Science.gov

Sample records for cooling towers application

  1. Cooling tower and plume modeling for satellite remote sensing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, B.J.

    1995-05-01

    It is often useful in nonproliferation studies to be able to remotely estimate the power generated by a power plant. Such information is indirectly available through an examination of the power dissipated by the plant. Power dissipation is generally accomplished either by transferring the excess heat generated into the atmosphere or into bodies of water. It is the former method with which we are exclusively concerned in this report. We discuss in this report the difficulties associated with such a task. In particular, we primarily address the remote detection of the temperature associated with the condensed water plume emitted from the cooling tower. We find that the effective emissivity of the plume is of fundamental importance for this task. Having examined the dependence of the plume emissivity in several IR bands and with varying liquid water content and droplet size distributions, we conclude that the plume emissivity, and consequently the plume brightness temperature, is dependent upon not only the liquid water content and band, but also upon the droplet size distribution. Finally, we discuss models dependent upon a detailed point-by-point description of the hydrodynamics and thermodynamics of the plume dynamics and those based upon spatially integrated models. We describe in detail a new integral model, the LANL Plume Model, which accounts for the evolution of the droplet size distribution. Some typical results obtained from this model are discussed.

  2. The nominal cooling tower

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, R.

    1995-12-31

    The heat Rejection Industry defines a nominal cooling tower as circulating three gallons of water per minute (GPM) per ton of refrigeration from entering the tower at 95{degrees}F. Hot Water temperature (HWT) Leaving at 85{degrees}F Cold Water Temperature (CWT) at a Design Wet Bulb of 70{degrees}F (WBT). Manufacturers then provide a selection chart based on various wet bulb temperatures and HWTs. The wet bulb fluctuates and varies through out the world since it is the combination ambient temperature, relative humidity, and/or dew point. Different HWT and CWT requirements are usually charted as they change, so that the user can select the nominal cooling tower model recommended by the manufacturer. Ask any HVAC operator, refinery manager, power generating station operator what happens when the Wet Bulb reaches or exceeds the design WBT of the area. He probably will tell you, {open_quotes}My cooling tower works quite well, but in the summer time, I usually have trouble with it.{close_quotes} This occurs because he is operating a nominal cooling tower.

  3. PBF Cooling Tower. Hot deck of Cooling Tower with fan ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF Cooling Tower. Hot deck of Cooling Tower with fan motors in place. Fan's propeller blades (not in view) rotate within lower portion of vents. Inlet pipe is a left of view. Contractor's construction buildings in view to right. Photographer: Larry Page. Date: June 30, 1969. INEEL negative no. 69-3781 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  4. Ozonation of cooling tower waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrey, M. F.; French, K. R.; Howe, R. D. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Continuous ozone injection into water circulating between a cooling tower and heat exchanger with heavy scale deposits inhibits formation of further deposits, promotes flaking of existing deposits, inhibits chemical corrosion and controls algae and bacteria.

  5. Technical Evaluation of Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers

    SciTech Connect

    2012-10-01

    Cooling towers are an integral component of many refrigeration systems, providing comfort or process cooling across a broad range of applications. Cooling towers represent the point in a cooling system where heat is dissipated to the atmosphere through evaporation. Cooling towers are commonly used in industrial applications and in large commercial buildings to release waste heat extracted from a process or building system through evaporation of water.

  6. Common misconceptions about cooling towers

    SciTech Connect

    Willa, J.L.; Campbell, J.C.

    1983-12-01

    This article discusses the design and performance of the water cooling tower. In many cases the numbers presented in a cooling tower inquiry for thermal performance design represent a more stringent condition than that found in the operation of the unit. A common misconception is to take the service factor or safety factor in the cold water temperature or the wet bulb temperature. Service factors are used in the preparation of specifications for most industrial equipment. Standards specify a minimum service factor of 2.0 for cooling tower right angle spiral bevel gears. Closing the approach (cold water temperature minus wet bulb temperature) does not vary linearly with increasing difficulty of duty for the cooling tower, and consequently does not represent a straight-line increase in size or cost. A decrease in the specified approach is equivalent to a decrease in the driving force available for the transfer of mass and heat from the water to the air stream. A decrease in approach from 20 to 19/sup 0/F would result in an increase in cost of about 5%, while a decrease from 5 to 4/sup 0/F would require about 20% more cooling tower.

  7. Film fill for power plant cooling towers

    SciTech Connect

    Mirsky, G.R. ); Monjoie, M. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on film fill, which is the use of flat or formed sheets to provide a surface upon which liquid and air come in contact with each other to affect the exchange of heat. The only other fill options available to a cooling tower designer is the use of splash fill or combinations whereby heat exchange occurs on the surface of water droplets, or both. As film fill allows the designer the opportunity to build a more compact, cost effective, energy efficient cooling tower; this type of fill material is receiving ever increasing acceptance and finding it way into more and more cooling tower applications. film fill is used to both counterflow and crossflow cooling towers, from small air conditioning applications to large natural draft towers serving 1300 to 1500 M.W. power plants around the world. It is being used in applications using unfiltered water high in suspended solids, high concentrations of dissolved salts, water carrying fibers, silt, mud, treated and untreated waste effluent, scale etc. These situations are caused by users who are: trying to reduce water make-up, using untreated or unfiltered water, or trying to save on the cost of chemical treatment.

  8. 75 FR 63802 - Action Affecting Export Privileges; Parto Abgardan Cooling Towers Co.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ... Bureau of Industry and Security Action Affecting Export Privileges; Parto Abgardan Cooling Towers Co. Parto Abgardan Cooling Towers Co., P.O. Box 966, Folsom, CA 95763; and P.O. Box 19395/5478, Tehran, Iran... Cooling Towers, Co. Applicable to Parto Abgardan Cooling Towers Co. Pursuant to Section 766.23 of...

  9. Ozone Treatment For Cooling Towers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwelder, Rick; Baldwin, Leroy V.; Feeney, Ellen S.

    1990-01-01

    Report presents results of study of cooling tower in which water treated with ozone instead of usual chemical agents. Bacteria and scale reduced without pollution and at low cost. Operating and maintenance costs with treatment about 30 percent of those of treatment by other chemicals. Corrosion rates no greater than with other chemicals. Advantage of ozone, even though poisonous, quickly detected by smell in very low concentrations.

  10. Cooling tower water conditioning study. [using ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrey, M. F.; French, K. R.

    1979-01-01

    Successful elimination of cooling tower treatment chemicals was demonstrated. Three towers functioned for long periods of time with ozone as the only treatment for the water. The water in the systems was reused as much as 30 times (cycles of concentration) without deleterious effects to the heat exchangers. Actual system blow-down was eliminated and the only makeup water added was that required to replace the evaporation and mist entrainment losses. Minimum water savings alone are approximately 75.1 1/kg/year. Cost estimates indicate that a savings of 55 percent was obtained on the systems using ozone. A major problem experienced in the use of ozone for cooling tower applications was the difficulty of accurate concentration measurements. The ability to control the operational characteristics relies on easily and accurately determined concentration levels. Present methods of detection are subject to inaccuracies because of interfering materials and the rapid destruction of the ozone.

  11. Plant Vogtle cooling tower studies

    SciTech Connect

    O'Steen, L.

    2000-01-26

    Intensive ground-based field studies of plumes from two large, natural-draft cooling towers were conducted in support of the MTI modeling effort. Panchromatic imagery, IR imagery, meteorological data, internal tower temperatures and plant power data were collected during the field studies. These data were used to evaluate plume simulations, plume radioactive transfer calculations and plume volume estimation algorithms used for power estimation. Results from six field studies indicate that a 3-D atmospheric model at sufficient spatial resolution can effectively simulate a cooling tower plume if the plume is of sufficient size and the ambient meteorology is known and steady. Small plumes and gusty wind conditions degrade the agreement between the simulated and observed plumes. Thermal radiance calculations based on the simulated plumes produced maximum IR temperatures (near tower exit) which were in good agreement with measured IR temperatures for the larger plumes. For the smaller plumes, the calculated IR temperature was lower than the measured temperature by several degrees. Variations in maximum IR plume temperature with decreasing power (one reactor was undergoing a shutdown process), were clearly observed in the IR imagery and seen in the simulations. These temperature changes agreed with those calculated from an overall tower energy and momentum balance. Plume volume estimates based on camcorder images at three look angles were typically 20--30 percent larger than the plume volumes derived from the simulations, although one estimate was twice the simulated volume. Volume overestimation is expected and will have to be accounted for to some degree if plume volume is to be a useful diagnostic quantity in power estimation. Volume estimation with MTI imagery will require a large, stable plume and two looks in the visible bands (5m GSD) along with a solar shadow.

  12. 2004 Savannah River Cooling Tower Collection (U)

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, Alfred; Parker, Matthew J.; Villa-Aleman, E.

    2005-05-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) collected ground truth in and around the Savannah River Site (SRS) F-Area cooling tower during the spring and summer of 2004. The ground truth data consisted of air temperatures and humidity inside and around the cooling tower, wind speed and direction, cooling water temperatures entering; inside adn leaving the cooling tower, cooling tower fan exhaust velocities and thermal images taken from helicopters. The F-Area cooling tower had six cells, some of which were operated with fans off during long periods of the collection. The operating status (fan on or off) for each of the six cells was derived from operations logbooks and added to the collection database. SRNL collected the F-Area cooling tower data to produce a database suitable for validation of a cooling tower model used by one of SRNL's customer agencies. SRNL considers the data to be accurate enough for use in a model validation effort. Also, the thermal images of the cooling tower decks and throats combined with the temperature measurements inside the tower provide valuable information about the appearance of cooling towers as a function of fan operating status and time of day.

  13. Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers

    SciTech Connect

    2012-10-20

    This technology evaluation assesses side stream filtration options for cooling towers, with an objective to assess key attributes that optimize energy and water savings along with providing information on specific technology and implementation options. This information can be used to assist Federal sites to determine which options may be most appropriate for their applications. This evaluation provides an overview of the characterization of side stream filtration technology, describes typical applications, and details specific types of filtration technology.

  14. Reinforced concrete corrosion: Application of Bayesian networks to the risk management of a cooling tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capra, B.; Le Drogo, J.; Wolff, V.

    2006-11-01

    Degradation modelling of concrete structures uses uncertain variables and leads, using reliability assessment, to time dependant evolution of failure probabilities. However, only few data are generally available to feed models leading to two types of uncertainties: an intrinsic one depending on the modelled phenomena and one related to the precision of the measurement. Each new data available is a piece of information which allows to update the initial prediction. In this article, an example of updating process, based on a Bayesian network, is presented and applied on the corrosion risk of a cooling tower.

  15. The Damaging Effects of Earthquake Excitation on Concrete Cooling Towers

    SciTech Connect

    Abedi-Nik, Farhad; Sabouri-Ghomi, Saeid

    2008-07-08

    Reinforced concrete cooling towers of hyperbolic shell configuration find widespread application in utilities engaged in the production of electric power. In design of critical civil infrastructure of this type, it is imperative to consider all the possible loading conditions that the cooling tower may experience, an important loading condition in many countries is that of the earthquake excitation, whose influence on the integrity and stability of cooling towers is profound. Previous researches have shown that the columns supporting a cooling tower are sensitive to earthquake forces, as they are heavily loaded elements that do not possess high ductility, and understanding the behavior of columns under earthquake excitation is vital in structural design because they provide the load path for the self weight of the tower shell. This paper presents the results of a finite element investigation of a representative 'dry' cooling tower, using realistic horizontal and vertical acceleration data obtained from the recent and widely-reported Tabas, Naghan and Bam earthquakes in Iran. The results of both linear and nonlinear analyses are reported in the paper, the locations of plastic hinges within the supporting columns are identified and the ramifications of the plastic hinges on the stability of the cooling tower are assessed. It is concluded that for the (typical) cooling tower configuration analyzed, the columns that are instrumental in providing a load path are influenced greatly by earthquake loading, and for the earthquake data used in this study the representative cooling tower would be rendered unstable and would collapse under the earthquake forces considered.

  16. COOLING TOWER PUMP HOUSE, TRA606. CONNECTION TO COOLING TOWER. PUMPHOUSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    COOLING TOWER PUMP HOUSE, TRA-606. CONNECTION TO COOLING TOWER. PUMP-HOUSE FLOOR PLAN AND FOUNDATION PLANS. LAYOUT OF SIX COOLING TOWER UNITS. BLAW-KNOX 3150-807-2, 12/1950. INL INDEX NO. 53-0607-62-098-100671, REV. 1. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. Solar tower enhanced natural draft dry cooling tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huiqiang; Xu, Yan; Acosta-Iborra, Alberto; Santana, Domingo

    2017-06-01

    Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) plants are located in desert areas where the Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) value is very high. Since water resource is scarcely available, mechanical draft cooing technology is commonly used, with power consumption of mechanical fans being approximately 2% of the total power generated. Today, there is only one solar power plant (Khi Solar One in South Africa) uses a condenser installed in a Natural Draft Cooling (NDC) tower that avoids the windage loss of water occurring in wet cooling towers. Although, Khi Solar One is a cavity receiver power tower, the receivers can be hung onto the NDC tower. This paper looks at a novel integration of a NDC tower into an external molten salt receiver of a solar power plant, which is one of a largest commercial molten salt tower in China, with 100MWe power capacity. In this configuration study, the NDC tower surrounds the concrete tower of the receiver concentrically. In this way, the receiver concrete tower is the central support of the NDC tower, which consists of cable networks that are fixed to the concrete tower and suspended at a certain height over the floor. The cable networks support the shell of the NDC tower. To perform a preliminary analysis of the behavior of this novel configuration, two cases of numerical simulation in three dimensional (3D) models have been solved using the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code, ANSYS Fluent 6.3. The results show that the integration of the NDC tower into an external central receiver tower is feasible. Additionally, the total heat transfer rate is not reduced but slightly increases when the molten salt receiver is in operation because of the additional natural draft induced by the high temperature of the receiver.

  18. Ozone inhibits corrosion in cooling towers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, K. R.; Howe, R. D.; Humphrey, M. F.

    1980-01-01

    Commercially available corona discharge ozone generator, fitted onto industrial cooling tower, significantly reduces formation of scales (calcium carbonate) and corrosion. System also controls growth of algae and other microorganisms. Modification lowers cost and improves life of cooling system.

  19. Application of a semi-spectral cloud water parameterization to cooling tower plumes simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzereau, Emmanuel; Musson Genon, Luc; Carissimo, Bertrand

    2008-10-01

    In order to simulate the plume produced by large natural draft cooling towers, a semi-spectral warm cloud parameterization has been implemented in an anelastic and non-hydrostatic 3D micro-scale meteorological code. The model results are compared to observations from a detailed field experiment carried out in 1980 at Bugey (location of an electrical nuclear power plant in the Rhône valley in East Central France) including airborne dynamical and microphysical measurements. Although we observe a slight overestimation of the liquid-water content, the results are satisfactory for all the 15 different cases simulated, which include different meteorological conditions ranging from low wind speed and convective conditions in clear sky to high wind and very cloudy. Such parameterization, which includes semi-spectral determination for droplet spectra, seems to be promising to describe plume interaction with atmosphere especially for aerosols and cloud droplets.

  20. Vortex-augmented cooling tower - windmill combination

    DOEpatents

    McAllister, J.E. Jr.

    1982-09-02

    A cooling tower for cooling large quantities of effluent water from a production facility by utilizing natural wind forces includes the use of a series of helically directed air inlet passages extending outwardly from the base of the tower to introduce air from any direction in a swirling vortical pattern while the force of the draft created in the tower makes it possible to place conventional power generating windmills in the air passage to provide power as a by-product.

  1. Applicability of a ``shower`` passive cooling tower in a hot dry climate

    SciTech Connect

    Givoni, B.; Al-Hemiddi, N.

    1995-11-01

    This cooling system has originally been developed by Givoni for cooling outdoor rest areas for the EXPO`92 in Seville, Spain. However, it can also be applied, and has been tested, as a cooling system for building and enclosed and shaded courtyards. It consists of an open shaft with showers at the top and a collecting ``pond`` at the bottom. Water is recirculated by a pump. The falling water entrain a large volume of air, creating a flow of cooled air down the shaft and into a building. A wind catcher can be installed above the shaft to enhance the air flow rate. The paper presents data on the performance of the system, tested by Al Hemiddi, including experimental data obtained first in a ``patio`` test cell at UCLA in Los Angeles, and later in a full size room in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The testing in Riyadh has demonstrated that with outdoor air maximum temperature of about 45 C the indoor air maximum of the cooled room was bout 29 C. This system can use brackish and sea water, in addition to fresh water. Thus it is applicable and capable of providing indoor comfort even in very hot desert regions, where any kind of water, even sea water, is available.

  2. Alternative water treatment for cooling towers

    SciTech Connect

    Wilsey, C.A.

    1997-04-01

    Problems commonly found in cooling towers include: calcium scale formation, corrosion, algae and bacterial growth. These problems can inhibit a cooling tower from operating at its most efficient capacity. An energy-saving, cost-efficient method to control each of these problems in tower water will ultimately benefit the owner as well as the environment. Supplemental ionic water purification was developed to overcome the disadvantages associates with a total chemical disinfection system. The concept of supplemental ionic water purification was developed in the early 1900s and later reviewed by NASA in the mid-1960`s. Only in the past seven years have biologists combined copper ions with chlorine to act as a bactericide. The findings have shown that metal compound ions (copper), when absorbed by bacteria, affect the organisms enzyme balance. This combination inhibits the organism`s reproduction and respiration capabilities. This technology has been applied to cooling tower operations as an alternative to a chemical-only regimen.

  3. Minimizing solids buildup in cooling towers

    SciTech Connect

    Barzuza, I.

    1995-10-01

    The quality of water passing through a cooling tower affects its operation and performance as a heat exchanger. Since evaporative cooling is usually the primary mode of operation, any dirt or solid impurity in the water tends to become concentrated in the closed-cycle tower as the water is evaporated. To reduce the buildup of impurities and thus minimize fouling, the cooling tower is periodically or continuously discharged or blown down and fresh makeup water added. An effective technique used to further minimize dirt load is to install a filter on a side stream of the tower. But it is often difficult to prove any cost justification for a particular type of filtration equipment. Presented below is an algorithm to calculate the changes in solids load in a cooling tower after the installation of a filtration system of known performance. This calculation constitutes the first step toward full-fledged economic evaluation of a filter`s cost-effectiveness. Furthermore, a method is introduced to operate self-cleaning strainers installed on the side stream of a cooling tower. The method increases the removal efficiency of particles smaller than the mesh size of the filter cake.

  4. Wet/dry cooling tower and method

    DOEpatents

    Glicksman, Leon R.; Rohsenow, Warren R.

    1981-01-01

    A wet/dry cooling tower wherein a liquid to-be-cooled is flowed along channels of a corrugated open surface or the like, which surface is swept by cooling air. The amount of the surface covered by the liquid is kept small compared to the dry part thereof so that said dry part acts as a fin for the wet part for heat dissipation.

  5. Update: Cooling tower and spray pond technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bartz, J.A.

    1995-05-01

    The 9th Cooling Tower and Spray Pond Symposium, under the auspices of the International Association for Hydraulic Research, took place at the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Belgium, in September 1994. Technical topics discussed included cooling system design, performance, operation, environmental effects, modeling and components. Symposium proceedings will not be published. However, information of primary interest to staffs of power plants in the United States is summarized in this article.

  6. Activation of a new cooling tower facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lansford, W.D.

    1986-01-01

    The activation of a completely new facility presents problems not found in modifications or additions to existing systems. Known baselines of previous operations provide some guidelines as to what is causing a particular problem. However, when a totally new, complex facility initially becomes operational, unfamiliar instrumentation, mechanical equipment, and unknown system idiosyncrasies, require careful analysis of each event to determine whether one is observing a symptom of pending disaster or a minor isolated occurrence of some subsystem. Careful planning and progressive introduction of related systems must be initiated, introducing operating personnel into the chain of events as early as possible. Personnel responsible for operation and maintenance should participate in the review of initial concepts and designs, to provide input based on systems experience. The cooling tower system described in this paper has gained recognition for dependability and consistency of operations since initially becoming operational. Instead of a once weekly activity, as originally anticipated, test units are now requesting cooling tower support for all test operations. During one five-month period, a total of 660 cooling tower operating hours were logged with one test support period of 78 non-stop hours recorded. The use of the cooling tower beyond original expectations is a compliment without comparison.

  7. 50. NORTHERN VIEW OF NONEVAPORATIVE WASTE WATER TREATMENT COOLING TOWERS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. NORTHERN VIEW OF NON-EVAPORATIVE WASTE WATER TREATMENT COOLING TOWERS IN CENTER, AND EVAPORATIVE WASTE WATER COOLING TOWERS ON RIGHT. (Jet Lowe) - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  8. North and west sides of the cooling tower, utility building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North and west sides of the cooling tower, utility building (building 2606) is in the background at right - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Cooling Tower, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  9. View from southwest to northeast of cooling towers for perimeter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View from southwest to northeast of cooling towers for perimeter acquisition radar building and PAR power plant - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Cooling Tower, In Limited Access Area, between Service Roads D & A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  10. PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF MECHANICAL DRAFT COOLING TOWER

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Alfred Garrett, A; James02 Bollinger, J; Larry Koffman, L

    2009-02-10

    Industrial processes use mechanical draft cooling towers (MDCT's) to dissipate waste heat by transferring heat from water to air via evaporative cooling, which causes air humidification. The Savannah River Site (SRS) has cross-flow and counter-current MDCT's consisting of four independent compartments called cells. Each cell has its own fan to help maximize heat transfer between ambient air and circulated water. The primary objective of the work is to simulate the cooling tower performance for the counter-current cooling tower and to conduct a parametric study under different fan speeds and ambient air conditions. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model and performed the benchmarking analysis against the integral measurement results to accomplish the objective. The model uses three-dimensional steady-state momentum, continuity equations, air-vapor species balance equation, and two-equation turbulence as the basic governing equations. It was assumed that vapor phase is always transported by the continuous air phase with no slip velocity. In this case, water droplet component was considered as discrete phase for the interfacial heat and mass transfer via Lagrangian approach. Thus, the air-vapor mixture model with discrete water droplet phase is used for the analysis. A series of parametric calculations was performed to investigate the impact of wind speeds and ambient conditions on the thermal performance of the cooling tower when fans were operating and when they were turned off. The model was also benchmarked against the literature data and the SRS integral test results for key parameters such as air temperature and humidity at the tower exit and water temperature for given ambient conditions. Detailed results will be published here.

  11. 40 CFR 63.1329 - Process contact cooling towers provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Process contact cooling towers... Process contact cooling towers provisions. (a) The owner or operator of each new affected source that... end finisher process that utilizes a process contact cooling tower shall comply with paragraph (c)...

  12. Repair and completion of damaged cooling tower

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, P.L. . Dept. of Civil Engineering); Guedelhoefer, O.C. )

    1989-03-01

    This paper reports on a large hyperbolic cooling tower, under construction and nearly completed, struck by a falling tower crane during a tornado. Damage occurred at the upper edge where a V-shaped notch was gouged. Also, considerable cracking beneath the notch was observed. The extent of the damage was documented by precision survey techniques and visual inspection. A comprehensive analytical study was performed to insure that the completed tower would meet the design criteria. The repair plan involved repairing the cracks, sawing back the notch in a step fashion, refurbishing the scaffolding, rebuilding the gouged region, and then carrying the construction to completion. Also, two circumferential stiffening rings were added to the shell.

  13. Legionella spp. in Puerto Rico cooling towers.

    PubMed Central

    Negrón-Alvíra, A; Pérez-Suarez, I; Hazen, T C

    1988-01-01

    Water samples from air conditioning cooling towers receiving different treatment protocols on five large municipal buildings in San Juan, P.R., were assayed for various Legionella spp. and serogroups by using direct immunofluorescence. Several water quality parameters were also measured for each sample. Guinea pigs were inoculated with water samples to confirm pathogenicity and recover viable organisms. Legionella pneumophila serogroups 1 to 6, L. bozemanii, L. micdadei, L. dumoffii, and L. gormanii were observed in at least one of the cooling towers. L. pneumophila was the most abundant species; its density reached 10(5) cells per ml, which is within the range that is considered potentially pathogenic to humans. A significantly higher density of L. pneumophila was observed in the cooling tower water that was not being treated with biocides. Percent respiration (INT) and total cell activity (acridine orange direct count) were inversely correlated with bacterial density. This study demonstrates that Legionella spp. are present in tropical air-conditioning cooling systems and that, without continuous biocide treatment, they may reach densities that present a health risk. PMID:3202625

  14. Legionella in Puerto Rico cooling towers

    SciTech Connect

    Negron-Alviro, A.; Perez-Suarez, I.; Hazen, T.C.

    1988-12-31

    Water samples from air conditioning cooling towers receiving different treatment protocols on five large municipal buildings in San Juan, Puerto Rico were assayed for various species and serogroups of Legionella spp. using direct immunofluorescence. Several water quality parameters were also measured with each sample. Guinea pigs were inoculated with water samples to confirm pathogenicity and recover viable organisms. Legionella pneumophila (1-6), L. bozemanii, L. micdadei, L. dumoffii, and L. gormanii were observed in at least one of the cooling towers. L. pneumophila was the most abundant species, reaching 10{sup 5} cells/ml, within the range that is considered potentially pathogenic to humans. A significantly higher density of L. pneumophila was observed in the cooling tower water that was not being treated with biocides. Percent respiration (INT) and total cell activity (AODC), were inversely correlated with bacterial density. This study demonstrates that Legionella spp. are present in tropical air-conditioning cooling systems, and without continuous biocide treatment may reach densities that present a health risk.

  15. Aspects of cooling tower biocides and protozoa

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, S.G.; Ashburn, R.J.; Ting, R.S.

    1998-12-31

    Previous work has shown that certain cooling tower amoebae and ciliated protozoa are resistant to several cooling tower biocides, even at the manufacturer`s recommended dosages. For the present study, an Acunthumoeba species was isolated from a cooling tower in Australia. Suspensions of the trophozoites (feeding stages) were exposed to isothiazolones. Cysts were tested separately. The minimum lethal concentration (MLC) for trophozoites was between 31-62 ppm of the biocide product, which is slightly less than the MLC for an amoebae species from the United States; and cyst forms were twofold more resistant than those of the US species, with a MLC of 62,500 ppm. A ciliate and an amoeba species were also exposed to bromochlorodimethylhydantoin. The MLC for the ciliate species was 1 ppm of the biocide product, and the MLC was 30--40 ppm for the amoeba trophozoites. Since amoebae can expel vesicles containing live Legionella, experiments were conducted to determine whether exposure of Acunthamoebu polyphugu to biocides influenced release of such potentially infectious particles. Vesicle release was not inhibited by any of the three biocides: quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs), isothiazolones, and a thiocarbamate compound. These results suggest that amoebae from various sources are resistant to recommended levels of biocides, and the amoebae may continue to release potentially infectious vesicles in the presence of biocides.

  16. Analysis of Radiant Cooling System Configurations Integrated with Cooling Tower for Different Indian Climatic Zones

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, Jyotirmay; Bhandari, Mahabir S; Jain, Robin; Srivastava, Prateek

    2016-01-01

    Radiant cooling system has proven to be a low energy consumption system for building cooling needs. This study describes the use of cooling tower in radiant cooling system to improve the overall system efficiency. A comprehensive simulation feasibility study of the application of cooling tower in radiant cooling system was performed for the fifteen cities in different climatic zones of India. It was found that in summer, the wet bulb temperature (WBT) of the different climatic zones except warm-humid is suitable for the integration of cooling tower with radiant cooling system. In these climates, cooling tower can provide on average 24 C to 27 C water In order to achieve the energy saving potential, three different configurations of radiant cooling system have been compared in terms of energy consumption. The different configurations of the radiant cooling system integrated with cooling tower are: (1) provide chilled water to the floor, wall and ceiling mounted tubular installation. (2) provide chilled water to the wall and ceiling mounted tabular installation. In this arrangement a separate chiller has also been used to provide chilled water at 16 C to the floor mounted tubular installation. (3) provide chilled water to the wall mounted tabular installation and a separate chiller is used to provide chilled water at 16 C to the floor and ceiling mounted tabular installation. A dedicated outdoor air system is also coupled for dehumidification and ventilation in all three configurations. A conventional all-air system was simulated as a baseline to compare these configurations for assessing the energy saving potential.

  17. Film fill fouling in counterflow cooling towers: Research results

    SciTech Connect

    Mortensen, K.P.; Conley, S.N.

    1994-12-31

    High-efficiency cross-corrugated PVC film packing materials, first introduced in the US for new counterflow cooling tower products in the 1970`s, have in a number of instances recently been used to improve the thermal performance of older splash and flat-sheet-filled counterflow towers. These highly interfaced PVC packs in new tower and retrofit service have been applied in a variety of circumstances and conditions. In some locations raw waters have fouled packs. This fouling process can, if left unchecked, reverse performance gains from the tower upgrade and add substantially to cooling tower structural loadings. This paper details a significant effort to understand and reproduce that primary fouling mechanism in a controlled and accelerated laboratory regimen, and to conduct equal basis comparative fouling tests on a number of fill configurations to optimize geometry. These efforts proceeded in specially constructed lab cells which did not risk customer tower installations while defining optimum fill design features. Considerable effort went into evaluating their customers` descriptions of field fouling and to duplicate field observations in the lab process. Field low-clog fill testing results are correlated with lab results. Many alternative fill shapes, spacings, texturings, support schemes, and materials are compared here in order to define the best geometry for the end user. Water conditions, particularly biological characterization and the relation of any circulating water biopotential to suspended solids concentration are discussed because of their specific causal relation in pack fouling. Low-Clog fill application criteria are established. Water treatment needs are discussed. Washing of existing fouled packing is also considered. Finally, a laboratory method for thermal comparison of various packs in fouled condition is described.

