implications for drug design. PMID:21693557

  1. Critical heat flux (CHF) phenomenon on a downward facing curved surface

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, F.B.; Haddad, K.H.; Liu, Y.C.

    1997-06-01

    This report describes a theoretical and experimental study of the boundary layer boiling and critical heat flux phenomena on a downward facing curved heating surface, including both hemispherical and toroidal surfaces. A subscale boundary layer boiling (SBLB) test facility was developed to measure the spatial variation of the critical heat flux and observe the underlying mechanisms. Transient quenching and steady-state boiling experiments were performed in the SBLB facility under both saturated and subcooled conditions to obtain a complete database on the critical heat flux. To complement the experimental effort, an advanced hydrodynamic CHF model was developed from the conservation laws along with sound physical arguments. The model provides a clear physical explanation for the spatial variation of the CHF observed in the SBLB experiments and for the weak dependence of the CHF data on the physical size of the vessel. Based upon the CHF model, a scaling law was established for estimating the local critical heat flux on the outer surface of a heated hemispherical vessel that is fully submerged in water. The scaling law, which compares favorably with all the available local CHF data obtained for various vessel sizes, can be used to predict the local CHF limits on large commercial-size vessels. This technical information represents one of the essential elements that is needed in assessing the efficacy of external cooling of core melt by cavity flooding as a severe accident management strategy. 83 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Experimental studies of lithium-based surface chemistry for fusion plasma-facing materials applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allain, J. P.; Rokusek, D. L.; Harilal, S. S.; Nieto-Perez, M.; Skinner, C. H.; Kugel, H. W.; Heim, B.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.

    2009-06-01

    Lithium has enhanced the operational performance of fusion devices such as: TFTR, CDX-U, FTU, T-11 M, and NSTX. Lithium in the solid and liquid state has been studied extensively in laboratory experiments including its erosion and hydrogen-retaining properties. Reductions in physical sputtering up to 40-60% have been measured for deuterated solid and liquid lithium surfaces. Computational modeling indicates that up to a 1:1 deuterium volumetric retention in lithium is possible. This paper presents the results of systematic in situ laboratory experimental studies on the surface chemistry evolution of ATJ graphite under lithium deposition. Results are compared to post-mortem analysis of similar lithium surface coatings on graphite exposed to deuterium discharge plasmas in NSTX. Lithium coatings on plasma-facing components in NSTX have shown substantial reduction of hydrogenic recycling. Questions remain on the role lithium surface chemistry on a graphite substrate has on particle sputtering (physical and chemical) as well as hydrogen isotope recycling. This is particularly due to the lack of in situ measurements of plasma-surface interactions in tokamaks such as NSTX. Results suggest that the lithium bonding state on ATJ graphite is lithium peroxide and with sufficient exposure to ambient air conditions, lithium carbonate is generated. Correlation between both results is used to assess the role of lithium chemistry on the state of lithium bonding and implications on hydrogen pumping and lithium sputtering. In addition, reduction of factors between 10 and 30 reduction in physical sputtering from lithiated graphite compared to pure lithium or carbon is also measured.

  3. The influence of crystal faces on corrosion behavior of copper surface: First-principle and experiment study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengwei; Wang, Qiang; Wang, Xu; Gao, Lin

    2017-02-01

    When the MBT-:Cl- ratio is 50-10:1 in a solution containing of NaCl and Na-MBT (sodium salt of 2-mercaptobenzothiazole), the copper sample-1 (S1) was passivated; when the ration is 10-5:1, it was corroded. The copper sample-2 (S2) had no anti-corrosive ability in all solutions with MBT-:Cl- = 50-5:1. First-principle calculation revealed that the Cu atoms of (220) face, the main face of S1, have more unsaturated and energetic electrons than that of (200) and (111) faces, the main faces of S2. The highest chemical activation of the (220) face leads the S1 surface to show a better anti-corrosive ability.

  4. Detection of Convexity and Concavity in Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertamini, Marco

    2008-01-01

    Sensitivity to shape changes was measured, in particular detection of convexity and concavity changes. The available data are contradictory. The author used a change detection task and simple polygons to systematically manipulate convexity/concavity. Performance was high for detecting a change of sign (a new concave vertex along a convex contour…

  5. Revisiting separation properties of convex fuzzy sets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Separation of convex sets by hyperplanes has been extensively studied on crisp sets. In a seminal paper separability and convexity are investigated, however there is a flaw on the definition of degree of separation. We revisited separation on convex fuzzy sets that have level-wise (crisp) disjointne...

  6. Convex lens-induced nanoscale templating

    PubMed Central

    Berard, Daniel J.; Michaud, François; Mahshid, Sara; Ahamed, Mohammed Jalal; McFaul, Christopher M. J.; Leith, Jason S.; Bérubé, Pierre; Sladek, Rob; Reisner, Walter; Leslie, Sabrina R.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a new platform, convex lens-induced nanoscale templating (CLINT), for dynamic manipulation and trapping of single DNA molecules. In the CLINT technique, the curved surface of a convex lens is used to deform a flexible coverslip above a substrate containing embedded nanotopography, creating a nanoscale gap that can be adjusted during an experiment to confine molecules within the embedded nanostructures. Critically, CLINT has the capability of transforming a macroscale flow cell into a nanofluidic device without the need for permanent direct bonding, thus simplifying sample loading, providing greater accessibility of the surface for functionalization, and enabling dynamic manipulation of confinement during device operation. Moreover, as DNA molecules present in the gap are driven into the embedded topography from above, CLINT eliminates the need for the high pressures or electric fields required to load DNA into direct-bonded nanofluidic devices. To demonstrate the versatility of CLINT, we confine DNA to nanogroove and nanopit structures, demonstrating DNA nanochannel-based stretching, denaturation mapping, and partitioning/trapping of single molecules in multiple embedded cavities. In particular, using ionic strengths that are in line with typical biological buffers, we have successfully extended DNA in sub–30-nm nanochannels, achieving high stretching (90%) that is in good agreement with Odijk deflection theory, and we have mapped genomic features using denaturation analysis. PMID:25092333

  7. Multiwavelength study of nearly face-on low surface brightness disk galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Dong; Liang, Yan-Chun; Liu, Shun-Fang; Zhong, Guo-Hu; Chen, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Yan-Bin; Hammer, Francois; Yang, Guo-Chao; Deng, Li-Cai; Hu, Jing-Yao

    2010-12-01

    We study the ages of a large sample (1802) of nearly face-on disk low surface brightness galaxies (LSBGs) using the evolutionary population synthesis (EPS) model PEGASE with an exponentially decreasing star formation rate to fit their multiwavelength spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from far-ultraviolet (FUV) to near-infrared (NIR). The derived ages of LSBGs are 1-5 Gyr for most of the sample no matter if constant or varying dust extinction is adopted, which are similar to most of the previous studies on smaller samples. This means that these LSBGs formed the majority of their stars quite recently. However, a small part of the sample (~2%-3%) has larger ages of 5-8 Gyr, meaning their major star forming process may have occurred earlier. At the same time, a large sample (5886) of high surface brightness galaxies (HSBGs) are selected and studied using the same method for comparisons. The derived ages are 1-5 Gyr for most of the sample (97%) as well. These results probably mean that these LSBGs have not much different star formation histories from their HSBGs counterparts. However, we should notice that the HSBGs are generally about 0.2 Gyr younger, which could mean that the HSBGs may have undergone more recent star forming activities than the LSBGs.

  8. Enforcing Convexity for Improved Alignment with Constrained Local Models

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Lucey, Simon; Cohn, Jeffrey F.

    2010-01-01

    Constrained local models (CLMs) have recently demonstrated good performance in non-rigid object alignment/tracking in comparison to leading holistic approaches (e.g., AAMs). A major problem hindering the development of CLMs further, for non-rigid object alignment/tracking, is how to jointly optimize the global warp update across all local search responses. Previous methods have either used general purpose optimizers (e.g., simplex methods) or graph based optimization techniques. Unfortunately, problems exist with both these approaches when applied to CLMs. In this paper, we propose a new approach for optimizing the global warp update in an efficient manner by enforcing convexity at each local patch response surface. Furthermore, we show that the classic Lucas-Kanade approach to gradient descent image alignment can be viewed as a special case of our proposed framework. Finally, we demonstrate that our approach receives improved performance for the task of non-rigid face alignment/tracking on the MultiPIE database and the UNBC-McMaster archive. PMID:20622926

  9. Surface Potentials of (001), (012), (113) Hematite (α-Fe2O3) Crystal Faces in Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Chatman, Shawn ME; Zarzycki, Piotr P.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2013-09-05

    Hematite (α-Fe2O3) is an important candidate electrode for energy system technologies such as photoelectrochemical water splitting. Conversion efficiency issues with this material are presently being addressed through nanostructuring, doping, and surface modification. However, key electrochemical properties of hematite/electrolyte interfaces remain poorly understood at a fundamental level, in particular those of crystallographically well-defined hematite faces likely present as interfacial components at the grain scale. We report a combined measurement and theory study that isolates and evaluates the equilibrium surface potentials of three nearly defect-free single crystal faces of hematite, titrated from pH 3 to 11.25. We link measured surface potentials with atomic-scale surface topology, namely the ratio and distributions of surface protonation/deprotonation site types expected from the bulk structure. The data reveal face-specific points of zero potential (PZP) relatable to points of zero net charge (PZC) that lie within a small pH window (8.35-8.85). Over the entire pH range the surface potentials show strong non-Nernstian charging at pH extremes separated by a wide central plateau in agreement with surface complexation modeling predictions, but with important face-specific distinctions. We introduce a new surface complexation model based on fitting the entire data set that depends primarily only on the proton affinities of two site types and the two associated electrical double layer capacitances. The data and model show that magnitudes of surface potential biases at the pH extremes are on the order of 100 mV, similar to the activation energy for electron hopping mobility. An energy band diagram for hematite crystallites with specific face expression and pH effects is proposed that could provide a baseline for understanding water splitting performance enhancement effects from nanostructuring, and guide morphology targets and pH for systematic improvements in

  10. Effect of Surface Site Interactions on Potentiometric Titration of Hematite (α-Fe2O3) Crystal Faces

    SciTech Connect

    Chatman, Shawn ME; Zarzycki, Piotr P.; Preocanin, Tajana; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2013-02-01

    Time dependent potentiometric pH titrations were used to study the effect of atomic scale surface structure on the protonation behavior of the structurally well defined hematite/aqueous electrolyte interfaces. Our recently proposed thermodynamic model [1,23] was applied to measured acidimetric and alkalimetric titration hysteresis loops, collected from highly organized (001), (012), and (113) crystal face terminations using pH equilibration times ranging from 15 to 30 mins. Hysteresis loop areas indicate that (001) faces equilibrate faster than the (012) and (113) faces, consistent with the different expected ensembles of singly, doubly, and triply coordinated surface sites on each face. Strongly non-linear hysteretic pH-potential relationships were found, with slopes exceeding Nernstian, collectively indicating that protonation and deprotonation is much more complex than embodied in present day surface complexation models. The asymmetrical shape of the acidimetric and alkalimetric titration branches were used to illustrate a proposed steric "leaky screen" repulsion/trapping interaction mechanism that stems from high affinity singly-coordinated sites electrostatically and sterically screening lower affinity doubly and triply coordinated sites. Our data indicate that site interaction is the dominant phenomenon defining surface potential accumulation behavior on single crystal faces of metal oxide minerals.

  11. The Origin of Convex Waterfalls Along the Niobrara River by Valentine, Nebraska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pederson, D. T.; Mason, L. J.; Goble, R. J.

    2003-12-01

    Waterfalls on tributaries along a stretch of the Niobrara River east of Valentine, Nebraska have a convex-downstream geometry in the horizontal plane and an arc in the vertical plane. Siltstone forming the cliff face is only slightly indurated and should be easily eroded by stream water. This is not the case as the cliff face on either side of the waterfalls clearly undergoes more rapid erosion than the face of the falls forming a convex geometry. This differential erosion rate includes points where waterfalls occur immediately along the banks of the Niobrara River. At these points, riverbank erosion is clearly more effective upstream and downstream of a waterfall as evidenced by the protrusion of the waterfall face into the river. There appears to be repetitive-cycles of waterfall evolution along the tributaries. The convexity increases until collapse occurs on the face of the falls, headward erosion then occurs, followed by the development of a new convex waterfall. The waterfalls have a more typical geometry (convex upstream) on tributaries in the lower reaches of the Niobrara River, where cliff faces become coarser grained. The tributaries are fed by springs. Several processes interact to form the convex geometry. Freeze/thaw erosion is more effective on either side of the waterfalls. Water enters the face of the falls and wicks into the cliff causing negative pore pressures. Clay coatings on mineral grains appear to play a role in protection from erosion. Algae and lichen growth aids in protecting the face of the falls. Small groundwater flow systems, represented by seepage into the streambed above the falls and discharge to the side of the falls can cause seepage erosion and enhancement of freeze/thaw erosion.

  12. Convex Accelerated Maximum Entropy Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Worley, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Maximum entropy (MaxEnt) spectral reconstruction methods provide a powerful framework for spectral estimation of nonuniformly sampled datasets. Many methods exist within this framework, usually defined based on the magnitude of a Lagrange multiplier in the MaxEnt objective function. An algorithm is presented here that utilizes accelerated first-order convex optimization techniques to rapidly and reliably reconstruct nonuniformly sampled NMR datasets using the principle of maximum entropy. This algorithm – called CAMERA for Convex Accelerated Maximum Entropy Reconstruction Algorithm – is a new approach to spectral reconstruction that exhibits fast, tunable convergence in both constant-aim and constant-lambda modes. A high-performance, open source NMR data processing tool is described that implements CAMERA, and brief comparisons to existing reconstruction methods are made on several example spectra. PMID:26894476

  13. Schur-convexity, Schur-geometric and Schur-harmonic convexity for a composite function of complete symmetric function.

    PubMed

    Shi, Huan-Nan; Zhang, Jing; Ma, Qing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, using the properties of Schur-convex function, Schur-geometrically convex function and Schur-harmonically convex function, we provide much simpler proofs of the Schur-convexity, Schur-geometric convexity and Schur-harmonic convexity for a composite function of the complete symmetric function.

  14. Molecular Graphics of Convex Body Fluids.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Adrian T; Meyer, Timm; Germano, Guido

    2008-03-01

    Coarse-grained modeling of molecular fluids is often based on nonspherical convex rigid bodies like ellipsoids or spherocylinders representing rodlike or platelike molecules or groups of atoms, with site-site interaction potentials depending both on the distance among the particles and the relative orientation. In this category of potentials, the Gay-Berne family has been studied most extensively. However, conventional molecular graphics programs are not designed to visualize such objects. Usually the basic units are atoms displayed as spheres or as vertices in a graph. Atomic aggregates can be highlighted through an increasing amount of stylized representations, e.g., Richardson ribbon diagrams for the secondary structure of proteins, Connolly molecular surfaces, density maps, etc., but ellipsoids and spherocylinders are generally missing, especially as elementary simulation units. We fill this gap providing and discussing a customized OpenGL-based program for the interactive, rendered representation of large ensembles of convex bodies, useful especially in liquid crystal research. We pay particular attention to the performance issues for typical system sizes in this field. The code is distributed as open source.

  15. Convex Diffraction Grating Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chrisp, Michael P. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A 1:1 Offner mirror system for imaging off-axis objects is modified by replacing a concave spherical primary mirror that is concentric with a convex secondary mirror with two concave spherical mirrors M1 and M2 of the same or different radii positioned with their respective distances d1 and d2 from a concentric convex spherical diffraction grating having its grooves parallel to the entrance slit of the spectrometer which replaces the convex secondary mirror. By adjusting their distances d1 and d2 and their respective angles of reflection alpha and beta, defined as the respective angles between their incident and reflected rays, all aberrations are corrected without the need to increase the spectrometer size for a given entrance slit size to reduce astigmatism, thus allowing the imaging spectrometer volume to be less for a given application than would be possible with conventional imaging spectrometers and still give excellent spatial and spectral imaging of the slit image spectra over the focal plane.

  16. Surface acoustic load sensing using a face-shear PIN-PMN-PT single-crystal resonator.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyungrim; Zhang, Shujun; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2012-11-01

    Pb(In(0.5)Nb(0.5))O(3)-Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))O(3)-PbTiO(3) (PIN-PMN-PT) resonators for surface acoustic load sensing are presented in this paper. Different acoustic loads are applied to thickness mode, thickness-shear mode, and face-shear mode resonators, and the electrical impedances at resonance and anti-resonance frequencies are recorded. More than one order of magnitude higher sensitivity (ratio of electrical impedance change to surface acoustic impedance change) at the resonance is achieved for the face-shear-mode resonator compared with other resonators with the same dimensions. The Krimholtz, Leedom, and Matthaei (KLM) model is used to verify the surface acoustic loading effect on the electrical impedance spectrum of face-shear PIN-PMN-PT single-crystal resonators. The demonstrated high sensitivity of face-shear mode resonators to surface loads is promising for a broad range of applications, including artificial skin, biological and chemical sensors, touch screens, and other touch-based sensors.

  17. Experimental study on effect of micro textured surfaces generated by ultrasonic vibration assisted face turning on friction and wear performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, S.; Hosseinabadi, H. Nouri; Sajjady, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    Ultrasonic vibration-assisted turning process (UVAT) is one of the effective methods in improving the tribological properties. In this research, the effect of different machining parameters such as cutting speed and feed rate as well as the effect of three vibration modes of one-dimensional (LVT), elliptical (EVT), and three-dimensional (3D-VT) on the tribological properties is examined. In order to validate the results of UVAT process, conventional face-turning operation was performed as well. Wear and friction tests were performed using pin-on-disk wear and friction machine with identical vertical load and sliding speed. The results of the tests show that the surfaces upon which micro-dimples have been created by UVAT processes reduce the average friction coefficient, wear rate and adhesion between pin and samples surface compared with conventional machined surfaces. Compared with conventional face-turning surfaces, average friction coefficient of the surfaces face-turned by LVT, EVT, and 3D-VT processes, show a maximum decrease of 13%, 18%, and 21% respectively. Moreover, compared with CT process, because of the unique features of UVAT process in creating micro-dimples, the contact between chrome steel pin and the sample surface decreases; this in turn leads to further reduction in wear rate for the processes of LVT, EVT, and 3D-VT respectively.

  18. Effects of an aft facing step on the surface of a laminar flow glider wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandlin, Doral R.; Saiki, Neal

    1993-01-01

    A motor glider was used to perform a flight test study on the effects of aft facing steps in a laminar boundary layer. This study focuses on two dimensional aft facing steps oriented spanwise to the flow. The size and location of the aft facing steps were varied in order to determine the critical size that will force premature transition. Transition over a step was found to be primarily a function of Reynolds number based on step height. Both of the step height Reynolds numbers for premature and full transition were determined. A hot film anemometry system was used to detect transition.

  19. Use of Convexity in Ostomy Care

    PubMed Central

    Salvadalena, Ginger; Pridham, Sue; Droste, Werner; McNichol, Laurie; Gray, Mikel

    2017-01-01

    Ostomy skin barriers that incorporate a convexity feature have been available in the marketplace for decades, but limited resources are available to guide clinicians in selection and use of convex products. Given the widespread use of convexity, and the need to provide practical guidelines for appropriate use of pouching systems with convex features, an international consensus panel was convened to provide consensus-based guidance for this aspect of ostomy practice. Panelists were provided with a summary of relevant literature in advance of the meeting; these articles were used to generate and reach consensus on 26 statements during a 1-day meeting. Consensus was achieved when 80% of panelists agreed on a statement using an anonymous electronic response system. The 26 statements provide guidance for convex product characteristics, patient assessment, convexity use, and outcomes. PMID:28002174

  20. Quantification of small, convex particles by TEM.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Sigmund J; Holme, Børge; Marioara, Calin D

    2008-07-01

    It is shown how size distributions of arbitrarily oriented, convex, non-overlapping particles extracted from conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images may be determined by a variation of the Schwartz-Saltykov method. In TEM, particles cut at the surfaces have diminished projections, which alter the observed size distribution. We represent this distribution as a vector and multiply it with the inverse of a matrix comprising thickness-dependent Scheil or Schwartz-Saltykov terms. The result is a corrected size distribution of the projections of uncut particles. It is shown how the real (3D) distribution may be estimated when particle shape is considered. Computer code to generate the matrix is given. A log-normal distribution of spheres and a real distribution of pill-box-shaped dispersoids in an Al-Mg-Si alloy are given as examples. The errors are discussed in detail.

  1. Contactless electroreflectance studies of surface potential barrier for N- and Ga-face epilayers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Kudrawiec, R.; Janicki, L.; Gladysiewicz, M.; Misiewicz, J.; Cywinski, G.; Boćkowski, M.; Muzioł, G.

    2013-07-29

    Two series of N- and Ga-face GaN Van Hoof structures were grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy to study the surface potential barrier by contactless electroreflectance (CER). A clear CER resonance followed by strong Franz-Keldysh oscillation of period varying with the thickness of undoped GaN layer was observed for these structures. This period was much shorter for N-polar structures that means smaller surface potential barrier in these structures than in Ga-polar structures. From the analysis of built-in electric field it was determined that the Fermi-level is located 0.27 ± 0.05 and 0.60 ± 0.05 eV below the conduction band for N- and Ga-face GaN surface, respectively.

  2. Fission Surface Power Systems (FSPS) Project Final Report for the Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP): Fission Surface Power, Transition Face to Face

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palac, Donald T.

    2011-01-01

    The Fission Surface Power Systems Project became part of the ETDP on October 1, 2008. Its goal was to demonstrate fission power system technology readiness in an operationally relevant environment, while providing data on fission system characteristics pertinent to the use of a fission power system on planetary surfaces. During fiscal years 08 to 10, the FSPS project activities were dominated by hardware demonstrations of component technologies, to verify their readiness for inclusion in the fission surface power system. These Pathfinders demonstrated multi-kWe Stirling power conversion operating with heat delivered via liquid metal NaK, composite Ti/H2O heat pipe radiator panel operations at 400 K input water temperature, no-moving-part electromagnetic liquid metal pump operation with NaK at flight-like temperatures, and subscale performance of an electric resistance reactor simulator capable of reproducing characteristics of a nuclear reactor for the purpose of system-level testing, and a longer list of component technologies included in the attached report. Based on the successful conclusion of Pathfinder testing, work began in 2010 on design and development of the Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU), a full-scale 1/4 power system-level non-nuclear assembly of a reactor simulator, power conversion, heat rejection, instrumentation and controls, and power management and distribution. The TDU will be developed and fabricated during fiscal years 11 and 12, culminating in initial testing with water cooling replacing the heat rejection system in 2012, and complete testing of the full TDU by the end of 2014. Due to its importance for Mars exploration, potential applicability to missions preceding Mars missions, and readiness for an early system-level demonstration, the Enabling Technology Development and Demonstration program is currently planning to continue the project as the Fission Power Systems project, including emphasis on the TDU completion and testing.

  3. What causes the facing-the-viewer bias in biological motion?

    PubMed

    Weech, Séamas; McAdam, Matthew; Kenny, Sophie; Troje, Nikolaus F

    2014-10-13

    Orthographically projected biological motion point-light displays are generally ambiguous with respect to their orientation in depth, yet observers consistently prefer the facing-the-viewer interpretation. There has been discussion as to whether this bias can be attributed to the social relevance of biological motion stimuli or relates to local, low-level stimulus properties. In the present study we address this question. In Experiment 1, we compared the facing-the-viewer bias produced by a series of four stick figures and three human silhouettes that differed in posture, gender, and the presence versus absence of walking motion. Using a paradigm in which we asked observers to indicate the spinning direction of these figures, we found no bias when participants observed silhouettes, whereas a pronounced degree of bias was elicited by most stick figures. We hypothesized that the ambiguous surface normals on the lines and dots that comprise stick figures are prone to a visual bias that assumes surfaces to be convex. The local surface orientations of the occluding contours of silhouettes are unambiguous, and as such the convexity bias does not apply. In Experiment 2, we tested the role of local features in ambiguous surface perception by adding dots to the elbows and knees of silhouettes. We found biases consistent with the facing directions implied by a convex body surface. The results unify a number of findings regarding the facing-the-viewer bias. We conclude that the facing-the-viewer bias is established at the level of surface reconstruction from local image features rather than on a semantic level.

  4. Flat tori in three-dimensional space and convex integration.

    PubMed

    Borrelli, Vincent; Jabrane, Saïd; Lazarus, Francis; Thibert, Boris

    2012-05-08

    It is well-known that the curvature tensor is an isometric invariant of C(2) Riemannian manifolds. This invariant is at the origin of the rigidity observed in Riemannian geometry. In the mid 1950s, Nash amazed the world mathematical community by showing that this rigidity breaks down in regularity C(1). This unexpected flexibility has many paradoxical consequences, one of them is the existence of C(1) isometric embeddings of flat tori into Euclidean three-dimensional space. In the 1970s and 1980s, M. Gromov, revisiting Nash's results introduced convex integration theory offering a general framework to solve this type of geometric problems. In this research, we convert convex integration theory into an algorithm that produces isometric maps of flat tori. We provide an implementation of a convex integration process leading to images of an embedding of a flat torus. The resulting surface reveals a C(1) fractal structure: Although the tangent plane is defined everywhere, the normal vector exhibits a fractal behavior. Isometric embeddings of flat tori may thus appear as a geometric occurrence of a structure that is simultaneously C(1) and fractal. Beyond these results, our implementation demonstrates that convex integration, a theory still confined to specialists, can produce computationally tractable solutions of partial differential relations.

  5. Flat tori in three-dimensional space and convex integration

    PubMed Central

    Borrelli, Vincent; Jabrane, Saïd; Lazarus, Francis; Thibert, Boris

    2012-01-01

    It is well-known that the curvature tensor is an isometric invariant of C2 Riemannian manifolds. This invariant is at the origin of the rigidity observed in Riemannian geometry. In the mid 1950s, Nash amazed the world mathematical community by showing that this rigidity breaks down in regularity C1. This unexpected flexibility has many paradoxical consequences, one of them is the existence of C1 isometric embeddings of flat tori into Euclidean three-dimensional space. In the 1970s and 1980s, M. Gromov, revisiting Nash’s results introduced convex integration theory offering a general framework to solve this type of geometric problems. In this research, we convert convex integration theory into an algorithm that produces isometric maps of flat tori. We provide an implementation of a convex integration process leading to images of an embedding of a flat torus. The resulting surface reveals a C1 fractal structure: Although the tangent plane is defined everywhere, the normal vector exhibits a fractal behavior. Isometric embeddings of flat tori may thus appear as a geometric occurrence of a structure that is simultaneously C1 and fractal. Beyond these results, our implementation demonstrates that convex integration, a theory still confined to specialists, can produce computationally tractable solutions of partial differential relations. PMID:22523238

  6. Corrosion behavior of cast titanium with reduced surface reaction layer made by a face-coating method.

    PubMed

    Koike, M; Cai, Z; Fujii, H; Brezner, M; Okabe, T

    2003-11-01

    This study characterized the corrosion behavior of cast CP titanium made with a face-coating method. Wax patterns were coated with oxide slurry of Y(2)O(3) or ZrO(2) before investing with a MgO-based investment. Three surface preparations were tested: ground, sandblasted, and as-cast. Uncoated castings served as controls. Sixteen-hour open circuit potential (OCP) measurement, linear polarization and potentiodynamic cathodic polarization were performed in an aerated modified Tani-Zucchi synthetic saliva at 37 degrees C. Anodic polarization was conducted in the same deaerated medium. Polarization resistance (R(p)) and Tafel slopes were determined. Corrosion current density was calculated for each specimen. Results (n=4) were subjected to nonparametric statistical analysis (alpha=0.05). Cross sections of cast specimens were examined by optical microscopy. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) spot analysis was performed at various depths below the surface. The OCP stabilized within several hours for all the specimens. Apparent differences in anodic polarization behavior were observed among the different surfaces. A distinctive wide passive region followed by breakdown was seen on specimens with ground and sandblasted surfaces. There were no significant differences in the corrosion resistance among the control and the two face-coating groups for each group. The Mann-Whitney test showed significantly lower OCP and higher R(p) values for ground surfaces. The surface condition significantly affected the corrosion behavior more than the face coating methods. In most cases, specimens with as-cast surfaces exhibited the least corrosion resistance during the potentiodynamic anodic polarization.

  7. The hollow-face illusion: object-specific knowledge, general assumptions or properties of the stimulus?

    PubMed

    Hill, Harold; Johnston, Alan

    2007-01-01

    The hollow-face illusion, in which a mask appears as a convex face, is a powerful example of binocular depth inversion occurring with a real object under a wide range of viewing conditions. Explanations of the illusion are reviewed and six experiments reported. In experiment 1 the detrimental effect of figural inversion, evidence for the importance of familiarity, was found for other oriented objects. The inversion effect held for masks lit from the side (experiment 2). The illusion was stronger for a mask rotated by 90 degrees lit from its forehead than from its chin, suggesting that familiar patterns of shading enhance the illusion (experiment 2). There were no effects of light source visibility or any left/right asymmetry (experiment 3). In experiments 4-6 we used a 'virtual' hollow face, with illusion strength quantified by the proportion of noise texture needed to eliminate the illusion. Adding characteristic surface colour enhanced the illusion, consistent with the familiar face pigmentation outweighing additional bottom-up cues (experiment 4). There was no difference between perspective and orthographic projection. Photographic negation reduced, but did not eliminate, the illusion, suggesting shading is important but not essential (experiment 5). Absolute depth was not critical, although a shallower mask was given less extreme convexity ratings (experiment 6). We argue that the illusion arises owing to a convexity preference when the raw data have ambiguous interpretations. However, using a familiar object with typical orientation, shading, and pigmentation greatly enhances the effect.

  8. The Band around a Convex Body

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, David

    2011-01-01

    We give elementary proofs of formulas for the area and perimeter of a planar convex body surrounded by a band of uniform thickness. The primary tool is a integral formula for the perimeter of a convex body which describes the perimeter in terms of the projections of the body onto lines in the plane.

  9. Polar DuaLs of Convex Bodies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    to Convex Bodies, Geometriae Dedicata 2" (1973) 225-248. 10. H. Guggenheimer, "The Analytic Geometry of the Unsymmetric Minkowski Plane," Lecture...Mathematics, Vol. 58, No. 2, 1975. 19. E. Lutwak, "On Cross-Sectional Measures of Polar Reciprocal Convex Bodies," Geometriae Dedicata 5, (1976) 79-80

  10. Experimental Studies of High-Speed Liquid Films on Downward-Facing Surfaces for Inertial Fusion Energy Wet Wall Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Jonathan K.; Durbin, Samuel G. II; Sadowski, Dennis L.; Yoda, Minami; Abdel-Khalik, Said I.

    2003-05-15

    The fusion event in inertial fusion energy (IFE) reactors creates neutrons, photons, and charged particles that can damage the chamber first walls. The Prometheus design study used a high-speed thin film of molten lead injected tangential to the wall to protect the upper endcap of the reactor chamber from damaging X rays and target debris. To assure full chamber coverage, the film must remain attached. Film detachment under the influence of gravity is most likely to occur on the downward-facing surfaces over the upper endcap of the reactor chamber. Accurate numerical predictions of detachment length are effectively impossible in this turbulent flow because of difficulties in determining appropriate boundary conditions near the detachment point.As part of the ARIES-IFE study, experimental investigations of high-speed water films injected onto downward-facing planar surfaces at angles of inclination up to 45 deg below the horizontal were therefore performed. The initial growth and subsequent detachment of films with initial thickness up to 2 mm and injection speed up to 11 m/s were measured. To our knowledge, these experiments are the first to investigate the detachment of turbulent liquid films on downward-facing surfaces. The implications of these initial results on thin liquid protection and the 'wet wall' concept are discussed.

  11. Mixtures, Generalized Convexity and Balayages.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    A I X) Bk dX(x 11Xi)1 (Sufficiency) Let f c C (K). Then, by LeIn 4.3, Corollary 4.5, Lera 4.6 and the definition of v , I fdv - ldv0 , hfdvo hf( ) 1k...denote the mixed model. hen the models, F., 9 c e , arise from a family of densities (f: 0 e e) with respect to a q-finite measure m, f- fe dX will...said to be a dilation of another d distribution F, written G > F, if I cdF cdG for all convex c .) Shaked showed that fx - f e has two sign changes and

  12. Face-dependent Auger neutralization and ground-state energy shift for He in front of Al surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wethekam, S.; Winter, H.; Valdes, Diego; Monreal, R. C.

    2008-08-15

    He atoms and ions with keV energies are scattered under grazing angles of incidence from Al(111), Al(100), and Al(110) surfaces. Fractions of surviving ions and normal energy gains of He{sup +} ions prior to neutralization, derived from shifts of angular distributions for incident atoms and ions, are compared to results from three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations based on theoretically calculated Auger neutralization rates and He ground-state energy shifts. From the good agreement of experimental data with simulations, we conclude a detailed microscopic understanding for a model system of ion-surface interactions. Our work provides further evidence for the recently reported surface Miller index dependence for the neutralization of He{sup +} ions at metal surfaces. The study is extended to the face dependence of the He ground-state energy shift.

  13. Endotoxin deposits on the inner surfaces of closed-face cassettes during bioaerosol sampling: a field investigation at composting facilities.

    PubMed

    Duquenne, Philippe; Simon, Xavier; Demange, Valérie; Harper, Martin; Wild, Pascal

    2015-05-01

    A set of 270 bioaerosol samples was taken from 15 composting facilities using polystyrene closed-face filter cassettes (CFCs). The objective was to measure the quantity of endotoxin deposits on the inner surfaces of the cassettes (sometimes referred to as 'wall deposits'). The results show that endotoxins are deposited on the inner surfaces of the CFCs through sampling and/or handling of samples. The quantity of endotoxins measured on inner surfaces range between 0.05 (the limit of detection of the method) and 3100 endotoxin units per cassette. The deposits can represent a large and variable percentage of the endotoxins sampled. More than a third of the samples presented a percentage of inner surface deposits >40% of the total quantity of endotoxins collected (filter + inner surfaces). Omitting these inner surface deposits in the analytical process lead to measurement errors relative to sampling all particles entering the CFC sampler, corresponding to a developing consensus on matching the inhalable particulate sampling convention. The result would be underestimated exposures and could affect the decision as to whether or not a result is acceptable in comparison to airborne concentration limits defined in terms of the inhalability convention. The results of this study suggest including the endotoxins deposited on the inner surfaces of CFCs during analysis. Further researches are necessary to investigate endotoxin deposits on the inner cassette surfaces in other working sectors.

  14. Thermal ablation of plasma-facing surfaces in tokamak disruptions: Sensitivity to particle kinetic energy

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A.; Hassanein, A.

    1996-02-01

    Ablation damage to solid targets with high heat flux impulses is generally greater high-energy electron beam heat sources compared to low-energy plasma guns. This sensitivity to incoming particle kinetic energy is explored with computer modelling; a fast-running routine (DESIRE) is developed for initial scoping analysis and is found to be in reasonable agreement with several experiments on graphite and tungsten targets. If tokamak disruptions are characterized by particle energies less than {approximately}1 keV, then we expect plasma guns are a better analogue than electron beams for simulating disruption behavior and testing candidate plasma-facing materials.

  15. Recent characterizations of generalized convexity in convexity in cooperative game thoery

    SciTech Connect

    Driessen, T.

    1994-12-31

    The notion of convexity for a real-valued function on the power set of the finite set N (the so-called cooperative game with player set N) is defined as in other mathematical fields. The study of convexity plays an important role within the field of cooperative game theory because the application of the solution part of game theory to convex games provides elegant results for the solution concepts involved. Especially, the well known solution concept called core is, for convex games, very well characterized. The current paper focuses on a notion of generalized convexity, called k- convexity, for cooperative n-person games. Due to very recent characterizations of convexity for cooperative games, the goal is to provide similar new characterizations of k-convexity. The main characterization states that for the k-convexity of an n-person game it is both necessary and sufficient that half of all the so-called marginal worth vectors belong to the core of the game. Here it is taken into account whether a marginal worth vector corresponds to an even or odd ordering of k elements of the n-person player set N. Another characterization of k-convexity is presented in terms of a so-called finite min-modular decomposition. That is, some specific cover game of a k-convex game can be decomposed as the minimum of a finite number of modular (or additive) games. Finally it is established that the k-convexity of a game can be characterized in terms of the second order partial derivates of the so-called multilinear extension of the game.

  16. Geometric-Harmonic convexity and integral inequalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akdemir, Ahmet Ocak; Yalçin, Abdüllatif; Polat, Fatma; Kavurmaci-Önalan, Havva

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, some new integral inequalities have been proved for functions whose absolute value of derivatives are GH-convex functions by using integral equalities that have been obtained previously.

  17. Convexity conditions and normal structure of Banach spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saejung, Satit

    2008-08-01

    We prove that F-convexity, the property dual to P-convexity of Kottman, implies uniform normal structure. Moreover, in the presence of the WORTH property, normal structure follows from a weaker convexity condition than F-convexity. The latter result improves the known fact that every uniformly nonsquare space with the WORTH property has normal structure.

  18. A further characteristic of abstract convexity structures on topological spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Shu-Wen; Xia, Shunyou

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, we give a characteristic of abstract convexity structures on topological spaces with selection property. We show that if a convexity structure defined on a topological space has the weak selection property then satisfies H0-condition. Moreover, in a compact convex subset of a topological space with convexity structure, the weak selection property implies the fixed point property.

  19. Exact and Approximate Sizes of Convex Datacubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedjar, Sébastien

    In various approaches, data cubes are pre-computed in order to efficiently answer Olap queries. The notion of data cube has been explored in various ways: iceberg cubes, range cubes, differential cubes or emerging cubes. Previously, we have introduced the concept of convex cube which generalizes all the quoted variants of cubes. More precisely, the convex cube captures all the tuples satisfying a monotone and/or antimonotone constraint combination. This paper is dedicated to a study of the convex cube size. Actually, knowing the size of such a cube even before computing it has various advantages. First of all, free space can be saved for its storage and the data warehouse administration can be improved. However the main interest of this size knowledge is to choose at best the constraints to apply in order to get a workable result. For an aided calibrating of constraints, we propose a sound characterization, based on inclusion-exclusion principle, of the exact size of convex cube as long as an upper bound which can be very quickly yielded. Moreover we adapt the nearly optimal algorithm HyperLogLog in order to provide a very good approximation of the exact size of convex cubes. Our analytical results are confirmed by experiments: the approximated size of convex cubes is really close to their exact size and can be computed quasi immediately.

  20. Neural networks for convex hull computation.

    PubMed

    Leung, Y; Zhang, J S; Xu, Z B

    1997-01-01

    Computing convex hull is one of the central problems in various applications of computational geometry. In this paper, a convex hull computing neural network (CHCNN) is developed to solve the related problems in the N-dimensional spaces. The algorithm is based on a two-layered neural network, topologically similar to ART, with a newly developed adaptive training strategy called excited learning. The CHCNN provides a parallel online and real-time processing of data which, after training, yields two closely related approximations, one from within and one from outside, of the desired convex hull. It is shown that accuracy of the approximate convex hulls obtained is around O[K(-1)(N-1/)], where K is the number of neurons in the output layer of the CHCNN. When K is taken to be sufficiently large, the CHCNN can generate any accurate approximate convex hull. We also show that an upper bound exists such that the CHCNN will yield the precise convex hull when K is larger than or equal to this bound. A series of simulations and applications is provided to demonstrate the feasibility, effectiveness, and high efficiency of the proposed algorithm.

  1. Heat transfer at an upstream-facing surface washed by fluid en route to an aperture in the surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparrow, E. M.; Gurdal, U.

    1981-05-01

    Forced convection heat transfer coefficients were measured at a plane surface pierced by an aperture (or tube inlet) of diameter (d) into which fluid flows from a large upstream space. Heat transfer effects were confined to a portion of the surface contained within an annulus of outer diameter D which surrounds the aperture. The experiments were carried out for several values of the d/D ratio ranging from 1/6 to 1/14.4, and for each fixed d/D the Reynolds number was varied parameterically over a range that spanned a factor of five. Dimensional analysis led to a Reynolds number involving the rate of mass flow through the aperture and the outer diameter of the thermall active region. The end result of the dimensional analysis indicated that for a fixed Prandtl number, the Nusselt number could depend on both Re and d/D. When the Nusselt number data for all cases were brought together on a single graph which spanned more than a decade in Reynolds number, no dependence on d/D was observed. It was also found that the average rate of heat transfer per unit area drops off sharply as the outer diameter of the thermally active annular region increases.

  2. Sparse recovery via convex optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, Paige Alicia

    program which can be written as either a linear program or a second-order cone program, and the well-established machinery of convex optimization used to solve it rapidly.

  3. Primary Breakup in Turbulent Liquid Films on Downward-Facing Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Shellabarger, B.T.; Durbin, S.G.; Yoda, M.; Abdel Khalik, S.I.; Sadowski, D.L.

    2004-12-15

    A number of thin liquid protection schemes involving a sacrificial thin liquid layer have been proposed to protect the first walls of inertial fusion energy reactor chambers from excessive radiation and energetic ion damage. The Prometheus study used a tangentially injected high-speed film of molten lead attached to the first wall to protect the upper endcap of the chamber reactor. Minimizing droplet formation and detachment from this film to avoid interference with beam propagation is a major design issue for such flows.Experiments were conducted on turbulent films of water injected tangentially with a rectangular nozzle into ambient air onto the underside of a horizontal flat plate. Previous efforts were focused on the effect of various design and operational parameters on the film detachment distance. This study focuses on measurement of the ''hydrodynamic source term,'' i.e., the rate of droplet formation due to primary turbulent breakup at the film surface. Droplet mass flux was measured using a simple collection technique at various standoff distances measured with respect to the plate surface and downstream distances measured from the nozzle exit. The data show that the ejected droplet mass flux increases as the standoff distance decreases and as both downstream distance and Weber number increase. Comparisons of the experimental data on the estimated ejected droplet mass flux with previously published correlations suggest that the correlations overpredict the ejected droplet mass flux by more than three orders of magnitude.

  4. Holographic interferometric study of heat transfer to a vapor bubble sliding along a downward facing heater surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manickam, Sathish Kumar

    Mechanistic modeling of heterogeneous boiling requires understanding of bubble nucleation, growth and departure from the heater surfaces. Often due to the nature of flow or heater geometry, bubbles upon leaving their nucleation sites, slide along the heater surface before eventual lift-off. In such cases understanding of bubble growth and its effect on heat transfer from the surface becomes very important part of mechanistic models. In this work an attempt is made to study the heat transfer associated with single vapor bubbles sliding along downward facing heater surfaces. Heater surface is made of polished silicon wafer, with a set of foil-heaters attached at the back. The surface can be tilted to a required angle of inclination. By controlling the power to these heaters the surface can be maintained at different wall superheats. Experiments were conducted with PF-5060 as test liquid, for liquid subcoolings ranging from 0.2 to 1.2°C and wall superheats from 0.2 to 0.8°C. Single bubbles were generated on an artificial cavity at the lower end of the heater surface. High-speed digital photography was used to measure the size of the bubbles and obtain the bubble growth rate. Temperature field in the liquid around the sliding bubble was measured non-intrusively using holographic interferometry. Heat transfer into the sliding vapor bubble is obtained from the interferometry fringes. Results show that for the range of parameters considered the bubbles continue to grow, with rates of growth decreasing with increasing liquid subcooling. Heat transfer measurements show that condensation occurs on most of the bubble interface away from the wall. Condensation accounts for less than 12% of the heat transfer from the bubble base. Results also show an increase in the area averaged heat flux values of about one to two orders of magnitude, with the presence of the vapor bubbles compared to that of natural convection. The heater surface showed no drop in temperature as a result

  5. Convex Banding of the Covariance Matrix.

    PubMed

    Bien, Jacob; Bunea, Florentina; Xiao, Luo

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new sparse estimator of the covariance matrix for high-dimensional models in which the variables have a known ordering. Our estimator, which is the solution to a convex optimization problem, is equivalently expressed as an estimator which tapers the sample covariance matrix by a Toeplitz, sparsely-banded, data-adaptive matrix. As a result of this adaptivity, the convex banding estimator enjoys theoretical optimality properties not attained by previous banding or tapered estimators. In particular, our convex banding estimator is minimax rate adaptive in Frobenius and operator norms, up to log factors, over commonly-studied classes of covariance matrices, and over more general classes. Furthermore, it correctly recovers the bandwidth when the true covariance is exactly banded. Our convex formulation admits a simple and efficient algorithm. Empirical studies demonstrate its practical effectiveness and illustrate that our exactly-banded estimator works well even when the true covariance matrix is only close to a banded matrix, confirming our theoretical results. Our method compares favorably with all existing methods, in terms of accuracy and speed. We illustrate the practical merits of the convex banding estimator by showing that it can be used to improve the performance of discriminant analysis for classifying sound recordings.

  6. Fluorescence mapping of mitochondrial TIM23 complex reveals a water-facing, substrate-interacting helix surface.

    PubMed

    Alder, Nathan N; Jensen, Robert E; Johnson, Arthur E

    2008-08-08

    Protein translocation across the mitochondrial inner membrane is mediated by the TIM23 complex. While its central component, Tim23, is believed to form a protein-conducting channel, the regions of this subunit that face the imported protein are unknown. To examine Tim23 structure and environment in intact membranes at high resolution, various derivatives, each with a single, environment-sensitive fluorescent probe positioned at a specific site, were assembled into functional TIM23 complexes in active mitochondria and analyzed by multiple spectral techniques. Probes placed sequentially throughout a transmembrane region that was identified by crosslinking as part of the protein-conducting channel revealed an alpha helix in an amphipathic environment. Probes on the aqueous-facing helical surface specifically underwent spectral changes during protein import, and their accessibility to hydrophilic quenching agents is considered in terms of channel gating. This approach has therefore provided an unprecedented view of a translocon channel structure in an intact, fully operational, membrane-embedded complex.

  7. Steady-state observations and theoretical modeling of critical heat flux phenomena on a downward facing hemispherical surface

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, F.B.; Haddad, K.H.

    1996-03-01

    Steady-state boiling experiments were performed in the SBLB test facility to observe the two-phase boundary layer flow behavior on the outer surface of a heated hemispherical vessel near the critical heat flux (CHF) limit and to measure the spatial variation of the local CHF along the vessel outer surface. Based upon the flow observations, an advanced hydrodynamic CHF model was developed. The model considers the existence of a micro-layer underneath an elongated vapor slug on the downward facing curved heating surface. The micro-layer is treated as a thin liquid film with numerous micro-vapor jets penetrating through it. The micro-jets have the characteristic size dictated by Helmholtz instability. Local dryout is considered to occur when the supply of fresh liquid from the two phase boundary layer to the micro-layer is not sufficient to prevent depletion of the liquid film by boiling. A boundary layer analysis, treating the two-phase motion as a separated flow, is performed to determine the liquid supply rate and thus the local critical heat flux. The model provides a clear physical explanation for the spatial variation of the CHF observed in the SBLB experiments and for the weak dependence of the CHF data on the physical size of the vessel.

  8. Effect of subcooling and wall thickness on pool boiling from downward-facing curved surfaces in water

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, M.S.; Glebov, A.G.

    1995-09-01

    Quenching experiments were performed to investigate the effects of water subcooling and wall thickness on pool boiling from a downward-facing curved surface. Experiments used three copper sections of the same diameter (50.8 mm) and surface radius (148 mm), but different thickness (12.8, 20 and 30 mm). Local and average pool boiling curves were obtained at saturation and 5 K, 10 K, and 14 K subcooling. Water subcooling increased the maximum heat flux, but decreased the corresponding wall superheat. The minimum film boiling heat flux and the corresponding wall superheat, however, increased with increased subcooling. The maximum and minimum film boiling heat fluxes were independent of wall thickness above 20 mm and Biot Number > 0.8, indicating that boiling curves for the 20 and 30 thick sections were representative of quasi steady-state, but not those for the 12.8 mm thick section. When compared with that for a flat surface section of the same thickness, the data for the 12.8 mm thick section showed significant increases in both the maximum heat flux (from 0.21 to 0.41 MW/m{sup 2}) and the minimum film boiling heat flux (from 2 to 13 kW/m{sup 2}) and about 11.5 K and 60 K increase in the corresponding wall superheats, respectively.

