Science.gov

Sample records for cooling time nuclear

  1. Nuclear superfluidity and cooling time of neutron star crusts

    SciTech Connect

    Monrozeau, C.; Margueron, J.; Sandulescu, N.

    2007-06-15

    We analyze the effect of neutron superfluidity on the cooling time of inner crust matter in neutron stars, in the case of a rapid cooling of the core. The specific heat of the inner crust, which determines the thermal response of the crust, is calculated in the framework of HFB approach at finite temperature. The calculations are performed with two paring forces chosen to simulate the pairing properties of uniform neutron matter corresponding to the BCS approximation and to many-body techniques including polarization effects. Using a simple model for the heat transport across the inner crust, it is shown that the two pairing scenarios mentioned above give very different values for the cooling time, i.e., of about 12 and 25 yr.

  2. GAS COOLED NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Long, E.; Rodwell, W.

    1958-06-10

    A gas-cooled nuclear reactor consisting of a graphite reacting core and reflector structure supported in a containing vessel is described. A gas sealing means is included for sealing between the walls of the graphite structure and containing vessel to prevent the gas coolant by-passing the reacting core. The reacting core is a multi-sided right prismatic structure having a pair of parallel slots around its periphery. The containing vessel is cylindrical and has a rib on its internal surface which supports two continuous ring shaped flexible web members with their radially innermost ends in sealing engagement within the radially outermost portion of the slots. The core structure is supported on ball bearings. This design permits thermal expansion of the core stracture and vessel while maintainirg a peripheral seal between the tvo elements.

  3. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors with passive cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Fanning, Alan W.

    1991-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of cooling medium flow circuits which cooperate to remove and carry heat away from the fuel core upon loss of the normal cooling flow circuit to areas external thereto.

  4. Water-cooled nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, W.; Irion, L.

    1981-07-07

    A water-cooled nuclear reactor pressure vessel is internally provided with a check valve assembly for the inner end of a coolant inlet nozzle to prevent immediate loss of the coolant from the vessel by backward flow in the event the pressure of the coolant supply through the nozzle, drops below the pressure inside the vessel while the reactor is operating. The valve assembly includes a plurality of flap valves working in parallel so that if one fails to close when required, the balance of the flap valves remain operative to check the discharge of the coolant.

  5. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, S.

    1980-10-07

    The vault of a liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor is lined with thermal insulation. The insulation is in two layers, a first layer cladding the vault surface is of solid ceramic material while a second layer cladding the first layer is of fibrous or metallic material. In the event of a breach of the vessel leakage of liquid metal is absorbed by the second layer providing a conduction path to the first layer thereby enhancing heat loss to the concrete of the vault and maintaining the internal temperature at a safe limit.

  6. Gas-cooled nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Peinado, Charles O.; Koutz, Stanley L.

    1985-01-01

    A gas-cooled nuclear reactor includes a central core located in the lower portion of a prestressed concrete reactor vessel. Primary coolant gas flows upward through the core and into four overlying heat-exchangers wherein stream is generated. During normal operation, the return flow of coolant is between the core and the vessel sidewall to a pair of motor-driven circulators located at about the bottom of the concrete pressure vessel. The circulators repressurize the gas coolant and return it back to the core through passageways in the underlying core structure. If during emergency conditions the primary circulators are no longer functioning, the decay heat is effectively removed from the core by means of natural convection circulation. The hot gas rising through the core exits the top of the shroud of the heat-exchangers and flows radially outward to the sidewall of the concrete pressure vessel. A metal liner covers the entire inside concrete surfaces of the concrete pressure vessel, and cooling tubes are welded to the exterior or concrete side of the metal liner. The gas coolant is in direct contact with the interior surface of the metal liner and transfers its heat through the metal liner to the liquid coolant flowing through the cooling tubes. The cooler gas is more dense and creates a downward convection flow in the region between the core and the sidewall until it reaches the bottom of the concrete pressure vessel when it flows radially inward and up into the core for another pass. Water is forced to flow through the cooling tubes to absorb heat from the core at a sufficient rate to remove enough of the decay heat created in the core to prevent overheating of the core or the vessel.

  7. Passive cooling safety system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Boardman, Charles E.; Hui, Marvin M.; Berglund, Robert C.

    1991-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of partitions surrounding the reactor vessel in spaced apart relation forming intermediate areas for circulating heat transferring fluid which remove and carry away heat from the reactor vessel. The passive cooling system includes a closed primary fluid circuit through the partitions surrounding the reactor vessel and a partially adjoining secondary open fluid circuit for carrying transferred heat out into the atmosphere.

  8. Indirect passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Boardman, Charles E.

    1990-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of partitions surrounding the reactor vessel in spaced apart relation forming intermediate areas for circulating heat transferring fluid which remove and carry away heat from the reactor vessel. The passive cooling system includes a closed primary fluid circuit through the partitions surrounding the reactor vessel and a partially adjoining secondary open fluid circuit for carrying transferred heat out into the atmosphere.

  9. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor plant system

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Boardman, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting for fuel decay during reactor shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. The reactor system is enhanced with sealing means for excluding external air from contact with the liquid metal coolant leaking from the reactor vessel during an accident. The invention also includes a silo structure which resists attack by leaking liquid metal coolant, and an added unique cooling means.

  10. Apparatus for in situ determination of burnup, cooling time and fissile content of an irradiated nuclear fuel assembly in a fuel storage pond

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, John R.; Halbig, James K.; Menlove, Howard O.; Klosterbuer, Shirley F.

    1985-01-01

    A detector head for in situ inspection of irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies submerged in a water-filled nuclear fuel storage pond. The detector head includes two parallel arms which extend from a housing and which are spaced apart so as to be positionable on opposite sides of a submerged fuel assembly. Each arm includes an ionization chamber and two fission chambers. One fission chamber in each arm is enclosed in a cadmium shield and the other fission chamber is unshielded. The ratio of the outputs of the shielded and unshielded fission chambers is used to determine the boron content of the pond water. Correcting for the boron content, the neutron flux and gamma ray intensity are then used to verify the declared exposure, cooling time and fissile material content of the irradiated fuel assembly.

  11. Apparatus for in situ determination of burnup, cooling time and fissile content of an irradiated nuclear fuel assembly in a fuel storage pond

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, J.R.; Halbig, J.K.; Menlove, H.O.; Klosterbuer, S.F.

    1984-01-01

    A detector head for in situ inspection of irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies submerged in a water-filled nuclear fuel storage pond. The detector head includes two parallel arms which extend from a housing and which are spaced apart so as to be positionable on opposite sides of a submerged fuel assembly. Each arm includes an ionization chamber and two fission chambers. One fission chamber in each arm is enclosed in a cadmium shield and the other fission chamber is unshielded. The ratio of the outputs of the shielded and unshielded fission chambers is used to determine the boron content of the pond water. Correcting for the boron content, the neutron flux and gamma ray intensity are then used to verify the declared exposure, cooling time and fissile material content of the irradiated fuel assembly.

  12. Cooling system for a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Amtmann, Hans H.

    1982-01-01

    A cooling system for a gas-cooled nuclear reactor is disclosed which includes at least one primary cooling loop adapted to pass coolant gas from the reactor core and an associated steam generator through a duct system having a main circulator therein, and at least one auxiliary cooling loop having communication with the reactor core and adapted to selectively pass coolant gas through an auxiliary heat exchanger and circulator. The main and auxiliary circulators are installed in a common vertical cavity in the reactor vessel, and a common return duct communicates with the reactor core and intersects the common cavity at a junction at which is located a flow diverter valve operative to effect coolant flow through either the primary or auxiliary cooling loops.

  13. Personal cooling in nuclear power stations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kamon, E.

    1983-03-01

    Two approaches to personal, non-restrictive cooling of workers exposed to high-temperature work environments in nuclear power plants were evaluated. Both approaches involved a cooling garment designed to be worn under the protective clothing donned in penetration into radiation areas. One garmet was developed to cool by direct body contact with small packets of frozen water enclosed in the pockets of a shirt. The other garmets cooled by circulating a cooled liquid through capillaries in a vest and head cap (System A) or a vest (System B). Testing was conducted in a laboratory simulation of high ambient temperature (55/sup 0/C) and moderate metabolic heat production (200 to 300 kcal/h). Exposure time without cooling (control) was 52 minutes (Group 1) for the workloads demanding 200 kcal/h (48 minutes for Group 2). A long garmet with 7.2 kg of frozen water (LFWG) increased mean exposure time over the control by 242% (163% for the same garmet with 6.2 kg of frozen water). A short-version garmet with 3.8 kg of frozen water (SFWG) increased the stay time by 115%. The circulating-liquid garmets increased mean exposure time 35% (System A) and 27% (System B) over the control. In field observation, the LFWG with 6.2 kg of frozen water improved stay time by 125%.

  14. Nuclear fuel for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Duncombe, E.; Adamson, J.; Gratton, C.P.

    1983-11-22

    In a cluster of nuclear fuel rods cooled by liquid metal an obstruction to coolant flow results in overheating in the wake of the obstruction. By the provision of open ended heat transfer tubes in the flow channels, a guaranteed supply of coolant is maintained and this supply holds the temperature to below saturation. Heat transfer via the tubes is highly efficient and ensures that a sufficient temperature rise occurs at the cluster exit to provoke a response from the outlet temperature transducer sensing average temperature.

  15. Liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kayser, G.

    1982-12-07

    Integrated nuclear reactor cooled by a liquid metal and incorporating a main vessel sealed in its upper part by a slab, an inner vessel containing the core, the latter resting on a system for the positioning and supply of the core with liquid metal and which is called the support, the latter itself resting on a supporting structure bearing on the bottom of the main vessel of the reactor, wherein it comprises an inner baffle cladding the side wall and bottom of the main vessel and defining with the latter an intermediate space filled with the liquid metal, tubes for supplying a liquid metal to the intermediate space below the bottom of the main vessel and tubes for returning said liquid metal to an auxiliary exchanger in order to remove heat from the intermediate space.

  16. Passive cooling system for top entry liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Boardman, Charles E.; Hunsbedt, Anstein; Hui, Marvin M.

    1992-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear fission reactor plant having a top entry loop joined satellite assembly with a passive auxiliary safety cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. This satellite type reactor plant is enhanced by a backup or secondary passive safety cooling system which augments the primary passive auxiliary cooling system when in operation, and replaces the primary cooling system when rendered inoperative.

  17. Method for passive cooling liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors, and system thereof

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Busboom, Herbert J.

    1991-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of partitions surrounding the reactor vessel in spaced apart relation forming intermediate areas for circulating heat transferring fluid which remove and carry away heat from the reactor vessel.

  18. Nuclear reactor cooling system decontamination reagent regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Anstine, Larry D.; James, Dean B.; Melaika, Edward A.; Peterson, Jr., John P.

    1985-01-01

    An improved method for decontaminating the coolant system of water-cooled nuclear power reactors and for regenerating the decontamination solution. A small amount of one or more weak-acid organic complexing agents is added to the reactor coolant, and the pH is adjusted to form a decontamination solution which is circulated throughout the coolant system to dissolve metal oxides from the interior surfaces and complex the resulting metal ions and radionuclide ions. The coolant containing the complexed metal ions and radionuclide ions is passed through a strong-base anion exchange resin bed which has been presaturated with a solution containing the complexing agents in the same ratio and having the same pH as the decontamination solution. As the decontamination solution passes through the resin bed, metal-complexed anions are exchanged for the metal-ion-free anions on the bed, while metal-ion-free anions in the solution pass through the bed, thus removing the metal ions and regenerating the decontamination solution.

  19. Electrochemistry of Water-Cooled Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, Dgiby; Urquidi-Macdonald, Mirna; Pitt, Jonathan

    2006-08-08

    This project developed a comprehensive mathematical and simulation model for calculating thermal hydraulic, electrochemical, and corrosion parameters, viz. temperature, fluid flow velocity, pH, corrosion potential, hydrogen injection, oxygen contamination, stress corrosion cracking, crack growth rate, and other important quantities in the coolant circuits of water-cooled nuclear power plants, including both Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). The model is being used to assess the three major operational problems in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR), which include mass transport, activity transport, and the axial offset anomaly, and provide a powerful tool for predicting the accumulation of SCC damage in BWR primary coolant circuits as a function of operating history. Another achievement of the project is the development of a simulation tool to serve both as a training tool for plant operators and as an engineering test-bed to evaluate new equipment and operating strategies (normal operation, cold shut down and others). The development and implementation of the model allows us to estimate the activity transport or "radiation fields" around the primary loop and the vessel, as a function of the operating parameters and the water chemistry.

  20. Passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors with backup coolant flow path

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Boardman, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear fission reactor plant having a passive auxiliary safety cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. This reactor plant is enhanced by a backup or secondary passive safety cooling system which augments the primary passive auxiliary cooling system when in operation, and replaces the primary system when rendered inoperable.

  1. Algorithmic cooling in liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atia, Yosi; Elias, Yuval; Mor, Tal; Weinstein, Yossi

    2016-01-01

    Algorithmic cooling is a method that employs thermalization to increase qubit purification level; namely, it reduces the qubit system's entropy. We utilized gradient ascent pulse engineering, an optimal control algorithm, to implement algorithmic cooling in liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance. Various cooling algorithms were applied onto the three qubits of C132-trichloroethylene, cooling the system beyond Shannon's entropy bound in several different ways. In particular, in one experiment a carbon qubit was cooled by a factor of 4.61. This work is a step towards potentially integrating tools of NMR quantum computing into in vivo magnetic-resonance spectroscopy.

  2. Time-dependent Cooling in Photoionized Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnat, Orly

    2017-02-01

    I explore the thermal evolution and ionization states in gas cooling from an initially hot state in the presence of external photoionizing radiation. I compute the equilibrium and nonequilibrium cooling efficiencies, heating rates, and ion fractions for low-density gas cooling while exposed to the ionizing metagalactic background radiation at various redshifts (z = 0 ‑ 3), for a range of temperatures (108–104 K), densities (10‑7–103 cm‑3), and metallicities (10‑3–2 times solar). The results indicate the existence of a threshold ionization parameter, above which the cooling efficiencies are very close to those in photoionization equilibrium (so that departures from equilibrium may be neglected), and below which the cooling efficiencies resemble those in collisional time-dependent gas cooling with no external radiation (and are thus independent of density).

  3. Passive cooling system for nuclear reactor containment structure

    DOEpatents

    Gou, Perng-Fei; Wade, Gentry E.

    1989-01-01

    A passive cooling system for the contaminant structure of a nuclear reactor plant providing protection against overpressure within the containment attributable to inadvertent leakage or rupture of the system components. The cooling system utilizes natural convection for transferring heat imbalances and enables the discharge of irradiation free thermal energy to the atmosphere for heat disposal from the system.

  4. Natural circulating passive cooling system for nuclear reactor containment structure

    DOEpatents

    Gou, Perng-Fei; Wade, Gentry E.

    1990-01-01

    A passive cooling system for the contaminant structure of a nuclear reactor plant providing protection against overpressure within the containment attributable to inadvertent leakage or rupture of the system components. The cooling system utilizes natural convection for transferring heat imbalances and enables the discharge of irradiation free thermal energy to the atmosphere for heat disposal from the system.

  5. PROCESS FOR COOLING A NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Borst, L.B.

    1962-12-11

    This patent relates to the operation of a reactor cooled by liquid sulfur dioxide. According to the invention the pressure on the sulfur dioxide in the reactor is maintained at least at the critical pressure of the sulfur dioxide. Heating the sulfur dioxide to its critical temperature results in vaporization of the sulfur dioxide without boiling. (AEC)

  6. Expansion cooled CO nuclear pumped laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. F.; Bird, P. F.; Mansfield, C. R.; Helmick, H. H.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes a series of experiments designed to investigate the performance of a fission fragment excited CO laser with gasdynamic cooling. The experiments use a wall source of fission fragments to provide excitation of CO or CO gas mixtures. A separate investigation examines the effects on vibrational excitation distribution of CO or CO gas mixtures with the addition of UF6.

  7. An Analysis of Nuclear-Rocket Nozzle Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, William H.; Bachkin, Daniel; Medeiros, Arthur A.

    1960-01-01

    A nuclear-rocket regenerative-cooling analysis was conducted over a range of reactor power of 46 to 1600 megawatts and is summarized herein. Although the propellant (hydrogen) is characterized by a large heat-sink capacity, an analysis of the local heat-flux capability of the coolant at the nozzle throat indicated that, for conventional values of system pressure drop, the cooling capability was inadequate to maintain a selected wall temperature of 1440 R. Several techniques for improving the cooling capability were discussed, for example, high pressure drop, high wall temperature, refractory wall coatings, thin highly conductive walls, and film cooling. In any specific design a combination of methods will probably be utilized to achieve successful cooling.

  8. The cooling time scales of growing sunspots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Dean-Yi

    1987-01-01

    The evolution of brightness and magnetic fields of growing sunspots is studied. Growing sunspots are found to be brighter (or less dark) than stable sunspots with the same magnetic field strength. From comparison of brightness and magnetic fields of a growing sunspot with those of stable sunspots, a dynamical parameter, the cooling time, of the growing sunspot is obtained. Ten growing sunspots are studied, and cooling times of 0.5 to 9 hr are found. Two models, the inhibition model and the Alfven wave model, give cooling times of about 0.05 hr, based on linear theory. The discrepancy between theory and observation may be due to the fact that the observed sunspots are in the nonlinear regime.

  9. Ice Thermal Storage Systems for Nuclear Power Plant Supplemental Cooling and Peak Power Shifting

    SciTech Connect

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Phil Sharpe; Blaise Hamanaka; Wei Yan; WoonSeong Jeong

    2013-03-01

    Availability of cooling water has been one of the major issues for the nuclear power plant site selection. Cooling water issues have frequently disrupted the normal operation at some nuclear power plants during heat waves and long draught. One potential solution is to use ice thermal storage (ITS) systems that reduce cooling water requirements and boost the plant’s thermal efficiency in hot hours. ITS uses cheap off-peak electricity to make ice and uses the ice for supplemental cooling during peak demand time. ITS also provides a way to shift a large amount of electricity from off peak time to peak time. For once-through cooling plants near a limited water body, adding ITS can bring significant economic benefits and avoid forced derating and shutdown during extremely hot weather. For the new plants using dry cooling towers, adding the ITS systems can effectively reduce the efficiency loss during hot weather so that new plants could be considered in regions lack of cooling water. This paper will review light water reactor cooling issues and present the feasibility study results.

  10. 78 FR 35330 - Initial Test Programs for Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Plants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-12

    ... COMMISSION Initial Test Programs for Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Plants AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... revision to Regulatory Guide (RG), 1.68, ``Initial Test Programs for Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Plants... Initial Test Programs (ITPs) for light water cooled nuclear power plants. ADDRESSES: Please refer to...

  11. Dynamical cooling of nuclear spins in double quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Rudner, M S; Levitov, L S

    2010-07-09

    Electrons trapped in quantum dots can exhibit quantum-coherent spin dynamics over long timescales. These timescales are limited by the coupling of electron spins to the disordered nuclear spin background, which is a major source of noise and dephasing in such systems. We propose a scheme for controlling and suppressing fluctuations of nuclear spin polarization in double quantum dots, which uses nuclear spin pumping in the spin-blockade regime. We show that nuclear spin polarization fluctuations can be suppressed when electronic levels in the two dots are properly positioned near resonance. The proposed mechanism is analogous to that of optical Doppler cooling. The Overhauser shift due to fluctuations of nuclear polarization brings electron levels in and out of resonance, creating internal feedback to suppress fluctuations. Estimates indicate that a better than 10-fold reduction of fluctuations is possible.

  12. Exercise and Quadriceps Muscle Cooling Time

    PubMed Central

    Long, Blaine C; Cordova, Mitchell L; Brucker, Jody B; Demchak, Timothy J; Stone, Marcus B

    2005-01-01

    Context: Cryotherapy is commonly used for a variety of purposes; however, the body's response to cryotherapy immediately postexercise is unknown. Objective: To investigate the effect of prior exercise on crushed-ice–bag treatment of a large muscle group. Design: 2 × 3 repeated-measures design on depth (1 cm and 2 cm below adipose tissue) and treatment (exercise followed by ice, exercise followed by no ice, and no exercise followed by ice). Setting: Sports Injury Research Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Six physically active, uninjured male volunteers. Intervention(s): For the 2 exercise conditions, subjects rode a stationary cycle ergometer at 70% to 80% of their age-predicted maximum heart rate, as calculated by the Karvonen method. For the no-exercise condition, subjects lay supine on a treatment table. The cryotherapy treatment consisted of a 1-kg ice bag applied to the anterior mid thigh. For the no-ice condition, subjects lay supine on a treatment table. Main Outcome Measure(s): Time required for the intramuscular temperatures at the 1-cm and 2-cm depths below adipose tissue to return to pre-exercise baseline and time required to cool the 1-cm and 2-cm depths to 10°C below the pre-exercise temperature. Results: The time to cool the rectus femoris to the pre-exercise temperature using a crushed-ice–bag treatment was reduced by approximately 40 minutes (P < .001). The ice bag cooled the 1-cm and 2-cm depths to the pre-exercise temperature within 7 minutes (P = .38), but the 2-cm tissue depth took nearly 13.5 minutes longer to cool than the 1-cm depth when no ice was applied (P = .001). The 1-cm depth cooled to 10°C below the pre-exercise temperature about 8 minutes sooner than the 2-cm depth, regardless of whether the tissue was exercised or not (P < .001). Exercise shortened the cooling time to 10°C below the pre-exercise temperature by approximately 13 minutes (P = .05). Conclusions: Exercise before cooling with a crushed-ice bag enhanced

  13. Study of Natural Convection Passive Cooling System for Nuclear Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdillah, Habibi; Saputra, Geby; Novitrian; Permana, Sidik

    2017-07-01

    Fukushima nuclear reactor accident occurred due to the reactor cooling pumps and followed by all emergencies cooling systems could not work. Therefore, the system which has a passive safety system that rely on natural laws such as natural convection passive cooling system. In natural convection, the cooling material can flow due to the different density of the material due to the temperature difference. To analyze such investigation, a simple apparatus was set up and explains the study of natural convection in a vertical closed-loop system. It was set up that, in the closed loop, there is a heater at the bottom which is representing heat source system from the reactor core and cooler at the top which is showing the cooling system performance in room temperature to make a temperature difference for convection process. The study aims to find some loop configurations and some natural convection performances that can produce an optimum flow of cooling process. The study was done and focused on experimental approach and simulation. The obtained results are showing and analyzing in temperature profile data and the speed of coolant flow at some point on the closed-loop system.

  14. Performance of Liquid Metals in Natural Circulation Cooled Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ceballos, Carlos; Lathouwers, Danny; Verkooijen, Adrian

    2004-07-01

    The inherent safety capability of natural circulation makes reactor design more reliable. Additionally, the construction and operation of a nuclear power plant with natural circulation in the primary cooling circuit is an interesting alternative for nuclear plant designers, due to their lower operational and investment costs obtained by simplifying systems and controls. This paper deals with the feasibility of application of natural circulation in the primary cooling circuit of a liquid metal fast reactor. The methodology employed is a non-dimensional analysis, which describes the relationship between the physical properties and system variables. The performance criterion is bounded by a safety argument, referring to the maximum cladding temperature allowed during operation. The study considers several coolants, which can play a part in reactor cooling systems, such as lead, lead-bismuth and sodium. Bismuth and gallium are included in this analysis, in order to extend the range of properties for reference purposes. The results present a characterization of natural circulation flow in a reactor and compare the cooling capabilities from different liquid metals coolants. (authors)

  15. Numerical study of nozzle wall cooling for nuclear thermal rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Suk C.; Stubbs, Robert M.

    1993-01-01

    The flowfields and performance of nuclear thermal rockets, which utilize radiation and film-cooling to cool the nozzle extension, are studied by solving the Navier-Stokes equations and species equations. The thrust level of the rocket for the present study is about 75,000 lb(f) for a chamber pressure of 68 atm(l,000 psi) and a chamber temperature of 2700 K. The throat radius of the nozzle is 0.0936 m and the area ratios of the nozzles are 300 and 500. It is assumed that the flow is chemically frozen and the turbulence is simulated by the modified Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model. The calculated results for various area ratios and film mass-flow rates are presented as Mach number contours, variations of nozzle wall temperature, exit profiles, and vacuum specific impulses. The present study shows that by selecting the flow rate of the film-cooling hydrogen and area ratio of the nozzle correctly, high area ratio nozzle extensions can be cooled effectively with radiation and film-cooling without significant penalty in performance.

  16. Continuous Cooling Transformations in Nuclear Pressure Vessel Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pous-Romero, Hector; Bhadeshia, Harry K. D. H.

    2014-10-01

    A class of low-alloy steels often referred to as SA508 represent key materials for the manufacture of nuclear reactor pressure vessels. The alloys have good properties, but the scatter in properties is of prime interest in safe design. Such scatter can arise from microstructural variations but most studies conclude that large components made from such steels are, following heat treatment, fully bainitic. In the present work, we demonstrate with the help of a variety of experimental techniques that the microstructures of three SA508 Gr.3 alloys are far from homogeneous when considered in the context of the cooling rates encountered in practice. In particular, allotriomorphic ferrite that is expected to lead to a deterioration in toughness, is found in the microstructure for realistic combinations of austenite grain size and the cooling rate combination. Parameters are established to identify the domains in which SA508 Gr.3 steels transform only into the fine bainitic microstructures.

  17. Fuel leak detection apparatus for gas cooled nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Burnette, Richard D.

    1977-01-01

    Apparatus is disclosed for detecting nuclear fuel leaks within nuclear power system reactors, such as high temperature gas cooled reactors. The apparatus includes a probe assembly that is inserted into the high temperature reactor coolant gaseous stream. The probe has an aperture adapted to communicate gaseous fluid between its inside and outside surfaces and also contains an inner tube for sampling gaseous fluid present near the aperture. A high pressure supply of noncontaminated gas is provided to selectively balance the pressure of the stream being sampled to prevent gas from entering the probe through the aperture. The apparatus includes valves that are operable to cause various directional flows and pressures, which valves are located outside of the reactor walls to permit maintenance work and the like to be performed without shutting down the reactor.

  18. 77 FR 73056 - Initial Test Programs for Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Plants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-07

    ...The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is issuing for public comment draft regulatory guide (DG), DG-1259, ``Initial Test Programs for Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Plants.'' This guide describes the general scope and depth that the staff of the NRC considers acceptable for Initial Test Programs (ITPs) for light water cooled nuclear power plants.

  19. Nuclear spin cooling by electric dipole spin resonance and coherent population trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ai-Xian; Duan, Su-Qing; Zhang, Wei

    2017-09-01

    Nuclear spin fluctuation suppression is a key issue in preserving electron coherence for quantum information/computation. We propose an efficient way of nuclear spin cooling in semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) by the coherent population trapping (CPT) and the electric dipole spin resonance (EDSR) induced by optical fields and ac electric fields. The EDSR can enhance the spin flip-flop rate and may bring out bistability under certain conditions. By tuning the optical fields, we can avoid the EDSR induced bistability and obtain highly polarized nuclear spin state, which results in long electron coherence time. With the help of CPT and EDSR, an enhancement of 1500 times of the electron coherence time can been obtained after a 500 ns preparation time.

  20. Optimization of Cooling Water Flow Rate in Nuclear and Thermal Power Plants Based on a Mathematical Model of Cooling Systems{sup 1}

    SciTech Connect

    Murav’ev, V. P. Kochetkov, A. V.; Glazova, E. G.

    2016-09-15

    A mathematical model and algorithms are proposed for automatic calculation of the optimum flow rate of cooling water in nuclear and thermal power plants with cooling systems of arbitrary complexity. An unlimited number of configuration and design variants are assumed with the possibility of obtaining a result for any computational time interval, from monthly to hourly. The structural solutions corresponding to an optimum cooling water flow rate can be used for subsequent engineering-economic evaluation of the best cooling system variant. The computerized mathematical model and algorithms make it possible to determine the availability and degree of structural changes for the cooling system in all stages of the life cycle of a plant.

  1. Passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors with backup coolant flow path

    SciTech Connect

    Hunsbedt, A.; Boardman, C.E.

    1993-06-29

    A dual passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled nuclear fission reactors is described, comprising the combination of: a reactor vessel for containing a pool of liquid metal coolant with a core of heat generating fissionable fuel substantially submerged therein, a side wall of the reactor vessel forming an innermost first partition; a containment vessel substantially surrounding the reactor vessel in spaced apart relation having a side wall forming a second partition; a first baffle cylinder substantially encircling the containment vessel in spaced apart relation having an encircling wall forming a third partition; a guard vessel substantially surrounding the containment vessel and first baffle cylinder in spaced apart relation having a side wall forming a forth partition; a sliding seal at the top of the guard vessel edge to isolate the dual cooling system air streams; a second baffle cylinder substantially encircling the guard vessel in spaced part relationship having an encircling wan forming a fifth partition; a concrete silo substantially surrounding the guard vessel and the second baffle cylinder in spaced apart relation providing a sixth partition; a first fluid coolant circulating flow course open to the ambient atmosphere for circulating air coolant comprising at lent one down comer duct having an opening to the atmosphere in an upper area thereof and making fluid communication with the space between the guard vessel and the first baffle cylinder and at least one riser duct having an opening to the atmosphere in the upper area thereof and making fluid communication with the space between the first baffle cylinder and the containment vessel whereby cooling fluid air can flow from the atmosphere down through the down comer duct and space between the forth and third partitions and up through the space between the third and second partition and the riser duct then out into the atmosphere; and a second fluid coolant circulating flow.

  2. Porous nuclear fuel element with internal skeleton for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Youchison, Dennis L.; Williams, Brian E.; Benander, Robert E.

    2013-09-03

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  3. Porous nuclear fuel element for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Youchison, Dennis L [Albuquerque, NM; Williams, Brian E [Pacoima, CA; Benander, Robert E [Pacoima, CA

    2011-03-01

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  4. Methods for manufacturing porous nuclear fuel elements for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Youchison, Dennis L [Albuquerque, NM; Williams, Brian E [Pocoima, CA; Benander, Robert E [Pacoima, CA

    2010-02-23

    Methods for manufacturing porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's). Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, a thin coating of nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made, for example, of reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  5. Nuclear fuel assemblies' deformations measurement by optoelectronic methods in cooling ponds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senchenko, E. S.; Zavyalov, P. S.; Finogenov, L. V.; Khakimov, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Increasing the reliability and life-time of nuclear fuel is actual problems for nuclear power engineering. It takes to provide the high geometric stability of nuclear fuel assemblies (FA) under exploitation, since various factors cause FA mechanical deformation (bending and twisting). To obtain the objective information and make recommendations for the FA design improvement one have to fulfill the post reactor FA analysis. Therefore it takes measurements of the FA geometric parameters in cooling ponds of nuclear power plants. As applied to this problem we have developed and investigated the different optoelectronic methods, namely, structured light method, television and shadow ones. In this paper effectiveness of these methods has been investigated using the special experimental test stand and fulfilled researches are described. The experimental results of FA measurements by different methods and recommendation for their usage is given.

  6. Viscous Particle Breakup within a Cooling Nuclear Fireball

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkinson, J. T.; Knight, K. B.; Dai, Z.; Ramon, C. E.; Reid, J. D.

    2016-10-04

    Following the surface detonation of a nuclear weapon, the Earth’s crust and immediate surroundings are drawn into the fireball and form melts. Fallout is formed as these melts incorporate radioactive material from the bomb vapor and cool rapidly. The resultant fallout plume and dispersion of radioactive contamination is a function of several factors including weather patterns and fallout particle shapes and size distributions. Accurate modeling of the size distributions of fallout forms an important data point for dispersion codes that calculate the aerial distribution of fallout. While morphological evidence for aggregation of molten droplets is well documented in fallout glass populations, the breakup of these molten droplets has not been similarly studied. This study documents evidence that quenched fallout populations preserve evidence of molten breakup mechanisms.

  7. Cool Roofs Through Time and Space

    ScienceCinema

    Levinson, Ronnen

    2016-07-12

    Ronnen Levinson, from the Lab's Heat Island Group, presents his research on cool roofs and introduces the California Cities Albedo Map at our '8 Big Ideas' Science at the Theater event on October 8th, 2014, in Oakland, California

  8. Cool Roofs Through Time and Space

    SciTech Connect

    Levinson, Ronnen

    2014-10-17

    Ronnen Levinson, from the Lab's Heat Island Group, presents his research on cool roofs and introduces the California Cities Albedo Map at our '8 Big Ideas' Science at the Theater event on October 8th, 2014, in Oakland, California

  9. The effects of age on nuclear power plant containment cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lofaro, R.; Subudhi, M.; Travis, R.; DiBiasio, A.; Azarm, A.; Davis, J.

    1994-04-01

    A study was performed to assess the effects of aging on the performance and availability of containment cooling systems in US commercial nuclear power plants. This study is part of the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) program sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The objectives of this program are to provide an understanding of the aging process and how it affects plant safety so that it can be properly managed. This is one of a number of studies performed under the NPAR program which provide a technical basis for the identification and evaluation of degradation caused by age. The effects of age were characterized for the containment cooling system by reviewing and analyzing failure data from national databases, as well as plant-specific data. The predominant failure causes and aging mechanisms were identified, along with the components that failed most frequently. Current inspection, surveillance, and monitoring practices were also examined. A containment cooling system unavailability analysis was performed to examine the potential effects of aging by increasing failure rates for selected components. A commonly found containment spray system design and a commonly found fan cooler system design were modeled. Parametric failure rates for those components in each system that could be subject to aging were accounted for in the model to simulate the time-dependent effects of aging degradation, assuming no provisions are made to properly manage it. System unavailability as a function of increasing component failure rates was then calculated.

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH DECOMMISSIONING THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COOLING POND

    SciTech Connect

    Farfan, E.

    2009-09-30

    Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and other nuclear fuel cycle facilities has been an imperative issue lately. There exist significant experience and generally accepted recommendations on remediation of lands with residual radioactive contamination; however, there are hardly any such recommendations on remediation of cooling ponds that, in most cases, are fairly large water reservoirs. The literature only describes remediation of minor reservoirs containing radioactive silt (a complete closure followed by preservation) or small water reservoirs resulting in reestablishing natural water flows. Problems associated with remediation of river reservoirs resulting in flooding of vast agricultural areas also have been described. In addition, the severity of environmental and economic problems related to the remedial activities is shown to exceed any potential benefits of these activities. One of the large, highly contaminated water reservoirs that require either remediation or closure is Karachay Lake near the MAYAK Production Association in the Chelyabinsk Region of Russia where liquid radioactive waste had been deep well injected for a long period of time. Backfilling of Karachay Lake is currently in progress. It should be noted that secondary environmental problems associated with its closure are considered to be of less importance since sustaining Karachay Lake would have presented a much higher radiological risk. Another well-known highly contaminated water reservoir is the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Cooling Pond, decommissioning of which is planned for the near future. This study summarizes the environmental problems associated with the ChNPP Cooling Pond decommissioning.

  11. Environmental Problems Associated With Decommissioning The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond

    SciTech Connect

    Farfan, E. B.; Jannik, G. T.; Marra, J. C.; Oskolkov, B. Ya.; Bondarkov, M. D.; Gaschak, S. P.; Maksymenko, A. M.; Maksymenko, V. M.; Martynenko, V. I.

    2009-11-09

    Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and other nuclear fuel cycle facilities has been an imperative issue lately. There exist significant experience and generally accepted recommendations on remediation of lands with residual radioactive contamination; however, there are hardly any such recommendations on remediation of cooling ponds that, in most cases, are fairly large water reservoirs. The literature only describes remediation of minor reservoirs containing radioactive silt (a complete closure followed by preservation) or small water reservoirs resulting in reestablishing natural water flows. Problems associated with remediation of river reservoirs resulting in flooding of vast agricultural areas also have been described. In addition, the severity of environmental and economic problems related to the remedial activities is shown to exceed any potential benefits of these activities. One of the large, highly contaminated water reservoirs that require either remediation or closure is Karachay Lake near the MAYAK Production Association in the Chelyabinsk Region of Russia where liquid radioactive waste had been deep well injected for a long period of time. Backfilling of Karachay Lake is currently in progress. It should be noted that secondary environmental problems associated with its closure are considered to be of less importance since sustaining Karachay Lake would have presented a much higher radiological risk. Another well-known highly contaminated water reservoir is the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Cooling Pond, decommissioning of which is planned for the near future. This study summarizes the environmental problems associated with the ChNPP Cooling Pond decommissioning.

  12. Disordered nuclear pasta, magnetic field decay, and crust cooling in neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, C. J.; Berry, D. K.; Briggs, C. M.; Caplan, M. E.; Cumming, A.; Schneider, A. S.

    2015-04-01

    Nuclear pasta, with non-spherical shapes, is expected near the base of the crust in neutron stars. Large scale molecular dynamics simulations of pasta show long lived topological defects that could increase electron scattering and reduce both the thermal and electrical conductivities. We model a possible low conductivity pasta layer by increasing an impurity parameter Qimp. Predictions of light curves for the low mass X-ray binary MXB 1659-29, assuming a large Qimp, find continued late time cooling that is consistent with Chandra observations. The electrical and thermal conductivities are likely related. Therefore observations of late time crust cooling can provide insight on the electrical conductivity and the possible decay of neutron star magnetic fields (assuming these are supported by currents in the crust). This research was supported in part by DOE Grants DE-FG02-87ER40365 (Indiana University) and DE-SC0008808 (NUCLEI SciDAC Collaboration).

  13. Disordered nuclear pasta, magnetic field decay, and crust cooling in neutron stars.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, C J; Berry, D K; Briggs, C M; Caplan, M E; Cumming, A; Schneider, A S

    2015-01-23

    Nuclear pasta, with nonspherical shapes, is expected near the base of the crust in neutron stars. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of pasta show long lived topological defects that could increase electron scattering and reduce both the thermal and electrical conductivities. We model a possible low-conductivity pasta layer by increasing an impurity parameter Q_{imp}. Predictions of light curves for the low-mass x-ray binary MXB 1659-29, assuming a large Q_{imp}, find continued late time cooling that is consistent with Chandra observations. The electrical and thermal conductivities are likely related. Therefore, observations of late time crust cooling can provide insight on the electrical conductivity and the possible decay of neutron star magnetic fields (assuming these are supported by currents in the crust).

  14. Disordered Nuclear Pasta, Magnetic Field Decay, and Crust Cooling in Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, C. J.; Berry, D. K.; Briggs, C. M.; Caplan, M. E.; Cumming, A.; Schneider, A. S.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear pasta, with nonspherical shapes, is expected near the base of the crust in neutron stars. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of pasta show long lived topological defects that could increase electron scattering and reduce both the thermal and electrical conductivities. We model a possible low-conductivity pasta layer by increasing an impurity parameter Qimp . Predictions of light curves for the low-mass x-ray binary MXB 1659-29, assuming a large Qimp, find continued late time cooling that is consistent with Chandra observations. The electrical and thermal conductivities are likely related. Therefore, observations of late time crust cooling can provide insight on the electrical conductivity and the possible decay of neutron star magnetic fields (assuming these are supported by currents in the crust).

  15. Nuclear reactor cooling system decontamination reagent regeneration. [PWR; BWR

    DOEpatents

    Anstine, L.D.; James, D.B.; Melaika, E.A.; Peterson, J.P. Jr.

    1980-06-06

    An improved method for decontaminating the coolant system of water-cooled nuclear power reactors and for regenerating the decontamination solution is described. A small amount of one or more weak-acid organic complexing agents is added to the reactor coolant, and the pH is adjusted to form a decontamination solution which is circulated throughout the coolant system to dissolve metal oxides from the interior surfaces and complex the resulting metal ions and radionuclide ions. The coolant containing the complexed metal ions and radionuclide ions is passed through a strong-base anion exchange resin bed which has been presaturated with a solution containing the complexing agents in the same ratio and having the same pH as the decontamination solution. As the decontamination solution passes through the resin bed, metal-complexed anions are exchanged for the metal-ion-free anions on the bed, while metal-ion-free anions in the solution pass through the bed, thus removing the metal ions and regenerating the decontamination solution.

  16. Monitoring system for a liquid-cooled nuclear fission reactor

    DOEpatents

    DeVolpi, Alexander

    1987-01-01

    A monitoring system for detecting changes in the liquid levels in various regions of a water-cooled nuclear power reactor, viz., in the downcomer, in the core, in the inlet and outlet plenums, at the head, and elsewhere; and also for detecting changes in the density of the liquid in these regions. A plurality of gamma radiation detectors are used, arranged vertically along the outside of the reactor vessel, and collimator means for each detector limits the gamma-radiation it receives as emitting from only isolated regions of the vessel. Excess neutrons produced by the fission reaction will be captured by the water coolant, by the steel reactor walls, or by the fuel or control structures in the vessel. Neutron capture by steel generates gamma radiation having an energy level of the order of 5-12 MeV, whereas neutron capture by water provides an energy level of approximately 2.2 MeV, and neutron capture by the fission fuel or its cladding provides an energy level of 1 MeV or less. The intensity of neutron capture thus changes significantly at any water-metal interface. Comparative analysis of adjacent gamma detectors senses changes from the normal condition with liquid coolant present to advise of changes in the presence and/or density of the coolant at these specific regions. The gamma detectors can also sense fission-product gas accumulation at the reactor head to advise of a failure of fuel-pin cladding.

  17. Time to Cooling Is Associated with Resuscitation Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Janata, Andreas; Peacock, W. Frank; Deal, Nathan S.; Kalra, Sarathi; Sterz, Fritz

    2016-01-01

    Our purpose was to analyze evidence related to timing of cooling from studies of targeted temperature management (TTM) after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after cardiac arrest and to recommend directions for future therapy optimization. We conducted a preliminary review of studies of both animals and patients treated with post-ROSC TTM and hypothesized that a more rapid cooling strategy in the absence of volume-adding cold infusions would provide improved outcomes in comparison with slower cooling. We defined rapid cooling as the achievement of 34°C within 3.5 hours of ROSC without the use of volume-adding cold infusions, with a ≥3.0°C/hour rate of cooling. Using the PubMed database and a previously published systematic review, we identified clinical studies published from 2002 through 2014 related to TTM. Analysis included studies with time from collapse to ROSC of 20–30 minutes, reporting of time from ROSC to target temperature and rate of patients in ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation, and hypothermia maintained for 20–24 hours. The use of cardiopulmonary bypass as a cooling method was an exclusion criterion for this analysis. We compared all rapid cooling studies with all slower cooling studies of ≥100 patients. Eleven studies were initially identified for analysis, comprising 4091 patients. Two additional studies totaling 609 patients were added based on availability of unpublished data, bringing the total to 13 studies of 4700 patients. Outcomes for patients, dichotomized into faster and slower cooling approaches, were determined using weighted linear regression using IBM SPSS Statistics software. Rapid cooling without volume-adding cold infusions yielded a higher rate of good neurological recovery than slower cooling methods. Attainment of a temperature below 34°C within 3.5 hours of ROSC and using a cooling rate of more than 3°C/hour appear to be beneficial. PMID:27906641

  18. Multi-Decadal Global Cooling and Unprecedented Ozone Loss Following a Regional Nuclear Conflict

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, M. J.; Toon, O. B.; Lee-Taylor, J. M.; Robock, A.

    2014-12-01

    We present the first study of the global impacts of a regional nuclear war with an Earth system model including atmospheric chemistry, ocean dynamics, and interactive sea-ice and land models (Mills et al., 2014). A limited, regional nuclear war between India and Pakistan in which each side detonates 50 15-kt weapons could produce about 5 Tg of black carbon. This would self-loft to the stratosphere, where it would spread globally, producing a sudden drop in surface temperatures and intense heating of the stratosphere. Using the Community Earth System Model with the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (CESM1(WACCM)), we calculate an e-folding time of 8.7 years for stratospheric black carbon, compared to 4-6.5 years for previous studies (figure panel a). Our calculations show that global ozone losses of 20-50% over populated areas, levels unprecedented in human history, would accompany the coldest average surface temperatures in the last 1000 years (figure panel c). We calculate summer enhancements in UV indices of 30-80% over Mid-Latitudes, suggesting widespread damage to human health, agriculture, and terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Killing frosts would reduce growing seasons by 10-40 days per year for 5 years. Surface temperatures would be reduced for more than 25 years, due to thermal inertia and albedo effects in the ocean and expanded sea ice. The combined cooling and enhanced UV would put significant pressures on global food supplies and could trigger a global nuclear famine. Knowledge of the impacts of 100 small nuclear weapons should motivate the elimination of the more than 17,000 nuclear weapons that exist today. Mills, M. J., O. B. Toon, J. Lee-Taylor, and A. Robock (2014), Multidecadal global cooling and unprecedented ozone loss following a regional nuclear conflict, Earth's Future, 2(4), 161-176, doi:10.1002/2013EF000205.

  19. High-sensitivity cooled coil system for nuclear magnetic resonance in kHz range

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Tingting; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Yi; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Lee, Yong-Ho; Lin, Jun

    2014-11-15

    In several low-field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (LF-NMR) and surface nuclear magnetic resonance applications, i.e., in the frequency range of kHz, high sensitivity magnetic field detectors are needed. Usually, low-T{sub c} superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) with a high field sensitivity of about 1 fT/Hz{sup 1/2} are employed as detectors. Considering the flux trapping and operational difficulties associated with low-T{sub c} SQUIDs, we designed and fabricated liquid-nitrogen-cooled Cu coils for NMR detection in the kHz range. A cooled coil system consisting of a 9-cm diameter Cu coil and a low noise preamplifier was systematically investigated and reached a sensitivity of 2 fT/Hz{sup 1/2} at 77 K, which is 3 times better compared to the sensitivity at 300 K. A Q-switch circuit as an essential element for damping the ringing effects of the pickup coil was developed to acquire free induction decay signals of a water sample with minimum loss of signal. Our studies demonstrate that cooled Cu coils, if designed properly, can provide a comparable sensitivity to low-T{sub c} SQUIDs.

  20. Health and Safety Considerations Associated with Sodium-Cooled Experimental Nuclear Fuel Dismantlement

    SciTech Connect

    Carvo, Alan E.

    2015-04-01

    Between the mid-1970s and the mid-1980s Sandia National Laboratory constructed eleven experimental assemblies to simulate debris beds formed in a sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor. All but one of the assemblies were irradiated. The experimental assemblies were transferred to the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in 2007 and 2008 for storage, dismantlement, recovery of the uranium for reuse in the nuclear fuel cycle, and disposal of unneeded materials. This paper addresses the effort to dismantle the assemblies down to the primary containment vessel and repackage them for temporary storage until such time as equipment necessary for sodium separation is in place.

  1. Zirconium determination by cooling curve analysis during the pyroprocessing of used nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphal, B. R.; Price, J. C.; Bateman, K. J.; Marsden, K. C.

    2015-02-01

    An alternative method to sampling and chemical analyses has been developed to monitor the concentration of zirconium in real-time during the casting of uranium products from the pyroprocessing of used nuclear fuel. The method utilizes the solidification characteristics of the uranium products to determine zirconium levels based on standard cooling curve analyses and established binary phase diagram data. Numerous uranium products have been analyzed for their zirconium content and compared against measured zirconium data. From this data, the following equation was derived for the zirconium content of uranium products:

  2. Time Dependent Nuclear Scattering Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeks, David

    2005-04-01

    A new time dependent method for calculating scattering matrix elements of two and three body nuclear collisions below 50 Mev is being developed. The procedure closely follows the channel packet method (CPM) used to compute scattering matrix elements for non-adiabatic molecular reactions.ootnotetextT.A.Niday and D.E.Weeks, Chem. Phys. Letters 308 (1999) 106 Currently, one degree of freedom calculations using a simple square well have been completed and a two body scattering calculation using the Yukawa potential is anticipated. To perform nuclear scattering calculations with the CPM that will incorporate the nucleon-nucleon tensor force, we plan to position initial reactant and product channel packets in the asymptotic limit on single coupled potential energy surfaces labeled by the spin, isospin, and total angular momentum of the reactant nucleons. The wave packets will propagated numerically using the split operator method augmented by a coordinate dependant unitary transformation used to diagonalize the potential. Scattering matrix elements will be determined by the Fourier transform of the correlation function between the evolving reactant and product wave packets. A brief outline of the Argonne v18 nucleon-nucleon potentialootnotetextR.B.Wiringa, V.G.J.Stoks, and R.Schiavilla, Physical Review C 51(1995) 38 and the proposed wave packet calculations will be presented.

  3. Demolition of Cooling Towers from the World's First Commercial Reactors - the Nuclear Factor

    SciTech Connect

    Foss, D.L.

    2006-07-01

    The demolition of hyperbolic cooling towers would be a relatively routine demolition project because the method of demolition has been proven straightforward and repeatable with the successful demolition of over 200 similar structures in the last 30 years. This paper will detail the unique aspects of the planning and execution of the cooling tower demolition project due to its location on a nuclear site and proximity to active nuclear operations. (authors)

  4. Subcutaneous adipose tissue thickness alters cooling time during cryotherapy.

    PubMed

    Otte, Jeffrey W; Merrick, Mark A; Ingersoll, Christopher D; Cordova, Mitchell L

    2002-11-01

    To determine if differing subcutaneous adipose thickness alters the treatment duration required to produce a standard cooling effect during cryotherapy. A 4-group, between-groups comparison in which the independent variable was skinfold thickness (0-10mm, 11-20mm, 21-30mm, 31-40mm) and the dependent variable was cooling time, defined as the treatment duration required to decrease intramuscular (IM) temperature 7 degrees C from baseline. A sports injury research laboratory. Forty-seven volunteers with anterior thigh skinfold measurement of less than 40mm. Topical cryotherapy (750g crushed-ice bag) to the anterior thigh to produce a typical cooling effect, defined as IM temperature at 1cm subadipose declining by 7 degrees C. Cryotherapy treatment duration required to produce a standardized cooling effect in subjects with differing subcutaneous adipose thickness. Analysis of variance revealed that mean time to cool IM tissues by 7 degrees C differed across all groups, with cooling time increasing as adipose thickness increased. The mean +/- standard deviation cooling times were as follows: 31-40mm (58.6+/-11.7min), 21-30mm (37.8+/-9.6min), 11-20mm (23.3+/-6.7min), and 0-10mm (8.0+/-3.4min). During cold application, there is a clinically important direct relationship between adipose thickness and required cooling time. This relationship necessitates dramatic adjustments to cryotherapy duration to produce similar IM temperature changes. A 25-minute treatment may be adequate for a patient with a skinfold of 20mm or less; however, a 40-minute application is required to produce similar results in a patients with skinfolds between 21 and 30mm, whereas a 60-minute application is required for patients with skinfolds of 30 to 40mm. Copyright 2002 by the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

  5. Beyond Newton's law of cooling - estimation of time since death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinbach, Carl

    2011-09-01

    The estimate of the time since death and, thus, the time of death is strictly that, an estimate. However, the time of death can be an important piece of information in some coroner's cases, especially those that involve criminal or insurance investigations. It has been known almost from the beginning of time that bodies cool after the internal mechanisms such as circulation of the blood stop. A first attempt to link this phenomenon to the determination of the time of death used a crude linear relationship. Towards the end of the nineteenth century, Newton's law of cooling using body temperature data obtained by the coroner was used to make a more accurate estimate. While based on scientific principles and resulting in a better estimate, Newton's law does not really describe the cooling of a non-homogeneous human body. This article will discuss a more accurate model of the cooling process based on the theoretical work of Marshall and Hoare and the laboratory-based statistical work of Claus Henssge. Using DERIVE®6.10 and the statistical work of Henssge, the double exponential cooling formula developed by Marshall and Hoare will be explored. The end result is a tool that can be used in the field by coroner's scene investigators to determine a 95% confidence interval for the time since death and, thus, the time of death.

  6. Analysis of Coolant Options for Advanced Metal Cooled Nuclear Reactors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    Nuclear Data File/B-Version V FENDL Fusion Evaluated Nuclear Data Library HLMC Heavy Liquid Metal Coolant LBE Lead-Bismuth Eutectic LMFBR ...According to a Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems report29 released February 21, 2006, the core outlet temperature and peak cladding temperature...24 sodium for Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor ( LMFBR ) systems worldwide.32 The pumping power requirements for lead, LBE and tin are much

  7. COOLING WATER ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES AT U.S. NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Vine

    2010-12-01

    This report has been prepared for the Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), for the purpose of providing a status report on the challenges and opportunities facing the U.S. commercial nuclear energy industry in the area of plant cooling water supply. The report was prompted in part by recent Second Circuit and Supreme Court decisions regarding cooling water system designs at existing thermo-electric power generating facilities in the U.S. (primarily fossil and nuclear plants). At issue in the courts have been Environmental Protection Agency regulations that define what constitutes “Best Technology Available” for intake structures that withdraw cooling water that is used to transfer and reject heat from the plant’s steam turbine via cooling water systems, while minimizing environmental impacts on aquatic life in nearby water bodies used to supply that cooling water. The report was also prompted by a growing recognition that cooling water availability and societal use conflicts are emerging as strategic energy and environmental issues, and that research and development (R&D) solutions to emerging water shortage issues are needed. In particular, cooling water availability is an important consideration in siting decisions for new nuclear power plants, and is an under-acknowledged issue in evaluating the pros and cons of retrofitting cooling towers at existing nuclear plants. Because of the significant ongoing research on water issues already being performed by industry, the national laboratories and other entities, this report relies heavily on ongoing work. In particular, this report has relied on collaboration with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), including its recent work in the area of EPA regulations governing intake structures in thermoelectric cooling water systems.

  8. 78 FR 64029 - Cost-Benefit Analysis for Radwaste Systems for Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Reactors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... COMMISSION Cost-Benefit Analysis for Radwaste Systems for Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Reactors AGENCY... Systems for Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Reactors,'' in which the NRC made editorial corrections and... analysis for liquid and gaseous radwaste system components for light water nuclear power...

  9. Laser cooling of nuclear spin 0 alkali 78Rb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, J. A.; Gorelov, A.; Anholm, M.

    2015-05-01

    The textbook example for sub-Doppler cooling is a J = 1/2 I = 0 alkali atom in lin ⊥ lin molasses. In the σ+ σ- configuration of a standard MOT, the main sub-Doppler cooling mechanism relies on changing alignment (MF2 population) with the summed linear polarization orientation, but there is no such variation in AC Stark shift for F = 1/2. We have nevertheless looked for signs of sub-Doppler cooling by trapping I = 0 78Rb in a standard MOT and measuring the cloud size as a function of laser detuning and intensity. The 78Rb cloud size does not change significantly with lowered intensity, and expands slightly with detuning, consistent with minimal to no sub-Doppler cooling. Our geometry does show the well-known substantially smaller cloud size with detuning and intensity for I = 3/2 87Rb. Maintaining an I = 0 alkali cloud size with lowered intensity will help our planned β- ν correlation experiments in 38mK decay by suppressing possible production of photoassisted dimers. Supported by NSERC and NRC Canada through TRIUMF.

  10. Pin-Type Gas Cooled Reactor for Nuclear Electric Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Steven A.; Lipinski, Ronald J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a point design for a pin-type Gas-Cooled Reactor concept that uses a fuel pin design similar to the SP100 fuel pin. The Gas-Cooled Reactor is designed to operate at 100 kWe for 7 years plus have a reduced power mode of 20% power for a duration of 5 years. The power system uses a gas-cooled, UN-fueled, pin-type reactor to heat He/Xe gas that flows directly into a recuperated Brayton system to produce electricity. Heat is rejected to space via a thermal radiator that unfolds in space. The reactor contains approximately 154 kg of 93.15 % enriched UN in 313 fuel pins. The fuel is clad with rhenium-lined Nb-1Zr. The pressures vessel and ducting are cooled by the 900 K He/Xe gas inlet flow or by thermal radiation. This permits all pressure boundaries to be made of superalloy metals rather than refractory metals, which greatly reduces the cost and development schedule required by the project. The reactor contains sufficient rhenium (a neutron poison) to make the reactor subcritical under water immersion accidents without the use of internal shutdown rods. The mass of the reactor and reflectors is about 750 kg.

  11. Real-Time Closed Loop Modulated Turbine Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyam, Vikram; Culley, Dennis E.; Eldridge, Jeffrey; Jones, Scott; Woike, Mark; Cuy, Michael

    2014-01-01

    It has been noted by industry that in addition to dramatic variations of temperature over a given blade surface, blade-to-blade variations also exist despite identical design. These variations result from manufacturing variations, uneven wear and deposition over the life of the part as well as limitations in the uniformity of coolant distribution in the baseline cooling design. It is proposed to combine recent advances in optical sensing, actuation, and film cooling concepts to develop a workable active, closed-loop modulated turbine cooling system to improve by 10 to 20 the turbine thermal state over the flight mission, to improve engine life and to dramatically reduce turbine cooling air usage and aircraft fuel burn. A reduction in oxides of nitrogen (NOx) can also be achieved by using the excess coolant to improve mixing in the combustor especially for rotorcraft engines. Recent patents filed by industry and universities relate to modulating endwall cooling using valves. These schemes are complex, add weight and are limited to the endwalls. The novelty of the proposed approach is twofold 1) Fluidic diverters that have no moving parts are used to modulate cooling and can operate under a wide range of conditions and environments. 2) Real-time optical sensing to map the thermal state of the turbine has never been attempted in realistic engine conditions.

  12. Multidecadal global cooling and unprecedented ozone loss following a regional nuclear conflict

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Michael J.; Toon, Owen B.; Lee-Taylor, Julia; Robock, Alan

    2014-04-01

    We present the first study of the global impacts of a regional nuclear war with an Earth system model including atmospheric chemistry, ocean dynamics, and interactive sea ice and land components. A limited, regional nuclear war between India and Pakistan in which each side detonates 50 15 kt weapons could produce about 5 Tg of black carbon (BC). This would self-loft to the stratosphere, where it would spread globally, producing a sudden drop in surface temperatures and intense heating of the stratosphere. Using the Community Earth System Model with the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model, we calculate an e-folding time of 8.7 years for stratospheric BC compared to 4-6.5 years for previous studies. Our calculations show that global ozone losses of 20%-50% over populated areas, levels unprecedented in human history, would accompany the coldest average surface temperatures in the last 1000 years. We calculate summer enhancements in UV indices of 30%-80% over midlatitudes, suggesting widespread damage to human health, agriculture, and terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Killing frosts would reduce growing seasons by 10-40 days per year for 5 years. Surface temperatures would be reduced for more than 25 years due to thermal inertia and albedo effects in the ocean and expanded sea ice. The combined cooling and enhanced UV would put significant pressures on global food supplies and could trigger a global nuclear famine. Knowledge of the impacts of 100 small nuclear weapons should motivate the elimination of more than 17,000 nuclear weapons that exist today.

  13. Increasing efficiency safety of cooling systems in a floating nuclear power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yenivatov, V.; Fedorovsky, K.; Zhelezniak, A.; Bordyug, A.

    2017-01-01

    In order to increase the reliability and safety of a floating nuclear power plant, the research proposes to apply closed-loop cooling systems for floating nuclear power plants’ cooling. A ship hull is proposed to be used as a surface of the heat exchanger, known as a ship hull heat exchanger. This paper presents detailed study on the effect of the ship hull angle on the heat transfer coefficient and measures to improve the heat transfer coefficient. It is concluded that application of gas-liquid flows to the seaside surfaces of the ship hull is one of the most effective ways of improving the heat transfer coefficient.

  14. A combined gas cooled nuclear reactor and fuel cell cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, David J.

    Rising oil costs, global warming, national security concerns, economic concerns and escalating energy demands are forcing the engineering communities to explore methods to address these concerns. It is the intention of this thesis to offer a proposal for a novel design of a combined cycle, an advanced nuclear helium reactor/solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) plant that will help to mitigate some of the above concerns. Moreover, the adoption of this proposal may help to reinvigorate the Nuclear Power industry while providing a practical method to foster the development of a hydrogen economy. Specifically, this thesis concentrates on the importance of the U.S. Nuclear Navy adopting this novel design for its nuclear electric vessels of the future with discussion on efficiency and thermodynamic performance characteristics related to the combined cycle. Thus, the goals and objectives are to develop an innovative combined cycle that provides a solution to the stated concerns and show that it provides superior performance. In order to show performance, it is necessary to develop a rigorous thermodynamic model and computer program to analyze the SOFC in relation with the overall cycle. A large increase in efficiency over the conventional pressurized water reactor cycle is realized. Both sides of the cycle achieve higher efficiencies at partial loads which is extremely important as most naval vessels operate at partial loads as well as the fact that traditional gas turbines operating alone have poor performance at reduced speeds. Furthermore, each side of the cycle provides important benefits to the other side. The high temperature exhaust from the overall exothermic reaction of the fuel cell provides heat for the reheater allowing for an overall increase in power on the nuclear side of the cycle. Likewise, the high temperature helium exiting the nuclear reactor provides a controllable method to stabilize the fuel cell at an optimal temperature band even during transients helping

  15. Thermal time constant estimation in warming and cooling ectotherms.

    PubMed

    Dzialowski, E M.; O'Connor, M P.

    2001-06-01

    (1) Measurement of physiological control of warming and cooling in reptiles requires calculating the thermal time constant (tau) of the animal. (2) Previously reported methods of estimating tau are sensitive to multiple problems including measurement error in operative environmental temperature and equilibrium body temperature, drift of environmental temperatures, requirements for extremely simple thermal environments, and ill conditioning of the estimation techniques themselves. (3) We propose a physiologically based heat transfer model which is less sensitive to common experimental errors, more numerically robust, and can provide physiologically meaningful estimates of time constants. (4) The method presented here allows time constants to be measured for animals subjected to the traditional step change experiment as well as to shorter periods of warming and cooling such as during shuttling.

  16. Nuclear medium cooling scenario in light of new Cas A cooling data and the 2M⊙ pulsar mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaschke, D.; Grigorian, H.; Voskresensky, D. N.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, Elshamounty et al. performed a reanalysis of the surface temperature of the neutron star in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A on the basis of Chandra data measured during the last decade and added a new data point. We show that all reliably known temperature data of neutron stars including those belonging to Cassiopeia A can be comfortably explained in our "nuclear medium cooling" scenario of neutron stars. The cooling rates account for medium-modified one-pion exchange in dense matter, polarization effects in the pair-breaking-formation processes operating on superfluid neutrons and protons paired in the 1S0 state, and other relevant processes. The emissivity of the pair-breaking-formation process in the 3P2 state is a tiny quantity within our scenario. Crucial for a successful description of the Cassiopeia A cooling proves to be the thermal conductivity from both the electrons and nucleons being reduced by medium effects. Moreover, we exploit an equation of state which stiffens at high densities due to an excluded volume effect and is capable of describing a maximum mass of 2.1M⊙, thus including the recent measurements of PSR J1614-2230 and PSR J0348+0432.

  17. Bypass Flow Resistance in Prismatic Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    McEligot, Donald M.; Johnson, Richard W.

    2016-12-20

    Available computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions of pressure distributions in the vertical bypass flow between blocks in a prismatic gas-cooled reactor (GCR) have been analyzed to deduce apparent friction factors and loss coefficients for systems and network codes. We performed calculations for vertical gap spacings "s" of 2, 6 and 10 mm, horizontal gaps between the blocks of two mm and two flow rates, giving a range of gap Reynolds numbers ReDh of about 40 to 5300. Laminar predictions of the fully-developed friction factor ffd were about three to ten per cent lower than the classical infinitely-wide channel In the entry region, the local apparent friction factor was slightly higher than the classic idealized case but the hydraulic entry length Lhy was approximately the same. The per cent reduction in flow resistance was greater than the per cent increase in flow area at the vertical corners of the blocks. The standard k-ϵ model was employed for flows expected to be turbulent. Its predictions of ffd and flow resistance were significantly higher than direct numerical simulations for the classic case; the value of Lhy was about thirty gap spacings. Initial quantitative information for entry coefficients and loss coefficients for the expansion-contraction junctions between blocks is also presented. Our study demonstrates how CFD predictions can be employed to provide integral quantities needed in systems and network codes.

  18. Bypass Flow Resistance in Prismatic Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactors

    DOE PAGES

    McEligot, Donald M.; Johnson, Richard W.

    2016-12-20

    Available computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions of pressure distributions in the vertical bypass flow between blocks in a prismatic gas-cooled reactor (GCR) have been analyzed to deduce apparent friction factors and loss coefficients for systems and network codes. We performed calculations for vertical gap spacings "s" of 2, 6 and 10 mm, horizontal gaps between the blocks of two mm and two flow rates, giving a range of gap Reynolds numbers ReDh of about 40 to 5300. Laminar predictions of the fully-developed friction factor ffd were about three to ten per cent lower than the classical infinitely-wide channel In themore » entry region, the local apparent friction factor was slightly higher than the classic idealized case but the hydraulic entry length Lhy was approximately the same. The per cent reduction in flow resistance was greater than the per cent increase in flow area at the vertical corners of the blocks. The standard k-ϵ model was employed for flows expected to be turbulent. Its predictions of ffd and flow resistance were significantly higher than direct numerical simulations for the classic case; the value of Lhy was about thirty gap spacings. Initial quantitative information for entry coefficients and loss coefficients for the expansion-contraction junctions between blocks is also presented. Our study demonstrates how CFD predictions can be employed to provide integral quantities needed in systems and network codes.« less

  19. Thermal performance upgrade of the Arkansas Nuclear One cooling tower: A ``root cause`` analysis approach

    SciTech Connect

    Liffick, G.W.; Cooper, J.W. Jr.