  18. Film fill fouling in counterflow cooling towers: Continuing research results

    SciTech Connect

    Mortensen, K.P.; Conely, S.N.

    1995-02-01

    High-efficiency crosscorrugated PVC film packing materials-first introduced in the U.S. for new counterflow cooling tower products in the 1970s-have in a number of instances of older splash and flat-sheet-filled counterflow towers. These highly interfaced PVC packs in new tower and retrofit service have been applied in a variety of circumstances and conditions. In some locations raw waters have fouled packs. This fouling process can, if left unchecked, reverse performance gains from the tower upgrade and add substantially to cooling tower structural loading. This paper details an effort to understand and reproduce that primary fouling mechanism in a controlled and accelerated laboratory regimen, and to conduct equal basis comparative fouling tests on a number of fill configurations to optimize geometry. These efforts proceeded in specially constructed lab cells which did not risk customer tower installations while defining optimum fill design features. Considerable effort went into evaluating our customer`s descriptions of field fouling and to duplicate field observations in the lab process. Field low-clog fill testing results are correlated with lab results. Many alternative fill shapes, spacing, texturing, support schemes, and materials are compared here in order to define the best geometry for the end user. Water conditions, particularly biological characterization and the relation of any circulating water biopotential to suspended solids concentration are discussed because of their specific casual relation in pack fouling. Low-clog fill application criteria are established. Water treatment needs are discussed. Washing of existing fouled packing is also considered. Finally, a laboratory method for thermal comparison of various packs in fouled condition is described.

  19. PBF Cooling Tower. View of stairway to fan deck. Vents ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF Cooling Tower. View of stairway to fan deck. Vents are made of redwood. Camera facing southwest toward north side of Cooling Tower. Siding is corrugated asbestos concrete. Photographer: Kirsh. Date: June 6, 1969. INEEL negative no. 69-3463 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  20. PBF Cooling Tower contextual view. Camera facing southwest. West wing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF Cooling Tower contextual view. Camera facing southwest. West wing and north facade (rear) of Reactor Building (PER-620) is at left; Cooling Tower to right. Photographer: Kirsh. Date: November 2, 1970. INEEL negative no. 70-4913 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  1. 36. EASTERN VIEW OF BOTTOM CONE OF GAS COOLING TOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. EASTERN VIEW OF BOTTOM CONE OF GAS COOLING TOWER No. 1 AND TWO GAS COOLING TOWER SERVICE WATER PUMPS IN THE GAS WASHER PUMP HOUSE. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  2. 40 CFR 63.1329 - Process contact cooling towers provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... DDD, shall maintain an ethylene glycol concentration in the process contact cooling tower at or below... to the process contact cooling tower. (1) To determine the ethylene glycol concentration, owners or... procedures specified in 40 CFR 60.564(j)(1)(i). An average ethylene glycol concentration by weight shall be...

  3. Vortex-augmented cooling tower-windmill combination

    DOEpatents

    McAllister, Jr., John E.

    1985-01-01

    A cooling tower for cooling large quantities of effluent water from a production facility by utilizing natural wind forces includes the use of a series of helically directed air inlet passages extending outwardly from the base of the tower to introduce air from any direction in a swirling vortical pattern while the force of the draft created in the tower makes it possible to place conventional power generating windmills in the air passages to provide power as a by-product.

  4. Bacterial aerosols produced from a cooling tower using wastewater effluent

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, A.P.; Garbett, M.; Rees, H.B.; Lewis, B.G.

    1980-03-01

    A cooling tower, which receives make-up water from a municipal wastewater treatment plant, was studied. Wastewater effluent was super-chlorinated, then treated with lime and a commercial coagulant to remove phosphates, calcium, magnesium, and suspended solids before it was pumped into the cooling tower. The chlorination and coagulation described above were used to reduce deposition of scale and slime on the power plant condenser surfaces. Bacterial counts were made of the cooling tower basin waters and of the aerosols exiting the cooling tower vents. It was dicovered that 39% of bacteria exiting the cooling tower vents were of the genus Pseudomonas. A few pathogenic microbes were also found to be present in the aerosolized particles but their numbers were so low that they were considered insignificant.

  5. Thermal performance upgrade of the Arkansas Nuclear One cooling tower: A ``root cause`` analysis approach

    SciTech Connect

    Liffick, G.W.; Cooper, J.W. Jr.

    1995-10-01

    The thermal performance efficiency of the natural draft cooling tower at Entergy Operations` 858 MWe Arkansas Nuclear One, Unit 2 was successfully upgraded to 101% of design performance capability in April 1994 as the end result of a unique root-cause analysis of the cooling tower`s long-standing performance deficiencies. Through application of state-of-the-art diagnostic testing methods and computer modeling techniques, Entergy was able to identify and correct air/water maldistribution problems in the 447 foot tall counterflow cooling tower at minimal cost. Entergy estimates that the savings realized, as a result of the 1.2 F reduction in cooling tower outlet water temperature, will pay for the thermal upgrade project in approximately 14 months.

  6. Influence of detergents on water drift in cooling towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitkovicova, Rut

    An influence of detergents on the water drift from the cooling tower was experimentally investigated. For this experimental measurements was used a model cooling tower, especially an experimental aerodynamic line, which is specially designed for the measurement and monitoring of processes taking place around the eliminators of the liquid phase. The effect of different concentrations of detergent in the cooling water on the drift of water droplets from a commonly used type eliminator was observed with visualization methods.

  7. Influence of detergents on water drift in cooling towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitkovicova, Rut

    2016-11-01

    An influence of detergents on the water drift from the cooling tower was experimentally investigated. For this experimental measurements was used a model cooling tower, especially an experimental aerodynamic line, which is specially designed for the measurement and monitoring of processes taking place around the eliminators of the liquid phase. The effect of different concentrations of detergent in the cooling water on the drift of water droplets from a commonly used type eliminator was observed with visualization methods.

  8. Pilot scale cooling tower fouled fill treatment: AFCATT (Anti-Fouling Chemical Additive Test Tower)

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, M.T.; Noble, R.T.; Philpot, E.F.; Eastis, J.H.

    1995-02-01

    Polyvinylchloride (PVC) film-type cellular fill is the fill of choice in replacing cement asbestor board fill in existing cooling towers and in new cooling towers because of its high thermal performance, ease of installation, and low initial cost. However, PVC fill has been found to foul quickly with biological and sediment material, significant reducing tower performance and the fill`s useful life. The Anti-Fouling Chemical Additives Test Tower (AFCATT) has been built to study accumulation rates of fouling deposits in corrugated PVC film fill and to study methods of cleaning and preventing the fouling deposits. This small mechanical draft cooling tower is located next to the Unit 4 natural draft cooling tower at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Bowen. The once-through mechanical draft tower receives hot water from the condenser and returns the cold water to the basin of the host tower. The pilot tower is divided into four chambers allowing for three different treatment programs and one control to be run simultaneously. PVC fill packs are suspended from load cells to allow the weight of the fill packs to be measured continuously. Six vendors participated in the summer 1993 test program. Each proposed different methods of cleaning the fouled fill and were given the opportunity to try their proposed method of fill cleaning. The success of each treatment program was determined by its ability to reduce fill pack weight (i.e., reduce fouling).

  9. Use of nanofiltration to reduce cooling tower water usage.

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Andres L.; Everett, Randy L.; Jensen, Richard Pearson; Cappelle, Malynda A.; Altman, Susan Jeanne

    2010-09-01

    Nanofiltration (NF) can effectively treat cooling-tower water to reduce water consumption and maximize water usage efficiency of thermoelectric power plants. A pilot is being run to verify theoretical calculations. A side stream of water from a 900 gpm cooling tower is being treated by NF with the permeate returning to the cooling tower and the concentrate being discharged. The membrane efficiency is as high as over 50%. Salt rejection ranges from 77-97% with higher rejection for divalent ions. The pilot has demonstrated a reduction of makeup water of almost 20% and a reduction of discharge of over 50%.

  10. Use of nanofiltration to reduce cooling tower water consumption.

    SciTech Connect

    Altman, Susan Jeanne; Ciferno, Jared

    2010-10-01

    Nanofiltration (NF) can effectively treat cooling-tower water to reduce water consumption and maximize water usage efficiency of thermoelectric power plants. A pilot is being run to verify theoretical calculations. A side stream of water from a 900 gpm cooling tower is being treated by NF with the permeate returning to the cooling tower and the concentrate being discharged. The membrane efficiency is as high as over 50%. Salt rejection ranges from 77-97% with higher rejection for divalent ions. The pilot has demonstrated a reduction of makeup water of almost 20% and a reduction of discharge of over 50%.

  11. Alternative cooling tower water treatment methods

    SciTech Connect

    Wilsey, C.A.

    1996-11-01

    The factors that contribute to proper water balance include total alkalinity, calcium hardness, and pH. In order to keep the cooling tower from scaling or corroding, a manipulation of these components is often necessary. This has traditionally been achieved with the use of chemicals, including but not limited to the following: acid, soda ash, sodium bicarbonate, calcium bicarbonate, algicide, and bactericide. Extensive research has shown that a balanced water system can also be achieved by using the proper combination of copper with a known halogen. Microbiologists have determined that a small amount of copper, acting as a supplement to chlorine at 0.4 ppm, has the same efficiency as 2.0 ppm free chlorine. Therefore, by using the following combination of components and procedures, the desired results can still be achieved: production of copper compound ions as a supplement to the chemical regimen; analysis and manipulation of make-up water; the use of copper as a coagulant for reduction of scale; copper as a supplemental bacterial disinfectant; and copper as an algicide.

  12. In Hot Water: A Cooling Tower Case Study. Instructor's Manual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Justin; Raju, P. K.; Sankar, Chetan

    2005-01-01

    Vogtle Electric Generating Plant operated by Southern Nuclear Operating Company, a subsidiary of Southern Company, has found itself at a decision point. Vogtle depends on their natural draft cooling towers to remove heat from the power cycle. Depending on the efficiency of the towers, the cycle can realize more or less power output. The efficiency…

  13. In Hot Water: A Cooling Tower Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Justin; Raju, P. K.; Sankar, Chetan

    2005-01-01

    Problem Statement: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant operated by Southern Nuclear Operating Company, a subsidiary of Southern Company, has found itself at a decision point. Vogtle depends on their natural draft cooling towers to remove heat from the power cycle. Depending on the efficiency of the towers, the cycle can realize more or less power…

  14. In Hot Water: A Cooling Tower Case Study. Instructor's Manual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Justin; Raju, P. K.; Sankar, Chetan

    2005-01-01

    Vogtle Electric Generating Plant operated by Southern Nuclear Operating Company, a subsidiary of Southern Company, has found itself at a decision point. Vogtle depends on their natural draft cooling towers to remove heat from the power cycle. Depending on the efficiency of the towers, the cycle can realize more or less power output. The efficiency…

  15. In Hot Water: A Cooling Tower Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Justin; Raju, P. K.; Sankar, Chetan

    2005-01-01

    Problem Statement: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant operated by Southern Nuclear Operating Company, a subsidiary of Southern Company, has found itself at a decision point. Vogtle depends on their natural draft cooling towers to remove heat from the power cycle. Depending on the efficiency of the towers, the cycle can realize more or less power…

  16. PBF Cooling Tower. Camera facing southwest. Round piers will support ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF Cooling Tower. Camera facing southwest. Round piers will support Tower's wood "fill" or "packing." Black-topped stack in far distance is at Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. Photographer: John Capek. Date: October 16, 1968. INEEL negative no. 68-4097 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. COOLING TOWER PUMP HOUSE, TRA606. SECTION, LAYOUT OF TOWERS. BLAWKNOX ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    COOLING TOWER PUMP HOUSE, TRA-606. SECTION, LAYOUT OF TOWERS. BLAW-KNOX 3150-7-2, 9/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0607-00-098-100014, REV. 2. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. 10. STATIC TEST TOWER CLOSEUP OF COOLING PIPES OF FLAME ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. STATIC TEST TOWER CLOSE-UP OF COOLING PIPES OF FLAME DEFLECTOR PIT ON NORTH ELEVATION. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  19. 16. SOUTH SIDE OF STEAM PLANT COOLING TOWER IN OPERABLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. SOUTH SIDE OF STEAM PLANT COOLING TOWER IN OPERABLE CONDITION, WITH STACKS OF ORIGINAL BOILERS IN BACKGROUND. June 10, 1941 - Crosscut Steam Plant, North side Salt River near Mill Avenue & Washington Street, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  20. 5. STEAM PLANT COOLING TOWER LOCATED WEST OF STEAM PLANT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. STEAM PLANT COOLING TOWER LOCATED WEST OF STEAM PLANT BUILDING, FROM SOUTH. SHOWS CURRENT LEVEL OF DISREPAIR. December 4, 1990 - Crosscut Steam Plant, North side Salt River near Mill Avenue & Washington Street, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  1. 2. Left side of Zinc Plant, from packless Cooling Tower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Left side of Zinc Plant, from packless Cooling Tower to midpoint of Cell Room, with majority of Upper Plant in view. View is to the east. - Sullivan Electrolytic Zinc Plant, Government Gulch, Kellogg, Shoshone County, ID

  2. 72. Joe Moore, Photographer. September, 1996. BEVATRON COOLING TOWERS (3 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    72. Joe Moore, Photographer. September, 1996. BEVATRON COOLING TOWERS (3 SHOWN) AND MOTOR GENERATOR ON RIGHT - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  3. An outbreak of Legionella pneumonia originating from a cooling tower.

    PubMed

    Isozumi, Rie; Ito, Yutaka; Ito, Isao; Osawa, Makoto; Hirai, Toyohiro; Takakura, Syunji; Iinuma, Yoshitsugu; Ichiyama, Satoshi; Tateda, Kazuhiro; Yamaguchi, Keizo; Mishima, Michiaki

    2005-01-01

    We report 2 cases of Legionella pneumonia in individuals who were exposed to aerosols during maintenance of a cooling tower at a waste processing plant. This report documents the first known occupation-related outbreak of Legionella pneumonia in Japan.

  4. Final Rule for Industrial Process Cooling Towers: Fact Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Fact sheet concerning a final rule to reduce air toxics emissions from industrial process cooling towers. Air toxics are those pollutants known or suspected of causing cancer or other serious health effects.

  5. 7. COOLING TOWER FROM ROOF. Hot Springs National Park, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. COOLING TOWER FROM ROOF. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Quapaw Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  6. 14. ENGINE TEST CELL BUILDING ROOF. VENTILATION AND COOLING TOWERS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. ENGINE TEST CELL BUILDING ROOF. VENTILATION AND COOLING TOWERS. LOOKING EAST. - Fairchild Air Force Base, Engine Test Cell Building, Near intersection of Arnold Street & George Avenue, Spokane, Spokane County, WA

  7. 39. LOOKING SOUTH AT GAS COOLING TOWERS No. 1 (ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. LOOKING SOUTH AT GAS COOLING TOWERS No. 1 (ON RIGHT) AND No. 2, WITH DORR-OLIVER THICKENER IN FOREGROUND. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  8. 40. LOOKING SOUTHWEST AT GAS COOLING TOWERS No. 1 AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. LOOKING SOUTHWEST AT GAS COOLING TOWERS No. 1 AND No. 2, WITH DORR-OLIVER THICKENER IN FOREGROUND. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  9. Environmental Impacts from the Operation of Cooling Towers at SRP

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.G. III

    2001-06-26

    An assessment has been made of the environmental effects that would occur from the operation of cooling towers at the SRP reactors. A more realistic numerical model of the cooling tower plume has been used to reassess the environmental impacts. The following effects were considered: (1) the occurrence of fog and ice and their impact on nearby structures, (2) drift and salt deposition from the plume, (3) the length and height of the visible plume, and (4) the possible dose from tritium.

  10. International cooling-tower and spray pond symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This document contains the manuscripts of sixty-one papers that were presented at the 7th Cooling Tower and Spray Pond Symposium of the International Association for Hydraulic Research, organized by the B.E. Vedeneev Institute (VNIIG) and held in Leningrad, USSR, in June 1990. This report represents a worldwide state-of-the-art survey of recent work on cooling towers and spray ponds. Individual papers are indexed separately on the energy database.

  11. Identification of cooling tower wood attack and methods of control

    SciTech Connect

    Song, P.; Trulear, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    Biological and chemical attack can greatly accelerate the deterioration of cooling tower wood. The damage, once inflicted, is irreversible and often results in premature and costly wood replacement. Biological attack is more serious than chemical, and is difficult to detect. Control of both types is essential for good tower maintenance A review of wood structures, types of attack and methods of control are presented. Effects of alkaline cooling water operation on wood deterioration are also discussed.

  12. Wastewater reuse as cooling-tower makeup: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, D.; Wei, I.; Casana, J.

    1987-08-01

    The objectives of this program are to document electric utility experience and concerns on the use of municipal wastewater as makeup to cooling towers and to identify areas lacking sufficient information for their application as well as to identify problem areas. Current users of municipal wastewater in electric utility cooling towers have been contacted and the literature has been reviewed. In addition, literature on the reuse of industrial wastewater has been reviewed. The findings are summarized in this report with emphasis on the use of municipal wastewater in electric utility cooling towers. It was found that this practice has been going on for sufficient time at sufficient places that the problems are fairly well understood. Scale formation by calcium phosphate is a problem. It is controlled by pH reduction or by removal of phosphate and suggested techniques are given. Fouling by slime is a problem. It is controlled by heavy doses of chlorine and other biocides or by mechanical and other non-chemical means without use of any biocide. Foaming, corrosion and blowdown disposal are not problems. There are a number of problem areas where more information is desired to establish a higher level of confidence in using sewage water as makeup. Three areas of research are recommended: (1) a study comparing the technological and environmental problems and costs of various technologies used to control the formation of biological slime, (2) laboratory and pilot scale testing to verify the prediction techniques for phosphate precipitation, and (3) to determine whether the health hazards of using sewage water are worse than the use of normal waters.

  13. PBF Cooling Tower detail. Camera facing southwest into north side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF Cooling Tower detail. Camera facing southwest into north side of Tower. Five horizontal layers of splash bars constitute fill decks, which will break up falling water into droplets, promoting evaporative cooling. Louvered faces, through which air enters tower, are on east and west sides. Louvers have been installed. Support framework for one of two venturi-shaped fan stacks (or "vents") is in center top. Orifices in hot basins (not in view) will distribute water over fill. Photographer: Kirsh. Date: May 15, 1969. INEEL negative no. 69-3032 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. Parametric study of closed wet cooling tower thermal performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qasim, S. M.; Hayder, M. J.

    2017-08-01

    The present study involves experimental and theoretical analysis to evaluate the thermal performance of modified Closed Wet Cooling Tower (CWCT). The experimental study includes: design, manufacture and testing prototype of a modified counter flow forced draft CWCT. The modification based on addition packing to the conventional CWCT. A series of experiments was carried out at different operational parameters. In view of energy analysis, the thermal performance parameters of the tower are: cooling range, tower approach, cooling capacity, thermal efficiency, heat and mass transfer coefficients. The theoretical study included develops Artificial Neural Network (ANN) models to predicting various thermal performance parameters of the tower. Utilizing experimental data for training and testing, the models simulated by multi-layer back propagation algorithm for varying all operational parameters stated in experimental test.

  15. Coagulation chemistries for silica removal from cooling tower water.

    SciTech Connect

    Nyman, May Devan; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Stewart, Tom

    2010-02-01

    The formation of silica scale is a problem for thermoelectric power generating facilities, and this study investigated the potential for removal of silica by means of chemical coagulation from source water before it is subjected to mineral concentration in cooling towers. In Phase I, a screening of many typical as well as novel coagulants was carried out using concentrated cooling tower water, with and without flocculation aids, at concentrations typical for water purification with limited results. In Phase II, it was decided that treatment of source or make up water was more appropriate, and that higher dosing with coagulants delivered promising results. In fact, the less exotic coagulants proved to be more efficacious for reasons not yet fully determined. Some analysis was made of the molecular nature of the precipitated floc, which may aid in process improvements. In Phase III, more detailed study of process conditions for aluminum chloride coagulation was undertaken. Lime-soda water softening and the precipitation of magnesium hydroxide were shown to be too limited in terms of effectiveness, speed, and energy consumption to be considered further for the present application. In Phase IV, sodium aluminate emerged as an effective coagulant for silica, and the most attractive of those tested to date because of its availability, ease of use, and low requirement for additional chemicals. Some process optimization was performed for coagulant concentration and operational pH. It is concluded that silica coagulation with simple aluminum-based agents is effective, simple, and compatible with other industrial processes.

  16. COOLING TOWER PUMP HOUSE, TRA606. THREE OF SIX SECTIONS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    COOLING TOWER PUMP HOUSE, TRA-606. THREE OF SIX SECTIONS OF COOLING TOWER ARE VISIBLE ABOVE RAILING. PUMP HOUSE IN FOREGROUND IS ON SOUTH SIDE OF COOLING TOWER. NOTE THREE PIPES TAKING WATER FROM PUMP HOUSE TO HOT DECK OF COOLING TOWER. EMERGENCY WATER SUPPLY TOWER IS ALSO IN VIEW. INL NEGATIVE NO. 6197. Unknown Photographer, 6/27/1952 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. ETR COOLING TOWER. PUMP HOUSE (TRA645) IN SHADOW OF TOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR COOLING TOWER. PUMP HOUSE (TRA-645) IN SHADOW OF TOWER ON LEFT. AT LEFT OF VIEW, HIGH-BAY BUILDING IS ETR. ONE STORY ATTACHMENT IS ETR ELECTRICAL BUILDING. STACK AT RIGHT IS ETR STACK; MTR STACK IS TOWARD LEFT. CAMERA FACING NORTHEAST. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-3799. Jack L. Anderson, 11/26/1956 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. Pontiac fever outbreak associated with a cooling tower.

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, S; Spitalny, K; Barbaree, J; Faur, Y; McKinney, R

    1987-01-01

    In late April 1984, an outbreak of Pontiac fever was investigated in an office building in lower Manhattan (New York City). The outbreak was characterized by a high attack rate (78 per cent overall); the predominant symptoms were myalgias, chills, fatigue, fever, and headache. There was a clustering of cases in an office that was air cooled by a dedicated cooling tower separate from the remainder of the building. A high concentration of live L. Pneumophila cells in the cooling tower was quantified. Airborne spread via settle plates placed along the air intake system and within the office was demonstrated. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 antigen was found in the urine of two cases, and identical monoclonal antibody reactivity patterns of isolates from all sources was observed. Difficulty was experienced in eliminating the organism from the tower. PMID:3565648

  19. Integrated reactor-containment hyperbolic-cooling-tower system

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, A.R.; Todreas, N.E.; Driscoll, M.J.

    1994-12-31

    A preliminary feasibility analysis has been conducted to evaluate placing a nuclear reactor containment building inside a large hyperbolic cooling tower, a concept previously suggested for fossil-fired units but for reasons other than those that motivate this evaluation. The geometry of the design, the amount of water available, and the shielding provided by the cooling tower are beneficial to the safety characteristics of the containment under accident conditions. Three means of decay heat management are employed: an initial water spray on the containment exterior, long-term air convection on side of the containment, and creation of a water pool inside the containment. A continuously spraying water tank on top of the containment allows for a completely passive decay heat removal system. An annular air chimney around the containment is effective in long-term removal of {approximately} 1O MW (thermal) through air convection. Five percent of the water inventory in the cooling-tower pond surrounding the containment is sufficient to flood the containment interior to a depth of 14.6 ft, thereby providing an internal containment heat sink. The packing and the height of the tower provide major scrubbing and dispersing sources for any uncontrolled radioactive leak. The cooling tower veil also protects the containment from external events such as lane crashes.

  20. Effectiveness of bromicide against Legionella pneumophila in a cooling tower

    SciTech Connect

    Fliermans, C.B.; Harvey, R.S.

    1983-01-01

    Cooling towers are considered to be man-made amplifiers of Legionella. Thus the proper maintenance and choice of biocides is important. The only biocide that has thus far been shown to be effective in field tests is the judicious use of chlorination. Perturbation studies were conducted on an industrial cooling tower shown to contain Legionella, using 1-bromo-3-chloro-5,5-dimethylhydantoin (Bromicide, Great Lakes Chemical Corp.). At the manufacturer's recommended concentrations neither the density nor the activity of Legionella was affected. At concentrations greater than 2.0 ppM free residual, the Bromicide was not effective in reducing Legionella to source water concentrations, nor was it effective in reducing the INT activity of the bacterium in situ. The data indicate that at concentrations up to 2.0 ppM, Bromicide is not effective in these tower studies. 23 references, 3 tables.

  1. PBF Cooling Tower under construction. Cold water basin is five ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF Cooling Tower under construction. Cold water basin is five feet deep. Foundation and basin walls are reinforced concrete. Camera facing west. Pipe openings through wall in front are outlets for return flow of cool water to reactor building. Photographer: John Capek. Date: September 4, 1968. INEEL negative no. 68-3473 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  2. 40 CFR 63.1329 - Process contact cooling towers provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... viscosity multiple end finisher process that utilizes a process contact cooling tower shall comply with... high viscosity multiple end finisher process and who is subject or becomes subject to 40 CFR part 60...) requires the use of ASTM D2908-74 or 91, “Standard Practice for Measuring Volatile Organic Matter in...

  3. 40 CFR 63.1329 - Process contact cooling towers provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... existing affected source that manufactures PET using a continuous terephthalic acid high viscosity multiple... viscosity multiple end finisher process, and who is subject or becomes subject to 40 CFR part 60, subpart... in the cooling tower water shall be recorded. For the initial performance test, these records...

  4. 49. LOOKING NORTH AT EVAPORATIVE WASTE WATER TREATMENT COOLING TOWERS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. LOOKING NORTH AT EVAPORATIVE WASTE WATER TREATMENT COOLING TOWERS, WITH BLOW ENGINE HOUSE No. 3 ON RIGHT, AND FILTER CAKE HOUSE IN FOREGROUND. (Jet Lowe) - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  5. MTR COOLING TOWER. BASIN IS ADJACENT TO PUMP HOUSE. CAMERA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR COOLING TOWER. BASIN IS ADJACENT TO PUMP HOUSE. CAMERA FACES SOUTHEAST TOWARD NORTH SIDE OF PUMP HOUSE. INL NEGATIVE NO. 2690. Unknown Photographer, 6/1951. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  6. Indiana State University Graduates to Advanced Plastic Cooling Towers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Ed

    2012-01-01

    Perhaps more than many other industries, today's universities and colleges are beset by dramatically rising costs on every front. One of the areas where overhead can be contained or reduced is in the operation of the chilled water systems that support air conditioning throughout college campuses, specifically the cooling towers. Like many…

  7. Cooling tower windage: a new aspect to environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, F. G.; Park, S. H.

    1980-01-01

    Results of the several investigations provided quantitative estimates of windage from Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant cooling towers. Windage water deposited on the ground has the potential to reach nearby streams through runoff. Windage deposited on moisture depleted soils would not be significant. During winter months at Oak Ridge soils generally have a high moisture content such that windage deposition could be quickly transported as runoff. It is during this time that cooling towers are sometimes operated without fan-induced draft. Since windage water contains the same hexavalent chromium concentration (9 ppM) as the recirculating cooling water system, the runoff stream from the K-892J tower constitues a NPDES violation as an unpermitted discharge. As a long-term abatement strategy, concrete aprons were constructed along each side of new cooling towers at the Paducah, Kentucky Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The maximum distance of windage impact is wind dependent. If apron construction is envisioned as an abatement strategy at Oak Ridge, the maximum distance of impact can be inferred graphically from the several points where windage (fans off) and drift (fans on) loss curves intersect under the different meteorological conditions. Once the hexavalent chromium laden runoff stream reaches Poplar Creek, it is diluted well below the standards for drinking water and poses little potential for biological effects to aquatic systems.

  8. Program for monitoring LDB concentrations in cooling-tower waters

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, W.E.

    1983-01-01

    A brief description is presented in tabular form describing the program employed by the Industrial Hygiene Department of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to monitor and control levels of Legionella in cooling tower waters. Guidelines are listed to protect personnel from an exposure that could lead to legionnaire's disease.

  9. Water distribution characteristics of spray nozzles in a cooling tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitkovic, Pavol

    2015-05-01

    Water distribution characteristics of spray nozzles with spray plates used to distribute cooling water to the cooling fills in a cooling tower is one of the important parameters for the selection of nozzles. Water distribution characteristic describes the distribution of water from the axis of the nozzle along a fill. One of the parameters affecting the water distribution characteristic of the nozzle is airflow velocity of counter flow airstream. Water distribution characteristics are commonly measured using by a set of containers. The problem with this method of the measurement of characteristics is block of the airflow with collections of containers. Therefore, this work is using the visualization method.

  10. Cooling tower plume - model and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cizek, Jan; Gemperle, Jiri; Strob, Miroslav; Nozicka, Jiri

    The paper discusses the description of the simple model of the, so-called, steam plume, which in many cases forms during the operation of the evaporative cooling systems of the power plants, or large technological units. The model is based on semi-empirical equations that describe the behaviour of a mixture of two gases in case of the free jet stream. In the conclusion of the paper, a simple experiment is presented through which the results of the designed model shall be validated in the subsequent period.