  9. Automatic Treatment Planning with Convex Imputing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayre, G. A.; Ruan, D.

    2014-03-01

    Current inverse optimization-based treatment planning for radiotherapy requires a set of complex DVH objectives to be simultaneously minimized. This process, known as multi-objective optimization, is challenging due to non-convexity in individual objectives and insufficient knowledge in the tradeoffs among the objective set. As such, clinical practice involves numerous iterations of human intervention that is costly and often inconsistent. In this work, we propose to address treatment planning with convex imputing, a new-data mining technique that explores the existence of a latent convex objective whose optimizer reflects the DVH and dose-shaping properties of previously optimized cases. Using ten clinical prostate cases as the basis for comparison, we imputed a simple least-squares problem from the optimized solutions of the prostate cases, and show that the imputed plans are more consistent than their clinical counterparts in achieving planning goals.

  10. Strain responsive concave and convex microlens arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Dinesh; Yang, Shu; Lin, Pei-Chun

    2007-12-01

    We report the fabrication of single-component, strain responsive microlens arrays with real-time tunability. The concave lens array is fabricated by patterning hard oxide layer on a bidirectionally prestretched soft elastomer, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) followed by confined buckling upon release of the prestrain. The convex microlens array is replica molded from the concave lenses in PDMS. Due to difference in lens formation mechanisms, the two types of lenses show different tunable range of focal length in response to the applied strain: large focal length change is observed from the concave microlens array, whereas that from the convex microlens array is much smaller.

  11. A Convex Approach to Fault Tolerant Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maghami, Peiman G.; Cox, David E.; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The design of control laws for dynamic systems with the potential for actuator failures is considered in this work. The use of Linear Matrix Inequalities allows more freedom in controller design criteria than typically available with robust control. This work proposes an extension of fault-scheduled control design techniques that can find a fixed controller with provable performance over a set of plants. Through convexity of the objective function, performance bounds on this set of plants implies performance bounds on a range of systems defined by a convex hull. This is used to incorporate performance bounds for a variety of soft and hard failures into the control design problem.

  12. Dry deposition washoff and dew on the surfaces of pine foliage on the urban- and mountain-facing sides of Mt. Gokurakuji, western Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiwa, M.; Oshiro, N.; Miyake, T.; Nakatani, N.; Kimura, N.; Yuhara, T.; Hashimoto, N.; Sakugawa, H.

    Dry deposition and dew components on pine foliage were measured from 1998 to 2000 on the urban- and mountain-facing sides of Mt. Gokurakuji in order to estimate the effect of anthropogenic activities to dry deposition and dew concentration on the surfaces of pine foliage. A leaf wash experiment was employed to determine the dry deposition rates on the pine foliage. The NO 3- and SO 42- dry deposition rates per unit surface area of pine foliage were 1.47 and 0.28 μmol m -2 h -1 respectively on the urban-facing side and 0.32 and 0.09 μmol m -2 h -1 on the mountain-facing side. Dry deposition fluxes of N (NO 3-+NH 4+) and S (SO 42-) to the forest floors were 8.4 kg N ha -1 yr -1 and 2.8 kg S ha -1 yr -1 on the urban-facing, and 3.3 kg N ha -1 yr -1 and 1.8 kg S ha -1 yr -1 on the mountain-facing side, respectively. The higher dry deposition fluxes of N and S on the urban-facing side could be attributed to its proximity to traffic roads and the urban area. The concentrations of most ions in the dew were higher on the urban-facing side (U130) than on the mountain-facing side (M430). NO 3- and SO 42- concentrations in dew at U130 were 802 and 428 μeq l -1, respectively, while at M430 they were 199 and 222 μeq l -1, respectively, suggesting that higher dry deposition rates on the urban-facing side enhanced their concentrations in the dew on this side. The role of dry deposits and subsequently dissolved ones in dew on the needle surfaces is discussed in terms of pine tree damage by atmospheric depositions.

  13. Surface temperature measurement of the plasma facing components with the multi-spectral infrared thermography diagnostics in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Gauthier, E.; Pocheau, C.; Balorin, C.; Pascal, J. Y.; Jouve, M.; Aumeunier, M. H.; Courtois, X.; Loarer, Th.; Houry, M.

    2017-03-01

    For the long-pulse high-confinement discharges in tokamaks, the equilibrium of plasma requires a contact with the first wall materials. The heat flux resulting from this interaction is of the order of 10 MW/m2 for steady state conditions and up to 20 MW/m2 for transient phases. The monitoring on surface temperatures of the plasma facing components (PFCs) is a major concern to ensure safe operation and to optimize performances of experimental operations on large fusion facilities. Furthermore, this measurement is also required to study the physics associated to the plasma material interactions and the heat flux deposition process. In tokamaks, infrared (IR) thermography systems are routinely used to monitor the surface temperature of the PFCs. This measurement requires an accurate knowledge of the surface emissivity. However, and particularly for metallic materials such as tungsten, this emissivity value can vary over a wide range with both the surface condition and the temperature itself, which makes instantaneous measurement challenging. In this context, the multi-spectral infrared method appears as a very promising alternative solution. Indeed, the system has the advantage to carry out a non-intrusive measurement on thermal radiation while evaluating surface temperature without requiring a mandatory surface emissivity measurement. In this paper, a conceptual design for the multi-spectral infrared thermography is proposed. The numerical study of the multi-channel system based on the Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) nonlinear curve fitting is applied. The numerical results presented in this paper demonstrate the design allows for measurements over a large temperature range with a relative error of less than 10%. Furthermore, laboratory experiments have been performed from 200 °C to 740 °C to confirm the feasibility for temperature measurements on stainless steel and tungsten. In these experiments, the unfolding results from the multi-channel detection provide good

  14. Material ejection and surface morphology changes during transient heat loading of tungsten as plasma-facing component in fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suslova, A.; El-Atwani, O.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the effect of edge-localized mode like transient heat events on pristine samples for two different grades of deformed tungsten with ultrafine and nanocrystalline grains as potential candidates for plasma-facing components. Pulses from a laser beam with durations ∼1 ms and operating in the near infrared wavelength were used for simulating transient heat loading in fusion devices. We specifically focused on investigating and analysis of different mechanisms for material removal from the sample surface under repetitive transient heat loads. Several techniques were applied for analysing different mechanisms leading to material removal from the W surface under repetitive transient heat loads which include witness plates for collected ejected material, and subsequent analysis using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, visible imaging using fast-gated camera, and evaluating thermal emission from the particles using optical emission spectroscopy. Our results show a significantly improved performance of polycrystalline cold-rolled tungsten compared to tungsten produced using an orthogonal machining process under repetitive transient loads for a wide range of the power densities.

  15. Modern technologies of fabrication and testing of large convex secondary mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Chang Jin; Lowman, Andrew E.; Dubin, Matt; Smith, Greg; Frater, Eric; Zhao, Chunyu; Burge, James H.

    2016-07-01

    Modern large telescopes such as TAO, LSST, TMT and EELT require 0.9m-4m monolithic convex secondary mirrors. The fabrication and testing of these large convex secondary mirrors of astronomical telescopes is getting challenging as the aperture of the mirror is getting bigger. The biggest challenge to fabricate these large convex aspheric mirrors is to measure the surface figure to a few nanometers, while maintaining the testing and fabrication cycle to be efficient to minimize the downtime. For the last a couple of decades there was huge advancement in the metrology and fabrication of large aspheric secondary mirrors. College of Optical Sciences in the University Arizona developed a full fabrication and metrology process with extremely high accuracy and efficiency for manufacturing the large convex secondary mirrors. In this paper modern metrology systems including Swing-Arm Optical Coordinate Measuring System (SOCMM) which is comparable to Interferometry and a Sub-aperture stitching interferometry scalable to a several meters have been presented. Also a Computer Controlled Fabrication Process which produces extremely fine surface figure and finish has been demonstrated. These most recent development has been applied to the fabrication and testing of 0.9m aspheric convex secondary mirror for the Tokyo Atacama Observatory's 6.5m telescope and the result has been presented.

  16. On strongly GA-convex functions and stochastic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Bekar, Nurgül Okur; Akdemir, Hande Günay; İşcan, İmdat

    2014-08-20

    In this study, we introduce strongly GA-convex functions and stochastic processes. We provide related well-known Kuhn type results and Hermite-Hadamard type inequality for strongly GA-convex functions and stochastic processes.

  17. On strongly GA-convex functions and stochastic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekar, Nurgül Okur; Akdemir, Hande Günay; Işcan, Imdat

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we introduce strongly GA-convex functions and stochastic processes. We provide related well-known Kuhn type results and Hermite-Hadamard type inequality for strongly GA-convex functions and stochastic processes.

  18. Convex Formulations of Learning from Crowds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajino, Hiroshi; Kashima, Hisashi

    It has attracted considerable attention to use crowdsourcing services to collect a large amount of labeled data for machine learning, since crowdsourcing services allow one to ask the general public to label data at very low cost through the Internet. The use of crowdsourcing has introduced a new challenge in machine learning, that is, coping with low quality of crowd-generated data. There have been many recent attempts to address the quality problem of multiple labelers, however, there are two serious drawbacks in the existing approaches, that are, (i) non-convexity and (ii) task homogeneity. Most of the existing methods consider true labels as latent variables, which results in non-convex optimization problems. Also, the existing models assume only single homogeneous tasks, while in realistic situations, clients can offer multiple tasks to crowds and crowd workers can work on different tasks in parallel. In this paper, we propose a convex optimization formulation of learning from crowds by introducing personal models of individual crowds without estimating true labels. We further extend the proposed model to multi-task learning based on the resemblance between the proposed formulation and that for an existing multi-task learning model. We also devise efficient iterative methods for solving the convex optimization problems by exploiting conditional independence structures in multiple classifiers.

  19. Robust Utility Maximization Under Convex Portfolio Constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Matoussi, Anis; Mezghani, Hanen Mnif, Mohamed

    2015-04-15

    We study a robust maximization problem from terminal wealth and consumption under a convex constraints on the portfolio. We state the existence and the uniqueness of the consumption–investment strategy by studying the associated quadratic backward stochastic differential equation. We characterize the optimal control by using the duality method and deriving a dynamic maximum principle.

  20. Local convexity-preserving C2 rational cubic spline for convex data.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Muhammad; Abd Majid, Ahmad; Ali, Jamaludin Md

    2014-01-01

    We present the smooth and visually pleasant display of 2D data when it is convex, which is contribution towards the improvements over existing methods. This improvement can be used to get the more accurate results. An attempt has been made in order to develop the local convexity-preserving interpolant for convex data using C(2) rational cubic spline. It involves three families of shape parameters in its representation. Data dependent sufficient constraints are imposed on single shape parameter to conserve the inherited shape feature of data. Remaining two of these shape parameters are used for the modification of convex curve to get a visually pleasing curve according to industrial demand. The scheme is tested through several numerical examples, showing that the scheme is local, computationally economical, and visually pleasing.

  1. On the convexity of N-Chebyshev sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodin, Petr A.

    2011-10-01

    We define N-Chebyshev sets in a Banach space X for every positive integer N (when N=1, these are ordinary Chebyshev sets) and study conditions that guarantee their convexity. In particular, we prove that all N-Chebyshev sets are convex when N is even and X is uniformly convex or N\\ge 3 is odd and X is smooth uniformly convex.

  2. Left ventricle segmentation in MRI via convex relaxed distribution matching.

    PubMed

    Nambakhsh, Cyrus M S; Yuan, Jing; Punithakumar, Kumaradevan; Goela, Aashish; Rajchl, Martin; Peters, Terry M; Ayed, Ismail Ben

    2013-12-01

    A fundamental step in the diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases, automatic left ventricle (LV) segmentation in cardiac magnetic resonance images (MRIs) is still acknowledged to be a difficult problem. Most of the existing algorithms require either extensive training or intensive user inputs. This study investigates fast detection of the left ventricle (LV) endo- and epicardium surfaces in cardiac MRI via convex relaxation and distribution matching. The algorithm requires a single subject for training and a very simple user input, which amounts to a single point (mouse click) per target region (cavity or myocardium). It seeks cavity and myocardium regions within each 3D phase by optimizing two functionals, each containing two distribution-matching constraints: (1) a distance-based shape prior and (2) an intensity prior. Based on a global measure of similarity between distributions, the shape prior is intrinsically invariant with respect to translation and rotation. We further introduce a scale variable from which we derive a fixed-point equation (FPE), thereby achieving scale-invariance with only few fast computations. The proposed algorithm relaxes the need for costly pose estimation (or registration) procedures and large training sets, and can tolerate shape deformations, unlike template (or atlas) based priors. Our formulation leads to a challenging problem, which is not directly amenable to convex-optimization techniques. For each functional, we split the problem into a sequence of sub-problems, each of which can be solved exactly and globally via a convex relaxation and the augmented Lagrangian method. Unlike related graph-cut approaches, the proposed convex-relaxation solution can be parallelized to reduce substantially the computational time for 3D domains (or higher), extends directly to high dimensions, and does not have the grid-bias problem. Our parallelized implementation on a graphics processing unit (GPU) demonstrates that the proposed algorithm

  3. Decompositions of Multiattribute Utility Functions Based on Convex Dependence.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    Member) Multiattribute utility theory Preference models Decision analysis Approximations Convex dependence 20. 0.STRACT (Continue an reverse d.* It...DECOMPOSITIONS OF MULTIATTRIBUTE UTILITY FUNCTIONS BASED ON CONVEX DEPENDENCE Hiroyuki Tamura* and Yutaka Nakamura** *Department of Precision Engineering...Decompositions of Multiattribute Utility Technical Report Functions Based on Convex Dependence 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(e) S. CONTRACT O

  4. Approximate proximal point methods for convex programming problems

    SciTech Connect

    Eggermont, P.

    1994-12-31

    We study proximal point methods for the finite dimensional convex programming problem minimize f(x) such that x {element_of} C, where f : dom f {contained_in} RIR is a proper convex function and C {contained_in} R is a closed convex set.

  5. Study on optical fabrication and metrology of precise convex aspheric mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huijun; Xu, Jin; Wang, Peng; Li, Ang; Guo, Wen; Du, Yan

    2016-10-01

    Optical fabrication and metrology technologies are studied in the paper to improve the accuracy of surface figure of a convex aspheric mirror. First, the main specifications of a convex aspheric mirror which is chosen to be the secondary mirror of an optical system are presented. The aperture of the mirror is 400mm. The mirror is made of ultra-low expansion (ULE) glass with honeycomb sandwich structure to get the ideal lightweight requirement. Then the mirror is surfaced by ultrasonic grinding, smart robot lapping and smart robot polishing processes relatively. Large-apertured tool is applied to reduce the mid-frequency surface error. Both the contour measuring method in the grinding and lapping stage and the measuring method with meniscus lens and its calibration mirror in the polishing stage are studied. The final surface figure of the mirror is that the root mean-square value (RMS value) is 0.016λ (λ=632.8nm), which meets the requirement of the optical system. The results show that the forging surfacing processes and measuring methods are accurate and efficient to fabricate the convex aspheric mirror and can be applied in optical fabrication for larger-apertured convex aspheric mirrors.

  6. Rapid Generation of Optimal Asteroid Powered Descent Trajectories Via Convex Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinson, Robin; Lu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates a convex optimization based method that can rapidly generate the fuel optimal asteroid powered descent trajectory. The ultimate goal is to autonomously design the optimal powered descent trajectory on-board the spacecraft immediately prior to the descent burn. Compared to a planetary powered landing problem, the major difficulty is the complex gravity field near the surface of an asteroid that cannot be approximated by a constant gravity field. This paper uses relaxation techniques and a successive solution process that seeks the solution to the original nonlinear, nonconvex problem through the solutions to a sequence of convex optimal control problems.

  7. Convexity Bias and Perspective Cues in the Reverse-Perspective Illusion.

    PubMed

    Dobias, Joshua J; Papathomas, Thomas V; Vlajnic, Vanja M

    2016-01-01

    The present experiment was designed to examine the roles of painted linear perspective cues, and the convexity bias that are known to influence human observers' perception of three-dimensional (3D) objects and scenes. Reverse-perspective stimuli were used to elicit a depth-inversion illusion, in which far points on the stimulus appear to be closer than near points and vice versa, with a 2 (Type of stimulus) × 2 (Fixation mark position) design. To study perspective, two types of stimuli were used: a version with painted linear perspective cues and a version with blank (unpainted) surfaces. To examine the role of convexity, two locations were used for the fixation mark: either in a locally convex or a locally concave part of each stimulus (painted and unpainted versions). Results indicated that the reverse-perspective illusion was stronger when the stimulus contained strong perspective cues and when observers fixated a locally concave region within the scene.

  8. Insulated face brick

    SciTech Connect

    Cromrich, J.; Cromrich, L.B.

    1990-10-16

    This patent describes a method for forming insulated brick intended solely for use in building walls and having superior insulation qualities and lighter weight consonant with the load bearing capabilities of building bricks and the appearance of facing brick. It comprises dry mixing two parts of vermiculite and one part of brick clay, thereby forming a dry mixture having a vermiculite to clay ratio of approximately two-to-one by volume; adding water to the dry mixture and mixing, so that a substantially dry admixture having expanded vermiculite and brick clay is formed; forming a facing layer solely from brick clay; molding and compressing the substantially dry admixture, so as to form a generally rectangular main body layer having parallel top and bottom faces, a pair of parallel side faces and a pair of parallel end faces, respectively, the top and bottom faces being substantially larger in area than the respective side faces, and the side faces being substantially larger in area than the respective end faces, the body layer further having at least one bore formed therein, the bore running from the top face to the bottom face perpendicularly thereto and substantially parallel to the side surfaces thereof, the bore being substantially centrally disposed and wherein the facing layer is disposed on one of the side surfaces of the body portion; curing the molded admixture having the facing layer disposed thereon; whereby a cured brick is formed; and firing the cured brick and the facing layer disposed thereon, whereby an integral brick is formed having top and bottom faces of the brick which are entirely devoid of facing layers, wherein the brick has the desired load bearing capability substantially between its top and bottom faces, whereby the outer facing layer only provides the desired appearance and weather resistance, and further whereby the weight of the brick is substantially reduced.

  9. In-situ erosion and deposition measurements of plasma-facing surfaces in Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, Harold S.

    2014-10-01

    The Accelerator Based In-situ Materials Surveillance (AIMS) diagnostic was recently developed to demonstrate the novel application of ion beam analysis (IBA) to in-vessel studies of plasma materials interactions in Alcator C-Mod. The AIMS diagnostic injects a 900 keV deuterium ion beam into the tokamak's vacuum vessel between plasma discharges while magnetic fields are used to steer the ion beam to plasma facing component (PFC) surfaces. Spectroscopic analysis of neutrons and gamma rays from the induced nuclear reactions provides a quantitative, spatially resolved map of the PFC surface composition that includes boron (B) and deuterium (D) content. Since AIMS is sensitive to low-Z elements and C-Mod regularly boronizes PFCs, the evolution of B and D on PFCs can be used to directly study erosion, deposition, and fuel retention in response to plasma operations and wall conditioning processes. AIMS analysis of 18 lower single null I-mode discharges show a net boron deposition rate of 6 +/- 2 nm/s on the inner wall while subsequent inner wall limited discharges and a disruption did not show significant changes in B. Measurements of D content showed relative changes of >2.5 following a similar trend. This suggests high D retention rates and net B deposition rates of ~18 cm/year of plasma exposure are possible and depend strongly on the plasma conditions. Ex-situ IBA was also performed on the same PFCs after removal from C-Mod, successfully validating the AIMS technique. These IBA measurements also show that the B content on the inner wall varied toroidally and poloidally from 0 to 3000 nm, demonstrating the importance of the spatial resolution provided by AIMS and the sensitivity of PFCs to B-field alignment. AIMS upgrades are underway for operation in 2014 and we anticipate new measurements correlating the evolution of PFC surfaces to plasma configuration, RF heating, and current drive scenarios. This work is supported by U.S. DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-94ER54235 and

  10. Compact coverings for Baire locally convex spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ka[Combining Cedilla]Kol, J.; Lopez Pellicer, M.

    2007-08-01

    Very recently Tkachuk has proved that for a completely regular Hausdorff space X the space Cp(X) of continuous real-valued functions on X with the pointwise topology is metrizable, complete and separable iff Cp(X) is Baire (i.e. of the second Baire category) and is covered by a family of compact sets such that K[alpha][subset of]K[beta] if [alpha][less-than-or-equals, slant][beta]. Our general result, which extends some results of De Wilde, Sunyach and Valdivia, states that a locally convex space E is separable metrizable and complete iff E is Baire and is covered by an ordered family of relatively countably compact sets. Consequently every Baire locally convex space which is quasi-Suslin is separable metrizable and complete.

  11. Convexity, gauge-dependence and tunneling rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plascencia, Alexis D.; Tamarit, Carlos

    2016-10-01

    We clarify issues of convexity, gauge-dependence and radiative corrections in relation to tunneling rates. Despite the gauge dependence of the effective action at zero and finite temperature, it is shown that tunneling and nucleation rates remain independent of the choice of gauge-fixing. Taking as a starting point the functional that defines the transition amplitude from a false vacuum onto itself, it is shown that decay rates are exactly determined by a non-convex, false vacuum effective action evaluated at an extremum. The latter can be viewed as a generalized bounce configuration, and gauge-independence follows from the appropriate Nielsen identities. This holds for any election of gauge-fixing that leads to an invertible Faddeev-Popov matrix.

  12. Convex hull test for ordered categorical data.

    PubMed

    Berger, V W; Permutt, T; Ivanova, A

    1998-12-01

    When testing for stochastic order in ordered 2 x J contingency tables, it is common to select the cutoff required to declare significance so as to ensure that the size of the test is exactly alpha conditionally on the margins. It is valid, however, to use the margins to select not only the cutoff but also the form of the test. Linear rank tests, which are locally most powerful and frequently used in practice, suffer from the drawback that they may have power as low as zero to detect some alternatives of interest when the margins satisfy certain conditions. The Smirnov and convex hull tests are shown, through exact conditional power calculations and simulations, to avoid this drawback. The convex hull test is also admissible and palindromic invariant and minimizes the required significance level to have limiting power of one as the alternative moves away from the null in any direction.

  13. Computational and statistical tradeoffs via convex relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, Venkat; Jordan, Michael I.

    2013-01-01

    Modern massive datasets create a fundamental problem at the intersection of the computational and statistical sciences: how to provide guarantees on the quality of statistical inference given bounds on computational resources, such as time or space. Our approach to this problem is to define a notion of “algorithmic weakening,” in which a hierarchy of algorithms is ordered by both computational efficiency and statistical efficiency, allowing the growing strength of the data at scale to be traded off against the need for sophisticated processing. We illustrate this approach in the setting of denoising problems, using convex relaxation as the core inferential tool. Hierarchies of convex relaxations have been widely used in theoretical computer science to yield tractable approximation algorithms to many computationally intractable tasks. In the current paper, we show how to endow such hierarchies with a statistical characterization and thereby obtain concrete tradeoffs relating algorithmic runtime to amount of data. PMID:23479655

  14. Convex Modeling of Interactions with Strong Heredity

    PubMed Central

    Haris, Asad; Witten, Daniela; Simon, Noah

    2015-01-01

    We consider the task of fitting a regression model involving interactions among a potentially large set of covariates, in which we wish to enforce strong heredity. We propose FAMILY, a very general framework for this task. Our proposal is a generalization of several existing methods, such as VANISH [Radchenko and James, 2010], hierNet [Bien et al., 2013], the all-pairs lasso, and the lasso using only main effects. It can be formulated as the solution to a convex optimization problem, which we solve using an efficient alternating directions method of multipliers (ADMM) algorithm. This algorithm has guaranteed convergence to the global optimum, can be easily specialized to any convex penalty function of interest, and allows for a straightforward extension to the setting of generalized linear models. We derive an unbiased estimator of the degrees of freedom of FAMILY, and explore its performance in a simulation study and on an HIV sequence data set.

  15. Monotone and convex quadratic spline interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Maria H.

    1990-01-01

    A method for producing interpolants that preserve the monotonicity and convexity of discrete data is described. It utilizes the quadratic spline proposed by Schumaker (1983) which was subsequently characterized by De Vore and Yan (1986). The selection of first order derivatives at the given data points is essential to this spline. An observation made by De Vore and Yan is generalized, and an improved method to select these derivatives is proposed. The resulting spline is completely local, efficient, and simple to implement.

  16. The Convex Geometry of Linear Inverse Problems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-02

    The Convex Geometry of Linear Inverse Problems Venkat Chandrasekaranm, Benjamin Rechtw, Pablo A. Parrilom, and Alan S. Willskym ∗ m Laboratory for...83) = 3r(m1 +m2 − r) + 2(m1 − r − r2) (84) where the second inequality follows from the fact that (a+ b)2 ≤ 2a2 + 2b2. References [1] Aja- Fernandez , S

  17. Convex relaxations for gas expansion planning

    SciTech Connect

    Borraz-Sanchez, Conrado; Bent, Russell Whitford; Backhaus, Scott N.; Hijazi, Hassan; Van Hentenryck, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Expansion of natural gas networks is a critical process involving substantial capital expenditures with complex decision-support requirements. Here, given the non-convex nature of gas transmission constraints, global optimality and infeasibility guarantees can only be offered by global optimisation approaches. Unfortunately, state-of-the-art global optimisation solvers are unable to scale up to real-world size instances. In this study, we present a convex mixed-integer second-order cone relaxation for the gas expansion planning problem under steady-state conditions. The underlying model offers tight lower bounds with high computational efficiency. In addition, the optimal solution of the relaxation can often be used to derive high-quality solutions to the original problem, leading to provably tight optimality gaps and, in some cases, global optimal solutions. The convex relaxation is based on a few key ideas, including the introduction of flux direction variables, exact McCormick relaxations, on/off constraints, and integer cuts. Numerical experiments are conducted on the traditional Belgian gas network, as well as other real larger networks. The results demonstrate both the accuracy and computational speed of the relaxation and its ability to produce high-quality solution

  18. On convex relaxation of graph isomorphism

    PubMed Central

    Aflalo, Yonathan; Bronstein, Alexander; Kimmel, Ron

    2015-01-01

    We consider the problem of exact and inexact matching of weighted undirected graphs, in which a bijective correspondence is sought to minimize a quadratic weight disagreement. This computationally challenging problem is often relaxed as a convex quadratic program, in which the space of permutations is replaced by the space of doubly stochastic matrices. However, the applicability of such a relaxation is poorly understood. We define a broad class of friendly graphs characterized by an easily verifiable spectral property. We prove that for friendly graphs, the convex relaxation is guaranteed to find the exact isomorphism or certify its inexistence. This result is further extended to approximately isomorphic graphs, for which we develop an explicit bound on the amount of weight disagreement under which the relaxation is guaranteed to find the globally optimal approximate isomorphism. We also show that in many cases, the graph matching problem can be further harmlessly relaxed to a convex quadratic program with only n separable linear equality constraints, which is substantially more efficient than the standard relaxation involving 2n equality and n2 inequality constraints. Finally, we show that our results are still valid for unfriendly graphs if additional information in the form of seeds or attributes is allowed, with the latter satisfying an easy to verify spectral characteristic. PMID:25713342

  19. Generalized vector calculus on convex domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Om P.; Xu, Yufeng

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we apply recently proposed generalized integral and differential operators to develop generalized vector calculus and generalized variational calculus for problems defined over a convex domain. In particular, we present some generalization of Green's and Gauss divergence theorems involving some new operators, and apply these theorems to generalized variational calculus. For fractional power kernels, the formulation leads to fractional vector calculus and fractional variational calculus for problems defined over a convex domain. In special cases, when certain parameters take integer values, we obtain formulations for integer order problems. Two examples are presented to demonstrate applications of the generalized variational calculus which utilize the generalized vector calculus developed in the paper. The first example leads to a generalized partial differential equation and the second example leads to a generalized eigenvalue problem, both in two dimensional convex domains. We solve the generalized partial differential equation by using polynomial approximation. A special case of the second example is a generalized isoperimetric problem. We find an approximate solution to this problem. Many physical problems containing integer order integrals and derivatives are defined over arbitrary domains. We speculate that future problems containing fractional and generalized integrals and derivatives in fractional mechanics will be defined over arbitrary domains, and therefore, a general variational calculus incorporating a general vector calculus will be needed for these problems. This research is our first attempt in that direction.

  20. Convex Hull Aided Registration Method (CHARM).

    PubMed

    Fan, Jingfan; Yang, Jian; Zhao, Yitian; Ai, Danni; Liu, Yonghuai; Wang, Ge; Wang, Yongtian

    2016-08-31

    Non-rigid registration finds many applications such as photogrammetry, motion tracking, model retrieval, and object recognition. In this paper we propose a novel convex hull aided registration method (CHARM) to match two point sets subject to a non-rigid transformation. Firstly, two convex hulls are extracted from the source and target respectively. Then, all points of the point sets are projected onto the reference plane through each triangular facet of the hulls. From these projections, invariant features are extracted and matched optimally. The matched feature point pairs are mapped back onto the triangular facets of the convex hulls to remove outliers that are outside any relevant triangular facet. The rigid transformation from the source to the target is robustly estimated by the random sample consensus (RANSAC) scheme through minimizing the distance between the matched feature point pairs. Finally, these feature points are utilized as the control points to achieve nonrigid deformation in the form of thin-plate spline of the entire source point set towards the target one. The experimental results based on both synthetic and real data show that the proposed algorithm outperforms several state-of-the-art ones with respect to sampling, rotational angle, and data noise. In addition, the proposed CHARM algorithm also shows higher computational efficiency compared to these methods.

  1. Convex relaxations for gas expansion planning

    DOE PAGES

    Borraz-Sanchez, Conrado; Bent, Russell Whitford; Backhaus, Scott N.; ...

    2016-01-01

    Expansion of natural gas networks is a critical process involving substantial capital expenditures with complex decision-support requirements. Here, given the non-convex nature of gas transmission constraints, global optimality and infeasibility guarantees can only be offered by global optimisation approaches. Unfortunately, state-of-the-art global optimisation solvers are unable to scale up to real-world size instances. In this study, we present a convex mixed-integer second-order cone relaxation for the gas expansion planning problem under steady-state conditions. The underlying model offers tight lower bounds with high computational efficiency. In addition, the optimal solution of the relaxation can often be used to derive high-quality solutionsmore » to the original problem, leading to provably tight optimality gaps and, in some cases, global optimal solutions. The convex relaxation is based on a few key ideas, including the introduction of flux direction variables, exact McCormick relaxations, on/off constraints, and integer cuts. Numerical experiments are conducted on the traditional Belgian gas network, as well as other real larger networks. The results demonstrate both the accuracy and computational speed of the relaxation and its ability to produce high-quality solution« less

  2. Application of orthogonal array technique and particle swarm optimization approach in surface roughness modification when face milling AISI1045 steel parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azadi Moghaddam, Masoud; Kolahan, Farhad

    2016-12-01

    Face milling is an important and common machining operation because of its versatility and capability to produce various surfaces. Face milling is a machining process of removing material by the relative motion between a work piece and rotating cutter with multiple cutting edges. It is an interrupted cutting operation in which the teeth of the milling cutter enter and exit the work piece during each revolution. This paper is concerned with the experimental and numerical study of face milling of AISI1045. The proposed approach is based on statistical analysis on the experimental data gathered using Taguchi design matrix. Surface roughness is the most important performance characteristics of the face milling process. In this study the effect of input face milling process parameters on surface roughness of AISI1045 steel milled parts have been studied. The input parameters are cutting speed ( v), feed rate ( f z ) and depth of cut ( a p ). The experimental data are gathered using Taguchi L9 design matrix. In order to establish the relations between the input and the output parameters, various regression functions have been fitted on the data based on output characteristics. The significance of the process parameters on the quality characteristics of the process was also evaluated quantitatively using the analysis of variance method. Then, statistical analysis and validation experiments have been carried out to compare and select the best and most fitted models. In the last section of this research, mathematical model has been developed for surface roughness prediction using particle swarm optimization (PSO) on the basis of experimental results. The model developed for optimization has been validated by confirmation experiments. It has been found that the predicted roughness using PSO is in good agreement with the actual surface roughness.

  3. Focused Weathering Control of Convex Waterfalls Along the Niobrara River in Cherry and Brown Counties, Nebraska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, L. J.; Pederson, D. T.; Goble, R. J.

    2004-12-01

    More than 200 waterfalls exist along the southern spring branch tributaries that feed an approximately twenty-five mile section of the Niobrara River, east of Valentine, Nebraska. Many of these waterfalls posses a convex shape in the horizontal plane and are buttressed. This morphology is controlled by focused, season-specific weathering along the escarpments adjacent to the waterfall face and a lack of stream erosion on the actual waterfall face. The waterfalls are composed of the Rosebud Formation, a poorly indurated siltstone that should be easily eroded by stream flow. The spring creeks are ineffective at significantly eroding the waterfall face mainly due to their relatively low discharge, three to five cubic feet per second, and low sediment load. The erosive power of the streams is further reduced at the site of the waterfall by the buttressed shape spreading the flow into a thin sheet. The buttressed shape of the waterfall develops in response to stress relief. The only areas of the waterfall face showing stream erosion and lack of diatom cover is where free falling water is impacting the waterfall face. Large, loose talus slopes at the base of the waterfall escarpments further support that the weathering processes operate at a faster rate than stream erosion. Observable groundwater seepage from the escarpments on either side of the waterfalls exposes the faces to season-specific weathering processes. The moisture content of the escarpments varies with exposure to sunlight and changes in air temperature. Cyclic differential expansion and contraction of clays and minerals as well as precipitation and hydration of salts operate on a daily and seasonal basis. These repeated stresses give the escarpments a flaky, shingle like appearance and can cause rapid deterioration of the escarpment. During the winter, the seeping groundwater and waterfall spray form large ice flows on either side of the waterfall face. Freeze-thaw processes operate on a seasonal and

  4. Phase transitions in two-dimensional monolayer films on the (110) face-centered-cubic crystal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrykiejew, A.; Sokołowski, S.; Zientarski, T.; Binder, K.

    1998-03-01

    The results of Monte Carlo simulation of two-dimensional films formed on the (110) face of a face-centered-cubic crystal are presented. Systems with different corrugation of the gas-solid potential and different size of adsorbed atoms are discussed. It is demonstrated that even small changes in the gas-solid potential corrugation considerably affect the inner structure of the low-temperature ordered phases and the location of the order-disorder phase transition.

  5. Quantifying the Convexity of Waterfalls Along the Niobrara River, Cherry, Keya Paha, and Brown Counties, Nebraska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, L. J.; Pederson, D. T.; Goble, R. J.

    2003-12-01

    Numerous waterfalls are present along the spring branch canyons of the Niobrara River, downstream of Cornell Dam, Valentine, Nebraska. Although the sizes of the waterfalls are variable, a majority of the waterfall faces have a convex outward geometry. In order to gain a better understanding of the processes responsible for the development of this profile, it is useful to quantify the convexity of the waterfall face. Due to the rugged topography of the spring branch canyon environment, traditional techniques, such as pin-flag and tape measurements are not practical and even dangerous. The waterfall faces are often greater than 3 meters high, steep, and algae covered. The spring branch canyon walls are also steep with actively creeping scree slopes along the bases. Therefore, due to this topography there is no easy way to access the waterfall faces for accurate measurements. The measurement problem was overcome by using a hand-held laser meter mounted on a tripod. A baseline was established below the waterfall face. The length of the baseline was measured using the hand-held laser meter. Measurements were taken on distinct features across the waterfall face and sidewalls from both endpoints of the baseline. The angle of the laser off the baseline and off the horizontal were measured using a compass with mirror. With these measurements, the waterfall faces profile relative to the baseline was reconstructed. A hand-held laser meter is an important tool for measuring waterfalls and other geomorphic features in hazardous environments because measurements can be taken from a safe location. It is possible for one person to take accurate measurements. New baselines can readily be established to measure relative erosion along the waterfall face over time.

  6. Surface aggregation of urinary proteins and aspartic acid-rich peptides on the faces of calcium oxalate monohydrate investigated by in situ force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, M L; Qiu, S R; Hoyer, J R; Casey, W H; Nancollas, G H; De Yoreo, J J

    2008-05-28

    The growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate in the presence of Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP), osteopontin (OPN), and the 27-residue synthetic peptides (DDDS){sub 6}DDD and (DDDG){sub 6}DDD [where D = aspartic acid and X = S (serine) or G (glycine)] was investigated via in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that these three growth modulators create extensive deposits on the crystal faces. Depending on the modulator and crystal face, these deposits can occur as discrete aggregates, filamentary structures, or uniform coatings. These proteinaceous films can lead to either the inhibition or increase of the step speeds (with respect to the impurity-free system) depending on a range of factors that include peptide or protein concentration, supersaturation and ionic strength. While THP and the linear peptides act, respectively, to exclusively increase and inhibit growth on the (-101) face, both exhibit dual functionality on the (010) face, inhibiting growth at low supersaturation or high modulator concentration and accelerating growth at high supersaturation or low modulator concentration. Based on analyses of growth morphologies and dependencies of step speeds on supersaturation and protein or peptide concentration, we argue for a picture of growth modulation that accounts for the observations in terms of the strength of binding to the surfaces and steps and the interplay of electrostatic and solvent-induced forces at crystal surface.

  7. CVXPY: A Python-Embedded Modeling Language for Convex Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, Steven; Boyd, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    CVXPY is a domain-specific language for convex optimization embedded in Python. It allows the user to express convex optimization problems in a natural syntax that follows the math, rather than in the restrictive standard form required by solvers. CVXPY makes it easy to combine convex optimization with high-level features of Python such as parallelism and object-oriented design. CVXPY is available at http://www.cvxpy.org/ under the GPL license, along with documentation and examples. PMID:27375369

  8. CVXPY: A Python-Embedded Modeling Language for Convex Optimization.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Steven; Boyd, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    CVXPY is a domain-specific language for convex optimization embedded in Python. It allows the user to express convex optimization problems in a natural syntax that follows the math, rather than in the restrictive standard form required by solvers. CVXPY makes it easy to combine convex optimization with high-level features of Python such as parallelism and object-oriented design. CVXPY is available at http://www.cvxpy.org/ under the GPL license, along with documentation and examples.

  9. Dissolution of quartz in aqueous basic solution, 106-236 C - Surface kinetics of 'perfect' crystallographic faces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gratz, Andrew J.; Bird, Peter; Quiro, Glenn B.

    1990-01-01

    A highly accurate method, called the negative crystal method, for determining the rate of dissolution on specific crystallographic faces of crystals was developed, in which the dissolution rates of nominally perfect crystal faces are obtained by measuring the size of individual negative crystals during a sequence of dissolution steps. The method was applied to determine the apparent activation energy and rate constants for the dissolution of quartz in 0.01 M KOH solutions at temperatures from 106 to 236 C. Also investigated were the effects of hydroxyl activity and ionic strength. The apparent activation energies for the dissolution of the prism and of the rhomb were determined.

  10. Some Randomized Algorithms for Convex Quadratic Programming

    SciTech Connect

    Goldbach, R.

    1999-01-15

    We adapt some randomized algorithms of Clarkson [3] for linear programming to the framework of so-called LP-type problems, which was introduced by Sharir and Welzl [10]. This framework is quite general and allows a unified and elegant presentation and analysis. We also show that LP-type problems include minimization of a convex quadratic function subject to convex quadratic constraints as a special case, for which the algorithms can be implemented efficiently, if only linear constraints are present. We show that the expected running times depend only linearly on the number of constraints, and illustrate this by some numerical results. Even though the framework of LP-type problems may appear rather abstract at first, application of the methods considered in this paper to a given problem of that type is easy and efficient. Moreover, our proofs are in fact rather simple, since many technical details of more explicit problem representations are handled in a uniform manner by our approach. In particular, we do not assume boundedness of the feasible set as required in related methods.

  11. Natural-scene statistics predict how the figure-ground cue of convexity affects human depth perception.

    PubMed

    Burge, Johannes; Fowlkes, Charless C; Banks, Martin S

    2010-05-26

    The shape of the contour separating two regions strongly influences judgments of which region is "figure" and which is "ground." Convexity and other figure-ground cues are generally assumed to indicate only which region is nearer, but nothing about how much the regions are separated in depth. To determine the depth information conveyed by convexity, we examined natural scenes and found that depth steps across surfaces with convex silhouettes are likely to be larger than steps across surfaces with concave silhouettes. In a psychophysical experiment, we found that humans exploit this correlation. For a given binocular disparity, observers perceived more depth when the near surface's silhouette was convex rather than concave. We estimated the depth distributions observers used in making those judgments: they were similar to the natural-scene distributions. Our findings show that convexity should be reclassified as a metric depth cue. They also suggest that the dichotomy between metric and nonmetric depth cues is false and that the depth information provided many cues should be evaluated with respect to natural-scene statistics. Finally, the findings provide an explanation for why figure-ground cues modulate the responses of disparity-sensitive cells in visual cortex.

  12. Study on the method to test large-aperture hyperboloid convex mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiaohui; Dong, Huiwen; Guo, Wen; Wang, Huijun

    2014-08-01

    There are numerous reflecting optical system designs that call for large-aperture convex surfaces, such as secondary mirror in on-axis three mirror anastigmatic (TMA). Several methods to test high accuracy hyperboloid convex surfaces are introduced separately in this paper. A kind of arrangement is chosen to test a surface with diameter of 420mm, radius of 1371mm, and conic K -2.1229. The CGH compensator for testing is designed, which is made up of illumination lens and hologram test plate with designed residual wavefront aberration less than 0.001λ (RMS). The second transmitted method that is equipped with a technical flat surface coating by Ag film in the bottom of surface mirror under test, which form an auto-collimation optical system to eliminate the aberration. The Hindle-Simpson test that requires a larger meniscus lens to compensate the optical aberration, and the designed result of optical test system is less than 0.0016λ. Contrasting the CGH compensator and the second transmitted method, the Hindle-Simpson testing method has the advantage of it is easily to manufacture and adjust; meanwhile the test result is stable and has been less affected by the environment. It has been found that the method is rational and reliable, and it can fulfill the requirement of manufacturing and testing process for hyperboloid convex mirrors.

  13. Fabrication of ф 160 mm convex hyperbolic mirror for remote sensing instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Ching-Hsiang; Yu, Zong-Ru; Ho, Cheng-Fang; Hsu, Wei-Yao; Chen, Fong-Zhi

    2012-10-01

    In this study, efficient polishing processes with inspection procedures for a large convex hyperbolic mirror of Cassegrain optical system are presented. The polishing process combines the techniques of conventional lapping and CNC polishing. We apply the conventional spherical lapping process to quickly remove the sub-surface damage (SSD) layer caused by grinding process and to get the accurate radius of best-fit sphere (BFS) of aspheric surface with fine surface texture simultaneously. Thus the removed material for aspherization process can be minimized and the polishing time for SSD removal can also be reduced substantially. The inspection procedure was carried out by using phase shift interferometer with CGH and stitching technique. To acquire the real surface form error of each sub aperture, the wavefront errors of the reference flat and CGH flat due to gravity effect of the vertical setup are calibrated in advance. Subsequently, we stitch 10 calibrated sub-aperture surface form errors to establish the whole irregularity of the mirror in 160 mm diameter for correction polishing. The final result of the In this study, efficient polishing processes with inspection procedures for a large convex hyperbolic mirror of Cassegrain optical system are presented. The polishing process combines the techniques of conventional lapping and CNC polishing. We apply the conventional spherical lapping process to quickly remove the sub-surface damage (SSD) layer caused by grinding process and to get the accurate radius of best-fit sphere (BFS) of aspheric surface with fine surface texture simultaneously. Thus the removed material for aspherization process can be minimized and the polishing time for SSD removal can also be reduced substantially. The inspection procedure was carried out by using phase shift interferometer with CGH and stitching technique. To acquire the real surface form error of each sub aperture, the wavefront errors of the reference flat and CGH flat due to

  14. Active Batch Selection via Convex Relaxations with Guaranteed Solution Bounds.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Shayok; Balasubramanian, Vineeth; Sun, Qian; Panchanathan, Sethuraman; Ye, Jieping

    2015-10-01

    Active learning techniques have gained popularity to reduce human effort in labeling data instances for inducing a classifier. When faced with large amounts of unlabeled data, such algorithms automatically identify the exemplar instances for manual annotation. More recently, there have been attempts towards a batch mode form of active learning, where a batch of data points is simultaneously selected from an unlabeled set. In this paper, we propose two novel batch mode active learning (BMAL) algorithms: BatchRank and BatchRand. We first formulate the batch selection task as an NP-hard optimization problem; we then propose two convex relaxations, one based on linear programming and the other based on semi-definite programming to solve the batch selection problem. Finally, a deterministic bound is derived on the solution quality for the first relaxation and a probabilistic bound for the second. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first research effort to derive mathematical guarantees on the solution quality of the BMAL problem. Our extensive empirical studies on 15 binary, multi-class and multi-label challenging datasets corroborate that the proposed algorithms perform at par with the state-of-the-art techniques, deliver high quality solutions and are robust to real-world issues like label noise and class imbalance.

  15. Game Face

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiner, Jill

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses "Game Face: Life Lessons Across the Curriculum", a teaching kit that challenges assumptions and builds confidence. Game Face, which is derived from a book and art exhibition, "Game Face: What Does a Female Athlete Look Like?", uses layered and powerful images of women and girls participating in sports to teach…

  16. Infants' Perception of Information along Object Boundaries: Concavities versus Convexities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatt, Ramesh S.; Hayden, Angela; Reed, Andrea; Bertin, Evelin; Joseph, Jane

    2006-01-01

    Object parts are signaled by concave discontinuities in shape contours. In seven experiments, we examined whether 5- and 6 1/2-month-olds are sensitive to concavities as special aspects of contours. Infants of both ages detected discrepant concave elements amid convex distractors but failed to discriminate convex elements among concave…

  17. On some interpolation properties in locally convex spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Pater, Flavius

    2015-03-10

    The aim of this paper is to introduce the notion of interpolation between locally convex spaces, the real method, and to present some elementary results in this setting. This represents a generalization from the Banach spaces framework to the locally convex spaces sequentially complete one, where the operators acting on them are locally bounded.

  18. Fourth class of convex equilateral polyhedron with polyhedral symmetry related to fullerenes and viruses

    PubMed Central

    Schein, Stan; Gayed, James Maurice

    2014-01-01

    The three known classes of convex polyhedron with equal edge lengths and polyhedral symmetry––tetrahedral, octahedral, and icosahedral––are the 5 Platonic polyhedra, the 13 Archimedean polyhedra––including the truncated icosahedron or soccer ball––and the 2 rhombic polyhedra reported by Johannes Kepler in 1611. (Some carbon fullerenes, inorganic cages, icosahedral viruses, geodesic structures, and protein complexes resemble these fundamental shapes.) Here we add a fourth class, “Goldberg polyhedra,” which are also convex and equilateral. We begin by decorating each of the triangular facets of a tetrahedron, an octahedron, or an icosahedron with the T vertices and connecting edges of a “Goldberg triangle.” We obtain the unique set of internal angles in each planar face of each polyhedron by solving a system of n equations and n variables, where the equations set the dihedral angle discrepancy about different types of edge to zero, and the variables are a subset of the internal angles in 6gons. Like the faces in Kepler’s rhombic polyhedra, the 6gon faces in Goldberg polyhedra are equilateral and planar but not equiangular. We show that there is just a single tetrahedral Goldberg polyhedron, a single octahedral one, and a systematic, countable infinity of icosahedral ones, one for each Goldberg triangle. Unlike carbon fullerenes and faceted viruses, the icosahedral Goldberg polyhedra are nearly spherical. The reasoning and techniques presented here will enable discovery of still more classes of convex equilateral polyhedra with polyhedral symmetry. PMID:24516137

  19. Computer simulation of surface and adatom properties of Lennard-Jones solids: A comparison between face-centered-cubic and hexagonal-close-packed structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somasi, Sweta; Khomami, Bamin; Lovett, Ronald

    2001-04-01

    We introduce a new molecular dynamics simulation path to easily calculate solid-vapor surface free energies. The method is illustrated with explicit calculations of the surface free energies of a face-centered-cubic (fcc) crystal (the [110], [111], and [100] surfaces) and a hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) crystal (the [111] surface) of Lennard-Jones atoms. We verify that, because of the reduced symmetry at interfaces, simulation of the surface structure and free energy requires a large cutoff distance for the range of the pair potential. To estimate when a growing crystal resolves the fcc/hcp structural ambiguity, we observe the binding free energy and dynamics of clusters of adatoms on [111] surfaces of fcc and hcp crystals. A structural distinction only appears when clusters become large enough that their slow translational motion allows a structural relaxation of the crystal's surface. From the observed distribution over cluster structures we deduce thermodynamic parameters that can be used to model the equilibrium between fcc-like clusters and hcp-like clusters on [111] surfaces and the rate of transformation between these.