    1995-10-01

    The thermal performance efficiency of the natural draft cooling tower at Entergy Operations` 858 MWe Arkansas Nuclear One, Unit 2 was successfully upgraded to 101% of design performance capability in April 1994 as the end result of a unique root-cause analysis of the cooling tower`s long-standing performance deficiencies. Through application of state-of-the-art diagnostic testing methods and computer modeling techniques, Entergy was able to identify and correct air/water maldistribution problems in the 447 foot tall counterflow cooling tower at minimal cost. Entergy estimates that the savings realized, as a result of the 1.2 F reduction in cooling tower outlet water temperature, will pay for the thermal upgrade project in approximately 14 months.

  20. Sensitivity Analysis of Reprocessing Cooling Times on Light Water Reactor and Sodium Fast Reactor Fuel Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    R. M. Ferrer; S. Bays; M. Pope

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantify the effects of variations of the Light Water Reactor (LWR) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) and fast reactor reprocessing cooling time on a Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) assuming a single-tier fuel cycle scenario. The results from this study show the effects of different cooling times on the SFR’s transuranic (TRU) conversion ratio (CR) and transuranic fuel enrichment. Also, the decay heat, gamma heat and neutron emission of the SFR’s fresh fuel charge were evaluated. A 1000 MWth commercial-scale SFR design was selected as the baseline in this study. Both metal and oxide CR=0.50 SFR designs are investigated.

  1. THE COOLING OF THE CASSIOPEIA A NEUTRON STAR AS A PROBE OF THE NUCLEAR SYMMETRY ENERGY AND NUCLEAR PASTA

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, William G.; Hooker, Joshua; Li, Bao-An; Murphy, Kyleah

    2013-12-10

    X-ray observations of the neutron star (NS) in the Cas A supernova remnant over the past decade suggest the star is undergoing a rapid drop in surface temperature of ≈2%-5.5%. One explanation suggests the rapid cooling is triggered by the onset of neutron superfluidity in the core of the star, causing enhanced neutrino emission from neutron Cooper pair breaking and formation (PBF). Using consistent NS crust and core equations of state (EOSs) and compositions, we explore the sensitivity of this interpretation to the density dependence of the symmetry energy L of the EOS used, and to the presence of enhanced neutrino cooling in the bubble phases of crustal ''nuclear pasta''. Modeling cooling over a conservative range of NS masses and envelope compositions, we find L ≲ 70 MeV, competitive with terrestrial experimental constraints and other astrophysical observations. For masses near the most likely mass of M ≳ 1.65 M {sub ☉}, the constraint becomes more restrictive 35 ≲ L ≲ 55 MeV. The inclusion of the bubble cooling processes decreases the cooling rate of the star during the PBF phase, matching the observed rate only when L ≲ 45 MeV, taking all masses into consideration, corresponding to NS radii ≲ 11 km.

  2. The Cooling of the Cassiopeia A Neutron Star as a Probe of the Nuclear Symmetry Energy and Nuclear Pasta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, William G.; Murphy, Kyleah; Hooker, Joshua; Li, Bao-An

    2013-12-01

    X-ray observations of the neutron star (NS) in the Cas A supernova remnant over the past decade suggest the star is undergoing a rapid drop in surface temperature of ≈2%-5.5%. One explanation suggests the rapid cooling is triggered by the onset of neutron superfluidity in the core of the star, causing enhanced neutrino emission from neutron Cooper pair breaking and formation (PBF). Using consistent NS crust and core equations of state (EOSs) and compositions, we explore the sensitivity of this interpretation to the density dependence of the symmetry energy L of the EOS used, and to the presence of enhanced neutrino cooling in the bubble phases of crustal "nuclear pasta." Modeling cooling over a conservative range of NS masses and envelope compositions, we find L <~ 70 MeV, competitive with terrestrial experimental constraints and other astrophysical observations. For masses near the most likely mass of M >~ 1.65 M ⊙, the constraint becomes more restrictive 35 <~ L <~ 55 MeV. The inclusion of the bubble cooling processes decreases the cooling rate of the star during the PBF phase, matching the observed rate only when L <~ 45 MeV, taking all masses into consideration, corresponding to NS radii <~ 11 km.

  3. Potential Application of a Thermoelectric Generator in Passive Cooling System of Nuclear Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongqing; Liu, Yu; Jiang, Jin; Pang, Wei; Lau, Woon Ming; Mei, Jun

    2016-12-01

    In the design of nuclear power plants, various natural circulation passive cooling systems are considered to remove residual heat from the reactor core in the event of a power loss and maintain the plant's safety. These passive systems rely on gravity differences of fluids, resulting from density differentials, rather than using an external power-driven system. Unfortunately, a major drawback of such systems is their weak driving force, which can negatively impact safety. In such systems, there is a temperature difference between the heat source and the heat sink, which potentially offers a natural platform for thermoelectric generator (TEG) applications. While a previous study designed and analyzed a TEG-based passive core cooling system, this paper considers TEG applications in other passive cooling systems of nuclear power plants, after which the concept of a TEG-based passive cooling system is proposed. In such a system, electricity is produced using the system's temperature differences through the TEG, and this electricity is used to further enhance the cooling process.

  4. Potential Application of a Thermoelectric Generator in Passive Cooling System of Nuclear Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongqing; Liu, Yu; Jiang, Jin; Pang, Wei; Lau, Woon Ming; Mei, Jun

    2017-05-01

    In the design of nuclear power plants, various natural circulation passive cooling systems are considered to remove residual heat from the reactor core in the event of a power loss and maintain the plant's safety. These passive systems rely on gravity differences of fluids, resulting from density differentials, rather than using an external power-driven system. Unfortunately, a major drawback of such systems is their weak driving force, which can negatively impact safety. In such systems, there is a temperature difference between the heat source and the heat sink, which potentially offers a natural platform for thermoelectric generator (TEG) applications. While a previous study designed and analyzed a TEG-based passive core cooling system, this paper considers TEG applications in other passive cooling systems of nuclear power plants, after which the concept of a TEG-based passive cooling system is proposed. In such a system, electricity is produced using the system's temperature differences through the TEG, and this electricity is used to further enhance the cooling process.

  5. Monitoring system for a liquid-cooled nuclear fission reactor. [PWR

    DOEpatents

    DeVolpi, A.

    1984-07-20

    The invention provides improved means for detecting the water levels in various regions of a water-cooled nuclear power reactor, viz., in the downcomer, in the core, in the inlet and outlet plenums, at the head, and elsewhere; and also for detecting the density of the water in these regions. The invention utilizes a plurality of exterior gamma radiation detectors and a collimator technique operable to sense separate regions of the reactor vessel to give respectively, unique signals for these regions, whereby comparative analysis of these signals can be used to advise of the presence and density of cooling water in the vessel.

  6. Experimental implementation of heat-bath algorithmic cooling using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Baugh, J; Moussa, O; Ryan, C A; Nayak, A; Laflamme, R

    2005-11-24

    The counter-intuitive properties of quantum mechanics have the potential to revolutionize information processing by enabling the development of efficient algorithms with no known classical counterparts. Harnessing this power requires the development of a set of building blocks, one of which is a method to initialize the set of quantum bits (qubits) to a known state. Additionally, fresh ancillary qubits must be available during the course of computation to achieve fault tolerance. In any physical system used to implement quantum computation, one must therefore be able to selectively and dynamically remove entropy from the part of the system that is to be mapped to qubits. One such method is an 'open-system' cooling protocol in which a subset of qubits can be brought into contact with an external system of large heat capacity. Theoretical efforts have led to an implementation-independent cooling procedure, namely heat-bath algorithmic cooling. These efforts have culminated with the proposal of an optimal algorithm, the partner-pairing algorithm, which was used to compute the physical limits of heat-bath algorithmic cooling. Here we report the experimental realization of multi-step cooling of a quantum system via heat-bath algorithmic cooling. The experiment was carried out using nuclear magnetic resonance of a solid-state ensemble three-qubit system. We demonstrate the repeated repolarization of a particular qubit to an effective spin-bath temperature, and alternating logical operations within the three-qubit subspace to ultimately cool a second qubit below this temperature. Demonstration of the control necessary for these operations represents an important step forward in the manipulation of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance qubits.

  7. Environmental problems associated with decommissioning the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond.

    PubMed

    Oskolkov, B Ya; Bondarkov, M D; Gaschak, S P; Maksymenko, A M; Maksymenko, V M; Martynenko, V I; Farfán, E B; Jannik, G T; Marra, J C

    2010-11-01

    Decommissioning of nuclear power plants and other nuclear fuel cycle facilities associated with residual radioactive contamination of their territories is an imperative issue. Significant problems may result from decommissioning of cooling ponds with residual radioactive contamination. The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) Cooling Pond is one of the largest self-contained water reservoirs in the Chernobyl region and Ukrainian and Belorussian Polesye region. The 1986 ChNPP Reactor Unit Number Four significantly contaminated the ChNPP Cooling Pond. The total radionuclide inventory in the ChNPP Cooling Pond bottom deposits are as follows: ¹³⁷Cs: 16.28 ± 2.59 TBq; ⁹⁰Sr: 2.4 ± 0.48 TBq; and ²³⁹+²⁴⁰Pu: 0.00518 ± 0.00148 TBq. The ChNPP Cooling Pond is inhabited by over 500 algae species and subspecies, over 200 invertebrate species, and 36 fish species. The total mass of the living organisms in the ChNPP Cooling Pond is estimated to range from about 60,000 to 100,000 tons. The territory adjacent to the ChNPP Cooling Pond attracts many birds and mammals (178 bird species and 47 mammal species were recorded in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone). This article describes several options for the ChNPP Cooling Pond decommissioning and environmental problems associated with its decommissioning. The article also provides assessments of the existing and potential exposure doses for the shoreline biota. For the 2008 conditions, the estimated total dose rate values were 11.4 40 μGy h⁻¹ for amphibians, 6.3 μGy h⁻¹ for birds, 15.1 μGy h⁻¹ for mammals, and 10.3 μGy h⁻¹ for reptiles, with the recommended maximum dose rate being equal to 40 μGy h⁻¹. However, drying the ChNPP Cooling Pond may increase the exposure doses to 94.5 μGy h⁻¹ for amphibians, 95.2 μGy h⁻¹ for birds, 284.0 μGy h⁻¹ for mammals, and 847.0 μGy h⁻¹ for reptiles. All of these anticipated dose rates exceed the recommended values.

  8. State of Fukushima nuclear fuel debris tracked by Cs137 in cooling water.

    PubMed

    Grambow, B; Mostafavi, M

    2014-11-01

    It is still difficult to assess the risk originating from the radioactivity inventory remaining in the damaged Fukushima nuclear reactors. Here we show that cooling water analyses provide a means to assess source terms for potential future releases. Until now already about 34% of the inventories of (137)Cs of three reactors has been released into water. We found that the release rate of (137)Cs has been constant for 2 years at about 1.8% of the inventory per year indicating ongoing dissolution of the fuel debris. Compared to laboratory studies on spent nuclear fuel behavior in water, (137)Cs release rates are on the higher end, caused by the strong radiation field and oxidant production by water radiolysis and by impacts of accessible grain boundaries. It is concluded that radionuclide analyses in cooling water allow tracking of the conditions of the damaged fuel and the associated risks.

  9. Thermionic nuclear reactor with internal heat distribution and multiple duct cooling

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, C.R.; Perry, L.W. Jr.

    1975-11-01

    A Thermionic Nuclear Reactor is described having multiple ribbon-like coolant ducts passing through the core, intertwined among the thermionic fuel elements to provide independent cooling paths. Heat pipes are disposed in the core between and adjacent to the thermionic fuel elements and the ribbon ducting, for the purpose of more uniformly distributing the heat of fission among the thermionic fuel elements and the ducts.

  10. Control rod system useable for fuel handling in a gas-cooled nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Spurrier, Francis R.

    1976-11-30

    A control rod and its associated drive are used to elevate a complete stack of fuel blocks to a position above the core of a gas-cooled nuclear reactor. A fuel-handling machine grasps the control rod and the drive is unlatched from the rod. The stack and rod are transferred out of the reactor, or to a new location in the reactor, by the fuel-handling machine.

  11. Nuclear Winter Revisited: can it Make a Difference This Time?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, S.

    2006-12-01

    Some 23 years ago, in the middle of a Cold War and the threat of a strategic nuclear weapons exchange between NATO and the Warsaw Pact nations, atmospheric scientists pointed out that the well-anticipated side effects of a large-scale nuclear war ozone depletion, radioactive contamination and some climatic effects had massively underestimated the more likely implications: massive fires, severe dimming and cooling beneath circulating smoke clouds, disruption to agriculture in non-combatant nations, severe loss of imports of food to already-food-deficient regions and major alterations to atmospheric circulation. While the specific consequences were dependent on both scenarios of weapons use and injections and removals of smoke and dust and other chemicals into the atmosphere, it was clear that this would be despite passionately argued uncertainties a large major additional effect. As further investigations of smoke removal, patchy transport, etc., were pursued, the basic concerns remained, but the magnitude calculated with one-dimensional models diminished creating an unfortunate media debate over nuclear winter vs. nuclear autumn. Of course, one can't grow summer crops in any autumn natural or nuclear but that concern often got lost in the contentious political debate. Of course, it was pointed out that anyone who required knowing the additional environmental consequences of a major nuclear exchange to be finally deterred was already so far from the reality of the direct effects of the blasts that they might never see the concerns. But for non-combatants, it was a major awakening of their inability to escape severe consequences of the troubles of others, even if they were bystanders in the east-west conflicts. Two decades later, things have radically changed: the prospect of a massive strategic nuclear exchange is greatly diminished good news but the possibility of limited regional exchanges or terrorist incidents is widely believed to have greatly increased bad

  12. Heat pipe cooled heat rejection subsystem modelling for nuclear electric propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moriarty, Michael P.

    1993-01-01

    NASA LeRC is currently developing a FORTRAN based computer model of a complete nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) vehicle that can be used for piloted and cargo missions to the Moon or Mars. Proposed designs feature either a Brayton or a K-Rankine power conversion cycle to drive a turbine coupled with rotary alternators. Both ion and magnetoplasmodynamic (MPD) thrusters will be considered in the model. In support of the NEP model, Rocketdyne is developing power conversion, heat rejection, and power management and distribution (PMAD) subroutines. The subroutines will be incorporated into the NEP vehicle model which will be written by NASA LeRC. The purpose is to document the heat pipe cooled heat rejection subsystem model and its supporting subroutines. The heat pipe cooled heat rejection subsystem model is designed to provide estimate of the mass and performance of the equipment used to reject heat from Brayton and Rankine cycle power conversion systems. The subroutine models the ductwork and heat pipe cooled manifold for a gas cooled Brayton; the heat sink heat exchanger, liquid loop piping, expansion compensator, pump and manifold for a liquid loop cooled Brayton; and a shear flow condenser for a K-Rankine system. In each case, the final heat rejection is made by way of a heat pipe radiator. The radiator is sized to reject the amount of heat necessary.

  13. Heat pipe cooled heat rejection subsystem modelling for nuclear electric propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriarty, Michael P.

    1993-11-01

    NASA LeRC is currently developing a FORTRAN based computer model of a complete nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) vehicle that can be used for piloted and cargo missions to the Moon or Mars. Proposed designs feature either a Brayton or a K-Rankine power conversion cycle to drive a turbine coupled with rotary alternators. Both ion and magnetoplasmodynamic (MPD) thrusters will be considered in the model. In support of the NEP model, Rocketdyne is developing power conversion, heat rejection, and power management and distribution (PMAD) subroutines. The subroutines will be incorporated into the NEP vehicle model which will be written by NASA LeRC. The purpose is to document the heat pipe cooled heat rejection subsystem model and its supporting subroutines. The heat pipe cooled heat rejection subsystem model is designed to provide estimate of the mass and performance of the equipment used to reject heat from Brayton and Rankine cycle power conversion systems. The subroutine models the ductwork and heat pipe cooled manifold for a gas cooled Brayton; the heat sink heat exchanger, liquid loop piping, expansion compensator, pump and manifold for a liquid loop cooled Brayton; and a shear flow condenser for a K-Rankine system. In each case, the final heat rejection is made by way of a heat pipe radiator. The radiator is sized to reject the amount of heat necessary.

  14. Retrieval effects on ventilation and cooling requirements for a nuclear waste repository

    SciTech Connect

    Hambley, D.F.

    1985-01-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (Public Law 97-425) and the regulations promulgated in Title 10, Part 60 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10CFR60) by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for an underground repository for spent fuel and high level nuclear waste (HLW) require that it is possible to retrieve waste, for whatever reason, from such a facility for a period of 50 years from initial storage or until the completion of the performance confirmation period, whichever comes first. This paper considers the effects that the retrievability option mandates on ventilation and cooling systems required for normal repository operations. An example is given for a hypothetical repository in salt. 18 refs., 1 tab.

  15. Impact of nuclear data on sodium-cooled fast reactor calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aures, Alexander; Bostelmann, Friederike; Zwermann, Winfried; Velkov, Kiril

    2016-03-01

    Neutron transport and depletion calculations are performed in combination with various nuclear data libraries in order to assess the impact of nuclear data on safety-relevant parameters of sodium-cooled fast reactors. These calculations are supplemented by systematic uncertainty analyses with respect to nuclear data. Analysed quantities are the multiplication factor and nuclide densities as a function of burn-up and the Doppler and Na-void reactivity coefficients at begin of cycle. While ENDF/B-VII.0 / -VII.1 yield rather consistent results, larger discrepancies are observed between the JEFF libraries. While the newest evaluation, JEFF-3.2, agrees with the ENDF/B-VII libraries, the JEFF-3.1.2 library yields significant larger multiplication factors.

  16. Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. Progress report, January 1, 1980-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-25

    Results are presented of work performed on the Advanced Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (helium containing small amounts of various other gases), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Included are the activities associated with the status of the simulated reactor helium supply system, testing equipment and gas chemistry analysis instrumentation and equipment. The progress in the screening test program is described, including screening creep results and metallographic analysis for materials thermally exposed or tested at 750, 850, and 950/sup 0/C.

  17. Advanced Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. Progress report, July 1, 1979-September 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-07

    The results of work performed from July 1, 1979 through September 30, 1979 on the Advanced Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program are presented. The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (helium containing small amounts of various other gases), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Work covered in this report includes the activities associated with the status of the simulated reactor helium supply system, testing equipment, and gas chemistry analysis instrumentation and equipment. The status of the data management system is presented. In addition, the progress in the screening test program is described.

  18. Modeling the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor process heat plant: a nuclear to chemical conversion process

    SciTech Connect

    Pfremmer, R.D.; Openshaw, F.L.

    1982-05-01

    The high-temperature heat available from the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) makes it suitable for many process applications. One of these applications is a large-scale energy production plant where nuclear energy is converted into chemical energy and stored for industrial or utility applications. This concept combines presently available nuclear HTGR technology and energy conversion chemical technology. The design of this complex plant involves questions of interacting plant dynamics and overall plant control. This paper discusses how these questions were answered with the aid of a hybrid computer model that was developed within the time-frame of the conceptual design studies. A brief discussion is given of the generally good operability shown for the plant and of the specific potential problems and their anticipated solution. The paper stresses the advantages of providing this information in the earliest conceptual phases of the design.

  19. Modeling the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor process heat plant a nuclear to chemical conversion process

    SciTech Connect

    Pfremmer, R.D.; Openshaw, F.L.

    1982-08-01

    The high-temperature heat available from the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) makes it suitable for many process applications. One of these applications is a large-scale energy production plant where nuclear energy is converted into chemical energy and stored for industrial or utility applications. This concept combines presently available nuclear HTGR technology and energy conversion chemical technology. The design of this complex plant involves questions of interacting plant dynamics and overall plant control. This paper discusses how these questions were answered with the aid of a hybrid computer model that was developed within the time-frame of the conceptual design studies. A brief discussion is given of the generally good operability shown for the plant and of the specific potential problems and their anticipated solution. The paper stresses the advantages of providing this information in the earliest conceptual phases of the design.

  20. Mechanically Cooled Large-Volume Germanium Detector Systems for Nuclear Explosion Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, Ethan L.; Pehl, Richard H.; Lathrop, James R.; Martin, Gregory N.; Mashburn, R. B.; Miley, Harry S.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Bowyer, Ted W.

    2006-09-21

    Compact maintenance free mechanical cooling systems are being developed to operate large volume (~570 cm3, ~3 kg, 140% or larger) germanium detectors for field applications. We are using a new generation of Stirling-cycle mechanical coolers for operating the very largest volume germanium detectors with absolutely no maintenance or liquid nitrogen requirements. The user will be able to leave these systems unplugged on the shelf until needed. The flip of a switch will bring a system to life in ~1 hour for measurements. The maintenance-free operating lifetime of these detector systems will exceed five years. These features are necessary for remote long-duration liquid-nitrogen free deployment of large-volume germanium gamma-ray detector systems for Nuclear Explosion Monitoring (NEM). The Radionuclide Aerosol Sampler/Analyzer (RASA) will greatly benefit from the availability of such detectors by eliminating the need for liquid nitrogen at RASA sites while still allowing the very largest available germanium detectors to be utilized. These mechanically cooled germanium detector systems being developed here will provide the largest, most sensitive detectors possible for use with the RASA. To provide such systems, the appropriate technical fundamentals are being researched. Mechanical cooling of germanium detectors has historically been a difficult endeavor. The success or failure of mechanically cooled germanium detectors stems from three main technical issues: temperature, vacuum, and vibration. These factors affect one another. There is a particularly crucial relationship between vacuum and temperature. These factors will be experimentally studied both separately and together to insure a solid understanding of the physical limitations each factor places on a practical mechanically cooled germanium detector system for field use. Using this knowledge, a series of mechanically cooled germanium detector prototype systems are being designed and fabricated. Our collaborators

  1. Emergency Cooling of Nuclear Power Plant Reactors With Heat Removal By a Forced-Draft Cooling Tower

    SciTech Connect

    Murav’ev, V. P.

    2016-07-15

    The feasibility of heat removal during emergency cooling of a reactor by a forced-draft cooling tower with accumulation of the peak heat release in a volume of precooled water is evaluated. The advantages of a cooling tower over a spray cooling pond are demonstrated: it requires less space, consumes less material, employs shorter lines in the heat removal system, and provides considerably better protection of the environment from wetting by entrained moisture.

  2. Organohalogen products from chlorination of cooling water at nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect

    Bean, R.M.

    1983-10-01

    Eight nuclear power units at seven locations in the US were studied to determine the effects of chlorine, added as a biocide, on the composition of cooling water discharge. Water, sediment and biota samples from the sites were analyzed for total organic halogen and for a variety of organohalogen compounds. Haloforms were discharged from all plants studied, at concentrations of a few ..mu..g/L (parts-per-billion). Evidence was obtained that power plants with cooling towers discharge a significant portion of the haloforms formed during chlorination to the atmosphere. A complex mixture of halogenated phenols was found in the cooling water discharges of the power units. Cooling towers can act to concentrate halogenated phenols to levels approaching those of the haloforms. Examination of samples by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry did not result in identification of any significant concentrations of lipophilic base-neutral compounds that could be shown to be formed by the chlorination process. Total concentrations of lipophilic (Bioabsorbable) and volatile organohalogen material discharged ranged from about 2 to 4 ..mu..g/L. Analysis of sediment samples for organohalogen material suggests that certain chlorination products may accumulate in sediments, although no tissue bioaccumulation could be demonstrated from analysis of a limited number of samples. 58 references, 25 figures, 31 tables.

  3. Precision measurement of the nuclear polarization in laser-cooled, optically pumped 37K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenker, B.; Behr, J. A.; Melconian, D.; Anderson, R. M. A.; Anholm, M.; Ashery, D.; Behling, R. S.; Cohen, I.; Craiciu, I.; Donohue, J. M.; Farfan, C.; Friesen, D.; Gorelov, A.; McNeil, J.; Mehlman, M.; Norton, H.; Olchanski, K.; Smale, S.; Thériault, O.; Vantyghem, A. N.; Warner, C. L.

    2016-07-01

    We report a measurement of the nuclear polarization of laser-cooled, optically pumped 37K atoms which will allow us to precisely measure angular correlation parameters in the {β }+-decay of the same atoms. These results will be used to test the V - A framework of the weak interaction at high precision. At the Triumf neutral atom trap (Trinat), a magneto-optical trap confines and cools neutral 37K atoms and optical pumping spin-polarizes them. We monitor the nuclear polarization of the same atoms that are decaying in situ by photoionizing a small fraction of the partially polarized atoms and then use the standard optical Bloch equations to model their population distribution. We obtain an average nuclear polarization of \\bar{P}=0.9913+/- 0.0009, which is significantly more precise than previous measurements with this technique. Since our current measurement of the β-asymmetry has 0.2 % statistical uncertainty, the polarization measurement reported here will not limit its overall uncertainty. This result also demonstrates the capability to measure the polarization to \\lt 0.1 % , allowing for a measurement of angular correlation parameters to this level of precision, which would be competitive in searches for new physics.

  4. Preliminary Aging Assessment of Nuclear Air-Treatment and Cooling System Fans

    SciTech Connect

    Winegardner, W. K.

    1995-07-01

    A preliminary aging assessment of the fans used in nuclear air treatment and cooling systems was performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory as part of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program. Details from guides and standards for the design, testing, and installation of fans; results of failure surveys; and information concerning stressors, related aging mechanisms, and inspection, surveillance, and monitoring methods (ISMM) were compiled. Failure surveys suggest that about half of the failures reported for fans are primarily associated with aging. Aging mechanisms associated with the various fan components and resulting from mechanical, thermal, and environmental stressors include wear, fatigue, corrosion, and erosion of metals and the deterioration of belts and lubricants. A bearing is the component most frequently linked to fan failure. The assessment also suggests that ISMM that will detect irregularities arising from improper lubrication, cooling, alignment, and balance of the various components should aid in counteracting many of the aging effects that could impair fan performance. An expanded program, to define and evaluate the adequacy of current ISMM and maintenance practices and to include a documented Phase I aging assessment, is recommended.

  5. Precision measurement of the nuclear polarization in laser-cooled, optically pumped 37 K

    DOE PAGES

    Fenker, B.; Behr, J. A.; Melconian, D.; ...

    2016-07-13

    We report a measurement of the nuclear polarization of laser-cooled, optically pumped 37K atoms which will allow us to precisely measure angular correlation parameters in themore » $${\\beta }^{+}$$-decay of the same atoms. These results will be used to test the V ₋ A framework of the weak interaction at high precision. At the Triumf neutral atom trap (Trinat), a magneto-optical trap confines and cools neutral 37K atoms and optical pumping spin-polarizes them. We monitor the nuclear polarization of the same atoms that are decaying in situ by photoionizing a small fraction of the partially polarized atoms and then use the standard optical Bloch equations to model their population distribution. We obtain an average nuclear polarization of $$\\bar{P}=0.9913\\pm 0.0009$$, which is significantly more precise than previous measurements with this technique. Since our current measurement of the β-asymmetry has $$0.2 \\% $$ statistical uncertainty, the polarization measurement reported here will not limit its overall uncertainty. This result also demonstrates the capability to measure the polarization to $$\\lt 0.1 \\% $$, allowing for a measurement of angular correlation parameters to this level of precision, which would be competitive in searches for new physics.« less

  6. Prospects for development of an innovative water-cooled nuclear reactor for supercritical parameters of coolant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyakin, S. G.; Kirillov, P. L.; Baranaev, Yu. D.; Glebov, A. P.; Bogoslovskaya, G. P.; Nikitenko, M. P.; Makhin, V. M.; Churkin, A. N.

    2014-08-01

    The state of nuclear power engineering as of February 1, 2014 and the accomplished elaborations of a supercritical-pressure water-cooled reactor are briefly reviewed, and the prospects of this new project are discussed based on this review. The new project rests on the experience gained from the development and operation of stationary water-cooled reactor plants, including VVERs, PWRs, BWRs, and RBMKs (their combined service life totals more than 15 000 reactor-years), and long-term experience gained around the world with operation of thermal power plants the turbines of which are driven by steam with supercritical and ultrasupercritical parameters. The advantages of such reactor are pointed out together with the scientific-technical problems that need to be solved during further development of such installations. The knowledge gained for the last decade makes it possible to refine the concept and to commence the work on designing an experimental small-capacity reactor.

  7. Accumulation of /sup 137/Cs in commercial fish of the Belyarsk nuclear power station cooling supply

    SciTech Connect

    Trapeznikova, V.N.; Kulikov, N.V.; Trapeznikov, A.V.

    1984-07-01

    Results are presented of a comparative study of the accumulation of /sup 137/Cs in basic species of commercial fish of the Beloyarsk reservoir which is used as the cooling supply for the Beloyarsk nuclear power station. Possible reasons for interspecies differences in accumulation of the radionuclide are indicated, and the increased accumulation of /sup 137/Cs by free-living fish in the zone of heated water effluent from the station and the reduced accumulation of the emitter in carp, which are cultivated on artificial food in cages, are noted. Levels of the content of the radionuclide are compared in roach and farm carp from the cooling supplies of the Beloyarsk station and the Reftinsk power plant in the Urals.

  8. Combined cooling and purification system for nuclear reactor spent fuel pit, refueling cavity, and refueling water storage tank

    DOEpatents

    Corletti, M.M.; Lau, L.K.; Schulz, T.L.

    1993-12-14

    The spent fuel pit of a pressured water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant has sufficient coolant capacity that a safety rated cooling system is not required. A non-safety rated combined cooling and purification system with redundant branches selectively provides simultaneously cooling and purification for the spent fuel pit, the refueling cavity, and the refueling water storage tank, and transfers coolant from the refueling water storage tank to the refueling cavity without it passing through the reactor core. Skimmers on the suction piping of the combined cooling and purification system eliminate the need for separate skimmer circuits with dedicated pumps. 1 figures.

  9. Combined cooling and purification system for nuclear reactor spent fuel pit, refueling cavity, and refueling water storage tank

    DOEpatents

    Corletti, Michael M.; Lau, Louis K.; Schulz, Terry L.

    1993-01-01

    The spent fuel pit of a pressured water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant has sufficient coolant capacity that a safety rated cooling system is not required. A non-safety rated combined cooling and purification system with redundant branches selectively provides simultaneously cooling and purification for the spent fuel pit, the refueling cavity, and the refueling water storage tank, and transfers coolant from the refueling water storage tank to the refueling cavity without it passing through the reactor core. Skimmers on the suction piping of the combined cooling and purification system eliminate the need for separate skimmer circuits with dedicated pumps.

  10. National Gas Cool Times, September/October 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natural Gas Cool Times, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Several articles are presented covering the development and use of gas/electric cooling solutions for public schools and colleges. Articles address financing issues; indoor air quality (IAQ) problems and solutions; and the analysis of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems. Three examples of how schools solved their cooling problems…

  11. KEY DESIGN REQUIREMENTS FOR THE HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR NUCLEAR HEAT SUPPLY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    L.E. Demick

    2010-09-01

    Key requirements that affect the design of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor nuclear heat supply system (HTGR-NHSS) as the NGNP Project progresses through the design, licensing, construction and testing of the first of a kind HTGR based plant are summarized. These requirements derive from pre-conceptual design development completed to-date by HTGR Suppliers, collaboration with potential end users of the HTGR technology to identify energy needs, evaluation of integration of the HTGR technology with industrial processes and recommendations of the NGNP Project Senior Advisory Group.

  12. Development concept for a small, split-core, heat-pipe-cooled nuclear reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lantz, E.; Breitwieser, R.; Niederauer, G. F.

    1974-01-01

    There have been two main deterrents to the development of semiportable nuclear reactors. One is the high development costs; the other is the inability to satisfy with assurance the questions of operational safety. This report shows how a split-core, heat-pipe cooled reactor could conceptually eliminate these deterrents, and examines and summarizes recent work on split-core, heat-pipe reactors. A concept for a small reactor that could be developed at a comparatively low cost is presented. The concept would extend the technology of subcritical radioisotope thermoelectric generators using 238 PuO2 to the evolution of critical space power reactors using 239 PuO2.

  13. Design and Transient Analysis of Passive Safety Cooling Systems for Advanced Nuclear Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvez, Cristhian

    2011-12-01

    The Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR) is a pebble fueled, liquid salt cooled, high temperature nuclear reactor design that can be used for electricity generation or other applications requiring the availability of heat at elevated temperatures. A stage in the design evolution of this plant requires the analysis of the plant during a variety of potential transients to understand the primary and safety cooling system response. This study focuses on the performance of the passive safety cooling system with a dual purpose, to assess the capacity to maintain the core at safe temperatures and to assist the design process of this system to achieve this objective. The analysis requires the use of complex computational tools for simulation and verification using analytical solutions and comparisons with experimental data. This investigation builds upon previous detailed design work for the PB-AHTR components, including the core, reactivity control mechanisms and the intermediate heat exchanger, developed in 2008. In addition the study of this reference plant design employs a wealth of auxiliary information including thermal-hydraulic physical phenomena correlations for multiple geometries and thermophysical properties for the constituents of the plant. Finally, the set of performance requirements and limitations imposed from physical constrains and safety considerations provide with a criteria and metrics for acceptability of the design. The passive safety cooling system concept is turned into a detailed design as a result from this study. A methodology for the design of air-cooled passive safety systems was developed and a transient analysis of the plant, evaluating a scrammed loss of forced cooling event was performed. Furthermore, a design optimization study of the passive safety system and an approach for the validation and verification of the analysis is presented. This study demonstrates that the resulting point design responds properly to the

  14. COOLING TIME, FREEFALL TIME, AND PRECIPITATION IN THE CORES OF ACCEPT GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Voit, G. Mark; Donahue, Megan

    2015-01-20

    Star formation in the universe's largest galaxies—the ones at the centers of galaxy clusters—depends critically on the thermodynamic state of their hot gaseous atmospheres. Central galaxies with low-entropy, high-density atmospheres frequently contain multiphase star-forming gas, while those with high-entropy, low-density atmospheres never do. The dividing line between these two populations in central entropy, and therefore central cooling time, is amazingly sharp. Two hypotheses have been proposed to explain the dichotomy. One points out that thermal conduction can prevent radiative cooling of cluster cores above the dividing line. The other holds that cores below the dividing line are subject to thermal instability that fuels the central active galactic nucleus (AGN) through a cold-feedback mechanism. Here we explore those hypotheses with an analysis of the Hα properties of ACCEPT galaxy clusters. We find that the two hypotheses are likely to be complementary. Our results support a picture in which cold clouds inevitably precipitate out of cluster cores in which cooling outcompetes thermal conduction and rain down on the central black hole, causing AGN feedback that stabilizes the cluster core. In particular, the observed distribution of the cooling-time to freefall-time ratio is nearly identical to that seen in simulations of this cold-feedback process, implying that cold-phase accretion, and not Bondi-like accretion of hot-phase gas, is responsible for the AGN feedback that regulates star formation in large galaxies.

  15. Heat Transfer in Pebble-Bed Nuclear Reactor Cores Cooled by Fluoride Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huddar, Lakshana Ravindranath

    With electricity demand predicted to rise by more than 50% within the next 20 years and a burgeoning world population requiring reliable emissions-free base-load electricity, can we design advanced nuclear reactors to help meet this challenge? At the University of California, Berkeley (UCB) Fluoride-salt-cooled High Temperature Reactors (FHR) are currently being investigated. FHRs are designed with better safety and economic characteristics than conventional light water reactors (LWR) currently in operation. These reactors operate at high temperature and low pressure making them more efficient and safer than LWRs. The pebble-bed FHR (PB-FHR) variant includes an annular nuclear reactor core that is filled with randomly packed pebble fuel. It is crucial to characterize the heat transfer within this unique geometry as this informs the safety limits of the reactor. The work presented in this dissertation focused on furthering the understanding of heat transfer in pebble-bed nuclear reactor cores using fluoride salts as a coolant. This was done through experimental, analytical and computational techniques. A complex nuclear system with a coolant that has never previously been in commercial use requires experimental data that can directly inform aspects of its design. It is important to isolate heat transfer phenomena in order to understand the underlying physics in the context of the PB-FHR, as well as to make decisions about further experimental work that needs to be done in support of developing the PB-FHR. Certain organic oils can simulate the heat transfer behaviour of the fluoride salt if relevant non-dimensional parameters are matched. The advantage of this method is that experiments can be done at a much lower temperature and at a smaller geometric scale compared to FHRs, thereby lowering costs. In this dissertation, experiments were designed and performed to collect data demonstrating similitude. The limitations of these experiments were also elucidated by

  16. Data Mining Techniques to Estimate Plutonium, Initial Enrichment, Burnup, and Cooling Time in Spent Fuel Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Trellue, Holly Renee; Fugate, Michael Lynn; Tobin, Stephen Joesph

    2015-03-19

    The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), Office of Nonproliferation and Arms Control (NPAC), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has sponsored a multi-laboratory, university, international partner collaboration to (1) detect replaced or missing pins from spent fuel assemblies (SFA) to confirm item integrity and deter diversion, (2) determine plutonium mass and related plutonium and uranium fissile mass parameters in SFAs, and (3) verify initial enrichment (IE), burnup (BU), and cooling time (CT) of facility declaration for SFAs. A wide variety of nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques were researched to achieve these goals [Veal, 2010 and Humphrey, 2012]. In addition, the project includes two related activities with facility-specific benefits: (1) determination of heat content and (2) determination of reactivity (multiplication). In this research, a subset of 11 integrated NDA techniques was researched using data mining solutions at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for their ability to achieve the above goals.

  17. Nuclear event zero-time calculation and uncertainty evaluation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Pujing; Ungar, R Kurt

    2012-04-01

    It is important to know the initial time, or zero-time, of a nuclear event such as a nuclear weapon's test, a nuclear power plant accident or a nuclear terrorist attack (e.g. with an improvised nuclear device, IND). Together with relevant meteorological information, the calculated zero-time is used to help locate the origin of a nuclear event. The zero-time of a nuclear event can be derived from measured activity ratios of two nuclides. The calculated zero-time of a nuclear event would not be complete without an appropriately evaluated uncertainty term. In this paper, analytical equations for zero-time and the associated uncertainty calculations are derived using a measured activity ratio of two nuclides. Application of the derived equations is illustrated in a realistic example using data from the last Chinese thermonuclear test in 1980. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Nuclear spin cooling using Overhauser-field selective coherent population trapping.

    PubMed

    Issler, M; Kessler, E M; Giedke, G; Yelin, S; Cirac, I; Lukin, M D; Imamoglu, A

    2010-12-31

    We show that a quantum interference effect in optical absorption from two electronic spin states of a solid-state emitter can be used to prepare the surrounding environment of nuclear spins in well-defined states, thereby suppressing electronic spin dephasing. The coupled electron-nuclei system evolves into a coherent population trapping state by optical-excitation-induced nuclear-spin diffusion for a broad range of initial optical detunings. The spectroscopic signature of this evolution where the single-electron strongly modifies its environment is a drastic broadening of the dark resonance in optical absorption experiments. The large difference in electronic and nuclear time scales allows us to verify the preparation of nuclear spins in the desired state.

  19. Mechanically Cooled Large-Volume Germanium Detector Systems for Nuclear Explosion Monitoring DOENA27323-1

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, E.L.

    2006-07-28

    Compact maintenance free mechanical cooling systems are being developed to operate large volume germanium detectors for field applications. To accomplish this we are utilizing a newly available generation of Stirling-cycle mechanical coolers to operate the very largest volume germanium detectors with no maintenance. The user will be able to leave these systems unplugged on the shelf until needed. The flip of a switch will bring a system to life in ~ 1 hour for measurements. The maintenance-free operating lifetime of these detector systems will exceed 5 years. These features are necessary for remote long-duration liquid-nitrogen free deployment of large-volume germanium gamma-ray detector systems for Nuclear Explosion Monitoring. The Radionuclide Aerosol Sampler/Analyzer (RASA) will greatly benefit from the availability of such detectors by eliminating the need for liquid nitrogen at RASA sites while still allowing the very largest available germanium detectors to be reliably utilized.

  20. Passive decay heat removal system for water-cooled nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W.

    1991-01-01

    A passive decay-heat removal system for a water-cooled nuclear reactor employs a closed heat transfer loop having heat-exchanging coils inside an open-topped, insulated box located inside the reactor vessel, below its normal water level, in communication with a condenser located outside of containment and exposed to the atmosphere. The heat transfer loop is located such that the evaporator is in a position where, when the water level drops in the reactor, it will become exposed to steam. Vapor produced in the evaporator passes upward to the condenser above the normal water level. In operation, condensation in the condenser removes heat from the system, and the condensed liquid is returned to the evaporator. The system is disposed such that during normal reactor operations where the water level is at its usual position, very little heat will be removed from the system, but during emergency, low water level conditions, substantial amounts of decay heat will be removed.

  1. Thermally Simulated Testing of a Direct-Drive Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfroy, Thomas; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon; VanDyke, Melissa

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the concept and preliminary component testing of a gas-cooled, UN-fueled, pin-type reactor which uses He/Xe gas that goes directly into a recuperated Brayton system to produce electricity for nuclear electric propulsion. This Direct-Drive Gas-Cooled Reactor (DDG) is designed to be subcritical under water or wet-sand immersion in case of a launch accident. Because the gas-cooled reactor can directly drive the Brayton turbomachinery, it is possible to configure the system such that there are no external surfaces or pressure boundaries that are refractory metal, even though the gas delivered to the turbine is 1144 K. The He/Xe gas mixture is a good heat transport medium when flowing, and a good insulator when stagnant. Judicious use of stagnant cavities as insulating regions allows transport of the 1144-K gas while keeping all external surfaces below 900 K. At this temperature super-alloys (Hastelloy or Inconel) can be used instead of refractory metals. Super-alloys reduce the technology risk because they are easier to fabricate than refractory metals, we have a much more extensive knowledge base on their characteristics, and, because they have a greater resistance to oxidation, system testing is eased. The system is also relatively simple in its design: no additional coolant pumps, heat exchanger, or freeze-thaw systems are required. Key to success of this concept is a good knowledge of the heat transfer between the fuel pins and the gas, as well as the pressure drop through the system. This paper describes preliminary testing to obtain this key information, as well as experience in demonstrating electrical thermal simulation of reactor components and concepts.

  2. Fretting wear behaviors of a dual-cooled nuclear fuel rod under a simulated rod vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young-Ho; Kim, Hyung-Kyu; Kang, Heung-Seok; Yoon, Kyung-Ho; Kim, Jae-Yong; Lee, Kang-Hee

    2012-06-06

    Recently, a dual-cooled fuel (i.e., annular fuel) that is compatible with current operating PWR plants has been proposed in order to realize both a considerable amount of power uprating and an increase of safety margins. As the design concept should be compatible with current operating PWR plants, however, it shows a narrow gap between the fuel rods when compared with current solid nuclear fuel arrays and needs to modify the spacer grid shapes and their positions. In this study, fretting wear tests have been performed to evaluate the wear resistance of a dual-cooled fuel by using a proposed spring and dimple of spacer grids that have a cantilever type and hemispherical shape, respectively. As a result, the wear volume of the spring specimen gradually increases as the contact condition is changed from a certain gap, just contact to positive force. However, in the dimple specimen, just contact condition shows a large wear volume. In addition, a circular rod motion at upper region of contact surface is gradually increased and its diametric size depends on the wear depth increase. Based on the test results, the fretting wear resistance of the proposed spring and dimple is analyzed by comparing the wear measurement results and rod motion in detail.

  3. Pozzolanic filtration/solidification of radionuclides in nuclear reactor cooling water

    SciTech Connect

    Englehardt, J.D.; Peng, C.

    1995-12-31

    Laboratory studies to investigate the feasibility of one- and two-step processes for precipitation/coprecipitating radionuclides from nuclear reactor cooling water, filtering with pozzolanic filter aid, and solidifying, are reported in this paper. In the one-step process, ferrocyanide salt and excess lime are added ahead of the filter, and the resulting filter cake solidifies by a pozzolanic reaction. The two-step process involves addition of solidifying agents subsequent to filtration. It was found that high surface area diatomaceous synthetic calcium silicate powders, sold commercially as functional fillers and carriers, adsorb nickel isotopes from solution at neutral and slightly basic pH. Addition of the silicates to cooling water allowed removal of the tested metal isotopes (nickel, iron, manganese, cobalt, and cesium) simultaneously at neutral to slightly basic pH. Lime to diatomite ratio was the most influential characteristic of composition on final strength tested, with higher lime ratios giving higher strength. Diatomaceous earth filter aids manufactured without sodium fluxes exhibited higher pozzolanic activity. Pozzolanic filter cake solidified with sodium silicate and a ratio of 0.45 parts lime to 1 part diatomite had compressive strength ranging from 470 to 595 psi at a 90% confidence level. Leachability indices of all tested metals in the solidified waste were acceptable. In light of the typical requirement of removing iron and desirability of control over process pH, a two-step process involving addition of Portland cement to the filter cake may be most generally applicable.

  4. Gas cooling in hydrodynamic simulations with an exact time integration scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qirong; Smith, Britton; Hernquist, Lars

    2017-09-01

    We implement and test the exact time integration method proposed by Townsend for gas cooling in cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. The errors using this time integrator for the internal energy are limited by the resolution of the cooling tables and are insensitive to the size of the time-step, improving accuracy relative to explicit or implicit schemes when the cooling time is short. We compare results with different time integrators for gas cooling in cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. We find that the temperature of the gas in filaments before accreting into dark matter haloes to form stars, obtained with the exact cooling integration, lies close to the equilibrium where radiative cooling balances heating from the ultraviolet background. For comparison, the gas temperature without the exact integrator shows substantial deviations from the equilibrium relation. Galaxy stellar masses with the exact cooling technique agree reasonably well, but are systematically lower than the results obtained by the other integration schemes, reducing the need for feedback to suppress star formation. Our implementation of the exact cooling technique is provided and can be easily incorporated into any hydrodynamic code.

  5. The impact of monochloramine on the diversity and dynamics of Legionella pneumophila subpopulations in a nuclear power plant cooling circuit.

    PubMed

    Jakubek, Delphine; Le Brun, Matthieu; Leblon, Gerard; DuBow, Michael; Binet, Marie

    2013-08-01

    Members of the pathogenic Legionella genus encounter suitable growth conditions in nuclear power plant cooling circuits. To limit its proliferation and ensure that levels remain below regulatory thresholds, chemical treatment with monochloramine can be used in continuous or sequential conditions. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of monochloramine on L. pneumophila subpopulations in the cooling circuits of a nuclear power plant. The chosen procedure involved monitoring the diversity and dynamics of L. pneumophila subpopulations every month over the course of a year in a nuclear power plant cooling circuit, which was treated for 2 months during the period under study. This study confirmed the effectiveness of monochloramine to limit L. pneumophila concentrations in cooling circuits. The culturable L. pneumophila community was strongly affected by the injection of monochloramine. Several subpopulations persisted during treatment at low concentrations (below the detection limit of standard methods), suggesting that the susceptibility of L. pneumophila is strain dependent. Although the composition of the subpopulations was not similar, the resilience of the community structure was observed. Indeed, the community eventually returned to its initial structure and presented a similar pattern of richness, diversity and uniformity to that seen before treatment.

  6. Risk management and maintenance optimization of nuclear reactor cooling piping system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augé, L.; Capra, B.; Lasne, M.; Bernard, O.; Bénéfice, P.; Comby, R.

    2006-11-01

    Seaside nuclear power plants have to face the ageing of nuclear reactor cooling piping systems. In order to minimize the duration of the production unit shutdown, maintenance operations have to be planned well in advance. In a context where owners of infrastructures tend to extend the life span of their goods while having to keep the safety level maximum, Oxand brings its expertise and know-how in management of infrastructures life cycle. A dedicated methodology relies on several modules that all participate in fixing network optimum replacement dates: expertise on ageing mechanisms (corrosion, cement degradation...) and the associated kinetics, expertise on impacts of ageing on functional integrity of piping systems, predictive simulation based on experience feedback, development of monitoring techniques focused on actual threats. More precisely, Oxand has designed a patented monitoring technique based on optic fiber sensors, which aims at controlling the deterioration level of piping systems. This preventive maintenance enables the owner to determine criteria for network replacement based on degradation impacts. This approach helps the owner justify his maintenance strategy and allows him to demonstrate the management of safety level. More generally, all monitoring techniques used by the owners are developed and coupled to predictive simulation tools, notably thanks to processes based on Bayesian approaches. Methodologies to evaluate and optimize operation budgets, depending on predictions of future functional deterioration and available maintenance solutions are also developed and applied. Finally, all information related to infrastructure ageing and available maintenance options are put together to reach the right solution for safe and performing infrastructure management.

  7. Multiple lead seal assembly for a liquid-metal-cooled fast-breeder nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, Ernest; Pardini, John A.

    1977-03-15

    A reusable multiple lead seal assembly provides leak-free passage of stainless-steel-clad instrument leads through the cover on the primary tank of a liquid-metal-cooled fast-breeder nuclear reactor. The seal isolates radioactive argon cover gas and sodium vapor within the primary tank from the exterior atmosphere and permits reuse of the assembly and the stainless-steel-clad instrument leads. Leads are placed in flutes in a seal body, and a seal shell is then placed around the seal body. Circumferential channels in the body and inner surface of the shell are contiguous and together form a conduit which intersects each of the flutes, placing them in communication with a port through the wall of the seal shell. Liquid silicone rubber sealant is injected into the flutes through the port and conduit; the sealant fills the space in the flutes not occupied by the leads themselves and dries to a rubbery hardness. A nut, threaded onto a portion of the seal body not covered by the seal shell, jacks the body out of the shell and shears the sealant without damage to the body, shell, or leads. The leads may then be removed from the body. The sheared sealant is cleaned from the body, leads, and shell and the assembly may then be reused with the same or different leads.

  8. Precision measurement of the nuclear polarization of laser-cooled, optically pumped 37K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, J. A.; Craiciu, I.; Gorelov, A.; Smale, S.; Warner, C. L.; Lawrence, L.; Fenker, B.; Behling, R. S.; Mehlman, M.; Melconian, D.; Gwinner, G.; Anholm, M.; McNeil, J.; Ashery, D.; Cohen, I.

    2016-09-01

    We have spin-polarized laser cooled 37K by direct optical pumping and measured the polarization to < 0 . 1 % accuracy [B. Fenker arXiv:1602.04526]. Our polarization method naturally monitors the polarization of the nuclei as they decay. The atoms absorb circularly polarized light directed along the quantization axis near-resonant with the atomic S1 / 2 to P1 / 2 transition. Once the atoms are polarized, they stop absorbing light, so the ratio between the final P1 / 2 population and its initial maximum probes the degree of polarization. We monitor the P1 / 2 population using UV photons energetic enough to photoionize the P1 / 2 state but not the S1 / 2 state. Since the final P1 / 2 population nearly vanishes, 5% precision on the final/maximum ratio determines the polarization to 0.1%. We eliminate a nonclassical effect, coherent population trapping, which could produce poorly polarized unexcited atoms. We show planned upgrades. Our result for the nuclear vector polarization during our Aβ measurement [B. Fenker, this conference] was 99.13(9)%, not the dominant systematic. Supported by NSERC, D.O.E., Israel Science Foundation. TRIUMF receives federal funding via a contribution agreement with the National Research Council of Canada.

  9. THR-TH: a high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor core thermal hydraulics code

    SciTech Connect

    Vondy, D.R.

    1984-07-01

    The ORNL version of PEBBLE, the (RZ) pebble bed thermal hydraulics code, has been extended for application to a prismatic gas cooled reactor core. The supplemental treatment is of one-dimensional coolant flow in up to a three-dimensional core description. Power density data from a neutronics and exposure calculation are used as the basic information for the thermal hydraulics calculation of heat removal. Two-dimensional neutronics results may be expanded for a three-dimensional hydraulics calculation. The geometric description for the hydraulics problem is the same as used by the neutronics code. A two-dimensional thermal cell model is used to predict temperatures in the fuel channel. The capability is available in the local BOLD VENTURE computation system for reactor core analysis with capability to account for the effect of temperature feedback by nuclear cross section correlation. Some enhancements have also been added to the original code to add pebble bed modeling flexibility and to generate useful auxiliary results. For example, an estimate is made of the distribution of fuel temperatures based on average and extreme conditions regularly calculated at a number of locations.

  10. Passive decay heat removal system for water-cooled nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Forseberg, C.W.

    1990-01-01

    This document describes passive decay-heat removal system for a water-cooled nuclear reactor which employs a closed heat transfer loop having heat-exchanging coils inside an open-topped, insulated evaporator located inside the reactor vessel, below its normal water level, in communication with a condenser located outside of containment and exposed to the atmosphere. The heat transfer loop is located such that the evaporator is in a position where, when the water level drops in the reactor, it will become exposed to steam. Vapor produced in the evaporator passes upward to the condenser above the normal water level. In operation, condensation in the condenser removes heat from the system, and the condensed liquid is returned to the evaporator. The system is disposed such that during normal reactor operations where the water level is at its usual position, very little heat will be removed from the system, but during emergency, low water level conditions, substantial amounts of decay heat will be removed.

  11. Vibration Monitoring Using Fiber Optic Sensors in a Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Cooled Nuclear Fuel Assembly.

    PubMed

    De Pauw, Ben; Lamberti, Alfredo; Ertveldt, Julien; Rezayat, Ali; van Tichelen, Katrien; Vanlanduit, Steve; Berghmans, Francis

    2016-04-21

    Excessive fuel assembly vibrations in nuclear reactor cores should be avoided in order not to compromise the lifetime of the assembly and in order to prevent the occurrence of safety hazards. This issue is particularly relevant to new reactor designs that use liquid metal coolants, such as, for example, a molten lead-bismuth eutectic. The flow of molten heavy metal around and through the fuel assembly may cause the latter to vibrate and hence suffer degradation as a result of, for example, fretting wear or mechanical fatigue. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of optical fiber sensors to measure the fuel assembly vibration in a lead-bismuth eutectic cooled installation which can be used as input to assess vibration-related safety hazards. We show that the vibration characteristics of the fuel pins in the fuel assembly can be experimentally determined with minimal intrusiveness and with high precision owing to the small dimensions and properties of the sensors. In particular, we were able to record local strain level differences of about 0.2 μϵ allowing us to reliably estimate the vibration amplitudes and modal parameters of the fuel assembly based on optical fiber sensor readings during different stages of the operation of the facility, including the onset of the coolant circulation and steady-state operation.

  12. NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY OF WATER-COOLED FUSION REACTORS: ISSUES AND SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, Andrei Y; Flanagan, George F

    2010-01-01

    ITER is an experimental Tokamak fusion energy reactor that is being built in Cadarache, France, in collaboration with seven agencies representing China, the European Union, India, Japan, Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation, and the United States. The main objective of ITER is to demonstrate the scientific and technical feasibility of a controlled fusion reaction An important U.S. contribution is the design, fabrication, and delivery of the Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS). This paper describes the main sources of radioactivity in TCWS water, which are the nitrogen isotopes 16N and 17N, tritium, activated corrosion products, and the carbon isotope 14C; the relative contribution of each of these sources to the total radioactive contamination of water; issues related to excess accumulation of these species; and methods to control TCWS radioactivity within acceptable limits. Among these methods are: (1) water purification to minimize corrosion of materials in contact with TCWS water; (2) monitoring of vital chemistry parameters and control of water chemistry; (3) design of proper building structure and/or TCWS loop/geometry configuration; and (4) design of an ITER liquid radwaste facility tailored to TCWS operational requirements. Design of TCWS nuclear chemistry control is crucial to ensuring that the inventory of radioactive species is consistent with the principle of 'As Low as Reasonably Achievable.'

  13. Nuclear data libraries assessment for modelling a small fluoride salt-cooled, high-temperature reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Hassan; Lindley, Benjamin; Parks, Geoffrey

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear data consists of measured or evaluated probabilities of various fundamental physical interactions involving the nuclei of atoms and their properties. Most fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR) studies that were reviewed do not give detailed information on the data libraries used in their assessments. Therefore, the main objective of this data libraries comparison study is to investigate whether there are any significant discrepancies between main data libraries, namely ENDF/B-VII, JEFF-3.1 and JEF-2.2. Knowing the discrepancies, especially its magnitude, is important and relevant for readers as to whether further cautions are necessary for any future verification or validation processes when modelling an FHR. The study is performed using AMEC's reactor physics software tool, WIMS. The WIMS calculation is simply a 2-D infinite lattice of fuel assembly calculation. The comparison between the data libraries in terms of infinite multiplication factor, kinf and pin power map are presented. Results show that the discrepancy between JEFF-3.1 and ENDF/B-VII libraries is reasonably small but increases as the fuel depletes due to the data libraries uncertainties that are accumulated at each burnup step. Additionally, there are large discrepancies between JEF-2.2 and ENDF/B-VII because of the inadequacy of the JEF-2.2 library.

  14. It Takes Time to Be Cool: On the Relationship between Hyperthermia and Body Cooling in a Migrating Seaduck

    PubMed Central

    Guillemette, Magella; Polymeropoulos, Elias T.; Portugal, Steven J.; Pelletier, David

    2017-01-01

    The large amount of energy expended during flapping flight is associated with heat generated through the increased work of the flight muscles. This increased muscle work rate can manifest itself in core body temperature (Tb) increase of 1–2°C in birds during flight. Therefore, episodic body cooling may be mandatory in migratory birds. To elucidate the thermoregulatory strategy of a short-distance migrant, common eiders (Somateria mollissima), we implanted data loggers in the body cavity of wild birds for 1 year, and report information on Tb during their entire migration for 19 individuals. We show that the mean body temperature during flight (TbMean) in the eiders was associated with rises in Tb ranging from 0.2 to 1.5°C, largely depending on flight duration. To understand how eiders are dealing with hyperthermia during migration, we first compare, at a daily scale, how Tb differs during migration using a before-after approach. Only a slight difference was found (0.05°C) between the after (40.30°C), the before (40.41°C) and the migration (40.36°C) periods, indicating that hyperthermia during flight had minimal impact at this time scale. Analyses at the scale of a flight cycle (flight plus stops on the water), however, clearly shows that eiders were closely regulating Tb during migration, as the relationship between the storage of heat during flight was highly correlated (slope = 1) with the level of heat dumping during stops, at both inter-individual and intra-individual levels. Because Tb at the start of a flight (TbStart) was significantly and positively related to Tb at the end of a flight (TbEnd), and the maximal attained Tb during a flight (TbMax), we conclude that in absence of sufficient body cooling during stopovers, eiders are likely to become increasingly hyperthermic during migration. Finally, we quantified the time spent cooling down during migration to be 36% of their daily (24 h) time budget, and conclude that behavioral body cooling in

  15. Beyond Newton's Law of Cooling--Estimation of Time since Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leinbach, Carl

    2011-01-01

    The estimate of the time since death and, thus, the time of death is strictly that, an estimate. However, the time of death can be an important piece of information in some coroner's cases, especially those that involve criminal or insurance investigations. It has been known almost from the beginning of time that bodies cool after the internal…

  16. Beyond Newton's Law of Cooling--Estimation of Time since Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leinbach, Carl

    2011-01-01

    The estimate of the time since death and, thus, the time of death is strictly that, an estimate. However, the time of death can be an important piece of information in some coroner's cases, especially those that involve criminal or insurance investigations. It has been known almost from the beginning of time that bodies cool after the internal…

  17. Sympathetic Ground State Cooling and Time-Dilation Shifts in an 27Al+ Optical Clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.-S.; Brewer, S. M.; Chou, C. W.; Wineland, D. J.; Leibrandt, D. R.; Hume, D. B.

    2017-02-01

    We report on Raman sideband cooling of 25Mg+ to sympathetically cool the secular modes of motion in a 25Mg+-27Al+ two-ion pair to near the three-dimensional (3D) ground state. The evolution of the Fock-state distribution during the cooling process is studied using a rate-equation simulation, and various heating sources that limit the efficiency of 3D sideband cooling in our system are discussed. We characterize the residual energy and heating rates of all of the secular modes of motion and estimate a secular motion time-dilation shift of -(1.9 ±0.1 )×10-18 for an 27Al+ clock at a typical clock probe duration of 150 ms. This is a 50-fold reduction in the secular motion time-dilation shift uncertainty in comparison with previous 27Al+ clocks.

  18. Sympathetic Ground State Cooling and Time-Dilation Shifts in an ^{27}Al^{+} Optical Clock.

    PubMed

    Chen, J-S; Brewer, S M; Chou, C W; Wineland, D J; Leibrandt, D R; Hume, D B

    2017-02-03

    We report on Raman sideband cooling of ^{25}Mg^{+} to sympathetically cool the secular modes of motion in a ^{25}Mg^{+}-^{27}Al^{+} two-ion pair to near the three-dimensional (3D) ground state. The evolution of the Fock-state distribution during the cooling process is studied using a rate-equation simulation, and various heating sources that limit the efficiency of 3D sideband cooling in our system are discussed. We characterize the residual energy and heating rates of all of the secular modes of motion and estimate a secular motion time-dilation shift of -(1.9±0.1)×10^{-18} for an ^{27}Al^{+} clock at a typical clock probe duration of 150 ms. This is a 50-fold reduction in the secular motion time-dilation shift uncertainty in comparison with previous ^{27}Al^{+} clocks.

  19. Solid electrolytes for use in lead-bismuth eutectic cooled nuclear reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariën, A.; Lim, J.; Rosseel, K.; Vandermeulen, W.; Van den Bosch, J.

    2012-08-01

    The operating temperature of electrochemical oxygen sensors can likely be lowered by reducing the solid electrolyte resistance. Most often, these sensors use yttria partially stabilized zirconia (e.g. (Y2O3)0.05(ZrO2)0.95, (5-YSZ)) as solid electrolyte. In this paper, we discuss the use of better conducting ceramics than yttria partially stabilized zirconia, as solid electrolytes for oxygen sensors that can be applied in lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) cooled nuclear reactors. Two stabilized zirconia ceramics ((Y2O3)0.08(ZrO2)0.92, (8-YSZ); (Sc2O3)0.1(CeO2)0.01(ZrO2)0.89) are investigated as well as a hypostoichiometric perovskite-type La0.8Sr0.2Ga0.8Mg0.2O3-δ. The results of microstructural analyses, thermochemical stability tests in LBE (at 360 °C), as well as mechanical tests and four-probe d.c. conductivity measurements (at 300-800 °C) are discussed and compared with the results that were obtained for a commercially available 5-YSZ (Friatec AG, Germany). Of the three studied ceramics, 8-YSZ was identified as the most promising solid electrolyte to reduce the operating temperature of electrochemical oxygen sensors. http://www.friatec.de/content/friatec/en/Ceramics/FRIALIT-DEGUSSIT-Oxide-Ceramics/downloads/Materials.pdf (this URL was last accessed on February 7th, 2012).

  20. Cooled semen for fixed-time artificial insemination in beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Borges-Silva, Juliana C; Silva, Márcio R; Marinho, Daniel B; Nogueira, Eriklis; Sampaio, Deiler C; Oliveira, Luiz Orcírio F; Abreu, Urbano G P; Mourão, Gerson B; Sartori, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluated the use of cooled semen in a fixed-time artificial insemination (FTAI) program compared with frozen-thawed semen to improve pregnancy rates in beef cattle. Ejaculates of three bulls were collected and divided into two treatments: (1) frozen-thawed semen and (2) cooled semen. Egg-yolk extender without glycerol was used for the cooled semen treatment. Straws (25×10(6) spermatozoa) were submitted to cooling for preservation at 5°C for 24h, after which FTAI was performed. Nelore cows (n=838) submitted to FTAI were randomly inseminated using frozen-thawed semen or cooled semen. There was a 20% increase in the pregnancy per AI (P AI(-1)) using cooled semen compared with frozen-thawed semen (59.9±4.7 vs 49.4±5.0%; P<0.005). There was no difference in P AI(-1) among the bulls (P=0.40). The frozen-thawed semen had fewer functional spermatozoa than did the cooled semen when evaluated by sperm motility (61.7 vs 81.0%), slow thermoresistance test (41.7 vs 66.7%) and hypoosmotic swelling test (38.3 vs 53.7%; P<0.05). The percentage of sperm abnormalities did not differ between the freeze-thawing and cooling processes (18.6 vs 22.1%; P>0.05). Because there was less damage to spermatozoa and improvement in P AI(-1), the use of cooled semen instead of frozen-thawed semen is an interesting approach to increase reproductive efficiency in cattle submitted to a FTAI protocol.