  11. Short-term pilot cooling tower tests

    SciTech Connect

    Suciu, D.F.; Miller, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    Two major problems are associated with the use of cooled geothermal water as coolant for the 5 MW(e) pilot plant at Raft River. They are: (1) a scaling potential owing to the chemical species present in solution, and (2) the corrosive nature of the geothermal water. Tests were conducted to obtain data so that methods can be devised to either reduce or eliminate effects from these problems. Data show that scaling can be prevented, but only by using a high concentration of dispersant. Pitting data, however, are not as conclusive and seem to indicate that pitting control cannot be realized, but this result cannot be substantiated without additional experimentation. Results also demonstrate that chromate can be removed by using either chemical destruction or ion exchange. Whichever method is used, EPA discharge limits for both chromate and zinc can be achieved. A preliminary economic analysis is presented.

  12. Factors stimulating propagation of legionellae in cooling tower water

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Sugiura, Minoru; Kusunoki, Shinji; Ezaki, Takayuki; Ikedo, Masanari; Yabuuchi, Eiko )

    1992-04-01

    The authors survey of cooling tower water demonstrated that the highest density of legionellae, {ge}10{sup 4} CFU/100 ml, appeared in water containing protozoa, {ge}10{sup 2} MPN/100 ml, and heterotrophic bacteria, {ge}10{sup 6} CFU/100 ml, at water temperatures between 25 and 35C. Viable counts of legionellae were detected even in the winter samples, and propagation, up to 10{sup 5} CFU/100 ml, occurs in summer. The counts of legionellae correlated positively with increases in water temperature, pH, and protozoan counts, but not with heterotrophic bacterial counts. The water temperature of cooling towers may promote increases in the viable counts of legionellae, and certain microbes, e.g., protozoa or some heterotrophic bacteria, may be a factor stimulating the propagation of legionellae.

  13. Susceptibility of Legionella pneumophila to three cooling tower microbicides.

    PubMed

    Grace, R D; Dewar, N E; Barnes, W G; Hodges, G R

    1981-01-01

    Investigation of epidemic outbreaks of Legionnaires disease by Center for Disease Control personnel has resulted in the isolation of Legionella pneumophila from water in the air-conditioning cooling towers or evaporative condensers at the site of the outbreak. It is suspected that improperly maintained open, recirculating water systems may play a role in the growth and dissemination of this pathogen. The objective of this study was to determine the antimicrobial activity of three chemically different, commercially available, cooling tower microbicides against L. pneumophila. Using two in vitro test systems, a combination of N-alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride and bis (tri-n-butyltin) oxide was found to kill L. pneumophila at a concentration 25 times less than the minimum recommended use concentration, whereas N-alkyl 1,3-propanediamine and methylene bis (thiocyanate) were active at concentrations equal to or greater than the concentrations recommended for use by the manufacturer.

  14. Susceptibility of Legionella pneumophila to three cooling tower microbicides.

    PubMed Central

    Grace, R D; Dewar, N E; Barnes, W G; Hodges, G R

    1981-01-01

    Investigation of epidemic outbreaks of Legionnaires disease by Center for Disease Control personnel has resulted in the isolation of Legionella pneumophila from water in the air-conditioning cooling towers or evaporative condensers at the site of the outbreak. It is suspected that improperly maintained open, recirculating water systems may play a role in the growth and dissemination of this pathogen. The objective of this study was to determine the antimicrobial activity of three chemically different, commercially available, cooling tower microbicides against L. pneumophila. Using two in vitro test systems, a combination of N-alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride and bis (tri-n-butyltin) oxide was found to kill L. pneumophila at a concentration 25 times less than the minimum recommended use concentration, whereas N-alkyl 1,3-propanediamine and methylene bis (thiocyanate) were active at concentrations equal to or greater than the concentrations recommended for use by the manufacturer. PMID:7224623

  15. Susceptibility of Legionella pneumophila to three cooling tower microbicides

    SciTech Connect

    Grace, R.D.; Dewar, N.E.; Barnes, W.G.; Hodges, G.R.

    1981-01-01

    Investigation of epidemic outbreaks of Legionnaires disease by Center for Disease Control personnel has resulted in the isolation of Legionella pneumophila from water in the air-conditioning cooling towers or evaporative condensers at the site of the outbreak. It is suspected that improperly maintained open, recirculating water systems may play a role in the growth and dissemination of this pathogen. The objective of this study was to determine the antimicrobial activity of three chemically different, commercially available, cooling tower microbicides against L. pneumophila. Using two in vitro test systems, a combination of N-alkyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride and bis (tri-n-butyltin) oxide was found to kill L. pneumophila at a concentration 25 times less than the minimum recommended use concentration, whereas N-alkyl 1,3-propanediamine and methylene bis(thiocyanate) were active at concentrations equal to or greater than the concentrations recommended for use by the manufacturer.

  16. BOD limit in synfuel plants' cooling-tower makeup

    SciTech Connect

    Aiyegbusi, O.; Goldstein, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    A model cooling tower/trickling filter was used to study acceptable BOD level in wastewater reuse as cooling system makeup and the effect on the system biofouling. Tap water was used to makeup for evaporation and blowdown while phenol solution was metered as the contaminant, into the circulating water. The phenol was degraded in the tower with less than 2 ppM in circulation at equivalent makeup concentrations below 1200 mg BOD/L. The rate of biofouling, measured by heat transfer coefficient, was correlated with phenol loading rates. Makeup concentrations below 1000 mg BOD/L gave low fouling rates while concentration above 1200 mg BOD/L resulted in intolerable fouling of exchanger tubes.

  17. CFD MODELING ANALYSIS OF MECHANICAL DRAFT COOLING TOWER

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Alfred Garrett, A; James02 Bollinger, J; Larry Koffman, L

    2008-03-03

    Industrial processes use mechanical draft cooling towers (MDCT's) to dissipate waste heat by transferring heat from water to air via evaporative cooling, which causes air humidification. The Savannah River Site (SRS) has a MDCT consisting of four independent compartments called cells. Each cell has its own fan to help maximize heat transfer between ambient air and circulated water. The primary objective of the work is to conduct a parametric study for cooling tower performance under different fan speeds and ambient air conditions. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to achieve the objective. The model uses three-dimensional steady-state momentum, continuity equations, air-vapor species balance equation, and two-equation turbulence as the basic governing equations. It was assumed that vapor phase is always transported by the continuous air phase with no slip velocity. In this case, water droplet component was considered as discrete phase for the interfacial heat and mass transfer via Lagrangian approach. Thus, the air-vapor mixture model with discrete water droplet phase is used for the analysis. A series of the modeling calculations was performed to investigate the impact of ambient and operating conditions on the thermal performance of the cooling tower when fans were operating and when they were turned off. The model was benchmarked against the literature data and the SRS test results for key parameters such as air temperature and humidity at the tower exit and water temperature for given ambient conditions. Detailed results will be presented here.

  18. PBF Cooling Tower. View from highbay roof of Reactor Building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF Cooling Tower. View from high-bay roof of Reactor Building (PER-620). Camera faces northwest. East louvered face has been installed. Inlet pipes protrude from fan deck. Two redwood vents under construction at top. Note piping, control, and power lines at sub-grade level in trench leading to Reactor Building. Photographer: Kirsh. Date: June 6, 1969. INEEL negative no. 69-3466 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  19. A Comparative Analysis of Three Water Treatment Programs for Cooling Tower Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    10 to 20 percent per month. Use: 89 Treatment of cooling water in smaller cooling towers. Federal Specifications: None. SODIUM HEXAMETAPHOSPHATE ...viscosity 200-1000 cps at 25 degrees C. Use: Dispersant in cooling tower to prevent fouling by nonliving matter. Federal Specification: None. SODIUM ...Legionnaires’ disease in cooling towers. Federal Specification: O-S-602. SODIUM SILICATE,relatively low alkalinity, 41 degree Baume, approximately 28.8

  20. Role of bacterial adhesion in the microbial ecology of biofilms in cooling tower systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Wei; Sileika, Tadas; Warta, Richard; Cianciotto, Nicholas P; Packman, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    The fate of the three heterotrophic biofilm forming bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Flavobacterium sp. in pilot scale cooling towers was evaluated both by observing the persistence of each species in the recirculating water and the formation of biofilms on steel coupons placed in each cooling tower water reservoir. Two different cooling tower experiments were performed: a short-term study (6 days) to observe the initial bacterial colonization of the cooling tower, and a long-term study (3 months) to observe the ecological dynamics with repeated introduction of the test strains. An additional set of batch experiments (6 days) was carried out to evaluate the adhesion of each strain to steel surfaces under similar conditions to those found in the cooling tower experiments. Substantial differences were observed in the microbial communities that developed in the batch systems and cooling towers. P. aeruginosa showed a low degree of adherence to steel surfaces both in batch and in the cooling towers, but grew much faster than K. pneumoniae and Flavobacterium in mixed-species biofilms and ultimately became the dominant organism in the closed batch systems. However, the low degree of adherence caused P. aeruginosa to be rapidly washed out of the open cooling tower systems, and Flavobacterium became the dominant microorganism in the cooling towers in both the short-term and long-term experiments. These results indicate that adhesion, retention and growth on solid surfaces play important roles in the bacterial community that develops in cooling tower systems.

  1. Role of bacterial adhesion in the microbial ecology of biofilms in cooling tower systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Wei; Sileika, Tadas; Warta, Richard; Cianciotto, Nicholas P.; Packman, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    The fate of the three heterotrophic biofilm forming bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Flavobacterium sp. in pilot scale cooling towers was evaluated both by observing the persistence of each species in the recirculating water and the formation of biofilms on steel coupons placed in each cooling tower water reservoir. Two different cooling tower experiments were performed: a short-term study (6 days) to observe the initial bacterial colonization of the cooling tower, and a long-term study (3 months) to observe the ecological dynamics with repeated introduction of the test strains. An additional set of batch experiments (6 days) was carried out to evaluate the adhesion of each strain to steel surfaces under similar conditions to those found in the cooling tower experiments. Substantial differences were observed in the microbial communities that developed in the batch systems and cooling towers. P. aeruginosa showed a low degree of adherence to steel surfaces both in batch and in the cooling towers, but grew much faster than K. pneumoniae and Flavobacterium in mixed-species biofilms and ultimately became the dominant organism in the closed batch systems. However, the low degree of adherence caused P. aeruginosa to be rapidly washed out of the open cooling tower systems, and Flavobacterium became the dominant microorganism in the cooling towers in both the short-term and long-term experiments. These results indicate that adhesion, retention and growth on solid surfaces play important roles in the bacterial community that develops in cooling tower systems. PMID:19177226

  2. Operational cooling tower model (CTTOOL V1.0)

    SciTech Connect

    Aleman, S.; LocalDomainServers, L.; Garrett, A.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical draft cooling towers (MDCT’s) are widely used to remove waste heat from industrial processes, including suspected proliferators of weapons of mass destruction (WMD). The temperature of the air being exhausted from the MDCT is proportional to the amount of thermal energy being removed from the process cooling water, although ambient weather conditions and cooling water flow rate must be known or estimated to calculate the rate of thermal energy dissipation (Q). It is theoretically possible to derive MDCT air exhaust temperatures from thermal images taken from a remote sensor. A numerical model of a MDCT is required to translate the air exhaust temperature to a Q. This report describes the MDCT model developed by the Problem Centered Integrated Analysis (PCIA) program that was designed to perform those computational tasks. The PCIA program is a collaborative effort between the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), the Northrop-Grumman Corporation (NG) and the Aerospace Corporation (AERO).

  3. Cooling tower irrigator layout with allowances for non-uniformity of the airflow velocity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushnov, A. S.; Ryabushenko, A. S.

    2016-07-01

    This article covers the results of analysis of aerodynamic processes in the cooling tower irrigator and provides the approaches to optimal layout of preformed packing blocks (of the irrigator) developed based on these results. The analysis of the airflow velocity field in the cooling towers shows that the irrigation space can be broken down into the following zones: the peripheral zone of the cooling tower near the airblast windows, the zone near the cooling tower center, and the intermediate zone. Furthermore, the highest level of nonuniformity of the airflow velocity field in cooling towers is in the zone adjoining the tower's airblast windows. The proposed concept of the cooling tower irrigator's layout is made with allowances for the airflow velocity field characteristics in the cross-section of the irrigation space of the cooling tower. Based on this concept, we suggest that higher irrigator blocks should be placed in the zone of increased airflow consumption, which provides the possibility to enhance the hydraulic resistance and, respectively, decrease the gas flow velocity as well as to boost the efficiency of chilling the circulating water in the cooling tower. For this purpose, additional irrigator blocks can be of the same design as the main irrigator. As an option, it is possible to use blocks of the geometry and design other than the main irrigator block in the cooling tower.

  4. Prevalence study of Simkania negevensis in cooling towers in Spain.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Leonardo Martín; Codony, Francesc; Ríos, Karina; Adrados, Bárbara; Fittipaldi, Mariana; De Dios, Gregori; Peñuela, Gustavo; Morató, Jordi

    2011-06-01

    Simkania negevensis is an obligate intracellular bacterium grouped into the order Chlamydiales. This new amoeba-resistant intracellular bacterium might represent a novel etiologic agent of bronchiolitis and community-acquired pneumonia and occurs in aquatic habitats such as drinking water and reclaimed wastewater. Another amoeba-related bacterium, Legionella pneumophila, is an etiologic agent of pneumonia transmitted by environmental aerosols or contaminated water/air cooling systems. These transmission pathways are important in the natural history of Legionellae infections and possibly other intracellular microorganisms such as Parachlamydiaceae; thus, understanding the feasibility of Simkania infection by these routes is relevant. In the present work, we investigated the prevalence of this newly identified pathogenic bacterium in cooling towers by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and its possible relationship with Legionella pneumophila co-infection. Our results show Simkania detection in 2 of 70 cooling towers analyzed. To our knowledge, this report is the first describing Simkania negevensis detection in this category of environmental water samples.

  5. High Flux Isotopes Reactor (HFIR) Cooling Towers Demolition Waste Management

    SciTech Connect

    Pudelek, R. E.; Gilbert, W. C.

    2002-02-26

    This paper describes the results of a joint initiative between Oak Ridge National Laboratory, operated by UT-Battelle, and Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC (BJC) to characterize, package, transport, treat, and dispose of demolition waste from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), Cooling Tower. The demolition and removal of waste from the site was the first critical step in the planned HFIR beryllium reflector replacement outage scheduled. The outage was scheduled to last a maximum of six months. Demolition and removal of the waste was critical because a new tower was to be constructed over the old concrete water basin. A detailed sampling and analysis plan was developed to characterize the hazardous and radiological constituents of the components of the Cooling Tower. Analyses were performed for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) heavy metals and semi-volatile constituents as defined by 40 CFR 261 and radiological parameters including gross alpha, gross beta, gross gamma, alpha-emitting isotopes and beta-emitting isotopes. Analysis of metals and semi-volatile constituents indicated no exceedances of regulatory limits. Analysis of radionuclides identified uranium and thorium and associated daughters. In addition 60Co, 99Tc, 226Rm, and 228Rm were identified. Most of the tower materials were determined to be low level radioactive waste. A small quantity was determined not to be radioactive, or could be decontaminated. The tower was dismantled October 2000 to January 2001 using a detailed step-by-step process to aid waste segregation and container loading. The volume of waste as packaged for treatment was approximately 1982 cubic meters (70,000 cubic feet). This volume was comprised of plastic ({approx}47%), wood ({approx}38%) and asbestos transite ({approx}14%). The remaining {approx}1% consisted of the fire protection piping (contaminated with lead-based paint) and incidental metal from conduit, nails and braces/supports, and sludge from the basin. The waste

  6. Gasifier waste water treatment: Phase I cooling tower assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, M.D.; Willson, W.G.; Hendrikson, J.G.; Winton, S.L.

    1985-02-01

    Details of an advanced study of the treatability of waste waters from the fixed-bed gasification of lignite describe the test equipment and results at a pilot plant in North Dakota using stripped-gas liquor (SGL) as cooling tower makeup. Ammonia, alkalinity, phenol, and other non-hydantoin organics were removed from the cooling water by stripping and/or biological degradation, with the phenol concentration in the exhaust air exceeding the odor threshold. It will be necessary to control foaming of the circulating water, but both glycol and silicon based agents performed well during the test. It will also be necessary to reduce the high level of biofouling on heat transfer surfaces, although stainless steel fouling was not a major problem. The conclusion is that SGL is limited by potentially serious operating problems without additional treatment. 5 references, 4 figures, 7 tables.

  7. Emergency Cooling of Nuclear Power Plant Reactors With Heat Removal By a Forced-Draft Cooling Tower

    SciTech Connect

    Murav’ev, V. P.

    2016-07-15

    The feasibility of heat removal during emergency cooling of a reactor by a forced-draft cooling tower with accumulation of the peak heat release in a volume of precooled water is evaluated. The advantages of a cooling tower over a spray cooling pond are demonstrated: it requires less space, consumes less material, employs shorter lines in the heat removal system, and provides considerably better protection of the environment from wetting by entrained moisture.

  8. Flue gas injection control of silica in cooling towers.

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Patrick Vane; Anderson, Howard L., Jr.; Altman, Susan Jeanne

    2011-06-01

    Injection of CO{sub 2}-laden flue gas can decrease the potential for silica and calcite scale formation in cooling tower blowdown by lowering solution pH to decrease equilibrium calcite solubility and kinetic rates of silica polymerization. Flue gas injection might best inhibit scale formation in power plant cooling towers that use impaired makeup waters - for example, groundwaters that contain relatively high levels of calcium, alkalinity, and silica. Groundwaters brought to the surface for cooling will degas CO{sub 2} and increase their pH by 1-2 units, possibly precipitating calcite in the process. Recarbonation with flue gas can lower the pHs of these fluids back to roughly their initial pH. Flue gas carbonation probably cannot lower pHs to much below pH 6 because the pHs of impaired waters, once outgassed at the surface, are likely to be relatively alkaline. Silica polymerization to form scale occurs most rapidly at pH {approx} 8.3 at 25 C; polymerization is slower at higher and lower pH. pH 7 fluids containing {approx}220 ppm SiO{sub 2} require > 180 hours equilibration to begin forming scale whereas at pH 8.3 scale formation is complete within 36 hours. Flue gas injection that lowers pHs to {approx} 7 should allow substantially higher concentration factors. Periodic cycling to lower recoveries - hence lower silica concentrations - might be required though. Higher concentration factors enabled by flue gas injection should decrease concentrate volumes and disposal costs by roughly half.

  9. Analyzing the possibility of achieving more efficient cooling of water in the evaporative cooling towers of the Armenian NPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosyan, V. G.; Yeghoyan, E. A.

    2015-10-01

    The specific features of the service cooling water system used at the Armenian NPP and modifications made in the arrangement for supplying water to the water coolers in order to achieve more efficient cooling are presented. The mathematical model applied in carrying out the analyses is described, the use of which makes it possible to investigate the operation of parallel-connected cooling towers having different hydraulic and thermal loads. When the third standby cooling tower is put into operation (with the same flow rate of water supplied to the water coolers), the cooled water temperature is decreased by around 2-3°C in the range of atmospheric air temperatures 0-35°C. However, the introduced water distribution arrangement with a decreased spraying density has limitation on its use at negative outdoor air temperatures due to the hazard intense freezing of the fill in the cooling tower peripheral zone. The availability of standby cooling towers in the shutdown Armenian NPP power unit along with the planned full replacement of the cooling tower process equipment create good possibilities for achieving a deeper water cooling extent and better efficiency of the NPP. The present work was carried out with the aim of achieving maximally efficient use of existing possibilities and for elaborating the optimal cooling tower modernization version. Individual specific heat-andmass transfer processes in the chimney-type evaporative cooling towers are analyzed. An improved arrangement for distributing cooled water over the cooling tower spraying area (during its operation with a decreased flow rate) is proposed with the aim of cooling water to a deeper extent and preserving the possibility of using the cooling towers in winter. The main idea behind improving the existing arrangement is to exclude certain zones of the cooling tower featuring inefficient cooling from operation. The effectiveness of introducing the proposed design is proven by calculations (taking as an

  10. Mathematical model and calculation of water-cooling efficiency in a film-filled cooling tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laptev, A. G.; Lapteva, E. A.

    2016-10-01

    Different approaches to simulation of momentum, mass, and energy transfer in packed beds are considered. The mathematical model of heat and mass transfer in a wetted packed bed for turbulent gas flow and laminar wave counter flow of the fluid film in sprinkler units of a water-cooling tower is presented. The packed bed is represented as the set of equivalent channels with correction to twisting. The idea put forward by P. Kapitsa on representation of waves on the interphase film surface as elements of the surface roughness in interaction with the gas flow is used. The temperature and moisture content profiles are found from the solution of differential equations of heat and mass transfer written for the equivalent channel with the volume heat and mass source. The equations for calculation of the average coefficients of heat emission and mass exchange in regular and irregular beds with different contact elements, as well as the expression for calculation of the average turbulent exchange coefficient are presented. The given formulas determine these coefficients for the known hydraulic resistance of the packed bed element. The results of solution of the system of equations are presented, and the water temperature profiles are shown for different sprinkler units in industrial water-cooling towers. The comparison with experimental data on thermal efficiency of the cooling tower is made; this allows one to determine the temperature of the cooled water at the output. The technical solutions on increasing the cooling tower performance by equalization of the air velocity profile at the input and creation of an additional phase contact region using irregular elements "Inzhekhim" are considered.

  11. PBF Cooling Tower and it Auxiliary Building (PER624) to left ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF Cooling Tower and it Auxiliary Building (PER-624) to left of tower. Camera facing west and the east louvered face of the tower. Details include secondary coolant water riser piping and flow control valves (butterfly valves) to distribute water evenly to all sections of tower. Photographer: Holmes. Date: May, 20, 1970. INEEL negative no. 70-2322 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  12. Development of a new seminested PCR method for detection of Legionella species and its application to surveillance of legionellae in hospital cooling tower water.

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, H; Yamamoto, H; Arima, K; Fujii, J; Maruta, K; Izu, K; Shiomori, T; Yoshida, S

    1997-01-01

    The presence of PCR inhibitors in water samples is well known and contributes to the fact that a practical PCR assay has not been developed for legionella surveillance. In this study, we devised a new seminested PCR assay for detection of Legionella spp. in water samples as a means of overriding the PCR inhibitors without loss of sensitivity. The seminested PCR assay utilized primers to amplify the 16S rRNA gene (LEG primers) of 39 Legionella spp. The assay was specific to legionellae, and the sensitivity was 1 fg of extracted Legionella DNA in laboratory examination. To evaluate the feasibility and sensitivity of the PCR assay in identifying the presence of legionellae, it was used to survey Legionella contamination in the water of 49 cooling towers of 32 hospitals. A commercially available EnviroAmp Legionella kit and a culture method were also used in the survey for comparison with the seminested PCR assay. The detection rates of legionellae in the samples were 91.8% (45 of 49) by the PCR assay and 79.5% (39 of 49) by the culture method. The EnviroAmp kit revealed that 30.6% of the water samples (15 of 49) contained inhibitors of the PCR amplification. However, the seminested PCR assay could produce the Legionella-specific DNA bands in 14 of the 15 samples. Although 8 of the 14 samples were positive in the first-step PCR, 6 of the 14 samples became positive in the second-step PCR. These results suggest that the effect of PCR inhibitors in samples, if any, can be reduced because of the dilution of the sample in the second-step PCR and that sensitivity of detection can be increased by the second-step PCR. Thus, the seminested PCR assay with LEG primers to amplify the 16S rRNA gene of 39 Legionella spp. was a practical and sensitive method to detect Legionella spp. in water samples. PMID:9212400

  13. PBF. Oblique and contextual view of PBF Cooling Tower, PER720. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF. Oblique and contextual view of PBF Cooling Tower, PER-720. Camera facing northeast. Auxiliary Building (PER-624) abuts Cooling Tower. Demolition equipment has arrived. Date: August 2003. INEEL negative no. HD-35-11-2 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. PBF Cooling Tower Auxiliary Building (PER624) interior. Camera facing north. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF Cooling Tower Auxiliary Building (PER-624) interior. Camera facing north. Deluge valves and automatic fire protection piping for Cooling Tower. Photographer: Holmes. Date: May 20, 1970. INEEL negative no. 70-2323 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  15. PBF Cooling Tower (PER720). Camera faces east to show west ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF Cooling Tower (PER-720). Camera faces east to show west facade. Sloped (louvered) panels in this and opposite facade allow air to enter tower and cool water falling on splash bars within. Date: August 2003. INEEL negative no. HD-35-10-2 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  16. Method and system for simulating heat and mass transfer in cooling towers

    DOEpatents

    Bharathan, Desikan; Hassani, A. Vahab

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a system and method for simulating the performance of a cooling tower. More precisely, the simulator of the present invention predicts values related to the heat and mass transfer from a liquid (e.g., water) to a gas (e.g., air) when provided with input data related to a cooling tower design. In particular, the simulator accepts input data regarding: (a) cooling tower site environmental characteristics; (b) cooling tower operational characteristics; and (c) geometric characteristics of the packing used to increase the surface area within the cooling tower upon which the heat and mass transfer interactions occur. In providing such performance predictions, the simulator performs computations related to the physics of heat and mass transfer within the packing. Thus, instead of relying solely on trial and error wherein various packing geometries are tested during construction of the cooling tower, the packing geometries for a proposed cooling tower can be simulated for use in selecting a desired packing geometry for the cooling tower.

  17. Isolation of Legionella pneumophila from hospital cooling towers in Johor, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Abdul Samad, B H; Suhaili, M R; Baba, N; Rajasekaran, G

    2004-08-01

    Water-based cooling towers and their water supply at two hospitals in Johor were surveyed for the presence Legionella pneumophila. L. pneumophila were grown from 19 (76%) out of 25 collected water samples. One hospital cooling tower was contaminated with L. pneumophila serogroup 1.

  18. Reduction in performance due to recirculation in mechanical-draft cooling towers

    SciTech Connect

    Kroger, D.G. )

    1989-01-01

    The influence of recirculating warm plume air on the performance of mechanical-draft cooling towers is investigated analytically, numerically and experimentally. It is shown that the amount of recirculation that occurs is a function of the flow and the thermal and geometric characteristics of the tower. The presence of a wind wall tends to reduce the mount of recirculation. An equation is presented with which the performance effectiveness due to recirculation can be evaluated approximately for a mechanical-draft cooling tower.

  19. [Isolation of Legionella spp. from cooling tower water and the effect of microbicides].

    PubMed

    Kasai, J; Ando, F; Kuwashima, M

    1989-08-01

    Legionella spp., the causative organism of legionnaires' disease, were isolated from more than 80% of water samples in cooling towers before washing. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of microbicide treatment of cooling tower water on Legionella spp., other bacteria and protozoa. 2-Bromo-2-nitropane-1,3-dial, 2,4-dibromo-5,5-dimethylhydantoin or silver nitrate-treated silica gel was added to cooling tower water. The isolation rate of Legionella spp. in the cooling tower water was 50% after microbiocide treatment with 2-bromo-2-nitropane-1,3-dial being the most effective. The microbicide treatment had no effect on other bacteria or protozoa. These findings indicated the importance of regular washing and water exchange of cooling tower water with microbicide treatment.

  20. 40 CFR 61.134 - Standard: Naphthalene processing, final coolers, and final-cooler cooling towers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Benzene Emissions from Coke By-Product Recovery Plants § 61.134... are allowed from naphthalene processing, final coolers and final-cooler cooling towers at coke...

  1. 40 CFR 61.134 - Standard: Naphthalene processing, final coolers, and final-cooler cooling towers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Benzene Emissions from Coke By-Product Recovery Plants § 61.134... are allowed from naphthalene processing, final coolers and final-cooler cooling towers at coke...

  2. 40 CFR 61.134 - Standard: Naphthalene processing, final coolers, and final-cooler cooling towers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Benzene Emissions from Coke By-Product Recovery Plants § 61.134... are allowed from naphthalene processing, final coolers and final-cooler cooling towers at coke...

  3. 40 CFR 61.134 - Standard: Naphthalene processing, final coolers, and final-cooler cooling towers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Benzene Emissions from Coke By-Product Recovery Plants § 61.134... are allowed from naphthalene processing, final coolers and final-cooler cooling towers at coke...

  4. 40 CFR 61.134 - Standard: Naphthalene processing, final coolers, and final-cooler cooling towers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Benzene Emissions from Coke By-Product Recovery Plants § 61.134... are allowed from naphthalene processing, final coolers and final-cooler cooling towers at coke...

  5. Demolition of Cooling Towers from the World's First Commercial Reactors - the Nuclear Factor

    SciTech Connect

    Foss, D.L.

    2006-07-01

    The demolition of hyperbolic cooling towers would be a relatively routine demolition project because the method of demolition has been proven straightforward and repeatable with the successful demolition of over 200 similar structures in the last 30 years. This paper will detail the unique aspects of the planning and execution of the cooling tower demolition project due to its location on a nuclear site and proximity to active nuclear operations. (authors)

  6. Vertical sampling flights in support of the 1981 ASCOT cooling tower experiments: field effort and data

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, G.T.

    1982-03-01

    During the month of August 1981, three nights of experimental sampling of tracers released into the cooling tower plume of a geothermal power plant were conducted. In these experiments a tethered balloon was used to lift a payload so as to obtain vertical profiles of the cooling tower plume and the entrained tracers. A description of the equipment used, the field effort and the data acquired are presented here.

  7. Performance prediction of a multi-stage wind tower for indoor cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issa, Roy J.; Chang, Byungik

    2012-08-01

    A theoretical model is developed to establish an in-depth understanding of the performance of a three-stage wind tower with a bypass system for indoor cooling in rural dry and hot climates. Model simulations are presented for a wide range of ambient conditions that include inlet wind speed, inlet temperature and relative humidity. Simulation results provide an insight into the desirable water flow rates and air-to-water loadings for comfort zone temperatures and relative humidity levels at the exit of the wind tower. Simulations show wind towers with variable cross-sections provide an increase in the cooling power for the same inlet wind speed, inlet air temperature and relative humidity when compared to wind towers with a constant cross-section. The study shall lead to a better understanding to designing wind towers that are both environmentally friendly and energy efficient.