  20. CPU timing routines for a CONVEX C220 computer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bynum, Mary Ann

    1989-01-01

    The timing routines available on the CONVEX C220 computer system in the Structural Mechanics Division (SMD) at NASA Langley Research Center are examined. The function of the timing routines, the use of the timing routines in sequential, parallel, and vector code, and the interpretation of the results from the timing routines with respect to the CONVEX model of computing are described. The timing routines available on the SMD CONVEX fall into two groups. The first group includes standard timing routines generally available with UNIX 4.3 BSD operating systems, while the second group includes routines unique to the SMD CONVEX. The standard timing routines described in this report are /bin/csh time,/bin/time, etime, and ctime. The routines unique to the SMD CONVEX are getinfo, second, cputime, toc, and a parallel profiling package made up of palprof, palinit, and palsum.

  1. Laser backscattering analytical model of Doppler power spectra about rotating convex quadric bodies of revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, YanJun; Wu, ZhenSen; Wang, MingJun; Cao, YunHua

    2010-01-01

    We propose an analytical model of Doppler power spectra in backscatter from arbitrary rough convex quadric bodies of revolution (whose lateral surface is a quadric) rotating around axes. In the global Cartesian coordinate system, the analytical model deduced is suitable for general convex quadric body of revolution. Based on this analytical model, the Doppler power spectra of cones, cylinders, paraboloids of revolution, and sphere-cones combination are proposed. We analyze numerically the influence of geometric parameters, aspect angle, wavelength and reflectance of rough surface of the objects on the broadened spectra because of the Doppler effect. This analytical solution may contribute to laser Doppler velocimetry, and remote sensing of ballistic missile that spin.

  2. Convex Lower Bounds for Free Energy Minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, Jonathan

    We construct lower bounds on free energy with convex relaxations from the nonlinear minimization over probabilities to linear programs over expectation values. Finite-temperature expectation values are further resolved into distributions over energy. A superset of valid expectation values is delineated by an incomplete set of linear constraints. Free energy bounds can be improved systematically by adding constraints, which also increases their computational cost. We compute several free energy bounds of increasing accuracy for the triangular-lattice Ising model to assess the utility of this method. This work was supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. On generalized quasi-convex bounded sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakuş, Mahmut

    2016-08-01

    The space of all sequences a = (ak) for which ‖a ‖q= ∑k k |Δ2ak | +supk|ak | <∞ is denoted by q. Here, Δak = ak - ak+1 and Δmak = Δ(Δm-1ak) = Δm-1ak - Δm-1ak+1 with Δ0ak = ak, m ≥ 1. If a = (ak) ∈q then kΔak → 0 (k → ∞) and q ⊂ bv, the space of all sequences of bounded-variation, since ∑k | Δ ak | ≤ ∑k k | Δ2ak | In this study, we give a generalization of quasi-convex bounded sequences.

  4. From concave to convex: capillary bridges in slit pore geometry.

    PubMed

    Broesch, David J; Frechette, Joelle

    2012-11-06

    We investigate the morphological evolution of nonaxisymmetric capillary bridges in slit-pore geometry as the height of the pore and aspect ratio of the bridge are varied. The liquid bridges are formed between two hydrophobic surfaces patterned with hydrophilic strips. The aspect ratio of the capillary bridges (length/width) is varied from 2.5 to 120 by changing the separation between the surfaces, the width of the strips, or the fluid volume. As the bridge height is increased, the aspect ratio decreases and we observe a large increase in the mean curvature of the bridge. More specifically, the following counterintuitive result is observed: the mean curvature of the bridges changes sign and goes from negative (concave bridge) to positive (convex bridge) when the height is increased at constant volume. These experimental observations are in quantitative agreement with Surface Evolver simulations. Scaling shows a collapse of the data indicating that this transition in the sign of the Laplace pressure is universal for capillary bridges with high aspect ratios. Finally, we show that the morphology diagrams obtained from our 3D analysis are considerably different from those expected from a 2D analysis.

  5. Surface band bending and band alignment of plasma enhanced atomic layer deposited dielectrics on Ga- and N-face gallium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jialing; Eller, Brianna S.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2014-09-01

    The effects of surface pretreatment, dielectric growth, and post deposition annealing on interface electronic structure and polarization charge compensation of Ga- and N-face bulk GaN were investigated. The cleaning process consisted of an ex-situ wet chemical NH4OH treatment and an in-situ elevated temperature NH3 plasma process to remove carbon contamination, reduce oxygen coverage, and potentially passivate N-vacancy related defects. After the cleaning process, carbon contamination decreased below the x-ray photoemission spectroscopy detection limit, and the oxygen coverage stabilized at ˜1 monolayer on both Ga- and N-face GaN. In addition, Ga- and N-face GaN had an upward band bending of 0.8 ± 0.1 eV and 0.6 ± 0.1 eV, respectively, which suggested the net charge of the surface states and polarization bound charge was similar on Ga- and N-face GaN. Furthermore, three dielectrics (HfO2, Al2O3, and SiO2) were prepared by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition on Ga- or N-face GaN and annealed in N2 ambient to investigate the effect of the polarization charge on the interface electronic structure and band offsets. The respective valence band offsets of HfO2, Al2O3, and SiO2 with respect to Ga- and N-face GaN were 1.4 ± 0.1, 2.0 ± 0.1, and 3.2 ± 0.1 eV, regardless of dielectric thickness. The corresponding conduction band offsets were 1.0 ± 0.1, 1.3 ± 0.1, and 2.3 ± 0.1 eV, respectively. Experimental band offset results were consistent with theoretical calculations based on the charge neutrality level model. The trend of band offsets for dielectric/GaN interfaces was related to the band gap and/or the electronic part of the dielectric constant. The effect of polarization charge on band offset was apparently screened by the dielectric-GaN interface states.

  6. Research into preparation and properties of graded cemented carbides with face center cubic-rich surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian; Deng, Xin; Gong, Manfeng; Liu, Wei; Wu, Shanghua

    2016-09-01

    This paper systematically investigated a set of functionally graded WC-TiC-Mo-Co cemented carbides with modified surface layer (called fcc-rich surface layer in this study), which is mainly composed of fcc phases (Ti(CN) and TiN) and WC. Nitridation at liquid phase sintering temperature is the key process making this fcc-rich surface layer. The functionally graded WC-TiC-Mo-Co cemented carbides synthesized in this study show 3 layer structure: the outer layer, i.e. the fcc-rich surface layer; the intermediate layer, which is characterized by abnormally large WC and high Co content; and the inner layer. It was found that TiC is the most critical component for the formation of fcc-rich surface layer. The higher content of TiC results in the thicker fcc-rich outer layer, higher (Ti(CN) and TiN) content in the outer layer, and higher hardness of the fcc-rich outer layer. The formation of this fcc-rich surface layer is mainly due to the nitridation process between Ti and N, which leads to the diffusion of Ti outwards (from the inside of the sample to the surface) and the subsequent migration of liquid cobalt inwards (from surface to the inside of the sample). The three-layer structure developed in this study provides the excellent combination of high wear resistance and high toughness, which is favorable for some applications.

  7. Electron work function and surface energy of body-centered and face-centered cubic modifications of 4 d- and 5 d-metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aref'eva, L. P.; Shebzukhova, I. G.

    2016-07-01

    A technique for the evaluation of the electron work function of metallic single crystals and the electron work function anisotropy has been developed in the framework of the electron-statistical method. The surface energy and the electron work function have been calculated for crystal faces of allotropic modifications of 4 d- and 5 d-metals. A change in the electron work function due to the allotropic transformations has been estimated, and the periodic dependence of the electron work function has been determined. It has been shown that the results obtained using the proposed technique correlate with the available experimental data for polycrystals.

  8. A convex urostomy pouch with adhesive border: a patient survey.

    PubMed

    McPhail, Jacqueline; Nichols, Thom; Menier, Melissa

    Patients previously using a standard-wear convex skin barrier urostomy pouch were invited by letter from a Dispensing Appliance Contractor to evaluate a similar pouching system, but with the addition of an extended-wear convex barrier and adhesive border. A total of 47 patients agreed to take part. Patients were asked to try three pouches and complete one evaluation form. Study participants found the addition of an extended-wear convex barrier and adhesive border, was easy to use, provided them with security and the potential for longer wear time.

  9. Face Painting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Diana

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the use of face painting as a technique for making the endangered species issue tangible for children while addressing the complexity of the issue. Children are "given" an animal of their own and are educated about the animal while having their faces painted to resemble the animal. (LZ)

  10. Convex Lens-induced Confinement to Visualize Biopolymers and Interaction Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stabile, Frank; Berard, Daniel; Henkin, Gil; Shayegan, Marjan; Michaud, François; Leslie, Sabrina

    In this poster, we present a versatile CLiC (Convex Lens-induced Confinement) microscopy system to access a broad range of biopolymer visualization and interaction parameters. In the CLiC technique, the curved surface of a convex lens is used to deform a flexible coverslip above a glass substrate, creating a nanoscale gap that can be tuned during an experiment to load and confine molecules into nanoscale features, both linear and circular, embedded in the bottom substrate. We demonstrate and characterize massively parallel DNA nanochannel-based stretching, building on prior work. Further, we demonstrate controlled insertion of reagent molecules within the CLiC imaging chamber. We visualize real-time reaction dynamics of nanoconfined species, including dye/DNA intercalation and DNA/DNA ligation reactions, demonstrating the versatility of this nanoscale microscopy platform.

  11. Convexity and symmetrization in relativistic theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggeri, T.

    1990-09-01

    There is a strong motivation for the desire to have symmetric hyperbolic field equations in thermodynamics, because they guarantee well-posedness of Cauchy problems. A generic quasi-linear first order system of balance laws — in the non-relativistic case — can be shown to be symmetric hyperbolic, if the entropy density is concave with respect to the variables. In relativistic thermodynamics this is not so. This paper shows that there exists a scalar quantity in relativistic thermodynamics whose concavity guarantees a symmetric hyperbolic system. But that quantity — we call it —bar h — is not the entropy, although it is closely related to it. It is formed by contracting the entropy flux vector — ha with a privileged time-like congruencebar ξ _α . It is also shown that the convexity of h plus the requirement that all speeds be smaller than the speed of light c provide symmetric hyperbolic field equations for all choices of the direction of time. At this level of generality the physical meaning of —h is unknown. However, in many circumstances it is equal to the entropy. This is so, of course, in the non-relativistic limit but also in the non-dissipative relativistic fluid and even in relativistic extended thermodynamics for a non-degenerate gas.

  12. Convex weighting criteria for speaking rate estimation

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yishan; Berisha, Visar; Tu, Ming; Liss, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Speaking rate estimation directly from the speech waveform is a long-standing problem in speech signal processing. In this paper, we pose the speaking rate estimation problem as that of estimating a temporal density function whose integral over a given interval yields the speaking rate within that interval. In contrast to many existing methods, we avoid the more difficult task of detecting individual phonemes within the speech signal and we avoid heuristics such as thresholding the temporal envelope to estimate the number of vowels. Rather, the proposed method aims to learn an optimal weighting function that can be directly applied to time-frequency features in a speech signal to yield a temporal density function. We propose two convex cost functions for learning the weighting functions and an adaptation strategy to customize the approach to a particular speaker using minimal training. The algorithms are evaluated on the TIMIT corpus, on a dysarthric speech corpus, and on the ICSI Switchboard spontaneous speech corpus. Results show that the proposed methods outperform three competing methods on both healthy and dysarthric speech. In addition, for spontaneous speech rate estimation, the result show a high correlation between the estimated speaking rate and ground truth values. PMID:26167516

  13. Convex recoloring as an evolutionary marker.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Zeev; Kiat, Yosef; Izhaki, Ido; Snir, Sagi

    2017-02-01

    With the availability of enormous quantities of genetic data it has become common to construct very accurate trees describing the evolutionary history of the species under study, as well as every single gene of these species. These trees allow us to examine the evolutionary compliance of given markers (characters). A marker compliant with the history of the species investigated, has undergone mutations along the species tree branches, such that every subtree of that tree exhibits a different state. Convex recoloring (CR) uses combinatorial representation to measure the adequacy of a taxonomic classifier to a given tree. Despite its biological origins, research on CR has been almost exclusively dedicated to mathematical properties of the problem, or variants of it with little, if any, relationship to taxonomy. In this work we return to the origins of CR. We put CR in a statistical framework and introduce and learn the notion of the statistical significance of a character. We apply this measure to two data sets - Passerine birds and prokaryotes, and four examples. These examples demonstrate various applications of CR, from evolutionary relatedness, through lateral evolution, to supertree construction. The above study was done with a new software that we provide, containing algorithmic improvement with a graphical output of a (optimally) recolored tree.

  14. Flip to Regular Triangulation and Convex Hull.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mingcen; Cao, Thanh-Tung; Tan, Tiow-Seng

    2017-02-01

    Flip is a simple and local operation to transform one triangulation to another. It makes changes only to some neighboring simplices, without considering any attribute or configuration global in nature to the triangulation. Thanks to this characteristic, several flips can be independently applied to different small, non-overlapping regions of one triangulation. Such operation is favored when designing algorithms for data-parallel, massively multithreaded hardware, such as the GPU. However, most existing flip algorithms are designed to be executed sequentially, and usually need some restrictions on the execution order of flips, making them hard to be adapted to parallel computation. In this paper, we present an in depth study of flip algorithms in low dimensions, with the emphasis on the flexibility of their execution order. In particular, we propose a series of provably correct flip algorithms for regular triangulation and convex hull in 2D and 3D, with implementations for both CPUs and GPUs. Our experiment shows that our GPU implementation for constructing these structures from a given point set achieves up to two orders of magnitude of speedup over other popular single-threaded CPU implementation of existing algorithms.

  15. Three-Dimensional Structure of a Simple Liquid at a Face-Centered-Cubic (001) Solid Surface Interface

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Luyao; Hu, Haibao; Wen, Jun; Sepri, Paavo; Luo, Kai

    2016-01-01

    A liquid in the vicinity of a solid-liquid interface (SLI) may exhibit complex structures. In this study, we used molecular dynamics simulations demonstrating for the first time that the liquid adjacent to the SLI can have a two-level structure in some cases: a major structure and a minor structure. Through a time-averaging process of molecular motions, we identified the type of the liquid structure by calculating positions of the maximum liquid density in three spatial dimensions, and these positions were found to distribute in many dispersed zones (called high-density zones (HDZs)). The major structure appears throughout the SLI, while the minor structure only occurs significantly within the third layer. Instead of the previously reported body-centered cubic (BCC) or face-centered-cubic (FCC) types, the major structure was found to show a body-centered tetragonal (BCT) type. The adjacent HDZs are connected by specific junctions, demonstrating that atoms diffuse along some particular high probability paths from one HDZ to another. By considering the three-dimensional liquid density distribution from the continuum point of view, more complete details of the structure and diffusive behavior of liquids in the SLI are also possible to be revealed. PMID:27430188

  16. Three-Dimensional Structure of a Simple Liquid at a Face-Centered-Cubic (001) Solid Surface Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Luyao; Hu, Haibao; Wen, Jun; Sepri, Paavo; Luo, Kai

    2016-07-01

    A liquid in the vicinity of a solid-liquid interface (SLI) may exhibit complex structures. In this study, we used molecular dynamics simulations demonstrating for the first time that the liquid adjacent to the SLI can have a two-level structure in some cases: a major structure and a minor structure. Through a time-averaging process of molecular motions, we identified the type of the liquid structure by calculating positions of the maximum liquid density in three spatial dimensions, and these positions were found to distribute in many dispersed zones (called high-density zones (HDZs)). The major structure appears throughout the SLI, while the minor structure only occurs significantly within the third layer. Instead of the previously reported body-centered cubic (BCC) or face-centered-cubic (FCC) types, the major structure was found to show a body-centered tetragonal (BCT) type. The adjacent HDZs are connected by specific junctions, demonstrating that atoms diffuse along some particular high probability paths from one HDZ to another. By considering the three-dimensional liquid density distribution from the continuum point of view, more complete details of the structure and diffusive behavior of liquids in the SLI are also possible to be revealed.

  17. Three-Dimensional Structure of a Simple Liquid at a Face-Centered-Cubic (001) Solid Surface Interface.

    PubMed

    Bao, Luyao; Hu, Haibao; Wen, Jun; Sepri, Paavo; Luo, Kai

    2016-07-19

    A liquid in the vicinity of a solid-liquid interface (SLI) may exhibit complex structures. In this study, we used molecular dynamics simulations demonstrating for the first time that the liquid adjacent to the SLI can have a two-level structure in some cases: a major structure and a minor structure. Through a time-averaging process of molecular motions, we identified the type of the liquid structure by calculating positions of the maximum liquid density in three spatial dimensions, and these positions were found to distribute in many dispersed zones (called high-density zones (HDZs)). The major structure appears throughout the SLI, while the minor structure only occurs significantly within the third layer. Instead of the previously reported body-centered cubic (BCC) or face-centered-cubic (FCC) types, the major structure was found to show a body-centered tetragonal (BCT) type. The adjacent HDZs are connected by specific junctions, demonstrating that atoms diffuse along some particular high probability paths from one HDZ to another. By considering the three-dimensional liquid density distribution from the continuum point of view, more complete details of the structure and diffusive behavior of liquids in the SLI are also possible to be revealed.

  18. A novel neural network for nonlinear convex programming.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xing-Bao

    2004-05-01

    In this paper, we present a neural network for solving the nonlinear convex programming problem in real time by means of the projection method. The main idea is to convert the convex programming problem into a variational inequality problem. Then a dynamical system and a convex energy function are constructed for resulting variational inequality problem. It is shown that the proposed neural network is stable in the sense of Lyapunov and can converge to an exact optimal solution of the original problem. Compared with the existing neural networks for solving the nonlinear convex programming problem, the proposed neural network has no Lipschitz condition, no adjustable parameter, and its structure is simple. The validity and transient behavior of the proposed neural network are demonstrated by some simulation results.

  19. Entropy and convexity for nonlinear partial differential equations

    PubMed Central

    Ball, John M.; Chen, Gui-Qiang G.

    2013-01-01

    Partial differential equations are ubiquitous in almost all applications of mathematics, where they provide a natural mathematical description of many phenomena involving change in physical, chemical, biological and social processes. The concept of entropy originated in thermodynamics and statistical physics during the nineteenth century to describe the heat exchanges that occur in the thermal processes in a thermodynamic system, while the original notion of convexity is for sets and functions in mathematics. Since then, entropy and convexity have become two of the most important concepts in mathematics. In particular, nonlinear methods via entropy and convexity have been playing an increasingly important role in the analysis of nonlinear partial differential equations in recent decades. This opening article of the Theme Issue is intended to provide an introduction to entropy, convexity and related nonlinear methods for the analysis of nonlinear partial differential equations. We also provide a brief discussion about the content and contributions of the papers that make up this Theme Issue. PMID:24249768

  20. Entropy and convexity for nonlinear partial differential equations.

    PubMed

    Ball, John M; Chen, Gui-Qiang G

    2013-12-28

    Partial differential equations are ubiquitous in almost all applications of mathematics, where they provide a natural mathematical description of many phenomena involving change in physical, chemical, biological and social processes. The concept of entropy originated in thermodynamics and statistical physics during the nineteenth century to describe the heat exchanges that occur in the thermal processes in a thermodynamic system, while the original notion of convexity is for sets and functions in mathematics. Since then, entropy and convexity have become two of the most important concepts in mathematics. In particular, nonlinear methods via entropy and convexity have been playing an increasingly important role in the analysis of nonlinear partial differential equations in recent decades. This opening article of the Theme Issue is intended to provide an introduction to entropy, convexity and related nonlinear methods for the analysis of nonlinear partial differential equations. We also provide a brief discussion about the content and contributions of the papers that make up this Theme Issue.

  1. Reduced Fresnel Losses in Chalcogenide Fibers by Using Anti-Reflective Surface Structures on Fiber End Faces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-06

    2007). 16. W. Barthlott, “Epidermal and seed surface characters of plants: systematic applicability and some evolutionary aspects,” Nord. J. Bot. 1(3...infrared spectral region,” Appl. Opt. 32(7), 1154–1167 (1993). 1. Introduction Optical fibers are of great interest for a variety of applications in...intensity laser illumination [12] which is of great interest for high-power applications . While most of the work has been directed to bulk optics

  2. Stochastic convex sparse principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Baytas, Inci M; Lin, Kaixiang; Wang, Fei; Jain, Anil K; Zhou, Jiayu

    2016-12-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) is a dimensionality reduction and data analysis tool commonly used in many areas. The main idea of PCA is to represent high-dimensional data with a few representative components that capture most of the variance present in the data. However, there is an obvious disadvantage of traditional PCA when it is applied to analyze data where interpretability is important. In applications, where the features have some physical meanings, we lose the ability to interpret the principal components extracted by conventional PCA because each principal component is a linear combination of all the original features. For this reason, sparse PCA has been proposed to improve the interpretability of traditional PCA by introducing sparsity to the loading vectors of principal components. The sparse PCA can be formulated as an ℓ1 regularized optimization problem, which can be solved by proximal gradient methods. However, these methods do not scale well because computation of the exact gradient is generally required at each iteration. Stochastic gradient framework addresses this challenge by computing an expected gradient at each iteration. Nevertheless, stochastic approaches typically have low convergence rates due to the high variance. In this paper, we propose a convex sparse principal component analysis (Cvx-SPCA), which leverages a proximal variance reduced stochastic scheme to achieve a geometric convergence rate. We further show that the convergence analysis can be significantly simplified by using a weak condition which allows a broader class of objectives to be applied. The efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed method are demonstrated on a large-scale electronic medical record cohort.

  3. Spectral calibration for convex grating imaging spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiankang; Chen, Xinhua; Ji, Yiqun; Chen, Yuheng; Shen, Weimin

    2013-12-01

    Spectral calibration of imaging spectrometer plays an important role for acquiring target accurate spectrum. There are two spectral calibration types in essence, the wavelength scanning and characteristic line sampling. Only the calibrated pixel is used for the wavelength scanning methods and he spectral response function (SRF) is constructed by the calibrated pixel itself. The different wavelength can be generated by the monochromator. The SRF is constructed by adjacent pixels of the calibrated one for the characteristic line sampling methods. And the pixels are illuminated by the narrow spectrum line and the center wavelength of the spectral line is exactly known. The calibration result comes from scanning method is precise, but it takes much time and data to deal with. The wavelength scanning method cannot be used in field or space environment. The characteristic line sampling method is simple, but the calibration precision is not easy to confirm. The standard spectroscopic lamp is used to calibrate our manufactured convex grating imaging spectrometer which has Offner concentric structure and can supply high resolution and uniform spectral signal. Gaussian fitting algorithm is used to determine the center position and the Full-Width-Half-Maximum(FWHM)of the characteristic spectrum line. The central wavelengths and FWHMs of spectral pixels are calibrated by cubic polynomial fitting. By setting a fitting error thresh hold and abandoning the maximum deviation point, an optimization calculation is achieved. The integrated calibration experiment equipment for spectral calibration is developed to enhance calibration efficiency. The spectral calibration result comes from spectral lamp method are verified by monochromator wavelength scanning calibration technique. The result shows that spectral calibration uncertainty of FWHM and center wavelength are both less than 0.08nm, or 5.2% of spectral FWHM.

  4. Ion beam figuring of Φ520mm convex hyperbolic secondary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiaohui; Wang, Yonggang; Li, Ang; Li, Wenqing

    2016-10-01

    The convex hyperbolic secondary mirror is a Φ520-mm Zerodur lightweight hyperbolic convex mirror. Typically conventional methods like CCOS, stressed-lap polishing are used to manufacture this secondary mirror. Nevertheless, the required surface accuracy cannot be achieved through the use of conventional polishing methods because of the unpredictable behavior of the polishing tools, which leads to an unstable removal rate. Ion beam figuring is an optical fabrication method that provides highly controlled error of previously polished surfaces using a directed, inert and neutralized ion beam to physically sputter material from the optic surface. Several iterations with different ion beam size are selected and optimized to fit different stages of surface figure error and spatial frequency components. Before ion beam figuring, surface figure error of the secondary mirror is 2.5λ p-v, 0.23λ rms, and is improved to 0.12λ p-v, 0.014λ rms in several process iterations. The demonstration clearly shows that ion beam figuring can not only be used to the final correction of aspheric, but also be suitable for polishing the coarse surface of large, complex mirror.

  5. Effects of Ultrasonics-Assisted Face Milling on Surface Integrity and Fatigue Life of Ni-Alloy 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez, Alfredo; Veiga, Fernando; de Lacalle, Luis N. López; Polvorosa, Roberto; Lutze, Steffen; Wretland, Anders

    2016-11-01

    This work investigates the effects of ultrasonic vibration-assisted milling on important aspects such us material surface integrity, tool wear, cutting forces and fatigue resistance. As an alternative to natural application of ultrasonic milling in brittle materials, in this study, ultrasonics have been applied to a difficult-to-cut material, Alloy 718, very common in high-temperature applications. Results show alterations in the sub-superficial part of the material which could influence fatigue resistance of the material, as it has been observed in a fatigue test campaign of specimens obtained with the application of ultrasonic milling in comparison with another batch obtained applying conventional milling. Tool wear pattern was found to be very similar for both milling technologies, concluding the study with the analysis of cutting forces, exhibiting certain improvement in case of the application of ultrasonic milling with a more stable evolution.

  6. Visual Adaptation to Convexity in Macaque Area V4

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Kai-Markus; Wilke, Melanie; Leopold, David A.

    2009-01-01

    After-effects are perceptual illusions caused by visual adaptation to one or more stimulus attribute, such as orientation, motion, or shape, and are generally characterized by a repulsive shift in the perception of the adapted features in a corresponding test stimulus. Neurophysiological studies seeking to understand the basis of adaptation have observed firing rate reduction and changes in tuning of sensory neurons during periods of prolonged stimulation. In the domain of shape, recent psychophysical work has shown that adaptation to a convex pattern induces a subsequently seen rectangle to appear slightly concave. In the present study, we investigate the possible contribution of V4 neurons, which are thought to be involved in the coding of convexity, to such shape-specific adaptation. Visually responsive neurons were monitored during the brief presentation of simple shapes varying in their convexity level. Each test presentation was preceded by either a blank period or several seconds of adaptation to a convex or concave stimulus, presented in two different sizes. Adaptation consistently changed the tuning of neurons away from the convex or concave adaptor, shifting the response to the neutral rectangle in the direction of the opposite convexity. This repulsive shift was consistent with the known perceptual distortion associated with adaptation to such stimuli. Adaptation also caused a nonspecific decrease in firing, as well as the shape-selective suppression for the repeated presentation of the adaptor stimulus. The latter effects were observed whether or not the adapting and test stimuli matched closely in their size. Taken together, these results provide evidence for shape-specific adaptation of neurons in area V4, which may contribute to the perception of the convexity aftereffect. PMID:19345725

  7. Compatibility of lithium plasma-facing surfaces with high edge temperatures in the Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majeski, Dick

    2016-10-01

    High edge electron temperatures (200 eV or greater) have been measured at the wall-limited plasma boundary in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX). High edge temperatures, with flat electron temperature profiles, are a long-predicted consequence of low recycling boundary conditions. The temperature profile in LTX, measured by Thomson scattering, varies by as little as 10% from the plasma axis to the boundary, determined by the lithium-coated high field-side wall. The hydrogen plasma density in the outer scrape-off layer is very low, 2-3 x 1017 m-3 , consistent with a low recycling metallic lithium boundary. The plasma surface interaction in LTX is characterized by a low flux of high energy protons to the lithium PFC, with an estimated Debye sheath potential approaching 1 kV. Plasma-material interactions in LTX are consequently in a novel regime, where the impacting proton energy exceeds the peak in the sputtering yield for the lithium wall. In this regime, further increases in the edge temperature will decrease, rather than increase, the sputtering yield. Despite the high edge temperature, the core impurity content is low. Zeff is 1.2 - 1.5, with a very modest contribution (<0.1) from lithium. So far experiments are transient. Gas puffing is used to increase the plasma density. After gas injection stops, the discharge density is allowed to drop, and the edge is pumped by the low recycling lithium wall. An upgrade to LTX which includes a 35A, 20 kV neutral beam injector to provide core fueling to maintain constant density, as well as auxiliary heating, is underway. Two beam systems have been loaned to LTX by Tri Alpha Energy. Additional results from LTX, as well as progress on the upgrade - LTX- β - will be discussed. Work supported by US DOE contracts DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  8. Inhibitory competition in figure-ground perception: context and convexity.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Mary A; Salvagio, Elizabeth

    2008-12-15

    Convexity has long been considered a potent cue as to which of two regions on opposite sides of an edge is the shaped figure. Experiment 1 shows that for a single edge, there is only a weak bias toward seeing the figure on the convex side. Experiments 1-3 show that the bias toward seeing the convex side as figure increases as the number of edges delimiting alternating convex and concave regions increases, provided that the concave regions are homogeneous in color. The results of Experiments 2 and 3 rule out a probability summation explanation for these context effects. Taken together, the results of Experiments 1-3 show that the homogeneity versus heterogeneity of the convex regions is irrelevant. Experiment 4 shows that homogeneity of alternating regions is not sufficient for context effects; a cue that favors the perception of the intervening regions as figures is necessary. Thus homogeneity alone does not alone operate as a background cue. We interpret our results within a model of figure-ground perception in which shape properties on opposite sides of an edge compete for representation and the competitive strength of weak competitors is further reduced when they are homogeneous.

  9. {epsilon}-optimality conditions for weakly convex problems

    SciTech Connect

    Pappalardo, M.

    1994-12-31

    There are several generalizations concerning the concept of convexity both for sets and for functions. Weak convexity, among these, has showed many possibilities of applications and many theoretical properties. It has, in fact, been applied in several fields of mathematics: see for example geometry and optimization. We want to analyze this generalization of the concept of convexity via the image-space approach. This kind of approach has showed its utility in many fields of optimization. In particular, we introduce a new concept of {open_quotes}image{close_quotes} based on a suitable relaxation or reduction (lower and upper) of the image itself. Moreover we analyze the main properties of this concept and we show how to utilize it in the study of weakly convex constrained extremum problems in order to obtain {epsilon}-optimality conditions. The paper is divided in three parts: in the first we introduce the concept of perturbed image and we investigate the main theoretical properties. In the second we state {epsilon}-optimality conditions for weakly convex constrained extremum problems. In the third one we study relationships between this type of image and the augmented lagrangian.

  10. Synthesis of Janus-like gold nanoparticles with hydrophilic/hydrophobic faces by surface ligand exchange and their self-assemblies in water.

    PubMed

    Iida, Ryo; Kawamura, Hitoshi; Niikura, Kenichi; Kimura, Takashi; Sekiguchi, Shota; Joti, Yasumasa; Bessho, Yoshitaka; Mitomo, Hideyuki; Nishino, Yoshinori; Ijiro, Kuniharu

    2015-04-14

    This study aims at the synthesis of Janus gold nanoparticles (Janus GNPs) with hydrophilic/hydrophobic faces by a simple ligand exchange reaction in an homogeneous system and at the elucidation of the self-assembled structures of the Janus GNPs in water. As hydrophilic surface ligands, we synthesized hexaethylene glycol (E6)-terminated thiolate ligands with C3, C7, or C11 alkyl chains, referred to as E6C3, E6C7, and E6C11, respectively. As a hydrophobic ligand, a butyl-headed thiolate ligand C4-E6C11, in which a C4 alkyl was introduced on the E6C11 terminus, was synthesized. The degree of segregation between the two ligands on the GNPs (5 nm in diameter) was examined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of fright mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis. We found that the choice of immobilization methods, one-step or two-step addition of the two ligands to the GNP solution, crucially affects the degree of segregation. The two-step addition of a hydrophilic ligand (E6C3) followed by a hydrophobic ligand (C4-E6C11) produced a large degree of segregation on the GNPs, providing Janus-like GNPs. When dispersed in water, these Janus-like GNPs formed assemblies of ∼160 nm in diameter, whereas Domain GNPs, in which the two ligands formed partial domains on the surface, were precipitated even when the molar ratio of the hydrophilic ligand and the hydrophobic ligand on the surface of the NPs was almost 1:1. The assembled structure of the Janus-like GNPs in water was directly observed by pulsed coherent X-ray solution scattering using an X-ray free-electron laser, revealing irregular spherical structures with uneven surfaces.

  11. Funny Faces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Yvonne

    2000-01-01

    Presents a torn-paper and gadget-print activity for younger students, specifically pre-kindergarten to first grade, that can be done any time over the school year or at Halloween. Discusses how the students create their funny faces and lists the materials needed. (CMK)

  12. Face Prints.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadash, Dre Ann

    1984-01-01

    Eighth graders made prints of their own faces, using photographic papers and chemicals. Describes the supplies needed and the printing process involved. Because junior high school students are so concerned with self, this was a very meaningful activity for them. (CS)

  13. Multifrequency swept common-path en-face OCT for wide-field measurement of interior surface vibrations in thick biological tissues.

    PubMed

    Choi, Samuel; Watanabe, Tomoya; Suzuki, Takamasa; Nin, Fumiaki; Hibino, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Osami

    2015-08-10

    Microvibrations that occur in bio-tissues are considered to play pivotal roles in organ function; however techniques for their measurement have remained underdeveloped. To address this issue, in the present study we have developed a novel optical coherence tomography (OCT) method that utilizes multifrequency swept interferometry. The OCT volume data can be acquired by sweeping the multifrequency modes produced by combining a tunable Fabry-Perot filter and an 840 nm super-luminescent diode with a bandwidth of 160 nm. The system employing the wide-field heterodyne method does not require mechanical scanning probes, which are usually incorporated in conventional Doppler OCTs and heterodyne-type interferometers. These arrangements allow obtaining not only 3D tomographic images but also various vibration parameters such as spatial amplitude, phase, and frequency, with high temporal and transverse resolutions over a wide field. Indeed, our OCT achieved the axial resolution of ~2.5 μm when scanning the surface of a glass plate. Moreover, when examining a mechanically resonant multilayered bio-tissue in full-field configuration, we captured 22 nm vibrations of its internal surfaces at 1 kHz by reconstructing temporal phase variations. This so-called "multifrequency swept common-path en-face OCT" can be applied for measuring microdynamics of a variety of biological samples, thus contributing to the progress in life sciences research.

  14. Laser micromilling of convex microfluidic channels onto glassy carbon for glass molding dies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Shih-Feng; Chen, Ming-Fei; Hsiao, Wen-Tse; Huang, Chien-Yao; Yang, Chung-Heng; Chen, Yu-Sheng

    2014-06-01

    This study reports the fabrication of convex microfluidic channels on glassy carbon using an ultraviolet laser processing system to produce glass molding dies. The laser processing parameters, including various laser fluences and scanning speeds of galvanometers, were adjusted to mill a convex microchannel on a glassy carbon substrate to identify the effects of material removal. The machined glassy carbon substrate was then applied as a glass molding die to fabricate a glass-based microfluidic biochip. The surface morphology, milled width and depth, and surface roughness of the microchannel die after laser micromilling were examined using a three-dimensional confocal laser scanning microscope. This study also investigates the transcription rate of microchannels after the glass molding process. To produce a 180 μm high microchannel on the GC substrate, the optimal number of milled cycles, laser fluence, and scanning speed were 25, 4.9 J/cm2, and 200 mm/s, respectively. The width, height, and surface roughness of milled convex microchannels were 119.6±0.217 μm, 180.26±0.01 μm, and 0.672±0.08 μm, respectively. These measured values were close to the predicted values and suitable for a glass molding die. After the glass molding process, a typical glass-based microchannel chip was formed at a molding temperature of 660 °C and the molding force of 0.45 kN. The transcription rates of the microchannel width and depth were 100% and 99.6%, respectively. Thus, the proposed approach is suitable for performing in chemical, biochemical, or medical reactions.

  15. Worst case estimation of homology design by convex analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshikawa, N.; Elishakoff, Isaac; Nakagiri, S.

    1998-01-01

    The methodology of homology design is investigated for optimum design of advanced structures. for which the achievement of delicate tasks by the aid of active control system is demanded. The proposed formulation of homology design, based on the finite element sensitivity analysis, necessarily requires the specification of external loadings. The formulation to evaluate the worst case for homology design caused by uncertain fluctuation of loadings is presented by means of the convex model of uncertainty, in which uncertainty variables are assigned to discretized nodal forces and are confined within a conceivable convex hull given as a hyperellipse. The worst case of the distortion from objective homologous deformation is estimated by the Lagrange multiplier method searching the point to maximize the error index on the boundary of the convex hull. The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated in a numerical example using the eleven-bar truss structure.

  16. Revisiting the method of characteristics via a convex hull algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeFloch, Philippe G.; Mercier, Jean-Marc

    2015-10-01

    We revisit the method of characteristics for shock wave solutions to nonlinear hyperbolic problems and we propose a novel numerical algorithm-the convex hull algorithm (CHA)-which allows us to compute both entropy dissipative solutions (satisfying all entropy inequalities) and entropy conservative (or multi-valued) solutions. From the multi-valued solutions determined by the method of characteristics, our algorithm "extracts" the entropy dissipative solutions, even after the formation of shocks. It applies to both convex and non-convex flux/Hamiltonians. We demonstrate the relevance of the proposed method with a variety of numerical tests, including conservation laws in one or two spatial dimensions and problem arising in fluid dynamics.

  17. First and second order convex approximation strategies in structural optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleury, C.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, various methods based on convex approximation schemes are discussed that have demonstrated strong potential for efficient solution of structural optimization problems. First, the convex linearization method (Conlin) is briefly described, as well as one of its recent generalizations, the method of moving asymptotes (MMA). Both Conlin and MMA can be interpreted as first-order convex approximation methods that attempt to estimate the curvature of the problem functions on the basis of semiempirical rules. Attention is next directed toward methods that use diagonal second derivatives in order to provide a sound basis for building up high-quality explicit approximations of the behavior constraints. In particular, it is shown how second-order information can be effectively used without demanding a prohibitive computational cost. Various first-order and second-order approaches are compared by applying them to simple problems that have a closed form solution.

  18. Widths of some classes of convex functions and bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, V. N.; Maiorov, Vitalii E.

    2010-02-01

    We consider classes of uniformly bounded convex functions defined on convex compact bodies in \\mathbb{R}^d and satisfying a Lipschitz condition and establish the exact orders of their Kolmogorov, entropy, and pseudo-dimension widths in the L_1-metric. We also introduce the notions of pseudo-dimension and pseudo-dimension widths for classes of sets and determine the exact orders of the entropy and pseudo-dimension widths of some classes of convex bodies in \\mathbb{R}^drelative to the pseudo-metric defined as the d-dimensional Lebesgue volume of the symmetric difference of two sets. We also find the exact orders of the entropy and pseudo-dimension widths of the corresponding classes of characteristic functions in L_p-spaces, 1\\le p\\le\\infty.

  19. Convexity and concavity constants in Lorentz and Marcinkiewicz spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminska, Anna; Parrish, Anca M.

    2008-07-01

    We provide here the formulas for the q-convexity and q-concavity constants for function and sequence Lorentz spaces associated to either decreasing or increasing weights. It yields also the formula for the q-convexity constants in function and sequence Marcinkiewicz spaces. In this paper we extent and enhance the results from [G.J.O. Jameson, The q-concavity constants of Lorentz sequence spaces and related inequalities, Math. Z. 227 (1998) 129-142] and [A. Kaminska, A.M. Parrish, The q-concavity and q-convexity constants in Lorentz spaces, in: Banach Spaces and Their Applications in Analysis, Conference in Honor of Nigel Kalton, May 2006, Walter de Gruyter, Berlin, 2007, pp. 357-373].

  20. Point-in-convex polygon and point-in-convex polyhedron algorithms with O(1) complexity using space subdivision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skala, Vaclav

    2016-06-01

    There are many space subdivision and space partitioning techniques used in many algorithms to speed up computations. They mostly rely on orthogonal space subdivision, resp. using hierarchical data structures, e.g. BSP trees, quadtrees, octrees, kd-trees, bounding volume hierarchies etc. However in some applications a non-orthogonal space subdivision can offer new ways for actual speed up. In the case of convex polygon in E2 a simple Point-in-Polygon test is of the O(N) complexity and the optimal algorithm is of O(log N) computational complexity. In the E3 case, the complexity is O(N) even for the convex polyhedron as no ordering is defined. New Point-in-Convex Polygon and Point-in-Convex Polyhedron algorithms are presented based on space subdivision in the preprocessing stage resulting to O(1) run-time complexity. The presented approach is simple to implement. Due to the principle of duality, dual problems, e.g. line-convex polygon, line clipping, can be solved in a similarly.

  1. ON THE STRUCTURE OF \\mathcal{H}_{n - 1}-ALMOST EVERYWHERE CONVEX HYPERSURFACES IN \\mathbf{R}^{n + 1}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, V. G.

    1982-04-01

    It is proved that a hypersurface f imbedded in \\mathbf{R}^{n + 1}, n \\geq 2, which is locally convex at all points except for a closed set E with (n - 1)-dimensional Hausdorff measure \\mathcal{K}_{n - 1}(E) = 0, and strictly convex near E is in fact locally convex everywhere. The author also gives various corollaries. In particular, let M be a complete two-dimensional Riemannian manifold of nonnegative curvature K and E \\subset M a closed subset for which \\mathcal{K}_1(E) = 0. Assume further that there exists a neighborhood U \\supset E such that K(x) > 0 for x \\in U \\setminus E, f \\colon M \\to \\mathbf{R}^3 is such that f\\big\\vert _{U \\setminus E} is an imbedding, and f\\big\\vert _{M \\setminus E} \\in C^{1, \\alpha}, \\alpha > 2/3. Then f(M) is a complete convex surface in \\mathbf{R}^3. This result is an generalization of results in the paper reviewed in MR 51 # 11374.Bibliography: 19 titles.

  2. An Algorithm to Find the Intersection of Two Convex Polygons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    I NSWCDD/TR-93/345/ I AD-A274 722I I I~IIIIIIII IIlllllil llllllllllllili I AN ALGORITHM TO FIND THE INTERSECTION OF TWO CONVEX POLYGONSI I BY ARMIDO...CENTER DAHLGREN DIVISIONmIN A Dahlgren. Virginia 22448-5000 I* • ( 94-01450 I �I 12 0 43 ~~~l NSWCDD/TR-93/345 AN ALGORITHM TO FIND THE...Division (LIO) of the Strike Systems Department. A description of the analysis and software developed to find the intersection of two convex polygons is

  3. Non-convex entropies for conservation laws with involutions.

    PubMed

    Dafermos, Constantine M

    2013-12-28

    The paper discusses systems of conservation laws endowed with involutions and contingent entropies. Under the assumption that the contingent entropy function is convex merely in the direction of a cone in state space, associated with the involution, it is shown that the Cauchy problem is locally well posed in the class of classical solutions, and that classical solutions are unique and stable even within the broader class of weak solutions that satisfy an entropy inequality. This is on a par with the classical theory of solutions to hyperbolic systems of conservation laws endowed with a convex entropy. The equations of elastodynamics provide the prototypical example for the above setting.

  4. Interpolation Error Estimates for Mean Value Coordinates over Convex Polygons

    PubMed Central

    Rand, Alexander; Gillette, Andrew; Bajaj, Chandrajit

    2012-01-01

    In a similar fashion to estimates shown for Harmonic, Wachspress, and Sibson coordinates in [Gillette et al., AiCM, to appear], we prove interpolation error estimates for the mean value coordinates on convex polygons suitable for standard finite element analysis. Our analysis is based on providing a uniform bound on the gradient of the mean value functions for all convex polygons of diameter one satisfying certain simple geometric restrictions. This work makes rigorous an observed practical advantage of the mean value coordinates: unlike Wachspress coordinates, the gradient of the mean value coordinates does not become large as interior angles of the polygon approach π. PMID:24027379

  5. Nonparametric estimation of a convex bathtub-shaped hazard function.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Hanna K; Wellner, Jon A

    2009-11-01

    In this paper, we study the nonparametric maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) of a convex hazard function. We show that the MLE is consistent and converges at a local rate of n(2/5) at points x(0) where the true hazard function is positive and strictly convex. Moreover, we establish the pointwise asymptotic distribution theory of our estimator under these same assumptions. One notable feature of the nonparametric MLE studied here is that no arbitrary choice of tuning parameter (or complicated data-adaptive selection of the tuning parameter) is required.

  6. Nonparametric estimation of a convex bathtub-shaped hazard function

    PubMed Central

    JANKOWSKI, HANNA K.; WELLNER, JON A.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we study the nonparametric maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) of a convex hazard function. We show that the MLE is consistent and converges at a local rate of n2/5 at points x0 where the true hazard function is positive and strictly convex. Moreover, we establish the pointwise asymptotic distribution theory of our estimator under these same assumptions. One notable feature of the nonparametric MLE studied here is that no arbitrary choice of tuning parameter (or complicated data-adaptive selection of the tuning parameter) is required. PMID:20383267

  7. Producing desired ice faces

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Mary Jane; Brumberg, Alexandra; Bisson, Patrick J.; Shultz, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    The ability to prepare single-crystal faces has become central to developing and testing models for chemistry at interfaces, spectacularly demonstrated by heterogeneous catalysis and nanoscience. This ability has been hampered for hexagonal ice, Ih––a fundamental hydrogen-bonded surface––due to two characteristics of ice: ice does not readily cleave along a crystal lattice plane and properties of ice grown on a substrate can differ significantly from those of neat ice. This work describes laboratory-based methods both to determine the Ih crystal lattice orientation relative to a surface and to use that orientation to prepare any desired face. The work builds on previous results attaining nearly 100% yield of high-quality, single-crystal boules. With these methods, researchers can prepare authentic, single-crystal ice surfaces for numerous studies including uptake measurements, surface reactivity, and catalytic activity of this ubiquitous, fundamental solid. PMID:26512102

  8. The Existence Problem for Steiner Networks in Strictly Convex Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire, Alexandre

    2011-05-01

    We consider the existence problem for `Steiner networks' (trivalent graphs with 2 π/3 angles at each junction) in strictly convex domains, with `Neumann' boundary conditions. For each of the three possible combinatorial possibilities, sufficient conditions on the domain are derived for existence. In addition, in each case explicit examples of nonexistence are given.

  9. Monotonicity, concavity, and convexity of fractional derivative of functions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xian-Feng; Liu, Song; Zhang, Zhixin; Jiang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    The monotonicity of the solutions of a class of nonlinear fractional differential equations is studied first, and the existing results were extended. Then we discuss monotonicity, concavity, and convexity of fractional derivative of some functions and derive corresponding criteria. Several examples are provided to illustrate the applications of our results.

  10. Prolonged cerebral "luxury perfusion" after removal of a convexity meningioma.

    PubMed

    Lunsford, L D; Selker, R G

    1979-04-01

    Following total removal of a convexity meningioma, serial computerized tomographic scans disclosed massive hemispheric contrast enhancement compatible with "luxury perfusion". Maximum enhancement occurred one month following the operation and resolved two months postoperatively. Luxury perfusion appeared to be associated with slowly resolving cerebral edema.