  1. Detailed Reaction Kinetics for CFD Modeling of Nuclear Fuel Pellet Coating for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, Francine

    2008-11-29

    The research project was related to the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative and was in direct alignment with advancing knowledge in the area of Nuclear Fuel Development related to the use of TRISO fuels for high-temperature reactors. The importance of properly coating nuclear fuel pellets received a renewed interest for the safe production of nuclear power to help meet the energy requirements of the United States. High-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors use fuel in the form of coated uranium particles, and it is the coating process that was of importance to this project. The coating process requires four coating layers to retain radioactive fission products from escaping into the environment. The first layer consists of porous carbon and serves as a buffer layer to attenuate the fission and accommodate the fuel kernel swelling. The second (inner) layer is of pyrocarbon and provides protection from fission products and supports the third layer, which is silicon carbide. The final (outer) layer is also pyrocarbon and provides a bonding surface and protective barrier for the entire pellet. The coating procedures for the silicon carbide and the outer pyrocarbon layers require knowledge of the detailed kinetics of the reaction processes in the gas phase and at the surfaces where the particles interact with the reactor walls. The intent of this project was to acquire detailed information on the reaction kinetics for the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of carbon and silicon carbine on uranium fuel pellets, including the location of transition state structures, evaluation of the associated activation energies, and the use of these activation energies in the prediction of reaction rate constants. After the detailed reaction kinetics were determined, the reactions were implemented and tested in a computational fluid dynamics model, MFIX. The intention was to find a reduced mechanism set to reduce the computational time for a simulation, while still providing accurate results

  2. A Cool Business: Trapping Intermediates on the submillisecond time scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Syun-Ru

    2004-03-01

    The freeze-quenching technique is extremely useful for trapping meta-stable intermediates populated during fast chemical or biochemical reactions. The application of this technique, however, is limited by the long mixing time of conventional solution mixers and the slow freezing time of cryogenic fluids. To overcome these problems, we have designed and tested a novel microfluidic silicon mixer equipped with a new freeze-quenching device, with which reactions can be followed down to 50 microseconds. In the microfluidic silicon mixer, seven vertical pillars with 10 micrometer diameter are arranged perpendicular to the flow direction and in a staggered fashion in the 450 picoliter mixing chamber to enhance turbulent mixing. The mixed solution jet, with a cross-section of 10 micrometer by 100 micrometer, exits from the microfluidic silicon mixer with a linear flow velocity of 20 m/sec. It instantaneously freezes on one of two rotating copper wheels maintained at 77 K and is subsequently ground into an ultra-fine powder. The ultra-fine frozen powder exhibits excellent spectral quality, high packing factor and can be readily transferred between spectroscopic observation cells. The microfluidic mixer was tested by the reaction between azide and myoglobin at pH 5.0. It was found that complete mixing was achieved within the mixing dead-time of the mixer (20 microseconds) and the first observable point for this coupled device was determined to be 50 microseconds, which is approximately two orders of magnitude faster than commercially available instruments. Several new applications of this device in ultra-fast biological reactions will be presented. Acknowledgements: This work is done in collaboration with Dr. Denis Rousseau and is supported by the NIH Grants HL65465 to S.-R.Y. and GM67814 to D.L.R.

  3. Time resolved cryogenic cooling analysis of the Cornell Injector Cryomodule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhorn, R.; Markham, S.; Smith, E.; Quigley, P.

    2015-12-01

    Managing parallel cryogenic flows has become a key challenge in designing efficient and smart cryo-modules for particle accelerators. In analysing the heating dynamics of the Cornell high current injector module a computational tool has been set-up allowing time resolved analysis and optimization. We describe the computational methods and data sets we have used, report the results and compare them to measured data from the module being in good agreement. Mitigation strategies developed on basis of this model have helped us in pushing the operational limitations.

  4. A new universal formula for efficiency: sensitivity to cooling conditions of nuclear and conventional power stations

    SciTech Connect

    Haidar, N.H.

    1984-10-01

    A new approximate formula is derived for the sensitivity of the net efficiency of fissile- and fossil-fueled condensing power stations to incremental variations in the design temperature of the cooling water or air. It is universal for the three basic modes (open circuit, wet tower, and dry tower) of turbine condenser cooling and incorporates nearly all of the decisive design parameters involved.

  5. Time resolved spectroscopy of the cool Ap star HD 213637*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkin, V. G.; Kurtz, D. W.; Mathys, G.

    2015-02-01

    We present an analysis of high time resolution spectra of the chemically peculiar Ap star HD 213637. The star shows rapid radial velocity variations with a period close to the photometric pulsation period. Radial velocity pulsation amplitudes vary significantly for different rare earth elements. The highest pulsation amplitudes belong to lines of Tb III (˜360 m s-1), Pr II (˜250 m s-1) and Pr III (˜230 m s-1). We did not detect any pulsations from spectral lines of Eu II and in Hα, in contrast to many other roAp stars. We also did not find radial velocity pulsations using spectral lines of other chemical elements, including Mg, Si, Ca, Sc, Cr, Fe, Ni, Y and Ba. There are phase shifts between the maxima of pulsation amplitudes of different rare earth elements and ions, which is evidence of an outwardly running magneto-acoustic wave propagating through the upper stellar atmosphere.

  6. RADIATION DOSE ASSESSMENT FOR THE BIOTA OF TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS IN THE SHORELINE ZONE OF THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COOLING POND

    SciTech Connect

    Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

    2011-10-01

    Radiation exposure of the biota in the shoreline area of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond was assessed to evaluate radiological consequences from the decommissioning of the Cooling Pond. The article addresses studies of radioactive contamination of the terrestrial faunal complex and radionuclide concentration ratios in bodies of small birds, small mammals, amphibians, and reptiles living in the area. The data were used to calculate doses to biota using the ERICA Tool software. Doses from {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs were calculated using the default parameters of the ERICA Tool and were shown to be consistent with biota doses calculated from the field data. However, the ERICA dose calculations for plutonium isotopes were much higher (2-5 times for small mammals and 10-14 times for birds) than the doses calculated using the experimental data. Currently, the total doses for the terrestrial biota do not exceed maximum recommended levels. However, if the Cooling Pond is allowed to drawdown naturally and the contaminants of the bottom sediments are exposed and enter the biological cycle, the calculated doses to biota may exceed the maximum recommended values. The study is important in establishing the current exposure conditions such that a baseline exists from which changes can be documented following the lowering of the reservoir water. Additionally, the study provided useful radioecological data on biota concentration ratios for some species that are poorly represented in the literature.

  7. Radiation dose assessment for the biota of terrestrial ecosystems in the shoreline zone of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant cooling pond.

    PubMed

    Oskolkov, Boris Ya; Bondarkov, Mikhail D; Gaschak, Sergey P; Maksimenko, Andrey M; Hinton, Thomas G; Coughlin, Daniel; Jannik, G Timothy; Farfán, Eduardo B

    2011-10-01

    Radiation exposure of the biota in the shoreline area of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond was assessed to evaluate radiological consequences from the decommissioning of the Cooling Pond. This paper addresses studies of radioactive contamination of the terrestrial faunal complex and radionuclide concentration ratios in bodies of small birds, small mammals, amphibians, and reptiles living in the area. The data were used to calculate doses to biota using the ERICA Tool software. Doses from 90Sr and 137Cs were calculated using the default parameters of the ERICA Tool and were shown to be consistent with biota doses calculated from the field data. However, the ERICA dose calculations for plutonium isotopes were much higher (2-5 times for small mammals and 10-14 times for birds) than the doses calculated using the experimental data. Currently, the total doses for the terrestrial biota do not exceed maximum recommended levels. However, if the Cooling Pond is allowed to draw down naturally and the contaminants of the bottom sediments are exposed and enter the biological cycle, the calculated doses to biota may exceed the maximum recommended values. The study is important in establishing the current exposure conditions such that a baseline exists from which changes can be documented following the lowering of the reservoir water. Additionally, the study provided useful radioecological data on biota concentration ratios for some species that are poorly represented in the literature.

  8. THE VALUE OF HELIUM-COOLED REACTOR TECHNOLOGIES OF NUCLEAR WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    C. RODRIGUEZ; A. BAXTER

    2001-03-01

    Helium-cooled reactor technologies offer significant advantages in accomplishing the waste transmutation process. They are ideally suited for use with thermal, epithermal, or fast neutron energy spectra. They can provide a relatively hard thermal neutron spectrum for transmutation of fissionable materials such as Pu-239 using ceramic-coated transmutation fuel particles, a graphite moderator, and a non-fertile burnable poison. These features (1) allow deep levels of transmutation with minimal or no intermediate reprocessing, (2) enhance passive decay heat removal via heat conduction and radiation, (3) allow operation at relatively high temperatures for a highly efficient generation of electricity, and (4) discharge the transmuted waste in a form that is highly resistant to corrosion for long times. They also offer the possibility for the use of epithermal neutrons that can interact with transmutable materials more effectively because of the large atomic cross sections in this energy domain. A fast spectrum may be useful for deep burnup of certain minor actinides. For this application, helium is essentially transparent to neutrons, does not degrade neutron energies, and offers the hardest possible neutron energy environment. In this paper, we report results from recent work on materials transmutation balances, safety, value to a geological repository, and economic considerations.

  9. Phytoplankton in the cooling pond of a nuclear fuel plant. Spectral Analysis (Report 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Tokarskaya, Z.B.; Smagin, A.I.; Ryzhkov, E.G.

    1995-07-01

    Dynamics of average monthly indices for 3 classes of phytoplankton and for 24 hydrochemical 7 meteorological, and 3 radiative factors were investigated over a period of 26 years in the cooling pond of the Mayak Production Association in Kyzyl-Tash Lake. The parameters were statistically treated by procedures of time series analysis. A seasonal succession of examined features is described. It is established that development of the diatoms peaks in February, and that of the green and the blue-green algae peaks in June and August, respectively. Seasonal growth of the blue-green algae is substantially influence by water temperature, Mn{sup 2+}, O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and solar radiation; that of the green algae is effected by water temperature, solar radiation, CO{sup 2}, Mn{sup 2+}, and cloudiness; that of the diatoms is controlled by SiO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, K{sup +} + Na{sup +}, CO{sub 2}, and water temperature. 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Small quantum absorption refrigerator in the transient regime: Time scales, enhanced cooling, and entanglement.

    PubMed

    Brask, Jonatan Bohr; Brunner, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    A small quantum absorption refrigerator, consisting of three qubits, is discussed in the transient regime. We discuss time scales for coherent dynamics, damping, and approach to the steady state, and we study cooling and entanglement. We observe that cooling can be enhanced in the transient regime, in the sense that lower temperatures can be achieved compared to the steady-state regime. This is a consequence of coherent dynamics but can occur even when this dynamics is strongly damped by the dissipative thermal environment, and we note that precise control over couplings or timing is not needed to achieve enhanced cooling. We also show that the amount of entanglement present in the refrigerator can be much larger in the transient regime compared to the steady state. These results are of relevance to future implementations of quantum thermal machines.

  11. Lack of demonstratable effects of pollutants on cyt b sequences in wood ducks from a contaminated nuclear reactor cooling pond.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K P; Stout, J; Brisbin, I L; Zink, R M; Burger, J

    1999-08-01

    The effects of low levels of radiation on DNA mutation rates are largely unknown for free-living vertebrates. In this study we investigated the effects of contamination from cooling ponds at a nuclear production facility in South Carolina on the mutation rates in mitochondrial DNA in wood ducks (Aix sponsa). Specifically, we sequenced a 433-bp portion of the cytochrome b gene from 18 female-offspring pairs of wood ducks from contaminated ponds and 2 female-offspring pairs from control ponds. Very low haplotype diversity was observed overall, and no case of mutation between female and offspring could be satisfactorily documented. This suggests that the levels of radioactive contamination in these cooling ponds have little effect on the mutation rate of mitochondrial DNA in these waterfowl and that mitochondrial DNA may not be as sensitive an indicator as previously anticipated. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  12. Effects of processing parameters on immersion vacuum cooling time and physico-chemical properties of pork hams.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chao-Hui; Drummond, Liana; Zhang, Zhi-Hang; Sun, Da-Wen

    2013-10-01

    The effects of agitation (1002 rpm), different pressure reduction rates (60 and 100 mbar/min), as well as employing cold water with different initial temperatures (IWT: 7 and 20°C) on immersion vacuum cooling (IVC) of cooked pork hams were experimentally investigated. Final pork ham core temperature, cooling time, cooling loss, texture properties, colour and chemical composition were evaluated. The application for the first time of agitation during IVC substantially reduced the cooling time (47.39%) to 4.6°C, compared to IVC without agitation. For the different pressure drop rates, there was a trend that shorter IVC cooling times were achieved with lower cooling rate, although results were not statistically significant (P>0.05). For both IWTs tested, the same trend was observed: shorter cooling time and lower cooling loss were obtained under lower linear pressure drop rate of 60 mbar/min (not statistically significant, P>0.05). Compared to the reference cooling method (air blast cooling), IVC achieved higher cooling rates and better meat quality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Thermal and dynamic analysis of the RING (Radiatively-cooled, Inertially-driven Nuclear Generator) power system radiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apley, Walter J.; Babb, Albert L.

    1989-01-01

    The nuclear option for a space-based power system appears most suitable for missions that require long-term, sustained operation at power levels above 100 kWe. Systems currently available operate at relatively low thermal efficiencies (6 to 10 percent). Thus, a 100 kWe system must discharge nearly 2 MWth of waste heat through the comparatively inefficient process of radiative cooling. The impact of the resultant radiator assembly size on overall power system weight is significant, and has led to proposals for radiators with potentially higher efficiencies. Examples include the liquid droplet radiator, fabric radiator, bubble membrane radiator, rotating film radiator, and dust radiator.

  14. Study on neutronic of very small Pb - Bi cooled no-onsite refueling nuclear power reactor (VSPINNOR)

    SciTech Connect

    Arianto, Fajar; Su'ud, Zaki; Zuhair

    2014-09-30

    A conceptual design study on Very Small Pb-Bi No-Onsite Refueling Cooled Nuclear Reactor (VSPINNOR) with Uranium nitride fuel using MCNPX program has been performed. In this design the reactor core is divided into three regions with different enrichment. At the center of the core is laid fuel without enrichment (internal blanket). While for the outer region using fuel enrichment variations. VSPINNOR fast reactor was operated for 10 years without refueling. Neutronic analysis shows optimized result of VSPINNOR has a core of 50 cm radius and 100 cm height with 300 MWth thermal power output at 60% fuel fraction that can be operated 18 years without refueling or fuel shuffling.

  15. Practical neck cooling and time-trial running performance in a hot environment.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Christopher James; Wild, Perry; Sunderland, Caroline

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this two-part experiment was to investigate the effect of cooling the neck on time-trial performance in hot conditions (~30°C; 50% RH). In Study A, nine participants completed a 75-min submaximal (~60% V(O₂(max)) pre-load phase followed by a 15-min self-paced time-trial (TT) on three occasions: one with a cooling collar (CC(90)), one without a collar (NC(90)) and one with the collar uncooled (C(90)). In Study B, eight participants completed a 15-min TT twice: once with (CC(15)) and once without (NC(15)) a cooling collar. Time-trial performance was significantly improved in Study A in CC(90) (3,030 ± 485 m) compared to C(90) (2,741 ± 537 m; P = 0.008) and NC(90) (2,884 ± 571 m; P = 0.041). Fifteen-minute TT performance was unaffected by the collar in Study B (CC(15) = 3,239 ± 267 m; NC(15) = 3,180 ± 271 m; P = 0.351). The collar had no effect on rectal temperature, heart rate or RPE. There was no effect of cooling the neck on S100β, cortisol, prolactin, adrenaline, noradrenaline or dopamine concentrations in Study A. Cooling the neck via a cooling collar can improve exercise performance in a hot environment but it appears that there may be a thermal strain threshold which must be breached to gain a performance benefit from the collar.

  16. Nuclear Energy: It is Time to Revitalize the Peaceful Atom

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-16

    meeting their ever-increasing demand for energy, the U.S. has fallen behind.2 The time has come for a nuclear renaissance in the United States. U.S...the renaissance of nuclear power in the U.S. since it provides several key financial incentives in the form of loan guarantees and tax credits.13...weeks prior to the accident at TMI, coincidently, The China Syndrome was released in the theatre creating fears of a severe reactor accident that

  17. Heating, cooling, and uplift during Tertiary time, northern Sangre de Cristo Range, Colorado ( USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindsay, D.A.; Andriessen, P.A.M.; Wardlaw, B.R.

    1986-01-01

    Paleozoic sedimentary rocks in a wide area of the northern Sangre de Cristo Range show effects of heating during Tertiary time. Heating is tentatively interpreted as a response to burial during Laramide folding and thrusting and also to high heat flow during Rio Grande rifting. Fission-track ages of apatite across a section of the range show that rocks cooled abruptly below 120oC, the blocking temperature for apatite, approx 19 Ma ago. Cooling was probably in response to rapid uplift and erosion of the northern Sangre de Cristo Range during early Rio Grande rifting.-from Authors

  18. Cooling a charged mechanical resonator with time-dependent bias gate voltages.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Qi; Li, Yong; Feng, Mang

    2013-04-10

    We show a purely electronic cooling scheme to cool a charged mechanical resonator (MR) down to nearly the vibrational ground state by elaborately tuning bias gate voltages on the electrodes, which couple the MR by the Coulomb interaction. The key step is the modification of the time-dependent effective eigen-frequency of the MR based on the Lewis-Riesenfeld invariant. With respect to a relevant idea proposed previously (Li et al 2011 Phys. Rev. A 83 043803), our scheme is simpler, more practical and completely within the reach of current technology.

  19. Timing system for firing widely spaced test nuclear detonations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Ralph E.

    1992-01-01

    The national weapons design laboratories (Los Alamos National Laboratory and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) test fire nuclear devices at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is spread over an area of over 1200 square miles. On each test there are hundreds of high time resolution recordings made of nuclear output waveforms and other phenomena. In order to synchronize these recordings with each other, with the nuclear device, and with offsite recordings, there is a requirement that the permanent command center and the outlying temporary firing sites be time tied to each other and to UTC to permit firing the shot at a predetermined time with an accuracy of about a microsecond. Various aspects of the test setup and timing system are discussed.

  20. Geomagnetic superchrons and time variations in the cooling rate of the core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, P.

    2015-12-01

    Polarity reversal systematics from numerical dynamos are used to explore the relationship between geomagnetic reversal frequency, including geomagnetic superchrons, and time variations in the rate of the cooling of the core. We develop a parameterization of the average reversal frequency from numerical dynamos in terms of the core heat flux normalized by the difference between the present-day core heat flux and the core heat flux at geomagnetic superchron onset. A low-order polynomial fit of this parameterization to the 0-300 Ma Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale (GPTS) reveals that a decrease in core heat flux relative to present-day of approximately 30% can account for the Cretaceous Normal Polarity and Kiaman Reversed Polarity Superchrons, whereas the hyper-reversing periods in the Jurassic GPTS imply a core heat flux approximately 20% higher than at present-day. Low heat flux and slow cooling of the core inferred during the Kiaman Reversed Polarity Superchron is qualitatively consistent with predictions from mantle global circulation models (mantle GCMs) that show a reduction in mantle convective activity during the time of Pangea, whereas these same mantle GCMs and most plate motion reconstructions predict fast core cooling during the Cretaceous Normal Polarity Superchron, suggesting that the cooling rate of the core is not generally in phase with variations in plate motions.

  1. Tolerance of brown bear spermatozoa to conditions of pre-freezing cooling rate and equilibration time.

    PubMed

    López-Urueña, E; Alvarez, M; Gomes-Alves, S; Martínez-Rodríguez, C; Borragan, S; Anel-López, L; de Paz, P; Anel, L

    2014-06-01

    Specific protocols for the cryopreservation of endangered Cantabrian brown bear spermatozoa are critical to create a genetic resource bank. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of cooling rates and equilibration time before freezing on post-thawed brown bear spermatozoa quality. Electroejaculates from 11 mature bears were extended to 100 × 10(6) spermatozoa/mL in a TES-Tris-Fructose-based extender, cryopreserved following performance of the respective cooling/equilibration protocol each sample was assigned to, and stored at -196 °C for further assessment. Before freezing, after thawing, and after 1 hour's incubation post-thawing at 37 °C (thermal stress test), the quality of the samples was assessed for motility by computer-assisted semen analysis, and for viability (SYBR-14/propidium iodide), acrosomal status (peanut agglutinin-fluorescein isothiocyanate /propidium iodide), and sperm chromatin stability (SCSA) by flow cytometry. In experiment 1, three cooling rates (0.25 °C/min, 1 °C/min, and 4 °C/min) to 5 °C were assessed. After thawing, total motility (%TM) was higher and percentage of damaged acrosomes (%dACR) was lower (P < 0.05) for 0.25 °C/min than for 4 °C/min. The thermal stress test data indicated equally poor quality (P < 0.05) for the 4 °C/min cooled samples in viability (%VIAB), %dACR, %TM, and progressive motility (%PM). In experiment 2, the effect of a pre-freezing equilibration period at 5 °C for 1 hour (cooling at 0.25 °C/min) was evaluated. Samples kept at 5 °C for 1 hour showed higher (P < 0.05) values than the nonequilibrated ones for both thawing (%dACR) and thermal stress test (%VIAB, %TM, and %PM). In experiment 3, samples stored without cooling and equilibration (direct freezing) were compared with the samples cooled at 0.25 °C/min and equilibrated for 1 hour (control freezing). Using thermal stress test, we observed that direct freezing causes damage in viability, acrosomal status, and motility of spermatozoa

  2. Thermal impact of waste emplacement and surface cooling associated with geologic disposal of nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.S.Y.; Mangold, D.C.; Spencer, R.K.; Tsang, C.F.

    1982-08-01

    The thermal effects associated with the emplacement of aged radioactive wastes in a geologic repository were studied, with emphasis on the following subjects: the waste characteristics, repository structure, and rock properties controlling the thermally induced effects; the current knowledge of the thermal, thermomechanical, and thermohydrologic impacts, determined mainly on the basis of previous studies that assume 10-year-old wastes; the thermal criteria used to determine the repository waste loading densities; and the technical advantages and disadvantages of surface cooling of the wastes prior to disposal as a means of mitigating the thermal impacts. The waste loading densities determined by repository designs for 10-year-old wastes are extended to older wastes using the near-field thermomechanical criteria based on room stability considerations. Also discussed are the effects of long surface cooling periods determined on the basis of far-field thermomechanical and thermohydrologic considerations. The extension of the surface cooling period from 10 years to longer periods can lower the near-field thermal impact but have only modest long-term effects for spent fuel. More significant long-term effects can be achieved by surface cooling of reprocessed high-level waste.

  3. Phytoplankton in the cooling pond of a nuclear fuel plant. II. Spectral analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tokarskaya, Z.B.; Smagin, A.I.; Ryzhkov, E.G.; Nikitina, L.V.

    1995-09-01

    This study continues investigations into the development dynamics of phytoplankton and hydrochemical and meteorological factors over a periods of 26 years in the cooling pond of the Mayak Production Association in the Kyzyl-Trash Lake. The aim is to evaluate the long-term oscillations in phytoplankton owing to changes in hydrochemical and meteorological factors. 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Examining the role of canister cooling conditions on the formation of nepheline from nuclear waste glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, J. H.

    2015-09-01

    Nepheline (NaAlSiO₄) crystals can form during slow cooling of high-level waste (HLW) glass after it has been poured into a waste canister. Formation of these crystals can adversely affect the chemical durability of the glass. The tendency for nepheline crystallization to form in a HLW glass increases with increasing concentrations of Al₂O₃ and Na₂O.

  5. Multiple regimes of carrier cooling in photoexcited graphene probed by time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenzel, A. J.; Gabor, N. M.; Herring, P. K.; Fang, W.; Kong, J.; Jarillo-Herrero, P.; Gedik, N.

    2013-03-01

    Energy relaxation and cooling of photoexcited charge carriers in graphene has recently attracted significant attention due to possible hot carrier effects, large quantum efficiencies, and photovoltaic applications. However, the details of these processes remain poorly understood, with many conflicting interpretations reported. Here we use time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy to explore multiple relaxation and cooling regimes in graphene in order to elucidate the fundamental physical processes which occur upon photoexcitation of charge carriers. We observe a novel negative terahertz photoconductivity that results from the unique linear dispersion and allows us to measure the electron temperature with ultrafast time resolution. Additionally, we present measurements of the relaxation dynamics over a wide range of excitation fluence. By varying the pump photon energy, we demonstrate that cooling dynamics of photoexcited carriers depend on the amount of energy deposited in the graphene system by the pump pulse, not the number of absorbed photons. The data suggest that fundamentally different regimes are encountered for different excitation fluences. These results may provide a unifying framework for reconciling various measurements of energy relaxation and cooling in graphene.

  6. Methodology for estimation of time-dependent surface heat flux due to cryogen spray cooling.

    PubMed

    Tunnell, James W; Torres, Jorge H; Anvari, Bahman

    2002-01-01

    Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) is an effective technique to protect the epidermis during cutaneous laser therapies. Spraying a cryogen onto the skin surface creates a time-varying heat flux, effectively cooling the skin during and following the cryogen spurt. In previous studies mathematical models were developed to predict the human skin temperature profiles during the cryogen spraying time. However, no studies have accounted for the additional cooling due to residual cryogen left on the skin surface following the spurt termination. We formulate and solve an inverse heat conduction (IHC) problem to predict the time-varying surface heat flux both during and following a cryogen spurt. The IHC formulation uses measured temperature profiles from within a medium to estimate the surface heat flux. We implement a one-dimensional sequential function specification method (SFSM) to estimate the surface heat flux from internal temperatures measured within an in vitro model in response to a cryogen spurt. Solution accuracy and experimental errors are examined using simulated temperature data. Heat flux following spurt termination appears substantial; however, it is less than that during the spraying time. The estimated time-varying heat flux can subsequently be used in forward heat conduction models to estimate temperature profiles in skin during and following a cryogen spurt and predict appropriate timing for onset of the laser pulse.

  7. A study of cooling time reduction of interferometric cryogenic gravitational wave detectors using a high-emissivity coating

    SciTech Connect

    Sakakibara, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Chen, D.; Tokoku, C.; Uchiyama, T.; Ohashi, M.; Kuroda, K.; Kimura, N.; Suzuki, T.; Koike, S.

    2014-01-29

    In interferometric cryogenic gravitational wave detectors, there are plans to cool mirrors and their suspension systems (payloads) in order to reduce thermal noise, that is, one of the fundamental noise sources. Because of the large payload masses (several hundred kg in total) and their thermal isolation, a cooling time of several months is required. Our calculation shows that a high-emissivity coating (e.g. a diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating) can reduce the cooling time effectively by enhancing radiation heat transfer. Here, we have experimentally verified the effect of the DLC coating on the reduction of the cooling time.

  8. Cook/chill foodservice systems. Predicting cooling time of a ground beef entrée chilled in bulk.

    PubMed

    Rollin, J L; Matthews, M E; Lung, D B

    1979-10-01

    Mathematical formulas which incorporate thermal properties of the food, geometry of the food mass, and process conditions during cooling were used to predict the time required for a cooked ground beef product chilled in bulk to cool to 45 degrees F. (7 degrees C.). Formulas predicted cooling time within 36 min. (11 per cent) of the actual cooling time. For widespread application, additional information on thermal properties of entrée products of the type served in foodservice operations needs to be obtained.

  9. Cationic surfactants for control of fresh- and saltwater mollusks in nuclear cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.M.; Mallen, E.; Lehmann, F.

    1991-11-01

    One result of the release of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Generic Letter 89-13, Service Water Problems Affecting Safety-Related Equipment, was the heightened awareness of the nuclear industry to the problems of macrofouling in heat exchange systems. The principal mollusk species that contribute to freshwater macrofouling problems are Asiatic Clam (southern United States) and Zebra Mussel (Great Lakes). The predominant saltwater fouling mollusks are the Blue Mussel (Pacific, northern Atlantic), Ribbed Mussel (southern Atlantic, Gulf Coast), and American Oyster (Atlantic, Gulf Coast). The nuclear community's awareness of macrofouling problems and the ineffectiveness of intermittent chlorination programs have led to the development of several chemical control technologies for eliminating macrofouling organism infestation. One technology that has proven effective for the control of macrofouling organisms is the periodic addition of a combination of two cationic charged surfactants, specifically, alkyldimethylbenzylammonium chloride (QUAT) and dodecyl guanidine hydrochloride (DGH). Experience with the cationic surfactants at several nuclear power plants is reported.

  10. Modeling Thermospheric Energetics: Implications of Cooling Rate Measurements by TIMED/SABER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, S. C.; Qian, L.; Mlynczak, M. G.

    2012-12-01

    Infrared radiation from the lower thermosphere has a significant effect on thermospheric temperature throughout its altitude range. Energy deposited in the upper thermosphere is conducted downward to altitudes where collisional processes with heterogeneous molecules are effective in exciting radiative transitions. Thus, exospheric temperature is strongly influenced by the infrared cooling rates. Measurements from the SABER instrument on the TIMED satellite have provided the global distribution and temporal variation of the two most important cooling rates, from the 15-micron band of carbon dioxide, and the 5.3-micron band of nitric oxide, both excited in the thermosphere primarily by collisions with atomic oxygen [e.g., Mlynczak et al., JGR, 2010]. Because these measurements are of the cooling rate itself, they are nearly independent of assumptions concerning carbon dioxide or nitric oxide density, atomic oxygen density, temperature, and rate coefficients, and so provide strong constraints on global models. Simulations using the NCAR Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIME-GCM) have obtained reasonable agreement with global nitric oxide cooling rates, on daily and solar-cycle time scales alike [c.f., Qian et al., JGR, 2010; Solomon et al., JGR, 2012]. This may be somewhat surprising, or serendipitous, considering the complexity of the production and chemistry of thermospheric nitric oxide, but is a hopeful indication of the model's ability to describe thermospheric temperature structure and variability. However, initial model simulations of 15-micron carbon dioxide emission have been significantly lower than the SABER measurements. This indicates that there may be issues with the carbon dioxide densities, with the atomic oxygen density, or with the rate coefficient for their interaction. Simply increasing any of these to bring the cooling rate into agreement with SABER measurements will have the additional effect of

  11. A gas-cooled-reactor closed-Brayton-cycle demonstration with nuclear heating.

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, Joshua J.; Jablonski, Jennifer A.; Wright, Steven Alan; Dorsey, Daniel John; Brown, Nicholas; Peters, Curtis D.; Lipinski, Ronald J.

    2004-09-01

    A gas-cooled reactor may be coupled directly to turbomachinery to form a closed-Brayton-cycle (CBC) system in which the CBC working fluid serves as the reactor coolant. Such a system has the potential to be a very simple and robust space-reactor power system. Gas-cooled reactors have been built and operated in the past, but very few have been coupled directly to the turbomachinery in this fashion. In this paper we describe the option for testing such a system with a small reactor and turbomachinery at Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia currently operates the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at steady-state powers up to 4 MW and has an adjacent facility with heavy shielding in which another reactor recently operated. Sandia also has a closed-Brayton-Cycle test bed with a converted commercial turbomachinery unit that is rated for up to 30 kWe of power. It is proposed to construct a small experimental gas-cooled reactor core and attach this via ducting to the CBC turbomachinery for cooling and electricity production. Calculations suggest that such a unit could produce about 20 kWe, which would be a good power level for initial surface power units on the Moon or Mars. The intent of this experiment is to demonstrate the stable start-up and operation of such a system. Of particular interest is the effect of a negative temperature power coefficient as the initially cold Brayton gas passes through the core during startup or power changes. Sandia's dynamic model for such a system would be compared with the performance data. This paper describes the neutronics, heat transfer, and cycle dynamics of this proposed system. Safety and radiation issues are presented. The views expressed in this document are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect agreement by the government.

  12. A Gas-Cooled-Reactor Closed-Brayton-Cycle Demonstration with Nuclear Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, Ronald J.; Wright, Steven A.; Dorsey, Daniel J.; Williamson, Joshua; Peters, Curtis D.; Brown, Nicholas; Jablonski, Jennifer

    2005-02-06

    A gas-cooled reactor may be coupled directly to turbomachinery to form a closed-Brayton-cycle (CBC) system in which the CBC working fluid serves as the reactor coolant. Such a system has the potential to be a very simple and robust space-reactor power system. Gas-cooled reactors have been built and operated in the past, but very few have been coupled directly to the turbomachinery in this fashion. In this paper we describe the option for testing such a system with a small reactor and turbomachinery at Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia currently operates the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at steady-state powers up to 4 MW and has an adjacent facility with heavy shielding in which another reactor recently operated. Sandia also has a closed-Brayton-Cycle test bed with a converted commercial turbomachinery unit that is rated for up to 30 kWe of power. It is proposed to construct a small experimental gas-cooled reactor core and attach this via ducting to the CBC turbomachinery for cooling and electricity production. Calculations suggest that such a unit could produce about 20 kWe, which would be a good power level for initial surface power units on the Moon or Mars. The intent of this experiment is to demonstrate the stable start-up and operation of such a system. Of particular interest is the effect of a negative temperature power coefficient as the initially cold Brayton gas passes through the core during startup or power changes. Sandia's dynamic model for such a system would be compared with the performance data. This paper describes the neutronics, heat transfer, and cycle dynamics of this proposed system. Safety and radiation issues are presented. The views expressed in this document are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect agreement by the government.

  13. A Gas-Cooled-Reactor Closed-Brayton-Cycle Demonstration with Nuclear Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipinski, Ronald J.; Wright, Steven A.; Dorsey, Daniel J.; Peters, Curtis D.; Brown, Nicholas; Williamson, Joshua; Jablonski, Jennifer

    2005-02-01

    A gas-cooled reactor may be coupled directly to turbomachinery to form a closed-Brayton-cycle (CBC) system in which the CBC working fluid serves as the reactor coolant. Such a system has the potential to be a very simple and robust space-reactor power system. Gas-cooled reactors have been built and operated in the past, but very few have been coupled directly to the turbomachinery in this fashion. In this paper we describe the option for testing such a system with a small reactor and turbomachinery at Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia currently operates the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at steady-state powers up to 4 MW and has an adjacent facility with heavy shielding in which another reactor recently operated. Sandia also has a closed-Brayton-Cycle test bed with a converted commercial turbomachinery unit that is rated for up to 30 kWe of power. It is proposed to construct a small experimental gas-cooled reactor core and attach this via ducting to the CBC turbomachinery for cooling and electricity production. Calculations suggest that such a unit could produce about 20 kWe, which would be a good power level for initial surface power units on the Moon or Mars. The intent of this experiment is to demonstrate the stable start-up and operation of such a system. Of particular interest is the effect of a negative temperature power coefficient as the initially cold Brayton gas passes through the core during startup or power changes. Sandia's dynamic model for such a system would be compared with the performance data. This paper describes the neutronics, heat transfer, and cycle dynamics of this proposed system. Safety and radiation issues are presented. The views expressed in this document are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect agreement by the government.

  14. Mechanically Cooled Large-Volume Germanium Detector Systems for Nuclear Explosion Monitoring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    cm3, ~ 3 kg, ~ 140 %, or larger). Maintenance-free Stirling -cycle mechanical coolers are being used. These coolers have operating lifetimes...photograph of the complete RASA 1 detector system is shown in Figure 1. The detector is cooled to temperatures below 50 K when the cooler is...cryostat- cooler combination can ultimately serve as a viable detector unit for RASA detector systems . During the pursuit of the microphonic noise

  15. Mechanically Cooled Large-Volume Germanium Detector Systems for Nuclear Explosion Monitoring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    produced Stirling -cycle mechanical coolers provide the basis for this evolution. When properly instrumented, these systems can cool the very largest...as 50 K. The system is free of microphonic noise with the cooler operating at full power. The lower detector operating temperature, coupled with...570 cm3, ~ 3 kg, ~ 140 %, or larger) for field use in rugged conditions. A new generation of Stirling -cycle mechanical cooler is being used to reliably

  16. Time-dependent density-functional description of nuclear dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Matsuyanagi, Kenichi; Matsuo, Masayuki; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    2016-10-01

    The basic concepts and recent developments in the time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) for describing nuclear dynamics at low energy are presented. The symmetry breaking is inherent in nuclear energy density functionals, which provides a practical description of important correlations at the ground state. Properties of elementary modes of excitation are strongly influenced by the symmetry breaking and can be studied with TDDFT. In particular, a number of recent developments in the linear response calculation have demonstrated their usefulness in the description of collective modes of excitation in nuclei. Unrestricted real-time calculations have also become available in recent years, with new developments for quantitative description of nuclear collision phenomena. There are, however, limitations in the real-time approach; for instance, it cannot describe the many-body quantum tunneling. Thus, the quantum fluctuations associated with slow collective motions are explicitly treated assuming that time evolution of densities is determined by a few collective coordinates and momenta. The concept of collective submanifold is introduced in the phase space associated with the TDDFT and used to quantize the collective dynamics. Selected applications are presented to demonstrate the usefulness and quality of the new approaches. Finally, conceptual differences between nuclear and electronic TDDFT are discussed, with some recent applications to studies of electron dynamics in the linear response and under a strong laser field.

  17. AP1000{sup R} nuclear power plant safety overview for spent fuel cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Gorgemans, J.; Mulhollem, L.; Glavin, J.; Pfister, A.; Conway, L.; Schulz, T.; Oriani, L.; Cummins, E.; Winters, J.

    2012-07-01

    The AP1000{sup R} plant is an 1100-MWe class pressurized water reactor with passive safety features and extensive plant simplifications that enhance construction, operation, maintenance, safety and costs. The AP1000 design uses passive features to mitigate design basis accidents. The passive safety systems are designed to function without safety-grade support systems such as AC power, component cooling water, service water or HVAC. Furthermore, these passive features 'fail safe' during a non-LOCA event such that DC power and instrumentation are not required. The AP1000 also has simple, active, defense-in-depth systems to support normal plant operations. These active systems provide the first level of defense against more probable events and they provide investment protection, reduce the demands on the passive features and support the probabilistic risk assessment. The AP1000 passive safety approach allows the plant to achieve and maintain safe shutdown in case of an accident for 72 hours without operator action, meeting the expectations provided in the U.S. Utility Requirement Document and the European Utility Requirements for passive plants. Limited operator actions are required to maintain safe conditions in the spent fuel pool via passive means. In line with the AP1000 approach to safety described above, the AP1000 plant design features multiple, diverse lines of defense to ensure spent fuel cooling can be maintained for design-basis events and beyond design-basis accidents. During normal and abnormal conditions, defense-in-depth and other systems provide highly reliable spent fuel pool cooling. They rely on off-site AC power or the on-site standby diesel generators. For unlikely design basis events with an extended loss of AC power (i.e., station blackout) or loss of heat sink or both, spent fuel cooling can still be provided indefinitely: - Passive systems, requiring minimal or no operator actions, are sufficient for at least 72 hours under all possible pool

  18. Cost benefit analysis of the night-time ventilative cooling in office building

    SciTech Connect

    Seppanen, Olli; Fisk, William J.; Faulkner, David

    2003-06-01

    The indoor temperature can be controlled with different levels of accuracy depending on the building and its HVAC system. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential productivity benefits of improved temperature control, and to apply the information for a cost-benefit analyses of night-time ventilative cooling, which is a very energy efficient method of reducing indoor daytime temperatures. We analyzed the literature relating work performance with temperature, and found a general decrement in work performance when temperatures exceeded those associated with thermal neutrality. These studies included physiological modelling, performance of various tasks in laboratory experiments and measured productivity at work in real buildings. The studies indicate an average 2% decrement in work performance per degree C temperature rise, when the temperature is above 25 C. When we use this relationship to evaluate night-time ventilative cooling, the resulting benefit to cost ratio varies from 32 to 120.

  19. Study Neutronic of Small Pb-Bi Cooled Non-Refuelling Nuclear Power Plant Reactor (SPINNOR) with Hexagonal Geometry Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nur Krisna, Dwita; Su'ud, Zaki

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear reactor technology is growing rapidly, especially in developing Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). The utilization of nuclear energy in power generation systems has been progressing phase of the first generation to the fourth generation. This final project paper discusses the analysis neutronic one-cooled fast reactor type Pb-Bi, which is capable of operating up to 20 years without refueling. This reactor uses Thorium Uranium Nitride as fuel and operating on power range 100-500MWtNPPs. The method of calculation used a computer simulation program utilizing the SRAC. SPINNOR reactor is designed with the geometry of hexagonal shaped terrace that radially divided into three regions, namely the outermost regions with highest percentage of fuel, the middle regions with medium percentage of fuel, and most in the area with the lowest percentage. SPINNOR fast reactor operated for 20 years with variations in the percentage of Uranium-233 by 7%, 7.75%, and 8.5%. The neutronic calculation and analysis show that the design can be optimized in a fast reactor for thermal power output SPINNOR 300MWt with a fuel fraction 60% and variations of Uranium-233 enrichment of 7%-8.5%.

  20. Helium heater design for the helium direct cycle component test facility. [for gas-cooled nuclear reactor power plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, V. R.; Gunn, S. V.; Lee, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The paper describes a helium heater to be used to conduct non-nuclear demonstration tests of the complete power conversion loop for a direct-cycle gas-cooled nuclear reactor power plant. Requirements for the heater include: heating the helium to a 1500 F temperature, operating at a 1000 psia helium pressure, providing a thermal response capability and helium volume similar to that of the nuclear reactor, and a total heater system helium pressure drop of not more than 15 psi. The unique compact heater system design proposed consists of 18 heater modules; air preheaters, compressors, and compressor drive systems; an integral control system; piping; and auxiliary equipment. The heater modules incorporate the dual-concentric-tube 'Variflux' heat exchanger design which provides a controlled heat flux along the entire length of the tube element. The heater design as proposed will meet all system requirements. The heater uses pressurized combustion (50 psia) to provide intensive heat transfer, and to minimize furnace volume and heat storage mass.

  1. Helium heater design for the helium direct cycle component test facility. [for gas-cooled nuclear reactor power plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, V. R.; Gunn, S. V.; Lee, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The paper describes a helium heater to be used to conduct non-nuclear demonstration tests of the complete power conversion loop for a direct-cycle gas-cooled nuclear reactor power plant. Requirements for the heater include: heating the helium to a 1500 F temperature, operating at a 1000 psia helium pressure, providing a thermal response capability and helium volume similar to that of the nuclear reactor, and a total heater system helium pressure drop of not more than 15 psi. The unique compact heater system design proposed consists of 18 heater modules; air preheaters, compressors, and compressor drive systems; an integral control system; piping; and auxiliary equipment. The heater modules incorporate the dual-concentric-tube 'Variflux' heat exchanger design which provides a controlled heat flux along the entire length of the tube element. The heater design as proposed will meet all system requirements. The heater uses pressurized combustion (50 psia) to provide intensive heat transfer, and to minimize furnace volume and heat storage mass.

  2. Time-series investigation of anomalous thermocouple responses in a liquid-metal-cooled reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, K.C.; Planchon, H.P.; Poloncsik, J.

    1988-03-24

    A study was undertaken using SAS software to investigate the origin of anomalous temperature measurements recorded by thermocouples (TCs) in an instrumented fuel assembly in a liquid-metal-cooled nuclear reactor. SAS macros that implement univariate and bivariate spectral decomposition techniques were employed to analyze data recorded during a series of experiments conducted at full reactor power. For each experiment, data from physical sensors in the tests assembly were digitized at a sampling rate of 2/s and recorded on magnetic tapes for subsequent interactive processing with CMS SAS. Results from spectral and cross-correlation analyses led to the identification of a flow rate-dependent electromotive force (EMF) phenomenon as the origin of the anomalous TC readings. Knowledge of the physical mechanism responsible for the discrepant TC signals enabled us to device and justify a simple correction factor to be applied to future readings.

  3. Nuclear detector system with reduced dead-time processor circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, R.J.

    1987-01-06

    This patent describes for use in a well logging system which has a nuclear event detector forming an output signal of randomly space peaks having amplitudes within a specified range, a reduced dead-time processor circuit which comprises: (a) input means adapted to be connected with a nuclear event detector in a sonde to provide an input signal having arranged for deflecting at least a part of the beam of electrons during passage from a surface of the anode grid structure facing the photocathode to the target.

  4. Natural Circulation in Water Cooled Nuclear Power Plants Phenomena, models, and methodology for system reliability assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Jose Reyes

    2005-02-14

    In recent years it has been recognized that the application of passive safety systems (i.e., those whose operation takes advantage of natural forces such as convection and gravity), can contribute to simplification and potentially to improved economics of new nuclear power plant designs. In 1991 the IAEA Conference on ''The Safety of Nuclear Power: Strategy for the Future'' noted that for new plants the use of passive safety features is a desirable method of achieving simplification and increasing the reliability of the performance of essential safety functions, and should be used wherever appropriate''.

  5. Model testing using Chernobyl data: II. Assessment of the consequences of the radioactive contamination of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant cooling pond.

    PubMed

    Kryshev, I I; Sazykina, T G; Ryabov, I N; Chumak, V K; Zarubin, O L

    1996-01-01

    The "Cooling Pond" scenario is designed to test models for radioactive contamination of aquatic ecosystems, based on data for contamination of different aquatic media and biota due to fallout of radionuclides into the cooling pond of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. Input data include characteristics of the cooling pond ecosystem (hydrological, hydrochemical, and hydrobiological conditions) and estimates of the amounts of 137Cs in the cooling pond. Predictions are requested in two stages: (1) calculations for 137Cs concentrations for comparison against actual measurements, including activities of 137Cs in the cooling pond water, in sediment layers, and in fish; and (2) calculations for which actual measurements are not available, including dose and risk estimates for aquatic biota and for humans following hypothetical consumption of contaminated biota. The latter calculations are intended to provide an opportunity for intercomparison among modelers of their results for a simulated assessment problem.

  6. THATCH: A computer code for modelling thermal networks of high- temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kroeger, P.G.; Kennett, R.J.; Colman, J.; Ginsberg, T. )

    1991-10-01

    This report documents the THATCH code, which can be used to model general thermal and flow networks of solids and coolant channels in two-dimensional r-z geometries. The main application of THATCH is to model reactor thermo-hydraulic transients in High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGRs). The available modules simulate pressurized or depressurized core heatup transients, heat transfer to general exterior sinks or to specific passive Reactor Cavity Cooling Systems, which can be air or water-cooled. Graphite oxidation during air or water ingress can be modelled, including the effects of added combustion products to the gas flow and the additional chemical energy release. A point kinetics model is available for analyzing reactivity excursions; for instance due to water ingress, and also for hypothetical no-scram scenarios. For most HTGR transients, which generally range over hours, a user-selected nodalization of the core in r-z geometry is used. However, a separate model of heat transfer in the symmetry element of each fuel element is also available for very rapid transients. This model can be applied coupled to the traditional coarser r-z nodalization. This report described the mathematical models used in the code and the method of solution. It describes the code and its various sub-elements. Details of the input data and file usage, with file formats, is given for the code, as well as for several preprocessing and postprocessing options. The THATCH model of the currently applicable 350 MW{sub th} reactor is described. Input data for four sample cases are given with output available in fiche form. Installation requirements and code limitations, as well as the most common error indications are listed. 31 refs., 23 figs., 32 tabs.

  7. Thermal and dynamic analysis of the RING (Radiatively-cooled, Inertially-driven Nuclear Generator) power system radiator

    SciTech Connect

    Apley, W.J.; Babb, A.L.

    1989-01-01

    The nuclear option for a space-based power system appears most suitable for missions that require long-term, sustained operation at power levels above 100 kWe. Systems currently available operate at relatively low thermal efficiencies (6--10%). Thus, a 100 kWe system must discharge nearly 2 MWth of waste heat through the comparatively inefficient process of radiative cooling. The impact of the resultant radiator assembly size on overall power system weight is significant, and has led to proposals for radiators with potentially higher efficiencies. Examples include the: liquid droplet radiator; fabric radiator; bubble membrane radiator; rotating film radiator; and dust radiator. 14 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Fibre optic sensor based measurements of flow-induced vibration in a liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor set-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pauw, B.; Vanlanduit, S.; Van Tichelen, K.; Geernaert, T.; Thienpont, H.; Berghmans, F.

    2017-04-01

    Fuel assembly vibrations in nuclear reactor cores should not be excessive as these can compromise the lifetime of the assembly and lead to safety hazards. This issue is particularly relevant to new reactor designs that use liquid metal coolants. We therefore demonstrate accurate measurements of the vibrations of a fuel assembly in a lead-bismuth eutectic cooled installation with fibre Bragg grating (FBG) based sensors. The use of FBGs in combination with a dedicated sensor integration approach allows accounting for the severe geometrical constraints and providing for the required minimal intrusiveness of the instrumentation, identifying the vibration modes with required accuracy and observing the differences between the vibration amplitudes of the individual fuel pins as well as evidencing a low frequency fuel pin vibration mode resulting from the supports.

  9. Design Study of Modular Nuclear Power Plant with Small Long Life Gas Cooled Fast Reactors Utilizing MOX Fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilham, Muhammad; Su'ud, Zaki

    2017-01-01

    Growing energy needed due to increasing of the world’s population encourages development of technology and science of nuclear power plant in its safety and security. In this research, it will be explained about design study of modular fast reactor with helium gas cooling (GCFR) small long life reactor, which can be operated over 20 years. It had been conducted about neutronic design GCFR with Mixed Oxide (UO2-PuO2) fuel in range of 100-200 MWth NPPs of power and 50-60% of fuel fraction variation with cylindrical pin cell and cylindrical balance of reactor core geometry. Calculation method used SRAC-CITATION code. The obtained results are the effective multiplication factor and density value of core reactor power (with geometry optimalization) to obtain optimum design core reactor power, whereas the obtained of optimum core reactor power is 200 MWth with 55% of fuel fraction and 9-13% of percentages.

  10. Paleobotanical evidence for cool north polar climates in middle Cretaceous (Albian-Cenomanian) time

    SciTech Connect

    Spicer, R.A.; Parrish, J.T.

    1986-08-01

    Mid-Cretaceous (Albian-Cenomanian) floras are abundant and diverse on the North Slope of Alaska. The older floras consist of conifers, cycadophytes, ferns, ginkgophytes, and sphenophytes (horsetails). Angiosperms appeared in latest Albian time and rapidly diversified. The preserved floras consist entirely of deciduous plants, with the exception of a microphyllous conifer, ferns, and sphenophytes. Deciduousness is evidence for strong seasonality, which for these floras might be variations in either light or temperature or both. Cool temperatures are suggested by the prevalence of toothed leaves among the angiosperms and the presence of large-leaved conifers. The paleobotanical evidence points to a mid-Cretaceous climate that was no warmer than cool temperate on the North Slope of Alaska.

  11. Development and validation of scale nuclear analysis methods for high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Gehin, Jess C; Jessee, Matthew Anderson; Williams, Mark L; Lee, Deokjung; Goluoglu, Sedat; Ilas, Germina; Ilas, Dan; Bowman, Steve A

    2010-01-01

    In support of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, ORNL is updating the nuclear analysis methods and data in the SCALE code system to support modeling of HTGRs. Development activities include methods used for reactor physics, criticality safety, and radiation shielding. This paper focuses on the nuclear methods in support of reactor physics, which primarily include lattice physics for cross-section processing of both prismatic and pebble-bed designs, Monte Carlo depletion methods and efficiency improvements for double heterogeneous fuels, and validation against relevant experiments. These methods enhancements are being validated using available experimental data from the HTTR and HTR-10 startup and initial criticality experiments. Results obtained with three-dimensional Monte Carlo models of the HTTR initial core critical configurations with SCALE6/KENO show excellent agreement between the continuous energy and multigroup methods and the results are consistent with results obtained by others. A three-dimensional multigroup Monte Carlo model for the initial critical core of the HTR-10 has been developed with SCALE6/KENO based on the benchmark specifications included in the IRPhE Handbook. The core eigenvalue obtained with this model is in very good agreement with the corresponding value obtained with a consistent continuous energy MCNP5 core model.

  12. Fabrication of cermet bearings for the control system of a high temperature lithium cooled nuclear reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yacobucci, H. G.; Heestand, R. L.; Kizer, D. E.

    1973-01-01

    The techniques used to fabricate cermet bearings for the fueled control drums of a liquid metal cooled reference-design reactor concept are presented. The bearings were designed for operation in lithium for as long as 5 years at temperatures to 1205 C. Two sets of bearings were fabricated from a hafnium carbide - 8-wt. % molybdenum - 2-wt. % niobium carbide cermet, and two sets were fabricated from a hafnium nitride - 10-wt. % tungsten cermet. Procedures were developed for synthesizing the material in high purity inert-atmosphere glove boxes to minimize oxygen content in order to enhance corrosion resistance. Techniques were developed for pressing cylindrical billets to conserve materials and to reduce machining requirements. Finishing was accomplished by a combination of diamond grinding, electrodischarge machining, and diamond lapping. Samples were characterized in respect to composition, impurity level, lattice parameter, microstructure and density.

  13. Apparatus for controlling coolant level in a liquid-metal-cooled nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Robert D.

    1978-01-01

    A liquid-metal-cooled fast-breeder reactor which has a thermal liner spaced inwardly of the pressure vessel and includes means for passing bypass coolant through the annulus between the thermal liner and the pressure vessel to insulate the pressure vessel from hot outlet coolant includes control ports in the thermal liner a short distance below the normal operating coolant level in the reactor and an overflow nozzle in the pressure vessel below the control ports connected to an overflow line including a portion at an elevation such that overflow coolant flow is established when the coolant level in the reactor is above the top of the coolant ports. When no makeup coolant is added, bypass flow is inwardly through the control ports and there is no overflow; when makeup coolant is being added, coolant flow through the overflow line will maintain the coolant level.

  14. A Nonlinear Least Squares Approach to Time of Death Estimation Via Body Cooling.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Marianito R

    2016-01-01

    The problem of time of death (TOD) estimation by body cooling is revisited by proposing a nonlinear least squares approach that takes as input a series of temperature readings only. Using a reformulation of the Marshall-Hoare double exponential formula and a technique for reducing the dimension of the state space, an error function that depends on the two cooling rates is constructed, with the aim of minimizing this function. Standard nonlinear optimization methods that are used to minimize the bivariate error function require an initial guess for these unknown rates. Hence, a systematic procedure based on the given temperature data is also proposed to determine an initial estimate for the rates. Then, an explicit formula for the TOD is given. Results of numerical simulations using both theoretical and experimental data are presented, both yielding reasonable estimates. The proposed procedure does not require knowledge of the temperature at death nor the body mass. In fact, the method allows the estimation of the temperature at death once the cooling rates and the TOD have been calculated. The procedure requires at least three temperature readings, although more measured readings could improve the estimates. With the aid of computerized recording and thermocouple detectors, temperature readings spaced 10-15 min apart, for example, can be taken. The formulas can be straightforwardly programmed and installed on a hand-held device for field use.

  15. Low-temperature dynamic nuclear polarization with helium-cooled samples and nitrogen-driven magic-angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Kent; Tycko, Robert

    2016-03-01

    We describe novel instrumentation for low-temperature solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and magic-angle spinning (MAS), focusing on aspects of this instrumentation that have not been described in detail in previous publications. We characterize the performance of an extended interaction oscillator (EIO) microwave source, operating near 264 GHz with 1.5 W output power, which we use in conjunction with a quasi-optical microwave polarizing system and a MAS NMR probe that employs liquid helium for sample cooling and nitrogen gas for sample spinning. Enhancement factors for cross-polarized (13)C NMR signals in the 100-200 range are demonstrated with DNP at 25K. The dependences of signal amplitudes on sample temperature, as well as microwave power, polarization, and frequency, are presented. We show that sample temperatures below 30K can be achieved with helium consumption rates below 1.3 l/h. To illustrate potential applications of this instrumentation in structural studies of biochemical systems, we compare results from low-temperature DNP experiments on a calmodulin-binding peptide in its free and bound states.

  16. Investigation of Nuclear Data Libraries with TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo Code for Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.-K.; Brun, E.

    2014-04-01

    The Sodium-cooled fast neutron reactor ASTRID is currently under design and development in France. Traditional ECCO/ERANOS fast reactor code system used for ASTRID core design calculations relies on multi-group JEFF-3.1.1 data library. To gauge the use of ENDF/B-VII.0 and JEFF-3.1.1 nuclear data libraries in the fast reactor applications, two recent OECD/NEA computational benchmarks specified by Argonne National Laboratory were calculated. Using the continuous-energy TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo transport code, both ABR-1000 MWth MOX core and metallic (U-Pu) core were investigated. Under two different fast neutron spectra and two data libraries, ENDF/B-VII.0 and JEFF-3.1.1, reactivity impact studies were performed. Using JEFF-3.1.1 library under the BOEC (Beginning of equilibrium cycle) condition, high reactivity effects of 808 ± 17 pcm and 1208 ± 17 pcm were observed for ABR-1000 MOX core and metallic core respectively. To analyze the causes of these differences in reactivity, several TRIPOLI-4 runs using mixed data libraries feature allow us to identify the nuclides and the nuclear data accounting for the major part of the observed reactivity discrepancies.

  17. Effect of cooling rate on timing and dynamics of crystallization within a man-made magma body

    SciTech Connect

    Dunbar, N.W.; Jacobs, G.K.; Naney, M.T. )

    1992-01-01

    A 1.3 [times] 10[sup 7] g, 3 m diameter, hemispheric-shaped, man-made mafic melt produced by inductance heating was allowed to cool naturally, dropping from a maximum temperature of 1,500 C to 500 C in 6 days. The cooled melt was found to be almost completely crystalline, and is composed dominantly of unzoned pyroxene and plagioclase. A thermal arrest, a 20 hr period of constant temperature (1,140 C) observed during cooling resulted from the release of latent heat during crystallization. However, crystallization within the central part of the melt probably began at a higher temperature, as indicated by thermal perturbations between 1,300 C and 1,140 C. Comparison of results from simple conductive cooling models with the observed cooling curves influenced by latent heat input allows estimates of the timing of crystalline growth. Growth rates for plagioclase and pyroxene are estimated to range between 10[sup [minus]5] and 10[sup [minus]6] cm/sec. Although the melt was physically, chemically, and thermally homogeneous at the time that cooling was initiated, the crystal morphology and composition varies systematically with distance from the edge of the melt, presumably as a function of cooling rate and degree of undercooling at the time that crystallization was initiated. Crystals near the edge of the melt, where cooling was most rapid are characterized by disequilibrium skeletal or spherulitic morphologies. With increased proximity to the interior, and progressively slower cooling rates, crystal morphology grade from chain-like to lath-like, and finally to tabular in the slowest-cooled areas. The chemical composition of the diopsidic pyroxene also varies as function of growth rate. Crystals that grew near the edge of the melt are enriched with respect to Al, and depleted with respect to Mg as compared to crystals from the central area.

  18. The cooling time of fertile chicken eggs at different stages of incubation.

    PubMed

    Mortola, Jacopo P; Gaonac'h-Lovejoy, Vanda

    2016-01-01

    We asked whether or not the thermal characteristics of fertile avian eggs changed throughout incubation. The cooling and warming times, expressed by the time constant τ of the egg temperature response to a rapid change in ambient temperature, were measured in fertile chicken eggs at early (E7), intermediate (E11) and late (E20) stages of embryonic development. Same measurements were conducted on eggs emptied of their content and refilled with water by various amounts. The results indicated that (1) the τ of a freshly laid egg was ~50 min; (2) τ decreased linearly with the drop in egg water volume; (3) the dry eggshell had almost no thermal resistance but its wet inner membrane contributed about one-third to the stability of egg temperature; (4) the egg constituents (yolk, albumen and embryonic tissues) and the chorioallantoic circulation had no measurable effect on τ; (5) the presence of an air pocket equivalent in volume to the air cell of fertile eggs reduced τ by about 3 min (E7), 5 min (E11) and 11 min (E20). Hence, in response to warming the egg τ at E20 was slightly shorter than at E7. In response to cooling, the egg τ at E20 was similar to, or longer than, E7 because embryonic thermogenesis (evaluated by measurements of oxygen consumption during cold) offset the reduction in τ introduced by the air cell. In conclusion, until the onset of thermogenesis the thermal behavior of a fertile egg is closely approximated by that of a water-filled egg with an air volume equivalent to the air cell. It is possible to estimate the cooling τ of avian eggs of different species from their weight and incubation time. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Optical Time Projection Chamber for imaging nuclear decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miernik, K.; Dominik, W.; Czyrkowski, H.; Dabrowski, R.; Fomitchev, A.; Golovkov, M.; Janas, Z.; Kuśmierz, W.; Pfützner, M.; Rodin, A.; Stepantsov, S.; Slepniev, R.; Ter-Akopian, G. M.; Wolski, R.

    2007-10-01

    We present a novel type of a Time Projection Chamber in which tracks of charged particles ionizing an active gas volume are recorded by means of optical signals. By combining a CCD camera image with the electron drift-time profile measured by a photomultiplier, it is possible to reconstruct trajectories of particles in three dimensions. The chamber was developed to study exotic nuclear decays in which charged particles are emitted. The results of first measurements will be demonstrated in which beta-delayed protons from 13O, the two-alpha decay of 8Be, and the triple-alpha decay of 12C excited states were recorded.

  20. A long pollen record from lowland Amazonia: Forest and cooling in glacial times

    SciTech Connect

    Colinvaux, P.A.; Moreno, J.E.; Bush, M.B.

    1996-10-04

    A continuous pollen history of more than 40,000 years was obtained from a lake in the lowland Amazon rain forest. Pollen spectra demonstrate that tropical rain forest occupied the region continuously and that savannas or grasslands were not present during the last glacial maximum. The data suggest that the western Amazon forest was not fragmented into refugia in glacial times and that the lowlands were not a source of dust. Glacial age forests were comparable to modern forests but also included species now restricted to higher evaluations by temperature, suggesting a cooling of the order of 5{degrees} to 6{degrees}C. 23 refs., 22 tabs.

  1. Time-dependent insulin oligomer reaction pathway prior to fibril formation: Cooling and seeding

    PubMed Central

    Sorci, Mirco; Grassucci, Robert A.; Hahn, Ingrid; Frank, Joachim; Belfort, Georges

    2009-01-01

    The difficulty in identifying the toxic agents in all amyloid-related diseases is likely due to the complicated kinetics and thermodynamics of the nucleation process and subsequent fibril formation. The slow progression of these diseases suggests that the formation, incorporation and/or action of toxic agents is possibly rate limiting. Candidate toxic agents include precursors (some at very low concentrations), also called oligomers and protofibrils, and the fibrils. Here, we investigate the kinetic and thermodynamic behavior of human insulin oligomers (imaged by cryo-EM) under fibril forming conditions (pH 1.6 and 65°C) by probing the reaction pathway to insulin fibril formation using two different types of experiments – cooling and seeding – and confirm the validity of the nucleation model and its effect on fibril growth. The results from both the cooling and seeding studies confirm the existence of a time-changing oligomer reaction process prior to fibril formation that likely involves a rate-limiting nucleation process followed by structural rearrangements of intermediates (into β-sheet rich entities) to form oligomers that then form fibrils. The latter structural rearrangement step occurs even in the absence of nuclei (i.e. with added heterologous seeds). Nuclei are formed at the fibrillation conditions (pH 1.6 and 65°C) but are also continuously formed during cooling at pH 1.6 and 25°C. Within the time-scale of the experiments, only after increasing the temperature to 65°C are the trapped insulin nuclei and resultant structures able to induce the structural rearrangement step and overcome the energy barrier to form fibrils. This delay in fibrillation and accumulation of nuclei at low temperature (25°C), result in a decrease in the mean length of the fibers when placed at 65°C. Fits of an empirical model to the data provide quantitative measures of the delay in the lag-time during the nucleation process and subsequent reduction in fibril growth rate

  2. Time-dependent insulin oligomer reaction pathway prior to fibril formation: cooling and seeding.

    PubMed

    Sorci, Mirco; Grassucci, Robert A; Hahn, Ingrid; Frank, Joachim; Belfort, Georges

    2009-10-01

    The difficulty in identifying the toxic agents in all amyloid-related diseases is likely due to the complicated kinetics and thermodynamics of the nucleation process and subsequent fibril formation. The slow progression of these diseases suggests that the formation, incorporation, and/or action of toxic agents are possibly rate limiting. Candidate toxic agents include precursors (some at very low concentrations), also called oligomers and protofibrils, and the fibrils. Here, we investigate the kinetic and thermodynamic behavior of human insulin oligomers (imaged by cryo-EM) under fibril-forming conditions (pH 1.6 and 65 degrees C) by probing the reaction pathway to insulin fibril formation using two different types of experiments-cooling and seeding-and confirm the validity of the nucleation model and its effect on fibril growth. The results from both the cooling and seeding studies confirm the existence of a time-changing oligomer reaction process prior to fibril formation that likely involves a rate-limiting nucleation process followed by structural rearrangements of intermediates (into beta-sheet rich entities) to form oligomers that then form fibrils. The latter structural rearrangement step occurs even in the absence of nuclei (i.e., with added heterologous seeds). Nuclei are formed at the fibrillation conditions (pH 1.6 and 65 degrees C) but are also continuously formed during cooling at pH 1.6 and 25 degrees C. Within the time-scale of the experiments, only after increasing the temperature to 65 degrees C are the trapped insulin nuclei and resultant structures able to induce the structural rearrangement step and overcome the energy barrier to form fibrils. This delay in fibrillation and accumulation of nuclei at low temperature (25 degrees C) result in a decrease in the mean length of the fibers when placed at 65 degrees C. Fits of an empirical model to the data provide quantitative measures of the delay in the lag-time during the nucleation process and

  3. Hot-gas-side heat transfer with and without film cooling on a simulated nuclear rocket thrust chamber using H2-O2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quentmeyer, R. J.; Schacht, R. L.; Jones, W. L.