  8. Engineering evaluation of magma cooling-tower demonstration at Nevada Power Company's Sunrise Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-11-01

    The Magma Cooling Tower (MCT) process utilizes a falling film heat exchanger integrated into an induced draft cooling tower to evaporate waste water. A hot water source such as return cooling water provides the energy for evaporation. Water quality control is maintained by removing potential scaling constituents to make concentrations of the waste water possible without scaling heat transfer surfaces. A pilot-scale demonstration test of the MCT process was performed from March 1979 through June 1979 at Nevada Power Company's Sunrise Station in Las Vegas, Nevada. The pilot unit extracted heat from the powerplant cooling system to evaporate cooling tower blowdown. Two water quality control methods were employed: makeup/sidestream softening and fluidized bed crystallization. The 11 week softening mode test was successful.

  9. Effect of solar radiation on the performance of cross flow wet cooling tower in hot climate of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banooni, Salem; Chitsazan, Ali

    2016-11-01

    In some cities such as Ahvaz-Iran, the solar radiation is very high and the annual-mean-daily of the global solar radiation is about 17.33 MJ m2 d-1. Solar radiation as an external heat source seems to affect the thermal performance of the cooling towers. Usually, in modeling cooling tower, the effects of solar radiation are ignored. To investigate the effect of sunshade on the performance and modeling of the cooling tower, the experiments were conducted in two different states, cooling towers with and without sunshade. In this study, the Merkel's approach and finite difference technique are used to predict the thermal behavior of cross flow wet cooling tower without sunshade and the results are compared with the data obtained from the cooling towers with and without sunshade. Results showed that the sunshade is very efficient and it reduced the outlet water temperature, the approach and the water exergy of the cooling tower up to 1.2 °C, 15 and 1.1 %, respectively and increased the range and the efficiency of the cooling tower up to 29 and 37 %, respectively. Also, the sunshade decreased the error between the experimental data of the cooling tower with sunshade and the modeling results of the cooling tower without sunshade 1.85 % in average.

  10. Disinfection of bacterial biofilms in pilot-scale cooling tower systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Wei; Sileika, Tadas; Warta, Richard; Cianciotto, Nicholas P; Packman, Aaron I

    2011-04-01

    The impact of continuous chlorination and periodic glutaraldehyde treatment on planktonic and biofilm microbial communities was evaluated in pilot-scale cooling towers operated continuously for 3 months. The system was operated at a flow rate of 10,080 l day(-1). Experiments were performed with a well-defined microbial consortium containing three heterotrophic bacteria: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Flavobacterium sp. The persistence of each species was monitored in the recirculating cooling water loop and in biofilms on steel and PVC coupons in the cooling tower basin. The observed bacterial colonization in cooling towers did not follow trends in growth rates observed under batch conditions and, instead, reflected differences in the ability of each organism to remain attached and form biofilms under the high-through flow conditions in cooling towers. Flavobacterium was the dominant organism in the community, while P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae did not attach well to either PVC or steel coupons in cooling towers and were not able to persist in biofilms. As a result, the much greater ability of Flavobacterium to adhere to surfaces protected it from disinfection, whereas P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae were subject to rapid disinfection in the planktonic state.

  11. Disinfection of bacterial biofilms in pilot-scale cooling tower systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Wei; Sileika, Tadas; Warta, Richard; Cianciotto, Nicholas P.; Packman, Aaron I.

    2015-01-01

    The impact of continuous chlorination and periodic glutaraldehyde treatment on planktonic and biofilm microbial communities was evaluated in pilot-scale cooling towers operated continuously for 3 months. The system was operated at a flow rate of 10,080 l day−1. Experiments were performed with a well-defined microbial consortium containing three heterotrophic bacteria: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Flavobacterium sp. The persistence of each species was monitored in the recirculating cooling water loop and in biofilms on steel and PVC coupons in the cooling tower basin. The observed bacterial colonization in cooling towers did not follow trends in growth rates observed under batch conditions and, instead, reflected differences in the ability of each organism to remain attached and form biofilms under the high-through flow conditions in cooling towers. Flavobacterium was the dominant organism in the community, while P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae did not attach well to either PVC or steel coupons in cooling towers and were not able to persist in biofilms. As a result, the much greater ability of Flavobacterium to adhere to surfaces protected it from disinfection, whereas P. aeruginosa and K. pneumoniae were subject to rapid disinfection in the planktonic state. PMID:21547755

  12. Occurrence of Infected Free-Living Amoebae in Cooling Towers of Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Soares, Scheila S; Souza, Thamires K; Berté, Francisco K; Cantarelli, Vlademir V; Rott, Marilise B

    2017-08-24

    This study determined the occurrence of potentially pathogenic free-living amoebae (FLA) and bacteria associated with amoebae in air-conditioning cooling towers in southern Brazil. Water samples were collected from 36 cooling systems from air-conditioning in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The organisms were identified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing automated. The results showed that these aquatic environments, with variable temperature, are potential "hot spots" for emerging human pathogens like free-living amoebae and bacteria associated. In total, 92% of the cooling-tower samples analyzed were positive for FLA, and Acanthamoeba was the dominant genus by culture and PCR. Amoebal isolates revealed intracellular bacteria in 39.3% of them and all were confirmed as members of the genus Pseudomonas. The results obtained show the important role of cooling towers as a source of amoebae-associated pathogens.

  13. A community outbreak of Legionnaires' disease: evidence of a cooling tower as the source.

    PubMed

    Sabria, M; Alvarez, J; Dominguez, A; Pedrol, A; Sauca, G; Salleras, L; Lopez, A; Garcia-Nuñez, M A; Parron, I; Barrufet, M P

    2006-07-01

    A community outbreak of Legionella pneumonia in the district of Cerdanyola, Mataró (Catalonia, Spain) was investigated in an epidemiological, environmental and molecular study. Each patient was interviewed to ascertain personal risk-factors and the clinical and epidemiological data. Isolates of Legionella from patients and water samples were subtyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Between 7 August and 25 August 2002, 113 cases of Legionella pneumonia fulfilling the outbreak case definition criteria were reported, with 84 (74%) cases being located within a 500-m radius of the suspected cooling tower source. In this area, the relative risk of being infected was 54.6 (95% CI 25.3-118.1) compared with individuals living far from the cooling tower. Considering the population residing in the Cerdanyola district (28,256 inhabitants) as a reference population, the attack rate for the outbreak was 399.9 cases/100,000 inhabitants, and the case fatality rate was 1.8%. A single DNA subtype was observed among the ten clinical isolates, and one of the subtypes from the cooling tower matched exactly with the clinical subtype. Nine days after closing the cooling tower, new cases of pneumonia caused by Legionella ceased to appear. The epidemiological features of the outbreak, and the microbiological and molecular investigations, implicated the cooling tower as the source of infection.

  14. A case of nosocomial Legionella pneumonia associated with a contaminated hospital cooling tower.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Kayo; Shigemura, Katsumi; Abe, Yasuhisa; Jikimoto, Takumi; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Fujisawa, Masato; Arakawa, Soichi

    2014-01-01

    We report the epidemiological investigation of a nosocomial pneumonia case due to Legionella pneumophila linked to a contaminated hospital cooling tower in an immune-compromised patient. A 73-year-old female patient was diagnosed with nosocomial Legionella pneumonia proven by a culture of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Two strains isolated from the patient and two strains isolated from two cooling towers were found to be identical using repetitive-sequence-based-PCR with a 95% probability. This Legionella pneumonia case might be caused by aerosol from cooling towers on the roof of the hospital building which was contaminated by L. pneumophila. We increased up the temperature of hot water supply appropriately for prevention of Legionella breeding in an environment of patients' living. On the other hand, as the maintenance of cooling tower, we increased the frequency of Legionella culture tests from twice a year to three times a year. In addition, we introduced an automated disinfectants insertion machine and added one antiseptic reagent (BALSTER ST-40 N, Tohzai Chemical Industry Co., Ltd., Kawasaki, Japan) after this Legionella disease, and thereafter, we have no additional cases of Legionella disease or detection of Legionella spp. from the cooling tower or hot water supply. This case demonstrates the importance of detecting the infection source and carrying out environmental maintenance in cooperation with the infection control team.

  15. CFD MODELING AND ANALYSIS FOR A-AREA AND H-AREA COOLING TOWERS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; Garrett, A.; Bollinger, J.

    2009-09-02

    Mechanical draft cooling towers are designed to cool process water via sensible and latent heat transfer to air. Heat and mass transfer take place simultaneously. Heat is transferred as sensible heat due to the temperature difference between liquid and gas phases, and as the latent heat of the water as it evaporates. Mass of water vapor is transferred due to the difference between the vapor pressure at the air-liquid interface and the partial pressure of water vapor in the bulk of the air. Equations to govern these phenomena are discussed here. The governing equations are solved by taking a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach. The purpose of the work is to develop a three-dimensional CFD model to evaluate the flow patterns inside the cooling tower cell driven by cooling fan and wind, considering the cooling fans to be on or off. Two types of the cooling towers are considered here. One is cross-flow type cooling tower located in A-Area, and the other is counterflow type cooling tower located in H-Area. The cooling tower located in A-Area is mechanical draft cooling tower (MDCT) consisting of four compartment cells as shown in Fig. 1. It is 13.7m wide, 36.8m long, and 9.4m high. Each cell has its own cooling fan and shroud without any flow communications between two adjacent cells. There are water distribution decks on both sides of the fan shroud. The deck floor has an array of about 25mm size holes through which water droplet falls into the cell region cooled by the ambient air driven by fan and wind, and it is eventually collected in basin area. As shown in Fig. 1, about 0.15-m thick drift eliminator allows ambient air to be humidified through the evaporative cooling process without entrainment of water droplets into the shroud exit. The H-Area cooling tower is about 7.3 m wide, 29.3 m long, and 9.0 m high. Each cell has its own cooling fan and shroud, but each of two corner cells has two panels to shield wind at the bottom of the cells. There is some

  16. Concentration, serotypic profiles, and infectivity of Legionnaires' Disease bacteria populations in cooling towers

    SciTech Connect

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    At the Philadelphia American Legion Convention in 1976 nearly two hundred people developed pulmonary infection. Of these, twenty-eight died. The causative bacterial agent was subsequently isolated and identified as a previously undiscovered human pathogen, that is, Legionnaires' Disease Bacterium (LDB). Currently it is estimated that over one hundred thousand cases of Legionella occur annually. Cooling towers have been shown to be the source of LDB in some of the outbreaks. Ecological information indicates that the bacteria are present in many natural waters. Moreover, there is strong evidence that algal products can stimulate the growth of LDB. Because cooling tower environments may be conducive for growth and/or dispersal of LDB, a survey of both industrial and air-conditioning cooling towers for the presence of LDB was undertaken.

  17. An alkaline approach to treating cooling towers for control of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    States, S J; Conley, L F; Towner, S G; Wolford, R S; Stephenson, T E; McNamara, A M; Wadowsky, R M; Yee, R B

    1987-01-01

    Earlier field and laboratory studies have shown that Legionella species survive and multiply in the pH range 5.5 to 9.2. Additionally, the technical feasibility of operating cooling towers at elevated alkalinities and pH has previously been documented by published guidelines. The guidelines indicate that these conditions facilitate corrosion control and favor chlorine persistence which enhances the effectiveness of continuous chlorination in biofouling control. This information suggests that control of Legionella species in cooling towers can be accomplished by operating the towers under alkaline conditions. To test this possibility, we collected water samples over a period of months from a hospital cooling tower. The samples were analyzed for a variety of chemical parameters. Subsamples were pasteurized and inoculated with non-agar-passaged Legionella pneumophila which had been maintained in tap water. Correlation of subsequent Legionella growth with corresponding pH and alkalinity values revealed statistically significant inverse associations. These data support the hypothesis that operating cooling towers outside of the optimal conditions for Legionella growth (e.g., at elevated alkalinities and a pH greater than 9) may be a useful approach to controlling growth in this habitat. PMID:3662515

  18. Experimental determination of drift and PM10 cooling tower emissions: Influence of components and operating conditions.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, J; Kaiser, A S; Lucas, M

    2017-11-01

    Cooling tower emissions have become an increasingly common hazard to the environment (air polluting, ice formation and salts deposition) and to the health (Legionella disease) in the last decades. Several environmental policies have emerged in recent years limiting cooling tower emissions but they have not prevented an increasing intensity of outbreaks. Since the level of emissions depends mainly on cooling tower component design and the operating conditions, this paper deals with an experimental investigation of the amount of emissions, drift and PM10, emitted by a cooling tower with different configurations (drift eliminators and distribution systems) and working under several operating conditions. This objective is met by the measurement of cooling tower source emission parameters by means of the sensitive paper technique. Secondary objectives were to contextualize the observed emission rates according to international regulations. Our measurements showed that the drift rates included in the relevant international standards are significantly higher than the obtained results (an average of 100 times higher) and hence, the environmental problems may occur. Therefore, a revision of the standards is recommended with the aim of reducing the environmental and human health impact. By changing the operating conditions and the distribution system, emissions can be reduced by 52.03% and 82% on average. In the case of drift eliminators, the difference ranges from 18.18% to 98.43% on average. As the emissions level is clearly influenced by operating conditions and components, regulation tests should be referred to default conditions. Finally, guidelines to perform emission tests and a selection criterion of components and conditions for the tested cooling tower are proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Hypotheses of calculation of the water flow rate evaporated in a wet cooling tower

    SciTech Connect

    Bourillot, C.

    1983-08-01

    The method developed by Poppe at the University of Hannover to calculate the thermal performance of a wet cooling tower fill is presented. The formulation of Poppe is then validated using full-scale test data from a wet cooling tower at the power station at Neurath, Federal Republic of Germany. It is shown that the Poppe method predicts the evaporated water flow rate almost perfectly and the condensate content of the warm air with good accuracy over a wide range of ambient conditions. The simplifying assumptions of the Merkel theory are discussed, and the errors linked to these assumptions are systematically described, then illustrated with the test data.

  20. Startup of air-cooled condensers and dry cooling towers at low temperatures of the cooling air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milman, O. O.; Ptakhin, A. V.; Kondratev, A. V.; Shifrin, B. A.; Yankov, G. G.

    2016-05-01

    The problems of startup and performance of air-cooled condensers (ACC) and dry cooling towers (DCT) at low cooling air temperatures are considered. Effects of the startup of the ACC at sub-zero temperatures are described. Different options of the ACC heating up are analyzed, and examples of existing technologies are presented (electric heating, heating up with hot air or steam, and internal and external heating). The use of additional heat exchanging sections, steam tracers, in the DCT design is described. The need for high power in cases of electric heating and heating up with hot air is noted. An experimental stand for research and testing of the ACC startup at low temperatures is described. The design of the three-pass ACC unit is given, and its advantages over classical single-pass design at low temperatures are listed. The formation of ice plugs inside the heat exchanging tubes during the start-up of ACC and DCT at low cooling air temperatures is analyzed. Experimental data on the effect of the steam flow rate, steam nozzle distance from the heat-exchange surface, and their orientation in space on the metal temperature were collected, and test results are analyzed. It is noted that the surface temperature at the end of the heat up is almost independent from its initial temperature. Recommendations for the safe start-up of ACCs and DCTs are given. The heating flow necessary to sufficiently heat up heat-exchange surfaces of ACCs and DCTs for the safe startup is estimated. The technology and the process of the heat up of the ACC with the heating steam external supply are described by the example of the startup of the full-scale section of the ACC at sub-zero temperatures of the cooling air, and the advantages of the proposed start-up technology are confirmed.

  1. Biocide usage in cooling towers in the electric power and petroleum refining industries

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J.; Rice, J.K.; Raivel, M.E.S.

    1997-11-01

    Cooling towers users frequently apply biocides to the circulating cooling water to control growth of microorganisms, algae, and macroorganisms. Because of the toxic properties of biocides, there is a potential for the regulatory controls on their use and discharge to become increasingly more stringent. This report examines the types of biocides used in cooling towers by companies in the electric power and petroleum refining industries, and the experiences those companies have had in dealing with agencies that regulate cooling tower blowdown discharges. Results from a sample of 67 electric power plants indicate that the use of oxidizing biocides (particularly chlorine) is favored. Quaternary ammonia salts (quats), a type of nonoxidizing biocide, are also used in many power plant cooling towers. The experience of dealing with regulators to obtain approval to discharge biocides differs significantly between the two industries. In the electric power industry, discharges of any new biocide typically must be approved in writing by the regulatory agency. The approval process for refineries is less formal. In most cases, the refinery must notify the regulatory agency that it is planning to use a new biocide, but the refinery does not need to get written approval before using it. The conclusion of the report is that few of the surveyed facilities are having any difficulty in using and discharging the biocides they want to use.

  2. Pilot-scale cooling tower to evaluate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control strategies for cooling system makeup water.

    PubMed

    Chien, S H; Hsieh, M K; Li, H; Monnell, J; Dzombak, D; Vidic, R

    2012-02-01

    Pilot-scale cooling towers can be used to evaluate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control strategies when using particular cooling system makeup water and particular operating conditions. To study the potential for using a number of different impaired waters as makeup water, a pilot-scale system capable of generating 27,000 kJ∕h heat load and maintaining recirculating water flow with a Reynolds number of 1.92 × 10(4) was designed to study these critical processes under conditions that are similar to full-scale systems. The pilot-scale cooling tower was equipped with an automatic makeup water control system, automatic blowdown control system, semi-automatic biocide feeding system, and corrosion, scaling, and biofouling monitoring systems. Observed operational data revealed that the major operating parameters, including temperature change (6.6 °C), cycles of concentration (N = 4.6), water flow velocity (0.66 m∕s), and air mass velocity (3660 kg∕h m(2)), were controlled quite well for an extended period of time (up to 2 months). Overall, the performance of the pilot-scale cooling towers using treated municipal wastewater was shown to be suitable to study critical processes (corrosion, scaling, biofouling) and evaluate cooling water management strategies for makeup waters of complex quality.

  3. Experimental measurement of cooling tower emissions using image processing of sensitive papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, J.; Kaiser, A. S.; Ballesta, M.; Gil, A.; Lucas, M.

    2013-04-01

    Cooling tower emissions are harmful for several reasons such as air polluting, wetting, icing and solid particle deposition, but mainly due to human health hazards (i.e. Legionella). There are several methods for measuring drift drops. This paper is focussed on the sensitive paper technique, which is suitable in low drift scenarios and real conditions. The lack of an automatic classification method motivated the development of a digital image process algorithm for the Sensitive Paper method. This paper presents a detailed description of this method, in which, drop-like elements are identified by means of the Canny edge detector combined with some morphological operations. Afterwards, the application of a J48 decision tree is proposed as one of the most relevant contributions. This classification method allows us to discern between stains whose origin is a drop and stains whose origin is not a drop. The method is applied to a real case and results are presented in terms of drift and PM10 emissions. This involves the calculation of the main features of the droplet distribution at the cooling tower exit surface in terms of drop size distribution data, cumulative mass distribution curve and characteristic drop diameters. The Log-normal and the Rosin-Rammler distribution functions have been fitted to the experimental data collected in the tests and it can been concluded that the first one is the most suitable for experimental data among the functions tested (whereas the second one is less suitable). Realistic PM10 calculations include the measurement of drift emissions and Total Dissolved Solids as well as the size and number of drops. Results are compared to the method proposed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency assessing its overestimation. Drift emissions have found to be 0.0517% of the recirculating water, which is over the Spanish standards limit (0.05%).

  4. Cost-optimal design of dry cooling towers through mathematical programming techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Buys, J.D.; Kroeger, D.G. )

    1989-05-01

    The Constrained Variable Metric Algorithm is chosen to minimize the objective function (cost) in the design of a natural draft dry cooling tower. An existing cooling system design that has specific performance characteristics under prescribed operating conditions is selected as a reference unit. By changing design variables, but not exceeding prescribed constraints, a more cost-effective design is achieved. The influence of various parameters, and the sensitivity of the objective function to these parameters, are evaluated.

  5. ETR COOLING TOWER PUMP HOUSE, TRA645. FOUR SECONDARY COOLANT PUMPS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR COOLING TOWER PUMP HOUSE, TRA-645. FOUR SECONDARY COOLANT PUMPS ARE ARRANGED IN A ROW. IN REAR ARE THREE SHUTDOWN EMERGENCY PUMPS. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-4176. Jack L. Anderson, Photographer, 12/21/1956 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  6. COOLING TOWER PUMP HOUSE, TRA606. PLAN AND SECTIONS. PUMPS, PIPE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    COOLING TOWER PUMP HOUSE, TRA-606. PLAN AND SECTIONS. PUMPS, PIPE AND MONORAIL LAYOUT. BLAW-KNOX 3150-7-1, 9/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0607-00-100013, REV. 4. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  7. COOLING TOWER PUMP HOUSE, TRA606. ELEVATIONS, STRUCTURAL AND ROOF PLAN, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    COOLING TOWER PUMP HOUSE, TRA-606. ELEVATIONS, STRUCTURAL AND ROOF PLAN, DETAILS. BLAW-KNOX 3150-807-1, 2/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0607-00-098-100670. REV. 3. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  8. PBF Cooling Tower (PER720). Camera faces south to show north ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF Cooling Tower (PER-720). Camera faces south to show north facade. Note enclosed stairway. Date: August 2003. INEEL negative no. HD-35-10-3 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  9. PBF Cooling Tower (PER720) and its Auxiliary Building (PER625). Camera ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF Cooling Tower (PER-720) and its Auxiliary Building (PER-625). Camera facing west shows east facades. Center pipe carried secondary coolant water from reactor. Building to distributor basin. Date: August 2003. INEEL negative no. HD-35-10-1 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. PBF Cooling Tower (PER720). Closeup detail of louvered wall panels ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF Cooling Tower (PER-720). Close-up detail of louvered wall panels on south facade. Date: August 2003. INEEL negative no. HD-35-11-1 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  11. PBF Cooling Tower (PER720), and Auxiliary Building (PER624). Camera faces ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF Cooling Tower (PER-720), and Auxiliary Building (PER-624). Camera faces north to show south facades. Oblong vertical structure at left of center is weather shield for stairway. Date: August 2003. INEEL negative no. HD-35-10-4 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  12. Prevalence of Legionella strains in cooling towers and legionellosis cases in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Lau, Robert; Maqsood, Saadia; Harte, David; Caughley, Brian; Deacon, Rob

    2013-01-01

    Over 3,900 water samples from 688 cooling towers were tested for Legionella in 2008 in New Zealand. Of 80 (2.05% isolation rate) Legionella isolates, 10 (12.5%) were L. pneumophila serogroup 1; 10 (12.5%) were L. anisa; nine (11.2%) were L. pneumophila serogroup 8; and one (1.2%) was L. longbeachae serogroup 2. Forty-one (51.2%) Legionella isolates were L. pneumophila serogroups. Over 3,990 water samples from 606 cooling towers were tested for Legionella in 2009 in New Zealand. Of 51 (1.28% isolation rate) Legionella isolates, 18 (35.3%) were L. pneumophila serogroup 1, and 39 (76.4%) were other L. pneumophila serogroups. L. pneumophila serogroups were significantly associated with legionellosis cases in 2008 and 2009. L. longbeachae serogroups were equally significantly associated with legionellosis cases. This significant association of L. longbeachae with legionellosis particularly of L. longbeachae serogroup 1 is unique in that part of the world. The authors' study also showed that the aqueous environment of the cooling tower is not a natural habitat for pathogenic L. longbeachae. Regular monitoring and maintenance of cooling towers have prevented outbreaks of legionellosis.

  13. ETR COOLING TOWER PUMP HOUSE, TRA645. PUMP HOUSE TAKES SHAPE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR COOLING TOWER PUMP HOUSE, TRA-645. PUMP HOUSE TAKES SHAPE. CAMERA FACES NORTH TOWARD ETR CONSTRUCTION AND MTR BEYOND. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-2041. Jack L. Anderson, Photographer, 6/14/1956 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. In Situ g-PHA Measurements of the 285-3H Cooling Tower Components

    SciTech Connect

    Salaymeh, S.R.

    2001-05-23

    The Analytical Development Section of Savannah River Technology Center was requested by the Facility Disposition Division to conduct in-situ gamma-ray pulse height analysis measurements to provide input toward the decision to unconditionally release the 285-3H cooling tower.

  15. Magnetic fluid conditioning system allows 3000 ppm hardness without cooling tower scale buildup

    SciTech Connect

    Szostak, R.J.; Toy, D.A.

    1985-08-01

    Big Three Industries, a manufacturer of compressed and liquefied atmospheric gases, operates a large production complex in Bayport, TX which recirculates 100,000 gpm cooling water. Due to regulatory agency guidelines, high costs, and limited effectiveness of conventional chemical treatment methods, Big Three was in need of a treatment method to prevent corrosion and scaling in recirculating water cooling systems. In December 1983 a magnetic fluid conditioner (MFC) was installed in the pump discharge piping of one cooling tower at Bayport. The patented MFC is an 18'' long spool pipe fitted with uranium-based alloy magnets. The MFC has no moving parts and requires no chemicals, external power source, or maintenance. The MFC is designed so that the fluid is accelerated through a magnetic field. The high velocity of the fluid causes nucleation of the salts in the fluid. The salts are separated from the water by precipitation. During eighteen months of using the MFC, the cooling tower has concentrated in excess of 50 cycles. Conductivity is in excess of 10,000 micromhos, and total hardness (CaCO/sub 3/) is above 4000 ppm with pH stabilized between 8 and 9. However, inspections have revealed clean surfaces. The cleaner metal surfaces within the cooling water system provide better heat transfer which has resulted in reduction of tower blowdown, makeup water requirements, and pumping costs. Associated savings will enable the MFC to achieve payback in two and a half years.

  16. Nosocomial legionnaires' disease: epidemiologic demonstration of cooling towers as a source. [Legionella pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Garbe, P.L.; Davis, B.J.; Weisfeld, J.S.; Markowitz, L.; Miner, P. Garrity, F.; Barbaree, J.M.; Reingold, A.L.

    1985-07-26

    Investigation of a recent outbreak of nosocomial legionnaires' disease - initially thought to be due to the documented presence of Legionella pneumophila in the hospital potable water - showed that aerosols from one or more cooling towers were the actual source of infection. From June 27 to Aug 25, 1983, nosocomial legionnaires' disease developed in 15 persons at a hospital in Rhode Island. Twelve (80%) of 15 case-patients occupied rooms in building 1, unit B, compared with eight (28%) of 29 control patients (odds ratio = 10.8; 95% confidence interval = 1.4 to 85.6). Subsequent investigation demonstrated that water in a cooling tower located 100 ft upwind of unit B was heavily contaminated with L. pneumophila, serogroup 1, subgroup 1, 2, 4, 5. The same strain was isolated from nine of the patients and from the make-up water for the tower. Active surveillance during the ten months following decontamination of the cooling tower identified no additional cases of nosocomial legionnaires' disease, although the hospital potable water had not been treated. While recommendations have been made for controlling nosocomial legionnaires' disease by heating or hyperchlorination of hospital potable water, this outbreak demonstrates the importance of an adequate epidemiologic-environmental investigation in choosing the appropriate control strategy.

  17. A STUDY ON LEGIONELLA PNEUMOPHILA, WATER CHEMISTRY, AND ATMOSPHERIC CONDITIONS IN COOLING TOWERS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.; Brigmon, R.

    2009-10-20

    Legionnaires disease is a pneumonia caused by the inhalation of the bacterium Legionella pneumophila. The majority of illnesses have been associated with cooling towers since these devices can harbor and disseminate the bacterium in the aerosolized mist generated by these systems. Historically, Savannah River Site (SRS) cooling towers have had occurrences of elevated levels of Legionella in all seasons of the year and in patterns that are difficult to predict. Since elevated Legionella in cooling tower water are a potential health concern a question has been raised as to the best control methodology. In this work we analyze available chemical, biological, and atmospheric data to determine the best method or key parameter for control. The SRS 4Q Industrial Hygiene Manual, 4Q-1203, 1 - G Cooling Tower Operation and the SRNL Legionella Sampling Program, states that 'Participation in the SRNL Legionella Sampling Program is MANDATORY for all operating cooling towers'. The resulting reports include L. pneumophila concentration information in cells/L. L. pneumophila concentrations >10{sup 7} cells/L are considered elevated and unsafe so action must be taken to reduce these densities. These remedial actions typically include increase biocide addition or 'shocking'. Sometimes additional actions are required if the problem persists including increase tower maintenance (e.g. cleaning). Evaluation of 14 SRS cooling towers, seven water quality parameters, and five Legionella serogroups over a three-plus year time frame demonstrated that cooling tower water Legionella densities varied widely though out this time period. In fact there was no one common consistent significant variable across all towers. The significant factors that did show up most frequently were related to suspended particulates, conductivity, pH, and dissolved oxygen, not chlorine or bromine as might be expected. Analyses of atmospheric data showed that there were more frequent significant elevated Legionella

  18. Leaching of asbestos-cement cooling-tower fill. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.N.; Stone, R.W.

    1981-04-01

    Cooling-tower fill is sometimes made of asbestos cement. Asbestos-cement fill has frequently been damaged by leaching and mechanical problems. This leaching was investigated. Previous studies of asbestos-cement water pipe and cooling-tower fill are summarized. Five plants were visited, and 43 others were contacted by telephone. Water and fill samples were collected and analyzed. About half of the cooling towers with asbestos-cement fill have experienced significant deterioration. To control leaching, water should not be undersaturated with respect to calcium carbonate. The Langelier saturation index is a useful tool for controlling blowdown rates and chemical feed. However, because this index does not allow for all of the relevant factors, it is not possible to recommend values that are suitable for all plants. If no scale inhibitors are used, the index should be kept as high as possible without causing calcium carbonate scale. If scale inhibitors are used, overdosing should be avoided. Asbestos-cement fill should be used only if the cooling-water chemistry can be well controlled. Specifications for asbestos-cement fill can be improved. Other design features, operating practices, and research are suggested.