  11. ConvexLAR: An Extension of Least Angle Regression*

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Wei; Zhou, Hua

    2016-01-01

    The least angle regression (LAR) was proposed by Efron, Hastie, Johnstone and Tibshirani (2004) for continuous model selection in linear regression. It is motivated by a geometric argument and tracks a path along which the predictors enter successively and the active predictors always maintain the same absolute correlation (angle) with the residual vector. Although it gains popularity quickly, its extensions seem rare compared to the penalty methods. In this expository article, we show that the powerful geometric idea of LAR can be generalized in a fruitful way. We propose a ConvexLAR algorithm that works for any convex loss function and naturally extends to group selection and data adaptive variable selection. After simple modification it also yields new exact path algorithms for certain penalty methods such as a convex loss function with lasso or group lasso penalty. Variable selection in recurrent event and panel count data analysis, Ada-Boost, and Gaussian graphical model is reconsidered from the ConvexLAR angle. PMID:27114697

  12. Preconditioning 2D Integer Data for Fast Convex Hull Computations.

    PubMed

    Cadenas, José Oswaldo; Megson, Graham M; Luengo Hendriks, Cris L

    2016-01-01

    In order to accelerate computing the convex hull on a set of n points, a heuristic procedure is often applied to reduce the number of points to a set of s points, s ≤ n, which also contains the same hull. We present an algorithm to precondition 2D data with integer coordinates bounded by a box of size p × q before building a 2D convex hull, with three distinct advantages. First, we prove that under the condition min(p, q) ≤ n the algorithm executes in time within O(n); second, no explicit sorting of data is required; and third, the reduced set of s points forms a simple polygonal chain and thus can be directly pipelined into an O(n) time convex hull algorithm. This paper empirically evaluates and quantifies the speed up gained by preconditioning a set of points by a method based on the proposed algorithm before using common convex hull algorithms to build the final hull. A speedup factor of at least four is consistently found from experiments on various datasets when the condition min(p, q) ≤ n holds; the smaller the ratio min(p, q)/n is in the dataset, the greater the speedup factor achieved.

  13. Online support vector machine based on convex hull vertices selection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Di; Qiao, Hong; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Min

    2013-04-01

    The support vector machine (SVM) method, as a promising classification technique, has been widely used in various fields due to its high efficiency. However, SVM cannot effectively solve online classification problems since, when a new sample is misclassified, the classifier has to be retrained with all training samples plus the new sample, which is time consuming. According to the geometric characteristics of SVM, in this paper we propose an online SVM classifier called VS-OSVM, which is based on convex hull vertices selection within each class. The VS-OSVM algorithm has two steps: 1) the samples selection process, in which a small number of skeleton samples constituting an approximate convex hull in each class of the current training samples are selected and 2) the online updating process, in which the classifier is updated with newly arriving samples and the selected skeleton samples. From the theoretical point of view, the first d+1 (d is the dimension of the input samples) selected samples are proved to be vertices of the convex hull. This guarantees that the selected samples in our approach keep the greatest amount of information of the convex hull. From the application point of view, the new algorithm can update the classifier without reducing its classification performance. Experimental results on benchmark data sets have shown the validity and effectiveness of the VS-OSVM algorithm.

  14. Convexity preserving C2 rational quadratic trigonometric spline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dube, Mridula; Tiwari, Preeti

    2012-09-01

    A C2 rational quadratic trigonometric spline interpolation has been studied using two kind of rational quadratic trigonometric splines. It is shown that under some natural conditions the solution of the problem exits and is unique. The necessary and sufficient condition that constrain the interpolation curves to be convex in the interpolating interval or subinterval are derived.

  15. Handbook of solar energy data for south-facing surfaces in the United States. Volume I. An insolation, array shadowing, and reflector augmentation model

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.H.

    1980-01-15

    This handbook provides estimates of average available solar insolation to fixed, flat-plate, south-facing collector surfaces at various array tilt angles at numerous sites in the US. This first volume contains average daily, total insolation estimates, by month, and annual totals for 235 locations. A model that estimates the direct, diffuse, and reflected components of total insolation on an hourly, daily, and monthly basis is presented. A shadow loss model and a reflector augmentation model providing estimates of the losses and gains associated with various fixed array geometries are also described. These models can be used with the insolation model provided or with other recorded data. A FORTRAN computer program with user's guide is presented. The program can be used to generate additional handbook values or to examine the effects of array shadowing and fixed reflector augmentation effects on a daily, monthly, or annual basis. Array shadowing depends on location, array size, array tilt, array separation, and time. The program can be used to examine trade-offs between array spacing and insolation losses due to shadowing. The reflector augmentation program can be used to examine trade-offs among array size and tilt, separation, and reflector tilt to determine the combination of design values that optimize the economic objectives or technical criteria of the system.

  16. Retinotopy versus face selectivity in macaque visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Rajimehr, Reza; Bilenko, Natalia Y; Vanduffel, Wim; Tootell, Roger B H

    2014-12-01

    Retinotopic organization is a ubiquitous property of lower-tier visual cortical areas in human and nonhuman primates. In macaque visual cortex, the retinotopic maps extend to higher-order areas in the ventral visual pathway, including area TEO in the inferior temporal (IT) cortex. Distinct regions within IT cortex are also selective to specific object categories such as faces. Here we tested the topographic relationship between retinotopic maps and face-selective patches in macaque visual cortex using high-resolution fMRI and retinotopic face stimuli. Distinct subregions within face-selective patches showed either (1) a coarse retinotopic map of eccentricity and polar angle, (2) a retinotopic bias to a specific location of visual field, or (3) nonretinotopic selectivity. In general, regions along the lateral convexity of IT cortex showed more overlap between retinotopic maps and face selectivity, compared with regions within the STS. Thus, face patches in macaques can be subdivided into smaller patches with distinguishable retinotopic properties.

  17. Emergency decompressive craniectomy after removal of convexity meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Missori, Paolo; Domenicucci, Maurizio; Paolini, Sergio; Mancarella, Cristina; Tola, Serena; D’Elia, Alessandro; Marotta, Nicola; Seferi, Arsen; Esposito, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Convexity meningiomas are benign brain tumors that are amenable to complete surgical resection and are associated with a low complication rate. The aim of this study was to identify factors that result in acute postoperative neurological worsening after the removal of convexity meningiomas. Methods: Clinical evaluation and neuroradiological analysis of patients who underwent removal of a supratentorial convexity meningioma were reviewed. Patients were selected when their postoperative course was complicated by acute neurological deterioration requiring decompressive craniectomy. Results: Six patients (mean age: 43.3 years) underwent surgical removal of a supratentorial convexity meningioma. Brain shift (mean: 9.9 mm) was evident on preoperative imaging due to lesions of varying size and perilesional edema. At various times postoperatively, patient consciousness worsened (up to decerebrate posture) with contralateral paresis and pupillary anisocoria. Computed tomography revealed no postoperative hematoma, however, did indicate increased brain edema and ventricular shift (mean: 12 mm). Emergency decompressive craniectomy and brief ventilator assistance were performed in all patients. Ischemia of the ipsilateral posterior cerebral artery occurred in 3 patients and hydrocephalus occurred in 2 patients. Outcome was good in 2, fair in 2, 1 patient had severe disability, and 1 patient died after 8 months. Conclusions: Brain shift on preoperative imaging is a substantial risk factor for postoperative neurological worsening in young adult patients after the removal of convexity meningiomas. Emergency decompressive craniectomy must be considered because it is effective in most cases. Other than consciousness impairment, there is no reliable clinical landmark to guide the decision to perform decompressive craniectomy; however, brain ischemia may have already occurred. PMID:27857859

  18. Curvature morphology of the mandibular dentition and the development of concave-convex vertical stripping instruments.

    PubMed

    Ihlow, Dankmar; Kubein-Meesenburg, Dietmar; Hunze, Justus; Dathe, Henning; Planert, Jens; Schwestka-Polly, Rainer; Nägerl, Hans

    2002-07-01

    Radii for concave-convex vertical stripping instruments can be derived from measurements of the natural curvature morphology in the horizontal contact area of the mandibular dentition. The concave-convex adjustment of contacts in the anterior dental arch with a newly developed set of concave-convex stripping instruments should enable orthodontic crowding problems to be alleviated biomechanically.

  19. Convex hull matching and hierarchical decomposition for multimodality medical image registration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Fan, Jingfan; Fu, Tianyu; Ai, Danni; Zhu, Jianjun; Li, Qin; Wang, Yongtian

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes a novel hierarchical pyramid strategy for 3D registration of multimodality medical images. The surfaces of the source and target volume data are first extracted, and the surface point clouds are then aligned roughly using convex hull matching. The convex hull matching registration procedure could align images with large-scale transformations. The original images are divided into blocks and the corresponding blocks in the two images are registered by affine and non-rigid registration procedures. The sub-blocks are iteratively smoothed by the Gaussian kernel with different sizes during the registration procedure. The registration result of the large kernel is taken as the input of the small kernel registration. The fine registration of the two volume data sets is achieved by iteratively increasing the number of blocks, in which increase in similarity measure is taken as a criterion for acceptation of each iteration level. Results demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method in registering the multiple modalities of medical images.

  20. Changing Faces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stauffer, John

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the benefits of painting a school's concrete buildings, and considerations when painting new or insufficiently aged concrete. Painting issues include allowing moisture to escape, choosing alkali-resistant paint, removing efflorescence, and surface preparation. (GR)

  1. Famous face recognition, face matching, and extraversion.

    PubMed

    Lander, Karen; Poyarekar, Siddhi

    2015-01-01

    It has been previously established that extraverts who are skilled at interpersonal interaction perform significantly better than introverts on a face-specific recognition memory task. In our experiment we further investigate the relationship between extraversion and face recognition, focusing on famous face recognition and face matching. Results indicate that more extraverted individuals perform significantly better on an upright famous face recognition task and show significantly larger face inversion effects. However, our results did not find an effect of extraversion on face matching or inverted famous face recognition.

  2. On Rank One Convex Functions that are Homogeneous of Degree One

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchheim, Bernd; Kristensen, Jan

    2016-07-01

    We show that positively 1-homogeneous rank one convex functions are convex at 0 and at matrices of rank one. The result is a special case of an abstract convexity result that we establish for positively 1-homogeneous directionally convex functions defined on an open convex cone in a finite dimensional vector space. From these results we derive a number of consequences including various generalizations of the Ornstein L1 non inequalities. Most of the results were announced in ( C R Acad Sci Paris Ser I 349:407-409, 2011).

  3. Electron-microscopic study of the structure of the surface layer in high-nitrogen 05Kh22AG15N8M2F steel after face turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinov, E. V.

    2016-01-01

    The structure of the surface layer in high-nitrogen 05Kh22AG15N8M2F steel workpieces subjected to face turning is studied by electron microscopy. It is found that improved machinability by VK8 alloy cutting tools is achieved at a cutting depth of 0.25 mm and that the cutting-tool life decreases sharply when the cutting depth increases to 1 mm. A nanocrystalline structure with nanocrystal sizes from several to several tens of nanometers forms in the surface layer upon face turning in the as-cast, hot-rolled, and thermally deformed states. The structure of the surface layer is characterized by a high dislocation density and large austenite fragments with broad subgrains and deformation twins.

  4. The effects of a convex rear-view mirror on ocular accommodative responses.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Tatsuo; Iwasaki, Tsuneto; Kondo, Hiroyuki; Tawara, Akihiko

    2013-11-01

    Convex mirrors are universally used as rear-view mirrors in automobiles. However, the ocular accommodative responses during the use of these mirrors have not yet been examined. This study investigated the effects of a convex mirror on the ocular accommodative systems. Seven young adults with normal visual functions were ordered to binocularly watch an object in a convex or plane mirror. The accommodative responses were measured with an infrared optometer. The average of the accommodation of all subjects while viewing the object in the convex mirror were significantly nearer than in the plane mirror, although all subjects perceived the position of the object in the convex mirror as being farther away. Moreover, the fluctuations of accommodation were significantly larger for the convex mirror. The convex mirror caused the 'false recognition of distance', which induced the large accommodative fluctuations and blurred vision. Manufactures should consider the ocular accommodative responses as a new indicator for increasing automotive safety.

  5. Non-convex Statistical Optimization for Sparse Tensor Graphical Model

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Wang, Zhaoran; Liu, Han; Cheng, Guang

    2016-01-01

    We consider the estimation of sparse graphical models that characterize the dependency structure of high-dimensional tensor-valued data. To facilitate the estimation of the precision matrix corresponding to each way of the tensor, we assume the data follow a tensor normal distribution whose covariance has a Kronecker product structure. The penalized maximum likelihood estimation of this model involves minimizing a non-convex objective function. In spite of the non-convexity of this estimation problem, we prove that an alternating minimization algorithm, which iteratively estimates each sparse precision matrix while fixing the others, attains an estimator with the optimal statistical rate of convergence as well as consistent graph recovery. Notably, such an estimator achieves estimation consistency with only one tensor sample, which is unobserved in previous work. Our theoretical results are backed by thorough numerical studies.

  6. Delivering sound energy along an arbitrary convex trajectory.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Sipei; Hu, Yuxiang; Lu, Jing; Qiu, Xiaojun; Cheng, Jianchun; Burnett, Ian

    2014-10-15

    Accelerating beams have attracted considerable research interest due to their peculiar properties and various applications. Although there have been numerous research on the generation and application of accelerating light beams, few results have been published on the generation of accelerating acoustic beams. Here we report on the experimental observation of accelerating acoustic beams along arbitrary convex trajectories. The desired trajectory is projected to the spatial phase profile on the boundary which is discretized and sampled spatially. The sound field distribution is formulated with the Green function and the integral equation method. Both the paraxial and the non-paraxial regimes are examined and observed in the experiments. The effect of obstacle scattering in the sound field is also investigated and the results demonstrate that the approach is robust against obstacle scattering. The realization of accelerating acoustic beams will have an impact on various applications where acoustic information and energy are required to be delivered along an arbitrary convex trajectory.

  7. Shock wave reflection over convex and concave wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitade, M.; Kosugi, T.; Yada, K.; Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    2001-04-01

    It is well known that the transition criterion nearly agrees with the detachment criterion in the case of strong shocks, two-dimensional, and pseudosteady flow. However, when the shock wave diffracts over a wedge whose angle is below the detachment criterion, that is, in the domain of Mach reflection, precursory regular reflection (PRR) appears near the leading edge and as the shock wave propagates, the PRR is swept away by the overtaking corner signal (cs) that forces the transition to Mach reflection. It is clear that viscosity and thermal conductivity influences transition and the triple point trajectory. On the other hand, the reflection over concave and convex wedges is truly unsteady flow, and the effect of viscosity and thermal conductivity on transition and triple point trajectory has not been reported. This paper describes that influence of viscosity over convex and concave corners investigated both experiments and numerical simulations.

  8. Convex hull of a Brownian motion in confinement.

    PubMed

    Chupeau, Marie; Bénichou, Olivier; Majumdar, Satya N

    2015-05-01

    We study the effect of confinement on the mean perimeter of the convex hull of a planar Brownian motion, defined as the minimum convex polygon enclosing the trajectory. We use a minimal model where an infinite reflecting wall confines the walk to one side. We show that the mean perimeter displays a surprising minimum with respect to the starting distance to the wall and exhibits a nonanalyticity for small distances. In addition, the mean span of the trajectory in a fixed direction θ∈]0,π/2[, which can be shown to yield the mean perimeter by integration over θ, presents these same two characteristics. This is in striking contrast to the one-dimensional case, where the mean span is an increasing analytical function. The nonmonotonicity in the two-dimensional case originates from the competition between two antagonistic effects due to the presence of the wall: reduction of the space accessible to the Brownian motion and effective repulsion.

  9. Convex hull of a Brownian motion in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chupeau, Marie; Bénichou, Olivier; Majumdar, Satya N.

    2015-05-01

    We study the effect of confinement on the mean perimeter of the convex hull of a planar Brownian motion, defined as the minimum convex polygon enclosing the trajectory. We use a minimal model where an infinite reflecting wall confines the walk to one side. We show that the mean perimeter displays a surprising minimum with respect to the starting distance to the wall and exhibits a nonanalyticity for small distances. In addition, the mean span of the trajectory in a fixed direction θ ∈]0 ,π /2 [ , which can be shown to yield the mean perimeter by integration over θ , presents these same two characteristics. This is in striking contrast to the one-dimensional case, where the mean span is an increasing analytical function. The nonmonotonicity in the two-dimensional case originates from the competition between two antagonistic effects due to the presence of the wall: reduction of the space accessible to the Brownian motion and effective repulsion.

  10. Reducing the duality gap in partially convex programming

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, R.

    1994-12-31

    We consider the non-linear minimization program {alpha} = min{sub z{element_of}D, x{element_of}C}{l_brace}f{sub 0}(z, x) : f{sub i}(z, x) {<=} 0, i {element_of} {l_brace}1, ..., m{r_brace}{r_brace} where f{sub i}(z, {center_dot}) are convex functions, C is convex and D is compact. Following Ben-Tal, Eiger and Gershowitz we prove the existence of a partial dual program whose optimum is arbitrarily close to {alpha}. The idea, corresponds to the branching principle in Branch and Bound methods. We describe such a kind of algorithm for obtaining the desired partial dual.

  11. Convexity and the Euclidean Metric of Space-Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalogeropoulos, Nikolaos

    2017-02-01

    We address the question about the reasons why the "Wick-rotated", positive-definite, space-time metric obeys the Pythagorean theorem. An answer is proposed based on the convexity and smoothness properties of the functional spaces purporting to provide the kinematic framework of approaches to quantum gravity. We employ moduli of convexity and smoothness which are eventually extremized by Hilbert spaces. We point out the potential physical significance that functional analytical dualities play in this framework. Following the spirit of the variational principles employed in classical and quantum Physics, such Hilbert spaces dominate in a generalized functional integral approach. The metric of space-time is induced by the inner product of such Hilbert spaces.

  12. A convex penalty for switching control of partial differential equations

    DOE PAGES

    Clason, Christian; Rund, Armin; Kunisch, Karl; ...

    2016-01-19

    A convex penalty for promoting switching controls for partial differential equations is introduced; such controls consist of an arbitrary number of components of which at most one should be simultaneously active. Using a Moreau–Yosida approximation, a family of approximating problems is obtained that is amenable to solution by a semismooth Newton method. In conclusion, the efficiency of this approach and the structure of the obtained controls are demonstrated by numerical examples.

  13. Convex Clustering: An Attractive Alternative to Hierarchical Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gary K.; Chi, Eric C.; Ranola, John Michael O.; Lange, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    The primary goal in cluster analysis is to discover natural groupings of objects. The field of cluster analysis is crowded with diverse methods that make special assumptions about data and address different scientific aims. Despite its shortcomings in accuracy, hierarchical clustering is the dominant clustering method in bioinformatics. Biologists find the trees constructed by hierarchical clustering visually appealing and in tune with their evolutionary perspective. Hierarchical clustering operates on multiple scales simultaneously. This is essential, for instance, in transcriptome data, where one may be interested in making qualitative inferences about how lower-order relationships like gene modules lead to higher-order relationships like pathways or biological processes. The recently developed method of convex clustering preserves the visual appeal of hierarchical clustering while ameliorating its propensity to make false inferences in the presence of outliers and noise. The solution paths generated by convex clustering reveal relationships between clusters that are hidden by static methods such as k-means clustering. The current paper derives and tests a novel proximal distance algorithm for minimizing the objective function of convex clustering. The algorithm separates parameters, accommodates missing data, and supports prior information on relationships. Our program CONVEXCLUSTER incorporating the algorithm is implemented on ATI and nVidia graphics processing units (GPUs) for maximal speed. Several biological examples illustrate the strengths of convex clustering and the ability of the proximal distance algorithm to handle high-dimensional problems. CONVEXCLUSTER can be freely downloaded from the UCLA Human Genetics web site at http://www.genetics.ucla.edu/software/ PMID:25965340

  14. Convexity properties of images under nonlinear integral operators

    SciTech Connect

    Kokurin, M Yu

    2014-12-31

    Conditions are obtained for the image of a given set under a general completely continuous nonlinear integral operator to have convex closure. These results are used to establish the uniqueness of quasi-solutions of nonlinear integral equations of the first kind and to prove the solvability of equations of the first kind on a dense subset of the right-hand sides. Bibliography: 11 titles.

  15. Convex Models of Malfunction Diagnosis in High Performance Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-01

    initiated as in the open-loop mode: with one fixed non -zero control function. The time-dependent controller is actuated as soon as any of the state ... controllers ) the diagnosis algorithm is designed by solving 8 CONCLUI)ING REMARKS AND FUTURE RESEARCH 70 a sequence of linear optimization problems . For...Automatic Controller ............... 8 3.3 Numerical Demonstration of the Normal Dynamics ............ 8 4 Representing Control - Actuator Failure 16 5 Convex

  16. A Partial Differential Equation for the Rank One Convex Envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberman, Adam M.; Ruan, Yuanlong

    2017-02-01

    A partial differential equation (PDE) for the rank one convex envelope is introduced. The existence and uniqueness of viscosity solutions to the PDE is established. Elliptic finite difference schemes are constructed and convergence of finite difference solutions to the viscosity solution of the PDE is proven. Computational results are presented and laminates are computed from the envelopes. Results include the Kohn-Strang example, the classical four gradient example, and an example with eight gradients which produces nontrivial laminates.

  17. Designing null phase screens to test a fast plano-convex aspheric lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DelOlmo-Márquez, Jesús; Castán-Ricaño, Diana; Avendaño-Alejo, Maximino; Díaz-Uribe, Rufino

    2015-08-01

    We have obtained a formula to represent the wavefront produced by a plano-convex aspheric lens with symmetry of revolution considering a plane wavefront propagating parallel to the optical axis and impinging on the refracting surface, it is called a zero-distance phase front, being it the first wavefront to be out of the optical system. Using a concept of differential geometry called parallel curves it is possible to obtain an analytic formula to represent the wavefront propagated at arbitrary distances through the optical axis. In order to evaluate qualitatively a plano-convex aspheric lens, we have modified slightly an interferometer Tywman-Green as follow: In the reference beam we use a plane mirror and the beam of test we have used a spatial light modulator (SLM) to compensate the phase produced by the lens under test. It will be called a null phase interferometer. The main idea is to recombine both wavefronts in order to get a null interferogram, otherwise we will associate the patterns of the interferogram to deformations of the lens under test. The null phase screens are formed with concentric circumferences assuming different gray levels printed on SLM.

  18. The deconvolution operation in convex analysis: An introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Hiriart-Urruty, J.B.

    1995-03-01

    Performing the infimal convolution of two functions is a frequent and useful operation in Convex Analysis: it is, to great extent, the dual operation of the addition; it serves (like other {open_quotes}convolutions{close_quotes} in Analysis) to regularize functions; it has nice geometrical and economic interpretations. The deconvolution of a (convex) function by another one is a new operation, firstly defined in clear-cut manner, which is to the infimal convolution what the subtraction is to the addition for real numbers; it appears in conjugating the difference of convex functions; it serves in solving explicitly convolution equations; it has an interpretation in terms of subtraction of epigraphs. Since its introduction, the deconvolution operation has been studied more thoroughly by the author and his former students or associates. What we intend to present here is a short (and, hopefully, pedagogical) introduction to the deconvolution operation, in a simplified setting. This can be viewed as a complement to chapter IV and X in the book.

  19. Stochastic Homogenization of Nonconvex Unbounded Integral Functionals with Convex Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerinckx, Mitia; Gloria, Antoine

    2016-09-01

    We consider the well-trodden ground of the problem of the homogenization of random integral functionals. When the integrand has standard growth conditions, the qualitative theory is well-understood. When it comes to unbounded functionals, that is, when the domain of the integrand is not the whole space and may depend on the space-variable, there is no satisfactory theory. In this contribution we develop a complete qualitative stochastic homogenization theory for nonconvex unbounded functionals with convex growth. We first prove that if the integrand is convex and has p-growth from below (with p > d, the dimension), then it admits homogenization regardless of growth conditions from above. This result, that crucially relies on the existence and sublinearity at infinity of correctors, is also new in the periodic case. In the case of nonconvex integrands, we prove that a similar homogenization result holds provided that the nonconvex integrand admits a two-sided estimate by a convex integrand (the domain of which may depend on the space variable) that itself admits homogenization. This result is of interest to the rigorous derivation of rubber elasticity from polymer physics, which involves the stochastic homogenization of such unbounded functionals.

  20. Constrained spacecraft reorientation using mixed integer convex programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Margaret; Glenn Lightsey, E.

    2016-10-01

    A constrained attitude guidance (CAG) system is developed using convex optimization to autonomously achieve spacecraft pointing objectives while meeting the constraints imposed by on-board hardware. These constraints include bounds on the control input and slew rate, as well as pointing constraints imposed by the sensors. The pointing constraints consist of inclusion and exclusion cones that dictate permissible orientations of the spacecraft in order to keep objects in or out of the field of view of the sensors. The optimization scheme drives a body vector towards a target inertial vector along a trajectory that consists solely of permissible orientations in order to achieve the desired attitude for a given mission mode. The non-convex rotational kinematics are handled by discretization, which also ensures that the quaternion stays unity norm. In order to guarantee an admissible path, the pointing constraints are relaxed. Depending on how strict the pointing constraints are, the degree of relaxation is tuneable. The use of binary variables permits the inclusion of logical expressions in the pointing constraints in the case that a set of sensors has redundancies. The resulting mixed integer convex programming (MICP) formulation generates a steering law that can be easily integrated into an attitude determination and control (ADC) system. A sample simulation of the system is performed for the Bevo-2 satellite, including disturbance torques and actuator dynamics which are not modeled by the controller. Simulation results demonstrate the robustness of the system to disturbances while meeting the mission requirements with desirable performance characteristics.

  1. Generalizations of entanglement based on coherent states and convex sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnum, Howard; Knill, Emanuel; Ortiz, Gerardo; Viola, Lorenza

    2003-09-01

    Unentangled pure states on a bipartite system are exactly the coherent states with respect to the group of local transformations. What aspects of the study of entanglement are applicable to generalized coherent states? Conversely, what can be learned about entanglement from the well-studied theory of coherent states? With these questions in mind, we characterize unentangled pure states as extremal states when considered as linear functionals on the local Lie algebra. As a result, a relativized notion of purity emerges, showing that there is a close relationship between purity, coherence, and (non)entanglement. To a large extent, these concepts can be defined and studied in the even more general setting of convex cones of states. Based on the idea that entanglement is relative, we suggest considering these notions in the context of partially ordered families of Lie algebras or convex cones, such as those that arise naturally for multipartite systems. The study of entanglement includes notions of local operations and, for information-theoretic purposes, entanglement measures and ways of scaling systems to enable asymptotic developments. We propose ways in which these may be generalized to the Lie-algebraic setting and, to a lesser extent, to the convex-cones setting. One of our motivations for this program is to understand the role of entanglementlike concepts in condensed matter. We discuss how our work provides tools for analyzing the correlations involved in quantum phase transitions and other aspects of condensed-matter systems.

  2. Multi-class DTI Segmentation: A Convex Approach.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yuchen; Chen, Ting; Ho, Jeffrey; Vemuri, Baba C

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel variational framework for multi-class DTI segmentation based on global convex optimization. The existing variational approaches to the DTI segmentation problem have mainly used gradient-descent type optimization techniques which are slow in convergence and sensitive to the initialization. This paper on the other hand provides a new perspective on the often difficult optimization problem in DTI segmentation by providing a reasonably tight convex approximation (relaxation) of the original problem, and the relaxed convex problem can then be efficiently solved using various methods such as primal-dual type algorithms. To the best of our knowledge, such a DTI segmentation technique has never been reported in literature. We also show that a variety of tensor metrics (similarity measures) can be easily incorporated in the proposed framework. Experimental results on both synthetic and real diffusion tensor images clearly demonstrate the advantages of our method in terms of segmentation accuracy and robustness. In particular, when compared with existing state-of-the-art methods, our results demonstrate convincingly the importance as well as the benefit of using more refined and elaborated optimization method in diffusion tensor MR image segmentation.

  3. Virtual & Real Face to Face Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teneqexhi, Romeo; Kuneshka, Loreta

    2016-01-01

    In traditional "face to face" lessons, during the time the teacher writes on a black or white board, the students are always behind the teacher. Sometimes, this happens even in the recorded lesson in videos. Most of the time during the lesson, the teacher shows to the students his back not his face. We do not think the term "face to…

  4. Bounding the errors for convex dynamics on one or more polytopes.

    PubMed

    Tresser, Charles

    2007-09-01

    We discuss the greedy algorithm for approximating a sequence of inputs in a family of polytopes lying in affine spaces by an output sequence made of vertices of the respective polytopes. More precisely, we consider here the case when the greed of the algorithm is dictated by the Euclidean norms of the successive cumulative errors. This algorithm can be interpreted as a time-dependent dynamical system in the vector space, where the errors live, or as a time-dependent dynamical system in an affine space containing copies of all the original polytopes. This affine space contains the inputs, as well as the inputs modified by adding the respective former errors; it is the evolution of these modified inputs that the dynamical system in affine space describes. Scheduling problems with many polytopes arise naturally, for instance, when the inputs are from a single polytope P, but one imposes the constraint that whenever the input belongs to a codimension n face, the output has to be in the same codimension n face (as when scheduling drivers among participants of a carpool). It has been previously shown that the error is bounded in the case of a single polytope by proving the existence of an arbitrary large convex invariant region for the dynamics in affine space: A region that is simultaneously invariant for several polytopes, each considered separately, was also constructed. It was then shown that there cannot be an invariant region in affine space in the general case of a family of polytopes. Here we prove the existence of an arbitrary large convex invariant set for the dynamics in the vector space in the case when the sizes of the polytopes in the family are bounded and the set of all the outgoing normals to all the faces of all the polytopes is finite. It was also previously known that starting from zero as the initial error set, the error set could not be saturated in finitely many steps in some cases with several polytopes: Contradicting a former conjecture, we show

  5. Bounding the errors for convex dynamics on one or more polytopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tresser, Charles

    2007-09-01

    We discuss the greedy algorithm for approximating a sequence of inputs in a family of polytopes lying in affine spaces by an output sequence made of vertices of the respective polytopes. More precisely, we consider here the case when the greed of the algorithm is dictated by the Euclidean norms of the successive cumulative errors. This algorithm can be interpreted as a time-dependent dynamical system in the vector space, where the errors live, or as a time-dependent dynamical system in an affine space containing copies of all the original polytopes. This affine space contains the inputs, as well as the inputs modified by adding the respective former errors; it is the evolution of these modified inputs that the dynamical system in affine space describes. Scheduling problems with many polytopes arise naturally, for instance, when the inputs are from a single polytope P, but one imposes the constraint that whenever the input belongs to a codimension n face, the output has to be in the same codimension n face (as when scheduling drivers among participants of a carpool). It has been previously shown that the error is bounded in the case of a single polytope by proving the existence of an arbitrary large convex invariant region for the dynamics in affine space: A region that is simultaneously invariant for several polytopes, each considered separately, was also constructed. It was then shown that there cannot be an invariant region in affine space in the general case of a family of polytopes. Here we prove the existence of an arbitrary large convex invariant set for the dynamics in the vector space in the case when the sizes of the polytopes in the family are bounded and the set of all the outgoing normals to all the faces of all the polytopes is finite. It was also previously known that starting from zero as the initial error set, the error set could not be saturated in finitely many steps in some cases with several polytopes: Contradicting a former conjecture, we show

  6. Face adaptation depends on seeing the face.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Farshad; Koch, Christof; Shimojo, Shinsuke

    2005-01-06

    Retinal input that is suppressed from visual awareness can nevertheless produce measurable aftereffects, revealing neural processes that do not directly result in a conscious percept. We here report that the face identity-specific aftereffect requires a visible face; it is effectively cancelled by binocular suppression or by inattentional blindness of the inducing face. Conversely, the same suppression does not interfere with the orientation-specific aftereffect. Thus, the competition between incompatible or interfering visual inputs to reach awareness is resolved before those aspects of information that are exploited in face identification are processed. We also found that the face aftereffect remained intact when the visual distracters in the inattention experiment were replaced with auditory distracters. Thus, cross-modal or cognitive interference that does not affect the visibility of the face does not interfere with the face aftereffect. We conclude that adaptation to face identity depends on seeing the face.

  7. Millihertz quasi-periodic oscillations in 4U 1636-53 associated with bursts with positive convexity only

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Ming; Méndez, Mariano; Altamirano, Diego; Zhang, Guobao

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the convexity of all type I X-ray bursts with millihertz quasi-periodic oscillations (mHz QPOs) in 4U 1636-53 using archival observations with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We found that, at a 3.5σ confidence level, in all 39 cases in which the mHz QPOs disappeared at the time of an X-ray burst, the convexity of the burst is positive. The convexity measures the shape of the rising part of the burst light curve and, according to recent models, it is related to the ignition site of bursts on the neutron-star surface. This finding suggests that in 4U 1636-53 these 39 bursts and the marginally stable nuclear burning process responsible for the mHz QPOs take place at the neutron-star equator. This scenario could explain the inconsistency between the high accretion rate required for triggering mHz QPOs in theoretical models and the relatively low accretion rate derived from observations.

  8. The shape of the face template: geometric distortions of faces and their detection in natural scenes.

    PubMed

    Pongakkasira, Kaewmart; Bindemann, Markus

    2015-04-01

    Human face detection might be driven by skin-coloured face-shaped templates. To explore this idea, this study compared the detection of faces for which the natural height-to-width ratios were preserved with distorted faces that were stretched vertically or horizontally. The impact of stretching on detection performance was not obvious when faces were equated to their unstretched counterparts in terms of their height or width dimension (Experiment 1). However, stretching impaired detection when the original and distorted faces were matched for their surface area (Experiment 2), and this was found with both vertically and horizontally stretched faces (Experiment 3). This effect was evident in accuracy, response times, and also observers' eye movements to faces. These findings demonstrate that height-to-width ratios are an important component of the cognitive template for face detection. The results also highlight important differences between face detection and face recognition.

  9. Use of Convexity in Ostomy Care: Results of an International Consensus Meeting.

    PubMed

    Hoeflok, Jo; Salvadalena, Ginger; Pridham, Sue; Droste, Werner; McNichol, Laurie; Gray, Mikel

    Ostomy skin barriers that incorporate a convexity feature have been available in the marketplace for decades, but limited resources are available to guide clinicians in selection and use of convex products. Given the widespread use of convexity, and the need to provide practical guidelines for appropriate use of pouching systems with convex features, an international consensus panel was convened to provide consensus-based guidance for this aspect of ostomy practice. Panelists were provided with a summary of relevant literature in advance of the meeting; these articles were used to generate and reach consensus on 26 statements during a 1-day meeting. Consensus was achieved when 80% of panelists agreed on a statement using an anonymous electronic response system. The 26 statements provide guidance for convex product characteristics, patient assessment, convexity use, and outcomes.

  10. Computation of nonparametric convex hazard estimators via profile methods

    PubMed Central

    Jankowski, Hanna K.; Wellner, Jon A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a profile likelihood algorithm to compute the nonparametric maximum likelihood estimator of a convex hazard function. The maximisation is performed in two steps: First the support reduction algorithm is used to maximise the likelihood over all hazard functions with a given point of minimum (or antimode). Then it is shown that the profile (or partially maximised) likelihood is quasi-concave as a function of the antimode, so that a bisection algorithm can be applied to find the maximum of the profile likelihood, and hence also the global maximum. The new algorithm is illustrated using both artificial and real data, including lifetime data for Canadian males and females. PMID:20300560

  11. Neural network for solving convex quadratic bilevel programming problems.

    PubMed

    He, Xing; Li, Chuandong; Huang, Tingwen; Li, Chaojie

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, using the idea of successive approximation, we propose a neural network to solve convex quadratic bilevel programming problems (CQBPPs), which is modeled by a nonautonomous differential inclusion. Different from the existing neural network for CQBPP, the model has the least number of state variables and simple structure. Based on the theory of nonsmooth analysis, differential inclusions and Lyapunov-like method, the limit equilibrium points sequence of the proposed neural networks can approximately converge to an optimal solution of CQBPP under certain conditions. Finally, simulation results on two numerical examples and the portfolio selection problem show the effectiveness and performance of the proposed neural network.

  12. Use of Convex supercomputers for flight simulation at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleveland, Jeff I., II

    1992-01-01

    The use of the Convex Computer Corporation supercomputers for flight simulation is discussed focusing on a real-time input/output system for supporting the flight simulation. The flight simulation computing system is based on two single processor control data corporation CYBER 175 computers, coupled through extended memory. The Advanced Real-Time Simulation System for digital data distribution and signal conversion is a state-of-the-art, high-speed fiber-optic-based, ring network system which is based on the computer automated measurement and control technology.

  13. Advances in dual algorithms and convex approximation methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smaoui, H.; Fleury, C.; Schmit, L. A.

    1988-01-01

    A new algorithm for solving the duals of separable convex optimization problems is presented. The algorithm is based on an active set strategy in conjunction with a variable metric method. This first order algorithm is more reliable than Newton's method used in DUAL-2 because it does not break down when the Hessian matrix becomes singular or nearly singular. A perturbation technique is introduced in order to remove the nondifferentiability of the dual function which arises when linear constraints are present in the approximate problem.

  14. Ordered Incidence Geometry and the Geometric Foundations of Convexity Theory.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    needed in the sequel. 5. Lineal hulls. Characterization of affine sets in terms of lineal hulls, (T2). 6. Convex sets. Definitions (D5)-(D7) and basic...wo) 5. LINEAL HULLS In the Euclidean geometry R" a set A is affine if and only if A = {Xiz,: ;EA, N"Xi=1J51 i.e. A coincides with the set of affine...combination, of its elements. The analogous geometrical representation in an QIG (where algebraic constructions such as (5.1) are not available) is

  15. On the structure of self-affine convex bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Voynov, A S

    2013-08-31

    We study the structure of convex bodies in R{sup d} that can be represented as a union of their affine images with no common interior points. Such bodies are called self-affine. Vallet's conjecture on the structure of self-affine bodies was proved for d = 2 by Richter in 2011. In the present paper we disprove the conjecture for all d≥3 and derive a detailed description of self-affine bodies in R{sup 3}. Also we consider the relation between properties of self-affine bodies and functional equations with a contraction of an argument. Bibliography: 10 titles.

  16. Supervised classification of protein structures based on convex hull representation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Wu, Ling-Yun; Chen, Luonan; Zhang, Xiang-Sun

    2007-01-01

    One of the central problems in functional genomics is to establish the classification schemes of protein structures. In this paper the relationship of protein structures is uncovered within the framework of supervised learning. Specifically, the novel patterns based on convex hull representation are firstly extracted from a protein structure, then the classification system is constructed and machine learning methods such as neural networks, Hidden Markov Models (HMM) and Support Vector Machines (SVMs) are applied. The CATH scheme is highlighted in the classification experiments. The results indicate that the proposed supervised classification scheme is effective and efficient.

  17. Convexity, internal representations and the statistical mechanics of neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opper, M.; Kuhlmann, P.; Mietzner, A.

    1997-01-01

    We present an approach to the statistical mechanics of feedforward neural networks which is based on counting realizable internal representations by utilizing convexity properties of the weight space. For a toy model, our method yields storage capacities based on an annealed approximation, which are in close agreement with one-step replica symmetry-breaking results obtained from a standard approach. For a single-layer perceptron, a combinatorial result for the number of realizable output combinations is recovered and generalized to fixed stabilities.

  18. Convex aggregative modelling of infinite memory nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachel, Paweł

    2016-08-01

    The convex aggregation technique is applied for modelling general class of nonlinear systems with unknown structure and infinite memory. The finite sample size properties of the algorithm are formally established and compared to the standard least-squares counterpart of the method. The proposed algorithm demonstrates its advantages when the a-priori knowledge and the measurement data are both scarce, that is, when the information about the actual system structure is unknown or uncertain and the measurement set is small and disturbed by a noise. Numerical experiments illustrate application and practical benefits of the method for various nonlinear systems.

  19. A convexity preserving scheme for conservative advection transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Feng; Peng, Xindong

    2004-08-01

    A simple and practical scheme for advection transport equation is presented. The scheme, namely piecewise rational method (PRM), is a variant of the existing piecewise parabolic method (PPM) of Colella and Woodward (1984). Instead of the parabolic function, a rational function is used for the reconstruction. Making use of the convexity preserving nature of the rational function enables us to obtain oscillation-less numerical solutions, but avoids the adjustments of the cell-interface values to enforce the monotonicity in PPM. The PRM is very simple and computationally efficient. Our numerical results show that PRM is competitive to the PPM in many aspects, such as numerical accuracy and shape-preserving property.

  20. Using Fisher Information Criteria for Chemical Sensor Selection via Convex Optimization Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-11-16

    best sensors after an optimization procedure. Due to the positive definite nature of the Fisher information matrix, convex optimization may be used to...parametrized to select the best sensors after an optimization procedure. Due to the positive definite nature of the Fisher information matrix, convex op...Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6180--16-9711 Using Fisher Information Criteria for Chemical Sensor Selection via Convex

  1. Further Development in the Global Resolution of Convex Programs with Complementarity Constraints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-09

    discuss various methods to tighten the relaxation by exploiting complementarity, with the aim of constructing better approximations to the convex hull of...AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0126 Global Resolution of Convex Programs with Complementarity Constraints Angelia Nedich UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS Final Report 04...Development in the Global Resolution of Convex Programs with Complementarity Constraints 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  2. Foil Face Seal Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munson, John

    2009-01-01

    In the seal literature you can find many attempts by various researchers to adapt film riding seals to the gas turbine engine. None have been successful, potential distortion of the sealing faces is the primary reason. There is a film riding device that does accommodate distortion and is in service in aircraft applications, namely the foil bearing. More specifically a foil thrust bearing. These are not intended to be seals, and they do not accommodate large axial movement between shaft & static structure. By combining the 2 a unique type of face seal has been created. It functions like a normal face seal. The foil thrust bearing replaces the normal primary sealing surface. The compliance of the foil bearing allows the foils to track distortion of the mating seal ring. The foil seal has several perceived advantages over existing hydrodynamic designs, enumerated in the chart. Materials and design methodology needed for this application already exist. Also the load capacity requirements for the foil bearing are low since it only needs to support itself and overcome friction forces at the antirotation keys.

  3. A Face Inversion Effect without a Face

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandman, Talia; Yovel, Galit

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have attributed the face inversion effect (FIE) to configural processing of internal facial features in upright but not inverted faces. Recent findings suggest that face mechanisms can be activated by faceless stimuli presented in the context of a body. Here we asked whether faceless stimuli with or without body context may induce…

  4. Learning Faces from Photographs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longmore, Christopher A.; Liu, Chang Hong; Young, Andrew W.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies examining face learning have mostly used only a single exposure to 1 image of each of the faces to be learned. However, in daily life, faces are usually learned from multiple encounters. These 6 experiments examined the effects on face learning of repeated exposures to single or multiple images of a face. All experiments…

  5. Mapping Teacher-Faces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Greg; Cook, Ian

    2013-01-01

    This paper uses Deleuze and Guattari's concept of faciality to analyse the teacher's face. According to Deleuze and Guattari, the teacher-face is a special type of face because it is an "overcoded" face produced in specific landscapes. This paper suggests four limit-faces for teacher faciality that actualise different mixes of significance and…

  6. Iterative Projection Onto Convex Sets for Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Weiran; Boada, Fernando; Poser, Benedikt A.; Schirda, Claudiu; Stenger, V. A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Quantitative Susceptibility Map (QSM) reconstruction is ill posed due to the zero values on the “magic angle cone” that make the maps prone to streaking artifacts. We propose Projection Onto Convex Sets (POCS) in the method of Steepest Descent (SD) for QSM reconstruction. Methods Two convex projections, an object-support projection in the image domain and a projection in k-space were used. QSM reconstruction using the proposed SD-POCS method was compared to SD and POCS alone as well as with truncated k-space division (TKD) for numerically simulated and 7 T human brain phase data. Results The QSM reconstruction error from noise-free simulated phase data using SD-POCS is at least two orders of magnitude lower than using SD, POCS or TKD and has reduced streaking artifacts. Using the l1-TV reconstructed susceptibility as a gold standard for 7T in vivo imaging, SD-POCS showed better image quality comparing to SD, POCS or TKD from visual inspection. Conclusion POCS is an alternative method for regularization that can be used in an iterative minimization method such as SD for QSM reconstruction. PMID:24604410

  7. Convex foundations for generalized MaxEnt models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frongillo, Rafael; Reid, Mark D.

    2014-12-01

    We present an approach to maximum entropy models that highlights the convex geometry and duality of generalized exponential families (GEFs) and their connection to Bregman divergences. Using our framework, we are able to resolve a puzzling aspect of the bijection of Banerjee and coauthors between classical exponential families and what they call regular Bregman divergences. Their regularity condition rules out all but Bregman divergences generated from log-convex generators. We recover their bijection and show that a much broader class of divergences correspond to GEFs via two key observations: 1) Like classical exponential families, GEFs have a "cumulant" C whose subdifferential contains the mean: Eo˜pθ[φ(o)]∈∂C(θ) ; 2) Generalized relative entropy is a C-Bregman divergence between parameters: DF(pθ,pθ')= D C(θ,θ') , where DF becomes the KL divergence for F = -H. We also show that every incomplete market with cost function C can be expressed as a complete market, where the prices are constrained to be a GEF with cumulant C. This provides an entirely new interpretation of prediction markets, relating their design back to the principle of maximum entropy.

  8. Mixed convection heat transfer in concave and convex channels

    SciTech Connect

    Moukalled, F.; Doughan, A.; Acharya, S.

    1997-07-01

    Mixed convection heat transfer studies in the literature have been primarily confined to pipe and rectangular channel geometry's. In some applications, however, heat transfer in curved channels may be of interest (e.g., nozzle and diffuser shaped passages in HVAC systems, fume hoods, chimneys, bell-shaped or dome-shaped chemical reactors, etc.). A numerical investigation of laminar mixed convection heat transfer of air in concave and convex channels is presented. Six different channel aspects ratios (R/L = 1.04, 1.25, 2.5, 5, 10, and {infinity}) and five different values of Gr/Re{sup 2} (Gr/Re{sup 2} = 0, 0.1, 1, 3, 5) are considered. Results are displayed in terms of streamline and isotherm plots, velocity and temperature profiles, and local and average Nusselt number estimates. Numerical predictions reveal that compared to straight channels of equal height, concave channels of low aspect ratio have lower heat transfer at relatively low values of Gr/Re{sup 2} and higher heat transfer at high values of Gr/Re{sup 2}. When compared to straight channels of equal heated length, concave channels are always found to have lower heat transfer and for all values of Gr/Re{sup 2}. On the other hand, predictions for convex channels revealed enhancement in heat transfer compared to straight channels of equal height and/or equal heated length for all values of Gr/Re{sup 2}.

  9. Convex hulls of random walks: Large-deviation properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claussen, Gunnar; Hartmann, Alexander K.; Majumdar, Satya N.

    2015-05-01

    We study the convex hull of the set of points visited by a two-dimensional random walker of T discrete time steps. Two natural observables that characterize the convex hull in two dimensions are its perimeter L and area A . While the mean perimeter and the mean area have been studied before, analytically and numerically, and exact results are known for large T (Brownian motion limit), little is known about the full distributions P (A ) and P (L ) . In this paper we provide numerical results for these distributions. We use a sophisticated large-deviation approach that allows us to study the distributions over a larger range of the support, where the probabilities P (A ) and P (L ) are as small as 10-300. We analyze (open) random walks as well as (closed) Brownian bridges on the two-dimensional discrete grid as well as in the two-dimensional plane. The resulting distributions exhibit, for large T , a universal scaling behavior (independent of the details of the jump distributions) as a function of A /T and L /√{T } , respectively. We are also able to obtain the rate function, describing rare events at the tails of these distributions, via a numerical extrapolation scheme and find a linear and square dependence as a function of the rescaled perimeter and the rescaled area, respectively.

  10. Convex hulls of random walks: Large-deviation properties.

    PubMed

    Claussen, Gunnar; Hartmann, Alexander K; Majumdar, Satya N

    2015-05-01

    We study the convex hull of the set of points visited by a two-dimensional random walker of T discrete time steps. Two natural observables that characterize the convex hull in two dimensions are its perimeter L and area A. While the mean perimeter 〈L〉 and the mean area 〈A〉 have been studied before, analytically and numerically, and exact results are known for large T (Brownian motion limit), little is known about the full distributions P(A) and P(L). In this paper we provide numerical results for these distributions. We use a sophisticated large-deviation approach that allows us to study the distributions over a larger range of the support, where the probabilities P(A) and P(L) are as small as 10(-300). We analyze (open) random walks as well as (closed) Brownian bridges on the two-dimensional discrete grid as well as in the two-dimensional plane. The resulting distributions exhibit, for large T, a universal scaling behavior (independent of the details of the jump distributions) as a function of A/T and L/√[T], respectively. We are also able to obtain the rate function, describing rare events at the tails of these distributions, via a numerical extrapolation scheme and find a linear and square dependence as a function of the rescaled perimeter and the rescaled area, respectively.