    1972-01-01

    Heat-transfer coefficients were obtained on a thrust chamber which simulated the geometry of the NERVA nuclear rocket. The tests were performed with and without peripheral film cooling over a chamber pressure range of 1.05 million to 5.84 million newtons per square meter (153 to 847 psia). With no film cooling, the overall axial variation in the value of the correlation coefficient C of the equation (Stanton)* (Prandtl)* to the 0.7ths power = C(Reynolds)* to the -0.2ths power, where * indicates the reference enthalpy condition, was reduced 66 percent when the local diameter in the Reynolds number was replaced by the axial distance from the injector face. The average peak values of C were reduced 25 percent with 2 and 3.75 percent cooling and 50 percent with 7.5 percent cooling.

  4. Electron Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Timothy J. P.

    1991-08-01

    Electron cooling is a method of reducing the 6 -dimensional phase space volume of a stored ion beam. The technique was invented by Budker and first developed by him and his colleagues at the Institute for Nuclear Physics in Novosibirsk. Further studies of electron cooling were subsequently performed at CERN and Fermilab. At the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) an electron cooling system was designed, built, and commissioned in 1988. This was the highest energy system built to date (270 keV for cooling 500 MeV protons) and the first such system to be used as an instrument for performing nuclear and atomic physics experiments. This dissertation summarizes the design principles; measurements of the longitudinal drag rate (cooling force), equilibrium cooled beam properties and effective longitudinal electron beam temperature. These measurements are compared with theory and with the measured performance of other cooling systems. In addition the feasibility of extending this technology to energies an order of magnitude higher are discussed.

  5. Decommissioning considerations at a time of nuclear renaissance

    SciTech Connect

    Devgun, Jas S.

    2007-07-01

    At a time of renaissance in the nuclear power industry, when it is estimated that anywhere between 60 to 130 new power reactors may be built worldwide over the next 15 years, why should we focus on decommissioning? Yet it is precisely the time to examine what decommissioning considerations should be taken into account as the industry proceeds with developing final designs for new reactors and the construction on the new build begins. One of the lessons learned from decommissioning of existing reactors has been that decommissioning was not given much thought when these reactors were designed three or four decades ago. Even though decommissioning may be sixty years down the road from the time they go on line, eventually all reactors will be decommissioned. It is only prudent that new designs be optimized for eventual decommissioning, along with the other major considerations. The overall objective in this regard is that when the time comes for decommissioning, it can be completed in shorter time frames, with minimum generation of radioactive waste, and with better radiological safety. This will ensure that the tail end costs of the power reactors are manageable and that the public confidence in the nuclear power is sustained through the renaissance and beyond. (author)

  6. Spray cooling simulation implementing time scale analysis and the Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreitzer, Paul Joseph

    Spray cooling research is advancing the field of heat transfer and heat rejection in high power electronics. Smaller and more capable electronics packages are producing higher amounts of waste heat, along with smaller external surface areas, and the use of active cooling is becoming a necessity. Spray cooling has shown extremely high levels of heat rejection, of up to 1000 W/cm 2 using water. Simulations of spray cooling are becoming more realistic, but this comes at a price. A previous researcher has used CFD to successfully model a single 3D droplet impact into a liquid film using the level set method. However, the complicated multiphysics occurring during spray impingement and surface interactions increases computation time to more than 30 days. Parallel processing on a 32 processor system has reduced this time tremendously, but still requires more than a day. The present work uses experimental and computational results in addition to numerical correlations representing the physics occurring on a heated impingement surface. The current model represents the spray behavior of a Spraying Systems FullJet 1/8-g spray nozzle. Typical spray characteristics are indicated as follows: flow rate of 1.05x10-5 m3/s, normal droplet velocity of 12 m/s, droplet Sauter mean diameter of 48 microm, and heat flux values ranging from approximately 50--100 W/cm2 . This produces non-dimensional numbers of: We 300--1350, Re 750--3500, Oh 0.01--0.025. Numerical and experimental correlations have been identified representing crater formation, splashing, film thickness, droplet size, and spatial flux distributions. A combination of these methods has resulted in a Monte Carlo spray impingement simulation model capable of simulating hundreds of thousands of droplet impingements or approximately one millisecond. A random sequence of droplet impingement locations and diameters is generated, with the proper radial spatial distribution and diameter distribution. Hence the impingement, lifetime

  7. Nuclear characteristics of a fissioning uranium plasma test reactor with light-water cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmarsh, C. L., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical study was performed to determine a design configuration for a cavity test reactor. Test section criteria were that an average flux of 10 to the 15th power neutrons/sq cm/sec (E less than or equal to 0.12 eV) be supplied to a 61-cm-diameter spherical cavity at 200-atm pressure. Design objectives were to minimize required driver power, to use existing fuel-element technology, and to obtain fuel-element life of 10 to 100 full-power hours. Parameter calculations were made on moderator region size and material, driver fuel arrangement, control system, and structure in order to determine a feasible configuration. Although not optimized, a configuration was selected which would meet design criteria. The driver fuel region was a cylindrical annular region, one element thick, of 33 MTR-type H2O-cooled elements (Al-U fuel plate configuration), each 101 cm long. The region between the spherical test cavity and the cylindrical driver fuel region was Be (10 vol. % H2O coolant) with a midplane dimension of 8 cm. Exterior to the driver fuel, the 25-cm-thick cylindrical and axial reflectors were also Be with 10 vol. % H2O coolant. The entire reactor was contained in a 10-cm-thick steel pressure vessel, and the 200-atm cavity pressure was equalized throughout the driver reactor. Fuel-element life was 50 hr at the required driver power of 200 MW. Reactor control would be achieved with rotating poison drums located in the cylindrical reflector region. A control range of about 18 percent delta k/k was required for reactor operation.

  8. Coccomyxa actinabiotis sp. nov. (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta), a new green microalga living in the spent fuel cooling pool of a nuclear reactor.

    PubMed

    Rivasseau, Corinne; Farhi, Emmanuel; Compagnon, Estelle; de Gouvion Saint Cyr, Diane; van Lis, Robert; Falconet, Denis; Kuntz, Marcel; Atteia, Ariane; Couté, Alain

    2016-10-01

    Life can thrive in extreme environments where inhospitable conditions prevail. Organisms which resist, for example, acidity, pressure, low or high temperature, have been found in harsh environments. Most of them are bacteria and archaea. The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is considered to be a champion among all living organisms, surviving extreme ionizing radiation levels. We have discovered a new extremophile eukaryotic organism that possesses a resistance to ionizing radiations similar to that of D. radiodurans. This microorganism, an autotrophic freshwater green microalga, lives in a peculiar environment, namely the cooling pool of a nuclear reactor containing spent nuclear fuels, where it is continuously submitted to nutritive, metallic, and radiative stress. We investigated its morphology and its ultrastructure by light, fluorescence and electron microscopy as well as its biochemical properties. Its resistance to UV and gamma radiation was assessed. When submitted to different dose rates of the order of some tens of mGy · h(-1) to several thousands of Gy · h(-1) , the microalga revealed to be able to survive intense gamma-rays irradiation, up to 2,000 times the dose lethal to human. The nuclear genome region spanning the genes for small subunit ribosomal RNA-Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) 1-5.8S rRNA-ITS2-28S rRNA (beginning) was sequenced (4,065 bp). The phylogenetic position of the microalga was inferred from the 18S rRNA gene. All the revealed characteristics make the alga a new species of the genus Coccomyxa in the class Trebouxiophyceae, which we name Coccomyxa actinabiotis sp. nov.

  9. Nuclear inertia from the time dependent pairing equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirea, M.

    2016-10-01

    In a dynamical system, the momenta of inertia and the effective masses are not adiabatic quantities, but are dynamical ones that depend on the dissipated energy accumulated during motion. However, these parameters are calculated for adiabatic nuclear systems, leaving no room for dissipated energy. In this work, a formalism is elaborated in order to derive simultaneously the nuclear momenta of inertia and the effective masses by taking into account the appearance of dissipated energy for large amplitude motion of the nuclear system. The expressions that define the inertia are obtained from the variational principle. The same principle manages the time dependent pairing equations, offering estimations of the averaged dissipation energy for large amplitude motions. The model is applied to 232Th fission. The fission barrier was calculated along the least action trajectory. The dissipation energy, effective mass and moment of inertia are determined for different values of the collective velocities. The dissipation increases with the internuclear velocity in binary disintegration processes and modifies the effective mass parameters. We observed that the inertia decreases as long as the collective velocity increases to some moderate values and begins to grow for larger collective velocities. So, a dependence between the cranking mass parameters and the intrinsic excitation energy is evidenced. In order to investigate the overall effect, the half-lives are predicted for adiabatic and dynamics simulations.

  10. Long Coherence Times in Nuclear Spin-Free Vanadyl Qubits.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chung-Jui; Graham, Michael J; Zadrozny, Joseph M; Niklas, Jens; Krzyaniak, Matthew D; Wasielewski, Michael R; Poluektov, Oleg G; Freedman, Danna E

    2016-11-09

    Quantum information processing (QIP) offers the potential to create new frontiers in fields ranging from quantum biology to cryptography. Two key figures of merit for electronic spin qubits, the smallest units of QIP, are the coherence time (T2), the lifetime of the qubit, and the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1), the thermally defined upper limit of T2. To achieve QIP, processable qubits with long coherence times are required. Recent studies on (Ph4P-d20)2[V(C8S8)3], a vanadium-based qubit, demonstrate that millisecond T2 times are achievable in transition metal complexes with nuclear spin-free environments. Applying these principles to vanadyl complexes offers a route to combine the previously established surface compatibility of the flatter vanadyl structures with a long T2. Toward those ends, we investigated a series of four qubits, (Ph4P)2[VO(C8S8)2] (1), (Ph4P)2[VO(β-C3S5)2] (2), (Ph4P)2[VO(α-C3S5)2] (3), and (Ph4P)2[VO(C3S4O)2] (4), by pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and compared the performance of these species with our recently reported set of vanadium tris(dithiolene) complexes. Crucially we demonstrate that solutions of 1-4 in SO2, a uniquely polar nuclear spin-free solvent, reveal T2 values of up to 152(6) μs, comparable to the best molecular qubit candidates. Upon transitioning to vanadyl species from the tris(dithiolene) analogues, we observe a remarkable order of magnitude increase in T1, attributed to stronger solute-solvent interactions with the polar vanadium-oxo moiety. Simultaneously, we detect a small decrease in T2 for the vanadyl analogues relative to the tris(dithiolene) complexes. We attribute this decrease to the absence of one nuclear spin-free ligand, which served to shield the vanadium centers against solvent nuclear spins. Our results highlight new design principles for long T1 and T2 times by demonstrating the efficacy of ligand-based tuning of solute-solvent interactions.

  11. Reviewing real-time performance of nuclear reactor safety systems

    SciTech Connect

    Preckshot, G.G.

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to recommend regulatory guidance for reviewers examining real-time performance of computer-based safety systems used in nuclear power plants. Three areas of guidance are covered in this report. The first area covers how to determine if, when, and what prototypes should be required of developers to make a convincing demonstration that specific problems have been solved or that performance goals have been met. The second area has recommendations for timing analyses that will prove that the real-time system will meet its safety-imposed deadlines. The third area has description of means for assessing expected or actual real-time performance before, during, and after development is completed. To ensure that the delivered real-time software product meets performance goals, the paper recommends certain types of code-execution and communications scheduling. Technical background is provided in the appendix on methods of timing analysis, scheduling real-time computations, prototyping, real-time software development approaches, modeling and measurement, and real-time operating systems.

  12. Initial assessment of environmental effects on SiC/SiC composites in helium-cooled nuclear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Contescu, Cristian I

    2013-09-01

    This report summarized the information available in the literature on the chemical reactivity of SiC/SiC composites and of their components in contact with the helium coolant used in HTGR, VHTR and GFR designs. In normal operation conditions, ultra-high purity helium will have chemically controlled impurities (water, oxygen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, hydrogen) that will create a slightly oxidizing gas environment. Little is known from direct experiments on the reactivity of third generation (nuclear grade) SiC/SiC composites in contact with low concentrations of water or oxygen in inert gas, at high temperature. However, there is ample information about the oxidation in dry and moist air of SiC/SiC composites at high temperatures. This information is reviewed first in the next chapters. The emphasis is places on the improvement in material oxidation, thermal, and mechanical properties during three stages of development of SiC fibers and at least two stages of development of the fiber/matrix interphase. The chemical stability of SiC/SiC composites in contact with oxygen or steam at temperatures that may develop in off-normal reactor conditions supports the conclusion that most advanced composites (also known as nuclear grade SiC/SiC composites) have the chemical resistance that would allow them maintain mechanical properties at temperatures up to 1200 1300 oC in the extreme conditions of an air or water ingress accident scenario. Further research is needed to assess the long-term stability of advanced SiC/SiC composites in inert gas (helium) in presence of very low concentrations (traces) of water and oxygen at the temperatures of normal operation of helium-cooled reactors. Another aspect that needs to be investigated is the effect of fast neutron irradiation on the oxidation stability of advanced SiC/SiC composites in normal operation conditions.

  13. Quantum cooling and squeezing of a levitating nanosphere via time-continuous measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genoni, Marco G.; Zhang, Jinglei; Millen, James; Barker, Peter F.; Serafini, Alessio

    2015-07-01

    With the purpose of controlling the steady state of a dielectric nanosphere levitated within an optical cavity, we study its conditional dynamics under simultaneous sideband cooling and additional time-continuous measurement of either the output cavity mode or the nanosphere’s position. We find that the average phonon number, purity and quantum squeezing of the steady-states can all be made more non-classical through the addition of time-continuous measurement. We predict that the continuous monitoring of the system, together with Markovian feedback, allows one to stabilize the dynamics for any value of the laser frequency driving the cavity. By considering state of the art values of the experimental parameters, we prove that one can in principle obtain a non-classical (squeezed) steady-state with an average phonon number {n}{ph}≈ 0.5.

  14. Frequency thermal response and cooling performance in a microscopic system with a time-dependent perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beraha, N.; Soba, A.; Carusela, M. F.

    2016-12-01

    Following the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism we study the thermal transport in a composite chain subject to a time-dependent perturbation. The system is formed by two finite linear asymmetric harmonic chains subject to an on-site potential connected together by a time-modulated coupling. The ends of the chains are coupled to two phononic reservoirs at different temperatures. We present the relevant equations used to calculate the heat current along each segment. We find that the system presents different transport regimes according the driving frequency and temperature gradients. One of the regimes corresponds to a heat pump against thermal gradient, thus a characterization of the cooling performance of the device is presented.

  15. The effect of mass recovery adsorption cooling cycle to optimize the collector number and time allocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabir, K. M. Ariful; Alam, K. C. Amanul; Rouf, Rifat A.; Sarker, M. M. A.

    2016-07-01

    The performance of mass recovery for solar adsorption cooling system has been investigated numerically. Solar adsorption cooling appears to have a prospect in tropical region. Though it has a huge installation cost, its long term payback could be a considerable fact. Mass recovery scheme increases Average Cooling Capacity (ACC) and Coefficient of Performance (COP) values of the adsorption cooling system. In intension to reduce cost and maximize system performance, a two bed solar driven conventional cooling system run by silica gel and water along with mass recovery process has been investigated mathematically.

  16. Vibration Monitoring Using Fiber Optic Sensors in a Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Cooled Nuclear Fuel Assembly †

    PubMed Central

    De Pauw, Ben; Lamberti, Alfredo; Ertveldt, Julien; Rezayat, Ali; van Tichelen, Katrien; Vanlanduit, Steve; Berghmans, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Excessive fuel assembly vibrations in nuclear reactor cores should be avoided in order not to compromise the lifetime of the assembly and in order to prevent the occurrence of safety hazards. This issue is particularly relevant to new reactor designs that use liquid metal coolants, such as, for example, a molten lead-bismuth eutectic. The flow of molten heavy metal around and through the fuel assembly may cause the latter to vibrate and hence suffer degradation as a result of, for example, fretting wear or mechanical fatigue. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of optical fiber sensors to measure the fuel assembly vibration in a lead-bismuth eutectic cooled installation which can be used as input to assess vibration-related safety hazards. We show that the vibration characteristics of the fuel pins in the fuel assembly can be experimentally determined with minimal intrusiveness and with high precision owing to the small dimensions and properties of the sensors. In particular, we were able to record local strain level differences of about 0.2 μϵ allowing us to reliably estimate the vibration amplitudes and modal parameters of the fuel assembly based on optical fiber sensor readings during different stages of the operation of the facility, including the onset of the coolant circulation and steady-state operation. PMID:27110782

  17. Review of High Temperature Water and Steam Cooled Reactor Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Yoshiaki

    2002-07-01

    This review summarizes design concepts of supercritical-pressure water cooled reactors (SCR), nuclear superheaters and steam cooled fast reactors from 1950's to the present time. It includes water moderated supercritical steam cooled reactor, SCOTT-R and SC-PWR of Westinghouse, heavy water moderated light water cooled SCR of GE, SCLWR and SCFR of the University of Tokyo, B-500SKDI of Kurchatov Institute, CANDU -X of AECL, nuclear superheaters of GE, subcritical-pressure steam cooled FBR of KFK and B and W, Supercritical-pressure steam cooled FBR of B and W, subcritical-pressure steam cooled high converter by Edlund and Schultz and subcritical-pressure water-steam cooled FBR by Alekseev. This paper is prepared based on the previous review of SCR2000 symposium, and some author's comments are added. (author)

  18. CONVERGENCE STUDIES OF MASS TRANSPORT IN DISKS WITH GRAVITATIONAL INSTABILITIES. I. THE CONSTANT COOLING TIME CASE

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, Scott; Steiman-Cameron, Thomas Y.; Durisen, Richard H.; Boley, Aaron C. E-mail: tomsc@astro.indiana.edu E-mail: aaron.boley@gmail.com

    2012-02-10

    We conduct a convergence study of a protostellar disk, subject to a constant global cooling time and susceptible to gravitational instabilities (GIs), at a time when heating and cooling are roughly balanced. Our goal is to determine the gravitational torques produced by GIs, the level to which transport can be represented by a simple {alpha}-disk formulation, and to examine fragmentation criteria. Four simulations are conducted, identical except for the number of azimuthal computational grid points used. A Fourier decomposition of non-axisymmetric density structures in cos (m{phi}), sin (m{phi}) is performed to evaluate the amplitudes A{sub m} of these structures. The A{sub m} , gravitational torques, and the effective Shakura and Sunyaev {alpha} arising from gravitational stresses are determined for each resolution. We find nonzero A{sub m} for all m-values and that A{sub m} summed over all m is essentially independent of resolution. Because the number of measurable m-values is limited to half the number of azimuthal grid points, higher-resolution simulations have a larger fraction of their total amplitude in higher-order structures. These structures act more locally than lower-order structures. Therefore, as the resolution increases the total gravitational stress decreases as well, leading higher-resolution simulations to experience weaker average gravitational torques than lower-resolution simulations. The effective {alpha} also depends upon the magnitude of the stresses, thus {alpha}{sub eff} also decreases with increasing resolution. Our converged {alpha}{sub eff} is consistent with predictions from an analytic local theory for thin disks by Gammie, but only over many dynamic times when averaged over a substantial volume of the disk.

  19. Imaging nuclear decays with Optical Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miernik, K.; Dominik, W.; Janas, Z.; Pfützner, M.; Bingham, C.; Czyrkowski, H.; Ćwiok, M.; Darby, I.; Dȧbrowski, R.; Fomitchev, A.; Gintei, T.; Golovkov, M.; Grzywacz, R.; Karny, M.; Korgul, A.; Kuśmierz, W.; Liddick, S.; Rajabali, M.; Rodin, A.; Rykaczewski, K.; Stepantsov, S.; Slepniev, R.; Stolz, A.; Ter-Akopian, G. M.; Wolski, R.

    2007-11-01

    A novel type of gaseous ionization detector—Optical Time Projection Chamber (OTPC)—developed to study rare nuclear decays is presented. The OTPC records tracks of charged particles ionizing a counting gas by optical imaging of the light generated by electrons multiplied in the amplification structures. By combining an electron drift-time profile measured by a photomultiplier and a CCD camera image we reconstruct three-dimensional trajectories of particles, energies and charges. The capabilities of the OTPC detector to study various decay modes are demonstrated by observation of beta-delayed proton emission from 13O, two-alpha break-up of 8Be, triple-alpha decay of 12C excited states and two-proton radioactivity of 45Fe.

  20. Time series analysis of nuclear instrumentation in EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Imel, G.R.

    1996-05-01

    Results of a time series analysis of the scaler count data from the 3 wide range nuclear detectors in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II are presented. One of the channels was replaced, and it was desired to determine if there was any statistically significant change (ie, improvement) in the channel`s response after the replacement. Data were collected from all 3 channels for 16-day periods before and after detector replacement. Time series analysis and statistical tests showed that there was no significant change after the detector replacement. Also, there were no statistically significant differences among the 3 channels, either before or after the replacement. Finally, it was determined that errors in the reactivity change inferred from subcritical count monitoring during fuel handling would be on the other of 20-30 cents for single count intervals.

  1. Comparative analysis of cooling systems for energy equipment of combined heat and power plants and nuclear power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reutov, B. F.; Lazarev, M. V.; Ermakova, S. V.; Zisman, S. L.; Kaplanovich, L. S.; Svetushkov, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    In the 20th century, the thermal power engineering in this country was oriented toward oncethrough cooling systems. More than 50% of the CHPP and NPP capacities with once-through cooling systems put into operation before the 1990s were large-scale water consumers but with minimum irretrievable water consumption. In 1995, the Water Code of the Russian Federation was adopted in which restrictions on application of once-through cooling systems for newly designed combined heat and power plants (CHPPs) were introduced for the first time. A ban on application of once-through systems was imposed by the current Water Code of the Russian Federation (Federal law no. 74-FZ, Art. 60 Cl. 4) not only for new CHPPs but also for those to be modified. Clause 4 of Article 60 of the Water Code of the Russian Federation contravenes law no. 7-FZ "On Protection of the Environment" that has priority significance, since the water environment is only part of the natural environment and those articles of the Water Code of the Russian Federation that are related directly to electric power engineering, viz., Articles 46 and 62. In recent decades, the search for means to increase revenue charges and the economic pressure on the thermal power industry caused introduction by law of charges for use of water by cooling systems irrespective of the latter's impact on the water quality of the source, the environment, the economic efficiency of the power production, and the living conditions of the people. The long-range annual increase in the water use charges forces the power generating companies to switch transfer once-through service water supply installations to recirculating water supply systems and once-through-recirculating systems with multiple reuse of warm water, which drastically reduces the technical, economic, and ecological characteristic of the power plant operation and also results in increasing power rates for the population. This work comprehensively substantiates the demands of

  2. Novel Controls for Time-Dependent Economic Dispatch of Combined Cooling Heating and Power (CCHP)

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelsen, Scott; Brouwer, Jack

    2013-08-31

    The research and development effort detailed in this report directly addresses the challenge of reducing U.S. industrial energy and carbon intensity by contributing to an increased understanding of potential CCHP technology, the CCHP market and the challenges of widespread adoption. This study developed a number of new tools, models, and approaches for the design, control, and optimal dispatch of various CCHP technologies. The UC Irvine campus served as a ‘living laboratory’ of new CCHP technologies and enabled the design and demonstration of several novel control methods. In particular, the integration of large scale thermal energy storage capable of shifting an entire day of cooling demand required a novel approach to the CCHP dispatch optimization. The thermal energy storage proved an economically viable resource which reduced both costs and emissions by enabling generators and chillers to operate under steady high efficiency conditions at all times of the day.

  3. Observations of infrared radiative cooling in the thermosphere on daily to multiyear timescales from the TIMED/SABER instrument (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynczak, M. G.

    2009-12-01

    We present observations of the infrared radiative cooling by carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitric oxide (NO) in Earth’s thermosphere. These data have been taken over a period of 7 years by the SABER instrument on the NASA TIMED satellite and are the dominant radiative cooling mechanisms for the thermosphere. From the SABER observations we derive vertical profiles of radiative cooling rates (W m-3), radiative fluxes (W m-2), and radiated power (W). In the period from January 2002 through January 2009 we observe a large decrease in the cooling rates, fluxes, and power consistent with the declining phase of solar cycle 23. The power radiated by NO during 2008 when the Sun exhibited few sunspots was nearly one order of magnitude smaller than the peak power observed shortly after the mission began. Substantial short-term variability in the infrared emissions is also observed throughout the entire mission duration. Radiative cooling rates and radiative fluxes from NO exhibit fundamentally different latitude dependence than do those from CO2, with the NO fluxes and cooling rates being largest at high latitudes and polar regions. The cooling rates are shown to be derived relatively independent of the collisional and radiative processes that drive the departure from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) in the CO2 15 μm and the NO 5.3 μm vibration-rotation bands. The observed NO and CO2 cooling rates have been compiled into a separate dataset and represent a climate data record that is available for use in assessments of radiative cooling in upper atmosphere general circulation models.

  4. Observations of Infrared Radiative Cooling in the Thermosphere on Daily to Multiyear Timescales from the TIMED/SABER Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Hunt, Linda A.; Marshall, B. Thomas; Martin-Torres, F. Javier; Mertens, Christopher J.; Russell, James M., III; Remsberg, Ellis E.; Lopez-Puertas, Manuel; Picard, Richard; Winick, Jeremy; Wintersteiner, Peter; Thompson, R. Earl; Gordley, Larry L.

    2009-01-01

    We present observations of the infrared radiative cooling by carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitric oxide (NO) in Earth s thermosphere. These data have been taken over a period of 7 years by the SABER instrument on the NASA TIMED satellite and are the dominant radiative cooling mechanisms for the thermosphere. From the SABER observations we derive vertical profiles of radiative cooling rates (W/cu m), radiative fluxes (W/sq m), and radiated power (W). In the period from January 2002 through January 2009 we observe a large decrease in the cooling rates, fluxes, and power consistent with the declining phase of solar cycle. The power radiated by NO during 2008 when the Sun exhibited few sunspots was nearly one order of magnitude smaller than the peak power observed shortly after the mission began. Substantial short-term variability in the infrared emissions is also observed throughout the entire mission duration. Radiative cooling rates and radiative fluxes from NO exhibit fundamentally different latitude dependence than do those from CO2, with the NO fluxes and cooling rates being largest at high latitudes and polar regions. The cooling rates are shown to be derived relatively independent of the collisional and radiative processes that drive the departure from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) in the CO2 15 m and the NO 5.3 m vibration-rotation bands. The observed NO and CO2 cooling rates have been compiled into a separate dataset and represent a climate data record that is available for use in assessments of radiative cooling in upper atmosphere general circulation models.

  5. Just In-Time Maintenance of Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    DR. Alexander G. Parlos

    2002-01-22

    The goal of this project has been to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a new technology for maintenance engineering: a Just-In-Time Maintenance (JITM) system for rotating machines. The JITM system is based on several key developments at Texas A and M over the past ten years in emerging intelligent information technologies, which if integrated into a single system could provide a revolutionary approach in the way maintenance is performed. Rotating machines, such as induction motors, range from a few horse power (hp) to several thousand hp in size, and they are widely used in nuclear power plants and in other industries. Forced outages caused by induction motor failures are the reason for as much as 15% - 40% of production costs to be attributable to maintenance, whereas plant shutdowns caused by induction motor failures result in daily financial losses to the utility and process industries of $1 M or more. The basic components of the JITM system are the available machine sensors, that is electric current sensors and accelerometers, and the computational algorithms used in the analysis and interpretation of the occurring incipient failures. The JITM system can reduce the costs attributable to maintenance by about 40% and it can lower the maintenance budgets of power and process plants by about 35%, while requiring no additional sensor installation. As a result, the JITM system can improve the competitiveness of US nuclear utilities at minimal additional cost.

  6. Analysis of Time-Dependent Tritium Breeding Capability of Water Cooled Ceramic Breeder Blanket for CFETR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fangfang; Zhang, Xiaokang; Pu, Yong; Zhu, Qingjun; Liu, Songlin

    2016-08-01

    Attaining tritium self-sufficiency is an important mission for the Chinese Fusion Engineering Testing Reactor (CFETR) operating on a Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) fuel cycle. It is necessary to study the tritium breeding ratio (TBR) and breeding tritium inventory variation with operation time so as to provide an accurate data for dynamic modeling and analysis of the tritium fuel cycle. A water cooled ceramic breeder (WCCB) blanket is one candidate of blanket concepts for the CFETR. Based on the detailed 3D neutronics model of CFETR with the WCCB blanket, the time-dependent TBR and tritium surplus were evaluated by a coupling calculation of the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) and the fusion activation code FISPACT-2007. The results indicated that the TBR and tritium surplus of the WCCB blanket were a function of operation time and fusion power due to the Li consumption in breeder and material activation. In addition, by comparison with the results calculated by using the 3D neutronics model and employing the transfer factor constant from 1D to 3D, it is noted that 1D analysis leads to an over-estimation for the time-dependent tritium breeding capability when fusion power is larger than 1000 MW. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB108004, 2015GB108002, and 2014GB119000), and by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11175207)

  7. Cool Shelter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Praeger, Charles E.

    2005-01-01

    Amid climbing energy costs and tightening budgets, administrators at school districts, colleges and universities are looking for all avenues of potential savings while promoting sustainable communities. Cool metal roofing can save schools money and promote sustainable design at the same time. Cool metal roofing keeps the sun's heat from collecting…

  8. Cool Shelter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Praeger, Charles E.

    2005-01-01

    Amid climbing energy costs and tightening budgets, administrators at school districts, colleges and universities are looking for all avenues of potential savings while promoting sustainable communities. Cool metal roofing can save schools money and promote sustainable design at the same time. Cool metal roofing keeps the sun's heat from collecting…

  9. Activation of equine nuclear transfer oocytes: methods and timing of treatment in relation to nuclear remodeling.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young-Ho; Love, Linda B; Westhusin, Mark E; Hinrichs, Katrin

    2004-01-01

    Early development of embryos produced by transfer of equine nuclei to bovine cytoplasts is superior to that of intraspecies equine nuclear transfer embryos. This may be related to differences in chromatin remodeling or efficiency of activation between the two oocyte types. The pattern of donor nucleus remodeling was examined in equine-equine and equine-bovine reconstructed oocytes. Chromosome condensation occurred in equine cytoplasts by 2 h but was not seen in bovine cytoplasts until 4 h. We investigated the effect of activation of equine-equine reconstructed oocytes at <30 min or at 2 h after reconstruction. Four activation treatments were evaluated at each time point: injection of sperm extract alone, or in combination with 6-dimethylaminopurine (6-DMAP), cytochalasin B, or 1% dimethylsulphoxide. There was no significant difference in normal cleavage rate or average nucleus number of embryos between equine oocytes activated <30 min or at 2 h after reconstruction. The combination of 6-DMAP with sperm extract significantly (P < 0.01) improved cleavage rate compared with the other three treatments. Activation with sperm extract and 6-DMAP 2 h after donor nucleus injection gave the highest cleavage (79%) and the highest cleavage with normal nuclei (40%). Sperm extract and 6-DMAP also effectively activated oocytes parthenogenetically, yielding 83% cleavage and 73% cleavage with normal nuclei. These results indicate that although nuclear remodeling occurs rapidly in equine cytoplasts, early activation does not improve embryonic development after reconstruction.

  10. The multi-isotope process monitor: Non-destructive, near-real-time nuclear safeguards monitoring at a reprocessing facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orton, Christopher Robert

    The IAEA will require advanced technologies to effectively safeguard nuclear material at envisioned large scale nuclear reprocessing plants. This dissertation describes results from simulations and experiments designed to test the Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor, a novel safeguards approach for process monitoring in reprocessing plants. The MIP Monitor combines the detection of intrinsic gamma ray signatures emitted from process solutions with multivariate analysis to detect off-normal conditions in process streams, nondestructively and in near-real time (NRT). Three different models were used to predict spent nuclear fuel composition, estimate chemical distribution during separation, and simulate spectra from a variety of gamma detectors in product and raffinate streams for processed fuel. This was done for fuel with various irradiation histories and under a variety of plant operating conditions. Experiments were performed to validate the results from the model. Three segments of commercial spent nuclear fuel with variations in burnup and cooling time were dissolved and subjected to a batch PUREX method to separate the uranium and plutonium from fission and activation products. Gamma spectra were recorded by high purity germanium (HPGe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors. Hierarchal Cluster Analysis (HCA) and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) were applied to spectra from both model and experiment to investigate spectral variations as a function of acid concentration, burnup level and cooling time. Partial Least Squares was utilized to extract quantitative information about process variables, such as acid concentration or burnup. The MIP Monitor was found to be sensitive to the induced variations of the process and was capable of extracting quantitative process information from the analyzed spectra.

  11. Cooling of Stored Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, F.

    1986-06-10

    Beam cooling methods developed for the accumulation of antiprotons are being employed to assist in the performance of experiments in Nuclear and Particle Physics with ion beams stored in storage rings. The physics of beam cooling, and the ranges of utility of stochastic and electron cooling are discussed in this paper.

  12. The effect of heating and cooling on time course of voluntary and electrically induced muscle force variation.

    PubMed

    Brazaitis, Marius; Skurvydas, Albertas; Vadopalas, Kazys; Daniusevičiūtė, Laura; Senikienė, Zibuoklė

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of heating and cooling on time course of voluntary and electrically induced muscle force variation. Ten volunteers performed 50 maximal voluntary and electrically induced contractions of the knee extensors at an angle of 120 degrees under the control conditions and after passive lower body heating and cooling in the control, heating, and cooling experiments. Peak torque, torque variation, and half-relaxation time were assessed during the exercise. Passive lower body heating increased muscle and core temperatures, while cooling lowered muscle temperature, but did not affect core temperature. We observed significantly lower muscle fatigue during voluntary contraction compared with electrically induced contractions. Body heating (opposite to cooling) increased involuntarily induced muscle force, but caused greater electrically induced muscle fatigue. In the middle of the exercise, the coefficient of correlation for electrically induced muscle torque decreased significantly as compared with the beginning of the exercise, while during maximal voluntary contractions, this relation for torque remained significant until the end of the exercise. It was shown that time course of voluntary contraction was more stable than in electrically induced contractions.

  13. Real-Time, Model-Based Spray-Cooling Control System for Steel Continuous Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrus, Bryan; Zheng, Kai; Zhou, X.; Thomas, Brian G.; Bentsman, Joseph

    2011-02-01

    This article presents a new system to control secondary cooling water sprays in continuous casting of thin steel slabs (CONONLINE). It uses real-time numerical simulation of heat transfer and solidification within the strand as a software sensor in place of unreliable temperature measurements. The one-dimensional finite-difference model, CON1D, is adapted to create the real-time predictor of the slab temperature and solidification state. During operation, the model is updated with data collected by the caster automation systems. A decentralized controller configuration based on a bank of proportional-integral controllers with antiwindup is developed to maintain the shell surface-temperature profile at a desired set point. A new method of set-point generation is proposed to account for measured mold heat flux variations. A user-friendly monitor visualizes the results and accepts set-point changes from the caster operator. Example simulations demonstrate how a significantly better shell surface-temperature control is achieved.

  14. Real-time dosimeter targeted to nuclear applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, Alexandre; Rosa, Carla C.; Santos, Pedro M. P.; Falcão, António N.; Lorentz, Katharina

    2014-08-01

    An intrinsic fiber optic dosimeter (FOD) targeted to nuclear applications is presented. The proposed real-time dosimeter provides dose information based on the historic record over time of the effects of ionizing radiation on single- and multimode pure silica fibers, and also on PMMA plastic fibers. The effect of 60Co gamma irradiation on optical links based on silica and plastic fibers were assessed, considering thermal environment effects over a wide range of variation of the operating parameters. Cerenkov radiation and radiation-induced absorption effects were in focus. The corresponding distortion and spectral transmission degradation were evaluated over wide range of the operating parameters. Radiation induced attenuation (RIA) has shown a spectral band dependent behaviour up to 840 Gy dose levels. The performance of different fibers was assessed against the performance of non-irradiated fibers. From the measurements of dose rate and total dose imparted by ionizing radiation in the fibers we verified that fibers with radiation resistance issues showed wavelength-dependent radiation sensitivity increasing with dose rate. Upon evaluation of correlations between the total dose, the induced loss at various dose rates and different wavelengths, it was concluded that intrinsic fiber dosimeters can be used for dose rates in the range 4 - 28 Gy/min., typical of severe radiation environments.

  15. Real-time graphic display utility for nuclear safety applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S.; Huang, X.; Taylor, J.; Stevens, J.; Gerardis, T.; Hsu, A.; McCreary, T.

    2006-07-01

    With the increasing interests in the nuclear energy, new nuclear power plants will be constructed and licensed, and older generation ones will be upgraded for assuring continuing operation. The tendency of adopting the latest proven technology and the fact of older parts becoming obsolete have made the upgrades imperative. One of the areas for upgrades is the older CRT display being replaced by the latest graphics displays running under modern real time operating system (RTOS) with safety graded modern computer. HFC has developed a graphic display utility (GDU) under the QNX RTOS. A standard off-the-shelf software with a long history of performance in industrial applications, QNX RTOS used for safety applications has been examined via a commercial dedication process that is consistent with the regulatory guidelines. Through a commercial survey, a design life cycle and an operating history evaluation, and necessary tests dictated by the dedication plan, it is reasonably confirmed that the QNX RTOS was essentially equivalent to what would be expected in the nuclear industry. The developed GDU operates and communicates with the existing equipment through a dedicated serial channel of a flat panel controller (FPC) module. The FPC module drives a flat panel display (FPD) monitor. A touch screen mounted on the FPD serves as the normal operator interface with the FPC/FPD monitor system. The GDU can be used not only for replacing older CRTs but also in new applications. The replacement of the older CRT does not disturb the function of the existing equipment. It not only provides modern proven technology upgrade but also improves human ergonomics. The FPC, which can be used as a standalone controller running with the GDU, is an integrated hardware and software module. It operates as a single board computer within a control system, and applies primarily to the graphics display, targeting, keyboard and mouse. During normal system operation, the GDU has two sources of data

  16. Deuterium migration in nuclear graphite: Consequences for the behavior of tritium in CO2-cooled reactors and for the decontamination of irradiated graphite waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Guillou, M.; Toulhoat, N.; Pipon, Y.; Moncoffre, N.; Khodja, H.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we aim at understanding tritium behavior in the graphite moderator of French CO2-cooled nuclear fission reactors (called UNGG for "Uranium Naturel-Graphite-Gaz") to get information on its distribution and inventory in the irradiated graphite waste after their dismantling. These findings should be useful both to improve waste treatment processes and to foresee tritium behavior during reactor decommissioning and waste disposal operations. The purpose of the present work is to elucidate the effects of temperature on the behavior of tritium during reactor operation. Furthermore, it aims at exploring options of thermal decontamination. For both purposes, annealing experiments were carried out in inert atmosphere as well as in thermal conditions as close as possible to those encountered in UNGG reactors and in view of a potential decontamination in humid gas. D+ ions were implanted into virgin nuclear graphite in order to simulate tritium displaced from its original structural site through recoil during reactor operation. The effect of thermal treatments on the mobility of the implanted deuterium was then investigated at temperatures ranging from 200 to 1200 °C, in inert atmosphere (vacuum or argon), in a gas simulating the UNGG coolant gas (mainly CO2) or in humid nitrogen. Deuterium was analyzed by Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) both at millimetric and micrometric scales. We have identified three main stages for the deuterium release. The first one corresponds to deuterium permeation through graphite open pores. The second and third ones are controlled by the progressive detrapping of deuterium located at different trapping sites and its successive migration through the crystallites and along crystallites and coke grains edges. Extrapolating the thermal behavior of deuterium to tritium, the results show that the release becomes significant above the maximum UNGG reactor temperature of 500 °C and should be lower than 30% of the total amount produced

  17. Public Discussion of Nuclear Warfare: A Time for Hope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Martha

    Anti-nuclear discourse, which peaked in 1981-82, signaled an emergence of public discourse on the nuclear warfare issue. During the development of the original atomic bomb, public discussion of the issue was severely restricted, but immediately after the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, discourse on the subject increased. During the Cold War…

  18. Public Discussion of Nuclear Warfare: A Time for Hope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Martha

    Anti-nuclear discourse, which peaked in 1981-82, signaled an emergence of public discourse on the nuclear warfare issue. During the development of the original atomic bomb, public discussion of the issue was severely restricted, but immediately after the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, discourse on the subject increased. During the Cold War…

  19. Structural relaxation time and cooling rate of a melt in the glass transition region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanditov, D. S.; Sydykov, B. S.

    2015-03-01

    The nature of the parameter involved in the Bartenev equation qτg = C relating the cooling rate of a glass-forming melt to its structural relaxation time in the glass transition region is discussed on the basis of the Volkenshtein-Ptitsyn theory using a number of known relationships. It is established that parameter C for amorphous substances with the same fragility is linearly temperature dependent. This parameter is shown to equal the narrow temperature range δ T g characterizing the liquid-glass transition region (by Nemilov); i.e., C = δ T g. It is concluded that δ T g for most glassy systems is only ˜0.7% of the glass transition temperature T g. The narrowness of temperature range δ T g is explained by the small fluctuation volume fraction f g "frozen" at the glass transition temperature. The concept of a close relationship between constant C and the structural order at T g (i.e., the characteristic of the inner state of a nonequilibrium "frozen" amorphous system) is developed.

  20. Multi-stage pulse tube cryocooler with acoustic impedance constructed to reduce transient cool down time and thermal loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedeon, David R. (Inventor); Wilson, Kyle B. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The cool down time for a multi-stage, pulse tube cryocooler is reduced by configuring at least a portion of the acoustic impedance of a selected stage, higher than the first stage, so that it surrounds the cold head of the selected stage. The surrounding acoustic impedance of the selected stage is mounted in thermally conductive connection to the warm region of the selected stage for cooling the acoustic impedance and is fabricated of a high thermal diffusivity, low thermal radiation emissivity material, preferably aluminum.

  1. Real-Time Characterization of Special Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Walston, Sean; Candy, Jim; Chambers, Dave; Chandrasekaran, Hema; Snyderman, Neal

    2015-09-04

    When confronting an item that may contain nuclear material, it is urgently necessary to determine its characteristics. Our goal is to provide accurate information with high-con dence as rapidly as possible.

  2. Effects of liquid cooling garments on recovery and performance time in individuals performing strenuous work wearing a firefighter ensemble.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Hyun; Coca, Aitor; Williams, W Jon; Roberge, Raymond J

    2011-07-01

    This study investigated the effects of body cooling using liquid cooling garments (LCG) on performance time (PT) and recovery in individuals wearing a fully equipped prototype firefighter ensemble (PFE) incorporating a self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA). Six healthy male participants (three firefighters and three non-firefighters) completed six experimental sessions in an environmental chamber (35°C, 50% relative humidity), consisting of three stages of 15 min exercise at 75% VO2max, and 10 min rest following each exercise stage. During each session, one of the following six conditions was administered in a randomized order: control (no cooling, CON); air ventilation of exhaust SCBA gases rerouted into the PFE (AV); top cooling garment (TCG); TCG combined with AV (TCG+AV); a shortened whole body cooling garment (SCG), and SCG combined with AV (SCG+AV). Results showed that total PT completed was longer under SCG and SCG+AV compared with CON, AV, TCG, and TCG+AV (p<0.01). Magnitude of core temperature (Tc) elevation was significantly decreased when SCG was utilized (p<0.01), and heart rate recovery rate (10 min) was enhanced under SCG, SCG+AV, TCG, and TCG+AV compared with CON (p<0.05). Estimated Esw rate (kg·h(-1)) was the greatest in CON, 1.62 (0.37), and the least in SCG+AV 0.98 (0.44): (descending order: CON>AV>TCG=TCG+AV>SCG>SCG+AV) without a statistical difference between the conditions (p<0.05). Results of the present study suggest that the application of LCG underneath the PFE significantly improves the recovery during a short period of rest and prolongs performance time in subsequent bouts of exercise. LCG also appears to be an effective method for body cooling that promotes heat dissipation during uncompensable heat stress.

  3. Nuclear Island Engineering MHTGR [Modular High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor] preliminary and final designs. Technical progress report, December 12, 1988--September 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    1989-12-01

    This report summarizes the Department of Energy (DOE)-funded work performed by General Atomics (GA) under the Nuclear Island Engineering (NIE)-Modular High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (MHTGR) Preliminary and Final Designs Contract DE-AC03-89SF17885 for the period December 12, 1988 through September 30, 1989. This reporting period is the first (partial) fiscal year of the 5-year contract performance period. The objective of DOE`s MHTGR program is to advance the design from the conceptual design phase into preliminary design and then on to final design in support of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC`s) design review and approval of the MHTGR Design Team, is focused on the Nuclear Island portion of the technology and design, primarily in the areas of the reactor and internals, fuel characteristics and fuel fabrication, helium services systems, reactor protection, shutdown cooling, circulator design, and refueling system. Maintenance and implementation of the functional methodology, plant-level analysis, support for probabilistic risk assessment, quality assurance, operations, and reliability/availability assessments are included in GA`s scope of work.

  4. Storm time variation of radiative cooling of thermosphere by nitric oxide emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, M. V. Sunil; Bag, Tikemani; Bharti, Gaurav

    2016-07-01

    The fundamental vibration-rotation band emission (Δν=1, Δ j=0,± 1) by nitric oxide (NO) at 5.3 µm is one of the most important cooling mechanisms in thermosphere. The collisional vibrational excitation of NO(ν=0) by impact with atomic oxygen is the main source of vibrationally excited nitric oxide. The variation of NO density depends on latitude, longitude and season. The present study aims to understand how the radiative flux gets influenced by the severe geomagnetic storm conditions. The variation of Nitric Oxide (NO) radiative flux exiting thermosphere is studied during the superstorm event of 7-12 November, 2004. The observations of TIMED/SABER suggest a strong anti-correlation with the O/N_2 ratio observed by GUVI during the same period. On a global scale the NO radiative flux showed an enhancement during the main phase on 8 November, 2004, whereas maximum depletion in O/N_2 is observed on 10 November, 2004. Both O/N_2 and NO radiative flux were found to propagate equatorward due to the effect of meridional wind resulting from joule and particle heating in polar region. Larger penetrations is observed in western longitude sectors. These observed variations are effectively connected to the variations in neutral densities. In the equatorial sectors, O/N_2 shows enhancement but almost no variation in radiative flux is observed. The possible reasons for the observed variations in NO radiative emission and O/N_2 ratios are discussed in the light of equator ward increase in the densities and prompt penetration.

  5. Helium-cooling and -spinning dynamic nuclear polarization for sensitivity-enhanced solid-state NMR at 14 T and 30 K.

    PubMed

    Matsuki, Yoh; Ueda, Keisuke; Idehara, Toshitaka; Ikeda, Ryosuke; Ogawa, Isamu; Nakamura, Shinji; Toda, Mitsuru; Anai, Takahiro; Fujiwara, Toshimichi

    2012-12-01

    We describe a (1)H polarization enhancement via dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at very low sample temperature T≈30 K under magic-angle spinning (MAS) conditions for sensitivity-enhanced solid-state NMR measurement. Experiments were conducted at a high external field strength of 14.1 T. For MAS DNP experiments at T<90 K, a new probe system using cold helium gas for both sample-cooling and -spinning was developed. The novel system can sustain a low sample temperature between 30 and 90K for a period of time >10 h under MAS at ν(R)≈3 kHz with liquid He consumption of ≈6 L/h. As a microwave source, we employed a high-power, continuously frequency-tunable gyrotron. At T≈34 K, (1)H DNP enhancement factors of 47 and 23 were observed with and without MAS, respectively. On the basis of these observations, a discussion on the total NMR sensitivity that takes into account the effect of sample temperature and external field strength used in DNP experiments is presented. It was determined that the use of low sample temperature and high external field is generally rewarding for the total sensitivity, in spite of the slower polarization buildup at lower temperature and lower DNP efficiency at higher field. These findings highlight the potential of the current continuous-wave DNP technique also at very high field conditions suitable to analyze large and complex systems, such as biological macromolecules. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Development and investigations of compact heat-transfer equipment for a nuclear power station equipped with a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovko, V. F.; Dmitrieva, I. V.; Kodochigov, N. G.; Bykh, O. A.

    2013-07-01

    The project of a nuclear power station the reactor coolant system of which includes a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor combined with a gas-turbine energy conversion unit supposes the use of high-efficient gas-cycle-based heat-transfer equipment. An analysis aimed at selecting the optimal heat-transfer surfaces is presented together with the results from their calculated and experimental investigation. The design features of recuperators arranged integrally with end and intermediate coolers and placed in a vertical sealed high-pressure vessel of limited sizes are considered.

  7. Time-dependent nuclear measurements of fuel-shell mix in ICF implosions at OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rygg, J. Ryan

    2006-10-01

    Fuel-shell mix remains a pivotal concern in inertial confinement fusion (ICF), as it can preclude ignition. Mix is the result of saturation of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth at a density interface that leads to small-scale, turbulent eddies and atomic-level mixing of cool, high-density fuel in the shell with hot, low-density fuel in the core. If sufficient mixing occurs, it will disrupt the formation of the ``hot-spot'' required for ignition. To sensitively probe the evolution and extent of mix in spherical implosions, the time dependence of the D^3He nuclear reaction rate was measured from implosions of capsules filled with pure ^3He. The capsule shell was comprised of a 1-μm layer of CD inside a 19-μm layer of CH. Nuclear burn will only occur in such capsules if there is sufficient mixing of D from the shell with hot ^3He in the core. By utilizing novel D^3He reaction-rate and proton spectrometers, all sensitive to the 14.7 MeV D^3He protons, a comprehensive, time dependent picture of mix was constructed. Important qualitative features were immediately evident: first, the shock burn of D^3He, always present for gas fills of D^3He, was absent, enabling a strong limit to be set on the amount and extent of D penetration into the ^3He. Second, the time necessary for RT instabilities to induce mix and to be heated by the hot core resulted in a 90 ps delay in the D^3He bang time as compared to bang time for implosions with D^3He fills. And third, when the gas pressure of ^3He was reduced from 20 to 4 atm, the extent of mix was enhanced by about a factor of 5. This work was supported in part by LLE, LLNL, the U.S. DoE, and the N.Y. State Energy Research and Development Authority.

  8. C. elegans Nuclear Envelope Proteins Emerin, MAN1, Lamin, and Nucleoporins Reveal Unique Timing of Nuclear Envelope Breakdown during Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kenneth K.; Gruenbaum, Yosef; Spann, Perah; Liu, Jun; Wilson, Katherine L.

    2000-01-01

    Emerin, MAN1, and LAP2 are integral membrane proteins of the vertebrate nuclear envelope. They share a 43-residue N-terminal motif termed the LEM domain. We found three putative LEM domain genes in Caenorhabditis elegans, designated emr-1, lem-2, and lem-3. We analyzed emr-l, which encodes Ce-emerin, and lem-2, which encodes Ce-MAN1. Ce-emerin and Ce-MAN1 migrate on SDS-PAGE as 17- and 52-kDa proteins, respectively. Based on their biochemical extraction properties and immunolocalization, both Ce-emerin and Ce-MAN1 are integral membrane proteins localized at the nuclear envelope. We used antibodies against Ce-MAN1, Ce-emerin, nucleoporins, and Ce-lamin to determine the timing of nuclear envelope breakdown during mitosis in C. elegans. The C. elegans nuclear envelope disassembles very late compared with vertebrates and Drosophila. The nuclear membranes remained intact everywhere except near spindle poles during metaphase and early anaphase, fully disassembling only during mid-late anaphase. Disassembly of pore complexes, and to a lesser extent the lamina, depended on embryo age: pore complexes were absent during metaphase in >30-cell embryos but existed until anaphase in 2- to 24-cell embryos. Intranuclear mRNA splicing factors disassembled after prophase. The timing of nuclear disassembly in C. elegans is novel and may reflect its evolutionary position between unicellular and more complex eukaryotes. PMID:10982402

  9. Microbial fouling community analysis of the cooling water system of a nuclear test reactor with emphasis on sulphate reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Balamurugan, P; Joshi, M Hiren; Rao, T S

    2011-10-01

    Culture and molecular-based techniques were used to characterize bacterial diversity in the cooling water system of a fast breeder test reactor (FBTR). Techniques were selected for special emphasis on sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Water samples from different locations of the FBTR cooling water system, in addition to biofilm scrapings from carbon steel coupons and a control SRB sample were characterized. Whole genome extraction of the water samples and SRB diversity by group specific primers were analysed using nested PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The results of the bacterial assay in the cooling water showed that the total culturable bacteria (TCB) ranged from 10(3) to 10(5) cfu ml(-1); iron-reducing bacteria, 10(3) to 10(5) cfu ml(-1); iron oxidizing bacteria, 10(2) to 10(3) cfu ml(-1) and SRB, 2-29 cfu ml(-1). However, the counts of the various bacterial types in the biofilm sample were 2-3 orders of magnitude higher. SRB diversity by the nested PCR-DGGE approach showed the presence of groups 1, 5 and 6 in the FBTR cooling water system; however, groups 2, 3 and 4 were not detected. The study demonstrated that the PCR protocol influenced the results of the diversity analysis. The paper further discusses the microbiota of the cooling water system and its relevance in biofouling.

  10. The thermal circuit of a nuclear power station's unit built around a supercritical-pressure water-cooled reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silin, V. A.; Zorin, V. M.; Tagirov, A. M.; Tregubova, O. I.; Belov, I. V.; Povarov, P. V.

    2010-12-01

    Main results obtained from calculations of the steam generator and thermal circuit of the steam turbine unit for a nuclear power unit with supercritical-pressure water coolant and integral layout are presented. The obtained characteristics point to the advisability of carrying out further developments of this promising nuclear power technology.

  11. Strictosidine activation in Apocynaceae: towards a "nuclear time bomb"?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    upon enzyme-substrate reunion occurring during potential herbivore feeding constituting a so-called "nuclear time bomb" in reference to the "mustard oil bomb" commonly used to describe the myrosinase-glucosinolate defence system in Brassicaceae. PMID:20723215

  12. Cool Vest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    ILC, Dover Division's lightweight cooling garment, called Cool Vest was designed to eliminate the harmful effects of heat stress; increases tolerance time in hot environments by almost 300 percent. Made of urethane-coated nylon used in Apollo, it works to keep the body cool, circulating chilled water throughout the lining by means of a small battery-powered pump. A pocket houses the pump, battery and the coolant which can be ice or a frozen gel, a valve control allows temperature regulation. One version is self-contained and portable for unrestrained movement, another has an umbilical line attached to an external source of coolant, such as standard tap water, when extended mobility is not required. It is reported from customers that the Cool Vest pays for itself in increased productivity in very high temperatures.

  13. Restaurant food cooling practices.

    PubMed

    Brown, Laura Green; Ripley, Danny; Blade, Henry; Reimann, Dave; Everstine, Karen; Nicholas, Dave; Egan, Jessica; Koktavy, Nicole; Quilliam, Daniela N

    2012-12-01

    Improper food cooling practices are a significant cause of foodborne illness, yet little is known about restaurant food cooling practices. This study was conducted to examine food cooling practices in restaurants. Specifically, the study assesses the frequency with which restaurants meet U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommendations aimed at reducing pathogen proliferation during food cooling. Members of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Environmental Health Specialists Network collected data on food cooling practices in 420 restaurants. The data collected indicate that many restaurants are not meeting FDA recommendations concerning cooling. Although most restaurant kitchen managers report that they have formal cooling processes (86%) and provide training to food workers on proper cooling (91%), many managers said that they do not have tested and verified cooling processes (39%), do not monitor time or temperature during cooling processes (41%), or do not calibrate thermometers used for monitoring temperatures (15%). Indeed, 86% of managers reported cooling processes that did not incorporate all FDA-recommended components. Additionally, restaurants do not always follow recommendations concerning specific cooling methods, such as refrigerating cooling food at shallow depths, ventilating cooling food, providing open-air space around the tops and sides of cooling food containers, and refraining from stacking cooling food containers on top of each other. Data from this study could be used by food safety programs and the restaurant industry to target training and intervention efforts concerning cooling practices. These efforts should focus on the most frequent poor cooling practices, as identified by this study.

  14. Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. Progress report, July 1, 1980-September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-12

    Objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (helium containing small amounts of various other gases), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Work covered in this report includes the activities associated with the status of the simulated reactor helium supply system, testing equipment and gas chemistry analysis instrumentation and equipment. The progress in the screening test program is described: screening creep results and metallographic analysis for materials thermally exposed or tested at 750, 850, 950 and 1050/sup 0/C. Initiation of controlled purity helium creep-rupture testing in the intensive screening test program is discussed. In addition, the results of 1000-hour exposures at 750 and 850/sup 0/C on several experimental alloys are discussed.

  15. Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. Progress report, April 1, 1980-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-14

    Objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (helium containing small amounts of various other gases), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Work covered in this report includes the activities associated with the status of the simulated reactor helium supply system, testing equipment and gas chemistry analysis instrumentation and equipment. The progress in the screening test program is described; this includes: screening creep results and metallographic analysis for materials thermally exposed or tested at 750, 850 and 950/sup 0/C. The initiation of air creep-rupture testing in the intensive screening test program is discussed. In addition, the status of the data management system is described.

  16. Cooling water distribution system

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Richard

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using an interconnected series of radial guide elements, a plurality of circumferential collector elements and collector boxes to collect and feed the cooling water into distribution channels extending along the curved surface of the steel containment vessel. The cooling water is uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weirs in the distribution channels.

  17. ITER's Tokamak Cooling Water System and the the Use of ASME Codes to Comply with French Regulations of Nuclear Pressure Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Jan; Ferrada, Juan J; Curd, Warren; Dell Orco, Dr. Giovanni; Barabash, Vladimir; Kim, Seokho H

    2011-01-01

    During inductive plasma operation of ITER, fusion power will reach 500 MW with an energy multiplication factor of 10. The heat will be transferred by the Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS) to the environment using the secondary cooling system. Plasma operations are inherently safe even under the most severe postulated accident condition a large, in-vessel break that results in a loss-of-coolant accident. A functioning cooling water system is not required to ensure safe shutdown. Even though ITER is inherently safe, TCWS equipment (e.g., heat exchangers, piping, pressurizers) are classified as safety important components. This is because the water is predicted to contain low-levels of radionuclides (e.g., activated corrosion products, tritium) with activity levels high enough to require the design of components to be in accordance with French regulations for nuclear pressure equipment, i.e., the French Order dated 12 December 2005 (ESPN). ESPN has extended the practical application of the methodology established by the Pressure Equipment Directive (97/23/EC) to nuclear pressure equipment, under French Decree 99-1046 dated 13 December 1999, and Order dated 21 December 1999 (ESP). ASME codes and supplementary analyses (e.g., Failure Modes and Effects Analysis) will be used to demonstrate that the TCWS equipment meets these essential safety requirements. TCWS is being designed to provide not only cooling, with a capacity of approximately 1 GW energy removal, but also elevated temperature baking of first-wall/blanket, vacuum vessel, and divertor. Additional TCWS functions include chemical control of water, draining and drying for maintenance, and facilitation of leak detection/localization. The TCWS interfaces with the majority of ITER systems, including the secondary cooling system. U.S. ITER is responsible for design, engineering, and procurement of the TCWS with industry support from an Engineering Services Organization (ESO) (AREVA Federal Services, with support

  18. Nuclear Engineering Computer Modules, Thermal-Hydraulics, TH-3: High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reihman, Thomas C.

    This learning module is concerned with the temperature field, the heat transfer rates, and the coolant pressure drop in typical high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel assemblies. As in all of the modules of this series, emphasis is placed on developing the theory and demonstrating its use with a simplified model. The heart of the module…

  19. Early to Middle Miocene cooling ages on Kea and Kythnos: timing constraints on crustal extension in the western Cyclades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, D. A.; Stockli, D.; Grasemann, B.; Iglseder, Ch.; Rice, A. H. N.; Heizler, M.

    2009-04-01

    metamorphic domes to represent the timing of extension and exhumation under moderate to rapid conditions. The structural style and metamorphic grade suggest these islands are exhumed portions of the Hellenic brittle-ductile transition zone. Except for the few younger Late Miocene ages on Kea, the bulk of our results are in marked contrast to the cooling pattern that has emerged on Serifos, a SSW-directed extensional dome directly adjacent to the south. Exhumation of the Cycladic metamorphic domes in general was accommodated along interfering and sequentially developed extensional detachment zones; the disparity in timing between the northern domes and Serifos may be a reflection of this detachment geometry and further indicates the relatively protracted nature of Attica-Cycladic extrusion since the Early Oligocene.

  20. REACTOR COOLING

    DOEpatents

    Quackenbush, C.F.

    1959-09-29

    A nuclear reactor with provisions for selectively cooling the fuel elements is described. The reactor has a plurality of tubes extending throughout. Cylindrical fuel elements are disposed within the tubes and the coolant flows through the tubes and around the fuel elements. The fuel elements within the central portion of the reactor are provided with roughened surfaces of material. The fuel elements in the end portions of the tubes within the reactor are provlded with low conduction jackets and the fuel elements in the region between the central portion and the end portions are provided with smooth surfaces of high heat conduction material.

  1. Quality and fertility of cooled-shipped stallion semen at the time of insemination.

    PubMed

    Heckenbichler, Sabine; Deichsel, Katharina; Peters, Pamela; Aurich, Christine

    2011-03-15

    Stallion semen processing is far from standardized and differs substantially between AI centers. Suboptimal pregnancy rates in equine AI may primarily result from breeding with low quality semen not adequately processed for shipment. It was the aim of the study to evaluate quality and fertility of cooled-shipped equine semen provided for breeding of client mares by commercial semen collection centers in Europe. Cooled shipped semen (n = 201 doses) from 67 stallions and 36 different EU-approved semen collection centers was evaluated. At arrival, semen temperature was 9.8 ± 0.2 °C, mean sperm concentration of AI doses was 68 ± 3 x 10(6)/ml), mean total sperm count was 1.0 ± 0.1 x 10(9), total motility averaged 83 ± 1% and morphological defects 45 ± 2%. A total of 86 mares were inseminated, overall per season-pregnancy rate in these mares was 67%. Sperm concentration significantly influenced semen motility and morphology at arrival of the shipped semen. Significant effects of month of the year on volume, sperm concentration and total sperm count of the insemination dose were found. The collection center significantly influenced all semen parameters evaluated. Semen doses used to inseminate mares that became pregnant had significantly higher total and progressive motility of spermatozoa and a significantly lower percentage of morphological semen defects than insemination doses used for mares failing to get pregnant. Results demonstrate that insemination with semen of better quality provides a higher chance to achieve pregnancy. Besides the use of stallions with good semen quality, appropriate semen processing is an important factor for satisfying results in artificial insemination with cooled-shipped horse semen.

  2. Buying time: Franchising hazardous and nuclear waste cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, D.R.

    1997-05-01

    This paper describes a private franchise approach to long-term custodial care, monitoring and eventual cleanup of hazardous and nuclear waste sites. The franchise concept could be applied to Superfund sites, decommissioning commercial reactors and safeguarding their wastes and to Department of Energy sites. Privatization would reduce costs by enforcing efficient operations and capital investments during the containment period, by providing incentives for successful innovation and by sustaining containment until the cleanup`s net benefits exceed its costs. The franchise system would also permit local governments and citizens to demand and pay for more risk reduction than provided by the federal government. In principle, they would have the option of taking over site management. The major political drawback of the idea is that it requires society to be explicit about what it is willing to pay for now to protect current and future generations. Hazardous waste sites are enduring legacies of energy development. Abandoned mines, closed refineries, underground storage tanks and nuclear facilities have often become threats to human health and water quality. The policy of the United States government is that such sites should quickly be made nonpolluting and safe for unrestricted use. That is, the policy of the United States is prompt cleanup. Orphaned commercial hazardous waste sites are addressed by the US Environmental Protection Agency`s Superfund program. 17 refs., 2 tabs.