  19. An ultrasensitive fouling monitoring system for cooling towers

    SciTech Connect

    Nohata, Y.; Taguchi, H.

    1995-03-01

    Fouling in industrial water has been a serious problem for many years. For example, the deterioration of the efficiency of heat exchangers and the occurrence of corrosion can cause cooling water leakage into the process streams. Biocides, dispersants, and filtration systems typically are used to prevent these problems. However, if these treatment programs are started too late, the early stages of fouling can occur. Here, a simple method for assessing fouling and chemical treatment efficiency is described. An ultrasensitive fouling sensor that uses piezoelectric quartz crystals was developed which detects fouling in the early stages.

  20. Calder Hall Cooling Tower Demolition: Landmark Milestone for Decommissioning at Sellafield

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, E.J.

    2008-07-01

    September 2007 saw a very visible change to the Sellafield site following the culmination of a major decommissioning project; the demolition of the four Calder Hall cooling towers. A key part of the UK's nuclear industrial heritage, Calder Hall, the world's first commercial nuclear power station, was opened by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II in October 1953 and continued to generate electricity until its closure in 2003. Following the decision to decommission the Calder Hall site, explosive demolition was identified as the safest and most cost effective route for the removal of the towers. The technique, involving the placement of explosive in 60% of the circumference of both shell and legs, is a tried and tested method which had already been used successfully in more than 200 cooling towers in the UK in the last 30 years. The location and composition of the four 88 metre high towers also created additional challenges. Situated only 40 metres away from the UK's only nuclear Fuel Handling Plant, as well as other sensitive structures on the Sellafield site, the project had to address the impact of a number of key areas, including dust, ground vibration and air over pressure, to ensure that the demolition could be carried out safely and without significant impact on other operational areas on the site. At the same time, the towers had to be prepared for demolition in a way that minimised the amounts of radioactive or hazardous waste materials arising. This paper follows the four year journey from the initial decision to demolish the towers right through to the demolition itself as well as the clean up of the site post demolition. It will also consider the massive programme of work necessary not only to carry out the physical work safely but also to gain regulatory confidence and stakeholder support to carry out the project successfully. In summary: The demolition of the four Calder Hall cooling towers was a highly visible symbol of the changes that are occurring on the

  1. Distinct difference of flaA genotypes of Legionella pneumophila between isolates from bath water and cooling tower water.

    PubMed

    Amemura-Maekawa, Junko; Kura, Fumiaki; Chang, Bin; Suzuki-Hashimoto, Atsuko; Ichinose, Masayuki; Endo, Takuro; Watanabe, Haruo

    2008-09-01

    To investigate the genetic difference of Legionella pneumophila in human-made environments, we collected isolates of L. pneumophila from bath water (n = 167) and cooling tower water (n = 128) primarily in the Kanto region in 2001 and 2005. The environmental isolates were serogrouped and sequenced for a target region of flaA. A total of 14 types of flaA genotypes were found: 10 from cooling tower water and nine from bath water. The flaA genotypes of isolates from cooling tower water were quite different from those of bath water.

  2. Reliability Analysis of Cooling Towers: Influence of Rebars Corrosion on Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Sudret, Bruno; Pendola, Maurice

    2002-07-01

    Natural-draught cooling towers are used in nuclear power plants as heat exchangers. These structures are submitted to environmental loads such as wind and thermal gradients that are stochastic in nature. A probabilistic framework has been developed by EDF (Electricite de France) for assessing the durability of such structures. In this paper, the corrosion of the rebars due to concrete carbonation and the corresponding weakening of the reinforced concrete sections is considered. Due to the presence of time in the definition of the limit state function associated with the loss of serviceability of the cooling tower, time-variant reliability analysis has to be used. A novel approach is proposed to take into account the random 'initiation time', which corresponds to the time necessary for the carbonation to attain the rebars. Results are given in terms of the probability of failure of the structure over its life time. (authors)

  3. Reduction of Fire Hazard in Materials for Irrigators and Water Collectors in Cooling Towers

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, N. V.; Konstantinova, N. I.; Gordon, E. P.; Poedintsev, E. A.

    2016-09-15

    A way of reducing the fire hazard of PVC film used to make cooling-tower irrigators and water collectors is examined. A new generation of fire retardant, nanostructured magnesium hydroxide, is used to impart fire retardant properties. The fabrication technology is optimized with a roller-calendering manufacturing technique, and the permissible ranges of fire hazard indicators for materials in irrigators and water collectors are determined.

  4. Evaluation of cooling tower and wastewater treatment operations at the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, R.A.

    1984-12-01

    The objective of this study was to provide a technical assessment of the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant Wastewater Treatment System. This Scope of Work consisted of five primary tasks described as follows: Task 1 - Determine the quantity of hydantoins in the stripped gas liquor (SGL), their precursors, and the kinetics of their formation in condensed liquor for the Great Plains Gasification Associates (GPGA) gasification facility. The University of North Dakota Energy Research Center (UNDERC) has measured a high concentration of hydantoins in the gas liquor from their slagging gasifier. UNDERC has tested the use of SGL in a pilot cooling tower and they witnessed some adverse effects in the cooling tower and heat exchanger systems. Task 2 - Investigate the adverse Department of Energy (DOE) findings at UNDERC with regard to corrosion, foaming, biological and organic fouling, chemical attack on concrete and organic emissions resulting from the use of SGL in a pilot plant cooling tower. Task 3 - Validate the heat load on the cooling tower for both summer and winter operation and determine the adequacy of the surge pond to store the maximum predicted amount of excess water accumulated during winter operation. Task 4 - Assess potential fouling, foaming and organic carry-over problems associated with operability of the multiple-effect evaporator and develop recommendations on possible alternate use of evaporator condensate to alleviate possible problems in disposing of excess wastewater. Task 5 - Provide DOE with recommendations on the wastewater treatment backup design and test program already committed to by GPGA. This paper presents Fluor's findings regarding the five primary tasks. 12 refs., 4 figs., 15 tabs.

  5. Demonstration of a Mixed Oxide Process for Control of Corrosion and Microbiological Growth in Cooling Towers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    the early weeks of perfor - mance monitoring indicate that the pH and conductivity of the cooling tower water do not change significantly when the mixed...biologically-induced cor- rosion and corrosion due to sulfate -reducing bacteria. The equipment is available in a range of sizes, from battery-powered...when it requires additional salt or other service, and it can transmit data for remote display. 110 copper electrodes and C1010 steel electrodes

  6. Prevalence and Molecular Characteristics of Waterborne Pathogen Legionella in Industrial Cooling Tower Environments

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lijie; Qin, Tian; Li, Yun; Zhou, Haijian; Song, Hongmei; Ren, Hongyu; Li, Liping; Li, Yongguang; Zhao, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Cooling towers are a source of Legionnaires’ disease. It is important from a public health perspective to survey industrial cooling towers for the presence of Legionella. Prospective surveillance of the extent of Legionella pollution was conducted at factories in Shijiazhuang, China between March 2011 and September 2012. Overall, 35.7% of 255 industrial cooling tower water samples showed Legionella-positive, and their concentrations ranged from 100 Colony-Forming Units (CFU)/liter to 88,000 CFU/liter, with an average concentration of 9100 CFU/liter. A total of 121 isolates were obtained. All isolates were L. pneumophila, and the isolated serogroups included serogroups 1 (68 isolates, 56.2%), 6 (25, 20.7%), 5 (12, 9.9%), 8 (8, 6.6%), 3 (6, 5.0%) and 9 (2, 1.6%). All 121 isolates were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and 64 different patterns were obtained. All 121 isolates were analyzed sequence-based typing (SBT), a full 7-allele profile was obtained from 117 isolates. One hundred and seventeen isolates were divided into 49 sequence types. Two virulence genes, lvh and rtxA, are analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). 92.6% (112/121) and 98.3% (119/121) isolates carried lvh and rtxA respectively and 90.9% (110/121) of tested isolates carried both genes. Our results demonstrated high prevalence and genetic polymorphism of L. pneumophila in industrial cooling tower environments in Shijiazhang, China, and the SBT and virulence gene PCR results suggested that the isolates were pathogenic. Improved control and prevention strategies are urgently needed. PMID:26473896

  7. Prevalence and Molecular Characteristics of Waterborne Pathogen Legionella in Industrial Cooling Tower Environments.

    PubMed

    Li, Lijie; Qin, Tian; Li, Yun; Zhou, Haijian; Song, Hongmei; Ren, Hongyu; Li, Liping; Li, Yongguang; Zhao, Dong

    2015-10-12

    Cooling towers are a source of Legionnaires' disease. It is important from a public health perspective to survey industrial cooling towers for the presence of Legionella. Prospective surveillance of the extent of Legionella pollution was conducted at factories in Shijiazhuang, China between March 2011 and September 2012. Overall, 35.7% of 255 industrial cooling tower water samples showed Legionella-positive, and their concentrations ranged from 100 Colony-Forming Units (CFU)/liter to 88,000 CFU/liter, with an average concentration of 9100 CFU/liter. A total of 121 isolates were obtained. All isolates were L. pneumophila, and the isolated serogroups included serogroups 1 (68 isolates, 56.2%), 6 (25, 20.7%), 5 (12, 9.9%), 8 (8, 6.6%), 3 (6, 5.0%) and 9 (2, 1.6%). All 121 isolates were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and 64 different patterns were obtained. All 121 isolates were analyzed sequence-based typing (SBT), a full 7-allele profile was obtained from 117 isolates. One hundred and seventeen isolates were divided into 49 sequence types. Two virulence genes, lvh and rtxA, are analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). 92.6% (112/121) and 98.3% (119/121) isolates carried lvh and rtxA respectively and 90.9% (110/121) of tested isolates carried both genes. Our results demonstrated high prevalence and genetic polymorphism of L. pneumophila in industrial cooling tower environments in Shijiazhang, China, and the SBT and virulence gene PCR results suggested that the isolates were pathogenic. Improved control and prevention strategies are urgently needed.

  8. Modified technique of in-place fungicide treatment of cooling towers as used at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, M.F.; Warriner, B.G.

    1982-02-01

    A modified technique of in-place fungicide treatment of cooling towers has been developed by Union Carbide Corporation, Paducah, Kentucky. The technique enables the fungicide user to treat towers safely without endangering the personnel applying the fungicide. The technique is time saving and effective in obtaining complete coverage of the plenum areas and the decking.

  9. Field Scale Transport of Chromate in Groundwater From Cooling Tower Wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladding, S. M.; Hunt, J. R.

    2007-12-01

    Chromate (Cr(VI)) was used extensively in evaporative cooling systems to prevent corrosion and scale formation. Waters from the cooling systems were discharged to ponds that were intended as evaporation ponds, but there were instances where the wastewaters infiltrated into the soil and released chromate to groundwater. Cooling tower discharges containing chromate also have elevated salt concentrations compared to the ambient groundwater because of the intended evaporative cooling process. Density driven flow and emplacement of contaminated brines should thus be expected. This conceptual model is being evaluated by the analysis of field data at two natural gas compressor facilities in the deserts of southeastern California. These facilities continuously released chromate containing water to unlined evaporation ponds for more than a decade, and subsequent investigations have identified groundwater plumes containing chromate. At one site, extensive remediation over a 15 year period has limited the plume migration but has not reduced groundwater concentrations. At the other site, density-stratified flow is observed. While there are uncertainties in the amounts released, the data available at these sites suggest that remedial approaches based on groundwater extraction are not effective in removing the source of chromate contamination from emplaced pockets of highly concentrated cooling tower discharge. Long term data sets collected during site investigations and remediation are valuable sources of data on field scale transport of highly mobile contaminants such as chromate.

  10. Investigation of Microbial Respirometry for Monitoring Natural Sulfide Abatement in Geothermal Cooling Tower Basins

    SciTech Connect

    Peter A. Pryfogle

    2005-09-01

    Geothermal plant operators are interested in investigating the ability of micro-organisms found in the cooling tower basin to metabolize and cycle sulfide to less toxic sulfur compounds. If the growth or activity of the organisms participating in sulfur-oxidation could be selectively enhanced, then hydrogen sulfide could be naturally abated in the cooling basin, substantially reducing the costs associated with the chemicals used for abatement. The use of respirometry has been proposed as a technique for monitoring the response of the microbial populations found in geothermal cooling towers to various conditions, including the addition of nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus. Respiro-metry is a manometric measurement of dissolved gases that are in equilibrium in a con-fined sample volume. Since microbes expire varying amounts of carbon dioxide or oxygen as they metabolize nutrients, this technique can be used to evaluate their activities in process streams. This report describes a series of experiments designed to determine the suitability of respirometry for tracking microbial activity for evaluating and enhancing natural abatement processes in geothermal cooling basins.

  11. Reuse of refinery's tertiary-treated wastewater in cooling towers: microbiological monitoring.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Vera Lúcia; Veiga, Andréa Azevedo; Mendonça, Rafael Silva; Alves, Andrea Lima; Pagnin, Sérgio; Santiago, Vânia M J

    2015-02-01

    The study was planned to quantify the distribution of bacteria between bulk water and biofilm formed on different materials in an industrial scale cooling tower system of an oil refinery operating with clarified and chlorinated freshwater (CCW) or chlorinated tertiary effluent (TRW) as makeup water. The sessile and planktonic heterotrophic bacteria and Pseudomonas aeruginosa densities were significantly higher in the cooling tower supplied with clarified and chlorinated freshwater (CTCW) (p < 0.05). In the two towers, the biofilm density was higher on the surface of glass slides and stainless steel coupons than on the surface of carbon steel coupons. The average corrosion rates of carbon steel coupons (0.4-0.8 millimeters per year (mpy)) and densities of sessile (12-1.47 × 10(3) colony-forming unit (CFU) cm(-1)) and planktonic (0-2.36 × 10(3) CFU mL(-1)) microbiota remained below of the maximum values of reference used by water treatment companies as indicative of efficient microbial control. These data indicate that the strategies of the water treatment station (WTS) (free chlorine) and industrial wastewater treatment station (IWTS) followed by reverse electrodialysis system (RES) (free chlorine plus chloramine) were effective for the microbiological control of the two makeup water sources.

  12. Comparison of the efficacy of free residual chlorine and monochloramine against biofilms in model and full scale cooling towers.

    PubMed

    Türetgen, Irfan

    2004-04-01

    The presence of microbial cells on surfaces results in the formation of biofilms, which may also give rise to microbiologically influenced corrosion. Biofilms accumulate on all submerged industrial and environmental surfaces. The efficacy of disinfectants is usually evaluated using planktonic cultures, which often leads to an underestimate of the concentration required to control a biofilm. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of monochloramine on biofilms developed in a cooling tower. The disinfectants selected for the study were commercial formulations recommended for controlling microbial growth in cooling towers. A cooling tower and a laboratory model recirculating water system were used as biofilm reactors. Although previous studies have evaluated the efficacy of free chlorine and monochloramine for controlling biofilm growth, there is a lack of published data concerning the use monochloramine in cooling towers. Stainless steel coupons were inserted in each tower basin for a period of 30 d before removal. Monochloramine and free chlorine were tested under identical conditions on mixed biofilms which had been allowed to grow on coupons. Monochloramine was found to be significantly more effective than free chlorine against cooling tower biofilms.

  13. Numerical study of coupled transfer of heat and mass between air and water inside a geothermal water cooling tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassem, Mohamed Mehdi; Bourouni, Karim; Thameur Chaibi, Mohamed

    2006-11-01

    In the south of Tunisia, geothermal water is used to irrigate cultures. Since its temperature is very high (70 C), geothermal water is cooled by cooling towers. These towers are sized empirically and present many operating problems such as excessive energy consumption, big loss of vapour and low cooling efficiency. The aim of our work is modelling the coupled heat and mass transfer between air and water inside the cooling tower. The most important results obtained are that the evaporative potential is dominating the convective one in the cooling process. That's why the cooling is more efficient in summer than in hibernal period when humidity of ambient air reaches high values. In other hand, the negative convective phenomenon is illustrated. In fact, at the bottom of the tower, water temperature reaches the air one; the two fluids begin to cooling simultaneously. Air is cooled by convection and water by evaporation. We demonstrate also that there is no point in putting fans in working during cold weather. We studied also the effect of the variation of heat transfer coefficient on the efficiency of cooling.

  14. Eight years of PV + Cool Tower in a desert residence: Lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Prososki-Marsland, G.

    1996-10-01

    Passive solar design, thermal mass, efficient thermal envelope, solar hot water heating, and a Cool Tower contributed to reducing the total electricity requirements of a 3,733 ft{sup 2} desert home, allowing it to use photovoltaic power for the majority of its electricity needs. The $27,400 PV system had an estimated payback period of 9 years. Not only does this residence have adequate power, but it is exceptionally comfortable, even during the hot and humid monsoon season. Problems encountered with residential PV homes are reviewed as are potential barriers. Suggestions for improvement and mainstreaming residential PV home design are covered.

  15. Wastewater reuse in a cascade based system of a petrochemical industry for the replacement of losses in cooling towers.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Everton; Rodrigues, Marco Antônio Siqueira; Aquim, Patrice Monteiro de

    2016-10-01

    This article discusses the mapping of opportunities for the water reuse in a cascade based system in a petrochemical industry in southern Brazil. This industrial sector has a large demand for water for its operation. In the studied industry, for example, approximately 24 million cubic meters of water were collected directly from the source in 2014. The objective of this study was to evaluate the implementation of the reuse of water in cascade in a petrochemical industry, focusing on the reuse of aqueous streams to replenish losses in the cooling towers. This is an industrial scale case study with real data collected during the years 2014 and 2015. Water reuse was performed using heuristic approach based on the exploitation of knowledge acquired during the search process. The methodology of work consisted of the construction of a process map identifying the stages of production and water consumption, as well as the characterization of the aqueous streams involved in the process. For the application of the industrial water reuse as cooling water, mass balances were carried out considering the maximum concentration levels of turbidity, pH, conductivity, alkalinity, calcium hardness, chlorides, sulfates, silica, chemical oxygen demand and suspended solids as parameters turbidity, pH, conductivity, alkalinity, calcium hardness, chlorides, sulfates, silica, chemical oxygen demand and suspended solids as parameters. The adopted guideline was the fulfillment of the water quality criteria for each application in the industrial process. The study showed the feasibility for the reuse of internal streams as makeup water in cooling towers, and the implementation of the reuse presented in this paper totaled savings of 385,440 m(3)/year of water, which means a sufficient volume to supply 6350 inhabitants for a period of one year, considering the average water consumption per capita in Brazil; in addition to 201,480 m(3)/year of wastewater that would no longer be generated

  16. Study plan for conducting a section 316(a) demonstration: K-Reactor cooling tower, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Paller, M.H.

    1991-02-01

    The K Reactor at the Savannah River Site (SRS) began operation in 1954. The K-Reactor pumped secondary cooling water from the Savannah River and discharged directly to the Indian Grave Branch, a tributary of Pen Branch which flows to the Savannah River. During earlier operations, the temperature and discharge rates of cooling water from the K-reactor were up to approximately 70{degree}C and 400 cfs, substantially altering the thermal and flow regimes of this stream. These discharges resulted in adverse impacts to the receiving stream and wetlands along the receiving stream. As a component of a Consent Order (84-4-W as amended) with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, the Department of Energy (DOE) evaluated the alternatives for cooling thermal effluents from K Reactor and concluded that a natural draft recirculating cooling tower should be constructed. The cooling tower will mitigate thermal and flow factors that resulted in the previous impacts to the Indian Grave/Pen Branch ecosystem. The purpose of the proposed biological monitoring program is to provide information that will support a Section 316(a) Demonstration for Indian Grave Branch and Pen Branch when K-Reactor is operated with the recirculating cooling tower. The data will be used to determine that Indian Grave Branch and Pen Branch support Balanced Indigenous Communities when K-Reactor is operated with a recirculating cooling tower. 4 refs., 1 fig. 1 tab.

  17. A Large Community Outbreak of Legionnaires' Disease Associated With a Cooling Tower in New York City, 2015.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Don; Boyd, Christopher; Rakeman, Jennifer L; Greene, Sharon K; Fitzhenry, Robert; McProud, Trevor; Musser, Kimberlee; Huang, Li; Kornblum, John; Nazarian, Elizabeth J; Fine, Annie D; Braunstein, Sarah L; Kass, Daniel; Landman, Keren; Lapierre, Pascal; Hughes, Scott; Tran, Anthony; Taylor, Jill; Baker, Deborah; Jones, Lucretia; Kornstein, Laura; Liu, Boning; Perez, Rodolfo; Lucero, David E; Peterson, Eric; Benowitz, Isaac; Lee, Kristen F; Ngai, Stephanie; Stripling, Mitch; Varma, Jay K

    Infections caused by Legionella are the leading cause of waterborne disease outbreaks in the United States. We investigated a large outbreak of Legionnaires' disease in New York City in summer 2015 to characterize patients, risk factors for mortality, and environmental exposures. We defined cases as patients with pneumonia and laboratory evidence of Legionella infection from July 2 through August 3, 2015, and with a history of residing in or visiting 1 of several South Bronx neighborhoods of New York City. We describe the epidemiologic, environmental, and laboratory investigation that identified the source of the outbreak. We identified 138 patients with outbreak-related Legionnaires' disease, 16 of whom died. The median age of patients was 55. A total of 107 patients had a chronic health condition, including 43 with diabetes, 40 with alcoholism, and 24 with HIV infection. We tested 55 cooling towers for Legionella, and 2 had a strain indistinguishable by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis from 26 patient isolates. Whole-genome sequencing and epidemiologic evidence implicated 1 cooling tower as the source of the outbreak. A large outbreak of Legionnaires' disease caused by a cooling tower occurred in a medically vulnerable community. The outbreak prompted enactment of a new city law on the operation and maintenance of cooling towers. Ongoing surveillance and evaluation of cooling tower process controls will determine if the new law reduces the incidence of Legionnaires' disease in New York City.

  18. Deposition and corrosion phenomena on aluminum surfaces under deluged dry cooling-tower condisions. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, K.R.; May, R.P.; Douglas, J.G.; Tylczak, J.H.

    1981-07-01

    Deposition and corrosion on aluminum heat exchanger surfaces resulting from deluge in wet/dry cooling towers is simulated in a laboratory Corrosion/Deposition Loop (CDL). Heat exchanger deposition buildup was found to be linearly dependent on concentration factor and number of wet/dry cycles. Deionized water rising after deluge reduced rate of deposition. Laboratory data obtained from CDL relates directly to operation of the Advanced Concepts Test (ACT) demonstration cooling tower. Technology transferable to ACT shows that deposition from supersaturated solution can be effectively controlled by attention to water chemistry, pH, water conditioning, and good heat transfer design. The additional mechanism of deposition by water film evaporation is effectively managed by soft water rinsing and uniform surface wetting. Exposure of a model TRANE surface (the ACT wet/dry exchanger) produced short-term deposition extrapolating to 0.011 mm buildup in three years. Studies continue to verify 4X as maximum cycles of concentration through control of water chemistry and rinsing after deluge. Deluge water used at ACT facility is sufficiently aggressive to warrant use of Alclad to extend tube service life.

  19. Investigation of the effect of packing location on performance of closed wet cooling tower based on exergy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qasim, S. M.; Hayder, M. J.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the effect of packing location on thermal performance of Closed Wet Cooling Tower (CWCT) based on exergy analysis has been studied. The experimental study incorporates design, manufacture and testing of a modified counter flow forced draft CWCT prototype. The modification based on addition packing to the conventional CWCT. The variation of spray water temperature, air dry bulb temperature, air wet bulb temperature, enthalpy and relative humidity of air for different position along the tower are measured experimentally. Applying the exergy destruction method for the cooling tower; exergy destruction, exergy efficiency, exergy of water and air were calculated for two cases: CWCT with packing below the heat exchanger and CWCT with packing above the heat exchanger. It is highly important to analyze the exergy along the cooling tower height. Therefore, the exergy analysis of different elements along the height of the tower is carried out. Results show that the total exergy destruction of modified CWCT is higher when the heat exchanger is located above the packing at the highest point of the tower.

  20. A model for autumn outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease associated with cooling towers, linked to system operation and size.

    PubMed Central

    Bentham, R. H.; Broadbent, C. R.

    1993-01-01

    Cooling towers have been demonstrated to be amplifiers and disseminators of legionella, the causative organism of Legionnaires' disease. Community outbreaks associated with cooling towers have been reported with several common factors. Small towers (< 300 kW) have predominantly been implicated in outbreaks. Cooling tower-associated outbreaks are most frequent in autumn, and frequently implicated systems have been operated after a period of shutdown. This paper reports field study data relating system operation to legionella colonization of systems. Operating systems have been shown to be more frequently colonized by legionella than shutdown systems. In some cases operation of systems after periods of shutdown raised legionella concentrations from below detection limits to between 50 and 950 c.f.u./ml within 10 min. These data and previously reported data relating to biofilm and sediment colonization of the systems, and community outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease, have been used to develop a model explaining the seasonal nature of outbreaks associated with irregularly operated, small cooling tower systems. PMID:8405155

  1. Molecular characterization of viable Legionella spp. in cooling tower water samples by combined use of ethidium monoazide and PCR.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiroaki; Fujimura, Reiko; Agata, Kunio; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Viable Legionella spp. in environmental water samples were characterized phylogenetically by a clone library analysis combining the use of ethidium monoazide and quantitative PCR. To examine the diversity of Legionella spp., six cooling tower water samples and three bath water samples were collected and analyzed. A total of 617 clones were analyzed for their 16S rRNA gene sequences and classified into 99 operational taxonomic units (OTUs). The majority of OTUs were not clustered with currently described Legionella spp., suggesting the wide diversity of not-yet-cultured Legionella groups harbored in cooling tower water environments.

  2. Comparison of plate counts, Petrifilm, dipslides, and adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence for monitoring bacteria in cooling-tower waters.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Sherry A; Anderson, James E; Kim, Byung R; Ball, James C

    2009-04-01

    Effective bacterial control in cooling-tower systems requires accurate and timely methods to count bacteria. Plate-count methods are difficult to implement on-site, because they are time- and labor-intensive and require sterile techniques. Several field-applicable methods (dipslides, Petrifilm, and adenosine triphosphate [ATP] bioluminescence) were compared with the plate count for two sample matrices--phosphate-buffered saline solution containing a pure culture of Pseudomonas fluorescens and cooling-tower water containing an undefined mixed bacterial culture. For the pure culture, (1) counts determined on nutrient agar and plate-count agar (PCA) media and expressed as colony-forming units (CFU) per milliliter were equivalent to those on R2A medium (p = 1.0 and p = 1.0, respectively); (2) Petrifilm counts were not significantly different from R2A plate counts (p = 0.99); (3) the dipslide counts were up to 2 log units higher than R2A plate counts, but this discrepancy was not statistically significant (p = 0.06); and (4) a discernable correlation (r2 = 0.67) existed between ATP readings and plate counts. For cooling-tower water samples (n = 62), (1) bacterial counts using R2A medium were higher (but not significant; p = 0.63) than nutrient agar and significantly higher than tryptone-glucose yeast extract (TGE; p = 0.03) and PCA (p < 0.001); (2) Petrifilm counts were significantly lower than nutrient agar or R2A (p = 0.02 and p < 0.001, respectively), but not statistically different from TGE, PCA, and dipslides (p = 0.55, p = 0.69, and p = 0.91, respectively); (3) the dipslide method yielded bacteria counts 1 to 3 log units lower than nutrient agar and R2A (p < 0.001), but was not significantly different from Petrifilm (p = 0.91), PCA (p = 1.00) or TGE (p = 0.07); (4) the differences between dipslides and the other methods became greater with a 6-day incubation time; and (5) the correlation between ATP readings and plate counts varied from system to system, was poor

  3. Applications of Meteorological Tower Data at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altino, Karen M.; Barbre, Robert E., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Members of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) design and operation communities rely on meteorological information collected at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), located near Cape Canaveral, Florida, to correctly apply the ambient environment to various tasks. The Natural Environments Branch/EV44, located at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, is responsible for providing its NASA customers with meteorological data using various climatological data sources including balloons, surface stations, aircraft, hindcast models, and meteorological towers. Of the many resources available within the KSC region, meteorological towers are preferred for near-surface applications because they record data at regular, frequent intervals over an extensive period of record at a single location. This paper discusses the uses of data measured at several different meteorological towers for a common period of record and how the data can be applied to various engineering decisions for the new Constellation Program Ares and Orion space vehicles.

  4. A mechanistic approach to the development of chemical solutions for fouling of cooling tower film fills

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, J.S.; Yorke, M.A.; Donlan, R.M.; Gibbon, D.L.; McClung, B.

    1995-02-01

    Since the 1980`s reported incidents of cooling tower film fill fouling have continually increased and many utilities have sought chemical treatment solution for their fouling problems. Specialty chemical companies have been called upon to research the problems and to provide programs and products that address this pressing issue. The process of surface fouling of high efficiency film fill is a complex problem due to the multiple components involved in the fouling. An in depth understanding of the problem is necessary to determine effective treatment approaches. This study defines the mechanisms of film fill fouling by examination of microorganisms, silt particles and inorganic minerals in the fouling process. The investigation of chemical treatment approaches for the effective control of fouling based on the fouling mechanisms also are discussed.

  5. Radar observation of snowfall from a natural-draft cooling tower plume

    SciTech Connect

    Sauvageot, H.