  11. Rationally convex sets on the unit sphere in ℂ2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wermer, John

    2008-04-01

    Let X be a rationally convex compact subset of the unit sphere S in ℂ2, of three-dimensional measure zero. Denote by R( X) the uniform closure on X of the space of functions P/ Q, where P and Q are polynomials and Q≠0 on X. When does R( X)= C( X)? Our work makes use of the kernel function for the bar{δ}b operator on S, introduced by Henkin in [5] and builds on results obtained in Anderson Izzo Wermer [3]. We define a real-valued function ɛ X on the open unit ball int B, with ɛ X ( z, w) tending to 0 as ( z, w) tends to X. We give a growth condition on ɛ X ( z, w) as ( z, w) approaches X, and show that this condition is sufficient for R( X)= C( X) (Theorem 1.1). In Section 4, we consider a class of sets X which are limits of a family of Levi-flat hypersurfaces in int B. For each compact set Y in ℂ2, we denote the rationally convex hull of Y by widehat{Y}. A general reference is Rudin [8] or Aleksandrov [1].

  12. Multiband RF pulses with improved performance via convex optimization.

    PubMed

    Shang, Hong; Larson, Peder E Z; Kerr, Adam; Reed, Galen; Sukumar, Subramaniam; Elkhaled, Adam; Gordon, Jeremy W; Ohliger, Michael A; Pauly, John M; Lustig, Michael; Vigneron, Daniel B

    2016-01-01

    Selective RF pulses are commonly designed with the desired profile as a low pass filter frequency response. However, for many MRI and NMR applications, the spectrum is sparse with signals existing at a few discrete resonant frequencies. By specifying a multiband profile and releasing the constraint on "don't-care" regions, the RF pulse performance can be improved to enable a shorter duration, sharper transition, or lower peak B1 amplitude. In this project, a framework for designing multiband RF pulses with improved performance was developed based on the Shinnar-Le Roux (SLR) algorithm and convex optimization. It can create several types of RF pulses with multiband magnitude profiles, arbitrary phase profiles and generalized flip angles. The advantage of this framework with a convex optimization approach is the flexible trade-off of different pulse characteristics. Designs for specialized selective RF pulses for balanced SSFP hyperpolarized (HP) (13)C MRI, a dualband saturation RF pulse for (1)H MR spectroscopy, and a pre-saturation pulse for HP (13)C study were developed and tested.

  13. What's in a face? The role of depth undulations in three-dimensional depth-inversion illusions.

    PubMed

    Vlajnic, Vanja M; Papathomas, Thomas V; Keane, Brian P; Zalokostas, Anna; Silverstein, Steven M

    2014-01-01

    Upright hollow human faces produce among the strongest depth-inversion illusions (DIIs), but why? We considered the role of depth undulations by comparing four types of hollow objects: an ellipsoid, a human mask, and two symmetric 'Martian'masks, which wavered in depth like the human mask but which lacked face-like features. Illusion strength was quantified either as the critical viewing distance at which the 3-D percept switched between convex and concave (experiment 1) or as the proportion of time ('predominance') that observers experienced DII from a fixed intermediate viewing distance (experiment 2). Critical distances were smallest--and hence the illusion was strongest--for the upright human mask; the remaining objects produced undifferentiated critical distance values. The predominance results were more fine-grained: illusions were experienced most often for the upright human mask, least often for the hollow ellipsoid, and to an intermediate extent for the Martian and upside-down human masks. These results suggest: (1) an upside-down human mask and a surface with nonface features undulating in depth are equivalent for the purposes of generating DIIs; (2) depth undulations contribute to DII; and (3) such undulations are most effective when structured into an upright human face.

  14. On FastMap and the convex hull of multivariate data: toward fast and robust dimension reduction.

    PubMed

    Ostrouchov, George; Samatova, Nagiza F

    2005-08-01

    FastMap is a dimension reduction technique that operates on distances between objects. Although only distances are used, implicitly the technique assumes that the objects are points in a p-dimensional Euclidean space. It selects a sequence of k < or = p orthogonal axes defined by distant pairs of points (called pivots) and computes the projection of the points onto the orthogonal axes. We show that FastMap uses only the outer envelope of a data set. Pivots are taken from the faces, usually vertices, of the convex hull of the data points in the original implicit Euclidean space. This provides a bridge to results in robust statistics, where the convex hull is used as a tool in multivariate outlier detection and in robust estimation methods. The connection sheds new light on the properties of FastMap, particularly its sensitivity to outliers, and provides an opportunity for a new class of dimension reduction algorithms, RobustMaps, that retain the speed of FastMap and exploit ideas in robust statistics.

  15. SNL3dFace

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, Trina; Koch, Mark; Koudelka, Melissa; Peters, Ralph; Little, Charles; Boehnen, Chris; Peters, Tanya

    2007-07-20

    This software distribution contains MATLAB and C++ code to enable identity verification using 3D images that may or may not contain a texture component. The code is organized to support system performance testing and system capability demonstration through the proper configuration of the available user interface. Using specific algorithm parameters the face recognition system has been demonstrated to achieve a 96.6% verification rate (Pd) at 0.001 false alarm rate. The system computes robust facial features of a 3D normalized face using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis (FLDA). A 3D normalized face is obtained by alighning each face, represented by a set of XYZ coordinated, to a scaled reference face using the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm. The scaled reference face is then deformed to the input face using an iterative framework with parameters that control the deformed surface regulation an rate of deformation. A variety of options are available to control the information that is encoded by the PCA. Such options include the XYZ coordinates, the difference of each XYZ coordinates from the reference, the Z coordinate, the intensity/texture values, etc. In addition to PCA/FLDA feature projection this software supports feature matching to obtain similarity matrices for performance analysis. In addition, this software supports visualization of the STL, MRD, 2D normalized, and PCA synthetic representations in a 3D environment.

  16. Face recognition across non-uniform motion blur, illumination, and pose.

    PubMed

    Punnappurath, Abhijith; Rajagopalan, Ambasamudram Narayanan; Taheri, Sima; Chellappa, Rama; Seetharaman, Guna

    2015-07-01

    Existing methods for performing face recognition in the presence of blur are based on the convolution model and cannot handle non-uniform blurring situations that frequently arise from tilts and rotations in hand-held cameras. In this paper, we propose a methodology for face recognition in the presence of space-varying motion blur comprising of arbitrarily-shaped kernels. We model the blurred face as a convex combination of geometrically transformed instances of the focused gallery face, and show that the set of all images obtained by non-uniformly blurring a given image forms a convex set. We first propose a non-uniform blur-robust algorithm by making use of the assumption of a sparse camera trajectory in the camera motion space to build an energy function with l1 -norm constraint on the camera motion. The framework is then extended to handle illumination variations by exploiting the fact that the set of all images obtained from a face image by non-uniform blurring and changing the illumination forms a bi-convex set. Finally, we propose an elegant extension to also account for variations in pose.

  17. Fast inference of ill-posed problems within a convex space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-de-Cossio-Diaz, J.; Mulet, R.

    2016-07-01

    In multiple scientific and technological applications we face the problem of having low dimensional data to be justified by a linear model defined in a high dimensional parameter space. The difference in dimensionality makes the problem ill-defined: the model is consistent with the data for many values of its parameters. The objective is to find the probability distribution of parameter values consistent with the data, a problem that can be cast as the exploration of a high dimensional convex polytope. In this work we introduce a novel algorithm to solve this problem efficiently. It provides results that are statistically indistinguishable from currently used numerical techniques while its running time scales linearly with the system size. We show that the algorithm performs robustly in many abstract and practical applications. As working examples we simulate the effects of restricting reaction fluxes on the space of feasible phenotypes of a genome scale Escherichia coli metabolic network and infer the traffic flow between origin and destination nodes in a real communication network.

  18. A fast and accurate sparse continuous signal reconstruction by homotopy DCD with non-convex regularization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianyun; Lu, Xinfei; Yu, Xiaofei; Xi, Zhendong; Chen, Weidong

    2014-03-26

    In recent years, various applications regarding sparse continuous signal recovery such as source localization, radar imaging, communication channel estimation, etc., have been addressed from the perspective of compressive sensing (CS) theory. However, there are two major defects that need to be tackled when considering any practical utilization. The first issue is off-grid problem caused by the basis mismatch between arbitrary located unknowns and the pre-specified dictionary, which would make conventional CS reconstruction methods degrade considerably. The second important issue is the urgent demand for low-complexity algorithms, especially when faced with the requirement of real-time implementation. In this paper, to deal with these two problems, we have presented three fast and accurate sparse reconstruction algorithms, termed as HR-DCD, Hlog-DCD and Hlp-DCD, which are based on homotopy, dichotomous coordinate descent (DCD) iterations and non-convex regularizations, by combining with the grid refinement technique. Experimental results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms and related analysis.

  19. A Fast and Accurate Sparse Continuous Signal Reconstruction by Homotopy DCD with Non-Convex Regularization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tianyun; Lu, Xinfei; Yu, Xiaofei; Xi, Zhendong; Chen, Weidong

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, various applications regarding sparse continuous signal recovery such as source localization, radar imaging, communication channel estimation, etc., have been addressed from the perspective of compressive sensing (CS) theory. However, there are two major defects that need to be tackled when considering any practical utilization. The first issue is off-grid problem caused by the basis mismatch between arbitrary located unknowns and the pre-specified dictionary, which would make conventional CS reconstruction methods degrade considerably. The second important issue is the urgent demand for low-complexity algorithms, especially when faced with the requirement of real-time implementation. In this paper, to deal with these two problems, we have presented three fast and accurate sparse reconstruction algorithms, termed as HR-DCD, Hlog-DCD and Hlp-DCD, which are based on homotopy, dichotomous coordinate descent (DCD) iterations and non-convex regularizations, by combining with the grid refinement technique. Experimental results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms and related analysis. PMID:24675758

  20. Chance-Constrained Guidance With Non-Convex Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ono, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    Missions to small bodies, such as comets or asteroids, require autonomous guidance for descent to these small bodies. Such guidance is made challenging by uncertainty in the position and velocity of the spacecraft, as well as the uncertainty in the gravitational field around the small body. In addition, the requirement to avoid collision with the asteroid represents a non-convex constraint that means finding the optimal guidance trajectory, in general, is intractable. In this innovation, a new approach is proposed for chance-constrained optimal guidance with non-convex constraints. Chance-constrained guidance takes into account uncertainty so that the probability of collision is below a specified threshold. In this approach, a new bounding method has been developed to obtain a set of decomposed chance constraints that is a sufficient condition of the original chance constraint. The decomposition of the chance constraint enables its efficient evaluation, as well as the application of the branch and bound method. Branch and bound enables non-convex problems to be solved efficiently to global optimality. Considering the problem of finite-horizon robust optimal control of dynamic systems under Gaussian-distributed stochastic uncertainty, with state and control constraints, a discrete-time, continuous-state linear dynamics model is assumed. Gaussian-distributed stochastic uncertainty is a more natural model for exogenous disturbances such as wind gusts and turbulence than the previously studied set-bounded models. However, with stochastic uncertainty, it is often impossible to guarantee that state constraints are satisfied, because there is typically a non-zero probability of having a disturbance that is large enough to push the state out of the feasible region. An effective framework to address robustness with stochastic uncertainty is optimization with chance constraints. These require that the probability of violating the state constraints (i.e., the probability of

  1. Convex Structures: Ray and Modal Techniques for Propagation and Scattering.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyman, Ehud

    A self-contained theory of two-dimensional time -harmonic and transient fields scattered by and/or guided along a smooth convex object is presented. Emphasis is on the high frequency region where ray methods are applicable. Guidance along a smooth convex boundary is formulated in terms of a self-consistent system of rays which are complex due to energy leakage. These complex ray congruences are generated by a complex caustic whose location relative to the boundary determines the type of the guided mode: trapped wave with slight leakage, creeping wave or leaky wave. While closure can be invoked globally when the object has circular symmetry, a local closure condition can be found in the case of variable curvature when the caustic is close to the boundary. By imposing circumferential periodicity on the guided modes traveling around the object, one may synthesize the complex resonances which form the basis for analysis of transient scattering by the Singularity Expansion Method (SEM). A hybrid method is developed therefrom which expresses transient scattering by a perfectly conducting smooth convex cylinder in terms of a well-defined combination of traveling (creeping) wave fields and of SEM resonances. The former describe efficiently the high-frequency effects that dominate the early time response while the latter are more appropriate for the lower frequency behavior at later times. Intimately related to the phenomena described above is the mechanism of excitation of ray fields, and the associated energy transfer, when a source is located near a curved interface. This problem is explored for a canonical prototype that involves a high-frequency line source on the concave (interior) side of a curved dielectric interface, which side also contains the denser medium. A detailed study of the transmitted field resolves the intricate behavior in the vicinity of the critically refracted ray in terms of GTD parameters appropriate to regular and to transition regions. The

  2. Hausdorff methods for approximating the convex Edgeworth-Pareto hull in integer problems with monotone objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pospelov, A. I.

    2016-08-01

    Adaptive methods for the polyhedral approximation of the convex Edgeworth-Pareto hull in multiobjective monotone integer optimization problems are proposed and studied. For these methods, theoretical convergence rate estimates with respect to the number of vertices are obtained. The estimates coincide in order with those for filling and augmentation H-methods intended for the approximation of nonsmooth convex compact bodies.

  3. Nonexpansiveness of a linearized augmented Lagrangian operator for hierarchical convex optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, Masao; Yamada, Isao

    2017-04-01

    Hierarchical convex optimization concerns two-stage optimization problems: the first stage problem is a convex optimization; the second stage problem is the minimization of a convex function over the solution set of the first stage problem. For the hierarchical convex optimization, the hybrid steepest descent method (HSDM) can be applied, where the solution set of the first stage problem must be expressed as the fixed point set of a certain nonexpansive operator. In this paper, we propose a nonexpansive operator that yields a computationally efficient update when it is plugged into the HSDM. The proposed operator is inspired by the update of the linearized augmented Lagrangian method. It is applicable to characterize the solution set of recent sophisticated convex optimization problems found in the context of inverse problems, where the sum of multiple proximable convex functions involving linear operators must be minimized to incorporate preferable properties into the minimizers. For such a problem formulation, there has not yet been reported any nonexpansive operator that yields an update free from the inversions of linear operators in cases where it is utilized in the HSDM. Unlike previously known nonexpansive operators, the proposed operator yields an inversion-free update in such cases. As an application of the proposed operator plugged into the HSDM, we also present, in the context of the so-called superiorization, an algorithmic solution to a convex optimization problem over the generalized convex feasible set where the intersection of the hard constraints is not necessarily simple.

  4. A Bayesian observer replicates convexity context effects in figure-ground perception.

    PubMed

    Goldreich, Daniel; Peterson, Mary A

    2012-01-01

    Peterson and Salvagio (2008) demonstrated convexity context effects in figure-ground perception. Subjects shown displays consisting of unfamiliar alternating convex and concave regions identified the convex regions as foreground objects progressively more frequently as the number of regions increased; this occurred only when the concave regions were homogeneously colored. The origins of these effects have been unclear. Here, we present a two-free-parameter Bayesian observer that replicates convexity context effects. The Bayesian observer incorporates two plausible expectations regarding three-dimensional scenes: (1) objects tend to be convex rather than concave, and (2) backgrounds tend (more than foreground objects) to be homogeneously colored. The Bayesian observer estimates the probability that a depicted scene is three-dimensional, and that the convex regions are figures. It responds stochastically by sampling from its posterior distributions. Like human observers, the Bayesian observer shows convexity context effects only for images with homogeneously colored concave regions. With optimal parameter settings, it performs similarly to the average human subject on the four display types tested. We propose that object convexity and background color homogeneity are environmental regularities exploited by human visual perception; vision achieves figure-ground perception by interpreting ambiguous images in light of these and other expected regularities in natural scenes.

  5. Facing facts: neuronal mechanisms of face perception.

    PubMed

    Dekowska, Monika; Kuniecki, Michał; Jaśkowski, Piotr

    2008-01-01

    The face is one of the most important stimuli carrying social meaning. Thanks to the fast analysis of faces, we are able to judge physical attractiveness and features of their owners' personality, intentions, and mood. From one's facial expression we can gain information about danger present in the environment. It is obvious that the ability to process efficiently one's face is crucial for survival. Therefore, it seems natural that in the human brain there exist structures specialized for face processing. In this article, we present recent findings from studies on the neuronal mechanisms of face perception and recognition in the light of current theoretical models. Results from brain imaging (fMRI, PET) and electrophysiology (ERP, MEG) show that in face perception particular regions (i.e. FFA, STS, IOA, AMTG, prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortex) are involved. These results are confirmed by behavioral data and clinical observations as well as by animal studies. The developmental findings reviewed in this article lead us to suppose that the ability to analyze face-like stimuli is hard-wired and improves during development. Still, experience with faces is not sufficient for an individual to become an expert in face perception. This thesis is supported by the investigation of individuals with developmental disabilities, especially with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD).

  6. Analysis of Conformational B-Cell Epitopes in the Antibody-Antigen Complex Using the Depth Function and the Convex Hull.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei; Ruan, Jishou; Hu, Gang; Wang, Kui; Hanlon, Michelle; Gao, Jianzhao

    2015-01-01

    The prediction of conformational b-cell epitopes plays an important role in immunoinformatics. Several computational methods are proposed on the basis of discrimination determined by the solvent-accessible surface between epitopes and non-epitopes, but the performance of existing methods is far from satisfying. In this paper, depth functions and the k-th surface convex hull are used to analyze epitopes and exposed non-epitopes. On each layer of the protein, we compute relative solvent accessibility and four different types of depth functions, i.e., Chakravarty depth, DPX, half-sphere exposure and half space depth, to analyze the location of epitopes on different layers of the proteins. We found that conformational b-cell epitopes are rich in charged residues Asp, Glu, Lys, Arg, His; aliphatic residues Gly, Pro; non-charged residues Asn, Gln; and aromatic residue Tyr. Conformational b-cell epitopes are rich in coils. Conservation of epitopes is not significantly lower than that of exposed non-epitopes. The average depths (obtained by four methods) for epitopes are significantly lower than that of non-epitopes on the surface using the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Epitopes are more likely to be located in the outer layer of the convex hull of a protein. On the benchmark dataset, the cumulate 10th convex hull covers 84.6% of exposed residues on the protein surface area, and nearly 95% of epitope sites. These findings may be helpful in building a predictor for epitopes.

  7. Attention Capture by Faces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langton, Stephen R. H.; Law, Anna S.; Burton, A. Mike; Schweinberger, Stefan R.

    2008-01-01

    We report three experiments that investigate whether faces are capable of capturing attention when in competition with other non-face objects. In Experiment 1a participants took longer to decide that an array of objects contained a butterfly target when a face appeared as one of the distracting items than when the face did not appear in the array.…

  8. Convex rear view mirrors compromise distance and time-to-contact judgements.

    PubMed

    Hecht, Heiko; Brauer, Julia

    2007-04-01

    Convex rear view mirrors increasingly replace planar mirrors in automobiles. While increasing the field of view, convex mirrors are also taken to increase distance estimates and thereby reduce safety margins. However, this study failed to replicate systematic distance estimation errors in a real world setting. Whereas distance estimates were accurate on average, convex mirrors lead to significantly more variance in distance and spacing estimations. A second experiment explored the effect of mirrors on time-to-contact estimations, which had not been previously researched. Potential effects of display size were separated from effects caused by distortion in convex mirrors. Time-to-contact estimations without a mirror were most accurate. However, not distortion, but visual angle seemed to cause estimation biases. Evaluating advantages and disadvantages of convex mirrors is far more complex than expected so far.

  9. Convex crystal x-ray spectrometer for laser plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    May, M.; Heeter, R.; Emig, J.

    2004-10-01

    Measuring time and space-resolved spectra is important for understanding Hohlraum and Halfraum plasmas. Experiments at the OMEGA laser have used the Nova TSPEC which was not optimized for the OMEGA diagnostic space envelope or for the needed spectroscopic coverage and resolution. An improved multipurpose spectrometer snout, the MSPEC, has been constructed and fielded on OMEGA. The MSPEC provides the maximal internal volume for mounting crystals without any beam interferences at either 2x or 3x magnification. The RAP crystal is in a convex mounting geometry bent to a 20 cm radius of curvature. The spectral resolution, E/dE, is about 200 at 2.5 keV. The spectral coverage is 2 to 4.5 keV. The MSPEC can record four separate spectra on the framing camera at time intervals of up to several ns. The spectrometer design and initial field-test performance will be presented and compared to that of the TSPEC.

  10. Numerical optimization method for packing regular convex polygons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galiev, Sh. I.; Lisafina, M. S.

    2016-08-01

    An algorithm is presented for the approximate solution of the problem of packing regular convex polygons in a given closed bounded domain G so as to maximize the total area of the packed figures. On G a grid is constructed whose nodes generate a finite set W on G, and the centers of the figures to be packed can be placed only at some points of W. The problem of packing these figures with centers in W is reduced to a 0-1 linear programming problem. A two-stage algorithm for solving the resulting problems is proposed. The algorithm finds packings of the indicated figures in an arbitrary closed bounded domain on the plane. Numerical results are presented that demonstrate the effectiveness of the method.

  11. Convex probe endobronchial ultrasound: applications beyond conventional indications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Zheng, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is maturing and gaining acceptance by more and more clinicians for lymph node staging of lung cancer and diagnosis of mediastinal and hilar masses or lymph node enlargement by convex probe endobronchial ultrasound (CP-EBUS). The application of CP-EBUS, however, is not limited to conventional indications. Diagnostically, elastography is a new technology for the differentiation of benign and malignant lymph nodes before aspiration. CP-EBUS can also be used for pulmonary vascular diseases, such as pulmonary embolism (PE) and non-thrombotic endovascular lesions (NELs). Therapeutically, CP-EBUS can be used for cyst drainage and drug injections. CP-EBUS is not limited to observation and aspiration of mediastinal masses and lymph nodes, but is also suitable for exploration of other tissues external to the central airway, which necessitates unprecedented skills for the bronchoscopist. PMID:26543618

  12. Isosurface construction in any dimension using Convex Hulls.

    PubMed

    Bhaniramka, Praveen; Wenger, Rephael; Crawfis, Roger

    2004-01-01

    We present an algorithm for constructing isosurfaces in any dimension. The input to the algorithm is a set of scalar values in a d-dimensional regular grid of (topological) hypercubes. The output is a set of (d-1)-dimensional simplices forming a piecewise linear approximation to the isosurface. The algorithm constructs the isosurface piecewise within each hypercube in the grid using the convex hull of an appropriate set of points. We prove that our algorithm correctly produces a triangulation of a (d-1)-manifold with boundary. In dimensions three and four, lookup tables with 2(8) and 2(16) entries, respectively, can be used to speed the algorithm's running time. In three dimensions, this gives the popular Marching Cubes algorithm. We discuss applications of four-dimensional isosurface construction to time varying isosurfaces, interval volumes, and morphing.

  13. Trajectory Design Employing Convex Optimization for Landing on Irregularly Shaped Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinson, Robin M.; Lu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    proposed solution for designing the asteroid powered descent trajectory is to use convex optimization, a gravity model with higher fidelity than Newtonian, and an iterative solution process to design the fuel optimal trajectory. The solution to the convex optimization problem is the thrust profile, magnitude and direction, that will yield the minimum fuel trajectory for a soft landing at the target site, subject to various mission and operational constraints. The equations of motion are formulated in a rotating coordinate system and includes a high fidelity gravity model. The vehicle's thrust magnitude can vary between maximum and minimum bounds during the burn. Also, constraints are included to ensure that the vehicle does not run out of propellant, or go below the asteroid's surface, and any vehicle pointing requirements. The equations of motion are discretized and propagated with the trapezoidal rule in order to produce equality constraints for the optimization problem. These equality constraints allow the optimization algorithm to solve the entire problem, without including a propagator inside the optimization algorithm.

  14. Faciotopy-A face-feature map with face-like topology in the human occipital face area.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, Linda; Mur, Marieke; Kriegeskorte, Nikolaus

    2015-11-01

    The occipital face area (OFA) and fusiform face area (FFA) are brain regions thought to be specialized for face perception. However, their intrinsic functional organization and status as cortical areas with well-defined boundaries remains unclear. Here we test these regions for "faciotopy", a particular hypothesis about their intrinsic functional organisation. A faciotopic area would contain a face-feature map on the cortical surface, where cortical patches represent face features and neighbouring patches represent features that are physically neighbouring in a face. The faciotopy hypothesis is motivated by the idea that face regions might develop from a retinotopic protomap and acquire their selectivity for face features through natural visual experience. Faces have a prototypical configuration of features, are usually perceived in a canonical upright orientation, and are frequently fixated in particular locations. To test the faciotopy hypothesis, we presented images of isolated face features at fixation to subjects during functional magnetic resonance imaging. The responses in V1 were best explained by low-level image properties of the stimuli. OFA, and to a lesser degree FFA, showed evidence for faciotopic organization. When a single patch of cortex was estimated for each face feature, the cortical distances between the feature patches reflected the physical distance between the features in a face. Faciotopy would be the first example, to our knowledge, of a cortical map reflecting the topology, not of a part of the organism itself (its retina in retinotopy, its body in somatotopy), but of an external object of particular perceptual significance.

  15. Path Following in the Exact Penalty Method of Convex Programming

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hua; Lange, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Classical penalty methods solve a sequence of unconstrained problems that put greater and greater stress on meeting the constraints. In the limit as the penalty constant tends to ∞, one recovers the constrained solution. In the exact penalty method, squared penalties are replaced by absolute value penalties, and the solution is recovered for a finite value of the penalty constant. In practice, the kinks in the penalty and the unknown magnitude of the penalty constant prevent wide application of the exact penalty method in nonlinear programming. In this article, we examine a strategy of path following consistent with the exact penalty method. Instead of performing optimization at a single penalty constant, we trace the solution as a continuous function of the penalty constant. Thus, path following starts at the unconstrained solution and follows the solution path as the penalty constant increases. In the process, the solution path hits, slides along, and exits from the various constraints. For quadratic programming, the solution path is piecewise linear and takes large jumps from constraint to constraint. For a general convex program, the solution path is piecewise smooth, and path following operates by numerically solving an ordinary differential equation segment by segment. Our diverse applications to a) projection onto a convex set, b) nonnegative least squares, c) quadratically constrained quadratic programming, d) geometric programming, and e) semidefinite programming illustrate the mechanics and potential of path following. The final detour to image denoising demonstrates the relevance of path following to regularized estimation in inverse problems. In regularized estimation, one follows the solution path as the penalty constant decreases from a large value. PMID:26366044

  16. Path Following in the Exact Penalty Method of Convex Programming.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hua; Lange, Kenneth

    2015-07-01

    Classical penalty methods solve a sequence of unconstrained problems that put greater and greater stress on meeting the constraints. In the limit as the penalty constant tends to ∞, one recovers the constrained solution. In the exact penalty method, squared penalties are replaced by absolute value penalties, and the solution is recovered for a finite value of the penalty constant. In practice, the kinks in the penalty and the unknown magnitude of the penalty constant prevent wide application of the exact penalty method in nonlinear programming. In this article, we examine a strategy of path following consistent with the exact penalty method. Instead of performing optimization at a single penalty constant, we trace the solution as a continuous function of the penalty constant. Thus, path following starts at the unconstrained solution and follows the solution path as the penalty constant increases. In the process, the solution path hits, slides along, and exits from the various constraints. For quadratic programming, the solution path is piecewise linear and takes large jumps from constraint to constraint. For a general convex program, the solution path is piecewise smooth, and path following operates by numerically solving an ordinary differential equation segment by segment. Our diverse applications to a) projection onto a convex set, b) nonnegative least squares, c) quadratically constrained quadratic programming, d) geometric programming, and e) semidefinite programming illustrate the mechanics and potential of path following. The final detour to image denoising demonstrates the relevance of path following to regularized estimation in inverse problems. In regularized estimation, one follows the solution path as the penalty constant decreases from a large value.

  17. Estimation of Saxophone Control Parameters by Convex Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cheng-i; Smyth, Tamara; Lipton, Zachary C.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, an approach to jointly estimating the tone hole configuration (fingering) and reed model parameters of a saxophone is presented. The problem isn't one of merely estimating pitch as one applied fingering can be used to produce several different pitches by bugling or overblowing. Nor can a fingering be estimated solely by the spectral envelope of the produced sound (as it might for estimation of vocal tract shape in speech) since one fingering can produce markedly different spectral envelopes depending on the player's embouchure and control of the reed. The problem is therefore addressed by jointly estimating both the reed (source) parameters and the fingering (filter) of a saxophone model using convex optimization and 1) a bank of filter frequency responses derived from measurement of the saxophone configured with all possible fingerings and 2) sample recordings of notes produced using all possible fingerings, played with different overblowing, dynamics and timbre. The saxophone model couples one of several possible frequency response pairs (corresponding to the applied fingering), and a quasi-static reed model generating input pressure at the mouthpiece, with control parameters being blowing pressure and reed stiffness. Applied fingering and reed parameters are estimated for a given recording by formalizing a minimization problem, where the cost function is the error between the recording and the synthesized sound produced by the model having incremental parameter values for blowing pressure and reed stiffness. The minimization problem is nonlinear and not differentiable and is made solvable using convex optimization. The performance of the fingering identification is evaluated with better accuracy than previous reported value. PMID:27754493

  18. Familiar face + novel face = familiar face? Representational bias in the perception of morphed faces in chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Myowa-Yamakoshi, Masako

    2016-01-01

    Highly social animals possess a well-developed ability to distinguish the faces of familiar from novel conspecifics to induce distinct behaviors for maintaining society. However, the behaviors of animals when they encounter ambiguous faces of familiar yet novel conspecifics, e.g., strangers with faces resembling known individuals, have not been well characterised. Using a morphing technique and preferential-looking paradigm, we address this question via the chimpanzee’s facial–recognition abilities. We presented eight subjects with three types of stimuli: (1) familiar faces, (2) novel faces and (3) intermediate morphed faces that were 50% familiar and 50% novel faces of conspecifics. We found that chimpanzees spent more time looking at novel faces and scanned novel faces more extensively than familiar or intermediate faces. Interestingly, chimpanzees looked at intermediate faces in a manner similar to familiar faces with regards to the fixation duration, fixation count, and saccade length for facial scanning, even though the participant was encountering the intermediate faces for the first time. We excluded the possibility that subjects merely detected and avoided traces of morphing in the intermediate faces. These findings suggest a bias for a feeling-of-familiarity that chimpanzees perceive familiarity with an intermediate face by detecting traces of a known individual, as 50% alternation is sufficient to perceive familiarity. PMID:27602275

  19. Programmed versus Face-to-Face Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, William M.; Ewing, Thomas N.

    1971-01-01

    A comparison was made of the effectiveness of a programmed Self-Counseling Manual and a normal precollege counseling interview by experienced counselors. Findings supported the use of programmed counseling as an adjunct to or substitute for face-to-face counseling. (Author)

  20. A Shape-Based Account for Holistic Face Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Mintao; Bülthoff, Heinrich H.; Bülthoff, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Faces are processed holistically, so selective attention to 1 face part without any influence of the others often fails. In this study, 3 experiments investigated what type of facial information (shape or surface) underlies holistic face processing and whether generalization of holistic processing to nonexperienced faces requires extensive…

  1. Description and recognition of faces from 3D data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coombes, Anne M.; Richards, Robin; Linney, Alfred D.; Bruce, Vicki; Fright, Rick

    1992-12-01

    A method based on differential geometry, is presented for mathematically describing the shape of the facial surface. Three-dimensional data for the face are collected by optical surface scanning. The method allows the segmentation of the face into regions of a particular `surface type,' according to the surface curvature. Eight different surface types are produced which all have perceptually meaningful interpretations. The correspondence of the surface type regions to the facial features are easily visualized, allowing a qualitative assessment of the face. A quantitative description of the face in terms of the surface type regions can be produced and the variation of the description between faces is demonstrated. A set of optical surface scans can be registered together and averages to produce an average male and average female face. Thus an assessment of how individuals vary from the average can be made as well as a general statement about the differences between male and female faces. This method will enable an investigation to be made as to how reliably faces can be individuated by their surface shape which, if feasible, may be the basis of an automatic system for recognizing faces. It also has applications in physical anthropology, for classification of the face, facial reconstructive surgery, to quantify the changes in a face altered by reconstructive surgery and growth, and in visual perception, to assess the recognizability of faces. Examples of some of these applications are presented.

  2. Growth morphology of vicinal hillocks on the (101) face of KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}: Evidence of surface diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Land, T.A.; De Yoreo, J.J.; Lee, J.D.; Ferguson, J.R.

    1995-01-10

    The growth morphologies of vicinal hillocks on KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} (101) surfaces have been investigated using atomic force microscopy. Both 2D and spiral dislocation growth hillocks are observed on the same crystal surface at supersaturations of {approximately}5%. Growth occurs on monomolecular 5 {Angstrom} steps both by step-flow and through layer-by-layer growth. The distribution of islands on the terraces demonstrate that surface diffusion is an important factor during growth. Terraces that are less than the diffusion length do not contain any islands. This, together with the length scale of the inter island spacing and the denuded zones provide an estimate of the diffusion length. In situ experiments at very low supersaturation ({approximately}0.l%) show that growth is a discontinuous process due to step pinning. In addition, in situ images allow for the direct determination of the fundamental growth parameters {alpha}, the step edge energy, and {beta}, the kinetic coefficient.

  3. Maximum margin classification based on flexible convex hulls for fault diagnosis of roller bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Ming; Yang, Yu; Zheng, Jinde; Cheng, Junsheng

    2016-01-01

    A maximum margin classification based on flexible convex hulls (MMC-FCH) is proposed and applied to fault diagnosis of roller bearings. In this method, the class region of each sample set is approximated by a flexible convex hull of its training samples, and then an optimal separating hyper-plane that maximizes the geometric margin between flexible convex hulls is constructed by solving a closest pair of points problem. By using the kernel trick, MMC-FCH can be extended to nonlinear cases. In addition, multi-class classification problems can be processed by constructing binary pairwise classifiers as in support vector machine (SVM). Actually, the classical SVM also can be regarded as a maximum margin classification based on convex hulls (MMC-CH), which approximates each class region with a convex hull. The convex hull is a special case of the flexible convex hull. To train a MMC-FCH classifier, time-domain and frequency-domain statistical parameters are extracted not only from raw vibration signals but also from the resulting intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) by performing empirical mode decomposition (EMD) on the raw signals, and then the distance evaluation technique (DET) is used to select salient features from the whole statistical features. The experiments on bearing datasets show that the proposed method can reliably recognize different bearing faults.

  4. 49 CFR 236.745 - Face, locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Face, locking. 236.745 Section 236.745 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Face, locking. The locking surface of a locking dog, tappet or cross locking of an interlocking machine....

  5. 49 CFR 236.745 - Face, locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Face, locking. 236.745 Section 236.745 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Face, locking. The locking surface of a locking dog, tappet or cross locking of an interlocking machine....

  6. 49 CFR 236.745 - Face, locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Face, locking. 236.745 Section 236.745 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Face, locking. The locking surface of a locking dog, tappet or cross locking of an interlocking machine....

  7. 49 CFR 236.745 - Face, locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Face, locking. 236.745 Section 236.745 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Face, locking. The locking surface of a locking dog, tappet or cross locking of an interlocking machine....

  8. 49 CFR 236.745 - Face, locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Face, locking. 236.745 Section 236.745 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Face, locking. The locking surface of a locking dog, tappet or cross locking of an interlocking machine....

  9. Face to Face Communications in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Malcolm M.; Davon, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    It has been reported that human face-to-face communications in space are compromised by facial edema, variations in the orientations of speakers and listeners, and background noises that are encountered in the shuttle and in space stations. To date, nearly all reports have been anecdotal or subjective, in the form of post-flight interviews or questionnaires; objective and quantitative data are generally lacking. Although it is acknowledged that efficient face-to-face communications are essential for astronauts to work safely and effectively, specific ways in which the space environment interferes with non-linguistic communication cues are poorly documented. Because we have only a partial understanding of how non-linguistic communication cues may change with mission duration, it is critically important to obtain objective data, and to evaluate these cues under well-controlled experimental conditions.

  10. Cell lysis induces redistribution of the GPI-anchored variant surface glycoprotein on both faces of the plasma membrane of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Cardoso De Almeida, M L; Geuskens, M; Pays, E

    1999-12-01

    African trypanosomes are coated by 10 million copies of a single variant specific glycoprotein (VSG) which are anchored in the plasma membrane by glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI). A GPI-specific phospholipase C (GPI-PLC) triggers fast VSG release upon cell lysis but in vivo it is safely controlled and topologically concealed from its substrate by being intracellular. One enigmatic aspect of GPI-PLC action therefore consists of how it could gain access to the VSG in the exoplasmic leaflet of the membrane. The data presented herewith disclose an unexpected possible solution for this puzzle: upon cell rupture the VSG invades the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane which thus becomes double coated. This unusual VSG rearrangement was stable in ruptured plasma membrane from GPI-PLC null mutant trypanosomes but transiently preceded VSG release in wild-type parasites. The formation of double coat membrane (DCM) was independent of the presence or activation of GPI-PLC, occurred both at 4 degrees C and 30 degrees C and was unaffected by the classical inhibitor of VSG release, p-choromercuryphenylsulfonic acid (PCM). DCMs conserved the same coat thickness and association with subpellicular microtubules as in intact cells and were prone to form vesicles following gradual detachment of the latter. Our data also demonstrate that: (i) GPI-PLC expressed by one trypanosome only targets its own plasma membrane, being unable to release VSG of another parasite; (ii) DCMs concomitantly formed from trypanosomes expressing different VSGs do not intermix, an indication that DCM might be refractory to membrane fusion.

  11. A One-Layer Recurrent Neural Network for Constrained Complex-Variable Convex Optimization.

    PubMed

    Qin, Sitian; Feng, Jiqiang; Song, Jiahui; Wen, Xingnan; Xu, Chen

    2016-12-22

    In this paper, based on CR calculus and penalty method, a one-layer recurrent neural network is proposed for solving constrained complex-variable convex optimization. It is proved that for any initial point from a given domain, the state of the proposed neural network reaches the feasible region in finite time and converges to an optimal solution of the constrained complex-variable convex optimization finally. In contrast to existing neural networks for complex-variable convex optimization, the proposed neural network has a lower model complexity and better convergence. Some numerical examples and application are presented to substantiate the effectiveness of the proposed neural network.

  12. Convexity and Concavity Properties of the Optimal Value Function in Parametric Nonlinear Programming.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-21

    Operations Research, Vol. 18, No. 1, pp. 107-118. FENCHEL , W. (1953). Convex Cones , Sets and Functions . Lecture Notes, Princeton University Press... FUNCTION AND CONVEXITY PROPERTIES OF THE SOLUTION SET MAP ..... .............. ... 40 5. CONCLUDING REMARKS ................ ...... 48 REFERENCES...I * -3- T-471 is the set conv(A) - {x1 + (l-X)x 12 XX 2 e A, A [0,1]1 . The set K CEr is a cone if x e K implies x e K for all > 0 ,and K is a convex

  13. On the James constant and B-convexity of Cesaro and Cesaro-Orlicz sequence spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maligranda, Lech; Petrot, Narin; Suantai, Suthep

    2007-02-01

    The classical James constant and the nth James constants, which are measure of B-convexity for the Cesaro sequence spaces cesp and the Cesaro-Orlicz sequence spaces cesM, are calculated. These investigations show that cesp,cesM are not uniformly non-square and even they are not B-convex. Therefore the classical Cesaro sequence spaces cesp are natural examples of reflexive spaces which are not B-convex. Moreover, the James constant for the two-dimensional Cesaro space is calculated.

  14. Statistical Mechanics of Optimal Convex Inference in High Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Advani, Madhu; Ganguli, Surya

    2016-07-01

    A fundamental problem in modern high-dimensional data analysis involves efficiently inferring a set of P unknown model parameters governing the relationship between the inputs and outputs of N noisy measurements. Various methods have been proposed to regress the outputs against the inputs to recover the P parameters. What are fundamental limits on the accuracy of regression, given finite signal-to-noise ratios, limited measurements, prior information, and computational tractability requirements? How can we optimally combine prior information with measurements to achieve these limits? Classical statistics gives incisive answers to these questions as the measurement density α =(N /P )→∞ . However, these classical results are not relevant to modern high-dimensional inference problems, which instead occur at finite α . We employ replica theory to answer these questions for a class of inference algorithms, known in the statistics literature as M-estimators. These algorithms attempt to recover the P model parameters by solving an optimization problem involving minimizing the sum of a loss function that penalizes deviations between the data and model predictions, and a regularizer that leverages prior information about model parameters. Widely cherished algorithms like maximum likelihood (ML) and maximum-a posteriori (MAP) inference arise as special cases of M-estimators. Our analysis uncovers fundamental limits on the inference accuracy of a subclass of M-estimators corresponding to computationally tractable convex optimization problems. These limits generalize classical statistical theorems like the Cramer-Rao bound to the high-dimensional setting with prior information. We further discover the optimal M-estimator for log-concave signal and noise distributions; we demonstrate that it can achieve our high-dimensional limits on inference accuracy, while ML and MAP cannot. Intriguingly, in high dimensions, these optimal algorithms become computationally simpler than

  15. Simulation of concave-convex imaging mirror system for development of a compact and achromatic full-field x-ray microscope.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Jumpei; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Sano, Yasuhisa; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2017-02-01

    We propose the use of two pairs of concave-convex mirrors as imaging optics for the compact full-field x-ray microscope with high resolution and magnification factors. The optics consists of two pairs of hyperbolic convex and elliptical concave mirrors with the principal surface near the object, consequently enabling the focal length to be 10 times shorter than conventional advanced Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror optics. This paper describes characteristics of the optics calculated by ray-tracing and wave-optical simulators. The expected spatial resolution is approximately 40 nm with a wide field of view of more than 10 μm and a total length of about 2 m, which may lead to the possibility of laboratory-sized, achromatic, and high-resolution full-field x-ray microscopes.

  16. Convex Crystal X-ray Spectrometer for Laser Plasma Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    May, M; Heeter, R; Emig, J

    2004-04-15

    Measuring time and space-resolved spectra is important for understanding Hohlraum and Halfraum plasmas. Experiments at the OMEGA laser have used the Nova TSPEC which was not optimized for the OMEGA diagnostic space envelope or for the needed spectroscopic coverage and resolution. An improved multipurpose spectrometer snout, the MSPEC, has been constructed and fielded on OMEGA. The MSPEC provides the maximal internal volume for mounting crystals without any beam interferences at either 2x or 3x magnification. The RAP crystal is in a convex mounting geometry bent to a 20 cm radius of curvature. The spectral resolution, E/dE, is about 200 at 2.5 keV. The spectral coverage is 2 to 4.5 keV. The MSPEC can record four separate spectra on the framing camera at time intervals of up to several ns. The spectrometer design and initial field-test performance will be presented and compared to that of the TSPEC. Work supported by U. S. DoE/UC LLNL contract W-7405-ENG-48

  17. A Localization Method for Multistatic SAR Based on Convex Optimization.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xuqi; Wu, Junjie; Yang, Jianyu; Sun, Zhichao; Huang, Yuling; Li, Zhongyu

    2015-01-01

    In traditional localization methods for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), the bistatic range sum (BRS) estimation and Doppler centroid estimation (DCE) are needed for the calculation of target localization. However, the DCE error greatly influences the localization accuracy. In this paper, a localization method for multistatic SAR based on convex optimization without DCE is investigated and the influence of BRS estimation error on localization accuracy is analysed. Firstly, by using the information of each transmitter and receiver (T/R) pair and the target in SAR image, the model functions of T/R pairs are constructed. Each model function's maximum is on the circumference of the ellipse which is the iso-range for its model function's T/R pair. Secondly, the target function whose maximum is located at the position of the target is obtained by adding all model functions. Thirdly, the target function is optimized based on gradient descent method to obtain the position of the target. During the iteration process, principal component analysis is implemented to guarantee the accuracy of the method and improve the computational efficiency. The proposed method only utilizes BRSs of a target in several focused images from multistatic SAR. Therefore, compared with traditional localization methods for SAR, the proposed method greatly improves the localization accuracy. The effectivity of the localization approach is validated by simulation experiment.

  18. A Localization Method for Multistatic SAR Based on Convex Optimization

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In traditional localization methods for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), the bistatic range sum (BRS) estimation and Doppler centroid estimation (DCE) are needed for the calculation of target localization. However, the DCE error greatly influences the localization accuracy. In this paper, a localization method for multistatic SAR based on convex optimization without DCE is investigated and the influence of BRS estimation error on localization accuracy is analysed. Firstly, by using the information of each transmitter and receiver (T/R) pair and the target in SAR image, the model functions of T/R pairs are constructed. Each model function’s maximum is on the circumference of the ellipse which is the iso-range for its model function’s T/R pair. Secondly, the target function whose maximum is located at the position of the target is obtained by adding all model functions. Thirdly, the target function is optimized based on gradient descent method to obtain the position of the target. During the iteration process, principal component analysis is implemented to guarantee the accuracy of the method and improve the computational efficiency. The proposed method only utilizes BRSs of a target in several focused images from multistatic SAR. Therefore, compared with traditional localization methods for SAR, the proposed method greatly improves the localization accuracy. The effectivity of the localization approach is validated by simulation experiment. PMID:26566031

  19. Optimization-based mesh correction with volume and convexity constraints

    DOE PAGES

    D'Elia, Marta; Ridzal, Denis; Peterson, Kara J.; ...

    2016-02-24

    Here, we consider the problem of finding a mesh such that 1) it is the closest, with respect to a suitable metric, to a given source mesh having the same connectivity, and 2) the volumes of its cells match a set of prescribed positive values that are not necessarily equal to the cell volumes in the source mesh. Also, this volume correction problem arises in important simulation contexts, such as satisfying a discrete geometric conservation law and solving transport equations by incremental remapping or similar semi-Lagrangian transport schemes. In this paper we formulate volume correction as a constrained optimization problemmore » in which the distance to the source mesh defines an optimization objective, while the prescribed cell volumes, mesh validity and/or cell convexity specify the constraints. We solve this problem numerically using a sequential quadratic programming (SQP) method whose performance scales with the mesh size. To achieve scalable performance we develop a specialized multigrid-based preconditioner for optimality systems that arise in the application of the SQP method to the volume correction problem. Numerical examples illustrate the importance of volume correction, and showcase the accuracy, robustness and scalability of our approach.« less

  20. Optimization-based mesh correction with volume and convexity constraints

    SciTech Connect

    D'Elia, Marta; Ridzal, Denis; Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel; Shashkov, Mikhail

    2016-02-24

    Here, we consider the problem of finding a mesh such that 1) it is the closest, with respect to a suitable metric, to a given source mesh having the same connectivity, and 2) the volumes of its cells match a set of prescribed positive values that are not necessarily equal to the cell volumes in the source mesh. Also, this volume correction problem arises in important simulation contexts, such as satisfying a discrete geometric conservation law and solving transport equations by incremental remapping or similar semi-Lagrangian transport schemes. In this paper we formulate volume correction as a constrained optimization problem in which the distance to the source mesh defines an optimization objective, while the prescribed cell volumes, mesh validity and/or cell convexity specify the constraints. We solve this problem numerically using a sequential quadratic programming (SQP) method whose performance scales with the mesh size. To achieve scalable performance we develop a specialized multigrid-based preconditioner for optimality systems that arise in the application of the SQP method to the volume correction problem. Numerical examples illustrate the importance of volume correction, and showcase the accuracy, robustness and scalability of our approach.

  1. Precision platform for convex lens-induced confinement microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berard, Daniel; McFaul, Christopher M. J.; Leith, Jason S.; Arsenault, Adriel K. J.; Michaud, François; Leslie, Sabrina R.