  3. Temperature-time distribution and thermal stresses on the RTG fins and shell during water cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    Radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) packages designed for space missions generally do not require active cooling. However, the heat they generate cannot remain inside of the launch vehicle bay and requires active removal. Therefore, before the Shuttle bay door is closed, the RTG coolant tubes attached to the heat rejection fins must be filled with water, which will circulate and remove most of the heat from the cargo bay. There is concern that charging a system at initial temperature around 200 C with water at 24 C can cause unacceptable thermal stresses in the RTG shell and fins. A computer model is developed to estimate the transient temperature distribution resulting from such charging. The thermal stresses resulting from the temperature gradients do not exceed the elastic deformation limit for the material. Since the simplified mathematical model for thermal stresses tends to overestimate stresses, it is concluded that the RTG can be cooled by introducing water at 24 C to the initially hot fin coolant tubes while the RTG is in the Shuttle cargo bay.

  4. Temperature-time distribution and thermal stresses on the RTG fins and shell during water cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    Radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) packages designed for space missions generally do not require active cooling. However, the heat they generate cannot remain inside of the launch vehicle bay and requires active removal. Therefore, before the Shuttle bay door is closed, the RTG coolant tubes attached to the heat rejection fins must be filled with water, which will circulate and remove most of the heat from the cargo bay. There is concern that charging a system at initial temperature around 200 C with water at 24 C can cause unacceptable thermal stresses in the RTG shell and fins. A computer model is developed to estimate the transient temperature distribution resulting from such charging. The thermal stresses resulting from the temperature gradients do not exceed the elastic deformation limit for the material. Since the simplified mathematical model for thermal stresses tends to overestimate stresses, it is concluded that the RTG can be cooled by introducing water at 24 C to the initially hot fin coolant tubes while the RTG is in the Shuttle cargo bay.

  5. Updating of ASME Nuclear Code Case N-201 to Accommodate the Needs of Metallic Core Support Structures for High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors Currently in Development

    SciTech Connect

    Mit Basol; John F. Kielb; John F. MuHooly; Kobus Smit

    2007-05-02

    On September 29, 2005, ASME Standards Technology, LLC (ASME ST-LLC) executed a multi-year, cooperative agreement with the United States DOE for the Generation IV Reactor Materials project. The project's objective is to update and expand appropriate materials, construction, and design codes for application in future Generation IV nuclear reactor systems that operate at elevated temperatures. Task 4 was embarked upon in recognition of the large quantity of ongoing reactor designs utilizing high temperature technology. Since Code Case N-201 had not seen a significant revision (except for a minor revision in September, 2006 to change the SA-336 forging reference for 304SS and 316SS to SA-965 in Tables 1.2(a) and 1.2(b), and some minor editorial changes) since December 1994, identifying recommended updates to support the current high temperature Core Support Structure (CSS) designs and potential new designs was important. As anticipated, the Task 4 effort identified a number of Code Case N-201 issues. Items requiring further consideration range from addressing apparent inconsistencies in definitions and certain material properties between CC-N-201 and Subsection NH, to inclusion of additional materials to provide the designer more flexibility of design. Task 4 developed a design parameter survey that requested input from the CSS designers of ongoing high temperature gas cooled reactor metallic core support designs. The responses to the survey provided Task 4 valuable input to identify the design operating parameters and future needs of the CSS designers. Types of materials, metal temperature, time of exposure, design pressure, design life, and fluence levels were included in the Task 4 survey responses. The results of the survey are included in this report. This research proves that additional work must be done to update Code Case N-201. Task 4 activities provide the framework for the Code Case N-201 update and future work to provide input on materials. Candidate

  6. Different mRNAs have different nuclear transit times in Dictyostelium discoideum aggregates.

    PubMed Central

    Mangiarotti, G; Zuker, C; Chisholm, R L; Lodish, H F

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear processing of mRNA precursors in differentiating multicellular Dictyostelium discoideum aggregates is markedly slower than in growing amoebae. Thus, we have been able to determine the time of nuclear processing of individual mRNA species in postaggregating cells by following the incorporation of 32PO4 into nuclear and cytoplasmic RNA complementary to cloned cDNAs. Precursors of mRNAs synthesized during both growth and differentiation remain in the nucleus for about 25 to 60 min. By contrast, typical mRNAs which are synthesized only by postaggregative cells have nuclear processing times between 50 and 100 min. Depending on the particular mRNA, between 20 and 60% of nuclear transcripts are converted into cytoplasmic mRNA. A third class of mRNAs are transcribed from a set of repetitive DNA segments and are expressed predominantly during differentiation. Nuclear precursors of these mRNAs are extensively degraded within the nucleus or very rapidly after transport to the cytoplasm. Those sequences that are stable in the cytoplasm exit from the nucleus only after a lag of over 2 h. Thus, mRNAs encoded by different genes that are subject to different types of developmental controls display different times of transit to the cytoplasm and different efficiencies of nuclear processing. Differential nuclear processing may contribute to the regulation of the level of individual cytoplasmic mRNAs. Images PMID:6621537

  7. Biofouling and microbial corrosion problem in the thermo-fluid heat exchanger and cooling water system of a nuclear test reactor.

    PubMed

    Rao, T S; Kora, Aruna Jyothi; Chandramohan, P; Panigrahi, B S; Narasimhan, S V

    2009-10-01

    This article discusses aspects of biofouling and corrosion in the thermo-fluid heat exchanger (TFHX) and in the cooling water system of a nuclear test reactor. During inspection, it was observed that >90% of the TFHX tube bundle was clogged with thick fouling deposits. Both X-ray diffraction and Mossbauer analyses of the fouling deposit demonstrated iron corrosion products. The exterior of the tubercle showed the presence of a calcium and magnesium carbonate mixture along with iron oxides. Raman spectroscopy analysis confirmed the presence of calcium carbonate scale in the calcite phase. The interior of the tubercle contained significant iron sulphide, magnetite and iron-oxy-hydroxide. A microbiological assay showed a considerable population of iron oxidizing bacteria and sulphate reducing bacteria (10(5) to 10(6) cfu g(-1) of deposit). As the temperature of the TFHX is in the range of 45-50 degrees C, the microbiota isolated/assayed from the fouling deposit are designated as thermo-tolerant bacteria. The mean corrosion rate of the CS coupons exposed online was approximately 2.0 mpy and the microbial counts of various corrosion causing bacteria were in the range 10(3) to 10(5) cfu ml(-1) in the cooling water and 10(6) to 10(8) cfu ml(-1) in the biofilm.

  8. The crucial role of nomothetic and idiographic conceptions of time: interdisciplinary collaboration in nuclear waste management.

    PubMed

    Moser, Corinne; Stauffacher, Michael; Krütli, Pius; Scholz, Roland W

    2012-01-01

    The disposal of nuclear waste involves extensive time scales. Technical experts consider up to 1 million years for the disposal of spent fuel and high-level waste in their safety assessment. Yet nuclear waste is not only a technical but also a so-called sociotechnical problem and, therefore, requires interdisciplinary collaboration between technical, natural, social sciences, and the humanities in its management. Given that these disciplines differ in their language, epistemics, and interests, such collaboration might be problematic. Based on evidence from cognitive psychology, we suggest that, in particular, a concept like time is presumably critical and can be understood differently. This study explores how different scientific disciplines understand extensive time scales in general and then focuses on nuclear waste. Eighteen qualitative exploratory interviews were conducted with experts for time-related phenomena of different disciplines, among them experts working in nuclear waste management. Analyses revealed two distinct conceptions of time corresponding to idiographic and nomothetic research approaches: scientists from the humanities and social sciences tend to have a more open, undetermined conception of time, whereas natural scientists tend to focus on a more determined conception that includes some undetermined aspects. Our analyses lead to reflections on potential difficulties for interdisciplinary teams in nuclear waste management. We focus on the understanding of the safety assessment, on potential implications for communication between experts from different disciplines (e.g., between experts from the humanities and engineering for risk assessment and risk communication), and we reflect on the roles of different disciplines in nuclear waste management.

  9. Cooled-Spool Piston Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Brian G.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed cooled-spool piston compressor driven by hydraulic power and features internal cooling of piston by flowing hydraulic fluid to limit temperature of compressed gas. Provides sufficient cooling for higher compression ratios or reactive gases. Unlike conventional piston compressors, all parts of compressed gas lie at all times within relatively short distance of cooled surface so that gas cooled more effectively.

  10. Conduction cooling: multicrate fastbus hardware

    SciTech Connect

    Makowiecki, D.; Sims, W.; Larsen, R.

    1980-11-01

    Described is a new and novel approach for cooling nuclear instrumentation modules via heat conduction. The simplicity of liquid cooled crates and ease of thermal management with conduction cooled modules are described. While this system was developed primarily for the higher power levels expected with Fastbus electronics, it has many general applications.

  11. Time stamp technique using a nuclear emulsion multi-stage shifter for gamma-ray telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Satoru; Aoki, Shigeki; Rokujo, Hiroki; Hamada, Kaname; Komatsu, Masahiro; Morishima, Kunihiro; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Nakano, Toshiyuki; Niwa, Kimio; Sato, Osamu; Yoshioka, Teppei; Kodama, Koichi

    2010-08-01

    Nuclear emulsion has a potential use as a gamma-ray telescope with high angular resolution. For this application it is necessary to know the time when each track was recorded in the emulsion. In previous experiments using nuclear emulsion, various efforts were used to associate time to nuclear emulsion tracks and to improve the time resolution. Using a high speed readout system for nuclear emulsion together with a clock-based multi-stage emulsion shifter, we invented a technique to give a time-stamp to emulsion tracks and greatly improve the time resolution. A test experiment with a 2-stage shifter was used to demonstrate the principle of multi-stage shifting, and we achieved a time resolution 1.5 s for 12.1 h (about 1 part in 29 000) with the time stamp reliability 97% and the time stamp efficiency 98%. This multi-stage shifter can achieve the time resolution required for a gamma-ray telescope and can also be applied to another cosmic ray observations and accelerator experiments using nuclear emulsion.

  12. Spent nuclear fuel project cold vacuum drying facility tempered water and tempered water cooling system design description

    SciTech Connect

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1998-11-30

    This document provides the System Design Description (SDD) for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) Tempered Water (TW) and Tempered Water Cooling (TWC) System . The SDD was developed in conjunction with HNF-SD-SNF-SAR-002, Safety Analysis Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Phase 2, Supporting Installation of Processing Systems (Garvin 1998), The HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-O02, 1998, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements, and the CVDF Design Summary Report. The SDD contains general descriptions of the TW and TWC equipment, the system functions, requirements and interfaces. The SDD provides references for design and fabrication details, operation sequences and maintenance. This SOD has been developed for the SNFP Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved.

  13. In vessel detection of delayed neutron emitters from clad failure in sodium cooled nuclear reactors: An estimation of the signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filliatre, P.; Jammes, C.; Chapoutier, N.; Jeannot, J.-P.; Jadot, F.; Batail, R.; Verrier, D.

    2014-04-01

    The detection of clad failures is mandatory in sodium-cooled fast neutron reactors in compliance with the "clean sodium" concept. An in-vessel detection system, sensitive to delayed neutrons from fission products released into the primary coolant by failures, partially tested in SUPERPHENIX, is foreseen in current SFR projects in order to reduce significantly the delay before an alarm is issued. In this paper, an estimation of the signal received by such a system in case of a failure is derived, taking the French project ASTRID as a working example. This failure induced signal is compared to that of the contribution of the neutrons from the core itself. The sensitivity of the system is defined in terms of minimal detectable surface of clad failure. Possible solutions to improve this sensitivity are discussed, involving either the sensor itself, or the hydraulic design of the vessel in the early stage of the reactor conception.

  14. Real-time measurement of the average temperature profiles in liquid cooling using digital holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero-Mendez, Carlos; Anaya, Tonatiuh Saucedo; Araiza-Esquivel, M.; Balderas-Navarro, Raúl E.; Aranda-Espinoza, Said; López-Martínez, Alfonso; Olvera-Olvera, Carlos

    2016-12-01

    We present an alternative optical method to estimate the temperature during the cooling process of a liquid using digital holographic interferometry (DHI). We make use of phase variations that are linked to variations in the refractive index and the temperature property of a liquid. In DHI, a hologram is first recorded using an object beam scattered from a rectangular container with a liquid at a certain reference temperature. A second hologram is then recorded when the temperature is decreased slightly. A phase difference between the two holograms indicates a temperature variation, and it is possible to obtain the temperature value at each small point of the sensed optical field. The relative phase map between the two object states is obtained simply and quickly through Fourier-transform method. Our experimental results reveal that the temperature values measured using this method and those obtained with a thermometer are consistent. We additionally show that it is possible to analyze the heat-loss process of a liquid sample in dynamic events using DHI.

  15. Optimization approach for evaluation of allowed outage times in nuclear-safety systems. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Farahzad, P.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop and demonstrate an approach for determining allowed outage times (AOTs) of nuclear systems based on linear programming techniques. Presently nuclear power plants are operated within the constraints of technical specifications defined by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. These specifications, among other things, define the time a safety system component may be allowed to be serviced for repair without bringing the plant to hot shutdown condition. The time the component is allowed to be serviced is commonly known as the allowed outage time and the determination of such times is presently based on engineering judgements. Over the last few years, efforts were made to develop allowed outage times for safety system components based on probabilistic considerations. The method given here is based on linear programming and it provides a tool for simultaneous consideration and evaluation of any number of linear constraints imposed on the problem.

  16. Benchmarking of thermal hydraulic loop models for Lead-Alloy Cooled Advanced Nuclear Energy System (LACANES), phase-I: Isothermal steady state forced convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jae Hyun; Batta, A.; Casamassima, V.; Cheng, X.; Choi, Yong Joon; Hwang, Il Soon; Lim, Jun; Meloni, P.; Nitti, F. S.; Dedul, V.; Kuznetsov, V.; Komlev, O.; Jaeger, W.; Sedov, A.; Kim, Ji Hak; Puspitarini, D.

    2011-08-01

    As highly promising coolant for new generation nuclear reactors, liquid Lead-Bismuth Eutectic has been extensively worldwide investigated. With high expectation about this advanced coolant, a multi-national systematic study on LBE was proposed in 2007, which covers benchmarking of thermal hydraulic prediction models for Lead-Alloy Cooled Advanced Nuclear Energy System (LACANES). This international collaboration has been organized by OECD/NEA, and nine organizations - ENEA, ERSE, GIDROPRESS, IAEA, IPPE, KIT/IKET, KIT/INR, NUTRECK, and RRC KI - contribute their efforts to LACANES benchmarking. To produce experimental data for LACANES benchmarking, thermal-hydraulic tests were conducted by using a 12-m tall LBE integral test facility, named as Heavy Eutectic liquid metal loop for integral test of Operability and Safety of PEACER (HELIOS) which has been constructed in 2005 at the Seoul National University in the Republic of Korea. LACANES benchmark campaigns consist of a forced convection (phase-I) and a natural circulation (phase-II). In the forced convection case, the predictions of pressure losses based on handbook correlations and that obtained by Computational Fluid Dynamics code simulation were compared with the measured data for various components of the HELIOS test facility. Based on comparative analyses of the predictions and the measured data, recommendations for the prediction methods of a pressure loss in LACANES were obtained. In this paper, results for the forced convection case (phase-I) of LACANES benchmarking are described.

  17. Non-equilibrium effects of core-cooling and time-dependent internal heating on mantle flush events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, D. A.; Balachandar, S.; Steinbach, V. C.; Honda, S.; Reuteler, D. M.; Smedsmo, J. J.; Lauer, G. S.

    We have examined the non-equilibrium effects of core-cooling and time-dependent internal-heating on the thermal evolution of the Earth's mantle and on mantle flush events caused by the two major phase transitions. Both two- and three-dimensional models have been employed. The mantle viscosity responds to the secular cooling through changes in the averaged temperature field. A viscosity which decreases algebraically with the average temperature has been considered. The time-dependent internal-heating is prescribed to decrease exponentially with a single decay time. We have studied the thermal histories with initial Rayleigh numbers between 2 x 107 and 108 . Flush events, driven by the non-equilibrium forcings, are much more dramatic than those produced by the equilibrium boundary conditions and constant internal heating. Multiple flush events are found under non-equilibrium conditions in which there is very little internal heating or very fast decay rates of internal-heating. Otherwise, the flush events take place in a relatively continuous fashion. Prior to massive flush events small-scale percolative structures appear in the 3D temperature fields. Time-dependent signatures, such as the surface heat flux, also exhibits high frequency oscillatory patterns prior to massive flush events. These two observations suggest that the flush event may be a self-organized critical phenomenon. The Nusselt number as a function of the time-varying Ra does not follow the Nusselt vs. Rayleigh number power-law relationship based on equilibrium (constant temperature) boundary conditions. Instead Nu(t) may vary non-monotonically with time because of the mantle flush events. Convective processes in the mantle operate quite differently under non-equilibrium conditions from its behaviour under the usual equilibrium situations.

  18. Effect of time of progesterone supplementation on serum progesterone and the conception rate of cooled Holstein heifers during the summer.

    PubMed

    Correa-Calderón, Abelardo; Pérez-Velázquez, Rolando; Avendaño-Reyes, Leonel; Macias-Cruz, Ulises; Diaz-Molina, Raúl; Rivera-Acuña, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the effects of progesterone supplementation at two different times on serum progesterone (P4 ) concentration, conception rate and resynchronization of cooled Holstein heifers in summer, 90 heifers were randomly assigned to two groups: (i) heifers subjected to TAI (timed artificial insemination) and progesterone supplementation from days 4 to 14 after TAI (S1; n = 45); and (ii) heifers under the same TAI protocol as S1 and progesterone supplementation from days 17 to 22 after TAI (S2 ; n = 45). The groups S1 and S2 were cooled 10 days before and 21 days after TAI. Respiratory rate, body surface temperature, vaginal temperature and rectal temperature recorded during the experiment were not different (P > 0.05) between S1 and S2 groups. Progesterone concentration was not different (P > 0.05) in S1 compared to S2 . The conception rates on days 30 and 55 were similar between groups (P > 0.05). Progesterone supplementation did not increase either conception rate or concentrations of P4 in heifers during the summer. Heifers not pregnant to first service in the group S2 were resynchronized (77.7%) for a second breeding. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  19. Integral and Separate Effects Tests for Thermal Hydraulics Code Validation for Liquid-Salt Cooled Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Per

    2012-10-30

    The objective of the 3-year project was to collect integral effects test (IET) data to validate the RELAP5-3D code and other thermal hydraulics codes for use in predicting the transient thermal hydraulics response of liquid salt cooled reactor systems, including integral transient response for forced and natural circulation operation. The reference system for the project is a modular, 900-MWth Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR), a specific type of Fluoride salt-cooled High temperature Reactor (FHR). Two experimental facilities were developed for thermal-hydraulic integral effects tests (IETs) and separate effects tests (SETs). The facilities use simulant fluids for the liquid fluoride salts, with very little distortion to the heat transfer and fluid dynamics behavior. The CIET Test Bay facility was designed, built, and operated. IET data for steady state and transient natural circulation was collected. SET data for convective heat transfer in pebble beds and straight channel geometries was collected. The facility continues to be operational and will be used for future experiments, and for component development. The CIET 2 facility is larger in scope, and its construction and operation has a longer timeline than the duration of this grant. The design for the CIET 2 facility has drawn heavily on the experience and data collected on the CIET Test Bay, and it was completed in parallel with operation of the CIET Test Bay. CIET 2 will demonstrate start-up and shut-down transients and control logic, in addition to LOFC and LOHS transients, and buoyant shut down rod operation during transients. Design of the CIET 2 Facility is complete, and engineering drawings have been submitted to an external vendor for outsourced quality controlled construction. CIET 2 construction and operation continue under another NEUP grant. IET data from both CIET facilities is to be used for validation of system codes used for FHR modeling, such as RELAP5-3D. A set of

  20. Universal long-time behavior of nuclear spin decays in a solid.

    PubMed

    Morgan, S W; Fine, B V; Saam, B

    2008-08-08

    Magnetic resonance studies of nuclear spins in solids are exceptionally well suited to probe the limits of statistical physics. We report experimental results indicating that isolated macroscopic systems of interacting nuclear spins possess the following fundamental property: spin decays that start from different initial configurations quickly evolve towards the same long-time behavior. This long-time behavior is characterized by the shortest ballistic microscopic time scale of the system and therefore falls outside of the validity range for conventional approximations of statistical physics. We find that the nuclear free-induction decay and different solid echoes in hyperpolarized solid xenon all exhibit sinusoidally modulated exponential long-time behavior characterized by identical time constants. This universality was previously predicted on the basis of analogy with resonances in classical chaotic systems.

  1. Terrestrial evidence of a nuclear catastrophe in paleoindian times

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, R.B.; Topping, W.

    2001-02-14

    A common problem at paleoindian sites in the northeastern region of North America is the recovery of radiocarbon dates that are much younger than their western counterparts, sometimes by as much as 10,000 years. Other methods like thermoluminescence, geoarchaeology, and sedimentation suggest that the dates are incorrect. Evidence has been mounting that the peopling of the Americas occurred much earlier than 12,000 bp. The discovery of tracks and micrometeorite-like particles in paleoindian artifacts across North America demonstrates they were bombarded during a cosmic event. Measurements of Uranium 235 (235U), depleted by 17-77%, and enhanced concentrations of Plutonium 239 (239Pu), from neutron capture on Uranium 238 (238U), in artifacts, associated chert types, and sediments at depth indicates that the entire prehistoric North American landscape was bombarded by thermal neutrons. Radiocarbon dating assumes that there is no substantial change in isotopic composition over time. A large thermal neutron event would convert residual Nitrogen 14 (14N) in charcoal to Carbon 14 (14C) thus resetting the radiocarbon date to a younger value and pushing back the date that paleoindians occupied the Americas by thousands of years. Analysis of data from 11 locations across North America indicates there were episodes of cosmic ray bombardments of the prehistoric landscape in Late Glacial times. Examination of the radiocarbon record suggests these events were coupled with geomagnetic excursions at 41,000, 33,000, and 12,500 bp and irradiated the landscape with massive thermal neutron fluxes of the order of {approximately}1015 neutrons/cm{sup 2}. These data provide a clear body of terrestrial evidence supporting either one of two longstanding hypotheses for catastrophe in paleoindian times: (1) a giant solar flare during a geomagnetic excursion as explored by Wolfendale and Zook, and (2) a supernova shockwave as forwarded by Brackenridge, Clarke, and Dar. The evidence is reviewed

  2. Design of the cooled IRFPA real-time non-uniformity correction system based on FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Yicheng; Yun, Lijun; Shi, Junsheng; Zhang, Chao

    2011-11-01

    Non-Uniformity Correction (NUC) is a key technology for Infrared Focal Plane Array (IRFPA) real-time image processing system. In this paper, an IRFPA real-time two-point calibration (TPC) algorithm hardware system was designed. The system use CycloneIII-EP3C120F780 FPGA of the ALTERA as the controller, and has following features: simple structure, high precision, stability, portability, and real-time. The timing simulation and measurement for the developed hardware system verified the effectiveness of the scheme.

  3. Application of remote sensing techniques for monitoring the thermal pollution of cooling-water discharge from nuclear power plant.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuqun; Shi, Ping; Mao, Qingwen

    2003-08-01

    This article introduces a practical method to investigate thermal pollution in coastal water from satellite data. The intensity and distribution areas of thermal pollution by the heated effluent discharge from the nuclear power plant on Daya Bay, southern China were investigated by using Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM) thermal band data from 1994 to 2001. A local algorithm was developed, based on sea-truth data of water surface temperature measured when the satellite passed over the study area. The local algorithm was then applied to estimate water temperature from TM data. It shows that the remote sensing technique provides an effective means to quantitatively monitor the intensity of thermal pollution and to retrieve a very detailed distribution pattern of thermal pollution in coastal waters. The remotely-sensed results of the thermal pollution can be used for environmental management of coastal waters.

  4. Proton-nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times in brain edema

    SciTech Connect

    Kamman, R.L.; Go, K.G.; Berendsen, H.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Proton relaxation times of protein solutions, bovine brain, and edematous feline brain tissue were studied as a function of water concentration, protein concentration, and temperature. In accordance with the fast proton exchange model for relaxation, a linear relation could be established between R1 and the inverse of the weight fraction of tissue water. This relation also applied to R2 of gray matter and of protein solutions. No straightforward relation with water content was found for R2 of white matter. Temperature-dependent studies indicated that in this case, the slow exchange model for relaxation had to be applied. The effect of macromolecules in physiological relevant concentrations on the total relaxation behavior of edematous tissue was weak. Total water content changes predominantly affected the relaxation rates. The linear relation may have high clinical potential for assessment of the status of cerebral edema on the basis of T1 and T2 readings from MR images.

  5. Investigating cryoinjury using simulations and experiments: 2. TF-1 cells during graded freezing (interrupted slow cooling without hold time).

    PubMed

    Ross-Rodriguez, L U; Elliott, J A W; McGann, L E

    2010-08-01

    Cryopreservation plays a key role in the long-term storage of native and engineered cells and tissues for research and clinical applications. The survival of cells and tissues after freezing and thawing depends on the ability of the cells to withstand a variety of stresses imposed by the cryopreservation protocol. A better understanding of the nature and kinetics of cellular responses to temperature-induced conditions is required to minimize cryoinjury. An interrupted freezing procedure that allows dissection of cryoinjury was used to investigate the progressive damage that occurs to cells during cryopreservation using slow cooling. Simulations of cellular osmotic responses were used to provide interpretation linking states of the cell with events during the freezing procedure. Simulations of graded freezing (interrupted slow cooling without hold time) were correlated with cell recovery results of TF-1 cells. Calculated intracellular supercooling and osmolality, were used as indicators of the probability of cryoinjury due to intracellular ice formation and solution effects, providing direct links of cellular conditions to events in the freezing process. Using simulations, this study demonstrated that both intracellular supercooling and osmolality are necessary to explain graded freezing results. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of the Duration Time of a Nuclear Accident on Radiological Health Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hyojoon; Park, Misun; Jeong, Haesun; Hwang, Wontae; Kim, Eunhan; Han, Moonhee

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to quantify the effect of duration time of a nuclear accident on the radiation dose of a densely populated area and the resulting acute health effects. In the case of nuclear accidents, the total emissions of radioactive materials can be classified into several categories. Therefore, the release information is very important for the assessment of risk to the public. We confirmed that when the duration time of the emissions are prolonged to 7 hours, the concentrations of radioactive substances in the ambient air are reduced by 50% compared to that when the duration time of emission is one hour. This means that the risk evaluation using only the first wind direction of an accident is very conservative, so it has to be used as a screening level for the risk assessment. Furthermore, it is judged that the proper control of the emission time of a nuclear accident can minimize the health effects on residents. PMID:24619120

  7. Assessment of nuclear anxiety among American students: Stability over time, secular trends, and emotional correlates

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomb, M.D.

    1989-10-01

    Studies of reactions and attitudes toward nuclear war have progressed from the use of anecdotal evidence to multi-item psychological measures. Additional psychometric data and substantive results of the Nuclear Attitudes Questionnaire (NAQ; Newcomb, 1986) are reported here. Data from three independent samples of students from the United States collected in 1984, 1986, and 1987 were compared and contrasted. The 1986 data were obtained immediately following the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident. Test-retest reliability of the NAQ items and subscales was quite high and comparable among samples and established the across-time stability of the measure. There were several secular trends across years on items and subscales, indicating some increased concern about nuclear power (particularly in 1986), but also a general increase in nuclear concerns, fears, and anxiety. Anticipated sex differences were found on many of the NAQ items and subscales. Correlations between the NAQ subscales and the nine SCL-90-R scales (Derogatis, 1977) were consistent for the 1986 and 1987 samples. In latent variable analyses, a general factor of Emotional Distress was significantly correlated with a general factor of Nuclear Anxiety, as well as specifically with nuclear concern and fear for the future.

  8. A feasibility and optimization study to determine cooling time and burnup of advanced test reactor fuels using a nondestructive technique

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, Jorge

    2013-12-01

    The goal of this study presented is to determine the best available non-destructive technique necessary to collect validation data as well as to determine burn-up and cooling time of the fuel elements onsite at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) canal. This study makes a recommendation of the viability of implementing a permanent fuel scanning system at the ATR canal and leads3 to the full design of a permanent fuel scan system. The study consisted at first in determining if it was possible and which equipment was necessary to collect useful spectra from ATR fuel elements at the canal adjacent to the reactor. Once it was establish that useful spectra can be obtained at the ATR canal the next step was to determine which detector and which configuration was better suited to predict burnup and cooling time of fuel elements non-destructively. Three different detectors of High Purity Germanium (HPGe), Lanthanum Bromide (LaBr3), and High Pressure Xenon (HPXe) in two system configurations of above and below the water pool were used during the study. The data collected and analyzed was used to create burnup and cooling time calibration prediction curves for ATR fuel. The next stage of the study was to determine which of the three detectors tested was better suited for the permanent system. From spectra taken and the calibration curves obtained, it was determined that although the HPGe detector yielded better results, a detector that could better withstand the harsh environment of the ATR canal was needed. The in-situ nature of the measurements required a rugged fuel scanning system, low in maintenance and easy to control system. Based on the ATR canal feasibility measurements and calibration results it was determined that the LaBr3 detector was the best alternative for canal in-situ measurements; however in order to enhance the quality of the spectra collected using this scintillator a deconvolution method was developed. Following the development of the deconvolution method

  9. BLACK HOLE-NEUTRON STAR MERGERS WITH A HOT NUCLEAR EQUATION OF STATE: OUTFLOW AND NEUTRINO-COOLED DISK FOR A LOW-MASS, HIGH-SPIN CASE

    SciTech Connect

    Deaton, M. Brett; Duez, Matthew D.; Foucart, Francois; O'Connor, Evan; Ott, Christian D.; Scheel, Mark A.; Szilagyi, Bela; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Muhlberger, Curran D. E-mail: m.duez@wsu.edu

    2013-10-10

    Neutrino emission significantly affects the evolution of the accretion tori formed in black hole-neutron star mergers. It removes energy from the disk, alters its composition, and provides a potential power source for a gamma-ray burst. To study these effects, simulations in general relativity with a hot microphysical equation of state (EOS) and neutrino feedback are needed. We present the first such simulation, using a neutrino leakage scheme for cooling to capture the most essential effects and considering a moderate mass (1.4 M{sub ☉} neutron star, 5.6 M{sub ☉} black hole), high-spin (black hole J/M {sup 2} = 0.9) system with the K{sub 0} = 220 MeV Lattimer-Swesty EOS. We find that about 0.08 M{sub ☉} of nuclear matter is ejected from the system, while another 0.3 M{sub ☉} forms a hot, compact accretion disk. The primary effects of the escaping neutrinos are (1) to make the disk much denser and more compact, (2) to cause the average electron fraction Y{sub e} of the disk to rise to about 0.2 and then gradually decrease again, and (3) to gradually cool the disk. The disk is initially hot (T ∼ 6 MeV) and luminous in neutrinos (L{sub ν} ∼ 10{sup 54} erg s{sup –1}), but the neutrino luminosity decreases by an order of magnitude over 50 ms of post-merger evolution.

  10. Vibrational cooling dynamics of a [FeFe]-hydrogenase mimic probed by time-resolved infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Caplins, Benjamin W; Lomont, Justin P; Nguyen, Son C; Harris, Charles B

    2014-12-11

    Picosecond time-resolved infrared spectroscopy (TRIR) was performed for the first time on a dithiolate bridged binuclear iron(I) hexacarbonyl complex ([Fe₂(μ-bdt)(CO)₆], bdt = benzene-1,2-dithiolate) which is a structural mimic of the active site of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase enzyme. As these model active sites are increasingly being studied for their potential in photocatalytic systems for hydrogen production, understanding their excited and ground state dynamics is critical. In n-heptane, absorption of 400 nm light causes carbonyl loss with low quantum yield (<10%), while the majority (ca. 90%) of the parent complex is regenerated with biexponential kinetics (τ₁ = 21 ps and τ₂ = 134 ps). In order to understand the mechanism of picosecond bleach recovery, a series of UV-pump TRIR experiments were performed in different solvents. The long time decay (τ₂) of the transient spectra is seen to change substantially as a function of solvent, from 95 ps in THF to 262 ps in CCl₄. Broadband IR-pump TRIR experiments were performed for comparison. The measured vibrational lifetimes (T₁(avg)) of the carbonyl stretches were found to be in excellent correspondence to the observed τ₂ decays in the UV-pump experiments, signifying that vibrationally excited carbonyl stretches are responsible for the observed longtime decays. The fast spectral evolution (τ₁) was determined to be due to vibrational cooling of low frequency modes anharmonically coupled to the carbonyl stretches that were excited after electronic internal conversion. The results show that cooling of both low and high frequency vibrational modes on the electronic ground state give rise to the observed picosecond TRIR transient spectra of this compound, without the need to invoke electronically excited states.

  11. Nuclear Power: Time, Space and Spirit--Keys to Scientific Literacy Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stonebarger, Bill

    One of the most important discoveries of the twentieth century was the fission of radioactive materials. This booklet considers nuclear energy from three aspects: time; space; and spirit. Time refers to a sense of history; space refers to geography; and spirit refers to life and thought. Several chapters on the history and concepts of nuclear…

  12. Nuclear Power: Time, Space and Spirit--Keys to Scientific Literacy Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stonebarger, Bill

    One of the most important discoveries of the twentieth century was the fission of radioactive materials. This booklet considers nuclear energy from three aspects: time; space; and spirit. Time refers to a sense of history; space refers to geography; and spirit refers to life and thought. Several chapters on the history and concepts of nuclear…

  13. Therapeutic hypothermia for out-of-hospital ventricular fibrillation survivors: a feasibility study comparing time to achieve target core temperature using conventional conductive cooling versus combined conductive plus pericranial convective cooling.

    PubMed

    Wass, C Thomas; White, Roger D; Schroeder, Darrell R; Mirzoyev, Sultan A; Warfield, Karen T

    2013-04-01

    Mild to moderate therapeutic hypothermia (TH) has been shown to improve survival and neurologic outcome, as well as to reduce healthcare costs in patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) with ventricular fibrillation. Accordingly, the American Heart Association has categorized this as a Class IB intervention. The therapeutic window for initiating TH is narrow, and thus, achieving target temperature expeditiously is of paramount importance to improve postresuscitative neurologic outcome. The present investigation is a feasibility study designed to assess the practicality and efficacy of including pericranial cooling in our postresuscitative TH protocol. Specifically, we compared time required to achieve target temperature (33°C) using our present standard of TH care (ie, conductive body cooling, conventional TH group) versus combined conductive body cooling plus convective (forced-air) head and neck cooling (combined TH group). Adult patients who experienced OHCA were included in the study provided TH could be initiated within 4 hours of resuscitation from ventricular fibrillation. Patients enrolled in both groups were cooled using the servo-controlled Arctic Sun conductive cooling system (Medivance, Inc, Louisville, CO). However, patients enrolled in the combined TH group also received forced-air pericranial cooling with an ambient temperature of approximately 13°C. In all cases, the target core (bladder) temperature was 33°C. The primary endpoint (ie, time required to achieve a core temperature of 33°C) was analyzed as a continuous variable and compared between groups using the rank sum test, whereas categorical variables were compared between groups using the chi-square test. Cardiac intensive care unit at a major tertiary care teaching center in Rochester, MN. Adult patients who experienced OHCA were included in the study. Patients enrolled in both groups were cooled using the servo-controlled Arctic Sun conductive cooling system

  14. Integrated Response Time Evaluation Methodology for the Nuclear Safety Instrumentation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang Jae; Yun, Jae Hee

    2017-06-01

    Safety analysis for a nuclear power plant establishes not only an analytical limit (AL) in terms of a measured or calculated variable but also an analytical response time (ART) required to complete protective action after the AL is reached. If the two constraints are met, the safety limit selected to maintain the integrity of physical barriers used for preventing uncontrolled radioactivity release will not be exceeded during anticipated operational occurrences and postulated accidents. Setpoint determination methodologies have actively been developed to ensure that the protective action is initiated before the process conditions reach the AL. However, regarding the ART for a nuclear safety instrumentation system, an integrated evaluation methodology considering the whole design process has not been systematically studied. In order to assure the safety of nuclear power plants, this paper proposes a systematic and integrated response time evaluation methodology that covers safety analyses, system designs, response time analyses, and response time tests. This methodology is applied to safety instrumentation systems for the advanced power reactor 1400 and the optimized power reactor 1000 nuclear power plants in South Korea. The quantitative evaluation results are provided herein. The evaluation results using the proposed methodology demonstrate that the nuclear safety instrumentation systems fully satisfy corresponding requirements of the ART.

  15. Nuclear physics experiments with in-beam fast-timing and plunger techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotty, C.

    2017-06-01

    Nuclear lifetime and g factor are crucial observables in nuclear physics, as they give access to the excited states nuclear wave functions using the well-known electromagnetic transition operators. Thus, they are benchmarks to validate or discard nuclear structure theories. During the last decades, the evolution of the nuclear instruments and methods gave birth to several techniques used to measure lifetimes and moments. Among them, the in-beam Fast Electronic Scintillation Timing (FEST) technique is used to measure lifetimes of nuclear states in the picosecond to nanosecond range. Plunger devices originally developed to perform lifetime measurements of excited states in the picosecond range using the Recoil Distance Doppler Shift (RDDS) are now also employed to measure g factor using the new Time-Differential Recoil-In-Vacuum (TDRIV) technique. Recently commissioned, the ROmanian array for SPectroscopy in HEavy ion REactions (ROSPHERE) is dedicated to perform γ-ray spectroscopy, specially suited for lifetime measurements using the RDDS and in-beam fast-timing techniques at the 9 MV Bucharest-Tandem accelerator facility of the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH). An introduction of above-mentioned techniques is provided and selected results are illustrating them with physics cases. The in-beam fast-timing and RDDS techniques are described using lifetime measurements respectively in 67Cu and 120Te measured at the 9 MV Bucharest-Tandem accelerator. Finally, the precise g factor measurement of the first-excited state in 24Mg using by the new TDRIV technique at the ALTO-Tandem Orsay facility is presented.

  16. Application Research of Two Real-Time Fault Diagnostic Methods in the Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Chun-Li Xie; Yong-Kuo Liu; Hong Xia

    2006-07-01

    In order to guarantee the safety of nuclear power plants (NPP), we built two real-time fault diagnosis systems adopting VISUAL BAS6.0 programming language, which apply neural network technology and data fusion technology respectively. The fault diagnosis systems interchange data with the simulator timely utilizing communication interface. We insert faults on simulator to test the two systems on line. The advantages and disadvantages are illuminated and contrasted through analyzing the faults diagnostic results off- line, which establish the foundation for the further research and application to the fault diagnosis system of the nuclear power plants. (authors)

  17. Plasma Time in Discriminating Nuclear Recoils in Germanium Detector for Dark Matter Searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Dongming; Barker, D'ann

    2012-10-01

    In the detection of WIMP-induced nuclear recoils with high-purity germanium detectors, CDMS-type bolometers are often used in measuring the ionization yield. For this technology, the detector is operated in the milli-Kelvin temperature range, which requires high priced detectors. Alternative electron/nuclear recoil discrimination using pulse shape has been widely utilized in the energy range of MeV in neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments with germanium detectors. However, the nuclear recoils induced by WIMPs are in the energy range of keV, and their pulse shape difference with electronic recoils in the same energy range has not proven to be visible in a commercially available germanium detector. This paper presents a new idea of using plasma time difference in pulse shape to discriminate nuclear recoils from electronic recoils. We show the plasma time difference as a function of nuclear recoil energy. The technique using plasma time will be discussed with a generic germanium detector.

  18. Cooling Devices in Laser therapy.

    PubMed

    Das, Anupam; Sarda, Aarti; De, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Cooling devices and methods are now integrated into most laser systems, with a view to protecting the epidermis, reducing pain and erythema and improving the efficacy of laser. On the basis of method employed, it can be divided into contact cooling and non-contact cooling. With respect to timing of irradiation of laser, the nomenclatures include pre-cooling, parallel cooling and post-cooling. The choice of the cooling device is dictated by the laser device, the physician's personal choice with respect to user-friendliness, comfort of the patient, the price and maintenance costs of the device. We hereby briefly review the various techniques of cooling, employed in laser practice.

  19. Survey for the presence of Naegleria fowleri amebae in lake water used to cool reactors at a nuclear power generating plant.

    PubMed

    Jamerson, Melissa; Remmers, Kenneth; Cabral, Guy; Marciano-Cabral, Francine

    2009-04-01

    Water from Lake Anna in Virginia, a lake that is used to cool reactors at a nuclear power plant and for recreational activities, was assessed for the presence of Naegleria fowleri, an ameba that causes primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). This survey was undertaken because it has been reported that thermally enriched water fosters the propagation of N. fowleri and, hence, increases the risk of infection to humans. Of 16 sites sampled during the summer of 2007, nine were found to be positive for N. fowleri by a nested polymerase chain reaction assay. However, total ameba counts, inclusive of N. fowleri, never exceeded 12/50 mL of lake water at any site. No correlation was obtained between the conductivity, dissolved oxygen, temperature, and pH of water and presence of N. fowleri. To date, cases of PAM have not been reported from this thermally enriched lake. It is postulated that predation by other protozoa and invertebrates, disturbance of the water surface from recreational boating activities, or the presence of bacterial or fungal toxins, maintain the number N. fowleri at a low level in Lake Anna.

  20. Distribution of a pelagic tunicate, Salpa fusiformis in warm surface current of the eastern Korean waters and its impingement on cooling water intakes of Uljin nuclear power plant.

    PubMed

    Chae, Jinho; Choi, Hyun Woo; Lee, Woo Jin; Kim, Dongsung; Lee, Jae Hac

    2008-07-01

    Impingement of a large amount of gelatinous plankton, Salpa fusiformis on the seawater intake system-screens in a nuclear power plant at Uljin was firstly recorded on 18th June 2003. Whole amount of the clogged animals was estimated were presumptively at 295 tons and the shortage of cooling seawater supply by the animal clogging caused 38% of decrease in generation capability of the power plant. Zooplankton collection with a multiple towing net during the day and at night from 5 to 6 June 2003 included various gelatinous zooplanktons known to be warm water species such as salps and siphonophores. Comparatively larger species, Salpa fusiformis occupied 25.4% in individual density among the gelatinous plankton and showed surface distribution in the depth shallower than thermocline, performing little diel vertical migration. Temperature, salinity and satellite data also showed warm surface current predominated over the southern coastal region near the power plant in June. The results suggested that warm surface current occasionally extended into the neritic region may transfer S. fusiformis, to the waters off the power plant. The environmental factors and their relation to ecobiology of the large quantity of salpa population that are being sucked into the intake channel of the power plant are discussed.

  1. Measuring flow and pressure of lithium coolant under developmental testing of a high-temperature cooling system of a space nuclear power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, V. Ya.; Sinyavsky, V. V.

    2014-12-01

    Sub-megawatt space NPP use lithium as a coolant and niobium alloy as a structural material. In order to refine the lithium-niobium technology of the material and design engineering, lithium-niobium loops were worked out in RSC Energia, and they were tested at a working temperature of lithium equal to 1070-1300 K. In order to measure the lithium flow and pressure, special gauges were developed, which made possible the calibration and checkout of the loops without their dismantling. The paper describes the architecture of the electromagnetic flowmeter and the electromagnetic vibrating-wire pressure transducer (gauge) for lithium coolant in the nuclear power plant cooling systems. The operating principles of these meters are presented. Flowmeters have been developed for channel diameters ranging from 10 to 100 mm, which are capable of measuring lithium flows in the range of 0.1 to 30 L/s with the error of 3% for design calibration and 1% for volume graduation. The temperature error of the pressure transducers does not exceed 0.4% per 100 K; the nonlinearity and hysteresis of the calibration curve do not exceed 0.3 and 0.4%, respectively. The transducer applications are illustrated by the examples of results obtained from tests on the NPP module mockup and heat pipes of a radiation cooler.

  2. Simultaneous measurements of the X-ray and nuclear shock-bang times in ICF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutcliffe, G.; Sio, H.; Rinderknecht, H.; Frenje, J.; Zylstra, A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R.; Rygg, J. R.; Macphee, A.; MacKinnon, A.; Le Pape, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, C.; Kilkenny, J.; Olson, R.

    2015-11-01

    Recent measurements of nuclear and x-ray shock-bang times in ICF implosions at OMEGA and the NIF provide new constraints on implosion modeling and may elucidate the underlying physics of e-i equilibration during the shock phase. As the ions are predominantly heated by the converging and rebounding shock, the ion temperature is initially much higher than the electron temperature and the difference relaxes at the e-i equilibration time scale. Nuclear and x-ray bang times are expected to differ because of different temperature dependence. At OMEGA, nuclear shock-bang time and burn history are routinely measured using streak camera diagnostics, while x-ray self-emission is observed with x-ray framing cameras. We are exploring the possibility of measuring both x-ray and nuclear shock-bang times with a single diagnostic with high relative accuracy, and will discuss the precision with which they can be made and the diagnostics necessary at OMEGA. This work was supported in part by NLUF, US DOE, and LLE.

  3. Long coherence times in nuclear spin-free vanadyl qubits [Long coherence times in surface-compatible nuclear spin-free vanadium qubits

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Chung -Jui; Graham, Michael J.; Zadrozny, Joseph M.; ...

    2016-10-31

    Quantum information processing (QIP) offers the potential to create new frontiers in fields ranging from quantum biology to cryptography. Two key figures of merit for electronic spin qubits, the smallest units of QIP, are the coherence time (T2), the lifetime of the qubit, and the spin–lattice relaxation time (T1), the thermally defined upper limit of T2. To achieve QIP, processable qubits with long coherence times are required. Recent studies on (Ph4P-d20)2[V(C8S8)3], a vanadium-based qubit, demonstrate that millisecond T2 times are achievable in transition metal complexes with nuclear spinfree environments. Applying these principles to vanadyl complexes offers a route to combinemore » the previously established surface compatibility of the flatter vanadyl structures with a long T2. Toward those ends, we investigated a series of four qubits, (Ph4P)2[VO(C8S8)2] (1), (Ph4P)2[VO(β-C3S5)2] (2), (Ph4P)2[VO(α-C3S5)2] (3), and (Ph4P)2[VO(C3S4O)2] (4), by pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and compared the performance of these species with our recently reported set of vanadium tris(dithiolene) complexes. Crucially we demonstrate that solutions of 1–4 in SO2, a uniquely polar nuclear spinfree solvent, reveal T2 values of up to 152(6) μs, comparable to the best molecular qubit candidates. Upon transitioning to vanadyl species from the tris(dithiolene) analogues, we observe a remarkable order of magnitude increase in 12, attributed to stronger solute–solvent interactions with the polar vanadium-oxo moiety. Simultaneously, we detect a small decrease in T2 for the vanadyl analogues relative to the tris(dithiolene) complexes. We attribute this decrease to the absence of one nuclear spinfree ligand, which served to shield the vanadium centers against solvent nuclear spins. Lastly, our results highlight new design principles for long T1 and T2 times by demonstrating the efficacy of ligand-based tuning of solute–solvent interactions.« less

  4. Stochastic Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2011-01-01

    Stochastic Cooling was invented by Simon van der Meer and was demonstrated at the CERN ISR and ICE (Initial Cooling Experiment). Operational systems were developed at Fermilab and CERN. A complete theory of cooling of unbunched beams was developed, and was applied at CERN and Fermilab. Several new and existing rings employ coasting beam cooling. Bunched beam cooling was demonstrated in ICE and has been observed in several rings designed for coasting beam cooling. High energy bunched beams have proven more difficult. Signal suppression was achieved in the Tevatron, though operational cooling was not pursued at Fermilab. Longitudinal cooling was achieved in the RHIC collider. More recently a vertical cooling system in RHIC cooled both transverse dimensions via betatron coupling.

  5. Review of microclimate cooling systems in the chemical, biological, radiological environment

    SciTech Connect

    Derion, T.; Pozos, R.S.

    1993-09-22

    Soldiers may work in hot environments and under conditions posing a biological, chemical, or nuclear threat. Chemical protective overgarments are worn to prevent contact with toxins; however, they prevent dissipation of body heat. This review addresses the effectiveness of microclimate cooling systems in alleviating thermal strain in personnel encapsulated in protective overgarments during exertion in the heat. Air, liquid, and passive ice cooling systems are primarily reviewed, but other methodologies are also discussed. Air cooling can increase tolerance time fourfold, but high ambient temperature air cooling may be dangerous. Liquid cooling is effective in reducing heat strain at light to moderate work loads and is beneficial when applied to the thighs during lower-body exercise. Overcooling and discomfort can occur with a liquid-cooled system due to cutaneous vasoconstriction. Liquid-cooled systems are heavy, require excessive maintenance, and tube compression can result in interrupted coolant flow. Air cooling is inefficient compared to liquid cooling because of air's lower specific heat. Ice cooling may only be suitable for short-term work and is generally less effective than either air or liquid cooling although the wearer can move about untethered. The best cooling system design approach may he indicated by consideration of the unique cooling needs of personnel performing specific tasks in various environments. Microclimate cooling CBR Environment.

  6. Reactivity and isotopic composition of spent PWR (pressurized-water-reactor) fuel as a function of initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time

    SciTech Connect

    Cerne, S.P.; Hermann, O.W.; Westfall, R.M.

    1987-10-01

    This study presents the reactivity loss of spent PWR fuel due to burnup in terms of the infinite lattice multiplications factor, k/sub infinity/. Calculations were performed using the SAS2 and CSAS1 control modules of the SCALE system. The k/sub infinity/ values calculated for all combinations of six enrichments, seven burnups, and five cooling times. The results are presented as a primary function of enrichment in both tabular and graphic form. An equation has been developed to estimate the tabulated values of k/sub infinity/'s by specifying enrichment, cooling time, and burnup. Atom densities for fresh fuel, and spent fuel at cooling times of 2, 10, and 20 years are included. 13 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs.

  7. Time domain-nuclear magnetic resonance study of chars from southern hardwoods

    Treesearch

    Thomas Elder; Nicole Labbe; David Harper; Timothy Rials

    2006-01-01

    Chars from the thermal degradation of silver maple (Acer saccharinum), red maple (Acer rubrum), sugar maple (Acer saccharum), and white oak (Quercus spp.), performed at temperatures from 250 to 350 oC, were examined using time domain-nuclear magnetic resonance...

  8. Pre-Cooling With Crushed Ice is as Effective as Heat Acclimation at Improving Cycling Time Trial Performance in the Heat.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Matthew; Landers, Grant J; Wallman, Karen E; Kent, Georgina

    2017-06-12

    This study compared pre-cooling (ice ingestion) with heat acclimation training on cycling time trial (CTT) performance in the heat. Fifteen male cyclists/triathletes completed two 800 kJ cycle time trials in the heat, with a 12-day training program in between. Initially, all participants consumed 7 g·kg(-1) of water (22°C) in 30 min, prior to completing an 800 kJ CTT in hot, humid conditions (pre-CTT) (35°C, 50% relative humidity; RH). Participants were then split into two groups, pre-cooling (n=7): trained in thermoneutral conditions then underwent pre-cooling with ice ingestion (7 g·kg(-1),1°C) prior to the final CTT (post-CTT), heat acclimation (n=8): trained in hot conditions (35°C, 50% RH) and consumed water (7 g·kg(-1)) prior to post-CTT. Following training in both conditions, improvement in CTT time was deemed a likely positive benefit (pre-cooling -166±133 s; heat acclimation -105±62 s), with this result being similar between conditions (d=0.22, -0.68-1.08 90% confidence intervals; CI). Core temperature for post-CTT was lower in pre-cooling compared with heat acclimation from 20 min into the pre-cooling period until the 100 kJ mark of the CTT (d>0.98). Sweat onset occurred later in pre-cooling (250±100 s) compared with heat acclimation (180±80 s) for post-CTT (d=0.65, -0.30-1.50 90% CI). Thermal sensation was lower at the end of the pre-cooling period prior to post-CTT for the pre-cooling trial, compared with heat acclimation (d=1.24, 0.90-1.58 90% CI). Pre-cooling with ice ingestion offers an alternate method of improving endurance cycling performance in hot conditions if heat acclimation cannot be attained.

  9. Proof of concept simulations of the Multi-Isotope Process monitor: An online, nondestructive, near-real-time safeguards monitor for nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orton, Christopher R.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Christensen, Richard N.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2011-02-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency will require the development of advanced technologies to effectively safeguard nuclear material at increasingly large-scale nuclear recycling facilities. Ideally, the envisioned technologies would be capable of nondestructive, near-real-time, autonomous process monitoring. This paper describes recent results from model simulations designed to test the Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) monitor, a novel addition to a safeguards system for reprocessing facilities. The MIP monitor combines the detection of intrinsic gamma ray signatures emitted from process solutions with multivariate analysis to detect off-normal conditions in process streams nondestructively and in near-real-time. Three computer models including ORIGEN-ARP, AMUSE, and SYNTH were used in series to predict spent nuclear fuel composition, estimate element partitioning during separation, and simulate spectra from product and raffinate streams using a variety of gamma detectors, respectively. Simulations were generated for fuel with various irradiation histories and under a variety of plant operating conditions. Principal component analysis was applied to the simulated gamma spectra to investigate pattern variations as a function of acid concentration, burnup, and cooling time. Hierarchical cluster analysis and partial least squares (PLS) were also used in the analysis. The MIP monitor was found to be sensitive to induced variations of several operating parameters including distinguishing ±2.5% variation from normal process acid concentrations. The ability of PLS to predict burnup levels from simulated spectra was also demonstrated to be within 3.5% of measured values.

  10. Application of Entry-Time Processes in Asset Management for Nuclear Power Plants (Final Report)

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Nelson

    2008-01-23

    A mathematical model of entry-time processes was developed, and a computational method for solving that model was verified. This methodology was demonstrated via application to a succession of increasingly more complex subsystems of nuclear power plants. The effort culminated in the application to main generators that constituted the PhD dissertation of Shuwen (“Eric”) Wang. Dr. Wang is now employed by ABS Consulting, in Anaheim, CA. ABS is a principal provider to the nuclear industry of technical services related to reliability and safety.

  11. Effect of Immersion Time and Cooling Mode on the Electrochemical Behavior of Hot-Dip Galvanized Steel in Sulfuric Acid Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekbir, Choukri; Dahoun, Nessrine; Guetitech, Asma; Hacid, Abdenour; Ziouche, Aicha; Ouaad, Kamel; Djadoun, Amar

    2017-04-01

    In this work, we investigated the influence of galvanizing immersion time and cooling modes environments on the electrochemical corrosion behavior of hot-dip galvanized steel, in 1 M sulfuric acid electrolyte at room temperature using potentiodynamic polarization technique. In addition, the evolution of thickness, structure and microstructure of zinc coatings for different immersion times and two cooling modes (air and water) is characterized, respectively, by using of Elcometer scan probe, x-ray diffraction and metallography analysis. The analysis of the behavior of steel and galvanized steel, vis-a-vis corrosion, by means of corrosion characteristic parameters as anodic (β a) and cathodic (β c) Tafel slopes, corrosion potential (E corr), corrosion current density (i corr), corrosion rate (CR) and polarization resistance (R p), reveals that the galvanized steel has anticorrosion properties much better than that of steel. More the immersion time increases, more the zinc coatings thickness increases, and more these properties become better. The comparison between the two cooling modes shows that the coatings of zinc produced by hot-dip galvanization and air-cooled provides a much better protection to steel against corrosion than those cooled by quenching in water which exhibit a brittle corrosive behavior due to the presence of cracks.

  12. Nuclear Dynamical Correlation Effects in X-ray Spectroscopy from a Theoretical Time-Domain Perspective.

    PubMed

    Karsten, Sven; Ivanov, Sergei D; Aziz, Saadullah G; Bokarev, Sergey I; Kühn, Oliver

    2017-03-02

    To date X-ray spectroscopy has become a routine tool that can reveal highly local and element-specific information on the electronic structure of atoms in complex environments. Here, we focus on nuclear dynamical correlation effects in X-ray spectra and develop a rigorous time-correlation function method employing ground state classical molecular dynamics simulations. The importance of nuclear correlation phenomena is demonstrated by comparison against the results from the conventional sampling approach performed on the same data set for gas phase water. In contrast to the first-order absorption, second-order resonant inelastic scattering spectra exhibit pronounced fingerprints of nuclear motions. The developed methodology is not biased to a particular electronic structure method and, owing to its generality, can be applied to, e.g., X-ray photoelectron and Auger spectroscopies.

  13. Damage dosimetry and embrittlement monitoring of nuclear pressure vessels in real time by magnetic properties measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbins, J.F.; Ougouag, A.M.; Williams, J.G.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a technique for real-time monitoring of neutron dose and of the onset and progression of embrittlement in operating nuclear pressure vessels. The technique relies on the measurement of magnetic properties of steel and other magnetic materials which are extremely sensitive to radiation-induced properties changes. The approach being developed here is innovative and unique. It promises to be readily applicable to all existing and planned reactor structures. The significance of this program is that it addresses a major concern in the operation of existing nuclear pressure vessels. The development of microscopic defect clusters during irradiation in the nuclear pressure vessel beltline region leads to an increase in material yield strength and a concomitant decrease in ductility, or ability to absorb energy in fracture (i.e. fracture toughness). This decrease in fracture toughness is alarming since it may impair the ability of the pressure vessel to resist fracture during unusual loading situations.

  14. Time differentiated nuclear resonance spectroscopy coupled with pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kupenko, I. Strohm, C.; McCammon, C.; Cerantola, V.; Petitgirard, S.; Dubrovinsky, L.; Glazyrin, K.; Vasiukov, D.; Aprilis, G.; Chumakov, A. I.; Rüffer, R.

    2015-11-15

    Developments in pulsed laser heating applied to nuclear resonance techniques are presented together with their applications to studies of geophysically relevant materials. Continuous laser heating in diamond anvil cells is a widely used method to generate extreme temperatures at static high pressure conditions in order to study the structure and properties of materials found in deep planetary interiors. The pulsed laser heating technique has advantages over continuous heating, including prevention of the spreading of heated sample and/or the pressure medium and, thus, a better stability of the heating process. Time differentiated data acquisition coupled with pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells was successfully tested at the Nuclear Resonance beamline (ID18) of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. We show examples applying the method to investigation of an assemblage containing ε-Fe, FeO, and Fe{sub 3}C using synchrotron Mössbauer source spectroscopy, FeCO{sub 3} using nuclear inelastic scattering, and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} using nuclear forward scattering. These examples demonstrate the applicability of pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells to spectroscopic techniques with long data acquisition times, because it enables stable pulsed heating with data collection at specific time intervals that are synchronized with laser pulses.

  15. Probing the Nuclear Spin-Lattice Relaxation Time at the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenaar, J. J. T.; den Haan, A. M. J.; de Voogd, J. M.; Bossoni, L.; de Jong, T. A.; de Wit, M.; Bastiaans, K. M.; Thoen, D. J.; Endo, A.; Klapwijk, T. M.; Zaanen, J.; Oosterkamp, T. H.

    2016-07-01

    Nuclear spin-lattice relaxation times are measured on copper using magnetic-resonance force microscopy performed at temperatures down to 42 mK. The low temperature is verified by comparison with the Korringa relation. Measuring spin-lattice relaxation times locally at very low temperatures opens up the possibility to measure the magnetic properties of inhomogeneous electron systems realized in oxide interfaces, topological insulators, and other strongly correlated electron systems such as high-Tc superconductors.

  16. Measurement of prompt neutron generation time at the VIR-2M pulsed nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glukhov, L. Yu.; Kotkov, S. P.; Kuznetsov, M. S.; Chursin, S. S.

    2016-12-01

    The prompt neutron generation time is measured in the core of the VIR-2M research nuclear reactor. The measurements are performed using the Babala method while the reactor is in the subcritical state. The VIR-2M reactor and the relevant experimental equipment are briefly described, and the experimental procedure and data processing technique are presented. It is shown that the prompt neutron generation time with empty experimental channels is 35 ± 1 μs.

  17. Measurement of prompt neutron generation time at the VIR-2M pulsed nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Glukhov, L. Yu.; Kotkov, S. P.; Kuznetsov, M. S.; Chursin, S. S.

    2016-12-15

    The prompt neutron generation time is measured in the core of the VIR-2M research nuclear reactor. The measurements are performed using the Babala method while the reactor is in the subcritical state. The VIR-2M reactor and the relevant experimental equipment are briefly described, and the experimental procedure and data processing technique are presented. It is shown that the prompt neutron generation time with empty experimental channels is 35 ± 1 μs.

  18. Timing major conflict between mitochondrial and nuclear genes in species relationships of Polygonia butterflies (Nymphalidae: Nymphalini)

    PubMed Central

    Wahlberg, Niklas; Weingartner, Elisabet; Warren, Andrew D; Nylin, Sören

    2009-01-01

    Background Major conflict between mitochondrial and nuclear genes in estimating species relationships is an increasingly common finding in animals. Usually this is attributed to incomplete lineage sorting, but recently the possibility has been raised that hybridization is important in generating such phylogenetic patterns. Just how widespread ancient and/or recent hybridization is in animals and how it affects estimates of species relationships is still not well-known. Results We investigate the species relationships and their evolutionary history over time in the genus Polygonia using DNA sequences from two mitochondrial gene regions (COI and ND1, total 1931 bp) and four nuclear gene regions (EF-1α, wingless, GAPDH and RpS5, total 2948 bp). We found clear, strongly supported conflict between mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences in estimating species relationships in the genus Polygonia. Nodes at which there was no conflict tended to have diverged at the same time when analyzed separately, while nodes at which conflict was present diverged at different times. We find that two species create most of the conflict, and attribute the conflict found in Polygonia satyrus to ancient hybridization and conflict found in Polygonia oreas to recent or ongoing hybridization. In both examples, the nuclear gene regions tended to give the phylogenetic relationships of the species supported by morphology and biology. Conclusion Studies inferring species-level relationships using molecular data should never be based on a single locus. Here we show that the phylogenetic hypothesis generated using mitochondrial DNA gives a very different interpretation of the evolutionary history of Polygonia species compared to that generated from nuclear DNA. We show that possible cases of hybridization in Polygonia are not limited to sister species, but may be inferred further back in time. Furthermore, we provide more evidence that Haldane's effect might not be as strong a process in

  19. Microbial analysis of meatballs cooled with vacuum and conventional cooling.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Hande Mutlu; Ozturk, Harun Kemal; Koçar, Gunnur

    2017-08-01

    Vacuum cooling is a rapid evaporative cooling technique and can be used for pre-cooling of leafy vegetables, mushroom, bakery, fishery, sauces, cooked food, meat and particulate foods. The aim of this study was to apply the vacuum cooling and the conventional cooling techniques for the cooling of the meatball and to show the vacuum pressure effect on the cooling time, the temperature decrease and microbial growth rate. The results of the vacuum cooling and the conventional cooling (cooling in the refrigerator) were compared with each other for different temperatures. The study shows that the conventional cooling was much slower than the vacuum cooling. Moreover, the microbial growth rate of the vacuum cooling was extremely low compared with the conventional cooling. Thus, the lowest microbial growth occurred at 0.7 kPa and the highest microbial growth was observed at 1.5 kPa for the vacuum cooling. The mass loss ratio for the conventional cooling and vacuum cooling was about 5 and 9% respectively.

  20. Heat exchanger with auxiliary cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Coleman, John H.

    1980-01-01

    A heat exchanger with an auxiliary cooling system capable of cooling a nuclear reactor should the normal cooling mechanism become inoperable. A cooling coil is disposed around vertical heat transfer tubes that carry secondary coolant therethrough and is located in a downward flow of primary coolant that passes in heat transfer relationship with both the cooling coil and the vertical heat transfer tubes. A third coolant is pumped through the cooling coil which absorbs heat from the primary coolant which increases the downward flow of the primary coolant thereby increasing the natural circulation of the primary coolant through the nuclear reactor.

  1. Time-Dependent Dynamics of Massive Quarkonium Resonances in Nuclear and Quark-Gluon-Plasma Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mah Hussin, Noor Sabrina; Shalaby, Asmaa; Petridis, Athanasios

    2014-03-01

    The time-dependent Schrödinger equation is used to study the formation of quarkonia and their propagation in Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) and nuclear media. The initial bound (ground) state is computed using imaginary-time propagation in a confining potential. The QGP is simulated with a confining potential of an extended asymptotic freedom region. The initial state propagates through this potential in real time. The nuclear medium is simulated with a periodic potential. In all cases the survival probability is calculated versus time for various potential parameters and relative momenta of the quarkonium with respect to the surrounding medium. In all calculations the staggered-leap frog method is used with special attention paid to the issue of stability. It is found that quarkonium decay is typically non-exponential. Fast moving states decay faster. There is a distinctive difference in the time-dependence of the survival probability between QGP and the nuclear medium. The effects of more realistic potentials are investigated.