    1987-11-01

    One of the potential atmospheric effects of energy dissipation at large power parks is the mesoscale modification of the precipitation field. Meteorological conditions favorable for such an influence mainly correspond to naturally precipitating atmospheres and make the identification of the anthropogenic components difficult. In this paper, millimetric Doppler radar data are used in order to analyze the three-dimensional structure of snowfalls associated, in a perturbed environment, with a natural-draft cooling tower park. The plumes observed spread out in the atmospheric boundary layer with spread angles of 15/sup 0/--30/sup 0/ over a distance of more than 20 km. Their main characteristics compare favorably with Koenig's numerical simulation results.

  6. Free-living amoebae and their associated bacteria in Austrian cooling towers: a 1-year routine screening.

    PubMed

    Scheikl, Ute; Tsao, Han-Fei; Horn, Matthias; Indra, Alexander; Walochnik, Julia

    2016-09-01

    Free-living amoebae (FLA) are widely spread in the environment and known to cause rare but often serious infections. Besides this, FLA may serve as vehicles for bacterial pathogens. In particular, Legionella pneumophila is known to replicate within FLA thereby also gaining enhanced infectivity. Cooling towers have been the source of outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease in the past and are thus usually screened for legionellae on a routine basis, not considering, however, FLA and their vehicle function. The aim of this study was to incorporate a screening system for host amoebae into a Legionella routine screening. A new real-time PCR-based screening system for various groups of FLA was established. Three cooling towers were screened every 2 weeks over the period of 1 year for FLA and Legionella spp., by culture and molecular methods in parallel. Altogether, 83.3 % of the cooling tower samples were positive for FLA, Acanthamoeba being the dominating genus. Interestingly, 69.7 % of the cooling tower samples were not suitable for the standard Legionella screening due to their high organic burden. In the remaining samples, positivity for Legionella spp. was 25 % by culture, but overall positivity was 50 % by molecular methods. Several amoebal isolates revealed intracellular bacteria.

  7. Flue gas discharge from cooling towers. Wind tunnel investigation of building downwash effects on ground-level concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schatzmann, M.; Lohmeyer, A.; Ortner, G.

    German power plants are required to meet new emission standards which limit the maximum sulfur dioxide (SOs) concentration in flue gas discharges to 400 mg m -3. To achieve this level of reduction in SO 2 concentration, wet scrubbing is necessary for large plants using lignite or hard coal. Wet scrubbing results in a significant reduction in the flue gas temperature leading to low effective stack heights. Instead of using stack gas reheating to achieve the plume rise necessary to satisfy local environmental standards, it was proposed to discharge the scrubbed flue gas from the existing natural-draft cooling towers (NDCT). This method should be effective in reducing local ground-level concentrations since NDCT-plumes are typically very buoyant (densimetric Froude number below 1 ) and normally reach considerable heights of rise. Only under strong wind conditions does the situation reverse itself. For such strong winds, the NDCT-plume is subject to tower and building downwash with the possibility of unacceptably high ground-level concentrations. For a 2700 MW e lignite-fired power plant near Cologne, a wind tunnel study was carried out to investigate the effects of tower and building downwash effects on the ground-level concentrations of SO 2 produced by discharging the scrubbed flue gas from the natural-draft cooling towers. Also, a comparison was made between the ground-level concentrations produced by the cooling tower discharge method and those produced by a traditional stack. It was found that for low and intermediate wind speeds, the groundlevel concentrations are lower for the case of the cooling tower discharge. Only for strong winds, which occur only very rarely at most German sites, did the conventional stack discharge appear to be superior.

  8. Hydraulic design of a low-specific speed Francis runner for a hydraulic cooling tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, H.; Luo, X. Q.; Liao, W. L.; Zhao, Y. P.

    2012-11-01

    The air blower in a cooling tower is normally driven by an electromotor, and the electric energy consumed by the electromotor is tremendous. The remaining energy at the outlet of the cooling cycle is considerable. This energy can be utilized to drive a hydraulic turbine and consequently to rotate the air blower. The purpose of this project is to recycle energy, lower energy consumption and reduce pollutant discharge. Firstly, a two-order polynomial is proposed to describe the blade setting angle distribution law along the meridional streamline in the streamline equation. The runner is designed by the point-to-point integration method with a specific blade setting angle distribution. Three different ultra-low-specificspeed Francis runners with different wrap angles are obtained in this method. Secondly, based on CFD numerical simulations, the effects of blade setting angle distribution on pressure coefficient distribution and relative efficiency have been analyzed. Finally, blade angles of inlet and outlet and control coefficients of blade setting angle distribution law are optimal variables, efficiency and minimum pressure are objective functions, adopting NSGA-II algorithm, a multi-objective optimization for ultra-low-specific speed Francis runner is carried out. The obtained results show that the optimal runner has higher efficiency and better cavitation performance.

  9. Legionnaires' Disease Outbreak at a Long-Term Care Facility Caused by a Cooling Tower Using an Automated Disinfection System--Ohio, 2013.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Celia; Demirjian, Alicia; Watkins, Louise Francois; Tomczyk, Sara; Lucas, Claressa; Brown, Ellen; Kozak-Muiznieks, Natalia; Benitez, Alvaro; Garrison, Laurel E; Kunz, Jasen; Brewer, Scott; Eitniear, Samantha; DiOrio, Mary

    2015-12-01

    On July 9, 2013, an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease (LD) was identified at Long-Term Care Facility A in central Ohio. This article describes the investigation of the outbreak and identification of the outbreak source, a cooling tower using an automated biocide delivery system. In total, 39 outbreak LD cases were identified; among these, six patients died. Water samples from a cooling tower were positive for Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1, reactive to monoclonal antibody 2, with matching sequence type to a patient isolate. An electronic control system turned off cooling tower pumps during low-demand periods, preventing delivery of disinfectant by a timed-release system, and leading to amplification of Legionella in the cooling tower. Guidelines for tower maintenance should address optimal disinfection when using automated systems.

  10. Direct injection GC method for measuring light hydrocarbon emissions from cooling-tower water.

    PubMed

    Lee, Max M; Logan, Tim D; Sun, Kefu; Hurley, N Spencer; Swatloski, Robert A; Gluck, Steve J

    2003-12-15

    A Direct Injection GC method for quantifying low levels of light hydrocarbons (C6 and below) in cooling water has been developed. It is intended to overcome the limitations of the currently available technology. The principle of this method is to use a stripper column in a GC to strip waterfrom the hydrocarbons prior to entering the separation column. No sample preparation is required since the water sample is introduced directly into the GC. Method validation indicates that the Direct Injection GC method offers approximately 15 min analysis time with excellent precision and recovery. The calibration studies with ethylene and propylene show that both liquid and gas standards are suitable for routine calibration and calibration verification. The sampling method using zero headspace traditional VOA (Volatile Organic Analysis) vials and a sample chiller has also been validated. It is apparent that the sampling method is sufficient to minimize the potential for losses of light hydrocarbons, and samples can be held at 4 degrees C for up to 7 days with more than 93% recovery. The Direct Injection GC method also offers <1 ppb (w/v) level method detection limits for ethylene, propylene, and benzene. It is superior to the existing El Paso stripper method. In addition to lower detection limits for ethylene and propylene, the Direct Injection GC method quantifies individual light hydrocarbons in cooling water, provides better recoveries, and requires less maintenance and setup costs. Since the instrumentation and supplies are readily available, this technique could easily be established as a standard or alternative method for routine emission monitoring and leak detection of light hydrocarbons in cooling-tower water.

  11. Unusual Decommissioning of Contaminated Facilities at the Savannah River Site - The Demolition of Cooling Towers 285-H and 285-F

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, William E.; Baldwin, Guy R.

    2008-01-15

    Savannah River Site is an 800-square kilometer (310-square mile) U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) industrial facility located in Aiken, Allendale, and Barnwell Counties in South Carolina. The site is dedicated to environmental cleanup, developing and deploying technologies to support the cleanup mission, processing and storing nuclear materials, and supporting national security missions. The current focus in environmental management is on the cleanup of legacy materials, facilities and wastes left from the Cold War. In 2002 the DOE initiated actions to expedite cleanup focusing on significant risk reduction coupled with reducing costs. SRS published the Savannah River Site Environmental Management Integrated Deactivation and Decommissioning Plan in 2003 which addressed the final disposition and physical end state of all 1,013 Environmental Management facilities on site by the year 2025. Included in this list of facilities are reactors, fabrication facilities, process facilities and the support facilities that were required during the past 50 years. By the end of FY06, over 200 facilities had been decommissioned. This paper describes the demolition of two facilities, cooling towers 285-H and 285-F that were associated with the operation of the process canyons. Because of the circumstances surrounding these decommissions, unique and unusual techniques were safely employed to demolish and remove the cooling towers. Both 285-H and 285-F were safely felled by pulling the columns remotely to weaken the internal portion of the structure so it would collapse inwards into the basin. Cooling tower 285-H fell in less than 1 second after approximately two-thirds of the columns had been broken. See Figure 3 for a photo of 285-H after its collapse. 285-F, which was larger than 285-H, fell in three sections, two cells at a time. Once the towers were felled conventional demolition equipment was used to segregate and remove the debris. All protective measures used to protect

  12. AUTOMATED DEAD-END ULTRAFILTRATION FOR ENHANCED SURVEILLANCE OF LEGIONELLA 2 PNEUMOPHILA AND LEGIONELLA SPP. IN COOLING TOWER WATERS

    SciTech Connect

    Brigmon, R.; Leskinen, S.; Kearns, E.; Jones, W.; Miller, R.; Betivas, C.; Kingsley, M.; Lim, D.

    2011-10-10

    Detection of Legionella pneumophila in cooling towers and domestic hot water systems involves concentration by centrifugation or membrane filtration prior to inoculation onto growth media or analysis using techniques such as PCR or immunoassays. The Portable Multi-use Automated Concentration System (PMACS) was designed for concentrating microorganisms from large volumes of water in the field and was assessed for enhancing surveillance of L. pneumophila at the Savannah River Site, SC. PMACS samples (100 L; n = 28) were collected from six towers between August 2010 and April 2011 with grab samples (500 ml; n = 56) being collected before and after each PMACS sample. All samples were analyzed for the presence of L. pneumophila by direct fluorescence immunoassay (DFA) using FITC-labeled monoclonal antibodies targeting serogroups 1, 2, 4 and 6. QPCR was utilized for detection of Legionella spp. in the same samples. Counts of L. pneumophila from DFA and of Legionella spp. from qPCR were normalized to cells/L tower water. Concentrations were similar between grab and PMACS samples collected throughout the study by DFA analysis (P = 0.4461; repeated measures ANOVA). The same trend was observed with qPCR. However, PMACS concentration proved advantageous over membrane filtration by providing larger volume, more representative samples of the cooling tower environment, which led to reduced variability among sampling events and increasing the probability of detection of low level targets. These data highlight the utility of the PMACS for enhanced surveillance of L. pneumophila by providing improved sampling of the cooling tower environment.

  13. Legionella anisa: a new species of Legionella isolated from potable waters and a cooling tower

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, G.W.; Feeley, J.C.; Steigerwalt, A.; Edelstein, P.H.; Moss, C.W.; Brenner, D.J.

    1985-02-01

    Between March 1980 and June 1981, five strains of Legionella-like organisms were isolated from water. Four were recovered from potable water collected from hospitals in Chicago, IL, and Los Angeles, CA, during outbreaks of nosocomial legionellosis. The fifth strain was isolated from water collected from an industrial cooling tower in Jamestown, NY. The strains exhibited biochemical reactions typical of Legionella species and were gram-negative motile rods which grew on buffered charcoal-yeast extract agar but not on blood agar, required cysteine, and were catalase positive, urease negative, nitrate negative, hippurate negative, and nonfermentative. All strains were positive for oxidase and beta-lactamase and produced a brown, diffusible pigment. The fatty-acid composition and ubiquinone content of these strains were consistent with those of other Legionella species. Direct fluorescent-antibody examination of the five strains with conjugates to previously described Legionella species demonstrated no cross-reactions except with the conjugates to L. longbeachae serogroup 2 and L. bozemannii serogroup 2. Four strains gave a 4+ reaction to the L. longbeachae serogroup 2 conjugate and the fifth strain gave a 1+ reaction. Each of the five strains gave a 4+ reaction with the conjugate to L. bozemanii serogroup 2. DNAs from the five strains were highly related (84 to 99%) and showed 5 to 57% relatedness to other Legionella species. These strains constitute a new species in the genus Legionella, and the name Legionella anisa sp. nov. is proposed.

  14. Factors affecting the recovery of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 from cooling tower water systems.

    PubMed

    Lu, H F; Tsou, M F; Huang, S Y; Tsai, W C; Chung, J G; Cheng, K S

    2001-09-01

    A total of 20 water samples collected from the cooling towers at 20 different sites were analyzed under various conditions for the presence of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1. A comparative assessment was performed to evaluate methods of sample collection (spray drops, beneath water at 20- to 40-cm depth, and water outlet), concentration (filtration and centrifugation), acid buffer treatment (no treatment, treatment for 3, 5, and 15 min), and CO2 incubation or candle jar incubation. The reduction in viable colonies and false negative rate were compared for the different factors. No quantitative differences in isolation of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 was found among samples collected from water at a depth of 20 to 40 cm, from water outlet, and from spray drops. Treatment in an acid buffer for 15 min significantly reduced the recovery rate, with a reduction in bacterial counts of about 40%, compared with a 3-min (12%) or a 5-min (25%) treatment. Acid buffer treatment for 3 or 5 min reduced the overgrowth of commensal flora. This treatment improved the selectivity but not the sensitivity for L. pneumophila serogroup 1. Colonies on plates incubated at 37 degrees C in a candle jar with a humidified atmosphere grew better than those incubated at 35 degrees C with 5% CO2. These results demonstrate that methods of sample collection, concentration, and incubation, but not collection site, can affect the isolation rate for L. pneumophila serogroup 1.

  15. Isolation of Legionella pneumophila from cooling towers, public baths, hospitals, and fountains in Seoul, Korea, from 2010 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Kim, Changkyu; Jeon, Sujin; Jung, Jihun; Oh, Younghee; Kim, Yeonsun; Lee, Jaein; Choi, Sungmin; Chae, Youngzoo; Lee, Young-Ki

    2015-01-01

    Legionnaire's disease is associated with a high mortality rate. The authors collected 3,495 water samples in Seoul, Korea, between 2010 and 2012 from public facilities (cooling towers, public baths, hospitals, and decorative fountains), which are considered the major habitats of Legionella pneumophila. In all, 527 (15.1%) isolates of L. pneumophila were obtained by microbial culture and polymerase chain reaction. Serological diagnosis and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis were performed for the samples. The authors categorized the samples into four groups (A-D) on the basis of PFGE results. The analysis revealed that cooling towers containing the most samples with L. pneumophila serogroup 1 constituted the highest proportion of isolate. Samples from public facilities and serogroups could be distinctively classified by PFGE patterns. Thus, it is expected that source-specific features revealed through PFGE and serological analyses could serve as the basis for effectively coping with future outbreaks of L. pneumophila.

  16. Demonstration and Validation of Corrosion-Mitigation Technologies for Mechanical Room Utility Piping and Cooling-Tower Pumps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    Acting Chief, Facility Maintenance Division, DPW • Brenda Audette – Water Resources Chief, DPW • Robert Mullen – Chief of Utilities, DPW...A2. Corroding pumps bodies at central heating plant at Fort Bragg. Special high-performance coatings, insulation, water treatment, and/or dehumidi... water treatment chemicals for central plant cooling towers will be completed, including an interim technical report, within 18 months. Performance

  17. Improved facility and sensitivity in the use of guinea pigs for the isolation of Legionella pneumophila from cooling tower water

    SciTech Connect

    Leinbach, E.D.; Winkler, H.H.; Wood, D.O.; Coggin, J.H. Jr.

    1983-03-01

    The established criteria for the determination of the optimum time for the sacrifice of guinea pigs inoculated with samples of cooling tower water were found to be inadequate for the detection of low levels of Legionella pneumophila. By ignoring the requirement for fever and by sequentially sacrificing the infected guinea pigs on days 3 through 5 postinoculation, we simplified the procedure, and the sensitivity of detection was improved a great deal.

  18. VERA2D-84: a computer program for two-dimensional analysis of flow, heat, and mass transfer in evaporative cooling towers. Volume 2. User's manual. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, A.K.; Agrawal, N.K.; Keeton, L.W.; Singhal, A.K.

    1985-07-01

    Cooling towers that do not meet design performance standards can add millions of dollars to the long-term operating costs of generating plants. The VERA2D-84 code offers a reliable method for predicting the performance of natural-draft and mechanical-draft towers on the basis of physical design information.

  19. Rapid on-site monitoring of Legionella pneumophila in cooling tower water using a portable microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Nobuyasu; Tokunaga, Yusuke; Goto, Satoko; Fujii, Yudai; Banno, Fumiya; Edagawa, Akiko

    2017-06-08

    Legionnaires' disease, predominantly caused by the bacterium Legionella pneumophila, has increased in prevalence worldwide. The most common mode of transmission of Legionella is inhalation of contaminated aerosols, such as those generated by cooling towers. Simple, rapid and accurate methods to enumerate L. pneumophila are required to prevent the spread of this organism. Here, we applied a microfluidic device for on-chip fluorescent staining and semi-automated counting of L. pneumophila in cooling tower water. We also constructed a portable system for rapid on-site monitoring and used it to enumerate target bacterial cells rapidly flowing in the microchannel. A fluorescently-labelled polyclonal antibody was used for the selective detection of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 in the samples. The counts of L. pneumophila in cooling tower water obtained using the system and fluorescence microscopy were similar. The detection limit of the system was 10(4) cells/ml, but lower numbers of L. pneumophila cells (10(1) to 10(3) cells/ml) could be detected following concentration of 0.5-3 L of the water sample by filtration. Our technique is rapid to perform (1.5 h), semi-automated (on-chip staining and counting), and portable for on-site measurement, and it may therefore be effective in the initial screening of Legionella contamination in freshwater.

  20. Prevalence and concentration of non-tuberculous mycobacteria in cooling towers by means of quantitative PCR: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Adrados, Bárbara; Julián, Esther; Codony, Francesc; Torrents, Eduard; Luquin, Marina; Morató, Jordi

    2011-01-01

    There is an increasing level of interest in non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) due to the increasing reported rates of diseases caused by them. Although it is well known that NTM are widely distributed in the environment it is necessary to identify its reservoirs to prevent possible infections. In this study, we aimed to investigate the occurrence and levels of NTM in cooling towers to provide evidences for considering these settings as possible sources of respiratory infections. In the current study, we detected and quantified the presence of NTM by means of a rapid method in water samples taken from 53 cooling towers of an urban area (Barcelona, Spain). A genus-specific quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) assay with a quantification limit (QL) of 500 cells l(-1) was used. 56% (30) of samples were positive with a concentration range from 4.6 × 10(3) to 1.79 × 10(6) cells l(-1). In some cases (9/30), samples were positive but with levels below the QL. The colonization rate confirmed that cooling towers could be considered as a potential reservoir for NTM. This study also evaluated Q-PCR as a useful method to detect and quantify NTM in samples coming from environmental sources.

  1. Technology to Facilitate the Use of Impaired Waters in Cooling Towers

    SciTech Connect

    Colborn, Robert

    2012-04-30

    The project goal was to develop an effective silica removal technology and couple that with existing electro-dialysis reversal (EDR) technology to achieve a cost effective treatment for impaired waters to allow for their use in the cooling towers of coal fired power plants. A quantitative target of the program was a 50% reduction in the fresh water withdrawal at a levelized cost of water of $3.90/Kgal. Over the course of the program, a new molybdenum-modified alumina was developed that significantly outperforms existing alumina materials in silica removal both kinetically and thermodynamically. The Langmuir capacity is 0.11g silica/g adsorbent. Moreover, a low cost recycle/regeneration process was discovered to allow for multiple recycles with minimal loss in activity. On the lab scale, five runs were carried out with no drop in performance between the second and fifth run in ability to absorb the silica from water. The Mo-modified alumina was successfully prepared on a multiple kilogram scale and a bench scale model column was used to remove 100 ppm of silica from 400 liters of simulated impaired water. Significant water savings would result from such a process and the regeneration process could be further optimized to reduce water requirements. Current barriers to implementation are the base cost of the adsorbent material and the fine powder form that would lead to back pressure on a large column. If mesoporous materials become more commonly used in other areas and the price drops from volume and process improvements, then our material would also lower in price because the amount of molybdenum needed is low and no additional processing is required. There may well be engineering solutions to the fine powder issue; in a simple concept experiment, we were able to pelletize our material with Boehmite, but lost performance due to a dramatic decrease in surface area.

  2. Legionella detection and subgrouping in water air-conditioning cooling tower systems in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Al-Matawah, Qadreyah; Al-Zenki, Sameer; Al-Azmi, Ahmad; Al-Waalan, Tahani; Al-Salameen, Fadila; Hejji, Ahmad Ben

    2015-07-01

    The main aim of the study was to test for the presence of Legionnaires' disease-causing microorganisms in air-conditioned buildings in Kuwait using molecular technologies. For this purpose, 547 samples were collected from 38 cooling towers for the analysis of Legionella pneumophila. These samples included those from water (n = 178), air (n = 231), and swabs (n = 138). Out of the 547 samples, 226 (41%) samples were presumptive positive for L. pneumophila, with L. pneumophila viable counts in the positive water samples ranging from 1 to 88 CFU/ml. Of the Legionella culture-positive samples, 204 isolates were examined by latex agglutination. These isolates were predominately identified as L. pneumophila serogroup (sg) 2-14. Using the Dresden panel of monoclonal antibodies, 74 representatives isolates were further serogrouped. Results showed that 51% of the isolates belonged to serogroup 7 followed by 1 (18%) and 3 (18%). Serogroups 4 (4%) and 10 (7%) were isolated at a lower frequency, and two isolates could not be assigned to a serogroup. These results indicate the wide prevalence of L. pneumophila serogroup 7 as the predominant serogroup at the selected sampling sites. Furthermore, the 74 L. pneumophila (sg1 = 13; sg3 = 13; sg4 = 3; sg7 = 38; sg10 = 5; sgX = 2) isolates were genotyped using the seven gene protocol sequence-based typing (SBT) scheme developed by the European Working Group for Legionella Infections (EWGLI). The results show that Legionella isolates were discriminated into nine distinct sequence typing (ST) profiles, five of which were new to the SBT database of EWGLI. Additionally, all of the ST1 serogroup 1 isolates were of the OLDA/Oxford subgroup. These baseline data will form the basis for the development of a Legionella environmental surveillance program and used for future epidemiological investigations.

  3. Natural Pathogen Control Chemistry to Replace Toxic Treatment of Microbes and Biofilm in Cooling Towers.

    PubMed

    Brouse, Lon; Brouse, Richard; Brouse, Daniel

    2017-03-31

    Application of toxic antibacterial agents is considered necessary to control prevalent fresh water microorganisms that grow in evaporative cooling water systems, but can adversely affect the environment and human health. However, natural antibacterial water chemistry has been applied in industrial cooling water systems for over 10 years to inhibit microorganisms with excellent results. The water chemistry method concentrates natural minerals in highly-softened water to produce elevated pH and dissolved solids, while maintaining low calcium and magnesium content. The method provides further benefits in water conservation, and generates a small volume of non-toxic natural salt concentrate for cost efficient separation and disposal if required. This report describes the antimicrobial effects of these chemistry modifications in the cooling water environment and the resultant collective inhibition of microbes, biofilm, and pathogen growth. This article also presents a novel perspective of parasitic microbiome functional relationships, including "Trojan Protozoans" and biofilms, and the function of polyvalent metal ions in the formation and inhibition of biofilms. Reducing global dependence on toxic antibacterial agents discharged to the environment is an emerging concern due to their impact on the natural microbiome, plants, animals and humans. Concurrently, scientists have concluded that discharge of antibacterial agents plays a key role in development of pathogen resistance to antimicrobials as well as antibiotics. Use of natural antibacterial chemistry can play a key role in managing the cooling water environment in a more ecologically sustainable manner.

  4. Natural Pathogen Control Chemistry to Replace Toxic Treatment of Microbes and Biofilm in Cooling Towers.

    PubMed

    Brouse, Lon; Brouse, Richard; Brouse, Daniel

    2017-03-31

    Application of toxic antibacterial agents is considered necessary to control prevalent fresh water microorganisms that grow in evaporative cooling water systems, but can adversely affect the environment and human health. However, natural antibacterial water chemistry has been applied in industrial cooling water systems for over 10 years to inhibit microorganisms with excellent results. The water chemistry method concentrates natural minerals in highly-softened water to produce elevated pH and dissolved solids, while maintaining low calcium and magnesium content. The method provides further benefits in water conservation, and generates a small volume of non-toxic natural salt concentrate for cost efficient separation and disposal if required. This report describes the antimicrobial effects of these chemistry modifications in the cooling water environment and the resultant collective inhibition of microbes, biofilm, and pathogen growth. This article also presents a novel perspective of parasitic microbiome functional relationships, including "Trojan Protozoans" and biofilms, and the function of polyvalent metal ions in the formation and inhibition of biofilms. Reducing global dependence on toxic antibacterial agents discharged to the environment is an emerging concern due to their impact on the natural microbiome, plants, animals and humans. Concurrently, scientists have concluded that discharge of antibacterial agents plays a key role in development of pathogen resistance to antimicrobials as well as antibiotics. Use of natural antibacterial chemistry can play a key role in managing the cooling water environment in a more ecologically sustainable manner.

  5. Natural Pathogen Control Chemistry to Replace Toxic Treatment of Microbes and Biofilm in Cooling Towers

    PubMed Central

    Brouse, Lon; Brouse, Richard; Brouse, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Application of toxic antibacterial agents is considered necessary to control prevalent fresh water microorganisms that grow in evaporative cooling water systems, but can adversely affect the environment and human health. However, natural antibacterial water chemistry has been applied in industrial cooling water systems for over 10 years to inhibit microorganisms with excellent results. The water chemistry method concentrates natural minerals in highly-softened water to produce elevated pH and dissolved solids, while maintaining low calcium and magnesium content. The method provides further benefits in water conservation, and generates a small volume of non-toxic natural salt concentrate for cost efficient separation and disposal if required. This report describes the antimicrobial effects of these chemistry modifications in the cooling water environment and the resultant collective inhibition of microbes, biofilm, and pathogen growth. This article also presents a novel perspective of parasitic microbiome functional relationships, including “Trojan Protozoans” and biofilms, and the function of polyvalent metal ions in the formation and inhibition of biofilms. Reducing global dependence on toxic antibacterial agents discharged to the environment is an emerging concern due to their impact on the natural microbiome, plants, animals and humans. Concurrently, scientists have concluded that discharge of antibacterial agents plays a key role in development of pathogen resistance to antimicrobials as well as antibiotics. Use of natural antibacterial chemistry can play a key role in managing the cooling water environment in a more ecologically sustainable manner. PMID:28420074

  6. Analysis of construction conditions affecting the structural response of the cooling tower at Willow Island, West Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, H.S.; Fattal, S.G.

    1980-07-01

    The initial investigation of the Willow Island cooling tower collapse (NBSIR 78-1578) established that the most probable cause of the collapse was the imposition of construction loads on the tower before the concrete had gained adequate strength. The analysis presented herein responds to questions outside the scope of that investigation which considered only actual conditions existing at the time of the collapse. The present investigation shows that failure would initiate in lift 28 if the concrete strength in that lift is 100 psi (6.9 MPa) or less, and to maintain a safety factor of 2.0, the concrete strength in that lift should be 4000 psi (27.6 MPa). This study also reveals that even if an additional bolt had been introduced between each exterior jumpform beam and the tower, the stresses would not have been relieved enough to prevent failure of lift 28. Finally, it is shown, that if the ground anchor point of the static line had been kept at the location occupied just prior to its last move to a location near the center of the tower, the stresses in the shell due to construction loads would have been relieved to the extent that failure of lift 28 would probably not have occurred.

  7. Effectiveness of 1-bromo-3-chloro-5,5-dimethylhydantoin against Legionella pneumophila in a cooling tower.

    PubMed Central

    Fliermans, C B; Harvey, R S

    1984-01-01

    Cooling towers are considered to be man-made amplifiers of Legionella spp. Thus, the proper maintenance and choice of biocides is important. The only biocidal measure that has thus far been shown to be effective in field tests is the judicious use of chlorination. Perturbation studies with 1-bromo-3-chloro-5, 5-dimethylhydantoin (Bromicide; Great Lakes Chemical Corp., West Lafayette, Ind.) (BCD) were conducted on an industrial cooling tower shown to contain Legionella pneumophila. At the concentrations recommended by the manufacturer, neither the density nor the activity of L. pneumophila was affected. At comcentrations greater than 2.0 ppm (2.0 micorgram/ml) free of residual, BCD was not effective in reducing L. pneumophila to source water concentrations, nor was it effective in reducing the 2-p-iodophenyl-3-p-nitrophenyl-5-phenyl tetrazolium chloride activity of the bacterium in situ. The data indicate that at concentrations up to 2.0 ppm, BCD is not effective in these tower studies. PMID:6742844

  8. The corrosion behaviour of galvanized steel in cooling tower water containing a biocide and a corrosion inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Minnoş, Bihter; Ilhan-Sungur, Esra; Çotuk, Ayşın; Güngör, Nihal Doğruöz; Cansever, Nurhan

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of galvanized steel in cooling tower water containing a biocide and a corrosion inhibitor was investigated over a 10-month period in a hotel. Planktonic and sessile numbers of sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) and heterotrophic bacteria were monitored. The corrosion rate was determined by the weight loss method. The corrosion products were analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. A mineralized, heterogeneous biofilm was observed on the coupons. Although a biocide and a corrosion inhibitor were regularly added to the cooling water, the results showed that microorganisms, such as SRB in the mixed species biofilm, caused corrosion of galvanized steel. It was observed that Zn layers on the test coupons were completely depleted after 3 months. The Fe concentrations in the biofilm showed significant correlations with the weight loss and carbohydrate concentration (respectively, p < 0.01 and p < 0.01).