    2013-10-01

    We present the conception, fabrication, and demonstration of a versatile, computer-controlled microscopy device which transforms a standard inverted fluorescence microscope into a precision single-molecule imaging station. The device uses the principle of convex lens-induced confinement [S. R. Leslie, A. P. Fields, and A. E. Cohen, Anal. Chem. 82, 6224 (2010)], which employs a tunable imaging chamber to enhance background rejection and extend diffusion-limited observation periods. Using nanopositioning stages, this device achieves repeatable and dynamic control over the geometry of the sample chamber on scales as small as the size of individual molecules, enabling regulation of their configurations and dynamics. Using microfluidics, this device enables serial insertion as well as sample recovery, facilitating temporally controlled, high-throughput measurements of multiple reagents. We report on the simulation and experimental characterization of this tunable chamber geometry, and its influence upon the diffusion and conformations of DNA molecules over extended observation periods. This new microscopy platform has the potential to capture, probe, and influence the configurations of single molecules, with dramatically improved imaging conditions in comparison to existing technologies. These capabilities are of immediate interest to a wide range of research and industry sectors in biotechnology, biophysics, materials, and chemistry.

  2. Minimum convex hull mass estimations of complete mounted skeletons.

    PubMed

    Sellers, W I; Hepworth-Bell, J; Falkingham, P L; Bates, K T; Brassey, C A; Egerton, V M; Manning, P L

    2012-10-23

    Body mass is a critical parameter used to constrain biomechanical and physiological traits of organisms. Volumetric methods are becoming more common as techniques for estimating the body masses of fossil vertebrates. However, they are often accused of excessive subjective input when estimating the thickness of missing soft tissue. Here, we demonstrate an alternative approach where a minimum convex hull is derived mathematically from the point cloud generated by laser-scanning mounted skeletons. This has the advantage of requiring minimal user intervention and is thus more objective and far quicker. We test this method on 14 relatively large-bodied mammalian skeletons and demonstrate that it consistently underestimates body mass by 21 per cent with minimal scatter around the regression line. We therefore suggest that it is a robust method of estimating body mass where a mounted skeletal reconstruction is available and demonstrate its usage to predict the body mass of one of the largest, relatively complete sauropod dinosaurs: Giraffatitan brancai (previously Brachiosaurus) as 23200 kg.

  3. Multi-label Moves for MRFs with Truncated Convex Priors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veksler, Olga

    Optimization with graph cuts became very popular in recent years. As more applications rely on graph cuts, different energy functions are being employed. Recent evaluation of optimization algorithms showed that the widely used swap and expansion graph cut algorithms have an excellent performance for energies where the underlying MRF has Potts prior. Potts prior corresponds to assuming that the true labeling is piecewise constant. While surprisingly useful in practice, Potts prior is clearly not appropriate in many circumstances. However for more general priors, the swap and expansion algorithms do not perform as well. Both algorithms are based on moves that give each pixel a choice of only two labels. Therefore such moves can be referred to as binary moves. Recently, range moves that act on multiple labels simultaneously were introduced. As opposed to swap and expansion, each pixel has a choice of more than two labels in a range move. Therefore we call them multi-label moves. Range moves were shown to work better for problems with truncated convex priors, which imply a piecewise smooth labeling. Inspired by range moves, we develop several different variants of multi-label moves. We evaluate them on the problem of stereo correspondence and discuss their relative merits.

  4. Convexity, Jensen's inequality and benefits of noisy mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Brewster, John F; Graham, M Ruth; Mutch, W Alan C

    2005-09-22

    Mechanical ventilators breathe for you when you cannot or when your lungs are too sick to do their job. Most ventilators monotonously deliver the same-sized breaths, like clockwork; however, healthy people do not breathe this way. This has led to the development of a biologically variable ventilator--one that incorporates noise. There are indications that such a noisy ventilator may be beneficial for patients with very sick lungs. In this paper we use a probabilistic argument, based on Jensen's inequality, to identify the circumstances in which the addition of noise may be beneficial and, equally important, the circumstances in which it may not be beneficial. Using the local convexity of the relationship between airway pressure and tidal volume in the lung, we show that the addition of noise at low volume or low pressure results in higher mean volume (at the same mean pressure) or lower mean pressure (at the same mean volume). The consequence is enhanced gas exchange or less stress on the lungs, both clinically desirable. The argument has implications for other life support devices, such as cardiopulmonary bypass pumps. This paper illustrates the benefits of research that takes place at the interface between mathematics and medicine.

  5. Ultrafast Quantum Process Tomography via Continuous Measurement and Convex Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, Charles; Riofrio, Carlos; Deutsch, Ivan

    2013-03-01

    Quantum process tomography (QPT) is an essential tool to diagnose the implementation of a dynamical map. However, the standard protocol is extremely resource intensive. For a Hilbert space of dimension d, it requires d2 different input preparations followed by state tomography via the estimation of the expectation values of d2 - 1 orthogonal observables. We show that when the process is nearly unitary, we can dramatically improve the efficiency and robustness of QPT through a collective continuous measurement protocol on an ensemble of identically prepared systems. Given the measurement history we obtain the process matrix via a convex program that optimizes a desired cost function. We study two estimators: least-squares and compressive sensing. Both allow rapid QPT due to the condition of complete positivity of the map; this is a powerful constraint to force the process to be physical and consistent with the data. We apply the method to a real experimental implementation, where optimal control is used to perform a unitary map on a d = 8 dimensional system of hyperfine levels in cesium atoms, and obtain the measurement record via Faraday spectroscopy of a laser probe. Supported by the NSF

  6. Minimum convex hull mass estimations of complete mounted skeletons

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, W. I.; Hepworth-Bell, J.; Falkingham, P. L.; Bates, K. T.; Brassey, C. A.; Egerton, V. M.; Manning, P. L.

    2012-01-01

    Body mass is a critical parameter used to constrain biomechanical and physiological traits of organisms. Volumetric methods are becoming more common as techniques for estimating the body masses of fossil vertebrates. However, they are often accused of excessive subjective input when estimating the thickness of missing soft tissue. Here, we demonstrate an alternative approach where a minimum convex hull is derived mathematically from the point cloud generated by laser-scanning mounted skeletons. This has the advantage of requiring minimal user intervention and is thus more objective and far quicker. We test this method on 14 relatively large-bodied mammalian skeletons and demonstrate that it consistently underestimates body mass by 21 per cent with minimal scatter around the regression line. We therefore suggest that it is a robust method of estimating body mass where a mounted skeletal reconstruction is available and demonstrate its usage to predict the body mass of one of the largest, relatively complete sauropod dinosaurs: Giraffatitan brancai (previously Brachiosaurus) as 23200 kg. PMID:22675141

  7. Energy efficient face seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sehnal, J.; Sedy, J.; Etsion, I.; Zobens, A.

    1982-01-01

    Torque, face temperature, leakage, and wear of a flat face seal were compared with three coned face seals at pressures up to 2758 kPa and speeds up to 8000 rpm. Axial movement of the mating seal parts was recorded by a digital data acquisition system. The coning of the tungsten carbide primary ring ranged from .51 micro-m to 5.6 micro-m. The torque of the coned face seal balanced to 76.3% was an average 42% lower, the leakage eleven times higher, than that of the standard flat face seal. The reduction of the balance of the coned face seal to 51.3% resulted by decreasing the torque by an additional 44% and increasing leakage 12 to 230 times, depending on the seal shaft speed. No measurable wear was observed on the face of the coned seals.

  8. A Convex Atomic-Norm Approach to Multiple Sequence Alignment and Motif Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Ian E. H.; Lin, Xin; Zhang, Jiong; Ravikumar, Pradeep; Dhillon, Inderjit S.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple Sequence Alignment and Motif Discovery, known as NP-hard problems, are two fundamental tasks in Bioinformatics. Existing approaches to these two problems are based on either local search methods such as Expectation Maximization (EM), Gibbs Sampling or greedy heuristic methods. In this work, we develop a convex relaxation approach to both problems based on the recent concept of atomic norm and develop a new algorithm, termed Greedy Direction Method of Multiplier, for solving the convex relaxation with two convex atomic constraints. Experiments show that our convex relaxation approach produces solutions of higher quality than those standard tools widely-used in Bioinformatics community on the Multiple Sequence Alignment and Motif Discovery problems. PMID:27559428

  9. Applicability of convex hull in multiple detector response space for neutron dose measurements.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Makoto; Iimoto, Takeshi; Kosako, Toshiso

    2009-08-01

    A novel neutron dose measurement method that flexibly responds to variations in the neutron field is being developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency. This is an implementation of the multi-detector method (first introduced in 1960s) for neutron dose evaluation using a convex hull in the response space defined for multiple detectors. The convex hull provides a range of possible neutron dose corresponding to the incident neutron spectrum. Feasibility of the method was studied using a simulated response of mixed gas proportional counter. Monochromatic neutrons are shown to be fundamentally suitable for mapping the convex. The convex hull can be further reduced taking into consideration a priori information about physically possible incident neutron spectra, for example, theoretically derived moderated neutron spectra originated from a fission neutron source.

  10. Congruency effects in dot comparison tasks: convex hull is more important than dot area.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Camilla; Cragg, Lucy; Hogan, Grace; Inglis, Matthew

    2016-11-16

    The dot comparison task, in which participants select the more numerous of two dot arrays, has become the predominant method of assessing Approximate Number System (ANS) acuity. Creation of the dot arrays requires the manipulation of visual characteristics, such as dot size and convex hull. For the task to provide a valid measure of ANS acuity, participants must ignore these characteristics and respond on the basis of number. Here, we report two experiments that explore the influence of dot area and convex hull on participants' accuracy on dot comparison tasks. We found that individuals' ability to ignore dot area information increases with age and display time. However, the influence of convex hull information remains stable across development and with additional time. This suggests that convex hull information is more difficult to inhibit when making judgements about numerosity and therefore it is crucial to control this when creating dot comparison tasks.

  11. Shadow-related concavity-convexity inversions reveal a very basic tolerance for impossible shadows.

    PubMed

    Casati, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The stimuli traditionally used for demonstrating shadow-related concavity-convexity inversions reveal a very basic tolerance for impossible shadows-namely, self shadows do not induce a visual request for geometrically mandatory cast shadows.

  12. Congruency effects in dot comparison tasks: convex hull is more important than dot area

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, Camilla; Cragg, Lucy; Hogan, Grace; Inglis, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The dot comparison task, in which participants select the more numerous of two dot arrays, has become the predominant method of assessing Approximate Number System (ANS) acuity. Creation of the dot arrays requires the manipulation of visual characteristics, such as dot size and convex hull. For the task to provide a valid measure of ANS acuity, participants must ignore these characteristics and respond on the basis of number. Here, we report two experiments that explore the influence of dot area and convex hull on participants’ accuracy on dot comparison tasks. We found that individuals’ ability to ignore dot area information increases with age and display time. However, the influence of convex hull information remains stable across development and with additional time. This suggests that convex hull information is more difficult to inhibit when making judgements about numerosity and therefore it is crucial to control this when creating dot comparison tasks. PMID:28163886

  13. Ammonia formation in N2/H2 plasmas on ITER-relevant plasma facing materials: Surface temperature and N2 plasma content effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, A.; Alegre, D.; Tabarés, F. L.

    2015-08-01

    Ammonia production in N2/H2 direct current glow discharge plasmas, with nitrogen concentrations from 1.5% to 33%, different wall materials (tungsten, stainless steel and aluminium as a proxy for beryllium) and surface temperatures up to 350 °C has been investigated. Ammonia yields on the exposed materials have been deduced, resulting in different values depending on the wall material, its temperature and N2 plasma content. The results indicate weak wall temperature dependence in tungsten and stainless steel. However, wall temperatures above 300 °C have a very clear influence on aluminium walls, as almost all the molecular N2 depleted from the gas phase is converted into ammonia. The amount of implanted N seems to have a direct impact on the ammonia formation yield, pointing to the competition between N implantation and N/H-N/N recombination on the walls as the key mechanism of the ammonia formation.

  14. On the existence of convex classical solutions to a generalized Prandtl-Batchelor free boundary problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acker, A.

    Under reasonably general assumptions, we prove the existence of convex classical solutions for the Prandtl-Batchelor free boundary problem in fluid dynamics, in which a flow of constant vorticity density is embedded in a potential flow, with a vortex sheet of constant vorticity density as the flow interface. These results apply to Batchelor flows which are confined to a bounded, convex vessel, and for which the limiting interior flow-speed exceeds the limiting exterior flow-speed along the interface.

  15. Image recovery in computer tomography from partial fan-beam data by convex projections.

    PubMed

    Peng, H; Stark, H

    1992-01-01

    For the image recovery process the authors use the convex projections method, also known as the method of projections onto convex sets (POCS). Several incomplete-data geometries, including those associated with limited source travel and beam-blocking internal opacities, are considered. To enable the recovery several prior-knowledge constraints including one associated with the directivity of the image vector are used. The overall recovery algorithm can be practically implemented by exploiting the Toeplitz structure of key operators.

  16. A Fast Algorithm of Convex Hull Vertices Selection for Online Classification.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shuguang; Nie, Xiangli; Qiao, Hong; Zhang, Bo

    2017-01-20

    Reducing samples through convex hull vertices selection (CHVS) within each class is an important and effective method for online classification problems, since the classifier can be trained rapidly with the selected samples. However, the process of CHVS is NP-hard. In this paper, we propose a fast algorithm to select the convex hull vertices, based on the convex hull decomposition and the property of projection. In the proposed algorithm, the quadratic minimization problem of computing the distance between a point and a convex hull is converted into a linear equation problem with a low computational complexity. When the data dimension is high, an approximate, instead of exact, convex hull is allowed to be selected by setting an appropriate termination condition in order to delete more nonimportant samples. In addition, the impact of outliers is also considered, and the proposed algorithm is improved by deleting the outliers in the initial procedure. Furthermore, a dimension convention technique via the kernel trick is used to deal with nonlinearly separable problems. An upper bound is theoretically proved for the difference between the support vector machines based on the approximate convex hull vertices selected and all the training samples. Experimental results on both synthetic and real data sets show the effectiveness and validity of the proposed algorithm.

  17. Quantification of Trunk Postural Stability Using Convex Polyhedron of the Time-Series Accelerometer Data

    PubMed Central

    Melecky, Roman; Socha, Vladimir; Kutilek, Patrik; Hanakova, Lenka; Takac, Peter; Schlenker, Jakub; Svoboda, Zdenek

    2016-01-01

    Techniques to quantify postural stability usually rely on the evaluation of only two variables, that is, two coordinates of COP. However, by using three variables, that is, three components of acceleration vector, it is possible to describe human movement more precisely. For this purpose, a single three-axis accelerometer was used, making it possible to evaluate 3D movement by use of a novel method, convex polyhedron (CP), together with a traditional method, based on area of the confidence ellipse (ACE). Ten patients (Pts) with cerebellar ataxia and eleven healthy individuals of control group (CG) participated in the study. The results show a significant increase of volume of the CP (CPV) in Pts or CG standing on foam surface with eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC) after the EC phase. Significant difference between Pts and CG was found in all cases as well. Correlation coefficient indicates strong correlation between the CPV and ACE in most cases of patient examinations, thus confirming the possibility of quantification of postural instability by the introduced method of CPV. PMID:27195465

  18. Friction stir spot welded joints of 409L stainless steels fabricated by a convex shoulder tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md. Abu Mowazzem; Hasan, Md. Tariqul; Hong, Sung-Tae; Miles, Michael; Cho, Hoon-Hwe; Han, Heung Nam

    2013-11-01

    Spot joints of ferritic 409L stainless steel are successfully fabricated by friction stir spot welding (FSSW) using a convex shoulder tool. The welding process, microstructure and failure of the FSSW joint are investigated experimentally. During the FSSW process, the Z-force history shows significant variations depending on the contact phenomena between the tool and the joined sheets, while the Z-torque history shows a rather steady increase without pronounced changes in the trend until the initiation of dwelling. Electron back-scatter diffraction suggests that both continuous dynamic recrystallization and recovery occurred in the stir zone during the FSSW process. Observation of the FSSW joint that failed under the given lap shear load shows that the cracks, which are the result of the interfaces between the upper and lower sheets, propagated into the weld along the interfacial surfaces, after which a necking/shear failure occurred. Finally, the rupture of the joint, which was initiated by the necking/shear failure, propagated along the circumference of the weld.

  19. SLOPE—ADAPTIVE VARIABLE SELECTION VIA CONVEX OPTIMIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Bogdan, Małgorzata; van den Berg, Ewout; Sabatti, Chiara; Su, Weijie; Candès, Emmanuel J.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new estimator for the vector of coefficients β in the linear model y = Xβ + z, where X has dimensions n × p with p possibly larger than n. SLOPE, short for Sorted L-One Penalized Estimation, is the solution to minb∈ℝp12‖y−Xb‖ℓ22+λ1|b|(1)+λ2|b|(2)+⋯+λp|b|(p),where λ1 ≥ λ2 ≥ … ≥ λp ≥ 0 and |b|(1)≥|b|(2)≥⋯≥|b|(p) are the decreasing absolute values of the entries of b. This is a convex program and we demonstrate a solution algorithm whose computational complexity is roughly comparable to that of classical ℓ1 procedures such as the Lasso. Here, the regularizer is a sorted ℓ1 norm, which penalizes the regression coefficients according to their rank: the higher the rank—that is, stronger the signal—the larger the penalty. This is similar to the Benjamini and Hochberg [J. Roy. Statist. Soc. Ser. B 57 (1995) 289–300] procedure (BH) which compares more significant p-values with more stringent thresholds. One notable choice of the sequence {λi} is given by the BH critical values λBH(i)=z(1−i⋅q/2p), where q ∈ (0, 1) and z(α) is the quantile of a standard normal distribution. SLOPE aims to provide finite sample guarantees on the selected model; of special interest is the false discovery rate (FDR), defined as the expected proportion of irrelevant regressors among all selected predictors. Under orthogonal designs, SLOPE with λBH provably controls FDR at level q. Moreover, it also appears to have appreciable inferential properties under more general designs X while having substantial power, as demonstrated in a series of experiments running on both simulated and real data. PMID:26709357

  20. Constrained iterations for blind deconvolution and convexity issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaletta, Giulia; Caucci, Luca

    2006-12-01

    The need for image restoration arises in many applications of various scientific disciplines, such as medicine and astronomy and, in general, whenever an unknown image must be recovered from blurred and noisy data [M. Bertero, P. Boccacci, Introduction to Inverse Problems in Imaging, Institute of Physics Publishing, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 1998]. The algorithm studied in this work restores the image without the knowledge of the blur, using little a priori information and a blind inverse filter iteration. It represents a variation of the methods proposed in Kundur and Hatzinakos [A novel blind deconvolution scheme for image restoration using recursive filtering, IEEE Trans. Signal Process. 46(2) (1998) 375-390] and Ng et al. [Regularization of RIF blind image deconvolution, IEEE Trans. Image Process. 9(6) (2000) 1130-1134]. The problem of interest here is an inverse one, that cannot be solved by simple filtering since it is ill-posed. The imaging system is assumed to be linear and space-invariant: this allows a simplified relationship between unknown and observed images, described by a point spread function modeling the distortion. The blurring, though, makes the restoration ill-conditioned: regularization is therefore also needed, obtained by adding constraints to the formulation. The restoration is modeled as a constrained minimization: particular attention is given here to the analysis of the objective function and on establishing whether or not it is a convex function, whose minima can be located by classic optimization techniques and descent methods. Numerical examples are applied to simulated data and to real data derived from various applications. Comparison with the behavior of methods [D. Kundur, D. Hatzinakos, A novel blind deconvolution scheme for image restoration using recursive filtering, IEEE Trans. Signal Process. 46(2) (1998) 375-390] and [M. Ng, R.J. Plemmons, S. Qiao, Regularization of RIF Blind Image Deconvolution, IEEE Trans. Image Process. 9

  1. 'Lysi-T-FACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herndl, Markus; Pötsch, Erich; Kandolf, Matthias; Bohner, Andreas; Schaumberger, Andreas; Resch, Reinhard; Graiss, Wilhelm; Krautzer, Bernhard; Buchgraber, Karl

    2010-05-01

    During the past century the average global surface air temperature has already increased by 1°C. A doubling of atmospheric concentration of CO2 near the end of the 21st century is predicted to result in a 3°C temperature increase. The Alpine region has experienced above average warming over the last century and is considered particularly vulnerable to global change. In Austria in some regions, grassland production suffered severe droughts during the last decade leading to serious damages and even temporal shortage in feed supply. Changes in temperature and precipitation have evident consequences for grassland vegetation. Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration is a major driver of climate change. Photosynthesis and productivity of most grassland species might be stimulated by increasing CO2 when soil nutrients and water are not limiting. On dry grassland sites increasing CO2 also reduces plant water loss, thereby increasing plant water use efficiency. When plant production is limited by seasonal cold temperatures as e.g. in the inner Alpine parts of Austria and in high altitude or high latitude grasslands, combined warming and higher CO2 might continue to enhance plant production. However, it is still unknown to what extend a further increase of temperature and CO2 will result in higher biomass yield in different grassland communities. To study the effects of global warming on future grassland communities and management, the application of a heating treatment combined with free-air controlled enhancement of CO2 (T-FACE) to open-field plant canopies at lysimeters is an innovative approach which allows studying responses of the plant-soil-systems as well as carbon- water and nutrient fluxes under expected future climate. The experiment is scheduled to run in the first phase 6 years (2011-2017) and is located at the AREC Raumberg-Gumpenstein, Upper Enns Valley, Austria (47,49; 14,10). Heater arrays and miniFACE rings are installed in 1.6 m diameter plots and expose

  2. How Well Do Computer-Generated Faces Tap Face Expertise?

    PubMed

    Crookes, Kate; Ewing, Louise; Gildenhuys, Ju-Dith; Kloth, Nadine; Hayward, William G; Oxner, Matt; Pond, Stephen; Rhodes, Gillian

    2015-01-01

    The use of computer-generated (CG) stimuli in face processing research is proliferating due to the ease with which faces can be generated, standardised and manipulated. However there has been surprisingly little research into whether CG faces are processed in the same way as photographs of real faces. The present study assessed how well CG faces tap face identity expertise by investigating whether two indicators of face expertise are reduced for CG faces when compared to face photographs. These indicators were accuracy for identification of own-race faces and the other-race effect (ORE)-the well-established finding that own-race faces are recognised more accurately than other-race faces. In Experiment 1 Caucasian and Asian participants completed a recognition memory task for own- and other-race real and CG faces. Overall accuracy for own-race faces was dramatically reduced for CG compared to real faces and the ORE was significantly and substantially attenuated for CG faces. Experiment 2 investigated perceptual discrimination for own- and other-race real and CG faces with Caucasian and Asian participants. Here again, accuracy for own-race faces was significantly reduced for CG compared to real faces. However the ORE was not affected by format. Together these results signal that CG faces of the type tested here do not fully tap face expertise. Technological advancement may, in the future, produce CG faces that are equivalent to real photographs. Until then caution is advised when interpreting results obtained using CG faces.

  3. On the convexity of ROC curves estimated from radiological test results

    PubMed Central

    Pesce, Lorenzo L.; Metz, Charles E.; Berbaum, Kevin S.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Although an ideal observer’s receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve must be convex — i.e., its slope must decrease monotonically — published fits to empirical data often display “hooks.” Such fits sometimes are accepted on the basis of an argument that experiments are done with real, rather than ideal, observers. However, the fact that ideal observers must produce convex curves does not imply that convex curves describe only ideal observers. This paper aims to identify the practical implications of non-convex ROC curves and the conditions that can lead to empirical and/or fitted ROC curves that are not convex. Materials and Methods This paper views non-convex ROC curves from historical, theoretical and statistical perspectives, which we describe briefly. We then consider population ROC curves with various shapes and analyze the types of medical decisions that they imply. Finally, we describe how sampling variability and curve-fitting algorithms can produce ROC curve estimates that include hooks. Results We show that hooks in population ROC curves imply the use of an irrational decision strategy, even when the curve doesn’t cross the chance line, and therefore usually are untenable in medical settings. Moreover, we sketch a simple approach to improve any non-convex ROC curve by adding statistical variation to the decision process. Finally, we sketch how to test whether hooks present in ROC data are likely to have been caused by chance alone and how some hooked ROCs found in the literature can be easily explained as fitting artifacts or modeling issues. Conclusion In general, ROC curve fits that show hooks should be looked upon with suspicion unless other arguments justify their presence. PMID:20599155

  4. Still-to-video face recognition in unconstrained environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haoyu; Liu, Changsong; Ding, Xiaoqing

    2015-02-01

    Face images from video sequences captured in unconstrained environments usually contain several kinds of variations, e.g. pose, facial expression, illumination, image resolution and occlusion. Motion blur and compression artifacts also deteriorate recognition performance. Besides, in various practical systems such as law enforcement, video surveillance and e-passport identification, only a single still image per person is enrolled as the gallery set. Many existing methods may fail to work due to variations in face appearances and the limit of available gallery samples. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for still-to-video face recognition in unconstrained environments. By assuming that faces from still images and video frames share the same identity space, a regularized least squares regression method is utilized to tackle the multi-modality problem. Regularization terms based on heuristic assumptions are enrolled to avoid overfitting. In order to deal with the single image per person problem, we exploit face variations learned from training sets to synthesize virtual samples for gallery samples. We adopt a learning algorithm combining both affine/convex hull-based approach and regularizations to match image sets. Experimental results on a real-world dataset consisting of unconstrained video sequences demonstrate that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art methods impressively.

  5. Face transplantation: Anesthetic challenges

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Aparna

    2016-01-01

    Face transplantation is a complex vascular composite allotransplantation (VCA) surgery. It involves multiple types of tissue, such as bone, muscles, blood vessels, nerves to be transferred from the donor to the recipient as one unit. VCAs were added to the definition of organs covered by the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network Final Rule and National Organ Transplant Act. Prior to harvest of the face from the donor, a tracheostomy is usually performed. The osteotomies and dissection of the midface bony skeleton may involve severe hemorrhagic blood loss often requiring transfusion of blood products. A silicon face mask created from the facial impression is used to reconstruct the face and preserve the donor’s dignity. The recipient airway management most commonly used is primary intubation of an existing tracheostoma with a flexometallic endotracheal tube. The recipient surgery usually averages to 19-20 h. Since the face is a very vascular organ, there is usually massive bleeding, both in the dissection phase as well as in the reperfusion phase. Prior to reperfusion, often, after one sided anastomosis of the graft, the contralateral side is allowed to bleed to get rid of the preservation solution and other additives. Intraoperative product replacement should be guided by laboratory values and point of care testing for coagulation and hemostasis. In face transplantation, bolus doses of pressors or pressor infusions have been used intraoperatively in several patients to manage hypotension. This article reviews the anesthetic considerations for management for face transplantation, and some of the perioperative challenges faced. PMID:28058213

  6. Electro-Fenton oxidation of coking wastewater: optimization using the combination of central composite design and convex optimization method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Sun, Jiwei; Wang, Qin; Fan, Niansi; Ni, Jialing; Li, Weicheng; Gao, Yingxin; Li, Yu-You; Xu, Changyou

    2017-01-12

    The electro-Fenton treatment of coking wastewater was evaluated experimentally in a batch electrochemical reactor. Based on central composite design coupled with response surface methodology, a regression quadratic equation was developed to model the total organic carbon (TOC) removal efficiency. This model was further proved to accurately predict the optimization of process variables by means of analysis of variance. With the aid of the convex optimization method, which is a global optimization method, the optimal parameters were determined as current density of 30.9 mA/cm(2), Fe(2+) concentration of 0.35 mg/L, and pH of 4.05. Under the optimized conditions, the corresponding TOC removal efficiency was up to 73.8%. The maximum TOC removal efficiency achieved can be further confirmed by the results of gas chromatography-mass spectrum analysis.

  7. Scalable analysis of nonlinear systems using convex optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papachristodoulou, Antonis

    In this thesis, we investigate how convex optimization can be used to analyze different classes of nonlinear systems at various scales algorithmically. The methodology is based on the construction of appropriate Lyapunov-type certificates using sum of squares techniques. After a brief introduction on the mathematical tools that we will be using, we turn our attention to robust stability and performance analysis of systems described by Ordinary Differential Equations. A general framework for constrained systems analysis is developed, under which stability of systems with polynomial, non-polynomial vector fields and switching systems, as well estimating the region of attraction and the L2 gain can be treated in a unified manner. We apply our results to examples from biology and aerospace. We then consider systems described by Functional Differential Equations (FDEs), i.e., time-delay systems. Their main characteristic is that they are infinite dimensional, which complicates their analysis. We first show how the complete Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional can be constructed algorithmically for linear time-delay systems. Then, we concentrate on delay-independent and delay-dependent stability analysis of nonlinear FDEs using sum of squares techniques. An example from ecology is given. The scalable stability analysis of congestion control algorithms for the Internet is investigated next. The models we use result in an arbitrary interconnection of FDE subsystems, for which we require that stability holds for arbitrary delays, network topologies and link capacities. Through a constructive proof, we develop a Lyapunov functional for FAST---a recently developed network congestion control scheme---so that the Lyapunov stability properties scale with the system size. We also show how other network congestion control schemes can be analyzed in the same way. Finally, we concentrate on systems described by Partial Differential Equations. We show that axially constant perturbations of

  8. CudaChain: an alternative algorithm for finding 2D convex hulls on the GPU.

    PubMed

    Mei, Gang

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an alternative GPU-accelerated convex hull algorithm and a novel S orting-based P reprocessing A pproach (SPA) for planar point sets. The proposed convex hull algorithm termed as CudaChain consists of two stages: (1) two rounds of preprocessing performed on the GPU and (2) the finalization of calculating the expected convex hull on the CPU. Those interior points locating inside a quadrilateral formed by four extreme points are first discarded, and then the remaining points are distributed into several (typically four) sub regions. For each subset of points, they are first sorted in parallel; then the second round of discarding is performed using SPA; and finally a simple chain is formed for the current remaining points. A simple polygon can be easily generated by directly connecting all the chains in sub regions. The expected convex hull of the input points can be finally obtained by calculating the convex hull of the simple polygon. The library Thrust is utilized to realize the parallel sorting, reduction, and partitioning for better efficiency and simplicity. Experimental results show that: (1) SPA can very effectively detect and discard the interior points; and (2) CudaChain achieves 5×-6× speedups over the famous Qhull implementation for 20M points.

  9. Mean perimeter of the convex hull of a random walk in a semi-infinite medium.

    PubMed

    Chupeau, Marie; Bénichou, Olivier; Majumdar, Satya N

    2015-08-01

    We study various properties of the convex hull of a planar Brownian motion, defined as the minimum convex polygon enclosing the trajectory, in the presence of an infinite reflecting wall. Recently [Phys. Rev. E 91, 050104(R) (2015)], we announced that the mean perimeter of the convex hull at time t, rescaled by √Dt, is a nonmonotonous function of the initial distance to the wall. In this article, we first give all the details of the derivation of this mean rescaled perimeter, in particular its value when starting from the wall and near the wall. We then determine the physical mechanism underlying this surprising nonmonotonicity of the mean rescaled perimeter by analyzing the impact of the wall on two complementary parts of the convex hull. Finally, we provide a further quantification of the convex hull by determining the mean length of the portion of the reflecting wall visited by the Brownian motion as a function of the initial distance to the wall.

  10. Augmented convex hull plots: Rationale, implementation in R and biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Vidmar, Gaj; Pohar, Maja

    2005-04-01

    The paper addresses the possibility to replace cluttered multi-group scatter-plots with augmented convex hull plots. By replacing scatter-plot points with convex hulls, space is gained for visualization of descriptive statistics with error bars or confidence ellipses within the convex hulls. An informative addition to the plot is calculation of the area of convex hull divided by corresponding group size as a bivariate dispersion measure. Marginal distributions can be depicted on the sides of the main plot in established ways. Bivariate density plots might be used instead of convex hulls in the presence of outliers. Like any scatter-plot type visualization, the technique is not limited to raw data -- points can be derived from any dimension reduction technique, or simple functions can be used as axes instead of original dimensions. The limited possibilities for producing such plots in existing software are surveyed, and our general and flexible implementation in R -- the publicly available chplot function -- is presented. Examples based on our daily biostatistical consulting practice illustrate the technique with various options.

  11. Mean perimeter of the convex hull of a random walk in a semi-infinite medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chupeau, Marie; Bénichou, Olivier; Majumdar, Satya N.

    2015-08-01

    We study various properties of the convex hull of a planar Brownian motion, defined as the minimum convex polygon enclosing the trajectory, in the presence of an infinite reflecting wall. Recently [Phys. Rev. E 91, 050104(R) (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevE.91.050104], we announced that the mean perimeter of the convex hull at time t , rescaled by √{D t }, is a nonmonotonous function of the initial distance to the wall. In this article, we first give all the details of the derivation of this mean rescaled perimeter, in particular its value when starting from the wall and near the wall. We then determine the physical mechanism underlying this surprising nonmonotonicity of the mean rescaled perimeter by analyzing the impact of the wall on two complementary parts of the convex hull. Finally, we provide a further quantification of the convex hull by determining the mean length of the portion of the reflecting wall visited by the Brownian motion as a function of the initial distance to the wall.

  12. Plaque removing effect of a convex-shaped brush compared with a conventional flat brush.

    PubMed

    Thevissen, E; Quirynen, M; van Steenberghe, D

    1987-12-01

    The plaque-removing effect of a convex-shaped multitufted brush was compared with that of a conventional flat multitufted brush. Two group (five and seven dental students, respectively), well instructed in the modified Bass technique, participated in a blind, splitmouth, crossover study during two consecutive experimental periods of 96 hours of undisturbed plaque growth. After each of these periods, a supervised brushing session was performed, followed by toothpick utilization. Plaque removal was evaluated using the modified Navy Plaque Index (MNPI) and planimetry. A 4% erythrosin solution was used as a disclosing agent. Planimetrically, the flat Oral B brush appeared significantly more effective than the convex shaped Ph brush (P less than 0.001). This superiority was even enhanced after the use of toothpicks (P less than 0.0005). The differences between the brushes, however, were too small to be detected by the less discriminating MNPI. Although it has been claimed that the convex brush could assure approximal plaque control, the results indicate that for the convex-shaped, as well as for the flat brush, an approximal aid is essential for good plaque control. The hypothesis that the design of the convex-shaped brush could facilitate the modified Bass technique for the average patient could not be proven in this study.

  13. Phase behaviour and gravity-directed self assembly of hard convex spherical caps.

    PubMed

    McBride, John M; Avendaño, Carlos

    2017-03-08

    We investigate the phase behaviour and self-assembly of convex spherical caps using Monte Carlo simulations. This model is used to represent the main features observed in experimental colloidal particles with mushroom-cap shape [Riley et al., Langmuir, 2010, 26, 1648]. The geometry of this non-centrosymmetric convex model is fully characterized by the aspect ratio χ* defined as the spherical cap height to diameter ratio. We use NPT Monte Carlo simulations combined with free energy calculations to determine the most stable crystal structures and the phase behaviour of convex spherical caps with different aspect ratios. We find a variety of crystal structures at each aspect ratio, including plastic and dimer-based crystals; small differences in chemical potential between the structures with similar morphology suggest that convex spherical caps have the tendency to form polycrystalline phases rather than crystallising into a single uniform structure. With the exception of plastic crystals observed at large aspect ratios (χ* > 0.75), crystallisation kinetics seem to be too slow, hindering the spontaneous formation of ordered structures. As an alternative, we also present a study of directing the self-assembly of convex spherical caps via sedimentation onto solid substrates. This study contributes to show how small changes to particle shape can significantly alter the self-assembly of crystal structures, and how a simple gravity field and a template can substantially enhance the process.

  14. Extended surface parallel coating inspection method

    DOEpatents

    Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2006-03-21

    Techniques for rapidly characterizing reflective surfaces and especially multi-layer EUV reflective surfaces of optical components involve illuminating the entire reflective surface instantaneously and detecting the image far field. The technique provides a mapping of points on the reflective surface to corresponding points on a detector, e.g., CCD. This obviates the need to scan a probe over the entire surface of the optical component. The reflective surface can be flat, convex, or concave.

  15. Face Search at Scale.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dayong; Otto, Charles; Jain, Anil K

    2016-06-20

    rsons of interest among the billions of shared photos on these websites. Despite significant progress in face recognition, searching a large collection of unconstrained face images remains a difficult problem. To address this challenge, we propose a face search system which combines a fast search procedure, coupled with a state-of-the-art commercial off the shelf (COTS) matcher, in a cascaded framework. Given a probe face, we first filter the large gallery of photos to find the top-k most similar faces using features learned by a convolutional neural network. The k retrieved candidates are re-ranked by combining similarities based on deep features and those output by the COTS matcher. We evaluate the proposed face search system on a gallery containing 80 million web-downloaded face images. Experimental results demonstrate that while the deep features perform worse than the COTS matcher on a mugshot dataset (93.7% vs. 98.6% TAR@FAR of 0.01%), fusing the deep features with the COTS matcher improves the overall performance (99.5% TAR@FAR of 0.01%). This shows that the learned deep features provide complementary information over representations used in state-of-the-art face matchers. On the unconstrained face image benchmarks, the performance of the learned deep features is competitive with reported accuracies. LFW database: 98.20% accuracy under the standard protocol and 88.03% TAR@FAR of 0.1% under the BLUFR protocol; IJB-A benchmark: 51.0% TAR@FAR of 0.1% (verification), rank 1 retrieval of 82.2% (closed-set search), 61.5% FNIR@FAR of 1% (open-set search). The proposed face search system offers an excellent trade-off between accuracy and scalability on galleries with millions of images. Additionally, in a face search experiment involving photos of the Tsarnaev brothers, convicted of the Boston Marathon bombing, the proposed cascade face search system could find the younger brother's (Dzhokhar Tsarnaev) photo at rank 1 in 1 second on a 5M gallery and at rank 8 in 7

  16. Dynamic Face Seal Arrangement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A radial face seal arrangement is disclosed comprising a stationary seal ring that is spring loaded against a seal seat affixed to a rotating shaft. The radial face seal arrangement further comprises an arrangement that not only allows for preloading of the stationary seal ring relative to the seal seat, but also provides for dampening yielding a dynamic seating response for the radial face seal arrangement. The overall seal system, especially regarding the selection of the material for the stationary seal ring, is designed to operate over a wide temperature range from below ambient up to 900 C.

  17. Gaze cueing by pareidolia faces

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kohske; Watanabe, Katsumi

    2013-01-01

    Visual images that are not faces are sometimes perceived as faces (the pareidolia phenomenon). While the pareidolia phenomenon provides people with a strong impression that a face is present, it is unclear how deeply pareidolia faces are processed as faces. In the present study, we examined whether a shift in spatial attention would be produced by gaze cueing of face-like objects. A robust cueing effect was observed when the face-like objects were perceived as faces. The magnitude of the cueing effect was comparable between the face-like objects and a cartoon face. However, the cueing effect was eliminated when the observer did not perceive the objects as faces. These results demonstrated that pareidolia faces do more than give the impression of the presence of faces; indeed, they trigger an additional face-specific attentional process. PMID:25165505

  18. Cotton fabrics with single-faced superhydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuyang; Xin, J H; Choi, Chang-Hwan

    2012-12-18

    This article reports on the fabrication of cotton fabrics with single-faced superhydrophobicity using a simple foam finishing process. Unlike most commonly reported superhydrophobic fabrics, the fabrics developed in this study exhibit asymmetric wettability on their two faces: one face showing superhydrophobic behavior (highly nonwetting or water-repellent characteristics) and the other face retaining the inherent hydrophilic nature of cotton. The superhydrophobic face exhibits a low contact angle hysteresis of θ(a)/θ(r) = 151°/144° (θ(a), advancing contact angle; θ(r), receding contact angle), which enables water drops to roll off the surface easily so as to endow the surface with well-known self-cleaning properties. The untreated hydrophilic face preserves its water-absorbing capability, resulting in 44% of the water-absorbing capacity compared to that of the original cotton samples with both sides untreated (hydrophilic). The single-faced superhydrophobic fabrics also retain moisture transmissibility that is as good as that of the original untreated cotton fabrics. They also show robust washing fastness with the chemical cross-linking process of hydrophobic fluoropolymer to fabric fibers. Fabric materials with such asymmetric or gradient wettability will be of great use in many applications such as unidirectional liquid transporting, moisture management, microfluidic systems, desalination of seawater, flow management in fuel cells, and water/oil separation.

  19. A high-performance feedback neural network for solving convex nonlinear programming problems.

    PubMed

    Leung, Yee; Chen, Kai-Zhou; Gao, Xing-Bao

    2003-01-01

    Based on a new idea of successive approximation, this paper proposes a high-performance feedback neural network model for solving convex nonlinear programming problems. Differing from existing neural network optimization models, no dual variables, penalty parameters, or Lagrange multipliers are involved in the proposed network. It has the least number of state variables and is very simple in structure. In particular, the proposed network has better asymptotic stability. For an arbitrarily given initial point, the trajectory of the network converges to an optimal solution of the convex nonlinear programming problem under no more than the standard assumptions. In addition, the network can also solve linear programming and convex quadratic programming problems, and the new idea of a feedback network may be used to solve other optimization problems. Feasibility and efficiency are also substantiated by simulation examples.

  20. Convex and concave successions of power-law decays in small-angle scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anitas, E. M.

    2016-08-01

    The small-angle scattering (SAS) structure factor from a new model of a 3D deterministic fractal in which the relative positions and the number of structural units vary with fractal iteration number is calculated. It is shown that, depending on the relative positions of scattering units inside the fractal, we can obtain various types of power-law successions, such as: convex/concave - when the absolute value of the scattering exponent of the first power-law decay is higher/smaller than that of the subsequent power- law decay, or any combination of them (i.e. convex-concave or concave-convex). The obtained results can explain experimental SAS (neutron or X-rays) data which are characterized by a succession of power-law decays of arbitrary length.

  1. Improving the accuracy of convexity splitting methods for gradient flow equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasner, Karl; Orizaga, Saulo

    2016-06-01

    This paper introduces numerical time discretization methods which significantly improve the accuracy of the convexity-splitting approach of Eyre (1998) [7], while retaining the same numerical cost and stability properties. A first order method is constructed by iteration of a semi-implicit method based upon decomposing the energy into convex and concave parts. A second order method is also presented based on backwards differentiation formulas. Several extrapolation procedures for iteration initialization are proposed. We show that, under broad circumstances, these methods have an energy decreasing property, leading to good numerical stability. The new schemes are tested using two evolution equations commonly used in materials science: the Cahn-Hilliard equation and the phase field crystal equation. We find that our methods can increase accuracy by many orders of magnitude in comparison to the original convexity-splitting algorithm. In addition, the optimal methods require little or no iteration, making their computation cost similar to the original algorithm.

  2. A tractable approximation of non-convex chance constrained optimization with non-Gaussian uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geletu, Abebe; Klöppel, Michael; Hoffmann, Armin; Li, Pu

    2015-04-01

    Chance constrained optimization problems in engineering applications possess highly nonlinear process models and non-convex structures. As a result, solving a nonlinear non-convex chance constrained optimization (CCOPT) problem remains as a challenging task. The major difficulty lies in the evaluation of probability values and gradients of inequality constraints which are nonlinear functions of stochastic variables. This article proposes a novel analytic approximation to improve the tractability of smooth non-convex chance constraints. The approximation uses a smooth parametric function to define a sequence of smooth nonlinear programs (NLPs). The sequence of optimal solutions of these NLPs remains always feasible and converges to the solution set of the CCOPT problem. Furthermore, Karush-Kuhn-Tucker (KKT) points of the approximating problems converge to a subset of KKT points of the CCOPT problem. Another feature of this approach is that it can handle uncertainties with both Gaussian and/or non-Gaussian distributions.

  3. A Convex Geometry-Based Blind Source Separation Method for Separating Nonnegative Sources.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zuyuan; Xiang, Yong; Rong, Yue; Xie, Kan

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a convex geometry (CG)-based method for blind separation of nonnegative sources. First, the unaccessible source matrix is normalized to be column-sum-to-one by mapping the available observation matrix. Then, its zero-samples are found by searching the facets of the convex hull spanned by the mapped observations. Considering these zero-samples, a quadratic cost function with respect to each row of the unmixing matrix, together with a linear constraint in relation to the involved variables, is proposed. Upon which, an algorithm is presented to estimate the unmixing matrix by solving a classical convex optimization problem. Unlike the traditional blind source separation (BSS) methods, the CG-based method does not require the independence assumption, nor the uncorrelation assumption. Compared with the BSS methods that are specifically designed to distinguish between nonnegative sources, the proposed method requires a weaker sparsity condition. Provided simulation results illustrate the performance of our method.

  4. A multilayer self-organizing model for convex-hull computation.

    PubMed

    Pal, S; Datta, A; Pal, N R

    2001-01-01

    A self-organizing neural-network model is proposed for computation of the convex-hull of a given set of planar points. The network evolves in such a manner that it adapts itself to the hull-vertices of the convex-hull. The proposed network consists of three layers of processors. The bottom layer computes some angles which are passed to the middle layer. The middle layer is used for computation of the minimum angle (winner selection). These information are passed to the topmost layer as well as fed back to the bottom layer. The network in the topmost layer self-organizes by labeling the hull-processors in an orderly fashion so that the final convex-hull is obtained from the topmost layer. Time complexity of the proposed model is analyzed and is compared with existing models of similar nature.

  5. A connectionist model for convex-hull of a planar set.

    PubMed

    Datta, A; Pal, S; Pal, N R

    2000-04-01

    A neural network model is proposed for computation of the convex-hull of a finite planar set. The model is self-organizing in that it adapts itself to the hull-vertices of the convex-hull in an orderly fashion without any supervision. The proposed network consists of three layers of processors. The bottom layer computes the activation functions, the outputs of which are passed onto the middle layer. The middle layer is used for winner selection. These information are passed onto the topmost layer as well as fed back to the bottom layer. The network in the topmost layer self-organizes by labeling the hull-processors in an orderly fashion so that the final convex-hull is obtained from the topmost layer. Time complexities of the proposed model are analyzed and are compared with existing models of similar nature.

  6. Lp stability for entropy solutions of scalar conservation laws with strict convex flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adimurthi; Ghoshal, Shyam Sundar; Veerappa Gowda, G. D.

    Here we consider the scalar convex conservation laws in one space dimension with strictly convex flux which is in C1. Existence, uniqueness and L1 contractivity were proved by Kružkov [14]. Using the relative entropy method, Leger showed that for a uniformly convex flux and for the shock wave solutions, the L2 norm of a perturbed solution relative to the shock wave is bounded by the L2 norm of the initial perturbation. Here we generalize the result to Lp norm for all 1⩽p<∞. Also we show that for the non-shock wave solution, Lp norm of the perturbed solution relative to the modified N-wave is bounded by the Lp norm of the initial perturbation for all 1⩽p<∞.

  7. Continuity of the maximum-entropy inference: Convex geometry and numerical ranges approach

    SciTech Connect

    Rodman, Leiba; Spitkovsky, Ilya M. E-mail: ilya@math.wm.edu; Szkoła, Arleta Weis, Stephan

    2016-01-15

    We study the continuity of an abstract generalization of the maximum-entropy inference—a maximizer. It is defined as a right-inverse of a linear map restricted to a convex body which uniquely maximizes on each fiber of the linear map a continuous function on the convex body. Using convex geometry we prove, amongst others, the existence of discontinuities of the maximizer at limits of extremal points not being extremal points themselves and apply the result to quantum correlations. Further, we use numerical range methods in the case of quantum inference which refers to two observables. One result is a complete characterization of points of discontinuity for 3 × 3 matrices.

  8. Blur and illumination robust face recognition via set-theoretic characterization.

    PubMed

    Vageeswaran, Priyanka; Mitra, Kaushik; Chellappa, Rama

    2013-04-01

    We address the problem of unconstrained face recognition from remotely acquired images. The main factors that make this problem challenging are image degradation due to blur, and appearance variations due to illumination and pose. In this paper, we address the problems of blur and illumination. We show that the set of all images obtained by blurring a given image forms a convex set. Based on this set-theoretic characterization, we propose a blur-robust algorithm whose main step involves solving simple convex optimization problems. We do not assume any parametric form for the blur kernels, however, if this information is available it can be easily incorporated into our algorithm. Furthermore, using the low-dimensional model for illumination variations, we show that the set of all images obtained from a face image by blurring it and by changing the illumination conditions forms a bi-convex set. Based on this characterization, we propose a blur and illumination-robust algorithm. Our experiments on a challenging real dataset obtained in uncontrolled settings illustrate the importance of jointly modeling blur and illumination.