  2. Time-Resolved Expression Profiling of the Nuclear Receptor Superfamily in Human Adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lahnalampi, Mari; Heinäniemi, Merja; Sinkkonen, Lasse; Wabitsch, Martin; Carlberg, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    Background The differentiation of fibroblast-like pre-adipocytes to lipid-loaded adipocytes is regulated by a network of transcription factors, the most prominent one being the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ. However, many of the other 47 members of the nuclear receptor superfamily have an impact on adipogenesis, which in human cells has not been investigated in detail. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed by quantitative PCR all human nuclear receptors at multiple time points during differentiation of SGBS pre-adipocytes. The earliest effect was the down-regulation of the genes RARG, PPARD, REV-ERBA, REV-ERBB, VDR and GR followed by the up-regulation of PPARG, LXRA and AR. These observations are supported with data from 3T3-L1 mouse pre-adipocytes and primary human adipocytes. Investigation of the effects of the individual differentiation mix components in short-term treatments and of their omission from the full mix showed that the expression levels of the early-regulated nuclear receptor genes were most affected by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) ligand cortisol and the phosophodiesterase inhibitor IBMX. Interestingly, the effects of both compounds converged to repress the genes PPARD, REV-ERBA, REV-ERBB, VDR and GR, whereas cortisol and IBMX showed antagonistic interaction for PPARG, LXRA and AR causing a time lag in their up-regulation. We hypothesize that the well-known auto-repression of GR fine-tunes the detected early responses. Consistently, chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments showed that GR association increased on the transcription start sites of the genes RARG, REV-ERBB, VDR and GR. Conclusions/Significance Adipocyte differentiation is a process, in which many members of the nuclear receptor superfamily change their mRNA expression. The actions of cortisol and IBMX converged to repress several nuclear receptors early in differentiation, while up-regulation of other nuclear receptor genes showed a time

  3. Long coherence times in nuclear spin-free vanadyl qubits [Long coherence times in surface-compatible nuclear spin-free vanadium qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Chung -Jui; Graham, Michael J.; Zadrozny, Joseph M.; Niklas, Jens; Krzyaniak, Matthew D.; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Poluektov, Oleg G.; Freedman, Danna E.

    2016-10-31

    Quantum information processing (QIP) offers the potential to create new frontiers in fields ranging from quantum biology to cryptography. Two key figures of merit for electronic spin qubits, the smallest units of QIP, are the coherence time (T2), the lifetime of the qubit, and the spin–lattice relaxation time (T1), the thermally defined upper limit of T2. To achieve QIP, processable qubits with long coherence times are required. Recent studies on (Ph4P-d20)2[V(C8S8)3], a vanadium-based qubit, demonstrate that millisecond T2 times are achievable in transition metal complexes with nuclear spinfree environments. Applying these principles to vanadyl complexes offers a route to combine the previously established surface compatibility of the flatter vanadyl structures with a long T2. Toward those ends, we investigated a series of four qubits, (Ph4P)2[VO(C8S8)2] (1), (Ph4P)2[VO(β-C3S5)2] (2), (Ph4P)2[VO(α-C3S5)2] (3), and (Ph4P)2[VO(C3S4O)2] (4), by pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and compared the performance of these species with our recently reported set of vanadium tris(dithiolene) complexes. Crucially we demonstrate that solutions of 1–4 in SO2, a uniquely polar nuclear spinfree solvent, reveal T2 values of up to 152(6) μs, comparable to the best molecular qubit candidates. Upon transitioning to vanadyl species from the tris(dithiolene) analogues, we observe a remarkable order of magnitude increase in 12, attributed to stronger solute–solvent interactions with the polar vanadium-oxo moiety. Simultaneously, we detect a small decrease in T2 for the vanadyl analogues

  4. Time resolved analysis of Fermi gamma-ray bursts with fast-and slow-cooled synchrotron photon models

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, J. M.; Preece, R. D.; Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Goldstein, A.; Bhat, P. N.; Greiner, J.; Gruber, D.; Kienlin, A.; Kouveliotou, C.; McGlynn, S.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Rau, A.; Xiong, S.; Axelsson, M.; Baring, M. G.; Dermer, C. D.; Iyyani, S.; Kocevski, D.; Omodei, N.; Ryde, F.; Vianello, G.

    2014-02-27

    Time-resolved spectroscopy is performed on eight bright, long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) dominated by single emission pulses that were observed with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Fitting the prompt radiation of GRBs by empirical spectral forms such as the Band function leads to ambiguous conclusions about the physical model for the prompt radiation. Moreover, the Band function is often inadequate to fit the data. Therefore, the GRB spectrum is modeled with two emission components consisting of optically thin non-thermal synchrotron radiation from relativistic electrons and, when significant, thermal emission from a jet photosphere, which is represented by a blackbody spectrum. In order to produce an acceptable fit, the addition of a blackbody component is required in five out of the eight cases. We also find that the low-energy spectral index α is consistent with a synchrotron component with α = –0.81 ± 0.1. This value lies between the limiting values of α = –2/3 and α = –3/2 for electrons in the slow- and fast-cooling regimes, respectively, suggesting ongoing acceleration at the emission site. The blackbody component can be more significant when using a physical synchrotron model instead of the Band function, illustrating that the Band function does not serve as a good proxy for a non-thermal synchrotron emission component. The temperature and characteristic emission-region size of the blackbody component are found to, respectively, decrease and increase as power laws with time during the prompt phase. Additionally, we find that the blackbody and non-thermal components have separate temporal behaviors as far as their respective flux and spectral evolutions.

  5. Time resolved analysis of Fermi gamma-ray bursts with fast-and slow-cooled synchrotron photon models

    DOE PAGES

    Burgess, J. M.; Preece, R. D.; Connaughton, V.; ...

    2014-02-27

    Time-resolved spectroscopy is performed on eight bright, long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) dominated by single emission pulses that were observed with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Fitting the prompt radiation of GRBs by empirical spectral forms such as the Band function leads to ambiguous conclusions about the physical model for the prompt radiation. Moreover, the Band function is often inadequate to fit the data. Therefore, the GRB spectrum is modeled with two emission components consisting of optically thin non-thermal synchrotron radiation from relativistic electrons and, when significant, thermal emission from a jet photosphere, which is represented by a blackbody spectrum. Inmore » order to produce an acceptable fit, the addition of a blackbody component is required in five out of the eight cases. We also find that the low-energy spectral index α is consistent with a synchrotron component with α = –0.81 ± 0.1. This value lies between the limiting values of α = –2/3 and α = –3/2 for electrons in the slow- and fast-cooling regimes, respectively, suggesting ongoing acceleration at the emission site. The blackbody component can be more significant when using a physical synchrotron model instead of the Band function, illustrating that the Band function does not serve as a good proxy for a non-thermal synchrotron emission component. The temperature and characteristic emission-region size of the blackbody component are found to, respectively, decrease and increase as power laws with time during the prompt phase. Additionally, we find that the blackbody and non-thermal components have separate temporal behaviors as far as their respective flux and spectral evolutions.« less

  6. Hardware/Software Data Acquisition System for Real Time Cell Temperature Monitoring in Air-Cooled Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bartolucci, Veronica

    2017-01-01

    This work presents a hardware/software data acquisition system developed for monitoring the temperature in real time of the cells in Air-Cooled Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells (AC-PEFC). These fuel cells are of great interest because they can carry out, in a single operation, the processes of oxidation and refrigeration. This allows reduction of weight, volume, cost and complexity of the control system in the AC-PEFC. In this type of PEFC (and in general in any PEFC), the reliable monitoring of temperature along the entire surface of the stack is fundamental, since a suitable temperature and a regular distribution thereof, are key for a better performance of the stack and a longer lifetime under the best operating conditions. The developed data acquisition (DAQ) system can perform non-intrusive temperature measurements of each individual cell of an AC-PEFC stack of any power (from watts to kilowatts). The stack power is related to the temperature gradient; i.e., a higher power corresponds to a higher stack surface, and consequently higher temperature difference between the coldest and the hottest point. The developed DAQ system has been implemented with the low-cost open-source platform Arduino, and it is completed with a modular virtual instrument that has been developed using NI LabVIEW. Temperature vs time evolution of all the cells of an AC-PEFC both together and individually can be registered and supervised. The paper explains comprehensively the developed DAQ system together with experimental results that demonstrate the suitability of the system. PMID:28698497

  7. Time-resolved analysis of Fermi gamma-ray bursts with fast- and slow-cooled synchrotron photon models

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, J. M.; Preece, R. D.; Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Goldstein, A.; Bhat, P. N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Xiong, S.; Greiner, J.; Gruber, D.; Kienlin, A.; Rau, A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Meegan, C. A.; Axelsson, M.; Baring, M. G.; Dermer, C. D.; Iyyani, S.; Kocevski, D. E-mail: Rob.Preece@nasa.gov E-mail: baring@rice.edu; and others

    2014-03-20

    Time-resolved spectroscopy is performed on eight bright, long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) dominated by single emission pulses that were observed with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Fitting the prompt radiation of GRBs by empirical spectral forms such as the Band function leads to ambiguous conclusions about the physical model for the prompt radiation. Moreover, the Band function is often inadequate to fit the data. The GRB spectrum is therefore modeled with two emission components consisting of optically thin non-thermal synchrotron radiation from relativistic electrons and, when significant, thermal emission from a jet photosphere, which is represented by a blackbody spectrum. To produce an acceptable fit, the addition of a blackbody component is required in five out of the eight cases. We also find that the low-energy spectral index α is consistent with a synchrotron component with α = –0.81 ± 0.1. This value lies between the limiting values of α = –2/3 and α = –3/2 for electrons in the slow- and fast-cooling regimes, respectively, suggesting ongoing acceleration at the emission site. The blackbody component can be more significant when using a physical synchrotron model instead of the Band function, illustrating that the Band function does not serve as a good proxy for a non-thermal synchrotron emission component. The temperature and characteristic emission-region size of the blackbody component are found to, respectively, decrease and increase as power laws with time during the prompt phase. In addition, we find that the blackbody and non-thermal components have separate temporal behaviors as far as their respective flux and spectral evolutions.

  8. Hardware/Software Data Acquisition System for Real Time Cell Temperature Monitoring in Air-Cooled Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Segura, Francisca; Bartolucci, Veronica; Andújar, José Manuel

    2017-07-09

    This work presents a hardware/software data acquisition system developed for monitoring the temperature in real time of the cells in Air-Cooled Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells (AC-PEFC). These fuel cells are of great interest because they can carry out, in a single operation, the processes of oxidation and refrigeration. This allows reduction of weight, volume, cost and complexity of the control system in the AC-PEFC. In this type of PEFC (and in general in any PEFC), the reliable monitoring of temperature along the entire surface of the stack is fundamental, since a suitable temperature and a regular distribution thereof, are key for a better performance of the stack and a longer lifetime under the best operating conditions. The developed data acquisition (DAQ) system can perform non-intrusive temperature measurements of each individual cell of an AC-PEFC stack of any power (from watts to kilowatts). The stack power is related to the temperature gradient; i.e., a higher power corresponds to a higher stack surface, and consequently higher temperature difference between the coldest and the hottest point. The developed DAQ system has been implemented with the low-cost open-source platform Arduino, and it is completed with a modular virtual instrument that has been developed using NI LabVIEW. Temperature vs time evolution of all the cells of an AC-PEFC both together and individually can be registered and supervised. The paper explains comprehensively the developed DAQ system together with experimental results that demonstrate the suitability of the system.

  9. The contrasting roles of creep and stress relaxation in the time-dependent deformation during in-situ cooling of a nickel-base single crystal superalloy.

    PubMed

    Panwisawas, Chinnapat; D'Souza, Neil; Collins, David M; Bhowmik, Ayan

    2017-09-11

    Time dependent plastic deformation in a single crystal nickel-base superalloy during cooling from casting relevant temperatures has been studied using a combination of in-situ neutron diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and modelling. Visco-plastic deformation during cooling was found to be dependent on the stress and constraints imposed to component contraction during cooling, which mechanistically comprises creep and stress relaxation. Creep results in progressive work hardening with dislocations shearing the γ' precipitates, a high dislocation density in the γ channels and near the γ/γ' interface and precipitate shearing. When macroscopic contraction is restricted, relaxation dominates. This leads to work softening from a decreased dislocation density and the presence of long segment stacking faults in γ phase. Changes in lattice strains occur to a similar magnitude in both the γ and γ' phases during stress relaxation, while in creep there is no clear monotonic trend in lattice strain in the γ phase, but only a marginal increase in the γ' precipitates. Using a visco-plastic law derived from in-situ experiments, the experimentally measured and calculated stresses during cooling show a good agreement when creep predominates. However, when stress relaxation dominates accounting for the decrease in dislocation density during cooling is essential.

  10. Leaching properties of slag generated by a gasification/vitrification unit: the role of pH, particle size, contact time and cooling method used.

    PubMed

    Moustakas, K; Mavropoulos, A; Katsou, E; Haralambous, K J; Loizidou, M

    2012-03-15

    The environmental impact from the operation of thermal waste treatment facilities mainly originates from the air emissions, as well as the generated solid residues. The objective of this paper is to examine the slag residue generated by a demonstration plasma gasification/vitrification unit and investigate the composition, the leaching properties of the slag under different conditions, as well as the role of the cooling method used. The influence of pH, particle size and contact time on the leachability of heavy metals are discussed. The main outcome is that the vitrified slag is characterized as inert and stable and can be safely disposed at landfills or used in the construction sector. Finally, the water-cooled slag showed better resistance in relation to heavy metal leachability compared to the air-cooled slag.

  11. Measurement and simulation of two-phase CO2 cooling in Micromegas modules for a Large Prototype of Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, D. S.; Attié, D.; Colas, P.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Majumdar, N.; Bhattacharya, S.; Sarkar, S.; Bhattacharya, A.; Ganjour, S.

    2015-08-01

    The readout electronics of a Micromegas (MM) module consume nearly 26 W of electric power, which causes the temperature of electronic board to increase upto 70 oC. Increase in temperature results in damage of electronics. Development of temperature gradient in the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) may affect precise measurement as well. Two-phase CO2 cooling has been applied to remove heat from the MM modules during two test beam experiments at DESY, Hamburg. Following the experimental procedure, a comprehensive study of the cooling technique has been accomplished for a single MM module by means of numerical simulation. This paper is focused to discuss the application of two-phase CO2 cooling to keep the temperature below 30 oC and stabilized within 0.2 oC.

  12. Thermoluminescence and nuclear particle tracks in ALHA-81005 Evidence for a brief transit time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, S. R.; Crozaz, G.

    1983-09-01

    Thermoluminescence and nuclear particle track measurements were made on the Antarctic meteorite ALHA-81005. No nuclear particle tracks were found in lithic fragments indicating that the clast material never resided at the very surface of the parent body. The unusually low natural thermoluminescence of this material is interpreted as being due to a combination of anomalous fading and thermal decay. The thermal decay could be due to very long terrestrial age or heating either during atmospheric entry, in a near sun orbit or during a parent body impact event. Impact heating is considered the more likely of these possibilities for this meteorite. If the impact heating interpretation is correct the thermoluminescence data constrains the space exposure time of the object to be less than 2,500 years. Such a brief earth transit time is consistent with a lunar origin for this meteorite.

  13. Nuclear event time histories and computed site transfer functions for locations in the Los Angeles region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rogers, A.M.; Covington, P.A.; Park, R.B.; Borcherdt, R.D.; Perkins, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    This report presents a collection of Nevada Test Site (NTS) nuclear explosion recordings obtained at sites in the greater Los Angeles, Calif., region. The report includes ground velocity time histories, as well as, derived site transfer functions. These data have been collected as part of a study to evaluate the validity of using low-level ground motions to predict the frequency-dependent response of a site during an earthquake. For this study 19 nuclear events were recorded at 98 separate locations. Some of these sites have recorded more than one of the nuclear explosions, and, consequently, there are a total of 159, three-component station records. The location of all the recording sites are shown in figures 1–5, the station coordinates and abbreviations are given in table 1. The station addresses are listed in table 2, and the nuclear explosions that were recorded are listed in table 3. The recording sites were chosen on the basis of three criteria: (1) that the underlying geological conditions were representative of conditions over significant areas of the region, (2) that the site was the location of a strong-motion recording of the 1971 San Fernando earthquake, or (3) that more complete geographical coverage was required in that location.

  14. Toward Simultaneous Real-Time Fluoroscopic and Nuclear Imaging in the Intervention Room.

    PubMed

    Beijst, Casper; Elschot, Mattijs; Viergever, Max A; de Jong, Hugo W A M

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the technical feasibility of hybrid simultaneous fluoroscopic and nuclear imaging. An x-ray tube, an x-ray detector, and a gamma camera were positioned in one line, enabling imaging of the same field of view. Since a straightforward combination of these elements would block the lines of view, a gamma camera setup was developed to be able to view around the x-ray tube. A prototype was built by using a mobile C-arm and a gamma camera with a four-pinhole collimator. By using the prototype, test images were acquired and sensitivity, resolution, and coregistration error were analyzed. Nuclear images (two frames per second) were acquired simultaneously with fluoroscopic images. Depending on the distance from point source to detector, the system resolution was 1.5-1.9-cm full width at half maximum, the sensitivity was (0.6-1.5) × 10(-5) counts per decay, and the coregistration error was -0.13 to 0.15 cm. With good spatial and temporal alignment of both modalities throughout the field of view, fluoroscopic images can be shown in grayscale and corresponding nuclear images in color overlay. Measurements obtained with the hybrid imaging prototype device that combines simultaneous fluoroscopic and nuclear imaging of the same field of view have demonstrated the feasibility of real-time simultaneous hybrid imaging in the intervention room. © RSNA, 2015

  15. Time-Reversal Symmetry Violation in Molecules Induced by Nuclear Magnetic Quadrupole Moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flambaum, V. V.; DeMille, D.; Kozlov, M. G.

    2014-09-01

    Recent measurements in paramagnetic molecules improved the limit on the electron electric dipole moment (EDM) by an order of magnitude. Time-reversal (T) and parity (P) symmetry violation in molecules may also come from their nuclei. We point out that nuclear T, P-odd effects are amplified in paramagnetic molecules containing deformed nuclei, where the primary effects arise from the T, P-odd nuclear magnetic quadrupole moment (MQM). We perform calculations of T, P-odd effects in the molecules TaN, ThO, ThF+, HfF+, YbF, HgF, and BaF induced by MQMs. We compare our results with those for the diamagnetic TlF molecule, where the T, P-odd effects are produced by the nuclear Schiff moment. We argue that measurements in molecules with MQMs may provide improved limits on the strength of T, P-odd nuclear forces, on the proton, neutron, and quark EDMs, on quark chromo-EDMs, and on the QCD θ term and CP-violating quark interactions.

  16. Stochastic cooling in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan J. M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Mernick, K.

    2012-05-20

    The full 6-dimensional [x,x'; y,y'; z,z'] stochastic cooling system for RHIC was completed and operational for the FY12 Uranium-Uranium collider run. Cooling enhances the integrated luminosity of the Uranium collisions by a factor of 5, primarily by reducing the transverse emittances but also by cooling in the longitudinal plane to preserve the bunch length. The components have been deployed incrementally over the past several runs, beginning with longitudinal cooling, then cooling in the vertical planes but multiplexed between the Yellow and Blue rings, next cooling both rings simultaneously in vertical (the horizontal plane was cooled by betatron coupling), and now simultaneous horizontal cooling has been commissioned. The system operated between 5 and 9 GHz and with 3 x 10{sup 8} Uranium ions per bunch and produces a cooling half-time of approximately 20 minutes. The ultimate emittance is determined by the balance between cooling and emittance growth from Intra-Beam Scattering. Specific details of the apparatus and mathematical techniques for calculating its performance have been published elsewhere. Here we report on: the method of operation, results with beam, and comparison of results to simulations.

  17. a Zepto-Second Atomic Clock for Nuclear Contact Time Measurements at Superheavy Collision Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backe, H.

    2012-01-01

    The distance between the centers of gravity of two heavy colliding nuclei R(t) as function of time can be employed to describe the dynamical behavior of the di-nuclear system during the contact phase. In order to get information on this quantity, it was suggested by G. Soff, J. Reinhard, B. Müller and W. Greiner1,2 many years ago to investigate the spectral shape of electrons emitted in dissipative heavy ion collisions. It has been shown that in the limit of lowest order adiabatic perturbation theory the δ-electron spectrum just reflects the Fourier transform of the function Ṙ(t)/R(t). With this tool nuclear contact times in the order of 1 zs = 1 · 10-21 s have been determined for the U+Au collision system at an uranium beam energy of 8.65 MeV/u.9 The δ electron spectra observed for the U+Pd (Zu = 138) collision system at 6.1 MeV/u at impact parameters for which nuclear forces become important, most likely cannot anymore be analyzed within the framework of such a model because of its breakdown if time changes of Ṙ(t)/R(t) become too rapid.

  18. A Randomized, controlled, crossover trial to investigate times to onset of the perception of soothing and cooling by over-the-counter heartburn treatments.

    PubMed

    Strugala, V; Dettmar, P W; Sarratt, K; Sykes, J; Berry, P; Thomas, E

    2010-01-01

    This was a randomized, controlled, four-way crossover study in 45 subjects with a tendency to suffer from moderate heartburn following some meals. The study was designed to assess the time to onset of the perceived soothing and cooling effects of the alginate raft-forming products, Gaviscon Liquid (peppermint), Gaviscon Double Action Liquid (peppermint) and Gaviscon Powder Formulation (fresh tropical), compared with a non-active sublingual control. All three Gaviscon products provided significantly faster soothing and cooling effects compared with the control. Based on the upper 95% confidence limits for the median, time to onset of soothing was perceived within 3.15 min, 3.08 min and 4.05 min for Gaviscon Liquid, Double Action Liquid and Powder Formulation, respectively. Similarly, time to onset of cooling was perceived within 1.95 min, 1.23 min and 11.22 min for Gaviscon Liquid, Double Action Liquid and Powder Formulation, respectively. The results show that Gaviscon Liquid and Gaviscon Double Action soothe within 3.15 min and cool within 1.95 min.

  19. A fractal time thermal model for predicting the surface temperature of air-cooled cylindrical Li-ion cells based on experimental measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Marambio, Jorge; Moser, Francisco; Gana, Felipe; Severino, Bernardo; Calderón-Muñoz, Williams R.; Palma-Behnke, Rodrigo; Estevez, Pablo A.; Orchard, Marcos; Cortés, Marcelo

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a experimentally-validated fractal time thermal model to describe the discharge and cooling down processes of air-cooled cylindrical Lithium-ion cells. Three cases were studied, a spatially isolated single cell under natural convection and two spatial configurations of modules with forced air cooling: staggered and aligned arrays with 30 and 25 cells respectively. Surface temperature measurements for discharge processes were obtained in a single cell at 1 C, 2 C and 3 C discharge rates, and in the two arrays at 1 C discharge rate. In the modules, surface temperature measurements were obtained for selected cells at specific inlet cooling air speeds. The fractal time energy equation captures the anomalous temperature relaxation and describes the cell surface temperature using a stretched exponential model. Stretched exponential temperature models of cell surface temperature show a better agreement with experimental measurements than pure exponential temperature models. Cells closer to the horizontal side walls have a better heat dissipation than the cells along the centerline of the module. The high prediction capabilities of the fractal time energy equation are useful in new design approaches of thermal control strategies of modules and packs, and to develop more efficient signal-correction algorithms in multipoint temperature measurement technologies in Li-ion batteries.

  20. MEIC electron cooling program

    DOE PAGES

    Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Zhang, Yuhong

    2014-12-01

    Cooling of proton and ion beams is essential for achieving high luminosities (up to above 1034 cm-2s-1) for MEIC, a Medium energy Electron-Ion Collider envisioned at JLab [1] for advanced nuclear science research. In the present conceptual design, we utilize the conventional election cooling method and adopted a multi-staged cooling scheme for reduction of and maintaining low beam emittances [2,3,4]. Two electron cooling facilities are required to support the scheme: one is a low energy (up to 2 MeV) DC cooler installed in the MEIC ion pre-booster (with the proton kinetic energy up to 3 GeV); the other is amore » high electron energy (up to 55 MeV) cooler in the collider ring (with the proton kinetic energy from 25 to 100 GeV). The high energy cooler, which is based on the ERL technology and a circulator ring, utilizes a bunched electron beam to cool bunched proton or ion beams. To complete the MEIC cooling concept and a technical design of the ERL cooler as well as to develop supporting technologies, an R&D program has been initiated at Jefferson Lab and significant progresses have been made since then. In this study, we present a brief description of the cooler design and a summary of the progress in this cooling R&D.« less

  1. MEIC electron cooling program

    SciTech Connect

    Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Zhang, Yuhong

    2014-12-01

    Cooling of proton and ion beams is essential for achieving high luminosities (up to above 1034 cm-2s-1) for MEIC, a Medium energy Electron-Ion Collider envisioned at JLab [1] for advanced nuclear science research. In the present conceptual design, we utilize the conventional election cooling method and adopted a multi-staged cooling scheme for reduction of and maintaining low beam emittances [2,3,4]. Two electron cooling facilities are required to support the scheme: one is a low energy (up to 2 MeV) DC cooler installed in the MEIC ion pre-booster (with the proton kinetic energy up to 3 GeV); the other is a high electron energy (up to 55 MeV) cooler in the collider ring (with the proton kinetic energy from 25 to 100 GeV). The high energy cooler, which is based on the ERL technology and a circulator ring, utilizes a bunched electron beam to cool bunched proton or ion beams. To complete the MEIC cooling concept and a technical design of the ERL cooler as well as to develop supporting technologies, an R&D program has been initiated at Jefferson Lab and significant progresses have been made since then. In this study, we present a brief description of the cooler design and a summary of the progress in this cooling R&D.

  2. Axion cooling of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedrakian, Armen

    2016-03-01

    Cooling simulations of neutron stars and their comparison with the data from thermally emitting x-ray sources put constraints on the properties of axions, and by extension, of any light pseudoscalar dark matter particles, whose existence has been postulated to solve the strong-C P problem of QCD. We incorporate the axion emission by pair-breaking and formation processes by S - and P -wave nucleonic condensates in a benchmark code for cooling simulations, as well as provide fit formulas for the rates of these processes. Axion cooling of neutron stars has been simulated for 24 models covering the mass range 1 to 1.8 solar masses, featuring nonaccreted iron and accreted light-element envelopes, and a range of nucleon-axion couplings. The models are based on an equation state predicting conservative physics of superdense nuclear matter that does not allow for the onset of fast cooling processes induced by phase transitions to non-nucleonic forms of matter or high proton concentration. The cooling tracks in the temperature vs age plane were confronted with the (time-averaged) measured surface temperature of the central compact object in the Cas A supernova remnant as well as surface temperatures of three nearby middle-aged thermally emitting pulsars. We find that the axion coupling is limited to fa/107 GeV ≥(5 - 10 ) , which translates into an upper bound on axion mass ma≤(0.06 - 0.12 ) eV for Peccei-Quinn charges of the neutron |Cn|˜0.04 and proton |Cp|˜0.4 characteristic for hadronic models of axions.

  3. Anomalous transient uplift observed at the Lop Nor, China nuclear test site using satellite radar interferometry time-series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, P.; Buckley, S. M.; Yang, D.; Carle, S. F.

    2011-12-01

    Anomalous uplift is observed at the Lop Nor, China nuclear test site using ERS satellite SAR data. Using an InSAR time-series analysis method, we show that an increase in absolute uplift with time is observed between 1997 and 1999. The signal is collocated with past underground nuclear tests. Due to the collocation in space with past underground tests we postulate a nuclear test-related hydrothermal source for the uplift signal. A possible mechanism is presented that can account for the observed transient uplift and is consistent with documented thermal regimes associated with underground nuclear tests conducted at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) (formerly the Nevada Test Site).

  4. Nuclear Architecture Organized by Rif1 Underpins the Replication-Timing Program

    PubMed Central

    Foti, Rossana; Gnan, Stefano; Cornacchia, Daniela; Dileep, Vishnu; Bulut-Karslioglu, Aydan; Diehl, Sarah; Buness, Andreas; Klein, Felix A.; Huber, Wolfgang; Johnstone, Ewan; Loos, Remco; Bertone, Paul; Gilbert, David M.; Manke, Thomas; Jenuwein, Thomas; Buonomo, Sara C.B.

    2016-01-01

    Summary DNA replication is temporally and spatially organized in all eukaryotes, yet the molecular control and biological function of the replication-timing program are unclear. Rif1 is required for normal genome-wide regulation of replication timing, but its molecular function is poorly understood. Here we show that in mouse embryonic stem cells, Rif1 coats late-replicating domains and, with Lamin B1, identifies most of the late-replicating genome. Rif1 is an essential determinant of replication timing of non-Lamin B1-bound late domains. We further demonstrate that Rif1 defines and restricts the interactions between replication-timing domains during the G1 phase, thereby revealing a function of Rif1 as organizer of nuclear architecture. Rif1 loss affects both number and replication-timing specificity of the interactions between replication-timing domains. In addition, during the S phase, Rif1 ensures that replication of interacting domains is temporally coordinated. In summary, our study identifies Rif1 as the molecular link between nuclear architecture and replication-timing establishment in mammals. PMID:26725008

  5. Determining initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of pressurized-water-reactor spent fuel assemblies by analyzing passive gamma spectra measured at the Clab interim-fuel storage facility in Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favalli, A.; Vo, D.; Grogan, B.; Jansson, P.; Liljenfeldt, H.; Mozin, V.; Schwalbach, P.; Sjöland, A.; Tobin, S. J.; Trellue, H.; Vaccaro, S.

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI)-Spent Fuel (SF) project is to strengthen the technical toolkit of safeguards inspectors and/or other interested parties. The NGSI-SF team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins; (3) estimate the plutonium mass [which is also a function of the variables in (1)]; (4) estimate the decay heat; and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. Since August 2013, a set of measurement campaigns has been conducted at the Central Interim Storage Facility for Spent Nuclear Fuel (Clab), in collaboration with Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB). One purpose of the measurement campaigns was to acquire passive gamma spectra with high-purity germanium and lanthanum bromide scintillation detectors from Pressurized Water Reactor and Boiling Water Reactor spent fuel assemblies. The absolute 137Cs count rate and the 154Eu/137Cs, 134Cs/137Cs, 106Ru/137Cs, and 144Ce/137Cs isotopic ratios were extracted; these values were used to construct corresponding model functions (which describe each measured quantity's behavior over various combinations of burnup, cooling time, and initial enrichment) and then were used to determine those same quantities in each measured spent fuel assembly. The results obtained in comparison with the operator declared values, as well as the methodology developed, are discussed in detail in the paper.

  6. Determining initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of pressurized-water reactor spent fuel assemblies by analyzing passive gamma spectra measured at the Clab interim-fuel storage facility in Sweden

    DOE PAGES

    Favalli, Andrea; Vo, D.; Grogan, Brandon R.; ...

    2016-02-26

    The purpose of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI)–Spent Fuel (SF) project is to strengthen the technical toolkit of safeguards inspectors and/or other interested parties. The NGSI–SF team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins; (3) estimate the plutonium mass [which is also a function of the variables in (1)]; (4) estimate the decay heat; and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuelmore » assemblies. Since August 2013, a set of measurement campaigns has been conducted at the Central Interim Storage Facility for Spent Nuclear Fuel (Clab), in collaboration with Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB). One purpose of the measurement campaigns was to acquire passive gamma spectra with high-purity germanium and lanthanum bromide scintillation detectors from Pressurized Water Reactor and Boiling Water Reactor spent fuel assemblies. The absolute 137Cs count rate and the 154Eu/137Cs, 134Cs/137Cs, 106Ru/137Cs, and 144Ce/137Cs isotopic ratios were extracted; these values were used to construct corresponding model functions (which describe each measured quantity’s behavior over various combinations of burnup, cooling time, and initial enrichment) and then were used to determine those same quantities in each measured spent fuel assembly. Furthermore, the results obtained in comparison with the operator declared values, as well as the methodology developed, are discussed in detail in the paper.« less

  7. Determining initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of pressurized-water reactor spent fuel assemblies by analyzing passive gamma spectra measured at the Clab interim-fuel storage facility in Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Favalli, Andrea; Vo, D.; Grogan, Brandon R.; Jansson, Peter; Liljenfeldt, Henrik; Mozin, Vladimir; Schwalbach, P.; Sjoland, A.; Tobin, Stephen J.; Trellue, Holly; Vaccaro, S.

    2016-02-26

    The purpose of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI)–Spent Fuel (SF) project is to strengthen the technical toolkit of safeguards inspectors and/or other interested parties. The NGSI–SF team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins; (3) estimate the plutonium mass [which is also a function of the variables in (1)]; (4) estimate the decay heat; and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. Since August 2013, a set of measurement campaigns has been conducted at the Central Interim Storage Facility for Spent Nuclear Fuel (Clab), in collaboration with Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB). One purpose of the measurement campaigns was to acquire passive gamma spectra with high-purity germanium and lanthanum bromide scintillation detectors from Pressurized Water Reactor and Boiling Water Reactor spent fuel assemblies. The absolute 137Cs count rate and the 154Eu/137Cs, 134Cs/137Cs, 106Ru/137Cs, and 144Ce/137Cs isotopic ratios were extracted; these values were used to construct corresponding model functions (which describe each measured quantity’s behavior over various combinations of burnup, cooling time, and initial enrichment) and then were used to determine those same quantities in each measured spent fuel assembly. Furthermore, the results obtained in comparison with the operator declared values, as well as the methodology developed, are discussed in detail in the paper.

  8. Coherent electron cooling.

    PubMed

    Litvinenko, Vladimir N; Derbenev, Yaroslav S

    2009-03-20

    Cooling intense high-energy hadron beams poses a major challenge for modern accelerator physics. The synchrotron radiation emitted from such beams is feeble; even in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) operating with 7 TeV protons, the longitudinal damping time is about 13 hours. None of the traditional cooling methods seem able to cool LHC-class protons beams. In this Letter, we present a novel method of coherent electron cooling based on a high-gain free-electron laser (FEL). This technique could be critical for reaching high luminosities in hadron and electron-hadron colliders.

  9. Noninvasive real-time 2D imaging of temperature distribution during the plastic pellet cooling process by using electrical capacitance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Yusuke; Sapkota, Achyut; Sugawara, Michiko; Takei, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    This study has launched a concept to image a real-time 2D temperature distribution noninvasively by a combination of the electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) technique and a permittivity-temperature calibration equation for the plastic pellet cooling process. The concept has two steps, which are the relative permittivity calculation from the measured capacitance among the many electrodes by the ECT technique, and the temperature distribution imaging from the relative permittivity by the permittivity-temperature calibration equation. An ECT sensor with 12 electrodes was designed to image the cross-sectional temperature distribution during the polymethyl methacrylate pellets cooling process. The images of temperature distribution were successfully reconstructed from the relative permittivity distribution at every time step during the process. The images reasonably indicate the temperature diffusion in a 2D space and time within a 0.0065 and 0.0175 time-dependent temperature deviation, as compared to an analytical thermal conductance simulation and thermocouple measurement.

  10. Nuclear Receptor DHR4 Controls the Timing of Steroid Hormone Pulses During Drosophila Development

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Qiuxiang; Magico, Adam; King-Jones, Kirst

    2011-01-01

    In insects, precisely timed periodic pulses of the molting hormone ecdysone control major developmental transitions such as molts and metamorphosis. The synthesis and release of ecdysone, a steroid hormone, is itself controlled by PTTH (prothoracicotopic hormone). PTTH transcript levels oscillate with an 8 h rhythm, but its significance regarding the timing of ecdysone pulses is unclear. PTTH acts on its target tissue, the prothoracic gland (PG), by activating the Ras/Raf/ERK pathway through its receptor Torso, however direct targets of this pathway have yet to be identified. Here, we demonstrate that Drosophila Hormone Receptor 4 (DHR4), a nuclear receptor, is a key target of the PTTH pathway and establishes temporal boundaries by terminating ecdysone pulses. Specifically, we show that DHR4 oscillates between the nucleus and cytoplasm of PG cells, and that the protein is absent from PG nuclei at developmental times when low titer ecdysone pulses occur. This oscillatory behavior is blocked when PTTH or torso function is abolished, resulting in nuclear accumulation of DHR4, while hyperactivating the PTTH pathway results in cytoplasmic retention of the protein. Increasing DHR4 levels in the PG can delay or arrest development. In contrast, reducing DHR4 function in the PG triggers accelerated development, which is caused by precocious ecdysone signaling due to a failure to repress ecdysone pulses. Finally, we show that DHR4 negatively regulates the expression of a hitherto uncharacterized cytochrome P450 gene, Cyp6t3. Disruption of Cyp6t3 function causes low ecdysteroid titers and results in heterochronic phenotypes and molting defects, indicating a novel role in the ecdysone biosynthesis pathway. We propose a model whereby nuclear DHR4 controls the duration of ecdysone pulses by negatively regulating ecdysone biosynthesis through repression of Cyp6t3, and that this repressive function is temporarily overturned via the PTTH pathway by removing DHR4 from the nuclear

  11. Nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, W.C.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of core-collapse supernovae is used to illustrate the many connections between nuclear astrophysics and the problems nuclear physicists study in terrestrial laboratories. Efforts to better understand the collapse and mantle ejection are also motivated by a variety of interdisciplinary issues in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics, including galactic chemical evolution, neutrino masses and mixing, and stellar cooling by the emission of new particles. The current status of theory and observations is summarized.

  12. Nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, W.C.

    1992-12-31

    The problem of core-collapse supernovae is used to illustrate the many connections between nuclear astrophysics and the problems nuclear physicists study in terrestrial laboratories. Efforts to better understand the collapse and mantle ejection are also motivated by a variety of interdisciplinary issues in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics, including galactic chemical evolution, neutrino masses and mixing, and stellar cooling by the emission of new particles. The current status of theory and observations is summarized.

  13. Dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Instrumentation for Real-time Enzymatic Reaction Rate Measurements by NMR.

    PubMed

    Balzan, Riccardo; Fernandes, Laetitia; Comment, Arnaud; Pidial, Laetitia; Tavitian, Bertrand; Vasos, Paul R

    2016-02-23

    The main limitation of NMR-based investigations is low sensitivity. This prompts for long acquisition times, thus preventing real-time NMR measurements of metabolic transformations. Hyperpolarization via dissolution DNP circumvents part of the sensitivity issues thanks to the large out-of-equilibrium nuclear magnetization stemming from the electron-to-nucleus spin polarization transfer. The high NMR signal obtained can be used to monitor chemical reactions in real time. The downside of hyperpolarized NMR resides in the limited time window available for signal acquisition, which is usually on the order of the nuclear spin longitudinal relaxation time constant, T1, or, in favorable cases, on the order of the relaxation time constant associated with the singlet-state of coupled nuclei, TLLS. Cellular uptake of endogenous molecules and metabolic rates can provide essential information on tumor development and drug response. Numerous previous hyperpolarized NMR studies have demonstrated the relevancy of pyruvate as a metabolic substrate for monitoring enzymatic activity in vivo. This work provides a detailed description of the experimental setup and methods required for the study of enzymatic reactions, in particular the pyruvate-to-lactate conversion rate in presence of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), by hyperpolarized NMR.

  14. Cool Earth Solar

    ScienceCinema

    Lamkin, Rob; McIlroy, Andy; Swalwell, Eric; Rajan, Kish

    2016-07-12

    In a public-private partnership that takes full advantage of the Livermore Valley Open Campus (LVOC) for the first time, Sandia National Laboratories and Cool Earth Solar have signed an agreement that could make solar energy more affordable and accessible. In this piece, representatives from Sandia, Cool Earth Solar, and leaders in California government all discuss the unique partnership and its expected impact.

  15. Cool Earth Solar

    SciTech Connect

    Lamkin, Rob; McIlroy, Andy; Swalwell, Eric; Rajan, Kish

    2013-04-22

    In a public-private partnership that takes full advantage of the Livermore Valley Open Campus (LVOC) for the first time, Sandia National Laboratories and Cool Earth Solar have signed an agreement that could make solar energy more affordable and accessible. In this piece, representatives from Sandia, Cool Earth Solar, and leaders in California government all discuss the unique partnership and its expected impact.

  16. Real-time electron dynamics simulation of two-electron transfer reactions induced by nuclear motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yasumitsu; Yamashita, Koichi

    2012-04-01

    Real-time electron dynamics of two-electron transfer reactions induced by nuclear motion is calculated by three methods: the numerically exact propagation method, the time-dependent Hartree (TDH) method and the Ehrenfest method. We find that, as long as the nuclei move as localized wave packets, the TDH and Ehrenfest methods can reproduce the exact electron dynamics of a simple charge transfer reaction model containing two electrons qualitatively well, even when nonadiabatic transitions between adiabatic states occur. In particular, both methods can reproduce the cases where a complete two-electron transfer reaction occurs and those where it does not occur.

  17. Cerebellar Nuclear Neurons Use Time and Rate Coding to Transmit Purkinje Neuron Pauses.

    PubMed

    Sudhakar, Shyam Kumar; Torben-Nielsen, Benjamin; De Schutter, Erik

    2015-12-01

    Neurons of the cerebellar nuclei convey the final output of the cerebellum to their targets in various parts of the brain. Within the cerebellum their direct upstream connections originate from inhibitory Purkinje neurons. Purkinje neurons have a complex firing pattern of regular spikes interrupted by intermittent pauses of variable length. How can the cerebellar nucleus process this complex input pattern? In this modeling study, we investigate different forms of Purkinje neuron simple spike pause synchrony and its influence on candidate coding strategies in the cerebellar nuclei. That is, we investigate how different alignments of synchronous pauses in synthetic Purkinje neuron spike trains affect either time-locking or rate-changes in the downstream nuclei. We find that Purkinje neuron synchrony is mainly represented by changes in the firing rate of cerebellar nuclei neurons. Pause beginning synchronization produced a unique effect on nuclei neuron firing, while the effect of pause ending and pause overlapping synchronization could not be distinguished from each other. Pause beginning synchronization produced better time-locking of nuclear neurons for short length pauses. We also characterize the effect of pause length and spike jitter on the nuclear neuron firing. Additionally, we find that the rate of rebound responses in nuclear neurons after a synchronous pause is controlled by the firing rate of Purkinje neurons preceding it.

  18. Optimal testing input sets for reduced diagnosis time of nuclear power plant digital electronic circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D.S.; Seong, P.H. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1994-02-01

    This paper describes the optimal testing input sets required for the fault diagnosis of the nuclear power plant digital electronic circuits. With the complicated systems such as very large scale integration (VLSI), nuclear power plant (NPP), and aircraft, testing is the major factor of the maintenance of the system. Particularly, diagnosis time grows quickly with the complexity of the component. In this research, for reduce diagnosis time the authors derived the optimal testing sets that are the minimal testing sets required for detecting the failure and for locating of the failed component. For reduced diagnosis time, the technique presented by Hayes fits best for the approach to testing sets generation among many conventional methods. However, this method has the following disadvantages: (a) it considers only the simple network (b) it concerns only whether the system is in failed state or not and does not provide the way to locate the failed component. Therefore the authors have derived the optimal testing input sets that resolve these problems by Hayes while preserving its advantages. When they applied the optimal testing sets to the automatic fault diagnosis system (AFDS) which incorporates the advanced fault diagnosis method of artificial intelligence technique, they found that the fault diagnosis using the optimal testing sets makes testing the digital electronic circuits much faster than that using exhaustive testing input sets; when they applied them to test the Universal (UV) Card which is a nuclear power plant digital input/output solid state protection system card, they reduced the testing time up to about 100 times.

  19. Combining Hf-W Ages, Cooling Rates, and Thermal Models to Estimate the Accretion Time of Iron Meteorite Parent Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, L.; Dauphas, N.; Wadhwa, M.; Masarik, J.; Janney, P. E.

    2007-12-01

    The 182Hf-182W short-lived chronometer has been widely used to date metal-silicate differentiation processes in the early Solar System. However the presence of cosmogenic effects from exposure to GCR can potentially hamper the use of this system for chronology purposes (e.g. [1,2]). These effects must be corrected for in order to calculate metal-silicate differentiation ages. In this study, high-precision W isotope measurements are presented for 32 iron meteorites from 8 magmatic and 2 non-magmatic groups. Exposure ages and pre- atmospheric size estimates are available for most of these samples [3]. Our precision is better than or comparable to the currently most precise literature data and our results agree with previous work [4]. All magmatic irons have ɛ182W equal within error to or more negative than the Solar System initial derived from a CAI isochron [5]. Iron meteorites from the same magmatic groups show variations in ɛ182W. These are most easily explained by exposure to cosmic rays in space. A correction method was developed to estimate pre-exposure ɛ182W for individual iron meteorite groups. Metal-silicate differentiation in most iron meteorite parent bodies must have occurred within 2 Myr of formation of refractory inclusions. For the first time, we combine 182Hf-182W ages with parent body sizes inferred from metallographic cooling rates in a thermal model to constrain the accretion time of iron meteorite parent bodies. The estimated accretion ages are within 1.5 Myr for most magmatic groups, and could be as early as 0.2 Myr after CAI formation. This is consistent with the study of Bottke et al. [6] who argued that iron meteorite parent bodies could represent an early generation of planetesimals formed in the inner region of the Solar System. [1] Masarik J. (1997) EPSL 152, 181-185. [2] Markowski A. et al. (2006) EPSL 250,104-115. [3] Voshage H. (1984) EPSL 71, 181-194. [4] Markowski A. et al. (2006) EPSL 242, 1-15. [5] Kleine T. et al. (2005) GCA 69

  20. Molecular evidence from the nuclear genome for the time frame of human evolution.

    PubMed

    Easteal, S; Herbert, G

    1997-01-01

    Evolutionary divergence times can be inferred from molecular distances if a molecular clock can be assumed and if the substitution rate can be estimated. We present new evidence from relative rate tests that the rate of substitution at fourfold degenerate sites of nuclear genome-coding DNA is uniform in primate and rodent lineages. We also review recent relative rate test results showing substitution rate uniformity in the nuclear genome of simian primates. DNA distances between a range of mammalian taxa shows that a molecular clock is inconsistent with many assumed divergence times irrespective of the assumed substitution rate. We find that the substitution rate that implies the best compromise fit with divergence times across the range of taxa is 2.0-2.25 x 10(-9). This range of substitution rates implies a divergence time of humans and chimpanzees of 4.0-3.6 million years ago. This postdates the occurrence of Ardipithecus ramidus and the earliest occurrence of Australopithecus afarensis, suggesting that the common ancestor of humans and chimpanzees was bipedal and that the trait has been lost in chimpanzees rather than gained in humans.

  1. The nuclear membrane determines the timing of DNA replication in Xenopus egg extracts

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    We have exploited a property of chicken erythrocyte nuclei to analyze the regulation of DNA replication in a cell-free system from Xenopus eggs. Many individual demembranated nuclei added to the extract often became enclosed within a common nuclear membrane. Nuclei within such a "multinuclear aggregate" lacked individual membranes but shared the perimeter membrane of the aggregate. Individual nuclei that were excluded from the aggregates initiated DNA synthesis at different times over a 10-12-h period, as judged by incorporation of biotinylated dUTP into discrete replication foci at early times, followed by uniformly intense incorporation at later times. Replication forks were clustered in spots, rings, and horseshoe-shaped structures similar to those described in cultured cells. In contrast to the asynchronous replication seen between individual nuclei, replication within multinuclear aggregates was synchronous. There was a uniform distribution and similar fluorescent intensity of the replication foci throughout all the nuclei enclosed within the same membrane. However, different multinuclear aggregates replicated out of synchrony with each other indicating that each membrane-bound aggregate acts as an individual unit of replication. These data indicate that the nuclear membrane defines the unit of DNA replication and determines the timing of DNA synthesis in egg extract resulting in highly coordinated triggering of DNA replication on the DNA it encloses. PMID:1993731

  2. Universal Long-Time Behavior of Nuclear Spin Decays in Solid Hyperpolarized Xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saam, Brian; Morgan, Steven W.; Fine, Boris V.

    2009-05-01

    We have observed a universal long-time behavior of ^129Xe FIDs and solid echoes in polycrystalline hyperpolarized xenon at 77 K. In all cases, a decay of the form F(t) = Ae^-γt(φt + φ) sets in after just a few times T2; the behavior is universal in the sense that the decay constant γ and the beat frequency φ, which together characterize the long-time decay are the same for the FID and for solid echoes having different interpulse delay times τ. These findings reveal a fundamental property of nuclear spin dynamics and are thus relevant to theoretical efforts that have been ongoing for decades to understand NMR lineshapes in solids. Moreover, the functional form and universality of this behavior were previously predicted on the basis of analogy with resonances in classical chaotic systems [2]. While we expect this behavior to be characteristic of nuclear-spin solids in general, ^129Xe is an ideal system to examine it with high precision because of the relatively long T2 1 ms and because spin-exchange optical pumping can be used to achieve greatly enhanced magnetization, allowing precise examination of the decay over 3-4 orders of magnitude. [1] S.W. Morgan, et al., PRL 101, 067601 (2008). [2] B.V. Fine, PRL 94, 247601 (2005).

  3. Cooling wall

    SciTech Connect

    Nosenko, V.I.

    1995-07-01

    Protecting the shells of blast furnaces is being resolved by installing cast iron cooling plates. The cooling plates become non-operational in three to five years. The problem is that defects occur in manufacturing the cooling plates. With increased volume and intensity of work placed on blast furnaces, heat on the cast iron cooling plates reduces their reliability that limits the interim repair period of blast furnaces. Scientists and engineers from the Ukraine studied this problem for several years, developing a new method of cooling the blast furnace shaft called the cooling wall. Traditional cast iron plates were replaced by a screen of steel tubes, with the area between the tubes filled with fireproof concrete. Before placing the newly developed furnace shaft into operation, considerable work was completed such as theoretical calculations, design, research of temperature fields and tension. Continual testing over many years confirms the value of this research in operating blast furnaces. The cooling wall works with water cooling as well as vapor cooling and is operating in 14 blast furnaces in the Ukraine and two in Russia, and has operated for as long as 14 years.

  4. Cool & Connected

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Cool & Connected planning assistance program helps communities develop strategies and an action plan for using broadband to promote environmentally and economically sustainable community development.

  5. Time-correlated pulse-height measurements of low-multiplying nuclear materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, E. C.; Dolan, J. L.; Clarke, S. D.; Pozzi, S. A.; Tomanin, A.; Peerani, P.; Marleau, P.; Mattingly, J. K.

    2013-11-01

    Methods for the determination of the subcritical neutron multiplication of nuclear materials are of interest in the field of nuclear nonproliferation and safeguards. A series of measurements were performed at the Joint Research Center facility in Ispra, Italy to investigate the possibility of using a time-correlated pulse-height (TCPH) analysis to estimate the sub-critical multiplication of nuclear material. The objective of the measurements was to evaluate the effectiveness of this technique, and to benchmark the simulation capabilities of MCNPX-PoliMi/MPPost. In this campaign, two low-multiplication samples were measured: a 1-kg mixed oxide (MOX) powder sample and several low-mass plutonium-gallium (PuGa) disks. The measured results demonstrated that the sensitivity of the TCPH technique could not clearly distinguish samples with very-low levels of multiplication. However, the simulated TCPH distributions agree well with the measured data, within 12% for all cases, validating the simulation capabilities of MCNPX-PoliMi/MPPost. To investigate the potential of the TCPH method for identifying high-multiplication samples, the validated MCNPX-PoliMi/MPPost codes were used to simulate sources of higher multiplications. Lastly, a characterization metric, the cumulative region integral (CRI), was introduced to estimate the level of multiplication in a source. However, this response was shown to be insensitive over the range of multiplications of interest.

  6. Classical nuclear dynamics on a single time-dependent potential in electronic non-adiabatic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, Federica; Abedi, Ali; Suzuki, Yasumitsu; Min, Seung Kyu; Maitra, Neepa T.; Gross, E. K. U.

    2015-03-01

    The Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation allows to visualize the coupled electron-nuclear dynamics in molecular systems as a set of nuclei moving on a single potential energy surface representing the effect of the electrons in a given eigenstate. Many interesting phenomena, however, such as vision or charge separation in organic photovoltaic materials, take place in conditions beyond its range of validity. Nevertheless, the basic construct of the adiabatic treatment, the BO potential energy surfaces, is employed to describe non-adiabatic processes and the full problem is represented in terms of adiabatic states and transitions among them in regions of strong non-adiabatic coupling. But the concept of single potential energy is lost. The alternative point of view arising in the framework of the exact factorization of the electron-nuclear wave function will be presented. A single, time-dependent, potential energy provides the force driving the nuclear motion and is adopted as starting point for the development of quantum-classical approximations to the full quantum mechanical problem.

  7. Heat capacity and nuclear magnetic relaxation times of non-freezing water restrained by polysaccharides, revisited.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Tatsuko; Hatakeyama, Hyoe

    Calorimetric and nuclear magnetic relaxation studies on non-freezing water restrained by polysaccharide are introduced together with the historical background of this research field. Non-freezing water restrained by the hydrophilic group of polysaccharide shows no first order thermodynamic phase transition. The amount of non-freezing water calculated from the melting enthalpy of water restrained by various kinds of polysaccharides was collected. Molecular motion of polysaccharides is markedly enhanced by the introduction of non-freezing water and glass transition shifts to the ca. 200 K low temperature side. At the same time, molecular chains rearrange to a more stabilized state, which can be observed as the decrease in heat capacities. (1)H nuclear magnetic relaxation studies at a temperature lower than glass transition indicate that a part of the water molecules is closely bound to the backbone proton and is not sufficiently isolated. Calorimetric and nuclear magnetic relaxation studies suggest that non-freezing water inevitably cooperates with matrix polysaccharide molecules.

  8. Time-stamping system for nuclear physics experiments at RIKEN RIBF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, H.; Ichihara, T.; Ohnishi, T.; Takeuchi, S.; Yoshida, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Ota, S.; Shimoura, S.; Yoshinaga, K.

    2015-03-01

    A time-stamping system for nuclear physics experiments has been introduced at the RIKEN Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory. Individual trigger signals can be applied for separate data acquisition (DAQ) systems. After the measurements are complete, separately taken data are merged based on the time-stamp information. In a typical experiment, coincidence trigger signals are formed from multiple detectors to take desired events only. The time-stamping system allows the use of minimum bias triggers. Since coincidence conditions are given by software, a variety of physics events can be flexibly identified. The live time for a DAQ system is important when attempting to determine reaction cross-sections. However, the combined live time for separate DAQ systems is not clearly known because it depends not only on the DAQ dead time but also on the coincidence conditions. Using the proposed time-stamping system, all trigger timings can be acquired, so that the combined live time can be easily determined. The combined live time is also estimated using Monte Carlo simulations, and the results are compared with the directly measured values in order to assess the accuracy of the simulation.

  9. Modeling of 3d Space-time Surface of Potential Fields and Hydrogeologic Modeling of Nuclear Waste Disposal Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestopalov, V.; Bondarenko, Y.; Zayonts, I.; Rudenko, Y.

    extension and consolidation are identified. These data correlate with results of seismic and mining works. Hydrogeological 3D Model. The hydrogeological 3D Model de- velopment starts from the upper hydrodynamic zone, for which the data are available on hydraulic parameters. After calibration of the upper model elements, the deep part of the model is developed using data about the permeability structure of the crystalline rock massif, obtained from the 3D STSM. The results of analysis and the discrepancy of hydrodynamic regime modeling are used to refine the 3D Model for the rocks per- meability structure. This iterative process of consecutive correlation and refinement of model may be repeated many times. As a result of this technique implementation, the areas of active and very slow water exchange are found, and the system is revealed of vertically alternating zones of enhanced filtration and weak permeability. Based on these data, the sites are pre-selected, which are prospective for subsequently more detailed works on grounding the possibility of nuclear wastes isolation in geological formations. The use of the methodology described above is expedient at the stage of more detailed works, if the corresponding complex is provided of geophysical, hydro- geological, field testing and modeling investigations. Summary Successful testing of 3D STSM technology was carried out starting from 1997 till 1999 by the Ministry of Emergency Situations and Nuclear Safety of Ukraine during the realization of the project "Choosing the favorable geological structures for safe isolation of dangerous nuclear wastes of Chernobyl NPP". The performed works enabled us to draw prelim- inary 3D Space-Time Surface Model, structural-kinematic and geodynamic map of 2 the region understudy. As a result, two regions were selected, which are characterized by existence of geodynamic processes of cooling, thermal shrinkage and structural substance compression of geospace medium. Such regions seem to be the

  10. Real-time 3D radiation risk assessment supporting simulation of work in nuclear environments.

    PubMed

    Szőke, I; Louka, M N; Bryntesen, T R; Bratteli, J; Edvardsen, S T; RøEitrheim, K K; Bodor, K

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the latest developments at the Institute for Energy Technology (IFE) in Norway, in the field of real-time 3D (three-dimensional) radiation risk assessment for the support of work simulation in nuclear environments. 3D computer simulation can greatly facilitate efficient work planning, briefing, and training of workers. It can also support communication within and between work teams, and with advisors, regulators, the media and public, at all the stages of a nuclear installation's lifecycle. Furthermore, it is also a beneficial tool for reviewing current work practices in order to identify possible gaps in procedures, as well as to support the updating of international recommendations, dissemination of experience, and education of the current and future generation of workers.IFE has been involved in research and development into the application of 3D computer simulation and virtual reality (VR) technology to support work in radiological environments in the nuclear sector since the mid 1990s. During this process, two significant software tools have been developed, the VRdose system and the Halden Planner, and a number of publications have been produced to contribute to improving the safety culture in the nuclear industry.This paper describes the radiation risk assessment techniques applied in earlier versions of the VRdose system and the Halden Planner, for visualising radiation fields and calculating dose, and presents new developments towards implementing a flexible and up-to-date dosimetric package in these 3D software tools, based on new developments in the field of radiation protection. The latest versions of these 3D tools are capable of more accurate risk estimation, permit more flexibility via a range of user choices, and are applicable to a wider range of irradiation situations than their predecessors.

  11. Nuclear privatization

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffs, E.

    1995-11-01

    The United Kingdom government announced in May 1995 plans to privatize the country`s two nuclear generating companies, Nuclear Electric and Scottish Nuclear. Under the plan, the two companies will become operating divisions of a unified holding company, to be called British Electric, with headquarters in Scotland. Britain`s nuclear plants were left out of the initial privatization in 1989 because the government believed the financial community would be unwilling to accept the open-ended liability of decommissioning the original nine stations based on the Magnox gas-cooled reactor. Six years later, the government has found a way around this by retaining these power stations in state ownership, leaving the new nuclear company with the eight Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR) stations and the recently completed Sizewell B PWR stations. The operating Magnox stations are to be transferred to BNFL, which operates two Magnox stations of their own at Calder Hall and Chapelcross.

  12. Transport properties of isospin asymmetric nuclear matter using the time-dependent Hartree-Fock method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umar, A. S.; Simenel, C.; Ye, W.

    2017-08-01

    Background: The study of deep-inelastic reactions of nuclei provides a vehicle to explore nuclear transport phenomena for a full range of equilibration dynamics. These investigations provide us the ingredients to model such phenomena and help answer important questions about the nuclear equation of state and its evolution as a function of neutron-to-proton (N /Z ) ratio. Purpose: The motivation is to examine the real-time dynamics of nuclear transport phenomena and its dependence on N /Z asymmetry from a microscopic point of view to avoid any pre-conceived assumptions about the involved processes. Method: The time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) method in full three dimensions is employed to calculate deep-inelastic reactions of 78Kr+208Pb and 92Kr+208Pb systems at 8.5 MeV/nucleon. The impact parameter and energy-loss dependence of relevant observables are calculated. In addition, the density-constrained TDHF method is used to compute excitation energies of the primary fragments. The statistical deexcitation code gemini is utilized to examine the final reaction products. Results: The kinetic energy loss and sticking times as a function of impact parameter are calculated. The final properties of the fragments (charge, mass, scattering angle, and kinetic energy) are computed. Their evolution as a function of energy loss is studied and various intra-relations are investigated. The fragment excitation energy sharing is computed. Conclusions: We find a smooth dependence of the energy loss, Eloss, on the impact parameter for both systems. However, the transfer properties for low Eloss values are very different for the two systems but become similar in the higher Eloss regime. The mean lifetime of the charge equilibration process, obtained from the final (N -Z )/A value of the fragments, is shown to be ˜0.5 zs. This value is slightly larger than (but of the same order as) the value obtained from reactions at Fermi energies.

  13. TIME-OF-FLIGHT MASS MEASUREMENTS AND THEIR IMPORTANCE FOR NUCLEAR ASTROPHYSICS

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, M.; Shapira, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Atomic masses play an important role in nuclear astrophysics. The lack of experimental values for nuclides of interest has triggered a rapid development of new mass measurement devices around the world, including Time-of-Flight (TOF) mass measurements offering an access to the most exotic nuclides. Recently, the TOF-B rho technique that includes a position measurement for magnetic rigidity correction has been implemented at the NSCL. An experiment with a similar TOF-B rho technique is approved and planned at the next generation radioactive beam facility (RIBF) at RIKEN.

  14. Time-of-Flight Mass Measurements and Their Importance for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoš, M.; Estrade, A.; Amthor, A. M.; Bazin, D.; Becerril, A.; Elliot, T.; Famiano, M.; Gade, A.; Galaviz, D.; Lorusso, G.; Pereira, J.; Portillo, M.; Rogers, A.; Schatz, H.; Shapira, D.; Smith, E.; Stolz, A.; Wallace, M.

    2009-03-01

    Atomic masses play an important role in nuclear astrophysics. The lack of experimental values for nuclides of interest has triggered a rapid development of new mass measurement devices around the world, including Time-of-Flight (TOF) mass measurements offering an access to the most exotic nuclides. Recently, the TOF-Brho technique that includes a position measurement for magnetic rigidity correction has been implemented at the NSCL. An experiment with a similar TOF-Brho technique is approved and planned at the next generation radioactive beam facility (RIBF) at RIKEN.

  15. Nuclear Waste Facing the Test of Time: The Case of the French Deep Geological Repository Project.

    PubMed

    Poirot-Delpech, Sophie; Raineau, Laurence

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to consider the socio-anthropological issues raised by the deep geological repository project for high-level, long-lived nuclear waste. It is based on fieldwork at a candidate site for a deep storage project in eastern France, where an underground laboratory has been studying the feasibility of the project since 1999. A project of this nature, based on the possibility of very long containment (hundreds of thousands of years, if not longer), involves a singular form of time. By linking project performance to geology's very long timescale, the project attempts "jump" in time, focusing on a far distant future, without understanding it in terms of generations. But these future generations remain measurements of time on the surface, where the issue of remembering or forgetting the repository comes to the fore. The nuclear waste geological storage project raises questions that neither politicians nor scientists, nor civil society, have ever confronted before. This project attempts to address a problem that exists on a very long timescale, which involves our responsibility toward generations in the far future.

  16. A Feasibility Study to Determine Cooling Time and Burnup of ATR Fuel Using a Nondestructive Technique and Three Types of Gamma-ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Jorge Navarro; Rahmat Aryaeinejad,; David W. Nigg

    2011-05-01

    A Feasibility Study to Determine Cooling Time and Burnup of ATR Fuel Using a Nondestructive Technique1 Rahmat Aryaeinejad, Jorge Navarro, and David W Nigg Idaho National Laboratory Abstract Effective and efficient Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuel management require state of the art core modeling tools. These new tools will need isotopic and burnup validation data before they are put into production. To create isotopic, burn up validation libraries and to determine the setup for permanent fuel scanner system a feasibility study was perform. The study consisted in measuring short and long cooling time fuel elements at the ATR canal. Three gamma spectroscopy detectors (HPGe, LaBr3, and HPXe) and two system configurations (above and under water) were used in the feasibility study. The first stage of the study was to investigate which detector and system configuration would be better suited for different scenarios. The second stage of the feasibility study was to create burnup and cooling time calibrations using experimental isotopic data collected and ORIGEN 2.2 burnup data. The results of the study establish that a better spectra resolution is achieve with an above the water configuration and that three detectors can be used in the permanent fuel scanner system for different situations. In addition it was conclude that a number of isotopic ratios and absolute measurements could be used to predict ATR fuel burnup and cooling times. 1This work was supported by the U.S. Depart¬ment of Energy (DOE) under Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC Contract No. DE-AC07-05ID14517.

  17. Time-dependent pairing equations for seniority-one nuclear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mirea, M.