  9. Acidity of vapor plume from cooling tower mixed with flue gases emitted from coal-fired power plant.

    PubMed

    Hlawiczka, Stanislaw; Korszun, Katarzyna; Fudala, Janina

    2016-06-01

    Acidity of products resulting from the reaction of flue gas components emitted from a coal-fired power plant with water contained in a vapor plume from a wet cooling tower was analyzed in a close vicinity of a power plant (710 m from the stack and 315 m from the cooling tower). Samples of this mixture were collected using a precipitation funnel where components of the mixed plumes were discharged from the atmosphere with the rainfall. To identify situations when the precipitation occurred at the same time as the wind directed the mixed vapor and flue gas plumes above the precipitation funnel, an ultrasound anemometer designed for 3D measurements of the wind field located near the funnel was used. Precipitation samples of extremely high acidity were identified - about 5% of samples collected during 12 months showed the acidity below pH=3 and the lowest recorded pH was 1.4. During the measurement period the value of pH characterizing the background acidity of the precipitation was about 6. The main outcome of this study was to demonstrate a very high, and so far completely underestimated, potential of occurrence of episodes of extremely acid depositions in the immediate vicinity of a coal-fired power plant.

  10. Maisotsenko cycle applications for multistage compressors cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levchenko, D.; Yurko, I.; Artyukhov, A.; Baga, V.

    2017-08-01

    The present study provides the overview of Maisotsenko Cycle (M-Cycle) applications for gas cooling in compressor systems. Various schemes of gas cooling systems are considered regarding to their thermal efficiency and cooling capacity. Preliminary calculation of M-cycle HMX has been conducted. It is found that M-cycle HMX scheme allows to brake the limit of the ambient wet bulb temperature for evaporative cooling. It has demonstrated that a compact integrated heat and moisture exchange process can cool product fluid to the level below the ambient wet bulb temperature, even to the level of dew point temperature of the incoming air with substantially lower water and energy consumption requirements.

  11. A theoretical analysis of natural convection towers for solar energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasier, D. D.; Jacobs, E. W.

    1983-05-01

    A theoretical study of solar-powered natural convection tower (chimney) performance is presented. Both heated and cooled towers are analyzed, the latter using evaporating water as the cooling mechanism. The results, which are applicable to any open-cycle configuration, show that the ideal conversion efficiencies of both heated and cooled natural convection towers are linear functions of height. The performance of a heated tower in an adiabatic atmosphere ideally approaches the Carnot efficiency limit of approx. 3.4%/km (1.0%/1000 ft). Including water pumping requirements, the ideal limit to cooled tower performance is approx. 2.75%/km (0.85%/1000 ft). Ambient atmospheric conditions such as vertical temperature gradient (lapse rate) and relative humidity can have significantly adverse effects on natural convection tower performance. The combined effects of lapse rate and ambient relative humidity are especially important for cooled natural convection towers.

  12. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Improves Cooling System Performance: Best Management Practice Case Study #10: Cooling Towers (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has a longstanding sustainability program that revolves around energy and water efficiency as well as environmental protection. MSFC identified a problematic cooling loop with six separate compressor heat exchangers and a history of poor efficiency. The facility engineering team at MSFC partnered with Flozone Services, Incorporated to implement a comprehensive water treatment platform to improve the overall efficiency of the system.

  13. Fouling of cooling tower film fill: Causes, cleanup techniques and operating guidelines to minimize reoccurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Robinette, D.J.; Puckorius, P.R.

    1996-10-01

    The old adage an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure could not be more appropriate than in the case of film fill fouling. It is relatively easy to keep new film fill from fouling if a good chemical treatment program is established from day one. On the other hand, if fill becomes fouled, it often goes undetected until the problem has progressed to such an extent that--at best, the tower performance is severely impaired, or--at worst, a portion of the tower collapses from the weight of the deposit. It is usually an extremely difficult, costly, and time-consuming task to restore the fill`s cleanliness under the latter circumstances. It requires proper foulant diagnosis and development of an effective cleanup procedure, but restoration to near 100% cleanliness can be achieved. This paper discusses the phenomenon of film fill fouling from a perspective developed through numerous actual case histories in which the authors were called in to diagnose and correct the problem.

  14. Distribution of sequence-based types of legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 strains isolated from cooling towers, hot springs, and potable water systems in China.

    PubMed

    Qin, Tian; Zhou, Haijian; Ren, Hongyu; Guan, Hong; Li, Machao; Zhu, Bingqing; Shao, Zhujun

    2014-04-01

    Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 causes Legionnaires' disease. Water systems contaminated with Legionella are the implicated sources of Legionnaires' disease. This study analyzed L. pneumophila serogroup 1 strains in China using sequence-based typing. Strains were isolated from cooling towers (n = 96), hot springs (n = 42), and potable water systems (n = 26). Isolates from cooling towers, hot springs, and potable water systems were divided into 25 sequence types (STs; index of discrimination [IOD], 0.711), 19 STs (IOD, 0.934), and 3 STs (IOD, 0.151), respectively. The genetic variation among the potable water isolates was lower than that among cooling tower and hot spring isolates. ST1 was the predominant type, accounting for 49.4% of analyzed strains (n = 81), followed by ST154. With the exception of two strains, all potable water isolates (92.3%) belonged to ST1. In contrast, 53.1% (51/96) and only 14.3% (6/42) of cooling tower and hot spring, respectively, isolates belonged to ST1. There were differences in the distributions of clone groups among the water sources. The comparisons among L. pneumophila strains isolated in China, Japan, and South Korea revealed that similar clones (ST1 complex and ST154 complex) exist in these countries. In conclusion, in China, STs had several unique allelic profiles, and ST1 was the most prevalent sequence type of environmental L. pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates, similar to its prevalence in Japan and South Korea.

  15. Distribution of Sequence-Based Types of Legionella pneumophila Serogroup 1 Strains Isolated from Cooling Towers, Hot Springs, and Potable Water Systems in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haijian; Ren, Hongyu; Guan, Hong; Li, Machao; Zhu, Bingqing

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 causes Legionnaires' disease. Water systems contaminated with Legionella are the implicated sources of Legionnaires' disease. This study analyzed L. pneumophila serogroup 1 strains in China using sequence-based typing. Strains were isolated from cooling towers (n = 96), hot springs (n = 42), and potable water systems (n = 26). Isolates from cooling towers, hot springs, and potable water systems were divided into 25 sequence types (STs; index of discrimination [IOD], 0.711), 19 STs (IOD, 0.934), and 3 STs (IOD, 0.151), respectively. The genetic variation among the potable water isolates was lower than that among cooling tower and hot spring isolates. ST1 was the predominant type, accounting for 49.4% of analyzed strains (n = 81), followed by ST154. With the exception of two strains, all potable water isolates (92.3%) belonged to ST1. In contrast, 53.1% (51/96) and only 14.3% (6/42) of cooling tower and hot spring, respectively, isolates belonged to ST1. There were differences in the distributions of clone groups among the water sources. The comparisons among L. pneumophila strains isolated in China, Japan, and South Korea revealed that similar clones (ST1 complex and ST154 complex) exist in these countries. In conclusion, in China, STs had several unique allelic profiles, and ST1 was the most prevalent sequence type of environmental L. pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates, similar to its prevalence in Japan and South Korea. PMID:24463975

  16. 40 CFR 63.400 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Industrial Process Cooling Towers § 63.400 Applicability. (a) The provisions of this subpart apply to all new and existing industrial process cooling towers that are operated...

  17. 40 CFR 63.400 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Industrial Process Cooling Towers § 63.400 Applicability. (a) The provisions of this subpart apply to all new and existing industrial process cooling towers that are operated...

  18. 40 CFR 63.400 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Industrial Process Cooling Towers § 63.400 Applicability. (a) The provisions of this subpart apply to all new and existing industrial process cooling towers that are operated...

  19. 40 CFR 63.400 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Industrial Process Cooling Towers § 63.400 Applicability. (a) The provisions of this subpart apply to all new and existing industrial process cooling towers that are operated...

  20. 40 CFR 63.400 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Industrial Process Cooling Towers § 63.400 Applicability. (a) The provisions of this subpart apply to all new and existing industrial process cooling towers that are operated...

  1. Microgravity Spray Cooling Research for High Powered Laser Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zivich, Chad P.

    2004-01-01

    An extremely powerful laser is being developed at Goddard Space Flight Center for use on a satellite. This laser has several potential applications. One application is to use it for upper atmosphere weather research. In this case, the laser would reflect off aerosols in the upper atmosphere and bounce back to the satellite, where the aerosol velocities could be calculated and thus the upper atmosphere weather patterns could be monitored. A second application would be for the US. Air Force, which wants to use the laser strategically as a weapon for satellite defense. The Air Force fears that in the coming years as more and more nations gain limited space capabilities that American satellites may become targets, and the laser could protect the satellites. Regardless of the ultimate application, however, a critical step along the way to putting the laser in space is finding a way to efficiently cool it. While operating the laser becomes very hot and must be cooled to prevent overheating. On earth, this is accomplished by simply running cool tap water over the laser to keep it cool. But on a satellite, this is too inefficient. This would require too much water mass to be practical. Instead, we are investigating spray cooling as a means to cool the laser in microgravity. Spray cooling requires much less volume of fluid, and thus could be suitable for use on a satellite. We have inherited a 2.2 second Drop Tower rig to conduct our research with. In our experiments, water is pressurized with a compressed air tank and sprayed through a nozzle onto our test plate. We can vary the pressure applied to the water and the temperature of the plate before an experiment trial. The whole process takes place in simulated microgravity in the 2.2 second Drop Tower, and a high speed video camera records the spray as it hits the plate. We have made much progress in the past few weeks on these experiments. The rig originally did not have the capability to heat the test plate, but I did

  2. Microgravity Spray Cooling Research for High Powered Laser Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zivich, Chad P.

    2004-01-01

    An extremely powerful laser is being developed at Goddard Space Flight Center for use on a satellite. This laser has several potential applications. One application is to use it for upper atmosphere weather research. In this case, the laser would reflect off aerosols in the upper atmosphere and bounce back to the satellite, where the aerosol velocities could be calculated and thus the upper atmosphere weather patterns could be monitored. A second application would be for the US. Air Force, which wants to use the laser strategically as a weapon for satellite defense. The Air Force fears that in the coming years as more and more nations gain limited space capabilities that American satellites may become targets, and the laser could protect the satellites. Regardless of the ultimate application, however, a critical step along the way to putting the laser in space is finding a way to efficiently cool it. While operating the laser becomes very hot and must be cooled to prevent overheating. On earth, this is accomplished by simply running cool tap water over the laser to keep it cool. But on a satellite, this is too inefficient. This would require too much water mass to be practical. Instead, we are investigating spray cooling as a means to cool the laser in microgravity. Spray cooling requires much less volume of fluid, and thus could be suitable for use on a satellite. We have inherited a 2.2 second Drop Tower rig to conduct our research with. In our experiments, water is pressurized with a compressed air tank and sprayed through a nozzle onto our test plate. We can vary the pressure applied to the water and the temperature of the plate before an experiment trial. The whole process takes place in simulated microgravity in the 2.2 second Drop Tower, and a high speed video camera records the spray as it hits the plate. We have made much progress in the past few weeks on these experiments. The rig originally did not have the capability to heat the test plate, but I did

  3. Legionella pneumophila in cooling water systems. Report of a survey of cooling towers in London and a pilot trial of selected biocides.

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, J. B.; Bartlett, C. L.; Newton, U. A.; White, R. A.; Jones, N. L.

    1982-01-01

    Fourteen recirculating cooling water systems were surveyed during the summer, 1981, to see what factors might influence the prevalence of Legionella pneumophila. The effect on the organism of three anti-microbials was studied, each in two systems, by intermittent treatment at two week intervals. L. pneumophila was isolated from six of the 14 cooling systems at the beginning of the trial but by the end was present in ten. An association was found between the presence of the organism and the concentration of dissolved solids, and chlorides and the pH. There also appeared to be associations with exclusion of light and higher water temperatures. Repeated tests on eight untreated systems showed that two were consistently infected, three became and remained infected, one was infected on a single occasion and two were never infected with L. pneumophila. Treatment of a contaminated system, either with a 10 p.p.m mixture of a quaternary ammonium compound and tributyltinoxide or slow release chlorine briquettes (maximum recorded free chlorine level 1.2 p.p.m.), did not eliminated legionellae. Treatment of two infected towers with a chlorinated phenol (100 p.p.m.) eliminated legionellae for at least three days, but after 14 days the organism was again found. PMID:7086112

  4. Horizontal cooling towers: riverine ecosystem services and the fate of thermoelectric heat in the contemporary Northeast US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Robert J.; Wollheim, Wilfred M.; Miara, Ariel; Vörösmarty, Charles J.; Fekete, Balazs; Lammers, Richard B.; Rosenzweig, Bernice

    2013-06-01

    The electricity sector is dependent on rivers to provide ecosystem services that help regulate excess heat, either through provision of water for evaporative cooling or by conveying, diluting and attenuating waste heat inputs. Reliance on these ecosystem services alters flow and temperature regimes, which impact fish habitat and other aquatic ecosystem services. We demonstrate the contemporary (2000-2010) dependence of the electricity sector on riverine ecosystem services and associated aquatic impacts in the Northeast US, a region with a high density of thermoelectric power plants. We quantify these dynamics using a spatially distributed hydrology and water temperature model (the framework for aquatic modeling in the Earth system), coupled with the thermoelectric power and thermal pollution model. We find that 28.4% of thermoelectric heat production is transferred to rivers, whereas 25.9% is directed to vertical cooling towers. Regionally, only 11.3% of heat transferred to rivers is dissipated to the atmosphere and the rest is delivered to coasts, in part due to the distribution of power plants within the river system. Impacts to the flow regime are minimal, while impacts to the thermal regime include increased river lengths of unsuitable habitats for fish with maximum thermal tolerances of 24.0, 29.0, and 34.0 ° C in segments downstream of plants by 0.6%, 9.8%, and 53.9%, respectively. Our analysis highlights the interactions among electricity production, cooling technologies, aquatic impacts, and ecosystem services, and can be used to assess the full costs and tradeoffs of electricity production at regional scales.

  5. Corrosion control when using secondary treated municipal wastewater as alternative makeup water for cooling tower systems.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ming-Kai; Li, Heng; Chien, Shih-Hsiang; Monnell, Jason D; Chowdhury, Indranil; Dzombak, David A; Vidic, Radisav D

    2010-12-01

    Secondary treated municipal wastewater is a promising alternative to fresh water as power plant cooling water system makeup water, especially in arid regions. Laboratory and field testing was conducted in this study to evaluate the corrosiveness of secondary treated municipal wastewater for various metals and metal alloys in cooling systems. Different corrosion control strategies were evaluated based on varied chemical treatment. Orthophosphate, which is abundant in secondary treated municipal wastewater, contributed to more than 80% precipitative removal of phosphorous-based corrosion inhibitors. Tolyltriazole worked effectively to reduce corrosion of copper (greater than 95% inhibition effectiveness). The corrosion rate of mild steel in the presence of free chlorine 1 mg/L (as Cl2) was approximately 50% higher than in the presence of monochloramine 1 mg/L (as Cl2), indicating that monochloramine is a less corrosive biocide than free chlorine. The scaling layers observed on the metal alloys contributed to corrosion inhibition, which could be seen by comparing the mild steel 21-day average corrosion rate with the last 5-day average corrosion rate, the latter being approximately 50% lower than the former.

  6. A study of a desuperheater heat recovery system complete with a reversibly used water cooling tower (RUWCT) for hot water supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Kunxiong

    Recovering heat rejected from the condenser in a refrigeration system to generate service hot water for buildings is commonly seen in both tropics and subtropics. This study included a critical literature review on heat recovery from air-conditioning/refrigeration systems, with particular emphasis on the direct condenser heat recovery and its related mathematical simulation models. The review identified many applications of desuperheaters to small-scaled residential air-conditioning or heat pump units. The heat and mass transfer characteristics of a RUWCT have been studied in detail, which is based on the theory of direct contact heat and mass transfer between moist air and water. The thesis reports on the differences in the heat and mass transfer process that takes place in a RUWCT, a standard water cooling tower and a spray room. A corrective factor that accounts for the change of chilled water mass flow rate is incorporated into the theoretical analysis of a RUWCT. The algorithms developed from the theoretical analysis are capable of predicting the heat exchange capacity of a RUWCT at any operating conditions. This theoretical analysis is the first of its kind. Extensive field experimental work on the heat and mass transfer characteristics of a RUWCT has been carried out in a hotel building in Haikou, Hainan province of China, where the RUWCT is installed. Results from the experimental work indicate that the theoretical analysis can represent the heat and mass transfer characteristics in a RUWCT with an acceptable accuracy. A numerical analysis for a RUWCT is undertaken to determine both air and water states at intermediate horizontal sections along the tower height. Field experimental data confirm that the predicted air and water conditions at the tower inlet and outlet are of acceptable accuracy. A steady-state mathematical model is developed to simulate the operational performance of a water chiller plant complete with a desuperheater heat recovery system and

  7. Enhanced Biocide Treatments with D-amino Acid Mixtures against a Biofilm Consortium from a Water Cooling Tower

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Ru; Li, Yingchao; Al-Mahamedh, Hussain H.; Gu, Tingyue

    2017-01-01

    Different species of microbes form mixed-culture biofilms in cooling water systems. They cause microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) and biofouling, leading to increased operational and maintenance costs. In this work, two D-amino acid mixtures were found to enhance two non-oxidizing biocides [tetrakis hydroxymethyl phosphonium sulfate (THPS) and NALCO 7330 (isothiazoline derivatives)] and one oxidizing biocide [bleach (NaClO)] against a biofilm consortium from a water cooling tower in lab tests. Fifty ppm (w/w) of an equimass mixture of D-methionine, D-leucine, D-tyrosine, D-tryptophan, D-serine, D-threonine, D-phenylalanine, and D-valine (D8) enhanced 15 ppm THPS and 15 ppm NALCO 7330 with similar efficacies achieved by the 30 ppm THPS alone treatment and the 30 ppm NALCO 7330 alone treatment, respectively in the single-batch 3-h biofilm removal test. A sequential treatment method was used to enhance bleach because D-amino acids react with bleach. After a 4-h biofilm removal test, the sequential treatment of 5 ppm bleach followed by 50 ppm D8 achieved extra 1-log reduction in sessile cell counts of acid producing bacteria, sulfate reducing bacteria, and general heterotrophic bacteria compared with the 5 ppm bleach alone treatment. The 10 ppm bleach alone treatment showed a similar efficacy with the sequential treatment of 5 ppm bleach followed by 50 ppm D8. The efficacy of D8 was found better than that of D4 (an equimass mixture of D-methionine, D-leucine, D-tyrosine, and D-tryptophan) in the enhancement of the three individual biocides against the biofilm consortium. PMID:28861053

  8. Heat transfer characteristics in film cooling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licu, Dragos Nicolae

    1998-11-01

    . The local momentum flux ratio is a more appropriate scaling parameter when coolants with different densities are used. A film cooling effectiveness correlation was also developed for one of the geometries investigated based on an area-averaged film cooling effectiveness and on a newly defined blowing parameter. This correlation accounts implicitly for the particular geometrical layout used and explicitly for the main injection parameters investigated. The results can be now more directly used in existing design procedures. A new experimental technique based on wide-band liquid crystal thermography and transient one-dimensional heat conduction has been developed and implemented. The technique combines a real-time, true colour imaging system with the use of a wide-band liquid crystal and multiple event sampling for the simultaneous determination of the film cooling effectiveness and heat transfer coefficient from one transient test. A comparison of different image capture techniques is also presented and computer codes are developed for data processing. For a test case of compound angle square jets in a crossflow, very good agreement was obtained between the film cooling effectiveness calculated from the transient heat transfer experiments and the film cooling effectiveness measured in isothermal mass transfer experiments using a flame ionization detector technique. This new approach has been developed as a major part of this thesis and represents a significant contribution to the use of liquid crystal thermography in film cooling applications.

  9. Isolation of a sulfide-producing bacterial consortium from cooling-tower water: Evaluation of corrosive effects on galvanized steel.

    PubMed

    Ilhan-Sungur, Esra; Ozuolmez, Derya; Çotuk, Ayşın; Cansever, Nurhan; Muyzer, Gerard

    2017-02-01

    Sulfidogenic Clostridia and sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) often cohabit in nature. The presence of these microorganisms can cause microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) of materials in different ways. To investigate this aspect, bacteria were isolated from cooling tower water and used in corrosion tests of galvanized steel. The identity of the isolates was determined by comparative sequence analysis of PCR-amplified 16S rDNA gene fragments, separated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). This analysis showed that, in spite of the isolation process, colonies were not pure and consisted of a mixture of bacteria affiliated with Desulfosporosinus meridiei and Clostridium sp. To evaluate the corrosive effect, galvanized steel coupons were incubated with a mixed culture for 4, 8, 24, 72, 96, 168, 360 and 744 h, along with a control set in sterile culture medium only. The corrosion rate was determined by weight loss, and biofilm formation and corroded surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Although the sulfide-producing bacterial consortium led to a slight increase in the corrosion of galvanized steel coupons, when compared to the previous studies it can be said that Clostridium sp. can reduce the corrosive effect of the Desulfosporosinus sp. strain.

  10. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effect in RTG-2 cell line exposed to selected biocides used in the disinfection of cooling towers.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Fortún, S; Llorente, M T; Castaño, A

    2008-05-01

    The cytotoxic and genotoxic effects induced by trichloroisocyanuric acid, Oxone, and sodium bromide, active principles included in formulations for cleaning and disinfection of cooling towers, were studied on RTG-2 cell line. Neutral red assay was used to determine the cellular viability. Toxicity ranking based on IC(50) values found that trichloroisocyanuric acid was the most cytotoxic biocide tested followed by Oxone, whereas sodium bromide resulted in a very low cytotoxicity. DNA damage has been evaluated on RTG-2 cultures by means of an in vitro assay based on the ability of PicoGreen fluorochrome to interact preferentially with dsDNA, and the results indicated that trichloroisocyanuric acid induced DNA strand breaks at concentrations above 1.2 mg/l, equivalent to 1/50-EC(50(48)), whereas exposures to Oxone and sodium bromide did not induce DNA damage at the maximal concentrations tested (1/10-EC(50(48))). These results confirm the suitability of this method for the screening of genotoxic effects of this type of aquatic pollutants, and we suggest their use in environmental risk assessment procedures.

  11. Evaporation Tower With Prill Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du Fresne, E. R.

    1984-01-01

    Tower more efficient than conventional evaporation equipment. Liquids such as milk and fruit juice concentrated by passing them through tiny nozzle to form droplets, then allowing droplets to fall through evacuated tower with cooled walls.

  12. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Experimental Test Site (Site 300) Salinity Evaluation and Minimization Plan for Cooling Towers and Mechanical Equipment Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Daily III, W D

    2010-02-24

    This document was created to comply with the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board (CVRWQCB) Waste Discharge Requirement (Order No. 98-148). This order established new requirements to assess the effect of and effort required to reduce salts in process water discharged to the subsurface. This includes the review of technical, operational, and management options available to reduce total dissolved solids (TDS) concentrations in cooling tower and mechanical equipment water discharges at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) Experimental Test Site (Site 300) facility. It was observed that for the six cooling towers currently in operation, the total volume of groundwater used as make up water is about 27 gallons per minute and the discharge to the subsurface via percolation pits is 13 gallons per minute. The extracted groundwater has a TDS concentration of 700 mg/L. The cooling tower discharge concentrations range from 700 to 1,400 mg/L. There is also a small volume of mechanical equipment effluent being discharged to percolation pits, with a TDS range from 400 to 3,300 mg/L. The cooling towers and mechanical equipment are maintained and operated in a satisfactory manner. No major leaks were identified. Currently, there are no re-use options being employed. Several approaches known to reduce the blow down flow rate and/or TDS concentration being discharged to the percolation pits and septic systems were reviewed for technical feasibility and cost efficiency. These options range from efforts as simple as eliminating leaks to implementing advanced and innovative treatment methods. The various options considered, and their anticipated effect on water consumption, discharge volumes, and reduced concentrations are listed and compared in this report. Based on the assessment, it was recommended that there is enough variability in equipment usage, chemistry, flow rate, and discharge configurations that each discharge location at Site 300 should be

  13. Thermal Characteristics of Heating Towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Toshihiko; Kametani, Shigeki

    Thermal characteristics of heating towers for air-source heat pumps are studied in terms of the overall enthalpy-transfer coefficient. Ka. First. the method of counter-flow calculation is presented taking physical properties of ethylene glycol solutions into account. Next, both cooling-tower and heating-tower experiments are carried out in a small, induced-draft. counterflow tower packed with tubes of a staggerd arrangement. using water and commercial ethylene glycol solutions. The coefficient Ka measured in the heating-tower experiment shows a trend similar to that in the cooling-tower experiment. So. the data on cooling towers will be helpful to the thermal design of heating towers.

  14. Preliminary study on the applicability of semi-geodesic winding in the design and manufacturing of composite towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayran, A.; İbrahimoǧlu, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    During last twenty years, wind turbine manufacturers took the path of building larger machines to generate more electricity. However, the bigger the size became, the more material was required to support the loads, leading to great weight increases. Larger turbines and higher hub heights also resulted in larger tower base diameters which are limited considering their logistics. In many countries, the limit for transports with special permits maximizes the diameter to 4.5 metres. Considering this fact, the wind turbine market dominated by welded steel shell towers is looking for new structural solutions for their future turbines. Although, composite materials are not used as the structural material in the towers of today's turbines, the demand for larger wind turbines forces engineers to seek for alternative material systems with high specific strength and stiffness ratios to be used in towers. Inspired by the applicability of filament winding in tower production, in the present article we investigated the effect of semi-geodesic winding on the winding angle, thickness, stiffness coefficients and vibration characteristics of filament wound composite conical shells of revolution which simulate wind turbine towers at the structural level. Present study showed that the preset friction applied during semi-geodesic winding is an important design parameter which can be controlled to obtain gradually increasing thickness from tower top to the base of the tower, and favourably alter the dynamic characteristics of the composite towers.

  15. Epidemiological investigation and case-control study: a Legionnaires' disease outbreak associated with cooling towers in Warstein, Germany, August-September 2013.

    PubMed

    Maisa, Anna; Brockmann, Ansgar; Renken, Frank; Lück, Christian; Pleischl, Stefan; Exner, Martin; Daniels-Haardt, Inka; Jurke, Annette

    2015-01-01

    Between 1 August and 6 September 2013, an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease (LD) with 159 suspected cases occurred in Warstein, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. The outbreak consisted of 78 laboratory-confirmed cases of LD, including one fatality, with a case fatality rate of 1%. Legionella pneumophila, serogroup 1, subtype Knoxville, sequence type 345, was identified as the epidemic strain. A case-control study was conducted to identify possible sources of infection. In univariable analysis, cases were almost five times more likely to smoke than controls (odds ratio (OR): 4.81; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.33-9.93; p < 0.0001). Furthermore, cases were twice as likely to live within a 3 km distance from one identified infection source as controls (OR: 2.14; 95% CI: 1.09-4.20; p < 0.027). This is the largest outbreak of LD in Germany to date. Due to a series of uncommon events, this outbreak was most likely caused by multiple sources involving industrial cooling towers. Quick epidemiological assessment, source tracing and shutting down of potential sources as well as rapid laboratory testing and early treatment are necessary to reduce morbidity and mortality. Maintenance of cooling towers must be carried out according to specification to prevent similar LD outbreaks in the future.

  16. Establish feasibility for providing passive cooling with solar updraft and evaporative downdraft chimneys

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, W.A.; Mignon, G.V.; Thompson, T.L.

    1987-01-01

    Natural draft towers can be used for cooling and ventilating structures. From an operational perspective, the downdraft evaporatively cooled tower is preferred for a dry climate. Solar chimneys, when used alone, tend to require an excessively large solar collector area when appreciable quantities of air must be moved. When used in combination with a downdraft tower, the roof and attic of buildings may assist the solar chimney and their use becomes more attractive. Both a frame building and a greenhouse were successfully cooled during this program. The economics of the downdraft tower compare favorably with conventional evaporative cooling for some application.

  17. Establish feasibility for providing passive cooling with solar updraft and evaporate downdraft chimneys

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, W.A.; Mignon, G.V.; Thompson, T.L.

    1987-01-01

    Natural draft towers can be used for cooling and ventilating structures. From an operational perspective, the downdraft evaporatively cooled tower is preferred for a dry climate. Solar chimneys, when used alone, tend to require an excessively large solar collector area when appreciable quantities of air must be moved. When used in combination with a downdraft tower, the roof and attic of buildings may assist the solar chimney and their use becomes more attractive. Both a frame building and a greenhouse were successfully cooled during this program. The economics of the downdraft tower compare favorably with conventional evaporative cooling for some applications.

  18. High temperature performance of high-efficiency, multi-layer solar selective coatings for tower applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, M. H.; Tirawat, R.; Kessinger, K. A.; Ndione, P. F.