  9. Head and face reconstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... and facial skin. That is why sometimes a plastic surgeon (for skin and face) and a neurosurgeon ( ... Mosby; 2015:chap 24. McGrath MH, Pomerantz J. Plastic surgery. In: Townsend CM, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, ...

  10. The Compressible Stokes Flows with No-Slip Boundary Condition on Non-Convex Polygons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kweon, Jae Ryong

    2017-03-01

    In this paper we study the compressible Stokes equations with no-slip boundary condition on non-convex polygons and show a best regularity result that the solution can have without subtracting corner singularities. This is obtained by a suitable Helmholtz decomposition: {{{u}}={{w}}+nablaφ_R} with div w = 0 and a potential φ_R. Here w is the solution for the incompressible Stokes problem and φ_R is defined by subtracting from the solution of the Neumann problem the leading two corner singularities at non-convex vertices.

  11. A Modified BFGS Formula Using a Trust Region Model for Nonsmooth Convex Minimizations

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Zengru; Yuan, Gonglin; Sheng, Zhou; Liu, Wenjie; Wang, Xiaoliang; Duan, Xiabin

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a modified BFGS formula using a trust region model for solving nonsmooth convex minimizations by using the Moreau-Yosida regularization (smoothing) approach and a new secant equation with a BFGS update formula. Our algorithm uses the function value information and gradient value information to compute the Hessian. The Hessian matrix is updated by the BFGS formula rather than using second-order information of the function, thus decreasing the workload and time involved in the computation. Under suitable conditions, the algorithm converges globally to an optimal solution. Numerical results show that this algorithm can successfully solve nonsmooth unconstrained convex problems. PMID:26501775

  12. Is Face Distinctiveness Gender Based?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baudouin, Jean-Yves; Gallay, Mathieu

    2006-01-01

    Two experiments were carried out to study the role of gender category in evaluations of face distinctiveness. In Experiment 1, participants had to evaluate the distinctiveness and the femininity-masculinity of real or artificial composite faces. The composite faces were created by blending either faces of the same gender (sexed composite faces,…

  13. Successful Decoding of Famous Faces in the Fusiform Face Area

    PubMed Central

    Axelrod, Vadim; Yovel, Galit

    2015-01-01

    What are the neural mechanisms of face recognition? It is believed that the network of face-selective areas, which spans the occipital, temporal, and frontal cortices, is important in face recognition. A number of previous studies indeed reported that face identity could be discriminated based on patterns of multivoxel activity in the fusiform face area and the anterior temporal lobe. However, given the difficulty in localizing the face-selective area in the anterior temporal lobe, its role in face recognition is still unknown. Furthermore, previous studies limited their analysis to occipito-temporal regions without testing identity decoding in more anterior face-selective regions, such as the amygdala and prefrontal cortex. In the current high-resolution functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging study, we systematically examined the decoding of the identity of famous faces in the temporo-frontal network of face-selective and adjacent non-face-selective regions. A special focus has been put on the face-area in the anterior temporal lobe, which was reliably localized using an optimized scanning protocol. We found that face-identity could be discriminated above chance level only in the fusiform face area. Our results corroborate the role of the fusiform face area in face recognition. Future studies are needed to further explore the role of the more recently discovered anterior face-selective areas in face recognition. PMID:25714434

  14. Performance of the coned-face end seal with regard to energy conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sehnal, J.; Sedy, J.; Zobens, A.; Etsion, I.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of face coning on seal performance are evaluated with particular regard to the energy saving potential of convex conedface end seals as indicated by torque reduction. Experiments were conducted using a conventional carbon flat-face pusher-type seal, a coned-face pusher-type seal, coned-face bellows-type seal, and a modified coned-face pusher-type seal intended for dynamically unstable operation, with shaft rotation at up to 8000 rpm, pressures of up to 2758 kPa, and a petroleum-based turbine oil as lubricant. Torque at the seal interface is found to be reduced by 42% when the standard flat-face seal is replaced by a coned seal, although the leakage of the cone-face seal was 11 times greater. Reduction of seal balance from 76.1 to 51.3% resulted in an additional 44% reduction in torque, although at the expense of excessive leakage, but did not produce unstable operation. Face temperatures were reduced by 33-56 C and wear was also reduced greatly on the cone face seals. Seal performance is noted to be in agreement with analytical calculations.

  15. How Well Do Computer-Generated Faces Tap Face Expertise?

    PubMed Central

    Crookes, Kate; Ewing, Louise; Gildenhuys, Ju-dith; Kloth, Nadine; Hayward, William G.; Oxner, Matt; Pond, Stephen; Rhodes, Gillian

    2015-01-01

    The use of computer-generated (CG) stimuli in face processing research is proliferating due to the ease with which faces can be generated, standardised and manipulated. However there has been surprisingly little research into whether CG faces are processed in the same way as photographs of real faces. The present study assessed how well CG faces tap face identity expertise by investigating whether two indicators of face expertise are reduced for CG faces when compared to face photographs. These indicators were accuracy for identification of own-race faces and the other-race effect (ORE)–the well-established finding that own-race faces are recognised more accurately than other-race faces. In Experiment 1 Caucasian and Asian participants completed a recognition memory task for own- and other-race real and CG faces. Overall accuracy for own-race faces was dramatically reduced for CG compared to real faces and the ORE was significantly and substantially attenuated for CG faces. Experiment 2 investigated perceptual discrimination for own- and other-race real and CG faces with Caucasian and Asian participants. Here again, accuracy for own-race faces was significantly reduced for CG compared to real faces. However the ORE was not affected by format. Together these results signal that CG faces of the type tested here do not fully tap face expertise. Technological advancement may, in the future, produce CG faces that are equivalent to real photographs. Until then caution is advised when interpreting results obtained using CG faces. PMID:26535910

  16. Face the Fats Quiz 2

    MedlinePlus

    Face the Fats Quiz II Do you know your fats by heart? Ready to make informed choices about the foods you eat? From ... some familiar foods. Welcome to Face the Fats Quiz II - and be sure to check out Face ...

  17. An equine pain face

    PubMed Central

    Gleerup, Karina B; Forkman, Björn; Lindegaard, Casper; Andersen, Pia H

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the existence of an equine pain face and to describe this in detail. Study design Semi-randomized, controlled, crossover trial. Animals Six adult horses. Methods Pain was induced with two noxious stimuli, a tourniquet on the antebrachium and topical application of capsaicin. All horses participated in two control trials and received both noxious stimuli twice, once with and once without an observer present. During all sessions their pain state was scored. The horses were filmed and the close-up video recordings of the faces were analysed for alterations in behaviour and facial expressions. Still images from the trials were evaluated for the presence of each of the specific pain face features identified from the video analysis. Results Both noxious challenges were effective in producing a pain response resulting in significantly increased pain scores. Alterations in facial expressions were observed in all horses during all noxious stimulations. The number of pain face features present on the still images from the noxious challenges were significantly higher than for the control trial (p = 0.0001). Facial expressions representative for control and pain trials were condensed into explanatory illustrations. During pain sessions with an observer present, the horses increased their contact-seeking behavior. Conclusions and clinical relevance An equine pain face comprising ‘low’ and/or ‘asymmetrical’ ears, an angled appearance of the eyes, a withdrawn and/or tense stare, mediolaterally dilated nostrils and tension of the lips, chin and certain facial muscles can be recognized in horses during induced acute pain. This description of an equine pain face may be useful for improving tools for pain recognition in horses with mild to moderate pain. PMID:25082060

  18. The Pólya-Szegö Principle and the Anisotropic Convex Lorentz-Sobolev Inequality

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuai; He, Binwu

    2014-01-01

    An anisotropic convex Lorentz-Sobolev inequality is established, which extends Ludwig, Xiao, and Zhang's result to any norm from Euclidean norm, and the geometric analogue of this inequality is given. In addition, it implies that the (anisotropic) Pólya-Szegö principle is shown. PMID:25136698

  19. On some fractional equations with convex-concave and logistic-type nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carboni, Giulia; Mugnai, Dimitri

    2017-02-01

    We consider existence and multiplicity results for a semilinear problem driven by the square root of the negative Laplacian in presence of a nonlinear term which is the difference of two powers. In the case of convex-concave powers, a precise description of the problem at the threshold value of a given parameter is established through variational methods and truncation techniques.

  20. A fast finite volume method for conservative space-fractional diffusion equations in convex domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jinhong; Wang, Hong

    2016-04-01

    We develop a fast finite volume method for variable-coefficient, conservative space-fractional diffusion equations in convex domains via a volume-penalization approach. The method has an optimal storage and an almost linear computational complexity. The method retains second-order accuracy without requiring a Richardson extrapolation. Numerical results are presented to show the utility of the method.

  1. Higher order sensitivity of solutions to convex programming problems without strict complementarity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malanowski, Kazimierz

    1988-01-01

    Consideration is given to a family of convex programming problems which depend on a vector parameter. It is shown that the solutions of the problems and the associated Lagrange multipliers are arbitrarily many times directionally differentiable functions of the parameter, provided that the data of the problems are sufficiently regular. The characterizations of the respective derivatives are given.

  2. From a Nonlinear, Nonconvex Variational Problem to a Linear, Convex Formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Egozcue, J. Meziat, R. Pedregal, P.

    2002-12-19

    We propose a general approach to deal with nonlinear, nonconvex variational problems based on a reformulation of the problem resulting in an optimization problem with linear cost functional and convex constraints. As a first step we explicitly explore these ideas to some one-dimensional variational problems and obtain specific conclusions of an analytical and numerical nature.

  3. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related atraumatic convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage: an ARIA before the tsunami

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Lizana, Eva; Carmona-Iragui, María; Alcolea, Daniel; Gómez-Choco, Manuel; Vilaplana, Eduard; Sánchez-Saudinós, María B; Clarimón, Jordi; Hernández-Guillamon, Mar; Munuera, Josep; Gelpi, Ellen; Gómez-Anson, Beatriz; de Juan-Delago, Manel; Delgado-Mederos, Raquel; Montaner, Joan; Ois, Angel; Amaro, Sergi; Blesa, Rafael; Martí-Fàbregas, Joan; Lleó, Alberto; Fortea, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Atraumatic convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage (cSAH) in elderly patients is a rare entity that has been associated with cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) and intracerebral hematomas (ICH). To characterize this entity and to study these associations, 22 patients over 60 with cSAH were included in a multicenter ambispective cohort study. Clinical data, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, APOE genotyping, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers were evaluated. Results were compared with data from healthy controls (HC), non-cSAH CAA patients (CAAo), and Alzheimer disease patients. Convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage presented with transient sensory or motor symptoms. At follow-up (median 30.7 months), 5 patients had died, 6 survivors showed functional disability (modified Rankins Scale (mRS)>2), and 12 cognitive impairment. Four patients had prior ICH and six had an ICH during follow-up. CSF-Aß40 and Aß42 levels were lower in cSAH and CAAo compared with HC. Convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage presented an APOE-ɛ2 overrepresentation and CAAo had an APOE-ɛ4 overrepresentation. On MRI, all patients fulfilled CAA-modified Boston criteria and 9 showed cortical ischemia in the surrounding cortex or the vicinity of superficial siderosis. The neuropathologic study, available in one patient, showed severe CAA and advanced Alzheimer-type pathology. Convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage in the elderly is associated with cognitive impairment and lobar ICH occurrence. Our findings support the existence of an underlying CAA pathology. PMID:25735919

  4. Effects of aging on figure-ground perception: Convexity context effects and competition resolution.

    PubMed

    Lass, Jordan W; Bennett, Patrick J; Peterson, Mary A; Sekuler, Allison B

    2017-02-01

    We examined age-related differences in figure-ground perception by exploring the effect of age on Convexity Context Effects (CCE; Peterson & Salvagio, 2008). Experiment 1, using Peterson and Salvagio's procedure and black and white stimuli consisting of 2 to 8 alternating concave and convex regions, established that older adults exhibited reduced CCEs compared to younger adults. Experiments 2 and 3 demonstrated that this age difference was found at various stimulus durations and sizes. Experiment 4 compared CCEs obtained with achromatic stimuli, in which the alternating convex and concave regions were each all black or all white, and chromatic stimuli in which the concave regions were homogeneous in color but the convex regions varied in color. We found that the difference between CCEs measured with achromatic and colored stimuli was larger in older than in younger adults. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the senescent visual system is less able to resolve the competition among various perceptual interpretations of the figure-ground relations among stimulus regions.

  5. Modeling IrisCode and its variants as convex polyhedral cones and its security implications.

    PubMed

    Kong, Adams Wai-Kin

    2013-03-01

    IrisCode, developed by Daugman, in 1993, is the most influential iris recognition algorithm. A thorough understanding of IrisCode is essential, because over 100 million persons have been enrolled by this algorithm and many biometric personal identification and template protection methods have been developed based on IrisCode. This paper indicates that a template produced by IrisCode or its variants is a convex polyhedral cone in a hyperspace. Its central ray, being a rough representation of the original biometric signal, can be computed by a simple algorithm, which can often be implemented in one Matlab command line. The central ray is an expected ray and also an optimal ray of an objective function on a group of distributions. This algorithm is derived from geometric properties of a convex polyhedral cone but does not rely on any prior knowledge (e.g., iris images). The experimental results show that biometric templates, including iris and palmprint templates, produced by different recognition methods can be matched through the central rays in their convex polyhedral cones and that templates protected by a method extended from IrisCode can be broken into. These experimental results indicate that, without a thorough security analysis, convex polyhedral cone templates cannot be assumed secure. Additionally, the simplicity of the algorithm implies that even junior hackers without knowledge of advanced image processing and biometric databases can still break into protected templates and reveal relationships among templates produced by different recognition methods.

  6. A 1 log N parallel algorithm for detecting convex hulls on image boards.

    PubMed

    Lin, J C; Lin, J Y

    1998-01-01

    By finding the maximum and minimum of {yi-mxi|1=orconvex hull of N arbitrarily given points on an image board, The mathematical theory needed is included, and computation time is 1 log N.

  7. Stable anisotropic plasma confinement in magnetic configurations with convex-concave field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsventoukh, M. M.

    2014-02-01

    It is shown that a combination of the convex and the concave part of a field line provides a strong stabilizing action against convective (flute-interchange) plasma instability (Tsventoukh 2011 Nucl. Fusion 51 112002). This results in internal peaking of the stable plasma pressure profile that is calculated from the collisionless kinetic stability criterion for any magnetic confinement system with combination of mirrors and cusps. Connection of the convex and concave field line parts results in a reduction of the space charge that drives the unstable E × B motion, as there is an opposite direction of the particle drift in a non-uniform field at convex and concave field lines. The pressure peaking arises at the minimum of the second adiabatic invariant J that takes place at the ‘middle’ of a tandem mirror-cusp transverse cross-section. The position of the minimum in J varies with the particle pitch angle that results in a shift of the peaking position depending on plasma anisotropy. This allows one to improve a stable peaked pressure profile at a convex-concave field by changing the plasma anisotropy over the trap cross-section. Examples of such anisotropic distribution functions are found that give an additional substantial enhancement in the maximal central pressure. Furthermore, the shape of new calculated stable profiles has a wide central plasma layer instead of a narrow peak.

  8. Convexity of Energy-Like Functions: Theoretical Results and Applications to Power System Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Dvijotham, Krishnamurthy; Low, Steven; Chertkov, Michael

    2015-01-12

    Power systems are undergoing unprecedented transformations with increased adoption of renewables and distributed generation, as well as the adoption of demand response programs. All of these changes, while making the grid more responsive and potentially more efficient, pose significant challenges for power systems operators. Conventional operational paradigms are no longer sufficient as the power system may no longer have big dispatchable generators with sufficient positive and negative reserves. This increases the need for tools and algorithms that can efficiently predict safe regions of operation of the power system. In this paper, we study energy functions as a tool to design algorithms for various operational problems in power systems. These have a long history in power systems and have been primarily applied to transient stability problems. In this paper, we take a new look at power systems, focusing on an aspect that has previously received little attention: Convexity. We characterize the domain of voltage magnitudes and phases within which the energy function is convex in these variables. We show that this corresponds naturally with standard operational constraints imposed in power systems. We show that power of equations can be solved using this approach, as long as the solution lies within the convexity domain. We outline various desirable properties of solutions in the convexity domain and present simple numerical illustrations supporting our results.

  9. Dimpled/grooved face on a fuel injection nozzle body for flame stabilization and related method

    DOEpatents

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Kim, Kwanwoo; Zuo, Baifang

    2013-08-20

    A fuel injection head for a fuel nozzle used in a gas turbine combustor includes a substantially hollow body formed with an upstream end face, a downstream end face and a peripheral wall extending therebetween. A plurality of pre-mix tubes or passages extend axially through the hollow body with inlets at the upstream end face and outlets at the downstream end face. An exterior surface of the downstream end face is formed with three-dimensional surface features that increase a total surface area of the exterior surface as compared to a substantially flat, planar downstream end face.

  10. Voicing on Virtual and Face to Face Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamat, Hamidah

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses findings of a study conducted on pre-service teachers' experiences in virtual and face to face discussions. Technology has brought learning nowadays beyond the classroom context or time zone. The learning context and process no longer rely solely on face to face communications in the presence of a teacher.…

  11. Bayesian Face Recognition and Perceptual Narrowing in Face-Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balas, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    During the first year of life, infants' face recognition abilities are subject to "perceptual narrowing", the end result of which is that observers lose the ability to distinguish previously discriminable faces (e.g. other-race faces) from one another. Perceptual narrowing has been reported for faces of different species and different races, in…

  12. First-order convex feasibility algorithms for x-ray CT

    SciTech Connect

    Sidky, Emil Y.; Pan Xiaochuan; Jorgensen, Jakob S.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Iterative image reconstruction (IIR) algorithms in computed tomography (CT) are based on algorithms for solving a particular optimization problem. Design of the IIR algorithm, therefore, is aided by knowledge of the solution to the optimization problem on which it is based. Often times, however, it is impractical to achieve accurate solution to the optimization of interest, which complicates design of IIR algorithms. This issue is particularly acute for CT with a limited angular-range scan, which leads to poorly conditioned system matrices and difficult to solve optimization problems. In this paper, we develop IIR algorithms which solve a certain type of optimization called convex feasibility. The convex feasibility approach can provide alternatives to unconstrained optimization approaches and at the same time allow for rapidly convergent algorithms for their solution-thereby facilitating the IIR algorithm design process. Methods: An accelerated version of the Chambolle-Pock (CP) algorithm is adapted to various convex feasibility problems of potential interest to IIR in CT. One of the proposed problems is seen to be equivalent to least-squares minimization, and two other problems provide alternatives to penalized, least-squares minimization. Results: The accelerated CP algorithms are demonstrated on a simulation of circular fan-beam CT with a limited scanning arc of 144 Degree-Sign . The CP algorithms are seen in the empirical results to converge to the solution of their respective convex feasibility problems. Conclusions: Formulation of convex feasibility problems can provide a useful alternative to unconstrained optimization when designing IIR algorithms for CT. The approach is amenable to recent methods for accelerating first-order algorithms which may be particularly useful for CT with limited angular-range scanning. The present paper demonstrates the methodology, and future work will illustrate its utility in actual CT application.

  13. Computer aided surface representation

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhill, R E

    1987-11-01

    The aims of this research are the creation of new surface forms and the determination of geometric and physical properties of surfaces. The full sweep from constructive mathematics through the implementation of algorithms and the interactive computer graphics display of surfaces is utilized. Both three-dimensional and multi- dimensional surfaces are considered. Particular emphasis is given to the scientific computing solution of Department of Energy problems. The methods that we have developed and that we are proposing to develop allow applications such as: Producing smooth contour maps from measured data, such as weather maps. Modeling the heat distribution inside a furnace from sample measurements. Terrain modeling based on satellite pictures. The investigation of new surface forms includes the topics of triangular interpolants, multivariate interpolation, surfaces defined on surfaces and monotone and/or convex surfaces. The geometric and physical properties considered include contours, the intersection of surfaces, curvatures as a interrogation tool, and numerical integration.

  14. Face recognition system and method using face pattern words and face pattern bytes

    DOEpatents

    Zheng, Yufeng

    2014-12-23

    The present invention provides a novel system and method for identifying individuals and for face recognition utilizing facial features for face identification. The system and method of the invention comprise creating facial features or face patterns called face pattern words and face pattern bytes for face identification. The invention also provides for pattern recognitions for identification other than face recognition. The invention further provides a means for identifying individuals based on visible and/or thermal images of those individuals by utilizing computer software implemented by instructions on a computer or computer system and a computer readable medium containing instructions on a computer system for face recognition and identification.

  15. Ondes de surface transverses sur plaques piézoélectriques avec réseaux de bandes metalliques déposés sur les 2 faces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballandras, S.; Gavignet, E.; Bigler, E.

    1995-09-01

    A theoretical model has been implemented to study surface transverse waves propagating on piezoelectric plates of finite thickness with thin metal strip gratings on both sides. Calculations have been performed for AT-cuts of quartz of thickness varying from 140 to 120 μm. The spatial period of the gratings was fixed to 20 μm (acoustic wavelength equal to 40 μm). The dispersion curve relating the angular frequency to the wavenumber presents more than one stopband as found in the usual analyses on semi-infinite substrates. These multiple high-frequency stopbands allow to design and realize high stability resonators or highly sensitive sensors for gravimetry, accelerometer applications, etc. Un modèle théorique a été mis en œuvre pour l'étude des propriétés des ondes de surface transverses se propageant sur des plaques piézoélectriques d'épaisseur finie avec des réseaux de fines bandes métalliques déposés sur chaque face. Les calculs ont été effectués pour des plaques de quartz voisines de la coupe AT et d'épaisseur variant de 140 à 120 μm. La périodicité des réseaux en regard a été fixée à 20 μm (longueur d'onde acoustique 40 μm). La courbe de dispersion reliant la pulsation au nombre d'ondes présente plusieurs bandes d'arrêt incluant celle habituellement mise en évidence pour un substrat semi-infini. L'existence de ces multiples bandes d'arrêt haute fréquence ouvre de nouvelles perspectives pour la réalisation de résonateurs ultrastables ou de capteurs de très grande sensibilité gravimétrique, accélérométrique, etc.

  16. A Wall of Faces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Lori

    2008-01-01

    Visitors to the campus of Orland High School (OHS) will never question that they have stepped into a world of the masses: kids, activity, personalities, busyness, and playfulness--a veritable cloud of mild bedlam. The wall of ceramic faces that greets a visitor in the school office is another reminder of the organized chaos that the teachers…

  17. Challenges Facing Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyen, Edward L., Ed.; And Others

    This book presents 17 selected papers from recent issues of the journal, "Focus on Exceptional Children," concerning current and emerging challenges facing the field of special education. The book is organized in two parts. Part 1, "Contemporary Challenges," includes the following articles: "Transitions in Early Childhood Special Education: Issues…

  18. Bayesian Face Sketch Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nannan; Gao, Xinbo; Sun, Leiyu; Li, Jie

    2017-03-01

    Exemplar-based face sketch synthesis has been widely applied to both digital entertainment and law enforcement. In this paper, we propose a Bayesian framework for face sketch synthesis, which provides a systematic interpretation for understanding the common properties and intrinsic difference in different methods from the perspective of probabilistic graphical models. The proposed Bayesian framework consists of two parts: the neighbor selection model and the weight computation model. Within the proposed framework, we further propose a Bayesian face sketch synthesis method. The essential rationale behind the proposed Bayesian method is that we take the spatial neighboring constraint between adjacent image patches into consideration for both aforementioned models, while the state-of-the-art methods neglect the constraint either in the neighbor selection model or in the weight computation model. Extensive experiments on the Chinese University of Hong Kong face sketch database demonstrate that the proposed Bayesian method could achieve superior performance compared with the state-of-the-art methods in terms of both subjective perceptions and objective evaluations.

  19. Facing the Not Knowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennant, Roy

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about how to face the not knowing and offers a strategy to fill the gap of not knowing. In coping with constant change, he describes a strategy for library staff that might help in the absence of certainty. This includes: (a) guarding the data with one's life; (b) build not for longevity, but obsolescence; (c)…

  20. Automated Face Recognition System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    done at the University of California San Diego will be given(3, 1). Finally, the review will end with a short overview of the Karhunen Lorve and...define a face space. This basis set which is optimally tuned to the training data is derived using the Karhunen Lorve principal component analysis (7

  1. Facing Up to Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Elizabeth Kubler

    1972-01-01

    Doctor urges that Americans accept death as a part of life and suggests ways of helping dying patients and their families face reality calmly, with peace. Dying children and their siblings, as well as children's feelings about relatives' deaths, are also discussed. (PD)

  2. Two Faces of Japan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beasley, Conger, Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the inconsistency between Japanese exploitation of world natural resources and gestures to provide leadership in ecologically innovative technology. Explores Japanese culture, power structure, population trends, environmental ethics, industrialism, and international business practices as they relate to the philosophical face of…

  3. Lightweight Face Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cason, W. E. I.; Baucom, R. M.; Evans, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    Lightweight face mask originally developed to protect epileptic patients during seizures could have many other medical and nonmedical applications such as muscular distrophy patients, football linesmen and riot-control police. Masks are extremely lightweight, the lightest of the configurations weighing only 136 grams.

  4. Anatomy of ageing face.

    PubMed

    Ilankovan, V

    2014-03-01

    Ageing is a biological process that results from changes at a cellular level, particularly modification of mRNA. The face is affected by the same physiological process and results in skeletal, muscular, and cutaneous ageing; ligamentous attenuation, descent of fat, and ageing of the appendages. I describe these changes on a structural and clinical basis and summarise possible solutions for a rejuvenation surgeon.

  5. Workforce Issues Facing HRD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1995

    These four papers are from a symposium facilitated by Eugene Andette on work force issues facing human resources development (HRD) at the 1995 Academy of Human Resource Development conference. "Meaning Construction and Personal Transformation: Alternative Dimensions of Job Loss" (Terri A. Deems) reports a study conducted to explore the ways…

  6. Problems Facing Rural Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, C. E.; And Others

    Problems facing rural Scottish schools range from short term consideration of daily operation to long term consideration of organizational alternatives. Addressed specifically, such problems include consideration of: (1) liaison between a secondary school and its feeder primary schools; (2) preservice teacher training for work in small, isolated…

  7. Time-Resolved Visualization of Görtler Vortices in a Pulsed Convex Wall Jet using Fast Pressure-Sensitive Paint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, James; Danon, Ron; Greenblatt, David

    2015-11-01

    The time-resolved formation and structure of Görtler vortices in a pulsed convex wall jet are studied in this work. While the presence of Görtler vortices in laminar boundary layers on concave surfaces can be clearly observed, their presence in wall jets flowing over convex surfaces is difficult to discern due to transition to turbulence in the outer part of the jet. This work employed fast-response pressure-sensitive paint (PSP), which has a documented flat frequency response greater than 5 kHz, to visualize the time-resolved formation of the wall jet and the details of the Görtler vortices. The radius of curvature of the wall jet was 8 cm, and the Reynolds number (based on slot height and jet exit velocity) was varied between 5 ×102 and 4 ×104 . The characteristic spanwise wavelength of the vortices was studied as a function of jet Reynolds number. Furthermore, as the Reynolds number was increased, various secondary instabilities were observed that led to laminar-turbulent transition. Funding provided by the U.S. Fulbright Scholar Program.

  8. The Caledonian face test: A new test of face discrimination.

    PubMed

    Logan, Andrew J; Wilkinson, Frances; Wilson, Hugh R; Gordon, Gael E; Loffler, Gunter

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to develop a clinical test of face perception which is applicable to a wide range of patients and can capture normal variability. The Caledonian face test utilises synthetic faces which combine simplicity with sufficient realism to permit individual identification. Face discrimination thresholds (i.e. minimum difference between faces required for accurate discrimination) were determined in an "odd-one-out" task. The difference between faces was controlled by an adaptive QUEST procedure. A broad range of face discrimination sensitivity was determined from a group (N=52) of young adults (mean 5.75%; SD 1.18; range 3.33-8.84%). The test is fast (3-4 min), repeatable (test-re-test r(2)=0.795) and demonstrates a significant inversion effect. The potential to identify impairments of face discrimination was evaluated by testing LM who reported a lifelong difficulty with face perception. While LM's impairment for two established face tests was close to the criterion for significance (Z-scores of -2.20 and -2.27) for the Caledonian face test, her Z-score was -7.26, implying a more than threefold higher sensitivity. The new face test provides a quantifiable and repeatable assessment of face discrimination ability. The enhanced sensitivity suggests that the Caledonian face test may be capable of detecting more subtle impairments of face perception than available tests.

  9. Curvature and Tangency Handles for Control of Convex Cubic Shapes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    looked at A-splines constructed with segments of singular al- gebraic cubics, which are just rational cubics, with new, geometrically more meaningful...contact interpolation , and curvatures at three prescribed points, see Figures 1-4. Curve and Surface Design: Saint-Malo 1999 91 Pierre-Jean Laurent...curvature at one contact point. §2. Barycentric Coordinates and Curvature at the Endpoints The general algebraic cubic in cartesian coordinates x, y is

  10. Finding Faces Among Faces: Human Faces are Located More Quickly and Accurately than Other Primate and Mammal Faces

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Elizabeth A.; Buchin, Zachary; Werner, Katie; Worrell, Rey; Jakobsen, Krisztina V.

    2014-01-01

    We tested the specificity of human face search efficiency by examining whether there is a broad window of detection for various face-like stimuli—human and animal faces—or whether own-species faces receive greater attentional allocation. We assessed the strength of the own-species face detection bias by testing whether human faces are located more efficiently than other animal faces, when presented among various other species’ faces, in heterogeneous 16-, 36-, and 64-item arrays. Across all array sizes, we found that, controlling for distractor type, human faces were located faster and more accurately than primate and mammal faces, and that, controlling for target type, searches were faster when distractors were human faces compared to animal faces, revealing more efficient processing of human faces regardless of their role as targets or distractors (Experiment 1). Critically, these effects remained when searches were for specific species’ faces (human, chimpanzee, otter), ruling out a category-level explanation (Experiment 2). Together, these results suggest that human faces may be processed more efficiently than animal faces, both when task-relevant (targets), and when task-irrelevant (distractors), even when in direct competition with other faces. These results suggest that there is not a broad window of detection for all face-like patterns, but that human adults process own-species’ faces more efficiently than other species’ faces. Such own-species search efficiencies may arise through experience with own-species faces throughout development, or may be privileged early in development, due to the evolutionary importance of conspecifics’ faces. PMID:25113852

  11. Face-n-Food: Gender Differences in Tuning to Faces.

    PubMed

    Pavlova, Marina A; Scheffler, Klaus; Sokolov, Alexander N

    2015-01-01

    Faces represent valuable signals for social cognition and non-verbal communication. A wealth of research indicates that women tend to excel in recognition of facial expressions. However, it remains unclear whether females are better tuned to faces. We presented healthy adult females and males with a set of newly created food-plate images resembling faces (slightly bordering on the Giuseppe Arcimboldo style). In a spontaneous recognition task, participants were shown a set of images in a predetermined order from the least to most resembling a face. Females not only more readily recognized the images as a face (they reported resembling a face on images, on which males still did not), but gave on overall more face responses. The findings are discussed in the light of gender differences in deficient face perception. As most neuropsychiatric, neurodevelopmental and psychosomatic disorders characterized by social brain abnormalities are sex specific, the task may serve as a valuable tool for uncovering impairments in visual face processing.

  12. CRYSTAL/FACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgardner, Darrel; Kok, Greg; Anderson, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    Droplet Measurement Technologies (DMT), under funding from NASA, participated in the CRYSTAL/FACE field campaign in July, 2002 with measurements of cirrus cloud hydrometeors in the size range from 0.5 to 1600 microns. The measurements were made with the DMT Cloud, Aerosol and Precipitation Spectrometer (CAPS) that was flown on NASA's WB57F. With the exception of the first research flight when the data system failed two hours into the mission, the measurement system performed almost flawlessly during the thirteen flights. The measurements from the CAPS have been essential for interpretation of cirrus cloud properties and their impact on climate. The CAPS data set has been used extensively by the CRYSTAL/FACE investigators and as of the date of this report, have been included in five published research articles, 10 conference presentations and six other journal articles currently in preparation.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of "face-to-face" porphyrins.

    PubMed Central

    Collman, J P; Elliott, C M; Halbert, T R; Tovrog, B S

    1977-01-01

    The syntheses of four binary porphyrins, two of which are constrained to a "face-to-face" conformation, and their Co2+ and Cu2+ derivatives are described. Electron spin resonance indicates that the intermetallic separation in the binuclear "face-to-face" porphyrins is about 6.5-6.8 A. Electronic spectra and proton magnetic resonance spectra support the postulated "face-to-face" conformations. A hypothesis that related compounds may serve as multielectron redox catalysts for O2 and N2 is presented. PMID:189304

  14. Beyond Faces and Expertise

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Mintao; Bülthoff, Heinrich H.; Bülthoff, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Holistic processing—the tendency to perceive objects as indecomposable wholes—has long been viewed as a process specific to faces or objects of expertise. Although current theories differ in what causes holistic processing, they share a fundamental constraint for its generalization: Nonface objects cannot elicit facelike holistic processing in the absence of expertise. Contrary to this prevailing view, here we show that line patterns with salient Gestalt information (i.e., connectedness, closure, and continuity between parts) can be processed as holistically as faces without any training. Moreover, weakening the saliency of Gestalt information in these patterns reduced holistic processing of them, which indicates that Gestalt information plays a crucial role in holistic processing. Therefore, holistic processing can be achieved not only via a top-down route based on expertise, but also via a bottom-up route relying merely on object-based information. The finding that facelike holistic processing can extend beyond the domains of faces and objects of expertise poses a challenge to current dominant theories. PMID:26674129

  15. Neurocomputational bases of object and face recognition.

    PubMed Central

    Biederman, I; Kalocsai, P

    1997-01-01

    A number of behavioural phenomena distinguish the recognition of faces and objects, even when members of a set of objects are highly similar. Because faces have the same parts in approximately the same relations, individuation of faces typically requires specification of the metric variation in a holistic and integral representation of the facial surface. The direct mapping of a hypercolumn-like pattern of activation onto a representation layer that preserves relative spatial filter values in a two-dimensional (2D) coordinate space, as proposed by C. von der Malsburg and his associates, may account for many of the phenomena associated with face recognition. An additional refinement, in which each column of filters (termed a 'jet') is centred on a particular facial feature (or fiducial point), allows selectivity of the input into the holistic representation to avoid incorporation of occluding or nearby surfaces. The initial hypercolumn representation also characterizes the first stage of object perception, but the image variation for objects at a given location in a 2D coordinate space may be too great to yield sufficient predictability directly from the output of spatial kernels. Consequently, objects can be represented by a structural description specifying qualitative (typically, non-accidental) characterizations of an object's parts, the attributes of the parts, and the relations among the parts, largely based on orientation and depth discontinuities (as shown by Hummel & Biederman). A series of experiments on the name priming or physical matching of complementary images (in the Fourier domain) of objects and faces documents that whereas face recognition is strongly dependent on the original spatial filter values, evidence from object recognition indicates strong invariance to these values, even when distinguishing among objects that are as similar as faces. PMID:9304687

  16. Face-space: A unifying concept in face recognition research.

    PubMed

    Valentine, Tim; Lewis, Michael B; Hills, Peter J

    2016-10-01

    The concept of a multidimensional psychological space, in which faces can be represented according to their perceived properties, is fundamental to the modern theorist in face processing. Yet the idea was not clearly expressed until 1991. The background that led to the development of face-space is explained, and its continuing influence on theories of face processing is discussed. Research that has explored the properties of the face-space and sought to understand caricature, including facial adaptation paradigms, is reviewed. Face-space as a theoretical framework for understanding the effect of ethnicity and the development of face recognition is evaluated. Finally, two applications of face-space in the forensic setting are discussed. From initially being presented as a model to explain distinctiveness, inversion, and the effect of ethnicity, face-space has become a central pillar in many aspects of face processing. It is currently being developed to help us understand adaptation effects with faces. While being in principle a simple concept, face-space has shaped, and continues to shape, our understanding of face perception.

  17. Age-Dependent Face Detection and Face Categorization Performance

    PubMed Central

    Carbon, Claus-Christian; Grüter, Martina; Grüter, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Empirical studies on the development of face processing skills with age show inconsistent patterns concerning qualitative vs. quantitative changes over time or the age range for peak cognitive performance. In the present study, we tested the proficiency in face detection and face categorization with a large sample of participants (N = 312; age range: 2-88 yrs). As test objects, we used so-called Mooney faces, two-tone (black and white) images of faces lacking critical information of a local, featural and relational nature, reflecting difficult real world face processing conditions. We found that performance in the assessment of gender and age from Mooney faces increases up to about age 15, and decreases from 65 years on. The implications of these findings are discussed in the light of classic and recent findings from face development literature. PMID:24116236

  18. 9. WEST FACE OF OLD THEODOLITE BUILDING; WEST FACE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. WEST FACE OF OLD THEODOLITE BUILDING; WEST FACE OF EAST PHOTO TOWER IN BACKGROUND - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  19. A new "fat face" illusion.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu-Hao; Ge, Liezhong; Quinn, Paul C; Wang, Zhe; Xiao, Naiqi G; Pascalis, Olivier; Tanaka, James; Lee, Kang

    2012-01-01

    We report a novel fat face illusion that when two identical images of the same face are aligned vertically, the face at the bottom appears 'fatter'. This illusion emerged when the faces were shown upright, but not inverted, with the size of the illusion being 4%. When the faces were presented upside down, the illusion did not emerge. Also, when upright clocks were shown in the same vertically aligned fashion, we did not observe the illusion, indicating that the fat illusion does not generalize to every category of canonically upright objects with similar geometric shape as a face.

  20. Fast multiscale Gaussian beam methods for wave equations in bounded convex domains

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Gang; Lai, Jun; Qian, Jianliang

    2014-03-15

    Motivated by fast multiscale Gaussian wavepacket transforms and multiscale Gaussian beam methods which were originally designed for pure initial-value problems of wave equations, we develop fast multiscale Gaussian beam methods for initial boundary value problems of wave equations in bounded convex domains in the high frequency regime. To compute the wave propagation in bounded convex domains, we have to take into account reflecting multiscale Gaussian beams, which are accomplished by enforcing reflecting boundary conditions during beam propagation and carrying out suitable reflecting beam summation. To propagate multiscale beams efficiently, we prove that the ratio of the squared magnitude of beam amplitude and the beam width is roughly conserved, and accordingly we propose an effective indicator to identify significant beams. We also prove that the resulting multiscale Gaussian beam methods converge asymptotically. Numerical examples demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the method.

  1. A Genealogy of Convex Solids Via Local and Global Bifurcations of Gradient Vector Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domokos, Gábor; Holmes, Philip; Lángi, Zsolt

    2016-12-01

    Three-dimensional convex bodies can be classified in terms of the number and stability types of critical points on which they can balance at rest on a horizontal plane. For typical bodies, these are non-degenerate maxima, minima, and saddle points, the numbers of which provide a primary classification. Secondary and tertiary classifications use graphs to describe orbits connecting these critical points in the gradient vector field associated with each body. In previous work, it was shown that these classifications are complete in that no class is empty. Here, we construct 1- and 2-parameter families of convex bodies connecting members of adjacent primary and secondary classes and show that transitions between them can be realized by codimension 1 saddle-node and saddle-saddle (heteroclinic) bifurcations in the gradient vector fields. Our results indicate that all combinatorially possible transitions can be realized in physical shape evolution processes, e.g., by abrasion of sedimentary particles.

  2. Convex nanobending at a moving contact line: the missing mesoscopic link in dynamic wetting.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Yu, Jiapeng; Wang, Hao

    2014-11-25

    The morphological information on the very front of a spreading liquid is fundamental to our understanding of dynamic wetting. Debate has lasted for years concerning the nanoscopic local angles and the transition from them to the macroscopic counterpart, θ(D). This study of nonvolatile liquids analyzes the interface profile near the advancing contact line using an advanced atomic force microscopy. The interface is found following the macroscopic profile until bending in a convex profile around 20 nm from the substrate. This shoe-tip-like feature is common in partially wetting while absent for completely wetting, and its curvature varies with advancing speed. The observation ends the long-standing debate about the nanoscopic contact angles and their speed dependency. The convex nanobending provides a mesoscopic link and effectively complicates the dynamic wetting behaviors.

  3. A trait-based test for habitat filtering: Convex hull volume

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cornwell, W.K.; Schwilk, D.W.; Ackerly, D.D.

    2006-01-01

    Community assembly theory suggests that two processes affect the distribution of trait values within communities: competition and habitat filtering. Within a local community, competition leads to ecological differentiation of coexisting species, while habitat filtering reduces the spread of trait values, reflecting shared ecological tolerances. Many statistical tests for the effects of competition exist in the literature, but measures of habitat filtering are less well-developed. Here, we present convex hull volume, a construct from computational geometry, which provides an n-dimensional measure of the volume of trait space occupied by species in a community. Combined with ecological null models, this measure offers a useful test for habitat filtering. We use convex hull volume and a null model to analyze California woody-plant trait and community data. Our results show that observed plant communities occupy less trait space than expected from random assembly, a result consistent with habitat filtering. ?? 2006 by the Ecological Society of America.

  4. Convex hull test of the linear separability hypothesis in visual search.

    PubMed

    Bauer, B; Jolicoeur, P; Cowan, W B

    1999-08-01

    Visual search for a colour target in distractors of two other colours is dramatically affected by the configuration of the colours in CIE (x, y) space. To a first approximation, search is difficult when a target's chromaticity falls directly between (i.e. is not linearly separable from) two distractor chromaticities, otherwise search is easy (D'Zmura [1991, Vision Research, 31, 951-966]; Bauer, Jolicoeur, & Cowan [1996a, Vision Research, 36, 1439-1466]; Bauer, Jolicoeur, & Cowan [1996b, Perception, 25, 1282-1294]). In this paper, we demonstrate that the linear separability effect transcends the two distractor case. Placing a target colour inside the convex hull defined by a set of distractors hindered search performance compared with a target placed outside the convex hull. This is true whether the target was linearly separable in chromaticity only (Experiments 1 and 2), or in a combination of luminance and chromaticity (Experiments 3 and 4).

  5. A trait-based test for habitat filtering: convex hull volume.

    PubMed

    Cornwell, William K; Schwilk, L Dylan W; Ackerly, David D

    2006-06-01

    Community assembly theory suggests that two processes affect the distribution of trait values within communities: competition and habitat filtering. Within a local community, competition leads to ecological differentiation of coexisting species, while habitat filtering reduces the spread of trait values, reflecting shared ecological tolerances. Many statistical tests for the effects of competition exist in the literature, but measures of habitat filtering are less well-developed. Here, we present convex hull volume, a construct from computational geometry, which provides an n-dimensional measure of the volume of trait space occupied by species in a community. Combined with ecological null models, this measure offers a useful test for habitat filtering. We use convex hull volume and a null model to analyze California woody-plant trait and community data. Our results show that observed plant communities occupy less trait space than expected from random assembly, a result consistent with habitat filtering.

  6. Neurocomputing model for computation of an approximate convex hull of a set of points and spheres.

    PubMed

    Pal, Srimanta; Bhattacharya, Sabyasachi

    2007-03-01

    In this letter, a two-layer neural network is proposed for computation of an approximate convex hull of a set of given points in 3-D or a set of spheres of different sizes. The algorithm is designed based on an elegant concept-shrinking of a spherical rubber balloon surrounding the set of objects in 3-D. Logically, a set of neurons is orderly placed on a spherical mesh i.e., on a rubber balloon surrounding the objects. Each neuron has a parameter vector associated with its current position. The resultant force of attraction between a neuron and each of the given points/objects, determines the direction of a movement of the neuron lying on the rubber balloon. As the network evolves, the neurons (parameter vectors) approximate the convex hull more and more accurately.

  7. Seamless lamination of a concave-convex architecture with single-layer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ji-Hoon; Lim, Taekyung; Baik, Jaeyoon; Seo, Keumyoung; Moon, Youngkwon; Park, Noejung; Shin, Hyun-Joon; Kyu Kwak, Sang; Ju, Sanghyun; Real Ahn, Joung

    2015-10-01

    Graphene has been used as an electrode and channel material in electronic devices because of its superior physical properties. Recently, electronic devices have changed from a planar to a complicated three-dimensional (3D) geometry to overcome the limitations of planar devices. The evolution of electronic devices requires that graphene be adaptable to a 3D substrate. Here, we demonstrate that chemical-vapor-deposited single-layer graphene can be transferred onto a silicon dioxide substrate with a 3D geometry, such as a concave-convex architecture. A variety of silicon dioxide concave-convex architectures were uniformly and seamlessly laminated with graphene using a thermal treatment. The planar graphene was stretched to cover the concave-convex architecture, and the resulting strain on the curved graphene was spatially resolved by confocal Raman spectroscopy; molecular dynamic simulations were also conducted and supported the observations. Changes in electrical resistivity caused by the spatially varying strain induced as the graphene-silicon dioxide laminate varies dimensionally from 2D to 3D were measured by using a four-point probe. The resistivity measurements suggest that the electrical resistivity can be systematically controlled by the 3D geometry of the graphene-silicon dioxide laminate. This 3D graphene-insulator laminate will broaden the range of graphene applications beyond planar structures to 3D materials.Graphene has been used as an electrode and channel material in electronic devices because of its superior physical properties. Recently, electronic devices have changed from a planar to a complicated three-dimensional (3D) geometry to overcome the limitations of planar devices. The evolution of electronic devices requires that graphene be adaptable to a 3D substrate. Here, we demonstrate that chemical-vapor-deposited single-layer graphene can be transferred onto a silicon dioxide substrate with a 3D geometry, such as a concave-convex architecture. A

  8. A Generalization of Entanglement to Convex Operational Theories: Entanglement Relative to a Subspace of Observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnum, Howard; Ortiz, Gerardo; Somma, Rolando; Viola, Lorenza

    2005-12-01

    We define what it means for a state in a convex cone of states on a space of observables to be generalized-entangled relative to a subspace of the observables, in a general ordered linear spaces framework for operational theories. This extends the notion of ordinary entanglement in quantum information theory to a much more general framework. Some important special cases are described, in which the distinguished observables are subspaces of the observables of a quantum system, leading to results like the identification of generalized unentangled states with Lie-group-theoretic coherent states when the special observables form an irreducibly represented Lie algebra. Some open problems, including that of generalizing the semigroup of local operations with classical communication to the convex cones setting, are discussed.

  9. Octupolar approximation for the excluded volume of axially symmetric convex bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piastra, Marco; Virga, Epifanio G.

    2013-09-01

    We propose a simply computable formula for the excluded volume of convex, axially symmetric bodies, based on the classical Brunn-Minkoski theory for convex bodies, which is briefly outlined in an Appendix written in a modern mathematical language. This formula is applied to cones and spherocones, which are regularized cones; a shape-reconstruction algorithm is able to generate the region in space inaccessible to them and to compute their excluded volume, which is found to be in good agreement with our approximate analytical formula. Finally, for spherocones with an appropriately tuned amplitude, we predict the occurrence of a relative deep minimum of the excluded volume in a configuration lying between the parallel alignment (where the excluded volume is maximum) and the antiparallel alignment (where the excluded volume is minimum).

  10. Interpolation with slackness and continuity control and convexity-preservation using singular blending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Chiew-Lan; Wang, Guo-Jin

    2004-12-01

    This paper presents a new interpolation method that enables the construction of C2 cubic polynomial spline curves without solving a global system of equations, while providing slackness/continuity control and convexity preserving ability. The basic idea is to blend a cubic B-spline curve with a singularly parametrized sequence of connected line segments. A global slackness parameter controls the tautness, specifically the distance between the interpolating curve and the linear interpolant. The order of continuity at each knot is controlled via multiple knot insertions so that cusps and straight-line segments can be conveniently prescribed. In addition, a method for selecting local slackness values to produce G1 convexity preserving curve is presented. With the low-degree polynomials and direct computation of control vertices, this local method is computationally simple and is useful for interactive shape design and computer graphics applications.