    2008-10-15

    When the time-dependent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov intrinsic equations of motion are solved in the case of seniority-one nuclear systems, the unpaired nucleon remains on the same orbital. The blocking effect hinders the possibility to skip from one orbital to another. This unpleasant feature is by-passed with a new set of pairing time-dependent equations that allows the possibility that the unpaired nucleon changes its single-particle level. These equations generalize the time-dependent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov equations of motion by including the Landau-Zener effect. The derivation of these new equations is presented in detail. These equations are applied to the case of a superasymmetric fission process, that is, to explain the fine structure the {sup 14}C emission from {sup 233}Ra. In this context, a new version of the Woods-Saxon model extended for two-center potentials is used.

  18. Effects of cooling time and alloying elements on the microstructure of the gleeble-simulated heat-affected zone of 22% Cr duplex stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Rong-Iuan; Liou, Horng-Yih; Pan, Yeong-Tsuen

    2001-10-01

    The effects of austenite stabilizers, such as nitrogen, nickel, and manganese, and cooling time on the microstructure of the Gleeble simulated heat-affected zone (HAZ) of 22% Cr duplex stainless steels were investigated. The submerged are welding was performed for comparison purposes. Optical microscopy (OM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used for microscopic studies. The amount of Cr2N precipitates in the simulated HAZ was determined using the potentiostatic electrolysis method. The experimental results indicate that an increase in the nitrogen and nickel contents raised the δ to transformation temperature and also markedly increased the amount of austenite in the HAZ. The lengthened cooling time promotes the reformation of austenite. An increase in the austenite content reduces the supersaturation of nitrogen in ferrite matrix as well as the precipitation tendency of Cr2N. The optimum cooling time from 800 to 500 °C (Δ t 8/5) obtained from the Gleeble simulation is between 30 and 60 s, which ensures the austenite content in HAZ not falling below 25% and superior pitting and stress corrosion cracking resistance for the steels. The effect of manganese on the formation of austenite can be negligible.

  19. Direct Measurement of Initial Enrichment, Burn-up and Cooling Time of Spent Fuel Assembly with a Differential Die-Away Technique Based Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Henzl, Vladimir; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Tobin, Stephen J.

    2012-07-13

    An outline of this presentation of what a Differential Die-Away (DDA) instrument can do are: (1) Principle of operation of DDA instrument; (2) Determination of initial enrichment (IE) ({sigma} < 5%); (3) Determination of burn up (BU) ({sigma} {approx} 6%); (4) Determination of cooling time (CT) ({sigma} {approx} 20-50%); and (5) DDA instrument as a standalone device. DDA response (fresh fuel vs. spent fuel) is: (1) Fresh fuel => DDA response increases (die-away time is longer) with increasing fissile content; and (2) Spent fuel => DDA response decreases (die-away time is shorter) with higher burn-up (i.e. more neutron absorbers present).

  20. Phylogeny and divergence times of gymnosperms inferred from single-copy nuclear genes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ying; Ran, Jin-Hua; Guo, Dong-Mei; Yang, Zu-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Phylogenetic reconstruction is fundamental to study evolutionary biology and historical biogeography. However, there was not a molecular phylogeny of gymnosperms represented by extensive sampling at the genus level, and most published phylogenies of this group were constructed based on cytoplasmic DNA markers and/or the multi-copy nuclear ribosomal DNA. In this study, we use LFY and NLY, two single-copy nuclear genes that originated from an ancient gene duplication in the ancestor of seed plants, to reconstruct the phylogeny and estimate divergence times of gymnosperms based on a complete sampling of extant genera. The results indicate that the combined LFY and NLY coding sequences can resolve interfamilial relationships of gymnosperms and intergeneric relationships of most families. Moreover, the addition of intron sequences can improve the resolution in Podocarpaceae but not in cycads, although divergence times of the cycad genera are similar to or longer than those of the Podocarpaceae genera. Our study strongly supports cycads as the basal-most lineage of gymnosperms rather than sister to Ginkgoaceae, and a sister relationship between Podocarpaceae and Araucariaceae and between Cephalotaxaceae-Taxaceae and Cupressaceae. In addition, intergeneric relationships of some families that were controversial, and the relationships between Taxaceae and Cephalotaxaceae and between conifers and Gnetales are discussed based on the nuclear gene evidence. The molecular dating analysis suggests that drastic extinctions occurred in the early evolution of gymnosperms, and extant coniferous genera in the Northern Hemisphere are older than those in the Southern Hemisphere on average. This study provides an evolutionary framework for future studies on gymnosperms.

  1. Phylogeny and Divergence Times of Gymnosperms Inferred from Single-Copy Nuclear Genes

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong-Mei; Yang, Zu-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Phylogenetic reconstruction is fundamental to study evolutionary biology and historical biogeography. However, there was not a molecular phylogeny of gymnosperms represented by extensive sampling at the genus level, and most published phylogenies of this group were constructed based on cytoplasmic DNA markers and/or the multi-copy nuclear ribosomal DNA. In this study, we use LFY and NLY, two single-copy nuclear genes that originated from an ancient gene duplication in the ancestor of seed plants, to reconstruct the phylogeny and estimate divergence times of gymnosperms based on a complete sampling of extant genera. The results indicate that the combined LFY and NLY coding sequences can resolve interfamilial relationships of gymnosperms and intergeneric relationships of most families. Moreover, the addition of intron sequences can improve the resolution in Podocarpaceae but not in cycads, although divergence times of the cycad genera are similar to or longer than those of the Podocarpaceae genera. Our study strongly supports cycads as the basal-most lineage of gymnosperms rather than sister to Ginkgoaceae, and a sister relationship between Podocarpaceae and Araucariaceae and between Cephalotaxaceae-Taxaceae and Cupressaceae. In addition, intergeneric relationships of some families that were controversial, and the relationships between Taxaceae and Cephalotaxaceae and between conifers and Gnetales are discussed based on the nuclear gene evidence. The molecular dating analysis suggests that drastic extinctions occurred in the early evolution of gymnosperms, and extant coniferous genera in the Northern Hemisphere are older than those in the Southern Hemisphere on average. This study provides an evolutionary framework for future studies on gymnosperms. PMID:25222863

  2. Few-second-long correlation times in a quantum dot nuclear spin bath probed by frequency-comb nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waeber, A. M.; Hopkinson, M.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.; Nilsson, J.; Stevenson, R. M.; Bennett, A. J.; Shields, A. J.; Burkard, G.; Tartakovskii, A. I.; Skolnick, M. S.; Chekhovich, E. A.

    2016-07-01

    One of the key challenges in spectroscopy is the inhomogeneous broadening that masks the homogeneous spectral lineshape and the underlying coherent dynamics. Techniques such as four-wave mixing and spectral hole-burning are used in optical spectroscopy, and spin-echo in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). However, the high-power pulses used in spin-echo and other sequences often create spurious dynamics obscuring the subtle spin correlations important for quantum technologies. Here we develop NMR techniques to probe the correlation times of the fluctuations in a nuclear spin bath of individual quantum dots, using frequency-comb excitation, allowing for the homogeneous NMR lineshapes to be measured without high-power pulses. We find nuclear spin correlation times exceeding one second in self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots--four orders of magnitude longer than in strain-free III-V semiconductors. This observed freezing of the nuclear spin fluctuations suggests ways of designing quantum dot spin qubits with a well-understood, highly stable nuclear spin bath.

  3. Development of the Glenn Heat-Transfer (Glenn-HT) Computer Code to Enable Time-Filtered Navier-Stokes (TFNS) Simulations and Application to Film Cooling on a Flat Plate Through Long Cooling Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ameri, Ali; Shyam, Vikram; Rigby, David; Poinsatte, Phillip; Thurman, Douglas; Steinthorsson, Erlendur

    2014-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) formulation for turbomachinery-related flows has enabled improved engine component designs. RANS methodology has limitations that are related to its inability to accurately describe the spectrum of flow phenomena encountered in engines. Examples of flows that are difficult to compute accurately with RANS include phenomena such as laminar/turbulent transition, turbulent mixing due to mixing of streams, and separated flows. Large eddy simulation (LES) can improve accuracy but at a considerably higher cost. In recent years, hybrid schemes that take advantage of both unsteady RANS and LES have been proposed. This study investigated an alternative scheme, the time-filtered Navier-Stokes (TFNS) method applied to compressible flows. The method developed by Shih and Liu was implemented in the Glenn-Heat-Transfer (Glenn-HT) code and applied to film-cooling flows. In this report the method and its implementation is briefly described. The film effectiveness results obtained for film cooling from a row of 30deg holes with a pitch of 3.0 diameters emitting air at a nominal density ratio of unity and two blowing ratios of 0.5 and 1.0 are shown. Flow features under those conditions are also described.

  4. Development of the Glenn-Heat-Transfer (Glenn-HT) Computer Code to Enable Time-Filtered Navier Stokes (TFNS) Simulations and Application to Film Cooling on a Flat Plate Through Long Cooling Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ameri, Ali A.; Shyam, Vikram; Rigby, David; Poinsatte, Phillip; Thurman, Douglas; Steinthorsson, Erlendur

    2014-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) formulation for turbomachinery-related flows has enabled improved engine component designs. RANS methodology has limitations that are related to its inability to accurately describe the spectrum of flow phenomena encountered in engines. Examples of flows that are difficult to compute accurately with RANS include phenomena such as laminar/turbulent transition, turbulent mixing due to mixing of streams, and separated flows. Large eddy simulation (LES) can improve accuracy but at a considerably higher cost. In recent years, hybrid schemes that take advantage of both unsteady RANS and LES have been proposed. This study investigated an alternative scheme, the time-filtered Navier-Stokes (TFNS) method applied to compressible flows. The method developed by Shih and Liu was implemented in the Glenn-Heat-Transfer (Glenn-HT) code and applied to film-cooling flows. In this report the method and its implementation is briefly described. The film effectiveness results obtained for film cooling from a row of 30deg holes with a pitch of 3.0 diameters emitting air at a nominal density ratio of unity and two blowing ratios of 0.5 and 1.0 are shown. Flow features under those conditions are also described.

  5. Development of the Glenn-HT Computer Code to Enable Time-Filtered Navier-Stokes (TFNS) Simulations and Application to Film Cooling on a Flat Plate Through Long Cooling Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ameri, Ali; Shyam, Vikram; Rigby, David; Poinsatte, Philip; Thurman, Douglas; Steinthorsson, Erlendur

    2014-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) formulation for turbomachinery-related flows has enabled improved engine component designs. RANS methodology has limitations which are related to its inability to accurately describe the spectrum of flow phenomena encountered in engines. Examples of flows that are difficult to compute accurately with RANS include phenomena such as laminarturbulent transition, turbulent mixing due to mixing of streams, and separated flows. Large eddy simulation (LES) can improve accuracy but at a considerably higher cost. In recent years, hybrid schemes which take advantage of both unsteady RANS and LES have been proposed. This study investigated an alternative scheme, the time-filtered Navier-Stokes (TFNS) method applied to compressible flows. The method developed by Shih and Liu was implemented in the Glenn-HT code and applied to film cooling flows. In this report the method and its implementation is briefly described. The film effectiveness results obtained for film cooling from a row of 30 holes with a pitch of 3.0 diameters emitting air at a nominal density ratio of unity and four blowing ratios of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 are shown. Flow features under those conditions are also described.

  6. Real-time Kadanoff-Baym approach to nuclear response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, H. S.; Kwong, N. H.

    2016-03-01

    Linear density response functions are calculated for symmetric nuclear matter of normal density by time-evolving two-time Green's functions in real time. Of particular interest is the effect of correlations. The system is therefore initially time-evolved with a collision term calculated in a direct Born approximation until fully correlated. An external time-dependent potential is then applied. The ensuing density fluctuations are recorded to calculate the density response. This method was previously used by Kwong and Bonitz for studying plasma oscillations in a correlated electron gas. The energy-weighted sum-rule for the response function is guaranteed by using conserving self-energy insertions as the method then generates the full vertex-functions. These can alternatively be calculated by solving a Bethe -Salpeter equation as done in works by Bozek et al. The (first order) mean field is derived from a momentum-dependent (non-local) interaction while 2nd order self-energies are calculated using a particle-hole two-body effective (or residual) interaction given by a gaussian local potential. We show results of calculations of the response function S(ɷ,q0 ) for q0 = 0.2, 0.4 and 0.8fm -1. Comparison is made with the nucleons being un-correlated i.e. with only the first order mean field included. We discuss the relation of our work with the Landau quasi-particle theory as applied to nuclear systems by Babu and Brown and followers.

  7. Optically addressable nuclear spins in a solid with a six-hour coherence time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Manjin; Hedges, Morgan P.; Ahlefeldt, Rose L.; Bartholomew, John G.; Beavan, Sarah E.; Wittig, Sven M.; Longdell, Jevon J.; Sellars, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Space-like separation of entangled quantum states is a central concept in fundamental investigations of quantum mechanics and in quantum communication applications. Optical approaches are ubiquitous in the distribution of entanglement because entangled photons are easy to generate and transmit. However, extending this direct distribution beyond a range of a few hundred kilometres to a worldwide network is prohibited by losses associated with scattering, diffraction and absorption during transmission. A proposal to overcome this range limitation is the quantum repeater protocol, which involves the distribution of entangled pairs of optical modes among many quantum memories stationed along the transmission channel. To be effective, the memories must store the quantum information encoded on the optical modes for times that are long compared to the direct optical transmission time of the channel. Here we measure a decoherence rate of 8 × 10-5 per second over 100 milliseconds, which is the time required for light transmission on a global scale. The measurements were performed on a ground-state hyperfine transition of europium ion dopants in yttrium orthosilicate (151Eu3+:Y2SiO5) using optically detected nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. The observed decoherence rate is at least an order of magnitude lower than that of any other system suitable for an optical quantum memory. Furthermore, by employing dynamic decoupling, a coherence time of 370 +/- 60 minutes was achieved at 2 kelvin. It has been almost universally assumed that light is the best long-distance carrier for quantum information. However, the coherence time observed here is long enough that nuclear spins travelling at 9 kilometres per hour in a crystal would have a lower decoherence with distance than light in an optical fibre. This enables some very early approaches to entanglement distribution to be revisited, in particular those in which the spins are transported rather than the light.

  8. Time-dependent density-functional theory method in the electron nuclear dynamics framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajith Perera, S.; McLaurin, Patrick M.; Grimes, Thomas V.; Morales, Jorge A.

    2010-08-01

    A time-dependent density-functional theory (DFT) dynamics method in the electron nuclear dynamics (END) framework is presented. This time-dependent variational method treats simultaneously the nuclei and electrons of a system without utilizing predetermined potential energy surfaces. Like the simplest-level END, this method adopts a classical-mechanics description for the nuclei and a Thouless single-determinantal representation for the electrons. However, the electronic description is now expressed in a Kohn-Sham DFT form that provides electron correlation effects absent in the simplest-level END. Current implementation of this method employs the adiabatic approximation in the exchange-correlation action and potential. Simulations of molecular vibrations and proton-molecule reactions attest to the accuracy of the present method.

  9. Time of flight measurements of unirradiated and irradiated nuclear graphite under cyclic compressive load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodel, W.; Atkin, C.; Marsden, B. J.

    2017-04-01

    The time-of-flight technique has been used to investigate the stiffness of nuclear graphite with respect to the grade and grain direction. A loading rig was developed to collect time-of-flight measurements during cycled compressive loading up to 80% of the material's compressive strength and subsequent unloading of specimens along the axis of the applied stress. The transmission velocity (related to Young's modulus), decreased with increasing applied stress; and depending on the graphite grade and orientation, the modulus then increased, decreased or remained constant upon unloading. These tests were repeated while observing the microstructure during the load/unload cycles. Initial decreases in transmission velocity with compressive load are attributed to microcrack formation within filler and binder phases. Three distinct types of behaviour occur on unloading, depending on the grade, irradiation, and loading direction. These different behaviours can be explained in terms of the material microstructure observed from the microscopy performed during loading.

  10. Time-Domain Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation of Water Dynamics in Different Ginger Cultivars.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chongyang; Zhou, Qi; Gao, Shan; Bao, Qingjia; Chen, Fang; Liu, Chaoyang

    2016-01-20

    Different ginger cultivars may contain different nutritional and medicinal values. In this study, a time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance method was employed to study water dynamics in different ginger cultivars. Significant differences in transverse relaxation time T2 values assigned to the distribution of water in different parts of the plant were observed between Henan ginger and four other ginger cultivars. Ion concentration and metabolic analysis showed similar differences in Mn ion concentrations and organic solutes among the different ginger cultivars, respectively. On the basis of Pearson's correlation analysis, many organic solutes and 6-gingerol, the main active substance of ginger, exhibited significant correlations with water distribution as determined by NMR T2 relaxation, suggesting that the organic solute differences may impact water distribution. Our work demonstrates that low-field NMR relaxometry provides useful information about water dynamics in different ginger cultivars as affected by the presence of different organic solutes.

  11. Cooling Rates of Chondrules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y.; Hewins, R. H.; Eiben, B. A.

    1995-09-01

    rates. Depending on temperature and starting composition, the charges cooled under such cooling rates exhibit either total glass, BO, PO, POP, or relict olivine texture, consistent with previous linear cooling experiments [2,3,9]. For type IIAB chondrule charges with PO, olivine zoning produced by initially cooling between 500 degrees C/hr and 5000 degrees C/hr is very similar to that of Semarkona chondrules [2]. In this cooling rate range, higher cooling rates enhance the zoning. Charges cooled between 10 degrees C/hr and 100 degrees C/hr show very limited olivine zoning. Textures and olivine zoning with ~10^5 degrees C/hr initial cooling rates. A cooling rate this high can only be achieved by quenching the charge in air immediately after the desired temperature is reached. The final charges are composed of glass and numerous small olivine crystals with grain sizes seldom exceeding 20 fm. Repeated heating/quenching cycles at lower temperature slowly coarsen the olivine crystals: 100 heating/quenching cycles can double the size of olivine, but the final olivine crystals are somewhat rounded and have curved embayments. Very limited olivine zoning is produced: the core/rim difference in FeO rarely exceeds 5%. Discussion. Under flash heating conditions, cooling rates of 10 - 100 degrees C/hr will cause extensive volatile loss except with an unusual ambient gas, and produce limited olivine zoning. Cooling rates of as high as 105 degrees C/hr certainly can preserve high volatile contents, but the crystals grown are too small. Repeated heating/extremely fast cooling cycles can coarsen the olivine grains, but not enough, and do not reproduce porphyritic chondrule textures well. In addition, the heating mechanism to heat chondrules hundreds of times with peak temperatures always constrained within a narrow window is unrealistic. The initial cooling rates of the chondrule cooling curves are more likely between these two extremes, and from our volatile loss results, they are

  12. Estimation of water retention parameters from nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time distributions

    PubMed Central

    Costabel, Stephan; Yaramanci, Ugur

    2013-01-01

    [1] For characterizing water flow in the vadose zone, the water retention curve (WRC) of the soil must be known. Because conventional WRC measurements demand much time and effort in the laboratory, alternative methods with shortened measurement duration are desired. The WRC can be estimated, for instance, from the cumulative pore size distribution (PSD) of the investigated material. Geophysical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry have successfully been applied to recover PSDs of sandstones and limestones. It is therefore expected that the multiexponential analysis of the NMR signal from water-saturated loose sediments leads to a reliable estimation of the WRC. We propose an approach to estimate the WRC using the cumulative NMR relaxation time distribution and approximate it with the well-known van-Genuchten (VG) model. Thereby, the VG parameter n, which controls the curvature of the WRC, is of particular interest, because it is the essential parameter to predict the relative hydraulic conductivity. The NMR curves are calibrated with only two conventional WRC measurements, first, to determine the residual water content and, second, to define a fixed point that relates the relaxation time to a corresponding capillary pressure. We test our approach with natural and artificial soil samples and compare the NMR-based results to WRC measurements using a pressure plate apparatus and to WRC predictions from the software ROSETTA. We found that for sandy soils n can reliably be estimated with NMR, whereas for samples with clay and silt contents higher than 10% the estimation fails. This is the case when the hydraulic properties of the soil are mainly controlled by the pore constrictions. For such samples, the sensitivity of the NMR method for the pore bodies hampers a plausible WRC estimation. Citation: Costabel, S., and U. Yaramanci (2013), Estimation of water retention parameters from nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time distributions, Water

  13. Estimation of water retention parameters from nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time distributions.

    PubMed

    Costabel, Stephan; Yaramanci, Ugur

    2013-04-01

    [1] For characterizing water flow in the vadose zone, the water retention curve (WRC) of the soil must be known. Because conventional WRC measurements demand much time and effort in the laboratory, alternative methods with shortened measurement duration are desired. The WRC can be estimated, for instance, from the cumulative pore size distribution (PSD) of the investigated material. Geophysical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry have successfully been applied to recover PSDs of sandstones and limestones. It is therefore expected that the multiexponential analysis of the NMR signal from water-saturated loose sediments leads to a reliable estimation of the WRC. We propose an approach to estimate the WRC using the cumulative NMR relaxation time distribution and approximate it with the well-known van-Genuchten (VG) model. Thereby, the VG parameter n, which controls the curvature of the WRC, is of particular interest, because it is the essential parameter to predict the relative hydraulic conductivity. The NMR curves are calibrated with only two conventional WRC measurements, first, to determine the residual water content and, second, to define a fixed point that relates the relaxation time to a corresponding capillary pressure. We test our approach with natural and artificial soil samples and compare the NMR-based results to WRC measurements using a pressure plate apparatus and to WRC predictions from the software ROSETTA. We found that for sandy soils n can reliably be estimated with NMR, whereas for samples with clay and silt contents higher than 10% the estimation fails. This is the case when the hydraulic properties of the soil are mainly controlled by the pore constrictions. For such samples, the sensitivity of the NMR method for the pore bodies hampers a plausible WRC estimation. Citation: Costabel, S., and U. Yaramanci (2013), Estimation of water retention parameters from nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation time distributions, Water

  14. Proof of concept experiments of the multi-isotope process monitor: An online, nondestructive, near real-time monitor for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orton, Christopher R.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Christensen, Richard N.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2012-04-01

    Operators, national regulatory agencies and the IAEA will require the development of advanced technologies to efficiently control and safeguard nuclear material at increasingly large-scale nuclear recycling facilities. Ideally, the envisioned technologies would be capable of non-destructive, near real-time (NRT), autonomous process monitoring. This paper describes results from proof-of-principle experiments designed to test the multi-isotope process (MIP) monitor, a novel approach to monitoring and safeguarding reprocessing facilities. The MIP Monitor combines the detection of intrinsic gamma ray signatures emitted from process solutions with multivariate analysis to detect off-normal conditions in process streams nondestructively and in NRT. Commercial spent nuclear fuel of various irradiation histories was dissolved and separated using a PUREX-based batch solvent extraction. Extractions were performed at various nitric acid concentrations to mimic both normal and off-normal industrial plant operating conditions. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the simulated gamma spectra to investigate pattern variations as a function of acid concentration, burnup and cooling time. Partial least squares (PLS) regression was applied to attempt to quantify both the acid concentration and burnup of the dissolved spent fuel during the initial separation stage of recycle. The MIP Monitor demonstrated sensitivity to induced variations of acid concentration, including the distinction of ±1.3 M variation from normal process conditions by way of PCA. Acid concentration was predicted using measurements from the organic extract and PLS resulting in predictions with <0.7 M relative error. Quantification of burnup levels from dissolved fuel spectra using PLS was demonstrated to be within 2.5% of previously measured values.

  15. Cooled railplug

    DOEpatents

    Weldon, William F.

    1996-01-01

    The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers.

  16. Ice Thermal Storage Systems for LWR Supplemental Cooling and Peak Power Shifting

    SciTech Connect

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Phil Sharpe; Blaise Hamanaka; Wei Yan; WoonSeong Jeong

    2010-06-01

    Availability of enough cooling water has been one of the major issues for the nuclear power plant site selection. Cooling water issues have frequently disrupted the normal operation at some nuclear power plants during heat waves and long draught. The issues become more severe due to the new round of nuclear power expansion and global warming. During hot summer days, cooling water leaving a power plant may become too hot to threaten aquatic life so that environmental regulations may force the plant to reduce power output or even temporarily to be shutdown. For new nuclear power plants to be built at areas without enough cooling water, dry cooling can be used to remove waste heat directly into the atmosphere. However, dry cooling will result in much lower thermal efficiency when the weather is hot. One potential solution for the above mentioned issues is to use ice thermal storage systems (ITS) that reduce cooling water requirements and boost the plant’s thermal efficiency in hot hours. ITS uses cheap off-peak electricity to make ice and uses those ice for supplemental cooling during peak demand time. ITS is suitable for supplemental cooling storage due to its very high energy storage density. ITS also provides a way to shift large amount of electricity from off peak time to peak time. Some gas turbine plants already use ITS to increase thermal efficiency during peak hours in summer. ITSs have also been widely used for building cooling to save energy cost. Among three cooling methods for LWR applications: once-through, wet cooling tower, and dry cooling tower, once-through cooling plants near a large water body like an ocean or a large lake and wet cooling plants can maintain the designed turbine backpressure (or condensation temperature) during 99% of the time; therefore, adding ITS to those plants will not generate large benefits. For once-through cooling plants near a limited water body like a river or a small lake, adding ITS can bring significant economic

  17. Cooling Devices in Laser therapy

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anupam; Sarda, Aarti; De, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Cooling devices and methods are now integrated into most laser systems, with a view to protecting the epidermis, reducing pain and erythema and improving the efficacy of laser. On the basis of method employed, it can be divided into contact cooling and non-contact cooling. With respect to timing of irradiation of laser, the nomenclatures include pre-cooling, parallel cooling and post-cooling. The choice of the cooling device is dictated by the laser device, the physician's personal choice with respect to user-friendliness, comfort of the patient, the price and maintenance costs of the device. We hereby briefly review the various techniques of cooling, employed in laser practice. PMID:28163450

  18. Pipeline Implementation of Real Time Event Cross Correlation for Nuclear Treaty Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junek, W. N.; Wehlen, J. A., III

    2014-12-01

    The United States National Data Center (US NDC) is responsible for monitoring international compliance to nuclear test ban treaties. This mission is performed through real time acquisition, processing, and evaluation of data acquired by a global network of seismic, hydroacoustic, and infrasonic sensors. Automatic and human reviewed event solutions are stored in a data warehouse which contains over 15 years of alphanumeric information and waveform data. A significant effort is underway to employ the data warehouse in real time processing to improve the quality of automatic event solutions, reduce analyst burden, and supply decision makers with information regarding relevant historic events. To this end, the US NDC processing pipeline has been modified to automatically recognize events built in the past. Event similarity information and the most relevant historic solution are passed to the human analyst to assist their evaluation of automatically formed events. This is achieved through real time cross correlation of selected seismograms from automatically formed events against those stored in the data warehouse. Historic events used in correlation analysis are selected based on a set of user defined parameters, which are tuned to maintain pipeline timeliness requirements. Software architecture and database infrastructure were modified using a multithreaded design for increased processing speed, database connection pools for parallel queries, and Oracle spatial indexing to enhance query efficiency. This functionality allows the human analyst to spend more time studying anomalous events and less time rebuilding routine events.

  19. The development of the time dependence of the nuclear EMP electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Eng, C

    2009-10-30

    The nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) electric field calculated with the legacy code CHAP is compared with the field given by an integral solution of Maxwell's equations, also known as the Jefimenko equation, to aid our current understanding on the factors that affect the time dependence of the EMP. For a fair comparison the CHAP current density is used as a source in the Jefimenko equation. At first, the comparison is simplified by neglecting the conduction current and replacing the standard atmosphere with a constant density air slab. The simplicity of the resultant current density aids in determining the factors that affect the rise, peak and tail of the EMP electric field versus time. The three dimensional nature of the radiating source, i.e. sources off the line-of-sight, and the time dependence of the derivative of the current density with respect to time are found to play significant roles in shaping the EMP electric field time dependence. These results are found to hold even when the conduction current and the standard atmosphere are properly accounted for. Comparison of the CHAP electric field with the Jefimenko electric field offers a direct validation of the high-frequency/outgoing wave approximation.

  20. Time-related changes in suicide attempts after the nuclear accident in Fukushima.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Yuta; Okada, Megumi; Inokuchi, Ryota; Matsumoto, Akinori; Kumada, Yoshibumi; Yokoyama, Hideyuki; Ishida, Tokiya; Saito, Itaru; Ito, Humihito; Sato, Hajime; Tomio, Jun; Shinohara, Kazuaki; Thornicroft, Graham

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study is to assess whether the risk or types of suicide change in Fukushima in the aftermath of a series of disaster, including earthquake, tsunami and nuclear accident in March 2011. The clinical records of all patients visited to the medical centre near the nuclear plant from 1 year before to 1 year after the disaster were reviewed (n = 981). Patients with non-fatal suicide attempt were divided into two categories depending on their method of suicide attempt. Standardised mortality ratios were calculated to adjust for changes in demographic profiles. The risk of non-fatal suicide attempts using high-mortality methods was significantly higher for 4 months, by three to four times after the series of disasters, and then decreased. There was no significant increase of non-fatal suicide attempts using low-mortality methods after the disaster. After such a disaster, immediate psychiatric support may be required because of the increased risk of non-fatal suicide attempts in the immediate aftermath.

  1. Cool School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Suzanne

    1980-01-01

    The design for Floyd Elementary School in Miami (Florida) seeks to harness solar energy to provide at least 70 percent of the annual energy for cooling needs and 90 percent for hot water. (Author/MLF)

  2. Effects of etching time on alpha tracks in Solid state Nuclear Track Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillmore, Gavin; Wertheim, David; Crust, Simon

    2013-04-01

    Inhalation of radon gas is thought to be the cause of about 1100 lung cancer related deaths each year in the UK (1). Radon concentrations can be monitored using Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs) as the natural decay of radon results in alpha particles which form tracks in the detectors and these tracks can be etched in order to enable microscopic analysis. We have previously shown that confocal microscopy can be used for 3D visualisation of etched SSNTDs (2, 3). The aim of the study was to examine the effect of etching time on the appearance of alpha tracks in SSNTDs. Six SSNTDs were placed in a chamber with a luminous dial watch for a fixed period. The detectors were etched for between 30 minutes and 4.5 hours using 6M NaOH at a temperature of 90oC. A 'LEXT' OLS4000 confocal laser scanning microscope (Olympus Corporation, Japan) was used to acquire 2D and 3D image datasets of CR-39 plastic SSNTDs. Confocal microscope 3D images were acquired using a x50 or x100 objective lens. Data were saved as images and also spreadsheet files with height measurements. Software was written using MATLAB (The MathWorks Inc., USA) to analyse the height data. Comparing the 30 minute and 4 hour etching time detectors, we observed that there were marked differences in track area; the lower the etching time the smaller the track area. The degree to which etching may prevent visualising adjacent tracks also requires further study as it is possible that etching could result in some tracks being subsumed in other tracks. On the other hand if there is too little etching, track sizes would be reduced and hence could be more difficult to image; thus there is a balance required to obtain suitable measurement accuracy. (1) Gray A, Read S, McGale P and Darby S. Lung cancer deaths from indoor radon and the cost effectiveness and potential of policies to reduce them. BMJ 2009; 338: a3110. (2) Wertheim D, Gillmore G, Brown L, and Petford N. A new method of imaging particle tracks in

  3. Real-Time Attenuation Of Heated Optical Fibers In A Nuclear Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partin, Judy K.; Bolstad, Jon O.; Collins, David R.

    1984-03-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is actively involved in the development and application of fiberoptic-based sensor technology for use in nuclear reactor research. One such sensor is a minature fiberoptic probe which senses steam-to-water transitions in a high pressure, high temperature coolant circuit.' Hundreds of these probes have been utilized in non-nuclear reactor simulation facilities and efforts are underway to adapt these and other fiberoptic techniques to full-scale nuclear applications. This paper describes work recently completed to characterize fiberoptic attenuation induced by gamma and neutron radiation in a reactor. The specific goal was to make in-situ attenuation measurements of promising waveguide materials during radiation exposure at elevated temperatures characteristic of reactor environments. Testing was done in a swimming-pool-type reactor generating about one kilowatt thermal power and producing fluxes of about 109n/cm2/sec fast neutrons (>1 MEV), 1010 on /cm2/sec thermal neutrons, and dose rates of 6 X 106 rad/hr gamma radiation. Samples of state-of-the-art radiation-resistant waveguides, received from five manufacturers, were tested simultaneously. One set of waveguides was held at 180°C temperature and the other set remained at 20°C. Attenuation was monitored con-tinuously in several spectral bands in the 600-1050 nanometer region. Total reactor exposure time was about ten hours and the change in attenuation at this time for the heated samples was as low as 5 db/km at the longer wavelengths and as high as 3000 db/km at the shorter wavelengths. Attenuation in this range is acceptable for many instrumentation or sensor applications because transmission distances would be relatively short in the radiated region. The annealing effect at elevated temperature was found to be significant for all waveguide samples. A ten-fold decrease in attenuation was observed for one heated sample in comparison with its counterpart at ambient

  4. Effectiveness of ice-vest cooling in prolonging work tolerance time during heavy exercise in the heat for personnel wearing Canadian forces chemical defense ensembles

    SciTech Connect

    Bain, B.

    1991-01-01

    Effectiveness of a portable, ice-pack cooling vest (Steelevest) in prolonging work tolerance time in chemical defense clothing in the heat (33 C dry bulb, 33% relative humidity or 25 C WBGT) was evaluated while subjects exercised at a metabolic rate of approx. 700 watts. Subjects were six male volunteers. The protocol consisted of a 20 minute treadmill walk at 1.33 m/s. and 7.5% grade, followed by 15 minutes of a lifting task, 5 minutes rest, then another 20 minutes of lifting task for a total of one hour. The lifting task consisted of lifting of 20 kg box, carrying it 3 meters and setting it down. This was followed by a 6 m walk (3m back to the start point and 3 m back to the box) 15 sec after which the lifting cycle began again. The work was classified as heavy as previously defined. This protocol was repeated until the subjects were unable to continue or they reached a physiological endpoint. Time to voluntary cessation or physiological endpoint was called the work tolerance time. Physiological endpoints were rectal temperature of 39 C, heart rate exceeding 95% of maximum for two consecutive minutes or visible loss of motor control or nausea. The cooling vest had no effect on work tolerance time, rate of rise of rectal temperature or sweat loss. It was concluded that the Steelvest ice-vest is ineffective in prolonging work tolerance time and preventing increases in rectal temperature while wearing chemical protective clothing.

  5. Ultraefficient cooling of resonators: beating sideband cooling with quantum control.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoting; Vinjanampathy, Sai; Strauch, Frederick W; Jacobs, Kurt

    2011-10-21

    The present state of the art in cooling mechanical resonators is a version of sideband cooling. Here we present a method that uses the same configuration as sideband cooling-coupling the resonator to be cooled to a second microwave (or optical) auxiliary resonator-but will cool significantly colder. This is achieved by varying the strength of the coupling between the two resonators over a time on the order of the period of the mechanical resonator. As part of our analysis, we also obtain a method for fast, high-fidelity quantum information transfer between resonators. © 2011 American Physical Society

  6. Investigating cryoinjury using simulations and experiments. 1: TF-1 cells during two-step freezing (rapid cooling interrupted with a hold time).

    PubMed

    Ross-Rodriguez, L U; Elliott, J A W; McGann, L E

    2010-08-01

    There is significant interest in designing a cryopreservation protocol for hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) which does not rely on dimethyl sulfoxide (Me(2)SO) as a cryoprotectant. Computer simulations that describe cellular osmotic responses during cooling and warming can be used to optimize the viability of cryopreserved HSC; however, a better understanding of cellular osmotic parameters is required for these simulations. As a model for HSC, the erythroleukemic human cell line TF-1 was used in this study. Simulations, based on the osmotic properties of TF-1 cells and on the solution properties of the intra- and extracellular compartments, were used to interpret cryoinjury associated with a two-step cryopreservation protocol. Calculated intracellular supercooling was used as an indicator of cryoinjury related to intracellular ice formation. Simulations were applied to the two-step cooling protocol (rapid cooling interrupted with a hold time) for TF-1 cells in the absence of Me(2)SO or other cryoprotectants and optimized by minimizing the indicator of cryoinjury. A comparison of simulations and experimental measurements of membrane integrity supports the concept that, for two-step cooling, increasing intracellular supercooling is the primary contributor to potential freezing injury due to the increase in the likelihood of intracellular ice formation. By calculating intracellular supercooling for each step separately and comparing these calculations with cell recovery data, it was demonstrated that it is not optimal simply to limit overall supercooling during two-step freezing procedures. More aptly, appropriate limitations of supercooling differ from the first step to the second step. This study also demonstrates why high cell recovery after cryopreservation could be achieved in the absence of traditional cryoprotectants. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Nonlocal Nuclear Spin Quieting in Quantum Dot Molecules: Optically Induced Extended Two-Electron Spin Coherence Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Colin M.; Ross, Aaron M.; Kim, Danny; Gammon, Daniel; Bracker, Allan S.; Sham, L. J.; Steel, Duncan G.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate the extension of coherence between all four two-electron spin ground states of an InAs quantum dot molecule (QDM) via nonlocal suppression of nuclear spin fluctuations in two vertically stacked quantum dots (QDs), while optically addressing only the top QD transitions. Long coherence times are revealed through dark-state spectroscopy as resulting from nuclear spin locking mediated by the exchange interaction between the QDs. Line shape analysis provides the first measurement of the quieting of the Overhauser field distribution correlating with reduced nuclear spin fluctuations.

  8. Probing the Dynamics of a Nuclear Spin Bath in Diamond through Time-Resolved Central Spin Magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dréau, A.; Jamonneau, P.; Gazzano, O.; Kosen, S.; Roch, J.-F.; Maze, J. R.; Jacques, V.

    2014-09-01

    Using fast electron spin resonance spectroscopy of a single nitrogen-vacancy defect in diamond, we demonstrate real-time readout of the Overhauser field produced by its nuclear spin environment under ambient conditions. These measurements enable narrowing the Overhauser field distribution by postselection, corresponding to a conditional preparation of the nuclear spin bath. Correlations of the Overhauser field fluctuations are quantitatively inferred by analyzing the Allan deviation over consecutive measurements. This method allows us to extract the dynamics of weakly coupled nuclear spins of the reservoir.

  9. Nuclear molecule formation and time delay in collisions of nuclei with Z1 + Z2 ≥ 110

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, S.; Beliuskina, O.; Comas, V.; Devaraja, H. M.; Heinz, C.; Hofmann, S.; Kozulin, E.; Morherr, F.; Münzenberg, G.; Ackermann, D.; Heßberger, F. P.; Kindler, B.; Lommel, B.; Mann, R.; Maurer, J.

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the formation of nuclear molecules and the occurrence of time delays in reactions of the superheavy systems 64Ni + 207Pb ( Z1+Z2=110), 132Xe + 208Pb ( Z1+Z2=136) and 238U + 238U ( Z1+Z2=184. In deep inelastic binary reactions of Ni + Pb and Xe + Pb we observed clear signatures for the formation of long-living molecule-like nuclear systems which rotate by large angles of 180 degree. The evolution of the nuclear molecules was accompanied by large energy dissipation and a strong deformation of the nuclear system. The results from the giant system U + U revealed striking similarities to the ones from Ni + Pb and Xe + Pb , showing that significant time delays still occur in the heaviest accessible systems. The experiments were performed at the velocity filter SHIP at GSI and at the VAMOS spectrometer at GANIL.

  10. Performance impact on nuclear thermal propulsion of piloted Mars missions with short transit times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickenheiser, T. J.; Gessner, K. S.; Alexander, S. W.

    1991-01-01

    The requirements of nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) are examined with respect to a specific mission scenario derived from Stafford Committee recommendations. The recommended mission scenario is a split/sprint opposition mission which includes a piloted vehicle and a cargo vehicle, and the baseline mission is developed from a reference trajectory. Key mision parameters are developed from the baseline mission, including engine-thrust levels, mission opportunity, and engine burn-time requirements. The impact of engine failure is also considered in terms of burn-time requirements, and other mission-performance issues considered include propulsion-technology assumptions, triple-perigee earth-departure burns, and Mars parking-orbit selection. The engine requirements call for a 50-75-klb engine-thrust level, maximum single burn time of 0.6 hours, and a maximum total-mission burn time of 1.7 hours. For a crew of 6, a 475-day total-mission trip with a 90-day stay at Mars is possible.

  11. Effects of etching time on alpha tracks in solid state nuclear track detectors.

    PubMed

    Gillmore, Gavin; Wertheim, David; Crust, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs) are used extensively for monitoring alpha particle radiation, neutron flux and cosmic ray radiation. Radon gas inhalation is regarded as being a significant contributory factor to lung cancer deaths in the UK each year. Gas concentrations are often monitored using CR39 based SSNTDs as the natural decay of radon results in alpha particles which form tracks in these detectors. Such tracks are normally etched for about 4h to enable microscopic analysis. This study examined the effect of etching time on the appearance of alpha tracks in SSNTDs by collecting 2D and 3D image datasets using laser confocal microscope imaging techniques. Etching times of 2 to 4h were compared and marked differences were noted in resultant track area. The median equivalent diameters of tracks were 20.2, 30.2 and 38.9μm for etching at 2, 3 and 4h respectively. Our results indicate that modern microscope imaging can detect and image the smaller size tracks seen for example at 3h etching time. Shorter etching times may give rise to fewer coalescing tracks although there is a balance to consider as smaller track sizes may be more difficult to image. Thus etching for periods of less than 4h clearly merits further investigation as this approach has the potential to improve accuracy in assessing the number of tracks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Second-scale nuclear spin coherence time of ultracold 23Na40K molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jee Woo; Yan, Zoe Z.; Loh, Huanqian; Will, Sebastian A.; Zwierlein, Martin W.

    2017-07-01

    Coherence, the stability of the relative phase between quantum states, is central to quantum mechanics and its applications. For ultracold dipolar molecules at sub-microkelvin temperatures, internal states with robust coherence are predicted to offer rich prospects for quantum many-body physics and quantum information processing. We report the observation of stable coherence between nuclear spin states of ultracold fermionic sodium-potassium (NaK) molecules in the singlet rovibrational ground state. Ramsey spectroscopy reveals coherence times on the scale of 1 second; this enables high-resolution spectroscopy of the molecular gas. Collisional shifts are shown to be absent down to the 100-millihertz level. This work opens the door to the use of molecules as a versatile quantum memory and for precision measurements on dipolar quantum matter.

  13. Resolution of deep angiosperm phylogeny using conserved nuclear genes and estimates of early divergence times

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Liping; Zhang, Qiang; Sun, Renran; Kong, Hongzhi; Zhang, Ning; Ma, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Angiosperms are the most successful plants and support human livelihood and ecosystems. Angiosperm phylogeny is the foundation of studies of gene function and phenotypic evolution, divergence time estimation and biogeography. The relationship of the five divergent groups of the Mesangiospermae (~99.95% of extant angiosperms) remains uncertain, with multiple hypotheses reported in the literature. Here transcriptome data sets are obtained from 26 species lacking sequenced genomes, representing each of the five groups: eudicots, monocots, magnoliids, Chloranthaceae and Ceratophyllaceae. Phylogenetic analyses using 59 carefully selected low-copy nuclear genes resulted in highly supported relationships: sisterhood of eudicots and a clade containing Chloranthaceae and Ceratophyllaceae, with magnoliids being the next sister group, followed by monocots. Our topology allows a re-examination of the evolutionary patterns of 110 morphological characters. The molecular clock estimates of Mesangiospermae diversification during the late to middle Jurassic correspond well to the origins of some insects, which may have been a factor facilitating early angiosperm radiation. PMID:25249442

  14. Observation of Time-Invariant Coherence in a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Quantum Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Isabela A.; Souza, Alexandre M.; Bromley, Thomas R.; Cianciaruso, Marco; Marx, Raimund; Sarthour, Roberto S.; Oliveira, Ivan S.; Lo Franco, Rosario; Glaser, Steffen J.; deAzevedo, Eduardo R.; Soares-Pinto, Diogo O.; Adesso, Gerardo

    2016-10-01

    The ability to live in coherent superpositions is a signature trait of quantum systems and constitutes an irreplaceable resource for quantum-enhanced technologies. However, decoherence effects usually destroy quantum superpositions. It was recently predicted that, in a composite quantum system exposed to dephasing noise, quantum coherence in a transversal reference basis can stay protected for an indefinite time. This can occur for a class of quantum states independently of the measure used to quantify coherence, and it requires no control on the system during the dynamics. Here, such an invariant coherence phenomenon is observed experimentally in two different setups based on nuclear magnetic resonance at room temperature, realizing an effective quantum simulator of two- and four-qubit spin systems. Our study further reveals a novel interplay between coherence and various forms of correlations, and it highlights the natural resilience of quantum effects in complex systems.

  15. Observation of Time-Invariant Coherence in a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Quantum Simulator.

    PubMed

    Silva, Isabela A; Souza, Alexandre M; Bromley, Thomas R; Cianciaruso, Marco; Marx, Raimund; Sarthour, Roberto S; Oliveira, Ivan S; Lo Franco, Rosario; Glaser, Steffen J; deAzevedo, Eduardo R; Soares-Pinto, Diogo O; Adesso, Gerardo

    2016-10-14

    The ability to live in coherent superpositions is a signature trait of quantum systems and constitutes an irreplaceable resource for quantum-enhanced technologies. However, decoherence effects usually destroy quantum superpositions. It was recently predicted that, in a composite quantum system exposed to dephasing noise, quantum coherence in a transversal reference basis can stay protected for an indefinite time. This can occur for a class of quantum states independently of the measure used to quantify coherence, and it requires no control on the system during the dynamics. Here, such an invariant coherence phenomenon is observed experimentally in two different setups based on nuclear magnetic resonance at room temperature, realizing an effective quantum simulator of two- and four-qubit spin systems. Our study further reveals a novel interplay between coherence and various forms of correlations, and it highlights the natural resilience of quantum effects in complex systems.

  16. Resolution of deep angiosperm phylogeny using conserved nuclear genes and estimates of early divergence times.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Liping; Zhang, Qiang; Sun, Renran; Kong, Hongzhi; Zhang, Ning; Ma, Hong

    2014-09-24

    Angiosperms are the most successful plants and support human livelihood and ecosystems. Angiosperm phylogeny is the foundation of studies of gene function and phenotypic evolution, divergence time estimation and biogeography. The relationship of the five divergent groups of the Mesangiospermae (~99.95% of extant angiosperms) remains uncertain, with multiple hypotheses reported in the literature. Here transcriptome data sets are obtained from 26 species lacking sequenced genomes, representing each of the five groups: eudicots, monocots, magnoliids, Chloranthaceae and Ceratophyllaceae. Phylogenetic analyses using 59 carefully selected low-copy nuclear genes resulted in highly supported relationships: sisterhood of eudicots and a clade containing Chloranthaceae and Ceratophyllaceae, with magnoliids being the next sister group, followed by monocots. Our topology allows a re-examination of the evolutionary patterns of 110 morphological characters. The molecular clock estimates of Mesangiospermae diversification during the late to middle Jurassic correspond well to the origins of some insects, which may have been a factor facilitating early angiosperm radiation.

  17. Nuclear Recoil Cross Sections from Time-dependent Studies of Two-Photon Double Ionization of Helium

    SciTech Connect

    Horner, Daniel A.; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C. William

    2009-12-21

    We examine the sensitivity of nuclear recoil cross sections produced by two-photon double ionization of helium to the underlying triple differential cross sections (TDCS) used in their computation. We show that this sensitivity is greatest in the energy region just below the threshold for sequential double ionization. Accurate TDCS, extracted from non-perturbative solutions of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation, are used here in new computations of the nuclear recoil cross section.

  18. Just in Time DSA-The Hanford Nuclear Safety Basis Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Olinger, S. J.; Buhl, A. R.

    2002-02-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) is responsible for 30 hazard category 2 and 3 nuclear facilities that are operated by its prime contractors, Fluor Hanford Incorporated (FHI), Bechtel Hanford, Incorporated (BHI) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The publication of Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 830, Subpart B, Safety Basis Requirements (the Rule) in January 2001 imposed the requirement that the Documented Safety Analyses (DSA) for these facilities be reviewed against the requirements of the Rule. Those DSA that do not meet the requirements must either be upgraded to satisfy the Rule, or an exemption must be obtained. RL and its prime contractors have developed a Nuclear Safety Strategy that provides a comprehensive approach for supporting RL's efforts to meet its long term objectives for hazard category 2 and 3 facilities while also meeting the requirements of the Rule. This approach will result in a reduction of the total number of safety basis documents that must be developed and maintained to support the remaining mission and closure of the Hanford Site and ensure that the documentation that must be developed will support: compliance with the Rule; a ''Just-In-Time'' approach to development of Rule-compliant safety bases supported by temporary exemptions; and consolidation of safety basis documents that support multiple facilities with a common mission (e.g. decontamination, decommissioning and demolition [DD&D], waste management, surveillance and maintenance). This strategy provides a clear path to transition the safety bases for the various Hanford facilities from support of operation and stabilization missions through DD&D to accelerate closure. This ''Just-In-Time'' Strategy can also be tailored for other DOE Sites, creating the potential for large cost savings and schedule reductions throughout the DOE complex.

  19. Thermodynamic Analysis of the Use a Chemical Heat Pump to Link a Supercritical Water-Cooled Nuclear Reactor and a Thermochemical Water-Splitting Cycle for Hydrogen Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granovskii, Mikhail; Dincer, Ibrahim; Rosen, Marc A.; Pioro, Igor

    Increases in the power generation efficiency of nuclear power plants (NPPs) are mainly limited by the permissible temperatures in nuclear reactors and the corresponding temperatures and pressures of the coolants in reactors. Coolant parameters are limited by the corrosion rates of materials and nuclear-reactor safety constraints. The advanced construction materials for the next generation of CANDU reactors, which employ supercritical water (SCW) as a coolant and heat carrier, permit improved “steam” parameters (outlet temperatures up to 625°C and pressures of about 25 MPa). An increase in the temperature of steam allows it to be utilized in thermochemical water splitting cycles to produce hydrogen. These methods are considered by many to be among the most efficient ways to produce hydrogen from water and to have advantages over traditional low-temperature water electrolysis. However, even lower temperature water splitting cycles (Cu-Cl, UT-3, etc.) require an intensive heat supply at temperatures higher than 550-600°C. A sufficient increase in the heat transfer from the nuclear reactor to a thermochemical water splitting cycle, without jeopardizing nuclear reactor safety, might be effectively achieved by application of a heat pump, which increases the temperature of the heat supplied by virtue of a cyclic process driven by mechanical or electrical work. Here, a high-temperature chemical heat pump, which employs the reversible catalytic methane conversion reaction, is proposed. The reaction shift from exothermic to endothermic and back is achieved by a change of the steam concentration in the reaction mixture. This heat pump, coupled with the second steam cycle of a SCW nuclear power generation plant on one side and a thermochemical water splitting cycle on the other, increases the temperature of the “nuclear” heat and, consequently, the intensity of heat transfer into the water splitting cycle. A comparative preliminary thermodynamic analysis is conducted

  20. A time resolved high energy X-ray diffraction study of cooling liquid SiO2.

    PubMed

    Skinner, L B; Benmore, C J; Weber, J K R; Wilding, M C; Tumber, S K; Parise, J B

    2013-06-14

    The evolution of the X-ray structure factor and corresponding pair distribution function of SiO2 has been measured upon cooling from the melt using high energy X-ray diffraction combined with aerodynamic levitation. Small changes in the position of the average Si-O bond distance and peak width are found to occur at ~1500(100) K in the region of the calorimetric glass transition temperature, T(g) and the observed density minima. At higher temperatures deviations from linear behavior are seen in the first sharp diffraction peak width, height and area at around 1750(50) K, which coincides with the reported density maximum around 1.2T(g).

  1. The Effect of Protoplanetary Disk Cooling Times on the Formation of Gas Giant Planets by Gravitational Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    2017-02-01

    Observational evidence exists for the formation of gas giant planets on wide orbits around young stars by disk gravitational instability, but the roles of disk instability and core accretion for forming gas giants on shorter period orbits are less clear. The controversy extends to population synthesis models of exoplanet demographics and to hydrodynamical models of the fragmentation process. The latter refers largely to the handling of radiative transfer in three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamical models, which controls heating and cooling processes in gravitationally unstable disks, and hence dense clump formation. A suite of models using the β cooling approximation is presented here. The initial disks have masses of 0.091 M ⊙ and extend from 4 to 20 au around a 1 M ⊙ protostar. The initial minimum Toomre Q i values range from 1.3 to 2.7, while β ranges from 1 to 100. We show that the choice of Q i is equal in importance to the β value assumed: high Q i disks can be stable for small β, when the initial disk temperature is taken as a lower bound, while low Q i disks can fragment for high β. These results imply that the evolution of disks toward low Q i must be taken into account in assessing disk fragmentation possibilities, at least in the inner disk, i.e., inside about 20 au. The models suggest that if low Q i disks can form, there should be an as yet largely undetected population of gas giants orbiting G dwarfs between about 6 au and 16 au.

  2. Temperature-specific outcomes of cytoplasmic-nuclear interactions on egg-to-adult development time in seed beetles.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Damian K; Abiega, Katia Chávez; Arnqvist, Göran

    2007-01-01

    The integration of the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes coordinates cellular energy production and is fundamental to life among eukaryotes. Therefore, there is potential for strong selection to shape the interactions between the two genomes. Several studies have now demonstrated that epistatic interactions between cytoplasmic and nuclear genes for fitness can occur both at a "within" and "across" population level. Genotype-by-environment interactions are common for traits that are encoded by nuclear genes, but the effects of environmental heterogeneity on traits that are partly encoded by cytoplasmic genes have received little attention despite the fact that there are reasons to believe that phenotypic effects of cytoplasmic genetic variation may often be environment specific. Consequently, the importance of environmental heterogeneity to the outcomes of cyto-nuclear fitness interactions and to the maintenance of mitochondrial polymorphism is unclear. Here, we assess the influence of temperature on cyto-nuclear effects on egg-to-adult development time in seed beetles (Callosobruchus maculatus). We employed an "across-population" design, sourcing beetles from five distinct populations and using backcrossing to create orthogonal combinations of distinct introgression lines, fixed for their cytoplasmic and nuclear lineages. We then assayed development times at two different temperatures and found sizeable cyto-nuclear effects in general, as well as temperature- and block-specific cyto-nuclear effects. These results demonstrate that environmental factors such as temperature do exert selection on cytoplasmic genes by favoring specific cyto-nuclear genetic combinations, and are consistent with the suggestion that complex genotype-by-environment interactions may promote the maintenance of polymorphism in mitochondrial genes.

  3. Dopant-assisted negative photoionization Ion mobility spectrometry coupled with on-line cooling inlet for real-time monitoring H2S concentration in sewer gas.

    PubMed

    Peng, Liying; Jiang, Dandan; Wang, Zhenxin; Hua, Lei; Li, Haiyang

    2016-06-01

    Malodorous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas often exists in the sewer system and associates with the problems of releasing the dangerous odor to the atmosphere and causing sewer pipe to be corroded. A simple method is in demand for real-time measuring H2S level in the sewer gas. In this paper, an innovated method based on dopant-assisted negative photoionization ion mobility spectrometry (DANP-IMS) with on-line semiconductor cooling inlet was put forward and successfully applied for the real-time measurement of H2S in sewer gas. The influence of moisture was effectively reduced via an on-line cooling method and a non-equilibrium dilution with drift gas. The limits of quantitation for the H2S in ≥60% relative humidity air could be obtained at ≤79.0ng L(-1) with linear ranges of 129-2064ng L(-1). The H2S concentration in a sewer manhole was successfully determined while its product ions were identified by an ion-mobility time-of-fight mass spectrometry. Finally, the correlation between sewer H2S concentration and the daily routines and habits of residents was investigated through hourly or real-time monitoring the variation of sewer H2S in manholes, indicating the power of this DANP-IMS method in assessing the H2S concentration in sewer system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Usefulness of real-time PCR as a complementary tool to the monitoring of Legionella spp. and Legionella pneumophila by culture in industrial cooling systems.

    PubMed

    Touron-Bodilis, A; Pougnard, C; Frenkiel-Lebossé, H; Hallier-Soulier, S

    2011-08-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the usefulness of quantification by real-time PCR as a management tool to monitor concentrations of Legionella spp. and Legionella pneumophila in industrial cooling systems and its ability to anticipate culture trends by the French standard method (AFNOR T90-431). Quantifications of Legionella bacteria were achieved by both methods on samples from nine cooling systems with different water qualities. Proportion of positive samples for L. pneumophila quantified by PCR was clearly lower in deionized or river waters submitted to a biocide treatment than in raw river waters, while positive samples for Legionella spp. were quantified for almost all the samples. For some samples containing PCR inhibitors, high quantification limits (up to 4·80 × 10(5) GU l(-1) ) did not allow us to quantify L. pneumophila, when they were quantified by culture. Finally, the monitoring of concentrations of L. pneumophila by both methods showed similar trends for 57-100% of the samples. These results suggest that, if some methodological steps designed to reduce inhibitory problems and thus decrease the quantification limits, could be developed to quantify Legionella in complex waters, the real-time PCR could be a valuable complementary tool to monitor the evolution of L. pneumophila concentrations. This study shows the possibility of using real-time PCR to monitor L. pneumophila proliferations in cooling systems and the importance to adapt nucleic acid extraction and purification protocols to raw waters. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology. No claim to French Government works.

  5. A Role for Timely Nuclear Translocation of Clock Repressor Proteins in Setting Circadian Clock Speed

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Euna

    2014-01-01

    By means of a circadian clock system, all the living organisms on earth including human beings can anticipate the environmental rhythmic changes such as light/dark and warm/cold periods in a daily as well as in a yearly manner. Anticipating such environmental changes provide organisms with survival benefits via manifesting behavior and physiology at an advantageous time of the day and year. Cell-autonomous circadian oscillators, governed by transcriptional feedback loop composed of positive and negative elements, are organized into a hierarchical system throughout the organisms and generate an oscillatory expression of a clock gene by itself as well as clock controlled genes (ccgs) with a 24 hr periodicity. In the feedback loop, hetero-dimeric transcription factor complex induces the expression of negative regulatory proteins, which in turn represses the activity of transcription factors to inhibit their own transcription. Thus, for robust oscillatory rhythms of the expression of clock genes as well as ccgs, the precise control of subcellular localization and/or timely translocation of core clock protein are crucial. Here, we discuss how sub-cellular localization and nuclear translocation are controlled in a time-specific manner focusing on the negative regulatory clock proteins. PMID:25258565

  6. Effect of filtering on noise and timing in nuclear particle detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, S. A.

    1970-01-01

    The relations between signal shaping, noise, and timing resolution in nuclear particle detection systems are examined in this paper. Mathematical analysis of five commonly used types of filters leads to numerical results for system noise components arising from sources in the preamplifier, detector, and bias resistors. These results are presented in the form of design curves for the various filters, showing the dependence of each output noise component on both the magnitude of the noise sources and the filter time constants. Three of the filters considered are simple RC types; the remaining two are combinations of delay lines and RC elements. The quantitative calculations specifically assume a silicon detector and a field-effect-transistor preamplifier. Those filters that exhibit bipolar step response are analyzed in terms of crossover timing resolution, based on the earlier noise calculations. Again, the results are summarized in sets of design curves for each filter. Finally, the comparative performance of the various filter types is discussed, and specific examples are given.

  7. Effectiveness of Ice-Vest Cooling in Prolonging Work Tolerance Time during Heavy Exercise in the Heat for Personnel Wearing Canadian Forces Chemical Defence Ensembles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    this institute ( McLellan et al (5)), we found that work tolerance times decreased dramatically when CD equipment was worn during work in the heat when...order in which the trials would be performed. The subjects performed "heavy" work as defired in a previous study ( McLellan et al (5)). The work consisted...and sweat rate in the no cooling condition found in this study are similar to those we have reported in another experiment ( McLellan et al (5)). In

  8. Nuclear Misinformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Daniel F.; Kendall, Henry W.

    1975-01-01

    Many scientists feel that research into nuclear safety has been diverted or distorted, and the results of the research concealed or inaccurately reported on a large number of occasions. Of particular concern have been the emergency cooling systems which have not, as yet, been adequately tested. (Author/MA)

  9. Nuclear Misinformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Daniel F.; Kendall, Henry W.

    1975-01-01

    Many scientists feel that research into nuclear safety has been diverted or distorted, and the results of the research concealed or inaccurately reported on a large number of occasions. Of particular concern have been the emergency cooling systems which have not, as yet, been adequately tested. (Author/MA)

  10. Radiation dose prediction using data on time to emesis in the case of nuclear terrorism.

    PubMed

    Demidenko, Eugene; Williams, Benjamin B; Swartz, Harold M

    2009-03-01

    A rigorous statistical analysis of the retrospective estimation of radiation dose received using time to emesis and its uncertainty is provided based on 108 observations associated with accidents with significant exposures to ionizing radiation in the period 1956-2001. The standard error, confidence interval, specificity and sensitivity, and Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve are used to characterize the uncertainty of the dose prediction. The relative error of the dose prediction using time to emesis data is about 200%. Consequently, if D is the dose assessment, the 95% confidence interval is approximately (D/4, 4D). Our assessment of the precision is applied to computation of the probabilities in triage medical management in the case of a nuclear terrorism event. We also note several factors that indicate that there are additional problems in the use of time to emesis for triage, including a lack of consideration of individuals that do not vomit, differences between the conditions under which the data were obtained and the conditions under which they are likely to be used, and the potential for the incidence of vomiting to be altered by factors unrelated to radiation exposure such as psychogenic factors and the use of emetic agents. In summary, while time to emesis is a rapid and inexpensive method for estimating the radiation dose, it should be used with caution because it is imprecise and may lead to a very high false positive rate. More reliable methods for after-the-fact assessment of radiation dose are needed to complement the use of time to emesis.

  11. Radiation Dose Prediction Using Data on Time to Emesis in the Case of Nuclear Terrorism

    PubMed Central

    Demidenko, Eugene; Williams, Benjamin B.; Swartz, Harold M.

    2009-01-01

    A rigorous statistical analysis of the retrospective estimation of radiation dose received using time to emesis and its uncertainty is provided based on 108 observations associated with accidents with significant exposures to ionizing radiation in the period 1956–2001. The standard error, confidence interval, specificity and sensitivity, and Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve are used to characterize the uncertainty of the dose prediction. The relative error of the dose prediction using time to emesis data is about 200%. Consequently, if D is the dose assessment, the 95% confidence interval is approximately (D/4, 4D). Our assessment of the precision is applied to computation of the probabilities in triage medical management in the case of a nuclear terrorism event. We also note several factors that indicate that there are additional problems in the use of time to emesis for triage, including a lack of consideration of individuals that do not vomit, differences between the conditions under which the data were obtained and the conditions under which they are likely to be used, and the potential for the incidence of vomiting to be altered by factors unrelated to radiation exposure such as psychogenic factors and the use of emetic agents. In summary, while time to emesis is a rapid and inexpensive method for estimating the radiation dose, it should be used with caution because it is imprecise and may lead to a very high false positive rate. More reliable methods for after-the-fact assessment of radiation dose are needed to complement the use of time to emesis. PMID:19267558

  12. Cooled railplug

    DOEpatents

    Weldon, W.F.

    1996-05-07

    The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers. 10 figs.

  13. Cooling Vest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Because quadriplegics are unable to perspire below the level of spinal injury, they cannot tolerate heat stress. A cooling vest developed by Ames Research Center and Upjohn Company allows them to participate in outdoor activities. The vest is an adaptation of Ames technology for thermal control garments used to remove excess body heat of astronauts. The vest consists of a series of corrugated channels through which cooled water circulates. Its two outer layers are urethane coated nylon, and there is an inner layer which incorporates the corrugated channels. It can be worn as a backpack or affixed to a wheelchair. The unit includes a rechargeable battery, mini-pump, two quart reservoir and heat sink to cool the water.

  14. Force Enhancement Packages for Countering Nuclear Threats in the 2022-2027 Time Frame: Final Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    3 2. Threats, a Notional Scenario, and a Vision of a System A. Threats The threat of nuclear terrorism in the near future (2022–2027...over the next decade or two. Two relevant, recent unclassified analyses from U.S. Government agencies have commented on nuclear terrorism . The...in assisting nations to counter nuclear terrorism threats. 4. DOD will participate in planning and exercises with the selected countries. This planning

  15. Characterisation of prompt and delayed atmospheric radioactivity releases from underground nuclear tests at Nevada as a function of release time.

    PubMed

    Kalinowski, Martin B

    2011-09-01

    A database with information on about 500 cases of atmospheric radioactivity releases from underground nuclear tests is analysed. The data are statistically evaluated and systematically aggregated in order to characterise prompt uncontrolled as well as delayed operational releases of radioactivity into the atmosphere. The focus is put on the latter. The reported data compare well with theoretically derived xenon activities for reasonable nuclear test scenarios. Conclusions are drawn on the main features of releases that can be expected from underground nuclear tests as a function of release time. These findings are relevant for developing and validating methods to be applied in global monitoring of atmospheric radioactivity with respect to indications of an underground nuclear explosion. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. TIME BEHAVIOR OF CHARGED PARTICLES INJECTED BY 1962 HIGH ALTITUDE RUSSIAN NUCLEAR TESTS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CHARGED PARTICLES, FALLOUT, GEOPHYSICS, HIGH ALTITUDE , USSR, NUCLEAR RADIATION SPECTROMETERS, RADIATION MEASURING INSTRUMENTS, SCIENTIFIC SATELLITES, GEOMAGNETISM, BETA PARTICLES, RADIOACTIVE DECAY, SCINTILLATION COUNTERS.

  17. Iron oxide nanoparticles decrease nuclear fractal dimension of buccal epithelial cells in a time-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Nikolovski, D; Dugalic, S; Pantic, I

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we present results that iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) induce time-dependent structural changes in nuclei of buccal epithelial cells. The cells were treated with magnetite, Fe3 O4 nanoparticles (spherical shape, diameter 80-100 nanometres). The digital micrographs of the nuclei were made in 3 different time points: 15, 30 and 60 min after the treatment with IONPs, as well as in the control cells. A total of 120 nuclear structures (30 per sample) were analysed. Fractal analysis of nuclei was done in ImageJ software of the National Institutes of Health, (Bethesda, MD, USA). For each nuclear structure, the values of fractal dimension and lacunarity were calculated. There was a time-dependent reduction of nuclear fractal dimension in buccal epithelial cells after exposure to magnetite iron oxide nanoparticles. Negative trend was observed (p < 0.01). Nuclear lacunarity, as another fractal parameter was shown to increase, also in a time-dependent manner, after the treatment with IONPs. To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate effects of magnetite nanomaterial on nuclear fractal complexity, and also the first to apply fractal analysis method in testing of the interaction between nanoparticles and cell nucleus in this experimental setting. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  18. The impact of shadow evacuation on evacuation time estimates for nuclear power plants.

    PubMed

    Weinisch, Kevin; Brueckner, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A shadow evacuation is the voluntary evacuation of people from areas outside a declared evacuation area. Shadow evacuees can congest roadways and inhibit the egress of those evacuating from an area at risk. Federal regulations stipulate that nuclear power plant (NPP) licensees in the United States must conduct an Evacuation Time Estimate (ETE) study after each decennial census. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published federal guidance for conducting ETE studies in November 2011. This guidance document recommends the consideration of a Shadow Region which extends 5 miles radially beyond the existing 10-mile Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ) for NPPs. The federal guidance also suggests the consideration of the evacuation of 20 percent of the permanent resident population in the Shadow Region in addition to 100 percent of the declared evacuation region within the EPZ when conducting ETE studies. The 20 percent recommendation was questioned in a March 2013 report prepared by the US Government Accountability Office. This article discusses the effects on ETE of increasing the shadow evacuation from 20 to 60 percent for 48 NPPs in the United States. Only five (10 percent) of the 48 sites show a significant increase (30 minutes or greater) in 90th percentile ETE (time to evacuate 90 percent of the population in the EPZ), while seven (15 percent) of the 48 sites show a significant increase in 100th percentile ETE (time to evacuate all population in the EPZ). Study areas that are prone to a significant increase in ETE due to shadow evacuation are classified as one of four types; case studies are presented for one plant of each type to explain why the shadow evacuation significantly affects ETE. A matrix of the four case types can be used by emergency management personnel to predict during planning stages whether the evacuated area is prone to a significant increase in ETE due to shadow evacuation. Potential mitigation tactics that reduce demand (public information

  19. Teaching Social Communication Skills Using a Cool versus Not Cool Procedure plus Role-Playing and a Social Skills Taxonomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leaf, Justin B.; Taubman, Mitchell; Milne, Christine; Dale, Stephanie; Leaf, Jeremy; Townley-Cochran, Donna; Tsuji, Kathleen; Kassardjian, Alyne; Alcalay, Aditt; Leaf, Ronald; McEachin, John

    2016-01-01

    We utilized a cool versus not cool procedure plus role-playing to teach social communication skills to three individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. The cool versus not cool procedure plus role-playing consisted of the researcher randomly demonstrating the behavior correctly (cool) two times and the behavior incorrectly (not cool) two…

  20. Teaching Social Communication Skills Using a Cool versus Not Cool Procedure plus Role-Playing and a Social Skills Taxonomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leaf, Justin B.; Taubman, Mitchell; Milne, Christine; Dale, Stephanie; Leaf, Jeremy; Townley-Cochran, Donna; Tsuji, Kathleen; Kassardjian, Alyne; Alcalay, Aditt; Leaf, Ronald; McEachin, John

    2016-01-01

    We utilized a cool versus not cool procedure plus role-playing to teach social communication skills to three individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. The cool versus not cool procedure plus role-playing consisted of the researcher randomly demonstrating the behavior correctly (cool) two times and the behavior incorrectly (not cool) two…

  1. Measuring Out-of-Time-Order Correlators on a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Quantum Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Fan, Ruihua; Wang, Hengyan; Ye, Bingtian; Zeng, Bei; Zhai, Hui; Peng, Xinhua; Du, Jiangfeng

    2017-07-01

    The idea of the out-of-time-order correlator (OTOC) has recently emerged in the study of both condensed matter systems and gravitational systems. It not only plays a key role in investigating the holographic duality between a strongly interacting quantum system and a gravitational system, it also diagnoses the chaotic behavior of many-body quantum systems and characterizes information scrambling. Based on OTOCs, three different concepts—quantum chaos, holographic duality, and information scrambling—are found to be intimately related to each other. Despite its theoretical importance, the experimental measurement of the OTOC is quite challenging, and thus far there is no experimental measurement of the OTOC for local operators. Here, we report the measurement of OTOCs of local operators for an Ising spin chain on a nuclear magnetic resonance quantum simulator. We observe that the OTOC behaves differently in the integrable and nonintegrable cases. Based on the recent discovered relationship between OTOCs and the growth of entanglement entropy in the many-body system, we extract the entanglement entropy from the measured OTOCs, which clearly shows that the information entropy oscillates in time for integrable models and scrambles for nonintgrable models. With the measured OTOCs, we also obtain the experimental result of the butterfly velocity, which measures the speed of correlation propagation. Our experiment paves a way for experimentally studying quantum chaos, holographic duality, and information scrambling in many-body quantum systems with quantum simulators.

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance water relaxation time changes in bananas during ripening: a new mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Fayene Zeferino; Marconcini, Lucinéia Vizzotto; de Toledo, Ingrid Bertoni; de Vasconcellos Azeredo, Rodrigo Bagueira; Barbosa, Lucio Leonel; Colnago, Luiz Alberto

    2010-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of banana fragments during ripening show an increase on the water transverse relaxation time (T2) and a decrease in water self-diffusion coefficient (D). As T(2) and D are normally directly correlated, we studied these two properties in intact bananas during ripening, in an attempt to rule out the effect of injury on the apparent discrepancies in the behavior of T(2) and D. The results show that injury in bananas causes a decrease in T2 of the water in vacuoles (T(2vac)). They also show that T(2vac) increased and D decreased during ripening, ruling out the injury effect. To explain the apparent discrepancies, we propose a new hypothesis for the increase in T2 values, based on the reduction of Fe3+ ions to Fe2+ by galacturonic acid, produced by the hydrolysis of pectin and a decrease in internal oxygen concentration during ripening. As injury alters T2 values it is necessary to use intact bananas to study relaxation times during ripening. The novel interpretation for the increase in T(2vac) based on reduction of Fe+3 and O2 concentration is an alternative mechanism to that based on the hydrolysis of starch in amyloplasts. Copyright 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Nuclear microprobe - synchrotron synergy: towards integrated quantitative real-time elemental imaging using PIXE and SCRF.

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, C. G.; Etschmann, B. E.; Vogt, S.; Maser, J.; Harland, C. L.; van Achterbergh, E.; Legnini, D.; Experimental Facilities Division; CSIRO Exploration and Mining; Australian Synchrotron Research Program, ANSTO

    2005-01-01

    The Dynamic Analysis (DA) method, for the projection of quantitative elemental images using Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), has been extended for use with energy-dispersive Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence (SXRF) data collected with the X-ray microprobe by making use of similarities and synergy with nuclear microscopy. The broad element sensitivity of PIXE is complemented by the selective nature of SXRF, where the beam energy can be tuned to optimize the sensitivity in a portion of the periodic table. PIXE combined with Proton Induced {gamma}-ray Emission (PIGE) in this study provided images of geological samples of 25 elements, including characteristic X-rays up to the energy of the Nd K lines (37 keV). Maximum sensitivity was achieved for elements around Z {approx} 33 with detection limits of {approx}250 ppb (in 5 h). SXRF using a 16.1 keV photon microbeam provided images of 16 elements, with optimum sensitivity around Z {approx} 35 with detection limits of {approx}70 ppb (in 11 h), an improvement of {approx}2.4 times when corrected for acquisition time.

  4. Mars mission opportunity and transit time sensitivity for a nuclear thermal rocket propulsion application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Archie C.; Mulqueen, John A.; Nishimuta, Ena L.; Emrich, William J.

    1993-01-01

    President George Bush's 1989 challenge to America to support the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) of ``Back to the Moon and Human Mission to Mars'' gives the space industry an opportunity to develop effective and efficient space transportation systems. This paper presents stage performance and requirements for a nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) Mars transportation system to support the human Mars mission of the SEI. Two classes of Mars mission profiles are considered in developing the NTR propulsion vehicle performance and requirements. The two Mars mission classes include the opposition class and conjunction class. The opposition class mission is associated with relatively short Mars stay times ranging from 30 to 90 days and total mission duration of 350 to 600 days. The conjunction class mission is associated with much longer Mars stay times ranging from 500 to 600 days and total mission durations of 875 to 1,000 days. Vehicle mass scaling equations are used to determine the NTR stage mass, size, and performance range required for different Mars mission opportunities and for different Mars mission durations. Mission opportunities considered include launch years 2010 to 2018. The 2010 opportunity is the most demanding launch opportunity and the 2018 opportunity is the least demanding opportunity. NTR vehicle mass and size sensitivity to NTR engine thrust level, engine specific impulse, NTR engine thrust-to-weight ratio, and Mars surface payload are presented. NTR propulsion parameter ranges include those associated with NERVA, particle bed reactor (PBR), low-pressure, and ceramic-metal-type engine design.

  5. Time-of-Flight Mass Measurements for Nuclear Processes in Neutron Star Crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estradé, A.; Matoš, M.; Schatz, H.; Amthor, A. M.; Bazin, D.; Beard, M.; Becerril, A.; Brown, E. F.; Cyburt, R.; Elliot, T.; Gade, A.; Galaviz, D.; George, S.; Gupta, S. S.; Hix, W. R.; Lau, R.; Lorusso, G.; Möller, P.; Pereira, J.; Portillo, M.; Rogers, A. M.; Shapira, D.; Smith, E.; Stolz, A.; Wallace, M.; Wiescher, M.

    2011-10-01

    We present results from time-of-flight nuclear mass measurements at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory that are relevant for neutron star crust models. The masses of 16 neutron-rich nuclei in the scandium-nickel range were determined simultaneously, with the masses of V61, Cr63, Mn66, and Ni74 measured for the first time with mass excesses of -30.510(890)MeV, -35.280(650)MeV, -36.900(790)MeV, and -49.210(990)MeV, respectively. With these results the locations of the dominant electron capture heat sources in the outer crust of accreting neutron stars that exhibit super bursts are now experimentally constrained. We find the experimental Q value for the Fe66→Mn66 electron capture to be 2.1 MeV (2.6σ) smaller than predicted, resulting in the transition occurring significantly closer to the neutron star surface.

  6. Time-of-flight mass measurements for nuclear processes in neutron star crusts.

    PubMed

    Estradé, A; Matoš, M; Schatz, H; Amthor, A M; Bazin, D; Beard, M; Becerril, A; Brown, E F; Cyburt, R; Elliot, T; Gade, A; Galaviz, D; George, S; Gupta, S S; Hix, W R; Lau, R; Lorusso, G; Möller, P; Pereira, J; Portillo, M; Rogers, A M; Shapira, D; Smith, E; Stolz, A; Wallace, M; Wiescher, M

    2011-10-21

    We present results from time-of-flight nuclear mass measurements at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory that are relevant for neutron star crust models. The masses of 16 neutron-rich nuclei in the scandium-nickel range were determined simultaneously, with the masses of (61)V, (63)Cr, (66)Mn, and (74)Ni measured for the first time with mass excesses of -30.510(890) MeV, -35.280(650) MeV, -36.900(790) MeV, and -49.210(990) MeV, respectively. With these results the locations of the dominant electron capture heat sources in the outer crust of accreting neutron stars that exhibit super bursts are now experimentally constrained. We find the experimental Q value for the (66)Fe→(66)Mn electron capture to be 2.1 MeV (2.6σ) smaller than predicted, resulting in the transition occurring significantly closer to the neutron star surface. © 2011 American Physical Society

  7. Time-of-flight mass measurements for nuclear processes in neutron star crusts

    SciTech Connect

    Estrade, Alfredo; Matos, M.; Schatz, Hendrik; Amthor, A. M.; Bazin, D.; Beard, Mary; Becerril, A.; Brown, Edward; Elliot, T; Gade, A.; Galaviz, D.; George, S.; Gupta, Sanjib; Hix, William Raphael; Lau, Rita; Moeller, Peter; Pereira, J.; Portillo, M.; Rogers, A. M.; Shapira, Dan; Smith, E.; Stolz, A.; Wallace, M.; Wiescher, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The location of electron capture heat sources in the crust of accreting neutron stars depends on the masses of extremely neutron-rich nuclei. We present first results from a new implementation of the time-of-flight technique to measure nuclear masses of rare isotopes at the National Supercon- ducting Cyclotron Laboratory. The masses of 16 neutron-rich nuclei in the Sc Ni element range were determined simultaneously, improving the accuracy compared to previous data in 12 cases. The masses of 61V, 63Cr, 66Mn, and 74Ni were measured for the first time with mass excesses of 30.510(890) MeV, 35.280(650) MeV, 36.900(790) MeV, and 49.210(990) MeV, respectively. With the measurement of the 66Mn mass, the location of the two dominant heat sources in the outer crust of accreting neutron stars, which exhibit so called superbursts, is now experimentally constrained. We find that the location of the 66Fe 66Mn electron capture transition occurs sig- nificantly closer to the surface than previously assumed because our new experimental Q-value is 2.1 MeV smaller than predicted by the FRDM mass model. The results also provide new insights into the structure of neutron-rich nuclei around N = 40.

  8. Computer code for space-time diagnostics of nuclear safety parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Solovyev, D. A.; Semenov, A. A.; Gruzdov, F. V.; Druzhaev, A. A.; Shchukin, N. V.; Dolgenko, S. G.; Solovyeva, I. V.; Ovchinnikova, E. A.

    2012-07-01

    The computer code ECRAN 3D (Experimental and Calculation Reactor Analysis) is designed for continuous monitoring and diagnostics of reactor cores and databases for RBMK-1000 on the basis of analytical methods for the interrelation parameters of nuclear safety. The code algorithms are based on the analysis of deviations between the physically obtained figures and the results of neutron-physical and thermal-hydraulic calculations. Discrepancies between the measured and calculated signals are equivalent to obtaining inadequacy between performance of the physical device and its simulator. The diagnostics system can solve the following problems: identification of facts and time for inconsistent results, localization of failures, identification and quantification of the causes for inconsistencies. These problems can be effectively solved only when the computer code is working in a real-time mode. This leads to increasing requirements for a higher code performance. As false operations can lead to significant economic losses, the diagnostics system must be based on the certified software tools. POLARIS, version 4.2.1 is used for the neutron-physical calculation in the computer code ECRAN 3D. (authors)

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance and proton relaxation times in experimental heterotopic heart transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Eugene, M.; Lechat, P.; Hadjiisky, P.; Teillac, A.; Grosgogeat, Y.; Cabrol, C.

    1986-01-01

    It should be possible to detect heart transplant rejection by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging if it induces myocardial T1 and T2 proton relaxation time alterations or both. We studied 20 Lewis rats after a heterotopic heart transplantation. In vitro measurement of T1 and T2 was performed on a Minispec PC20 (Bruker) 3 to 9 days after transplantation. Histologic analysis allowed the quantification of rejection process based on cellular infiltration and myocardiolysis. Water content, a major determinant of relaxation time, was also studied. T1 and T2 were significantly prolonged in heterotopic vs orthotopic hearts (638 +/- 41 msec vs 606 +/- 22 msec for T1, p less than 0.01 and 58.2 +/- 8.4 msec vs 47.4 +/- 1.9 msec for T2, p less than 0.001). Water content was also increased in heterotopic hearts (76.4 +/- 2.3 vs 73.8 +/- 1.0, p less than 0.01). Most importantly, we found close correlations between T1 and especially T2 vs water content, cellular infiltration, and myocardiolysis. We conclude that rejection reaction should be noninvasively detected by NMR imaging, particularly with pulse sequences emphasizing T2.

  10. Rapid estimation of nuclear magnetic resonance experiment time in low-concentration environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Masoom, Hussain; Courtier-Murias, Denis; Farooq, Hashim; Soong, Ronald; Simpson, Myrna J; Maas, Werner; Kumar, Rajeev; Monette, Martine; Stronks, Henry; Simpson, André J

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is an essential tool for studying environmental samples but is often hindered by low sensitivity, especially for the direct detection of nuclei such as(13) C. In very heterogeneous samples with NMR nuclei at low abundance, such as soils, sediments, and air particulates, it can take days to acquire a conventional(13) C spectrum. The present study describes a prescreening method that permits the rapid prediction of experimental run time in natural samples. The approach focuses the NMR chemical shift dispersion into a single spike, and, even in samples with extremely low carbon content, the spike can be observed in two to three minutes, or less. The intensity of the spike is directly proportional to the total concentration of nuclei of interest in the sample. Consequently, the spike intensity can be used as a powerful prescreening method that answers two key questions: (1) Will this sample produce a conventional NMR spectrum? (2) How much instrument time is required to record a spectrum with a specific signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio? The approach identifies samples to avoid (or pretreat) and permits additional NMR experiments to be performed on samples producing high-quality NMR data. Applications in solid- and liquid-state(13) C NMR are demonstrated, and it is shown that the technique is applicable to a range of nuclei.

  11. Mars mission opportunity and transit time sensitivity for a nuclear thermal rocket propulsion application

    SciTech Connect

    Young, A.C.; Mulqueen, J.A.; Nishimuta, E.L.; Emrich, W.J. )

    1993-01-10

    President George Bush's 1989 challenge to America to support the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) of Back to the Moon and Human Mission to Mars'' gives the space industry an opportunity to develop effective and efficient space transportation systems. This paper presents stage performance and requirements for a nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) Mars transportation system to support the human Mars mission of the SEI. Two classes of Mars mission profiles are considered in developing the NTR propulsion vehicle performance and requirements. The two Mars mission classes include the opposition class and conjunction class. The opposition class mission is associated with relatively short Mars stay times ranging from 30 to 90 days and total mission duration of 350 to 600 days. The conjunction class mission is associated with much longer Mars stay times ranging from 500 to 600 days and total mission durations of 875 to 1,000 days. Vehicle mass scaling equations are used to determine the NTR stage mass, size, and performance range required for different Mars mission opportunities and for different Mars mission durations. Mission opportunities considered include launch years 2010 to 2018. The 2010 opportunity is the most demanding launch opportunity and the 2018 opportunity is the least demanding opportunity. NTR vehicle mass and size sensitivity to NTR engine thrust level, engine specific impulse, NTR engine thrust-to-weight ratio, and Mars surface payload are presented. NTR propulsion parameter ranges include those associated with NERVA, particle bed reactor (PBR), low-pressure, and ceramic-metal-type engine design.

  12. Passive containment cooling water distribution device

    DOEpatents

    Conway, Lawrence E.; Fanto, Susan V.

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using a series of radial guide elements and cascading weir boxes to collect and then distribute the cooling water into a series of distribution areas through a plurality of cascading weirs. The cooling water is then uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weir notches in the face plate of the weir box.

  13. Gas-cooled reactor power systems for space

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper the characteristics of six designs for power levels of 2, 10, and 20 MWe for operating times of 1 and 7 y are described. The operating conditions for these arbitrary designs were chosen to minimize system specific mass. The designs are based on recent work which benefits from earlier analyses of nuclear space power systems conducted at our Laboratory. Both gas- and liquid-cooled reactors had been considered. Pitts and Walter (1970) reported on the results of a detailed study of a 10-MWe lithium-cooled reactor in a potassium Rankine system. Unpublished results (1966) of a computer analysis provide details of an argon-cooled reactor in an argon Brayton system. The gas-cooled reactor design was based on extensive development work on the 500-MWth reactor for the nuclear ramjet (Pluto) as described by Walter (1964). The designs discussed here draw heavily on the Pluto project experience, which culminated in a successful full-power ground test as reported by Reynolds (1964). At higher power levels gas-cooled reactors coupled with Brayton systems with advanced radiator designs become attractive.

  14. ELECTRON COOLING FOR RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI,I.

    2001-05-13

    The Accelerator Collider Department (CAD) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is operating the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), which includes the dual-ring, 3.834 km circumference superconducting collider and the venerable AGS as the last part of the RHIC injection chain. CAD is planning on a luminosity upgrade of the machine under the designation RHIC II. One important component of the RHIC II upgrade is electron cooling of RHIC gold ion beams. For this purpose, BNL and the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics in Novosibirsk entered into a collaboration aimed initially at the development of the electron cooling conceptual design, resolution of technical issues, and finally extend the collaboration towards the construction and commissioning of the cooler. Many of the results presented in this paper are derived from the Electron Cooling for RHIC Design Report [1], produced by the, BINP team within the framework of this collaboration. BNL is also collaborating with Fermi National Laboratory, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and the University of Indiana on various aspects of electron cooling.

  15. Sodium supplementation has no effect on endurance performance during a cycling time-trial in cool conditions: a randomised cross-over trial.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, Samuel David; Black, Katherine Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Sodium ingestion during exercise may exert beneficial effects on endurance performance by either its ability to attenuate the decrease in plasma volume or reduce the risk of Exercise Associated Hyponatremia (EAH). This study aimed to investigate the effect of sodium supplements on endurance performance during a 72 km road cycling time-trial in cool conditions (13.8 ± 2.0°C). Nine well-trained cyclists (5 male, 4 female) participated in this randomized, double-blinded cross-over study, receiving either a 700 mg(.)h(-1) salt capsule, or a corn flour placebo during the time trial. Water was ingested ad-libitum throughout the time trial. Measurements were taken pre, post, and 40 min following time-trials, analysing blood, sweat, and urinary hydration and sodium concentration. Sodium supplements had no effect on time-trial performance (overall time = 171 min sodium vs. 172 min placebo; p = 0.46). There was also no effect on the change in plasma sodium concentration from pre to post time trial between trials (relative plasma [Na(+)] change (pre-post): sodium = 0.56%, placebo = 0.47%; p = 0.60). The greatest difference observed was a significantly change in plasma volume from pre to post exercise between the salt and the placebo trial (p = 0.02), which corresponded with an increased thirst with sodium supplementation. Sodium supplements therefore do not improving performance during exercise of approximately 3 h duration in cool conditions.

  16. High-Fidelity Space-Time Adaptive Multiphysics Simulations in Nuclear Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Solin, Pavel; Ragusa, Jean

    2014-03-09

    We delivered a series of fundamentally new computational technologies that have the potential to significantly advance the state-of-the-art of computer simulations of transient multiphysics nuclear reactor processes. These methods were implemented in the form of a C++ library, and applied to a number of multiphysics coupled problems relevant to nuclear reactor simulations.

  17. Cooling vest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmo, J.; Kane, J.; Coverdale, J.

    1977-01-01

    Inexpensive vest of heat-sealable urethane material, when strapped to person's body, presents significant uncomplicated cooling system for environments where heavy accumulation of metabolic heat exists. Garment is applicable to occupations where physical exertion is required under heavy protective clothing.

  18. Cool Andromeda

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-01-28

    In this new view of the Andromeda, also known as M31, galaxy from the Herschel space observatory, cool lanes of forming stars are revealed in the finest detail yet. M31 is the nearest major galaxy to our own Milky Way at a distance of 2.5 million light-ye

  19. Completely automated nuclear reactors for long-term operation II: toward a conceptual-level point design of a high-temperature, gas-cooled central power station system

    SciTech Connect

    Teller, E.; Ishikawa, M.; Wood, L.; Hyde, R.; Nuckolls, J.

    1996-06-01

    We discuss a new type of nuclear fission power reactor optimized for the generation of heat for use in obviously safe, economic, and long- duration electricity production in large central power stations. These reactors are fundamentally different in design, implementation, and operation from conventional light-water-cooled and- moderated reactors (LWRs) currently in widespread use. they feature a low- average-enrichment initial fuel loading which lasts the entire 30 year, full-power design life of the power plant, and which is intended never to be removed from the reactor. The reactor contains a cylindrical core comprised of a nuclear ignitor and a much larger nuclear [breeding + burning] wave propagating region containing natural thorium or uranium fuel, a surrounding neutron reflector and radiation shield, distributed means for implementing a thermostating function on the reactivity and local power density, a redundant pressurized gas coolant transport system, and automatic and redundant heat dumping means to obviate concerns regarding all classes of loss-of-coolant accidents during the plants operational and post operational life. These reactors are proposed to be situated at {>=}100 meter depths underground. There operation will be completely automatic, with no powered mechanisms, no operator controls and no provision for human access during or after their operational lifetime, in order to avoid both error and misuse. The power plant`s heat engine and electrical generator sub-systems are located above ground and are connected to the nuclear heat source only with readily sealed coolant conduits. This paper outlines a concept level point design of a 1 GWe member of this type of reactor, one oriented to production of high temperature, high pressure coolant gas and directed towards 60% efficiency, combined-cycle electricity generation.

  20. AIR COOLED NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Szilard, L.

    1958-05-27

    A nuclear reactor of the air-cooled, graphite moderated type is described. The active core consists of a cubicle mass of graphite, approximately 25 feet in each dimension, having horizontal channels of square cross section extending between two of the opposite faces, a plurality of cylindrical uranium slugs disposed in end to end abutting relationship within said channels providing a space in the channels through which air may be circulated, and a cadmium control rod extending within a channel provided in the moderator. Suitable shielding is provlded around the core, as are also provided a fuel element loading and discharge means, and a means to circulate air through the coolant channels through the fuel charels to cool the reactor.

  1. Time-dependent models of accretion discs with nuclear burning following the tidal disruption of a white dwarf by a neutron star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margalit, Ben; Metzger, Brian D.

    2016-09-01

    We construct time-dependent one-dimensional (vertically averaged) models of accretion discs produced by the tidal disruption of a white dwarf (WD) by a binary neutron star (NS) companion. Nuclear reactions in the disc mid-plane burn the WD matter to increasingly heavier elements at sequentially smaller radii, releasing substantial energy which can impact the disc dynamics. A model for disc outflows is employed, by which cooling from the outflow balances other sources of heating (viscous, nuclear) in regulating the Bernoulli parameter of the mid-plane to a fixed value ≲0. We perform a comprehensive parameter study of the compositional yields and velocity distributions of the disc outflows for WDs of different initial compositions. For C/O WDs, the radial composition profile of the disc evolves self-similarly in a quasi-steady-state manner, and is remarkably robust to model parameters. The nucleosynthesis in helium WD discs does not exhibit this behaviour, which instead depends sensitively on factors controlling the disc mid-plane density (e.g. the strength of the viscosity, α). By the end of the simulation, a substantial fraction of the WD mass is unbound in outflows at characteristic velocities of ˜109 cm s-1. The outflows from WD-NS merger discs contain 10-4-3 × 10-3 M⊙ of radioactive 56Ni, resulting in fast (˜ week long) dim (˜1040 erg s-1) optical transients; shock heating of the ejecta by late-time outflows may increase the peak luminosity to ˜1043 erg s-1. The accreted mass on to the NS is probably not sufficient to induce gravitational collapse, but may be capable of spinning up the NS to periods of ˜10 ms, illustrating the feasibility of this channel in forming isolated millisecond pulsars.

  2. A Low-Cost, Real-Time Network for Radiological Monitoring Around Nuclear Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bertoldo, N A

    2004-08-13

    A low-cost, real-time radiological sensor network for emergency response has been developed and deployed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Real-Time Radiological Area Monitoring (RTRAM) network is comprised of 16 Geiger-Mueller (GM) sensors positioned on the site perimeter to continuously monitor radiological conditions as part of LLNL's comprehensive environment/safety/health protection program. The RTRAM network sensor locations coincide with wind sector directions to provide thorough coverage of the one square mile site. These low-power sensors transmit measurement data back to a central command center (CCC) computer through the LLNL telecommunications infrastructure. Alarm conditions are identified by comparing current data to predetermined threshold parameters and are validated by comparison with plausible dispersion modeling scenarios and prevailing meteorological conditions. Emergency response personnel are notified of alarm conditions by automatic radio- and computer- based notifications. A secure intranet provides emergency response personnel with current condition assessment data that enable them to direct field response efforts remotely. This system provides a low-cost real-time radiation monitoring solution that is easily converted to incorporate both a hard-wired interior perimeter with strategically positioned wireless secondary and tertiary concentric remote locations. These wireless stations would be configured with solar voltaic panels that provide current to recharge batteries and power the sensors and radio transceivers. These platforms would supply data transmission at a range of up to 95 km from a single transceiver location. As necessary, using radio transceivers in repeater mode can extend the transmission range. The RTRAM network as it is presently configured at LLNL has proven to be a reliable system since initial deployment in August 2001 and maintains stability during inclement weather conditions. With the proposed

  3. Nanofluidity of fatty acid hydrocarbon chains as monitored by benchtop time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Michelle D; Cistola, David P

    2014-12-09

    The functional properties of lipid-rich assemblies such as serum lipoproteins, cell membranes, and intracellular lipid droplets are modulated by the fluidity of the hydrocarbon chain environment. Existing methods for monitoring hydrocarbon chain fluidity include fluorescence, electron spin resonance, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy; each possesses advantages and limitations. Here we introduce a new approach based on benchtop time-domain (1)H NMR relaxometry (TD-NMR). Unlike conventional NMR spectroscopy, TD-NMR does not rely on the chemical shift resolution made possible by homogeneous, high-field magnets and Fourier transforms. Rather, it focuses on a multiexponential analysis of the time decay signal. In this study, we investigated a series of single-phase fatty acid oils, which allowed us to correlate (1)H spin-spin relaxation time constants (T2) with experimental measures of sample fluidity, as obtained using a viscometer. Remarkably, benchtop TD-NMR at 40 MHz was able to resolve two to four T2 components in biologically relevant fatty acids, assigned to nanometer-scale domains in different segments of the hydrocarbon chain. The T2 values for each domain were exquisitely sensitive to hydrocarbon chain structure; the largest values were observed for pure fatty acids or mixtures with the highest cis-double bond content. Moreover, the T2 values for each domain exhibited positive linear correlations with fluidity. The TD-NMR T2 and fluidity measurements appear to be monitoring the same underlying phenomenon: variations in hydrocarbon chain packing. The results from this study validate the use of benchtop TD-NMR T2 as a nanofluidity meter and demonstrate its potential for probing nanofluidity in other systems of biological interest.

  4. Cross-relaxation mechanism for the formation of nuclear polarization: a quantitative time-resolved CIDNP study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozova, O. B.; Tsentalovich, Yu. P.; Yurkovskaya, A. V.; Sagdeev, R. Z.

    1995-12-01

    The kinetics of the nuclear polarization formed during the photolysis of acetone in isopropanol- d8 were analyzed quantitatively. Model calculations show that the spin-selective recombination of radicals gives rise to the electron polarization and, with regard to the electron-nuclear cross-relaxation, are adequate to describe the formation of the net nuclear polarization of the reaction products even if the solution contains only one type of radical. For the 2-hydroxy-2-propyl radicals at a magnetic field of 7 T, fitting the theoretical results to the experimental data gives the electron relaxation time T1e = 1.0 ± 0.2 μs and the cross-relaxation time Tx = 92 ± 18 μs.

  5. Field cage development for a time-projection chamber to constrain the nuclear symmetry energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estee, J.; Barney, J.; Chajecki, Z.; Famiano, M.; Dunn, J.; Lu, F.; Lynch, W. G.; McIntosh, A. B.; Isobe, T.; Murakami, T.; Sakurai, H.; Shane, R.; Taketani, A.; Tangwancharoen, S.; Tsang, M. B.; Yennello, S.

    2012-10-01

    The SAMURAI time-projection chamber (sTPC) is being developed for use in the dipole magnet of the newly-commissioned SAMURAI spectrometer at the RIBF facility in Japan. The main scientific objective of the sTPC is to provide constraints on the nuclear symmetry energy at supra-saturation densities. The TPC allows for tracking and identification of light charged particles such as pions, protons, tritons and ^3He. The sTPC must have a Cartesian geometry to match the symmetry of the dipole magnet. The walls of the field cage (FC) detector volume consist of sections of rigid, two-layer circuit boards. Inside and outside copper strips form decreasing equipotentials via a resistor chain, and create a uniform electric field with a maximum of 400 V/cm. The FC volume is hermetically sealed from the enclosure volume to create an insulation volume which can be filled with dry N2 to inhibit corona discharge. I will be presenting the current status of the design and assembly of the sTPC field cage.

  6. Advanced characterisation of encapsulated lipid powders regarding microstructure by time domain-nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Linke, Annika; Anzmann, Theresa; Weiss, Jochen; Kohlus, Reinhard

    2017-03-15

    Encapsulation is an established technique to protect sensitive materials from environmental stress. In order to understand the physical protection mechanism against oxidation, knowledge about the powder microstructure is required. Time domain-nuclear magnetic resonance (TD-NMR) has the potential to determine the surface oil (SO) and droplet size distribution by relaxation and restricted self-diffusion, respectively. The amount of SO, the retention and encapsulation efficiency are determined based on a lipid balance. The oil load of the initial powder and after SO removal is measured by TD-NMR. The results correlate with gravimetric and photometric references. The oil droplet size obtained by TD-NMR correlates well with static light scattering. The diameter of droplets in emulsions and dried powder both measured by TD-NMR, correlates (r = 0.998), implying that oil droplets embedded in a solid matrix can be measured. Summarising, TD-NMR allows analysis of the microstructure of encapsulated lipid powders, in a rapid, simple and non-destructive way.

  7. 7Li relaxation time measurements at very low magnetic field by 1H dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeghib, Nadir; Grucker, Daniel

    2001-09-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of water protons was used to measure the relaxation time of lithium at very low magnetic field as a demonstration of the use of DNP for nuclei less abundant than water protons. Lithium (Li+) was chosen because it is an efficient treatment for manic-depressive illness, with an unknown action mechanism. After having recalled the theoretical basis of a three-spin system comprising two nuclei - the water proton of the solvent, the dissolved Li+ ion and the free electron of a free radical - we have developed a transient solution in order to optimize potential biological applications of Li DNP. The three-spin model has allowed computation of all the parameters of the system - the longitudinal relaxation rate per unit of free radical concentration, the dipolar and scalar part of the coupling between the nuclei and the electron, and the maximum signal enhancement achievable for both proton and lithium spins. All these measurements have been obtained solely through the detection of the proton resonance.

  8. Separation of Joule Heating and Peltier Cooling via Time-Resolved X-Ray Di?raction in Si/SiGe Superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozina, Michael; Fuchs, Matthias; Chen, Jian; Jiang, Mason; Chen, Pice; Evans, Paul; Vermeersch, Bjorn; Bahk, Je-Hyeong; Shakouri, Ali; Brewe, Dale; Reis, David

    2012-02-01

    We present detailed measurements of the thermal pro?le in a pulsed current SiGe-based thermoelectric micro-cooler. The evolution of heat ?ow in thermoelectric materials has been previously studied using time-domain thermore?ectance imaging; however, such methods are typically only sensitive to the surface temperature of the device, and the heat ?ow into the material remains hidden. Using time-resolved x-ray di?raction, we probe the transient temperature change in both the surface gold electrode and the underlying Si/SiGe superlattice using the shift in diffraction pattern caused by thermal expansion. We are also able to resolve Joule heating vs. Peltier cooling taking place in the gold through separation of timescales made possible by the relatively short duration (100ps) of the Advanced Photon Source.

  9. Methods of beam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1996-02-01

    Diverse methods which are available for particle beam cooling are reviewed. They consist of some highly developed techniques such as radiation damping, electron cooling, stochastic cooling and the more recently developed, laser cooling. Methods which have been theoretically developed, but not yet achieved experimentally, are also reviewed. They consist of ionization cooling, laser cooling in three dimensions and stimulated radiation cooling.

  10. Cool Flame Quenching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Howard; Chapek, Richard

    2001-01-01

    Cool flame quenching distances are generally presumed to be larger than those associated with hot flames, because the quenching distance scales with the inverse of the flame propagation speed, and cool flame propagation speeds are often times slower than those associated with hot flames. To date, this presumption has never been put to a rigorous test, because unstirred, non-isothermal cool flame studies on Earth are complicated by natural convection. Moreover, the critical Peclet number (Pe) for quenching of cool flames has never been established and may not be the same as that associated with wall quenching due to conduction heat loss in hot flames, Pe approx. = 40-60. The objectives of this ground-based study are to: (1) better understand the role of conduction heat loss and species diffusion on cool flame quenching (i.e., Lewis number effects), (2) determine cool flame quenching distances (i.e, critical Peclet number, Pe) for different experimental parameters and vessel surface pretreatments, and (3) understand the mechanisms that govern the quenching distances in premixtures that support cool flames as well as hot flames induced by spark-ignition. Objective (3) poses a unique fire safety hazard if conditions exist where cool flame quenching distances are smaller than those associated with hot flames. For example, a significant, yet unexplored risk, can occur if a multi-stage ignition (a cool flame that transitions to a hot flame) occurs in a vessel size that is smaller than that associated with the hot quenching distance. To accomplish the above objectives, a variety of hydrocarbon-air mixtures will be tested in a static reactor at elevated temperature in the laboratory (1g). In addition, reactions with chemical induction times that are sufficiently short will be tested aboard NASA's KC-135 microgravity (mu-g) aircraft. The mu-g results will be compared to a numerical model that includes species diffusion, heat conduction, and a skeletal kinetic mechanism

  11. Analysis of the transient response of nuclear spins in GaAs with/without nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Rasly, Mahmoud; Lin, Zhichao; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Uemura, Tetsuya

    2016-05-15

    As an alternative to studying the steady-state responses of nuclear spins in solid state systems, working within a transient-state framework can reveal interesting phenomena. The response of nuclear spins in GaAs to a changing magnetic field was analyzed based on the time evolution of nuclear spin temperature. Simulation results well reproduced our experimental results for the transient oblique Hanle signals observed in an all-electrical spin injection device. The analysis showed that the so called dynamic nuclear polarization can be treated as a cooling tool for the nuclear spins: It works as a provider to exchange spin angular momentum between polarized electron spins and nuclear spins through the hyperfine interaction, leading to an increase in the nuclear polarization. In addition, a time-delay of the nuclear spin temperature with a fast sweep of the external magnetic field produces a possible transient state for the nuclear spin polarization. On the other hand, the nuclear magnetic resonance acts as a heating tool for a nuclear spin system. This causes the nuclear spin temperature to jump to infinity: i.e., the average nuclear spins along with the nuclear field vanish at resonant fields of {sup 75}As, {sup 69}Ga and {sup 71}Ga, showing an interesting step-dip structure in the oblique Hanle signals. These analyses provide a quantitative understanding of nuclear spin dynamics in semiconductors for application in future computation processing.

  12. Bunch beam cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryzgunov, M. I.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Li, J.; Mao, L. J.; Parkhomchuk, V. V.; Reva, V. B.; Yang, X. D.; Zhao, H.

    2017-07-01

    Electron cooling is used for damping both transverse and longitudinal oscillations of heavy particle. The cooling of bunch ion beam (with RF voltage on) is important part of experiments with inner target, ion collision system, stacking and RF manipulation. The short length of an ion bunch increases the peak luminosity, gives a start-time point for using of the time-of-flight methods and obtains a short extraction beam pulse. This article describes the review of last experiments with electron cooling carried out on the CSRm, CSRe (China) and COSY (Germany) storage rings. The accumulated experience may be used for the project of electron cooler on 2.5 MeV (NICA) and 0.5 MeV HIAF for obtaining high luminosity, depressing beam-beam effects and RF manipulation.

  13. Cool Sportswear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    New athletic wear design based on the circulating liquid cooling system used in the astronaut's space suits, allows athletes to perform more strenuous activity without becoming overheated. Techni-Clothes gear incorporates packets containing a heat-absorbing gel that slips into an insulated pocket of the athletic garment and is positioned near parts of the body where heat transfer is most efficient. A gel packet is good for about one hour. Easily replaced from a supply of spares in an insulated container worn on the belt. The products, targeted primarily for runners and joggers and any other athlete whose performance may be affected by hot weather, include cooling headbands, wrist bands and running shorts with gel-pack pockets.

  14. Cooling technique

    DOEpatents

    Salamon, Todd R; Vyas, Brijesh; Kota, Krishna; Simon, Elina

    2017-01-31

    An apparatus and a method are provided. Use is made of a wick structure configured to receive a liquid and generate vapor in when such wick structure is heated by heat transferred from heat sources to be cooled off. A vapor channel is provided configured to receive the vapor generated and direct said vapor away from the wick structure. In some embodiments, heat conductors are used to transfer the heat from the heat sources to the liquid in the wick structure.

  15. Improved and safer nuclear power.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J J

    1989-04-21

    Recent progress in advanced nuclear power development in the United States is revealing high potential for nuclear reactor systems that are smaller and easier to operate than the present generation. Passive, or intrinsic, characteristics are applied not only to provide inherent stability of the chain reaction but also to ensure continued cooling of the fuel and its containment systems even if a major breakdown of the normal cooling and control functions were to occur. The chance of a severe accident is thereby substantially reduced. The plant designs that are emerging are simpler and more rugged, have a longer life span, and place less burden on equipment and operating personnel. Modular design concepts and design standardization are also used to reduce construction time and engineering costs, giving promise that the cost of generating power from these systems will be competitive with alternative methods.

  16. Surface cooling due to forest fire smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robock, Alan

    1991-11-01

    In four different cases of extensive forest fire smoke the surface temperature effects were determined under the smoke cloud. In all cases, daytime cooling and no nighttime effects were found. The locations of smoke clouds from extensive forest fires in western Canada in 1981 and 1982, in northern China and Siberia in 1987, and in Yellowstone National Park in northwestern Wyoming in 1988 were determined from satellite imagery. As these smoke clouds passed over the midwestern United States for the Canadian and Yellow-stone fires and over Alaska for the Chinese/Siberian fires, surface air temperature effects were determined by comparing actual surface air temperatures with those forecast by model output statistics (MOS) of the United States National Weather Service. MOS error fields corresponding to the smoke cloud locations showed day-time cooling of 1.5° to 7°C under the smoke but no nighttime effects. These results correspond to theoretical estimates of the effects of smoke, and they serve as observational confirmation of a portion of the nuclear winter theory. This also implies that smoke from biomass burning can have a daytime cooling effect of a few degrees over seasonal time scales. In order to properly simulate the present climate with a numerical climate model in regions of regular burning it may be necessary to include this smoke effect.

  17. Nuclear Power - Post Fukushima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Jose, Jr.

    2011-10-01

    The extreme events that led to the prolonged power outage at the Fukushima Daiicchi nuclear plant have highlighted the importance of assuring a means for stable long term cooling of the nuclear fuel and containment following a complete station blackout. Legislative bodies, regulatory agencies and industry are drawing lessons from those events and considering what changes, if any, are needed to nuclear power, post Fukushima. The enhanced safety of a new class of reactor designed by NuScale Power is drawing significant attention in light of the Fukushima events. During normal operation, each NuScale containment is fully immersed in a water-filled stainless steel lined concrete pool that resides underground. The pool, housed in a Seismic Category I building, is large enough to provided 30 days of core and containment cooling without adding water. After 30 days, the decay heat generations coupled with thermal radiation heat transfer is completely adequate to remove core decay heat for an unlimited period of time. These passive power systems can perform their function without requiring an external supply of water of power. An assessment of the NuScale passive systems is being performed through a comprehensive test program that includes the NuScale integral system test facility at Oregon State University

  18. Three-dimensional dose evaluation system using real-time wind field information for nuclear accidents in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jay; Lu, Chung-Hsin; Chang, Shu-Jun; Yang, Yung-Muh; Chang, Bor-Jing; Teng, Jen-Hsin

    2006-09-01

    In Taiwan, the three operating nuclear power plants are all built along the coast over complex terrain. Dose estimates after a nuclear accident with releases of radioactive materials, therefore, cannot be accurately calculated using simple dispersion models. We developed a three-dimensional dose evaluation system, which incorporates real-time prognostic wind field information with three-dimensional numerical models to predict dose results. The proposed system consists of three models: a three-dimensional mesoscale atmospheric model (HOTMAC), a three-dimensional transport and diffusion model (RAPTAD), and a dose calculation model (DOSE). The whole-body dose and thyroid dose as well as dose rates can be rapidly estimated and displayed on the three-dimensional terrain model constructed by satellite images. The developed three-dimensional dose evaluation system could accurately forecast the dose results and has been used in the annual nuclear emergency response exercise to provide suggestions for protective measures.

  19. Digitized pressure-time records, selected nuclear events. Technical report, 1 September 1982-1 April 1986

    SciTech Connect

    McMullan, F.W.; Bryant, E.J.

    1986-04-30

    Pressure-time records are presented for selected atmospheric nuclear events. The records were extracted from published test reports, digitized, and given uniform pressure-time scales for a given event and a given range to permit easier comparison. Data include p-t, q-t, p(tot)-t, Mach No-t, and Impulse-t as appropriate. Selected data were scaled to 1 kT.

  20. Understanding generalized inversions of nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, J.; Chandrasekera, T. C.

    2014-12-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time T2, measured using the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiment, is a powerful method for obtaining unique information on liquids confined in porous media. Furthermore, T2 provides structural information on the porous material itself and has many applications in petrophysics, biophysics, and chemical engineering. Robust interpretation of T2 distributions demands appropriate processing of the measured data since T2 is influenced by diffusion through magnetic field inhomogeneities occurring at the pore scale, caused by the liquid/solid susceptibility contrast. Previously, we introduced a generic model for the diffusion exponent of the form -ant_e^k (where n is the number and te the temporal separation of spin echoes, and a is a composite diffusion parameter) in order to distinguish the influence of relaxation and diffusion in CPMG data. Here, we improve the analysis by introducing an automatic search for the optimum power k that best describes the diffusion behavior. This automated method is more efficient than the manual trial-and-error grid search adopted previously, and avoids variability through subjective judgments of experimentalists. Although our method does not avoid the inherent assumption that the diffusion exponent depends on a single k value, we show through simulation and experiment that it is robust in measurements of heterogeneous systems that violate this assumption. In this way, we obtain quantitative T2 distributions from complicated porous structures and demonstrate the analysis with examples of ceramics used for filtration and catalysis, and limestone of relevance to the construction and petroleum industries.

  1. Understanding generalized inversions of nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.; Chandrasekera, T. C.

    2014-12-14

    The nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation time T{sub 2}, measured using the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiment, is a powerful method for obtaining unique information on liquids confined in porous media. Furthermore, T{sub 2} provides structural information on the porous material itself and has many applications in petrophysics, biophysics, and chemical engineering. Robust interpretation of T{sub 2} distributions demands appropriate processing of the measured data since T{sub 2} is influenced by diffusion through magnetic field inhomogeneities occurring at the pore scale, caused by the liquid/solid susceptibility contrast. Previously, we introduced a generic model for the diffusion exponent of the form −ant{sub e}{sup k} (where n is the number and t{sub e} the temporal separation of spin echoes, and a is a composite diffusion parameter) in order to distinguish the influence of relaxation and diffusion in CPMG data. Here, we improve the analysis by introducing an automatic search for the optimum power k that best describes the diffusion behavior. This automated method is more efficient than the manual trial-and-error grid search adopted previously, and avoids variability through subjective judgments of experimentalists. Although our method does not avoid the inherent assumption that the diffusion exponent depends on a single k value, we show through simulation and experiment that it is robust in measurements of heterogeneous systems that violate this assumption. In this way, we obtain quantitative T{sub 2} distributions from complicated porous structures and demonstrate the analysis with examples of ceramics used for filtration and catalysis, and limestone of relevance to the construction and petroleum industries.

  2. Nuclear Rocket Technology Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    The Lewis Research Center has a strong interest in nuclear rocket propulsion and provides active support of the graphite reactor program in such nonnuclear areas as cryogenics, two-phase flow, propellant heating, fluid systems, heat transfer, nozzle cooling, nozzle design, pumps, turbines, and startup and control problems. A parallel effort has also been expended to evaluate the engineering feasibility of a nuclear rocket reactor using tungsten-matrix fuel elements and water as the moderator. Both of these efforts have resulted in significant contributions to nuclear rocket technology. Many successful static firings of nuclear rockets have been made with graphite-core reactors. Sufficient information has also been accumulated to permit a reasonable Judgment as to the feasibility of the tungsten water-moderated reactor concept. We therefore consider that this technoIogy conference on the nuclear rocket work that has been sponsored by the Lewis Research Center is timely. The conference has been prepared by NASA personnel, but the information presented includes substantial contributions from both NASA and AEC contractors. The conference excludes from consideration the many possible mission requirements for nuclear rockets. Also excluded is the direct comparison of nuclear rocket types with each other or with other modes of propulsion. The graphite reactor support work presented on the first day of the conference was partly inspired through a close cooperative effort between the Cleveland extension of the Space Nuclear Propulsion Office (headed by Robert W. Schroeder) and the Lewis Research Center. Much of this effort was supervised by Mr. John C. Sanders, chairman for the first day of the conference, and by Mr. Hugh M. Henneberry. The tungsten water-moderated reactor concept was initiated at Lewis by Mr. Frank E. Rom and his coworkers. The supervision of the recent engineering studies has been shared by Mr. Samuel J. Kaufman, chairman for the second day of the

  3. A high-performance matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometer with collisional cooling.

    PubMed

    Loboda, A V; Ackloo, S; Chernushevich, I V

    2003-01-01

    A high-performance orthogonal time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer was developed specifically for use in combination with a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) source. The MALDI source features an ionization region containing a buffer gas with variable pressure. The source is interfaced to the TOF section via a collisional focusing ion guide. The pressure in the source influences the rate of cooling and allows control of ion fragmentation. The instrument provides uniform resolution up to 18,000 FWHM (full width at half maximum). Mass accuracy routinely achieved with a single-point internal recalibration is below 2 ppm for protein digest samples. The instrument is also capable of recording spectra of samples containing compounds with a broad range of masses while using one set of experimental conditions and without compromising resolution or mass accuracy.

  4. Boar spermatozoa and prostaglandin F2alpha. Quality of boar sperm after the addition of prostaglandin F2alpha to the short-term extender over cooling time.

    PubMed

    Yeste, M; Briz, M; Pinart, E; Sancho, S; Garcia-Gil, N; Badia, E; Bassols, J; Pruneda, A; Bussalleu, E; Casas, I; Bonet, S

    2008-10-01

    Prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2alpha) has been used to improve reproductive performance in swine. The goal of the present work was to determine how the addition of PGF2alpha affects boar sperm quality. Eleven different treatments were evaluated: eight with only PGF2alpha (0.625, 1.25, 2.50, 5, 10, 12.50, 25 and 50mg PGF2alpha/100ml) and three binary treatments (0.625mg PGF2alpha/100ml+200microg/ml hyaluronic acid (HA), 1.25mg PGF2alpha/100ml+200microg/ml HA, 0.625mg PGF2alpha/100ml+7.5microM caffeine (Caf)). All these substances were added to 16 ejaculates from 16 healthy and sexually mature boars (n=16), and each ejaculate was considered as a replicate. Our study also assessed the effects of these 11 treatments over different periods of preservation. Sperm quality was tested immediately after the addition of treatments (time 0), and after 1, 3, 6 and 10 days of cooling at 15 degrees C. To evaluate sperm quality, five parameters were analysed: (1) sperm viability, acrosome and mitochondrial sheath integrity (using a multiple fluorochrome-staining test), (2) sperm motility, (3) sperm morphology and (4) agglutination (using a computer assisted system) and (5) osmotic resistance (using the ORT). Parametric (analysis of variance for repeated measures) and non-parametric tests (Friedman test) were used as statistical analyses. Treatments with PGF2alpha concentrations higher than 12.5mg/100ml were cytotoxic while the others did not damage boar spermatozoa. Thus, the other treatments may be used to produce profitable effects without adverse effects. Moreover, the addition of PGF2alpha at 5mg/100ml to sperm diluted in BTS may maintain sperm viability and motility better after 6 days of cooling, because significant differences were observed (P<0.05) compared with control at the same time.

  5. Designing Cool Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A NASA SBIR contract served as the beginning for the development of Daat Research Corporation's Coolit software. Coolit is a unique computational fluid dynamics (CFD) application aimed at thermal and cooling design problems. Coolit can generate 3-D representations of the thermofluid environment and "sketch" the component on the computer. The software modeling reduces time and effort in prototype building and testing.

  6. Elementary stochastic cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Tollestrup, A.V.; Dugan, G

    1983-12-01

    Major headings in this review include: proton sources; antiproton production; antiproton sources and Liouville, the role of the Debuncher; transverse stochastic cooling, time domain; the accumulator; frequency domain; pickups and kickers; Fokker-Planck equation; calculation of constants in the Fokker-Planck equation; and beam feedback. (GHT)

  7. Anomalous law of cooling.

    PubMed

    Lapas, Luciano C; Ferreira, Rogelma M S; Rubí, J Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A

    2015-03-14

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  8. Anomalous law of cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Rubí, J. Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2015-03-01

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  9. Cyclic cooling algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Rempp, Florian; Mahler, Guenter; Michel, Mathias

    2007-09-15

    We introduce a scheme to perform the cooling algorithm, first presented by Boykin et al. in 2002, for an arbitrary number of times on the same set of qbits. We achieve this goal by adding an additional SWAP gate and a bath contact to the algorithm. This way one qbit may repeatedly be cooled without adding additional qbits to the system. By using a product Liouville space to model the bath contact we calculate the density matrix of the system after a given number of applications of the algorithm.

  10. Anomalous law of cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Rubí, J. Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2015-03-14

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton’s law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  11. A time-correlation function approach to nuclear dynamical effects in X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karsten, Sven; Bokarev, Sergey I.; Aziz, Saadullah G.; Ivanov, Sergei D.; Kühn, Oliver

    2017-06-01

    Modern X-ray spectroscopy has proven itself as a robust tool for probing the electronic structure of atoms in complex environments. Despite working on energy scales that are much larger than those corresponding to nuclear motions, taking nuclear dynamics and the associated nuclear correlations into account may be of importance for X-ray spectroscopy. Recently, we have developed an efficient protocol to account for nuclear dynamics in X-ray absorption and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectra [Karsten et al., J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 8, 992 (2017)], based on ground state molecular dynamics accompanied with state-of-the-art calculations of electronic excitation energies and transition dipoles. Here, we present an alternative derivation of the formalism and elaborate on the developed simulation protocol using gas phase and bulk water as examples. The specific spectroscopic features stemming from the nuclear motions are analyzed and traced down to the dynamics of electronic energy gaps and transition dipole correlation functions. The observed tendencies are explained on the basis of a simple harmonic model, and the involved approximations are discussed. The method represents a step forward over the conventional approaches that treat the system in full complexity and provides a reasonable starting point for further improvements.

  12. A domain-specific analysis system for examining nuclear reactor simulation data for light-water and sodium-cooled fast reactors

    DOE PAGES

    Billings, Jay Jay; Deyton, Jordan H.; Forest Hull, S.; ...

    2015-07-17

    Building new fission reactors in the United States presents many technical and regulatory challenges. Chief among the technical challenges is the need to share and present results from new high- fidelity, high- performance simulations in an easily consumable way. In light of the modern multi-scale, multi-physics simulations can generate petabytes of data, this will require the development of new techniques and methods to reduce the data to familiar quantities of interest with a more reasonable resolution and size. Furthermore, some of the results from these simulations may be new quantities for which visualization and analysis techniques are not immediately availablemore » in the community and need to be developed. Our paper describes a new system for managing high-performance simulation results in a domain-specific way that naturally exposes quantities of interest for light water and sodium-cooled fast reactors. It enables easy qualitative and quantitative comparisons between simulation results with a graphical user interface and cross-platform, multi-language input- output libraries for use by developers to work with the data. One example comparing results from two different simulation suites for a single assembly in a light-water reactor is presented along with a detailed discussion of the system s requirements and design.« less

  13. Newton's Law of Cooling Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, M.

    2009-01-01

    The cooling of objects is often described by a law, attributed to Newton, which states that the temperature difference of a cooling body with respect to the surroundings decreases exponentially with time. Such behaviour has been observed for many laboratory experiments, which led to a wide acceptance of this approach. However, the heat transfer…

  14. Newton's Law of Cooling Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, M.

    2009-01-01

    The cooling of objects is often described by a law, attributed to Newton, which states that the temperature difference of a cooling body with respect to the surroundings decreases exponentially with time. Such behaviour has been observed for many laboratory experiments, which led to a wide acceptance of this approach. However, the heat transfer…

  15. Triatomic molecules laser-cooled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2017-06-01

    Molecules containing three atoms have been laser-cooled to ultracold temperatures for the first time. John Doyle and colleagues at Harvard University in the US used a technique called Sisyphus cooling to chill an ensemble of about a million strontium-monohydroxide molecules to 750 μK.

  16. On a distinctive feature of problems of calculating time-average characteristics of nuclear reactor optimal control sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonenkov, A. V.; Trifonenkov, V. P.

    2017-01-01

    This article deals with a feature of problems of calculating time-average characteristics of nuclear reactor optimal control sets. The operation of a nuclear reactor during threatened period is considered. The optimal control search problem is analysed. The xenon poisoning causes limitations on the variety of statements of the problem of calculating time-average characteristics of a set of optimal reactor power off controls. The level of xenon poisoning is limited. There is a problem of choosing an appropriate segment of the time axis to ensure that optimal control problem is consistent. Two procedures of estimation of the duration of this segment are considered. Two estimations as functions of the xenon limitation were plot. Boundaries of the interval of averaging are defined more precisely.

  17. Cooling device

    SciTech Connect

    Teske, L.

    1984-02-21

    A cooling device is claimed for coal dust comprising a housing, a motor-driven conveyor system therein to transport the coal dust over coolable trays in the housing and conveyor-wheel arms of spiral curvature for moving the coal dust from one or more inlets to one or more outlets via a series of communicating passages in the trays over which the conveyor-wheel arms pass under actuation of a hydraulic motor mounted above the housing and driving a vertical shaft, to which the conveyor-wheel arms are attached, extending centrally downwardly through the housing.

  18. [Ecological and radio-ecological effects from long-term use of the lake Kyzyl-Tash as a cooling reservoir by the nuclear fuel cycle facility].

    PubMed

    Smagin, A I

    2010-01-01

    This review introduces long-term study findings on ecological and radiation induced regime of the water reservoir - lake Kyzyl-Tash (R-2) - used as a heat sink of nuclear-power reactors in the Southern Urals from 1948 through 2008. It was exhibited that water reservoir exploitation by the nuclear fuel cycle facility "Mayak" PA resulted in hydrological, thermal, hydrochemical and radiological ecosystem regimes changes. The central radioactive substances depot in the water reservoir was determined to be the upper 20-30 cm bed silt layers, contamination density of which in 1980-1990s amounted on average approximately 0.2 PBq/km2 (about 5 kKu/km2). Some regularities of radionuclide distribution in bed sediments and biota were ascertained. Dose estimates from ionizing exposure to fish inhabited the water reservoir were experimentally made. Dose contribution was mainly due to incorporated beta-emitters amounted up to 2-3 Gy/y in 1980s. The leading role in the reservoir life belonged to phytoplankton with its algal nuisance periodicity constituting 5-6 years for blue-green and diatomic algae, and 2-3 years for green algae. During periods of the highest development pressure phytoplankton productive capacity in the reservoir was by an order of magnitude greater compared to control water reservoirs of the region. Combined long-term impact of radiological and chemical factors did not cause irreversible changes either in fish populations or ecological system in general. It can be proved by the fact that during 1970-1980s the water reservoir R-2 was inhabited by such cleanness indicators as crawfish (Astacus leptodactylus) and shellfish (Anodonta cygnea L.). On reducing of thermal and chemical pressure in the end of 1980s some processes observed gave evidence of ecosystem restoration in the lake Kyzyl-Tash. At the present moment the situation of the water reservoir exploiting as a heat sink is stabilized with preserved self-cleaning capacity.

  19. Safety Investigation of Liquid-Metal-Cooled Nuclear Systems with Heat Exchanger in the Risers of Simple Flow-Path Pool Design

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsson, Johan; Wider, Hartmut U.

    2005-12-15

    Safety investigations were performed on 600- and 1426-MW(thermal) liquid-metal-cooled reactors with the heat exchangers (HXs) located in the risers of simple flow-path pool designs. This includes both critical reactors and accelerator-driven systems (ADSs) using liquid-metal coolants. For the 600-MW(thermal) ADS, the safety implications were examined for vessel sizes of two heights (11 and 15 m) and two diameters (6 and 10 m). Then, the reference design of 11-m height and 6-m diameter was compared with a similar design, but with the HXs located in the downcomers. The transients investigated were total-loss-of-power (TLOP), unprotected-loss-of-flow (ULOF), protected-loss-of-flow, and unprotected loss-of-heat-sink accidents. The 600-MW(thermal) ADS of 11-m height and 6-m diameter peaks at 1041 K after 29 h during a TLOP accident. If the diameter is increased to 10 m, it will peak after 55 h at a 178 K lower temperature thanks to its larger thermal inertia. The difference between locating the HXs in the risers and the downcomers is insignificant for this accident type. With the HXs in the risers, the temperature peaks at 1045 K after 28 h. During a ULOF accident in an ADS at full power, the core outlet temperature stabilizes at 1010 K, which is 337 K above the nominal outlet temperature. When the vessel height is increased to 15 m, the natural convection is improved, and the core outlet temperature stabilizes at 911 K. A Pb-cooled 1426-MW(thermal) reactor of 11-m height and 12-m diameter is also shown to be sufficiently coolable during a TLOP accident; i.e., it peaks at 1093 K after 49 h. In a pool-type design with a simple flow path, the use of HXs in the risers and flaps at their inlets that prevent a flow reversal will have significant safety advantages in case of HX tube failures. Steam or gas bubbles exiting from the secondary circuit cannot be dragged into the core region by the liquid-metal coolant. Instead, they would rise with the coolant and exit through the

  20. Safe and Effective Deactivation of Metallic Sodium Filled Scrap and Cold Traps From Sodium-cooled Nuclear Reactor D and D - 12176

    SciTech Connect

    Nester, Dean; Crocker, Ben; Smart, Bill

    2012-07-01

    As part of the Plateau Remediation Project at US Department of Energy's Hanford, Washington site, CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) contracted with IMPACT Services, LLC to receive and deactivate approximately 28 cubic meters of sodium metal contaminated debris from two sodium-cooled research reactors (Enrico Fermi Unit 1 and the Fast Flux Test Facility) which had been stored at Hanford for over 25 years. CHPRC found an off-site team composed of IMPACT Services and Commodore Advanced Sciences, Inc., with the facilities and technological capabilities to safely and effectively perform deactivation of this sodium metal contaminated debris. IMPACT Services provided the licensed fixed facility and the logistical support required to receive, store, and manage the waste materials before treatment, and the characterization, manifesting, and return shipping of the cleaned material after treatment. They also provided a recycle outlet for the liquid sodium hydroxide byproduct resulting from removal of the sodium from reactor parts. Commodore Advanced Sciences, Inc. mobilized their patented AMANDA unit to the IMPACT Services site and operated the unit to perform the sodium removal process. Approximately 816 Kg of metallic sodium were removed and converted to sodium hydroxide, and the project was accomplished in 107 days, from receipt of the first shipment at the IMPACT Services facility to the last outgoing shipment of deactivated scrap metal. There were no safety incidents of any kind during the performance of this project. The AMANDA process has been demonstrated in this project to be both safe and effective for deactivation of sodium and NaK. It has also been used in other venues to treat other highly reactive alkali metals, such as lithium (Li), potassium (K), NaK and Cesium (Cs). (authors)