  11. Image restoration by the method of convex projections: part 2 applications and numerical results.

    PubMed

    Sezan, M I; Stark, H

    1982-01-01

    The image restoration theory discussed in a previous paper by Youla and Webb [1] is applied to a simulated image and the results compared with the well-known method known as the Gerchberg-Papoulis algorithm. The results show that the method of image restoration by projection onto convex sets, by providing a convenient technique for utilizing a priori information, performs significantly better than the Gerchberg-Papoulis method.

  12. Collaborative Research: Further Developments in the Global Resolution of Convex Programs with Complementary Contraints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-31

    problem Theorem 6 NLP satisfying Frank- Wolfe property Theorem 2, requiring polyhedral K and ad- ditional restrictions Theorem 1 nSp-QCQP with convex...directly as a smooth continuous nonlinear program ( NLP ). It is the main purpose of this research to examine the quality of solutions computed by...standard NLP solvers applied to these smooth reformulations of the `0-norm. There are two properties of the NLP reformulations that make them difficult to

  13. Fast Bundle-Level Type Methods for Unconstrained and Ball-Constrained Convex Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    ZHANG ¶ Abstract. It has been shown in [14] that the accelerated prox-level ( APL ) method and its variant, the uniform smoothing level (USL) method...introduce two new variants of level methods, i.e., the fast APL (FAPL) method and the fast USL (FUSL) method, for solving large scale black-box and...structured convex programming problems respectively. Both FAPL and FUSL enjoy the same optimal iteration complexity as APL and USL, while the number of

  14. A Perfect Price Discrimination Market Model with Production, and a (Rational) Convex Program for It

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, Gagan; Vazirani, Vijay

    Recent results showed PPAD-completeness of the problem of computing an equilibrium for Fisher's market model under additively separable, piecewise-linear, concave utilities. We show that introducing perfect price discrimination in this model renders its equilibrium polynomial time computable. Moreover, its set of equilibria are captured by a convex program that generalizes the classical Eisenberg-Gale program, and always admits a rational solution.

  15. Face-to-Face Interference in Typical and Atypical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riby, Deborah M.; Doherty-Sneddon, Gwyneth; Whittle, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Visual communication cues facilitate interpersonal communication. It is important that we look at faces to retrieve and subsequently process such cues. It is also important that we sometimes look away from faces as they increase cognitive load that may interfere with online processing. Indeed, when typically developing individuals hold face gaze…

  16. Bayesian face recognition and perceptual narrowing in face-space.

    PubMed

    Balas, Benjamin

    2012-07-01

    During the first year of life, infants' face recognition abilities are subject to 'perceptual narrowing', the end result of which is that observers lose the ability to distinguish previously discriminable faces (e.g. other-race faces) from one another. Perceptual narrowing has been reported for faces of different species and different races, in developing humans and primates. Though the phenomenon is highly robust and replicable, there have been few efforts to model the emergence of perceptual narrowing as a function of the accumulation of experience with faces during infancy. The goal of the current study is to examine how perceptual narrowing might manifest as statistical estimation in 'face-space', a geometric framework for describing face recognition that has been successfully applied to adult face perception. Here, I use a computer vision algorithm for Bayesian face recognition to study how the acquisition of experience in face-space and the presence of race categories affect performance for own and other-race faces. Perceptual narrowing follows from the establishment of distinct race categories, suggesting that the acquisition of category boundaries for race is a key computational mechanism in developing face expertise.

  17. The roles of the convex hull and the number of potential intersections in performance on visually presented traveling salesperson problems.

    PubMed

    Vickers, Douglas; Lee, Michael D; Dry, Matthew; Hughes, Peter

    2003-10-01

    The planar Euclidean version of the traveling salesperson problem requires finding the shortest tour through a two-dimensional array of points. MacGregor and Ormerod (1996) have suggested that people solve such problems by using a global-to-local perceptual organizing process based on the convex hull of the array. We review evidence for and against this idea, before considering an alternative, local-to-global perceptual process, based on the rapid automatic identification of nearest neighbors. We compare these approaches in an experiment in which the effects of number of convex hull points and number of potential intersections on solution performance are measured. Performance worsened with more points on the convex hull and with fewer potential intersections. A measure of response uncertainty was unaffected by the number of convex hull points but increased with fewer potential intersections. We discuss a possible interpretation of these results in terms of a hierarchical solution process based on linking nearest neighbor clusters.

  18. A two-layer recurrent neural network for nonsmooth convex optimization problems.

    PubMed

    Qin, Sitian; Xue, Xiaoping

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a two-layer recurrent neural network is proposed to solve the nonsmooth convex optimization problem subject to convex inequality and linear equality constraints. Compared with existing neural network models, the proposed neural network has a low model complexity and avoids penalty parameters. It is proved that from any initial point, the state of the proposed neural network reaches the equality feasible region in finite time and stays there thereafter. Moreover, the state is unique if the initial point lies in the equality feasible region. The equilibrium point set of the proposed neural network is proved to be equivalent to the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker optimality set of the original optimization problem. It is further proved that the equilibrium point of the proposed neural network is stable in the sense of Lyapunov. Moreover, from any initial point, the state is proved to be convergent to an equilibrium point of the proposed neural network. Finally, as applications, the proposed neural network is used to solve nonlinear convex programming with linear constraints and L1 -norm minimization problems.

  19. A proof of convergence of the concave-convex procedure using Zangwill's theory.

    PubMed

    Sriperumbudur, Bharath K; Lanckriet, Gert R G

    2012-06-01

    The concave-convex procedure (CCCP) is an iterative algorithm that solves d.c. (difference of convex functions) programs as a sequence of convex programs. In machine learning, CCCP is extensively used in many learning algorithms, including sparse support vector machines (SVMs), transductive SVMs, and sparse principal component analysis. Though CCCP is widely used in many applications, its convergence behavior has not gotten a lot of specific attention. Yuille and Rangarajan analyzed its convergence in their original paper; however, we believe the analysis is not complete. The convergence of CCCP can be derived from the convergence of the d.c. algorithm (DCA), proposed in the global optimization literature to solve general d.c. programs, whose proof relies on d.c. duality. In this note, we follow a different reasoning and show how Zangwill's global convergence theory of iterative algorithms provides a natural framework to prove the convergence of CCCP. This underlines Zangwill's theory as a powerful and general framework to deal with the convergence issues of iterative algorithms, after also being used to prove the convergence of algorithms like expectation-maximization and generalized alternating minimization. In this note, we provide a rigorous analysis of the convergence of CCCP by addressing two questions: When does CCCP find a local minimum or a stationary point of the d.c. program under consideration? and when does the sequence generated by CCCP converge? We also present an open problem on the issue of local convergence of CCCP.

  20. Convex hull or crossing avoidance? Solution heuristics in the traveling salesperson problem.

    PubMed

    MacGregor, James N; Chronicle, Edward P; Ormerod, Thomas C

    2004-03-01

    Untrained adults appear to have access to cognitive processes that allow them to perform well in the Euclidean version of the traveling salesperson problem (E-TSP). They do so despite the famous computational intractability of the problem, which stems from its combinatorial complexity. A current hypothesis is the humans' good performance is based on following a strategy of connecting boundary points in order (the convex hull hypothesis). Recently, an alternative has been proposed, that performance is governed by a strategy of avoiding crossings. We examined the crossing avoidance hypothesis from the perspectives of its capacity to explain existing data, its theoretical adequacy, and its ability to explain the results of three new experiments. In Experiment 1, effects on the solution quality of number of points versus number of interior points were compared. In Experiment 2, the distributions of observed paths were compared with those predicted from the two hypotheses. In Experiment 3, figural effects were varied to induce crossings. The results of the experiments were more consistent with the convex hull than with the crossing avoidance hypothesis. Despite its simplicity and intuitive appeal, crossing avoidance does not provide a complete alternative to the convex hull hypothesis. Further elucidation of human strategies and heuristics for optimization problems such as the E-TSP will aid our understanding of how cognitive processes have adapted to the demands of combinatorial difficulty.

  1. Convex Sparse Spectral Clustering: Single-view to Multi-view.

    PubMed

    Lu, Canyi; Yan, Shuicheng; Lin, Zhouchen

    2016-04-12

    Spectral Clustering (SC) is one of the most widely used methods for data clustering. It first finds a low-dimensonal embedding U of data by computing the eigenvectors of the normalized Laplacian matrix, and then performs k-means on U> to get the final clustering result. In this work, we observe that, in the ideal case, UU> should be block diagonal and thus sparse. Therefore we propose the Sparse Spectral Clustering (SSC) method which extends SC with sparse regularization on UU>. To address the computational issue of the nonconvex SSC model, we propose a novel convex relaxation of SSC based on the convex hull of the fixed rank projection matrices. Then the convex SSC model can be efficiently solved by the Alternating Direction Method of Multipliers (ADMM). Furthermore, we propose the Pairwise Sparse Spectral Clustering (PSSC) which extends SSC to boost the clustering performance by using the multi-view information of data. Experimental comparisons with several baselines on real-world datasets testify to the efficacy of our proposed methods.

  2. Efficient convex-elastic net algorithm to solve the Euclidean traveling salesman problem.

    PubMed

    Al-Mulhem, M; Al-Maghrabi, T

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a hybrid algorithm that combines an adaptive-type neural network algorithm and a nondeterministic iterative algorithm to solve the Euclidean traveling salesman problem (E-TSP). It begins with a brief introduction to the TSP and the E-TSP. Then, it presents the proposed algorithm with its two major components: the convex-elastic net (CEN) algorithm and the nondeterministic iterative improvement (NII) algorithm. These two algorithms are combined into the efficient convex-elastic net (ECEN) algorithm. The CEN algorithm integrates the convex-hull property and elastic net algorithm to generate an initial tour for the E-TSP. The NII algorithm uses two rearrangement operators to improve the initial tour given by the CEN algorithm. The paper presents simulation results for two instances of E-TSP: randomly generated tours and tours for well-known problems in the literature. Experimental results are given to show that the proposed algorithm ran find the nearly optimal solution for the E-TSP that outperform many similar algorithms reported in the literature. The paper concludes with the advantages of the new algorithm and possible extensions.

  3. Image registration and object recognition using affine invariants and convex hulls.

    PubMed

    Yang, Z; Cohen, F S

    1999-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of feature point registration and scene recognition from images under weak perspective transformations which are well approximated by affine transformations and under possible occlusion and/or appearance of new objects. It presents a set of local absolute affine invariants derived from the convex hull of scattered feature points (e.g., fiducial or marking points, corner points, inflection points, etc.) extracted from the image. The affine invariants are constructed from the areas of the triangles formed by connecting three vertices among a set of four consecutive vertices (quadruplets) of the convex hull, and hence do make direct use of the area invariance property associated with the affine transformation. Because they are locally constructed, they are very well suited to handle the occlusion and/or appearance of new objects. These invariants are used to establish the correspondences between the convex hull vertices of a test image with a reference image in order to undo the affine transformation between them. A point matching approach for recognition follows this. The time complexity for registering L feature points on the test image with N feature points of the reference image is of order O(N x L). The method has been tested on real indoor and outdoor images and performs well.

  4. Hard convex lens-shaped particles: Densest-known packings and phase behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Cinacchi, Giorgio; Torquato, Salvatore

    2015-12-14

    By using theoretical methods and Monte Carlo simulations, this work investigates dense ordered packings and equilibrium phase behavior (from the low-density isotropic fluid regime to the high-density crystalline solid regime) of monodisperse systems of hard convex lens-shaped particles as defined by the volume common to two intersecting congruent spheres. We show that, while the overall similarity of their shape to that of hard oblate ellipsoids is reflected in a qualitatively similar phase diagram, differences are more pronounced in the high-density crystal phase up to the densest-known packings determined here. In contrast to those non-(Bravais)-lattice two-particle basis crystals that are the densest-known packings of hard (oblate) ellipsoids, hard convex lens-shaped particles pack more densely in two types of degenerate crystalline structures: (i) non-(Bravais)-lattice two-particle basis body-centered-orthorhombic-like crystals and (ii) (Bravais) lattice monoclinic crystals. By stacking at will, regularly or irregularly, laminae of these two crystals, infinitely degenerate, generally non-periodic in the stacking direction, dense packings can be constructed that are consistent with recent organizing principles. While deferring the assessment of which of these dense ordered structures is thermodynamically stable in the high-density crystalline solid regime, the degeneracy of their densest-known packings strongly suggests that colloidal convex lens-shaped particles could be better glass formers than colloidal spheres because of the additional rotational degrees of freedom.

  5. Convex Analysis of Mixtures for Separating Non-negative Well-grounded Sources

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yitan; Wang, Niya; Miller, David J.; Wang, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Blind Source Separation (BSS) is a powerful tool for analyzing composite data patterns in many areas, such as computational biology. We introduce a novel BSS method, Convex Analysis of Mixtures (CAM), for separating non-negative well-grounded sources, which learns the mixing matrix by identifying the lateral edges of the convex data scatter plot. We propose and prove a sufficient and necessary condition for identifying the mixing matrix through edge detection in the noise-free case, which enables CAM to identify the mixing matrix not only in the exact-determined and over-determined scenarios, but also in the under-determined scenario. We show the optimality of the edge detection strategy, even for cases where source well-groundedness is not strictly satisfied. The CAM algorithm integrates plug-in noise filtering using sector-based clustering, an efficient geometric convex analysis scheme, and stability-based model order selection. The superior performance of CAM against a panel of benchmark BSS techniques is demonstrated on numerically mixed gene expression data of ovarian cancer subtypes. We apply CAM to dissect dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging data taken from breast tumors and time-course microarray gene expression data derived from in-vivo muscle regeneration in mice, both producing biologically plausible decomposition results. PMID:27922124

  6. Application of the phase shifting diffraction interferometer for measuring convex mirrors and negative lenses

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.; Campbell, Eugene W.

    2004-03-09

    To measure a convex mirror, a reference beam and a measurement beam are both provided through a single optical fiber. A positive auxiliary lens is placed in the system to give a converging wavefront onto the convex mirror under test. A measurement is taken that includes the aberrations of the convex mirror as well as the errors due to two transmissions through the positive auxiliary lens. A second, measurement provides the information to eliminate this error. A negative lens can also be measured in a similar way. Again, there are two measurement set-ups. A reference beam is provided from a first optical fiber and a measurement beam is provided from a second optical fiber. A positive auxiliary lens is placed in the system to provide a converging wavefront from the reference beam onto the negative lens under test. The measurement beam is combined with the reference wavefront and is analyzed by standard methods. This measurement includes the aberrations of the negative lens, as well as the errors due to a single transmission through the positive auxiliary lens. A second measurement provides the information to eliminate this error.

  7. Application Of The Phase Shifting Diffraction Interferometer For Measuring Convex Mirrors And Negative Lenses

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.; Campbell, Eugene W.

    2005-06-21

    To measure a convex mirror, a reference beam and a measurement beam are both provided through a single optical fiber. A positive auxiliary lens is placed in the system to give a converging wavefront onto the convex mirror under test. A measurement is taken that includes the aberrations of the convex mirror as well as the errors due to two transmissions through the positive auxiliary lens. A second measurement provides the information to eliminate this error. A negative lens can also be measured in a similar way. Again, there are two measurement set-ups. A reference beam is provided from a first optical fiber and a measurement beam is provided from a second optical fiber. A positive auxiliary lens is placed in the system to provide a converging wavefront from the reference beam onto the negative lens under test. The measurement beam is combined with the reference wavefront and is analyzed by standard methods. This measurement includes the aberrations of the negative lens, as well as the errors due to a single transmission through the positive auxiliary lens. A second measurement provides the information to eliminate this error.

  8. Challenges facing production grids

    SciTech Connect

    Pordes, Ruth; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Today's global communities of users expect quality of service from distributed Grid systems equivalent to that their local data centers. This must be coupled to ubiquitous access to the ensemble of processing and storage resources across multiple Grid infrastructures. We are still facing significant challenges in meeting these expectations, especially in the underlying security, a sustainable and successful economic model, and smoothing the boundaries between administrative and technical domains. Using the Open Science Grid as an example, I examine the status and challenges of Grids operating in production today.

  9. Null test of aspheric surfaces in zone-plate interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Junejei; Chang, Chihui

    1992-10-01

    Instead of using lenses or mirrors as a null compensator, the construction of the zone plate interferometer is used to accomplish the null test. By choosing the focal length of the zone plate according to the radius of curvature and conic constant of the test surface, the conventional zone plate interferometer is modified to be a null test of concave conicoids. To test convex conicoids, an imaging lens is added between the zone plate and the test surface. As long as the zone plate is perfectly imaged into the center of the curvature of the test surface, a null test of convex conicoids is the same as that of concave ones.

  10. Aging changes in the face

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/004004.htm Aging changes in the face To use the sharing ... face with age References Brodie SE, Francis JH. Aging and disorders of the eye. In: Fillit HM, ...

  11. Vitiligo on the face (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This is a picture of vitiligo on the face. Complete loss of melanin, the primary skin pigment, ... the same areas on both sides of the face -- symmetrically -- or it may be patchy -- asymmetrical. The ...

  12. Higher order smooth fitting for the convex cavities in the multiply connected plane domain by multiple functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jialian; Wan, Chaoyan; Zhao, Wenzhong

    2013-07-01

    In order to satisfy different engineering applications, a new higher order smooth fitting method for the convex cavities in the multiply connected plane domain by multiple functions is put forward. For the boundaries of convex cavities in the multiply connected domain--every close domain, the unique fitting function KS, is represented with some fitting precision controlled by only one single parameter (Rho). The fitted smooth figure can be drawn according to the function.

  13. Detecting Faces in Impoverished Images

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-11-01

    International Conference on Face and Gesture Recognition , Nara, Japan. Heisle, B., T. Serre, S. Mukherjee and T. Poggio. (2001) Feature Reduction and...Third International Conference on Face and Gesture Recognition , Nara, Japan. Leung, T. K., Burl, M. C., & Perona, P. (1995). Finding faces in...of invariant moments. Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Face and Gesture Recognition , Nara, Japan. Thornhill, R. and Gangestad

  14. IntraFace

    PubMed Central

    De la Torre, Fernando; Chu, Wen-Sheng; Xiong, Xuehan; Vicente, Francisco; Ding, Xiaoyu; Cohn, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Within the last 20 years, there has been an increasing interest in the computer vision community in automated facial image analysis algorithms. This has been driven by applications in animation, market research, autonomous-driving, surveillance, and facial editing among others. To date, there exist several commercial packages for specific facial image analysis tasks such as facial expression recognition, facial attribute analysis or face tracking. However, free and easy-to-use software that incorporates all these functionalities is unavailable. This paper presents IntraFace (IF), a publicly-available software package for automated facial feature tracking, head pose estimation, facial attribute recognition, and facial expression analysis from video. In addition, IFincludes a newly develop technique for unsupervised synchrony detection to discover correlated facial behavior between two or more persons, a relatively unexplored problem in facial image analysis. In tests, IF achieved state-of-the-art results for emotion expression and action unit detection in three databases, FERA, CK+ and RU-FACS; measured audience reaction to a talk given by one of the authors; and discovered synchrony for smiling in videos of parent-infant interaction. IF is free of charge for academic use at http://www.humansensing.cs.cmu.edu/intraface/. PMID:27346987

  15. Flat-ramp vs. convex-concave thrust geometries in a deformable hanging wall: new insights from analogue modeling experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Pedro; Tomas, Ricardo; Rosas, Filipe; Duarte, Joao; Terrinha, Pedro

    2015-04-01

    Different modes of strain accommodation affecting a deformable hanging-wall in a flat-ramp-flat thrust system were previously addressed through several (sandbox) analog modeling studies, focusing on the influence of different variables, such as: a) thrust ramp dip angle and friction (Bonini et al, 2000); b) prescribed thickness of the hanging-wall (Koy and Maillot, 2007); and c) sin-thrust erosion (compensating for topographic thrust edification, e.g. Persson and Sokoutis, 2002). In the present work we reproduce the same experimental procedure to investigate the influence of two different parameters on hanging-wall deformation: 1) the geometry of the thrusting surface; and 2) the absence of a velocity discontinuity (VD) that is always present in previous similar analogue modeling studies. Considering the first variable we use two end member ramp geometries, flat-ramp-flat and convex-concave, to understand the control exerted by the abrupt ramp edges in the hanging-wall stress-strain distribution, comparing the obtain results with the situation in which such edge singularities are absent (convex-concave thrust ramp). Considering the second investigated parameter, our motivation was the recognition that the VD found in the different analogue modeling settings simply does not exist in nature, despite the fact that it has a major influence on strain accommodation in the deformable hanging-wall. We thus eliminate such apparatus artifact from our models and compare the obtained results with the previous ones. Our preliminary results suggest that both investigated variables play a non-negligible role on the structural style characterizing the hanging-wall deformation of convergent tectonic settings were such thrust-ramp systems were recognized. Acknowledgments This work was sponsored by the Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia (FCT) through project MODELINK EXPL/GEO-GEO/0714/2013. Pedro Almeida wants to thank to FCT for the Ph.D. grant (SFRH/BD/52556/2014) under the

  16. User-guided segmentation of preterm neonate ventricular system from 3-D ultrasound images using convex optimization.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Wu; Yuan, Jing; Kishimoto, Jessica; McLeod, Jonathan; Chen, Yimin; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine; Fenster, Aaron

    2015-02-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound (US) system has been developed to monitor the intracranial ventricular system of preterm neonates with intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) and the resultant dilation of the ventricles (ventriculomegaly). To measure ventricular volume from 3-D US images, a semi-automatic convex optimization-based approach is proposed for segmentation of the cerebral ventricular system in preterm neonates with IVH from 3-D US images. The proposed semi-automatic segmentation method makes use of the convex optimization technique supervised by user-initialized information. Experiments using 58 patient 3-D US images reveal that our proposed approach yielded a mean Dice similarity coefficient of 78.2% compared with the surfaces that were manually contoured, suggesting good agreement between these two segmentations. Additional metrics, the mean absolute distance of 0.65 mm and the maximum absolute distance of 3.2 mm, indicated small distance errors for a voxel spacing of 0.22 × 0.22 × 0.22 mm(3). The Pearson correlation coefficient (r = 0.97, p < 0.001) indicated a significant correlation of algorithm-generated ventricular system volume (VSV) with the manually generated VSV. The calculated minimal detectable difference in ventricular volume change indicated that the proposed segmentation approach with 3-D US images is capable of detecting a VSV difference of 6.5 cm(3) with 95% confidence, suggesting that this approach might be used for monitoring IVH patients' ventricular changes using 3-D US imaging. The mean segmentation times of the graphics processing unit (GPU)- and central processing unit-implemented algorithms were 50 ± 2 and 205 ± 5 s for one 3-D US image, respectively, in addition to 120 ± 10 s for initialization, less than the approximately 35 min required by manual segmentation. In addition, repeatability experiments indicated that the intra-observer variability ranges from 6.5% to 7.5%, and the inter-observer variability is 8.5% in terms

  17. Transoral carotid ultrasonography using a micro convex probe with B-flow imaging for extracranial internal carotid artery dissection.

    PubMed

    Sakima, Hirokuni; Isa, Katsunori; Anegawa, Takahiro; Kokuba, Kazuhito; Nakachi, Koh; Goya, Yoshino; Tokashiki, Takashi; Ishiuchi, Shogo; Ohya, Yusuke

    2012-11-01

    We report on transoral carotid ultrasonography using a micro convex probe with B-flow imaging for determining spontaneous extracranial internal carotid artery dissection just below the petrous portion. A 49-year-old man suffered cortical and subcortical infarction in the region of the right middle cerebral artery. Magnetic resonance angiography on the third day of admission revealed spontaneous recanalization of the right internal carotid artery associated with an intimal flap-like structure at the petrous portion. Transoral carotid ultrasonography using a micro convex probe revealed right extracranial internal carotid artery dissection, showing an increased diameter of the right extracranial internal carotid artery with double lumen formation, stenosis of the true lumen, and a mobile intimal flap in B-flow imaging. Transoral carotid ultrasonography using a micro convex probe was helpful to attempt a self-expanding stent for recanalizing right extracranial internal carotid artery dissection. The patient recovered and was discharged ambulatory. The size of the micro convex probe was optimum for transoral carotid ultrasonography in our patient. Micro convex probe is more commonly used than the standard transoral carotid ultrasonography probe, which lacks versatility. We consider that transoral carotid ultrasonography using a micro convex probe could be routinely used for ultrasonographic evaluation of extracranial internal carotid artery dissection.

  18. A novel thermal face recognition approach using face pattern words

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yufeng

    2010-04-01

    A reliable thermal face recognition system can enhance the national security applications such as prevention against terrorism, surveillance, monitoring and tracking, especially at nighttime. The system can be applied at airports, customs or high-alert facilities (e.g., nuclear power plant) for 24 hours a day. In this paper, we propose a novel face recognition approach utilizing thermal (long wave infrared) face images that can automatically identify a subject at both daytime and nighttime. With a properly acquired thermal image (as a query image) in monitoring zone, the following processes will be employed: normalization and denoising, face detection, face alignment, face masking, Gabor wavelet transform, face pattern words (FPWs) creation, face identification by similarity measure (Hamming distance). If eyeglasses are present on a subject's face, an eyeglasses mask will be automatically extracted from the querying face image, and then masked with all comparing FPWs (no more transforms). A high identification rate (97.44% with Top-1 match) has been achieved upon our preliminary face dataset (of 39 subjects) from the proposed approach regardless operating time and glasses-wearing condition.e

  19. FaceID: A face detection and recognition system

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, M.B.; Rao, N.S.V.; Olman, V.; Uberbacher, E.C.; Mann, R.C.

    1996-12-31

    A face detection system that automatically locates faces in gray-level images is described. Also described is a system which matches a given face image with faces in a database. Face detection in an Image is performed by template matching using templates derived from a selected set of normalized faces. Instead of using original gray level images, vertical gradient images were calculated and used to make the system more robust against variations in lighting conditions and skin color. Faces of different sizes are detected by processing the image at several scales. Further, a coarse-to-fine strategy is used to speed up the processing, and a combination of whole face and face component templates are used to ensure low false detection rates. The input to the face recognition system is a normalized vertical gradient image of a face, which is compared against a database using a set of pretrained feedforward neural networks with a winner-take-all fuser. The training is performed by using an adaptation of the backpropagation algorithm. This system has been developed and tested using images from the FERET database and a set of images obtained from Rowley, et al and Sung and Poggio.

  20. Adaptive face coding and discrimination around the average face.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Gillian; Maloney, Laurence T; Turner, Jenny; Ewing, Louise

    2007-03-01

    Adaptation paradigms highlight the dynamic nature of face coding and suggest that identity is coded relative to an average face that is tuned by experience. In low-level vision, adaptive coding can enhance sensitivity to differences around the adapted level. We investigated whether sensitivity to differences around the average face is similarly enhanced. Converging evidence from three paradigms showed no enhancement. Discrimination of small interocular spacing differences was not better for faces close to the average (Study 1). Nor was perceived similarity reduced for face pairs close to (spanning) the average (Study 2). On the contrary, these pairs were judged most similar. Maximum likelihood perceptual difference scaling (Studies 3 and 4) confirmed that sensitivity to differences was reduced, not enhanced, around the average. We conclude that adaptive face coding does not enhance discrimination around the average face.

  1. Electrostatic Potential of Specific Mineral Faces

    SciTech Connect

    Zarzycki, Piotr P.; Chatman, Shawn ME; Preocanin, Tajana; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2011-07-05

    Reaction rates of environmental processes occurring at hydrated mineral surfaces are primarily controlled by the electrostatic potential that develops at the interface. This potential depends on the structure of exposed crystal faces, as well as the pH and the type of ions and their interactions with these faces. Despite its importance, experimental methods for determining fundamental electrostatic properties of specific crystal faces such as the point of zero charge are few. Here we show that this information may be obtained from simple, cyclic potentiometric titration using a well characterized single-crystal electrode exposing the face of interest. The method exploits the presence of a hysteresis loop in the titration measurements that allows extraction of key electrostatic descriptors using the Maxwell construction. The approach is demonstrated for hematite (α-Fe2O3) (001), and a thermodynamic proof is provided for the resulting estimate of its point of zero charge. Insight gained from this method will aid in predicting the fate of migrating contaminants, mineral growth/dissolution processes, mineral-microbiological interactions, and in testing surface complexation theories.

  2. Influence of nanomorphology on the melting and catalytic properties of convex polyhedral nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guisbiers, G.; Abudukelimu, G.

    2013-02-01

    It is well known today that the melting temperature and the catalytic activation energy of nanoparticles are size-dependent. These properties are here analyzed in a size range between 4 and 100 nm, with a special attention to sizes below 20 nm. Nevertheless, their unique properties are determined not only by their size but also by their shape defined by the relative area of different surface facets. In this paper, the influence of crystal structure and shape of the nanoparticles on the melting and catalytic properties are theoretically investigated. The theory is developed for cubic crystal structures i.e., simple cubic, body centered cubic, and face centered cubic. The following shapes are then considered: tetrahedron, cube, octahedron, decahedron, dodecahedron, rhombic dodecahedron, truncated octahedron, cuboctahedron, and icosahedron. The predictions were compared with available experimental data and molecular dynamics simulation results coming from the literature and relatively good agreement was obtained for gold, silver, nickel, and platinum nanoparticles.

  3. Reanimating the paralyzed face

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Facial animation is an essential part of human communication and one of the main means of expressing emotions, indexing our physiologic state and providing nonverbal cues. The loss of this important human quality due to facial paralysis can be devastating and is often associated with depression, social isolation and poor quality of life. Interruption of the neuromuscular pathway from the facial motor cortex to the facial muscles is the common causative factor in facial paralysis resulting from various etiologies. Restoring tone, symmetry and movement to the paralyzed face requires timely nerve grafting intervention in cases of reversible paralysis and the transfer of functional muscle units in irreversible paralysis. We review recent advances in these techniques. PMID:24273650

  4. The many faces of research on face perception

    PubMed Central

    Little, Anthony C.; Jones, Benedict C.; DeBruine, Lisa M.

    2011-01-01

    Face perception is fundamental to human social interaction. Many different types of important information are visible in faces and the processes and mechanisms involved in extracting this information are complex and can be highly specialized. The importance of faces has long been recognized by a wide range of scientists. Importantly, the range of perspectives and techniques that this breadth has brought to face perception research has, in recent years, led to many important advances in our understanding of face processing. The articles in this issue on face perception each review a particular arena of interest in face perception, variously focusing on (i) the social aspects of face perception (attraction, recognition and emotion), (ii) the neural mechanisms underlying face perception (using brain scanning, patient data, direct stimulation of the brain, visual adaptation and single-cell recording), and (iii) comparative aspects of face perception (comparing adult human abilities with those of chimpanzees and children). Here, we introduce the central themes of the issue and present an overview of the articles. PMID:21536550

  5. Learning Compact Binary Face Descriptor for Face Recognition.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jiwen; Liong, Venice Erin; Zhou, Xiuzhuang; Zhou, Jie

    2015-10-01

    Binary feature descriptors such as local binary patterns (LBP) and its variations have been widely used in many face recognition systems due to their excellent robustness and strong discriminative power. However, most existing binary face descriptors are hand-crafted, which require strong prior knowledge to engineer them by hand. In this paper, we propose a compact binary face descriptor (CBFD) feature learning method for face representation and recognition. Given each face image, we first extract pixel difference vectors (PDVs) in local patches by computing the difference between each pixel and its neighboring pixels. Then, we learn a feature mapping to project these pixel difference vectors into low-dimensional binary vectors in an unsupervised manner, where 1) the variance of all binary codes in the training set is maximized, 2) the loss between the original real-valued codes and the learned binary codes is minimized, and 3) binary codes evenly distribute at each learned bin, so that the redundancy information in PDVs is removed and compact binary codes are obtained. Lastly, we cluster and pool these binary codes into a histogram feature as the final representation for each face image. Moreover, we propose a coupled CBFD (C-CBFD) method by reducing the modality gap of heterogeneous faces at the feature level to make our method applicable to heterogeneous face recognition. Extensive experimental results on five widely used face datasets show that our methods outperform state-of-the-art face descriptors.

  6. Face detection and eyeglasses detection for thermal face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yufeng

    2012-01-01

    Thermal face recognition becomes an active research direction in human identification because it does not rely on illumination condition. Face detection and eyeglasses detection are necessary steps prior to face recognition using thermal images. Infrared light cannot go through glasses and thus glasses will appear as dark areas in a thermal image. One possible solution is to detect eyeglasses and to exclude the eyeglasses areas before face matching. In thermal face detection, a projection profile analysis algorithm is proposed, where region growing and morphology operations are used to segment the body of a subject; then the derivatives of two projections (horizontal and vertical) are calculated and analyzed to locate a minimal rectangle of containing the face area. Of course, the searching region of a pair of eyeglasses is within the detected face area. The eyeglasses detection algorithm should produce either a binary mask if eyeglasses present, or an empty set if no eyeglasses at all. In the proposed eyeglasses detection algorithm, block processing, region growing, and priori knowledge (i.e., low mean and variance within glasses areas, the shapes and locations of eyeglasses) are employed. The results of face detection and eyeglasses detection are quantitatively measured and analyzed using the manually defined ground truths (for both face and eyeglasses). Our experimental results shown that the proposed face detection and eyeglasses detection algorithms performed very well in contrast with the predefined ground truths.

  7. [Comparative studies of face recognition].

    PubMed

    Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2012-07-01

    Every human being is proficient in face recognition. However, the reason for and the manner in which humans have attained such an ability remain unknown. These questions can be best answered-through comparative studies of face recognition in non-human animals. Studies in both primates and non-primates show that not only primates, but also non-primates possess the ability to extract information from their conspecifics and from human experimenters. Neural specialization for face recognition is shared with mammals in distant taxa, suggesting that face recognition evolved earlier than the emergence of mammals. A recent study indicated that a social insect, the golden paper wasp, can distinguish their conspecific faces, whereas a closely related species, which has a less complex social lifestyle with just one queen ruling a nest of underlings, did not show strong face recognition for their conspecifics. Social complexity and the need to differentiate between one another likely led humans to evolve their face recognition abilities.

  8. Performance characteristics of a curved-channel microchannel plate with a curved input face and a plane output face

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, David C.; Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Timothy, J. Gethyn

    1989-01-01

    The presently performance-evaluated format, in which a high-gain curved-channel microchannel plate (M2MCP) has a spherical concave input face and a plane output face, allows the input face of the MCP (1) to match such curved focal surfaces as that of a Rowland-circle spectrometer mounting, while (2) having a high-resolution plane readout array in proximity focus with the output face. This MCP has been evaluated in a discrete-anode multicathode microchannel array detector system. The saturated modal gain was found to be inversely proportional to the length/diameter ratio of the channels and directly proportional to the applied MCP voltage.

  9. Face-n-Food: Gender Differences in Tuning to Faces

    PubMed Central

    Pavlova, Marina A.; Scheffler, Klaus; Sokolov, Alexander N.

    2015-01-01

    Faces represent valuable signals for social cognition and non-verbal communication. A wealth of research indicates that women tend to excel in recognition of facial expressions. However, it remains unclear whether females are better tuned to faces. We presented healthy adult females and males with a set of newly created food-plate images resembling faces (slightly bordering on the Giuseppe Arcimboldo style). In a spontaneous recognition task, participants were shown a set of images in a predetermined order from the least to most resembling a face. Females not only more readily recognized the images as a face (they reported resembling a face on images, on which males still did not), but gave on overall more face responses. The findings are discussed in the light of gender differences in deficient face perception. As most neuropsychiatric, neurodevelopmental and psychosomatic disorders characterized by social brain abnormalities are sex specific, the task may serve as a valuable tool for uncovering impairments in visual face processing. PMID:26154177

  10. About-face on face recognition ability and holistic processing

    PubMed Central

    Richler, Jennifer J.; Floyd, R. Jackie; Gauthier, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Previous work found a small but significant relationship between holistic processing measured with the composite task and face recognition ability measured by the Cambridge Face Memory Test (CFMT; Duchaine & Nakayama, 2006). Surprisingly, recent work using a different measure of holistic processing (Vanderbilt Holistic Face Processing Test [VHPT-F]; Richler, Floyd, & Gauthier, 2014) and a larger sample found no evidence for such a relationship. In Experiment 1 we replicate this unexpected result, finding no relationship between holistic processing (VHPT-F) and face recognition ability (CFMT). A key difference between the VHPT-F and other holistic processing measures is that unique face parts are used on each trial in the VHPT-F, unlike in other tasks where a small set of face parts repeat across the experiment. In Experiment 2, we test the hypothesis that correlations between the CFMT and holistic processing tasks are driven by stimulus repetition that allows for learning during the composite task. Consistent with our predictions, CFMT performance was correlated with holistic processing in the composite task when a small set of face parts repeated over trials, but not when face parts did not repeat. A meta-analysis confirms that relationships between the CFMT and holistic processing depend on stimulus repetition. These results raise important questions about what is being measured by the CFMT, and challenge current assumptions about why faces are processed holistically. PMID:26223027

  11. The Face that Launched a Thousand Slips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. M.; Howard, A. D.; Schenk, P.; Thomas, P. C.

    2013-01-01

    formative processes been active in the recent past? 5) Finally, is the surface accreting or eroding? The smooth character of the leading edge hemisphere of Helene and the dominance of mass wasting suggest that the surface is composed of fine-grained debris, probably dominated by dust-size to small gravel particles. The Lagrangian points of saturnian satellites are locations where planetesimals might have accreted to form co-orbital satellites such as and they may capture ejecta from their master moon. Published models suggest that Helene is a site of net accretion, but we find no extant explanation for the dominance of fine grain sizes for the surface (and probable subsurface) composition of Helene and the other Lagrangian satellites. Observation of the mass wasting tracks on Helene suggests the presence of well-defined streams of debris with low bordering levees that may be depositional features or remnants of the dissected higher surface. Some flows in grazing illumination appear to have a convex cross-section. This mass-flow morphology might be consistent with the occurrence of large-scale flow events, but which might have occurred through rapid emplacement or slow glacier-like creep. On the other hand, small craters appear to have been "softened" by creep-like processes, indicating ongoing mass wasting.

  12. Local hull-based surface construction of volumetric data from silhouettes.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dongjoe; Tjahjadi, Tardi

    2008-08-01

    The marching cubes (MC) is a general method which can construct a surface of an object from its volumetric data generated using a shape from silhouette method. Although MC is efficient and straightforward to implement, a MC surface may have discontinuity even though the volumetric data is continuous. This is because surface construction is more sensitive to image noise than the construction of volumetric data. To address this problem, we propose a surface construction algorithm which aggregates local surfaces constructed by the 3-D convex hull algorithm. Thus, the proposed method initially classifies local convexities from imperfect MC vertices based on sliced volumetric data. Experimental results show that continuous surfaces are obtained from imperfect silhouette images of both convex and nonconvex objects.

  13. Convex-Optimization-Based Compartmental Pharmacokinetic Analysis for Prostate Tumor Characterization Using DCE-MRI.

    PubMed

    Ambikapathi, ArulMurugan; Chan, Tsung-Han; Lin, Chia-Hsiang; Yang, Fei-Shih; Chi, Chong-Yung; Wang, Yue

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is a powerful imaging modality to study the pharmacokinetics in a suspected cancer/tumor tissue. The pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis of prostate cancer includes the estimation of time activity curves (TACs), and thereby, the corresponding kinetic parameters (KPs), and plays a pivotal role in diagnosis and prognosis of prostate cancer. In this paper, we endeavor to develop a blind source separation algorithm, namely convex-optimization-based KPs estimation (COKE) algorithm for PK analysis based on compartmental modeling of DCE-MRI data, for effective prostate tumor detection and its quantification. The COKE algorithm first identifies the best three representative pixels in the DCE-MRI data, corresponding to the plasma, fast-flow, and slow-flow TACs, respectively. The estimation accuracy of the flux rate constants (FRCs) of the fast-flow and slow-flow TACs directly affects the estimation accuracy of the KPs that provide the cancer and normal tissue distribution maps in the prostate region. The COKE algorithm wisely exploits the matrix structure (Toeplitz, lower triangular, and exponential decay) of the original nonconvex FRCs estimation problem, and reformulates it into two convex optimization problems that can reliably estimate the FRCs. After estimation of the FRCs, the KPs can be effectively estimated by solving a pixel-wise constrained curve-fitting (convex) problem. Simulation results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed COKE algorithm. The COKE algorithm is also evaluated with DCE-MRI data of four different patients with prostate cancer and the obtained results are consistent with clinical observations.

  14. The CONVEX Liner Add-On to the DIAMOND-FORTUNE event

    SciTech Connect

    Heuze, F.E.; Swift, R.P.; Hill, L.R.; Barrett, W.H.

    1993-11-15

    This report describes the execution of the CONVEX Liner Add-On to the DIAMOND FORTUNE low-yield cavity test of the Defense Nuclear Agency. CONVEX stands for COntained Nuclear Vessel EXperiment. It concerns the design of underground chambers where repeated low-yield nuclear explosions could be conducted. The approach proposed by the first author in the early 1980`s was to engineer a steel-lined rock cavern where the steel liner would be prestressed against the rock by tendons and/or bolts. These would daylight in tunnels surrounding the main cavity. From there, they could be initially tensioned and retensioned, if needed, after each test. The CONVEX Liner Add-On to DIAMOND FORTUNE consisted of anchoring a 1.4-m square, 2.5-cm thick steel plate to the wall of the cavity, using a 5-cm diameter center bolt, and four 2.5-cm diameter comer bolts. The bolts daylighted in a drift surrounding the gallery, and separated from it by a 9-m thick rock pillar. The liner plate, the bolts, and the rock pillar were equipped with 23 gages to describe the thermal and mechanical response of the system during pretensioning, during the dynamic loading phase, and post-test. Particular emphasis was given to obtaining the response both upon loading and during the rebound of the system, in order to determine whether the plate ever separated from the rock. So, the main operational objectives of this project were to acquire response data of the system under nuclear loading and to ascertain the status of contact between the steel plate and the rock, as shown by toadstool data and bolt tension data. The instrumentation and data acquisition system performed extremely well. Data were recorded during the dynamic phase; plate temperature was monitored for several hours after the test; and the remaining tension was obtained for several bolts more than three months after the test, upon re-entry in the runaround drift.

  15. Facing the Spectator

    PubMed Central

    Koenderink, Jan; van Doorn, Andrea; Pinna, Baingio

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the familiar phenomenon of the uncanny feeling that represented people in frontal pose invariably appear to “face you” from wherever you stand. We deploy two different methods. The stimuli include the conventional one—a flat portrait rocking back and forth about a vertical axis—augmented with two novel variations. In one alternative, the portrait frame rotates whereas the actual portrait stays motionless and fronto-parallel; in the other, we replace the (flat!) portrait with a volumetric object. These variations yield exactly the same optical stimulation in frontal view, but become grossly different in very oblique views. We also let participants sample their momentary awareness through “gauge object” settings in static displays. From our results, we conclude that the psychogenesis of visual awareness maintains a number—at least two, but most likely more—of distinct spatial frameworks simultaneously involving “cue–scission.” Cues may be effective in one of these spatial frameworks but ineffective or functionally different in other ones. PMID:27895885

  16. Facing the Spectator.

    PubMed

    Koenderink, Jan; van Doorn, Andrea; Pinna, Baingio; Pepperell, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the familiar phenomenon of the uncanny feeling that represented people in frontal pose invariably appear to "face you" from wherever you stand. We deploy two different methods. The stimuli include the conventional one-a flat portrait rocking back and forth about a vertical axis-augmented with two novel variations. In one alternative, the portrait frame rotates whereas the actual portrait stays motionless and fronto-parallel; in the other, we replace the (flat!) portrait with a volumetric object. These variations yield exactly the same optical stimulation in frontal view, but become grossly different in very oblique views. We also let participants sample their momentary awareness through "gauge object" settings in static displays. From our results, we conclude that the psychogenesis of visual awareness maintains a number-at least two, but most likely more-of distinct spatial frameworks simultaneously involving "cue-scission." Cues may be effective in one of these spatial frameworks but ineffective or functionally different in other ones.

  17. ON EPIMORPHICITY OF A CONVOLUTION OPERATOR IN CONVEX DOMAINS IN \\mathbf{C}^l

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morzhakov, V. V.

    1988-02-01

    Let D be a convex domain and K a convex compact set in \\mathbf{C}^l; let H(D) be the space of analytic functions in D, provided with the topology of uniform convergence on compact sets, and H(K) the space of germs of analytic functions on K with the natural inductive limit topology; and let H'(K) be the space dual to H(K). Each functional T\\in H'(K) generates a convolution operator (\\check{T}y)(z)=T_\\zeta(y(z+\\zeta)), y\\in H(D+K), z\\in D, which acts continuously from H(D+K) into H(D). Further let (\\mathscr{F}T)(z)=T_\\zeta(\\exp\\langle z,\\,\\zeta\\rangle) be the Fourier-Borel transform of the functional T\\in H'(K).In this paper the following theorem is proved:Theorem. Let D be a bounded convex domain in \\mathbf{C}^l with boundary of class C^1 or D=D_1\\times\\dots \\times D_l, where the D_j are bounded planar convex domains with boundaries of class C^1, and let T\\in H'(K). In order that \\check{T}(H(D+K))=H(D) it is necessary and sufficient that 1) \\mathscr{L}^*_{\\mathscr{F}T}(\\zeta)=h_K(\\zeta) for all \\zeta\\in\\mathbf{C}^l, and 2) (\\mathscr{F}T)(z) be a function of completely regular growth in \\mathbf{C}^l in the sense of weak convergence in D'(\\mathbf{C}^l).Here \\displaystyle \\mathscr{L}^*_{\\mathscr{F}T}(\\zeta)=\\varlimsup_{r\\to\\zeta}\\,\\varlimsup_{r\\to\\infty}\\frac{\\ln\\vert(\\mathscr{F}T)(rz)\\vert}{r}is the regularized radial indicator of the entire function (\\mathscr{F}T)(z), and h_K(\\zeta) is the support function of the compact set K.Bibliography: 29 titles.

  18. Block clustering based on difference of convex functions (DC) programming and DC algorithms.

    PubMed

    Le, Hoai Minh; Le Thi, Hoai An; Dinh, Tao Pham; Huynh, Van Ngai

    2013-10-01

    We investigate difference of convex functions (DC) programming and the DC algorithm (DCA) to solve the block clustering problem in the continuous framework, which traditionally requires solving a hard combinatorial optimization problem. DC reformulation techniques and exact penalty in DC programming are developed to build an appropriate equivalent DC program of the block clustering problem. They lead to an elegant and explicit DCA scheme for the resulting DC program. Computational experiments show the robustness and efficiency of the proposed algorithm and its superiority over standard algorithms such as two-mode K-means, two-mode fuzzy clustering, and block classification EM.

  19. Distributed convex optimisation with event-triggered communication in networked systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiayun; Chen, Weisheng

    2016-12-01

    This paper studies the distributed convex optimisation problem over directed networks. Motivated by practical considerations, we propose a novel distributed zero-gradient-sum optimisation algorithm with event-triggered communication. Therefore, communication and control updates just occur at discrete instants when some predefined condition satisfies. Thus, compared with the time-driven distributed optimisation algorithms, the proposed algorithm has the advantages of less energy consumption and less communication cost. Based on Lyapunov approaches, we show that the proposed algorithm makes the system states asymptotically converge to the solution of the problem exponentially fast and the Zeno behaviour is excluded. Finally, simulation example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  20. Generalised monogamy relation of convex-roof extended negativity in multi-level systems

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Tian; Luo, Yu; Li, Yongming

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the generalised monogamy inequalities of convex-roof extended negativity (CREN) in multi-level systems. The generalised monogamy inequalities provide the upper and lower bounds of bipartite entanglement, which are obtained by using CREN and the CREN of assistance (CRENOA). Furthermore, we show that the CREN of multi-qubit pure states satisfies some monogamy relations. Additionally, we test the generalised monogamy inequalities for qudits by considering the partially coherent superposition of a generalised W-class state in a vacuum and show that the generalised monogamy inequalities are satisfied in this case as well. PMID:27857163