    2015-05-01

    The roadmap to next-generation concentrating solar power plants anticipates a progression to central towers with operating temperatures in excess of 650°C. These higher temperatures are required to drive higher power-cycle efficiencies, resulting in lower cost energy. However, these conditions also place a greater burden on the materials making up the receiver. Any novel absorber material developed for next-generation receivers must be stable in air, cost effective, and survive thousands of heating and cooling cycles. The collection efficiency of a power tower plant can be increased if the energy absorbed by the receiver is maximized while the heat loss from the receiver to the environment is minimized. Thermal radiation losses can be significant (>7% annual energy loss) with receivers at temperatures above 650°C. We present progress toward highly efficient and durable solar selective absorbers (SSAs) intended for operating temperatures from 650°C to 1000°C. Selective efficiency (ηsel) is defined as the energy retained by the absorber, accounting for both absorptance and emittance, relative to the energy incident on the surface. The low emittance layers of multilayer SSAs are binary compounds of refractory metals whose material properties indicate that coatings formed of these materials should be oxidation resistant in air to 800-1200°C. On this basis, we initially developed a solar selective coating for parabolic troughs. This development has been successfully extended to meet the absorptance and emittance objectives for the more demanding, high temperature regime. We show advancement in coating materials, processing and designs resulting in the initial attainment of target efficiencies ηsel > 0.91 for proposed tower conditions. Additionally, spectral measurements show that these coatings continue to perform at targeted levels after cycling to temperatures of 1000°C in environments of nitrogen and forming gas.

  19. High temperature performance of high-efficiency, multi-layer solar selective coatings for tower applications

    DOE PAGES

    Gray, M. H.; Tirawat, R.; Kessinger, K. A.; ...

    2015-05-01

    The roadmap to next-generation concentrating solar power plants anticipates a progression to central towers with operating temperatures in excess of 650°C. These higher temperatures are required to drive higher power-cycle efficiencies, resulting in lower cost energy. However, these conditions also place a greater burden on the materials making up the receiver. Any novel absorber material developed for next-generation receivers must be stable in air, cost effective, and survive thousands of heating and cooling cycles. The collection efficiency of a power tower plant can be increased if the energy absorbed by the receiver is maximized while the heat loss from themore » receiver to the environment is minimized. Thermal radiation losses can be significant (>7% annual energy loss) with receivers at temperatures above 650°C. We present progress toward highly efficient and durable solar selective absorbers (SSAs) intended for operating temperatures from 650°C to 1000°C. Selective efficiency (ηsel) is defined as the energy retained by the absorber, accounting for both absorptance and emittance, relative to the energy incident on the surface. The low emittance layers of multilayer SSAs are binary compounds of refractory metals whose material properties indicate that coatings formed of these materials should be oxidation resistant in air to 800-1200°C. On this basis, we initially developed a solar selective coating for parabolic troughs. This development has been successfully extended to meet the absorptance and emittance objectives for the more demanding, high temperature regime. We show advancement in coating materials, processing and designs resulting in the initial attainment of target efficiencies ηsel > 0.91 for proposed tower conditions. Additionally, spectral measurements show that these coatings continue to perform at targeted levels after cycling to temperatures of 1000°C in environments of nitrogen and forming gas.« less

  20. A new thermoelectric alloy for cooling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettenberg, Martin Harris

    In the last twenty years no improvements in bulk materials has been achieved for cooling in the thermoelectrics industry that has surpassed the cooling capabilities of the alloys developed at RCA by Yim and Rosi. In that work they achieved a DeltaT of 77.6K from room temperature. This work focuses on the development of a new n-type and improving the p-type alloy from the Bisb2Tesb3-Sbsb2Tesb3-Sbsb2Sesb3 pseudo-ternary alloy system. Improvements in the alloy have allowed the construction of a cooling device that achieves a DeltaT of 79.2K. In bulk material growth the highest figure of merit material, Z, for room temperature cooling applications is a p-type material (Bisb2Tesb3)sb{25}(Sbsb2Tesb3)sb{72}(Sbsb2Sesb3)sb3 that has a Z = 3.6× 10sp{-3}/K and an n-type material (Bisb2Tesb3)sb{90}(Sbsb2Tesb3)sb5(Sbsb2Sesb3)sb5 with a Z = 3.2× 10sp{-3}/K developed at the University of Virginia. The present work improves on these results by developing a new n-type material (Bisb2Tesb3)sb{70}(Sbsb2Tesb3)sb{25}(Sbsb2Sesb2)sb5 with a Z = 3.4× 10sp{-3}/K. The improvement in this new alloy is due to a lower thermal conductivity with equivalent electrical properties to the old n-type alloy (Bisb2Tesb3)sb{90}(Sbsb2Tesb3)sb5(Sbsb2Sesb3)sb5. The temperature dependent properties from 250K-400K of the three alloys with various dopant concentrations was measured to study temperature effects on the thermoelectric properties. Studies were also conducted on ohmic contacts, including measuring the contact resistivity size and the resistivity of the solder. The contact resistivity is an effect that is critical to device performance in small modules. This work also found that the dopant material is relevant to the overall thermoelectric properties of the alloy. In the p-type material (Bisb2Tesb3)sb{25}(Sbsb2Tesb3)sb{72}(Sbsb2Sesb3)sb3 the figure of merit was lowered when SbIsb3 was used instead of Te as a compensator of excess holes. This effect was not apparent in the new n-type alloy (Bisb2

  1. Modeling of the Evaporative Cooling of Running-Down Liquid Films in the Slit Channel of the Spraying Device of a Cooling Tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dashkov, G. V.; Malenko, G. L.; Solodukhin, A. D.; Tyutyuma, V. D.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the results of computational modeling of the nonstationary evaporative cooling of a liquid film running down a vertical surface cooled by a turbulent vapor-air counterflow. The heat and mass transfer problem has been formulated in conjugate form. The calculation data on the total heat flow density at the interface for various instants of time are given.

  2. Development of an improved PCR-ICT hybrid assay for direct detection of Legionellae and Legionella pneumophila from cooling tower water specimens.

    PubMed

    Horng, Yu-Tze; Soo, Po-Chi; Shen, Bin-Jon; Hung, Yu-Li; Lo, Kai-Yin; Su, Hsun-Pi; Wei, Jun-Rong; Hsieh, Shang-Chen; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Lai, Hsin-Chih

    2006-06-01

    A novelly improved polymerase chian reaction and immunochromatography test (PCR-ICT) hybrid assay comprising traditional multiplex-nested PCR and ICT, (a lateral-flow device) was developed for direct detection of Legionella bacteria from environmental cooling tower samples. The partial 16S rDNA (specific for Legionella spp.) and dnaJ (specific for Legionella pneumophila) genes from Legionella chromosome were first specifically amplified by multiplex-nested PCR, respectively, followed by detection using ICT strip. Reading of results was based on presence or absence of the two test lines on the strips. Presence of test line 1 indicated existence of Legionella spp. specific 16S rDNA and identified Legionella spp. Presence of test line 2 further indicated existence of dnaJ and thus specifically identified L. pneumophila. In contrast, for non-Legionellae bacteria no test line formation was observed. Results of direct detection of Legionella bacteria and L. pneumophila from water tower specimens by this assay showed 100% sensitivity, and 96.6% and 100% specificity, respectively compared with traditional culture, biochemical and serological identification methods. The PCR-ICT hybrid assay does not require sophisticated equipment and was proved to be practically useful in rapid and direct Legionellae detection from environmental water samples.

  3. Moist air state above counterflow wet-cooling tower fill based on Merkel, generalised Merkel and Klimanek & Białecky models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyhlík, Tomáš

    2017-09-01

    The article deals with an evaluation of moist air state above counterflow wet-cooling tower fill. The results based on Klimanek & Białecky model are compared with results of Merkel model and generalised Merkel model. Based on the numerical simulation it is shown that temperature is predicted correctly by using generalised Merkel model in the case of saturated or super-saturated air above the fill, but the temperature is underpredicted in the case of unsaturated moist air above the fill. The classical Merkel model always under predicts temperature above the fill. The density of moist air above the fill, which is calculated using generalised Merkel model, is strongly over predicted in the case of unsaturated moist air above the fill.

  4. Biomedical Application of Aerospace Personal Cooling Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Yu-Tsuan E.; Lee, Hank C.; Montgomery, Leslie D.; Webbon, Bruce W.; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Personal thermoregulatory systems which are used by astronauts to alleviate thermal stress during extravehicular activity have been applied to the therapeutic management of multiple sclerosis. However, little information is available regarding the physiologic and circulatory changes produced by routine operation of these systems. The objectives of this study were to compare the effectiveness of two passive and two active cooling vests and to measure the body temperature and circulatory changes produced by each cooling vest configuration. The MicroClimate Systems and the Life Enhancement Tech(LET) lightweight liquid cooling vests, the Steele Vest and LET's Zipper Front Garment were used to cool the chest region of 10 male and female subjects (25 to 55 yr.) in this study. Calf, forearm and finger blood flows were measured using a tetrapolar impedance rheograph. The subjects, seated in an upright position at normal room temperature (approx.22C), were tested for 60 min. with the cooling system operated at its maximum cooling capacity. Blood flows were recorded continuously using a computer data acquisition system with a sampling frequency of 250 Hz. Oral, right and left ear temperatures and cooling system parameters were logged manually every 5 min. Arm, leg, chest and rectal temperatures; heart rate; respiration; and an activity index were recorded continuously on a U.F.I., Inc. Biolog ambulatory monitor. In general, the male and female subjects' oral and ear temperature responses to cooling were similar for all vest configurations tested. Oral temperatures during the recovery period were significantly (P<0.05) lower than during the control period, approx. 0.2 - 0.5C, for both men and women wearing any of the four different garments. The corresponding ear temperatures were significantly (P<0.05) decreased approx.0.2 - 0.4C by the end of the recovery period. Compared to the control period, no significant differences were found in rectal temperatures during cooling and

  5. Biomedical Application of Aerospace Personal Cooling Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Yu-Tsuan E.; Lee, Hank C.; Montgomery, Leslie D.; Webbon, Bruce W.; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Personal thermoregulatory systems which are used by astronauts to alleviate thermal stress during extravehicular activity have been applied to the therapeutic management of multiple sclerosis. However, little information is available regarding the physiologic and circulatory changes produced by routine operation of these systems. The objectives of this study were to compare the effectiveness of two passive and two active cooling vests and to measure the body temperature and circulatory changes produced by each cooling vest configuration. The MicroClimate Systems and the Life Enhancement Tech(LET) lightweight liquid cooling vests, the Steele Vest and LET's Zipper Front Garment were used to cool the chest region of 10 male and female subjects (25 to 55 yr.) in this study. Calf, forearm and finger blood flows were measured using a tetrapolar impedance rheograph. The subjects, seated in an upright position at normal room temperature (approx.22C), were tested for 60 min. with the cooling system operated at its maximum cooling capacity. Blood flows were recorded continuously using a computer data acquisition system with a sampling frequency of 250 Hz. Oral, right and left ear temperatures and cooling system parameters were logged manually every 5 min. Arm, leg, chest and rectal temperatures; heart rate; respiration; and an activity index were recorded continuously on a U.F.I., Inc. Biolog ambulatory monitor. In general, the male and female subjects' oral and ear temperature responses to cooling were similar for all vest configurations tested. Oral temperatures during the recovery period were significantly (P<0.05) lower than during the control period, approx. 0.2 - 0.5C, for both men and women wearing any of the four different garments. The corresponding ear temperatures were significantly (P<0.05) decreased approx.0.2 - 0.4C by the end of the recovery period. Compared to the control period, no significant differences were found in rectal temperatures during cooling and

  6. Great increase of the efficiency of an old 32 MW steam turbine unit with the cooling tower system by the use of the wasted heat energy of condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Savic, B.M.; Vasiljevic, N.; Rosic, B.; Stojakovic, M.

    1996-11-01

    Possibility of the use of the wasted heat energy of condensation of an old 32 MW steam turbine unit with the cooling tower system in the regimes of the permitted range of the vacuum conditions was analyzed. Using the computer program TURBOEX for this unit, the different regime loads in designed and also low vacuum conditions were calculated. Great coincidence between the results of the calculations and the designed data ground also the validity of the results of the calculations in the extrapolated region of the low vacuum. The obtained disposive temperature level (55 C) of the cooling water at the output of condenser in the range of the permitted operating regime loads (below the alarm limit low vacuum set as 80% of vacuum) enables the economical use of the wasted heat energy of condensation for the low-temperatures consumers, like a green house. The large increase of the efficiency obtained in this way with the electric and heat energy production in cogeneration without steam turbine unit reconstruction gives hope that this proposition could be very profitable and this fact could be a good reason for the new life prolongation of this old unit.

  7. A Practical Application Combining Wireless Sensor Networks and Internet of Things: Safety Management System for Tower Crane Groups

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Dexing; Lv, Hongqiang; Han, Jiuqiang; Wei, Quanrui

    2014-01-01

    The so-called Internet of Things (IoT) has attracted increasing attention in the field of computer and information science. In this paper, a specific application of IoT, named Safety Management System for Tower Crane Groups (SMS-TC), is proposed for use in the construction industry field. The operating status of each tower crane was detected by a set of customized sensors, including horizontal and vertical position sensors for the trolley, angle sensors for the jib and load, tilt and wind speed sensors for the tower body. The sensor data is collected and processed by the Tower Crane Safety Terminal Equipment (TC-STE) installed in the driver's operating room. Wireless communication between each TC-STE and the Local Monitoring Terminal (LMT) at the ground worksite were fulfilled through a Zigbee wireless network. LMT can share the status information of the whole group with each TC-STE, while the LMT records the real-time data and reports it to the Remote Supervision Platform (RSP) through General Packet Radio Service (GPRS). Based on the global status data of the whole group, an anti-collision algorithm was executed in each TC-STE to ensure the safety of each tower crane during construction. Remote supervision can be fulfilled using our client software installed on a personal computer (PC) or smartphone. SMS-TC could be considered as a promising practical application that combines a Wireless Sensor Network with the Internet of Things. PMID:25196106

  8. A practical application combining wireless sensor networks and Internet of Things: Safety Management System for Tower Crane Groups.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Dexing; Lv, Hongqiang; Han, Jiuqiang; Wei, Quanrui

    2014-07-30

    The so-called Internet of Things (IoT) has attracted increasing attention in the field of computer and information science. In this paper, a specific application of IoT, named Safety Management System for Tower Crane Groups (SMS-TC), is proposed for use in the construction industry field. The operating status of each tower crane was detected by a set of customized sensors, including horizontal and vertical position sensors for the trolley, angle sensors for the jib and load, tilt and wind speed sensors for the tower body. The sensor data is collected and processed by the Tower Crane Safety Terminal Equipment (TC-STE) installed in the driver's operating room. Wireless communication between each TC-STE and the Local Monitoring Terminal (LMT) at the ground worksite were fulfilled through a Zigbee wireless network. LMT can share the status information of the whole group with each TC-STE, while the LMT records the real-time data and reports it to the Remote Supervision Platform (RSP) through General Packet Radio Service (GPRS). Based on the global status data of the whole group, an anti-collision algorithm was executed in each TC-STE to ensure the safety of each tower crane during construction. Remote supervision can be fulfilled using our client software installed on a personal computer (PC) or smartphone. SMS-TC could be considered as a promising practical application that combines a Wireless Sensor Network with the Internet of Things.

  9. Actively cooled SLMS technology for HEL applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacoby, Marc T.; Goodman, William A.; Reily, Jack C.; Kegley, Jeffrey R.; Haight, Harlan J.; Tucker, John; Wright, Ernest R.; Hogue, William D.

    2005-06-01

    Schafer has demonstrated two different methods for actively cooling our Silicon Lightweight Mirror System (SLMSTM) technology. Direct internal cooling was accomplished by flowing liquid nitrogen through the continuous open cell core of the SLMSTM mirror. Indirect external cooling was accomplished by flowing liquid nitrogen through a CTE matched Cesic® square-tube manifold that was bonded to the back of the mirror in the center. Testing was done in the small 4- foot thermal/vacuum chamber located at the NASA/MSFC X-Ray Calibration Facility. Seven thermal diodes were located over the front side of the 5 inch diameter mirror and one was placed on the outlet side of the Cesic® manifold. Results indicate that the mirror reaches steady state at 82K in less than four minutes for both cooling methods. The maximum temperature difference of the eight diodes was less than 200 mK when the mirror was internally cooled and covered with MLI to insulate it from the large 300 K aluminum plate that was used to mount it.

  10. Establish feasibility for providing passive cooling with solar updraft and evaporate downdraft chimneys. Final report, June 15, 1984--December 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, W.A.; Mignon, G.V.; Thompson, T.L.

    1987-12-31

    Natural draft towers can be used for cooling and ventilating structures. From an operational perspective, the downdraft evaporatively cooled tower is preferred for a dry climate. Solar chimneys, when used alone, tend to require an excessively large solar collector area when appreciable quantities of air must be moved. When used in combination with a downdraft tower, the roof and attic of buildings may assist the solar chimney and their use becomes more attractive. Both a frame building and a greenhouse were successfully cooled during this program. The economics of the downdraft tower compare favorably with conventional evaporative cooling for some applications.

  11. Establish feasibility for providing passive cooling with solar updraft and evaporative downdraft chimneys. Final report, June 15, 1984--December 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, W.A.; Mignon, G.V.; Thompson, T.L.

    1987-12-31

    Natural draft towers can be used for cooling and ventilating structures. From an operational perspective, the downdraft evaporatively cooled tower is preferred for a dry climate. Solar chimneys, when used alone, tend to require an excessively large solar collector area when appreciable quantities of air must be moved. When used in combination with a downdraft tower, the roof and attic of buildings may assist the solar chimney and their use becomes more attractive. Both a frame building and a greenhouse were successfully cooled during this program. The economics of the downdraft tower compare favorably with conventional evaporative cooling for some application.

  12. Survey of reinjection experience from groundwater cooling applications

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, M.; Lee, C.H.

    1980-09-01

    The use of groundwater for cooling applications is a common practice throughout the country wherever an adequate supply of water exists. However, the reinjection of the cooling water to water-bearing strata is not as widely practiced. The literature pertaining to reinjection of heated water is not well documented. To fulfill the need for more information, a study was conducted to identify and document at least 30 sites where reinjection of grundwater from cooling applications was being (or had been) performed. The information obtained on each site was compiled and analyzed, the site described briefly and cooling and reinjection problems characterized. The end result of this study was to establish a data base of reinjection experience based on a variety of sites around the country with different hydrogeologic characteristics and cooling systems. These data are presented.

  13. Wind turbine generator application places unique demands on tower design and materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kita, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    The most relevant contractual tower design requirements and goal for the Mod-1 tower are related to steel truss tower construction, cost-effective state-of-the-art design, a design life of 30 years, and maximum wind conditions of 120 mph at 30 feet elevation. The Mod-1 tower design approach was an iterative process. Static design loads were calculated and member sizes and overall geometry chosen with the use of finite element computer techniques. Initial tower dynamic characteristics were then combined with the dynamic properties of the other wind turbine components, and a series of complex dynamic computer programs were run to establish a dynamic load set and then a second tower design.

  14. Wind turbine generator application places unique demands on tower design and materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kita, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    The most relevant contractual tower design requirements and goal for the Mod-1 tower are related to steel truss tower construction, cost-effective state-of-the-art design, a design life of 30 years, and maximum wind conditions of 120 mph at 30 feet elevation. The Mod-1 tower design approach was an iterative process. Static design loads were calculated and member sizes and overall geometry chosen with the use of finite element computer techniques. Initial tower dynamic characteristics were then combined with the dynamic properties of the other wind turbine components, and a series of complex dynamic computer programs were run to establish a dynamic load set and then a second tower design.

  15. Spray Cooling Processes for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizito, John P.; VanderWal, Randy L.; Berger, Gordon; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2004-01-01

    The present paper reports ongoing work to develop numerical and modeling tools used to design efficient and effective spray cooling processes and to determine characteristic non-dimensional parametric dependence for practical fluids and conditions. In particular, we present data that will delineate conditions towards control of the impingement dynamics of droplets upon a heated substrate germane to practical situations.

  16. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.

    1994-01-01

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air and of generating electricity utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity. Other embodiments may also provide fresh water, and operate in an updraft mode.

  17. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, M.L.

    1996-01-16

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water. 6 figs.

  18. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.

    1995-01-01

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water.

  19. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.

    1996-01-01

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water.

  20. Ant Tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlot, Nathan; Shinotsuka, Sho; Hu, David

    2010-11-01

    Ants walk via adhesive drops of fluid extruded by their feet. They also use these drops as mortar to build structures such as rafts, bridges and towers, each composed of thousands of ants linked together. We investigate experimentally the construction of triangular ant towers braced by hydrophobic walls. Particular attention is paid to the relationship between tower height and contact angle hysteresis of the wall. We rationalize tower height according to ant adhesion, and tower shape according to the constraints on a column of constant strength.

  1. The Physics of Shot Towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipscombe, Trevor C.; Mungan, Carl E.

    2012-04-01

    In the late 18th and throughout the 19th century, lead shot for muskets was prepared by use of a shot tower. Molten lead was poured from the top of a tower and, during its fall, the drops became spherical under the action of surface tension. In this article, we ask and answer the question: How does the size of the lead shot depend on the height of the tower? In the process, we explain the basic technology underlying an important historical invention (the shot tower) and use simple physics (Newtonian mechanics and the thermodynamic laws of cooling) to model its operation.

  2. Applications of the Aqueous Self-Cooled Blanket concept

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, D.; Embrechts, M.J.; Varsamis, G.; Wrisley, K.; Deutch, L.; Gierszewski, P.

    1986-11-01

    In this paper a novel water-cooled blanket concept is examined. This concept, designated the Aqueous Self-Cooled Blanket (ASCB), employs water with small amounts of dissolved fertile compounds as both the coolant and the breeding medium. The ASCB concept is reviewed and its application in three different contexts is examined: (1) power reactors; (2) near-term devices such as NET; and (3) fusion-fission hybrids.

  3. Flow Cooling of Superconducting Magnets for Spacecraft Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietz, A. J.; Audette, W. E.; Barton, M. D.; Hilderbrand, J. K.; Marshall, W. S.; Rey, C. M.; Winter, D. S.; Petro, A. J.

    2008-03-01

    The development and testing of a flow cooling system for high-temperature superconducting (HTS) magnets is described. The system includes a turbo-Brayton cryocooler, a magnet thermal interface, and a magnet thermal isolation and support system. The target application is the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR). Turbo-Brayton coolers are well suited to such spacecraft applications, as they are compact, modular, lightweight, and efficient, with long maintenance-free lifetimes. Furthermore, the technology scales well to high-cooling capacities. The feasibility of using turbo-Brayton coolers in this application was proven in a design exercise in which existing cooler designs were scaled to provide cooling for the magnet sets required by 200 kW and 1 MW VASIMR engines. The performance of the concepts for the thermal interface and the thermal isolation and support system were measured in separate laboratory tests with a demonstration system built about a representative HTS magnet. Cooling for these tests was provided by a flow cooling loop comprising a compressor, recuperator and GM cryocooler, with the flow pressure, temperature, and mass flow rate selected to effectively simulate the turbo-Brayton operating condition. During system testing, the magnet was cooled below its design operating temperature of 35 K, and good thermal uniformity (<0.4 K) and low thermal loads (<0.5 W) were demonstrated.

  4. Convection towers

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, M.L.

    1994-02-08

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air and of generating electricity utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity. Other embodiments may also provide fresh water, and operate in an updraft mode. 5 figures.

  5. Optimization of Microscale Thermoelectric Cooling (TEC) Element Dimensions for Hotspot Cooling Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, P. Y.; Baskaran, R.; Böhringer, K. F.

    2009-07-01

    Microscale thermoelectric cooling elements (TECs) are being proposed to cool down an integrated circuit to maintain its performance. The maximum cooling power of microscale TECs is significantly reduced by the interfacial resistance. For our particular application, we calculate the optimal dimension of the TECs, made of Bi2Te3, that reduce the temperature at a hotspot on an IC chip by 10°C. By the one-dimensional analytical model that we developed and numerical solutions of TEC equations using MATLAB©, we obtain performance characteristics that relate the cooling power density to other control variables and material constants. The optimal dimension of microscale TECs is calculated for cooling at a hotspot region by a range of temperature differences, for example from 10°C to 50°C. Further, the percentage change in the optimal thickness for various thermal resistances and electrical contact resistances can be predicted. These results act as a good guideline for two-dimensional analysis and assembly of TECs.

  6. Cool-and Unusual-CAD Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Ken

    2004-01-01

    This article describes several very useful applications of AutoCAD that may lie outside the normal scope of application. AutoCAD commands used in this article are based on AutoCAD 2000I. The author and his students used a Hewlett Packard 750C DesignJet plotter for plotting. (Contains 5 figures and 5 photos.)

  7. Cool-and Unusual-CAD Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Ken

    2004-01-01

    This article describes several very useful applications of AutoCAD that may lie outside the normal scope of application. AutoCAD commands used in this article are based on AutoCAD 2000I. The author and his students used a Hewlett Packard 750C DesignJet plotter for plotting. (Contains 5 figures and 5 photos.)

  8. Radiative sky cooling: fundamental physics, materials, structures, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xingshu; Sun, Yubo; Zhou, Zhiguang; Alam, Muhammad Ashraful; Bermel, Peter

    2017-08-01

    Radiative sky cooling reduces the temperature of a system by promoting heat exchange with the sky; its key advantage is that no input energy is required. We will review the origins of radiative sky cooling from ancient times to the modern day, and illustrate how the fundamental physics of radiative cooling calls for a combination of properties that may not occur in bulk materials. A detailed comparison with recent modeling and experiments on nanophotonic structures will then illustrate the advantages of this recently emerging approach. Potential applications of these radiative cooling materials to a variety of temperature-sensitive optoelectronic devices, such as photovoltaics, thermophotovoltaics, rectennas, and infrared detectors, will then be discussed. This review will conclude by forecasting the prospects for the field as a whole in both terrestrial and space-based systems.

  9. Applications to determine the shortest tower BTS distance using Dijkstra algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardana, Herwin; Maharani, Septya; Hatta, Heliza Rahmania

    2017-02-01

    Telecommunications Tower or so-called BTS (Base Transceiver System) Toweris one of the main components in the network infrastructure that has experienced an increase in the number of construction. Telecommunications tower function as a place to put the antenna signal transmitter (access network) to provide communication services to customers around the tower. In addition, other use of telecommunications tower also to place the transmission signal antenna (transport network using microwave technology) for connecting customers with a central area. Therefore, in needed of a decision support system that can provide recommendations planting route of fiber optic cable with the shortest distance in purpose the use of fiber optic cable becoming more efficient. The results of the research were the shortest rule information, showing the distance to be travelled and the map view to enabling users to look at these.

  10. Composite Grounding Application of Transmission Line Tower with Flexible Graphite Grounding Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongtao; Zhang, Lei; Xiong, Jia; Cui, Zhenxing; Yang, Qi

    2017-07-01

    To solve the metal corrosion problem of transmission line tower grounding grid, a composite grounding material technique based on flexible graphite grounding is proposed. Using CDEGS software, the power frequency grounding resistances with different soils layers and different ground network size of tower are simulated. The researches show that layered soil resistance can be reduced by laying vertical grounding body and uniform soil can reduce ground resistance by increasing grounding network size.

  11. Effect of chlorine and temperature on free-living protozoa in operational man-made water systems (cooling towers and hot sanitary water systems) in Catalonia.

    PubMed

    Canals, Oriol; Serrano-Suárez, Alejandra; Salvadó, Humbert; Méndez, Javier; Cervero-Aragó, Sílvia; Ruiz de Porras, Vicenç; Dellundé, Jordi; Araujo, Rosa

    2015-05-01

    In recent decades, free-living protozoa (FLP) have gained prominence as the focus of research studies due to their pathogenicity to humans and their close relationship with the survival and growth of pathogenic amoeba-resisting bacteria. In the present work, we studied the presence of FLP in operational man-made water systems, i.e. cooling towers (CT) and hot sanitary water systems (HSWS), related to a high risk of Legionella spp. outbreaks, as well as the effect of the biocides used, i.e. chlorine in CT and high temperature in HSWS, on FLP. In CT samples, high-chlorine concentrations (7.5 ± 1.5 mg chlorine L(-1)) reduced the presence of FLP by 63.8 % compared to samples with low-chlorine concentrations (0.04 ± 0.08 mg chlorine L(-1)). Flagellates and amoebae were observed in samples collected with a level of 8 mg chlorine L(-1), which would indicate that some FLP, including the free-living amoeba (FLA) Acanthamoeba spp., are resistant to the discontinuous chlorine disinfection method used in the CT studied. Regarding HSWS samples, the amount of FLP detected in high-temperatures samples (53.1 ± 5.7 °C) was 38 % lower than in low-temperature samples (27.8 ± 5.8 °C). The effect of high temperature on FLP was chiefly observed in the results obtained by the culture method, in which there was a clear reduction in the presence of FLP at temperatures higher than 50 °C, but not in those obtained by PCR. The findings presented here show that the presence of FLP in operational man-made water systems should be taken into account in future regulations.

  12. Cryogenic Cooling for Myriad Applications-A STAR Is Born

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Cryogenics, the science of generating extremely low temperatures, has wide applicability throughout NASA. The Agency employs cryogenics for rocket propulsion, high-pressure gas supply, breathable air in space, life support equipment, electricity, water, food preservation and packaging, medicine, imaging devices, and electronics. Cryogenic liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen systems are also replacing solid rocket motor propulsion systems in most of the proposed launch systems, a reversion to old-style liquid propellants. In the late 1980s, NASA wanted a compact linear alternator/motor with reduced size and mass, as well as high efficiency, that had unlimited service life for use in a thermally driven power generator for space power applications. Prior development work with free-piston Stirling converters (a Stirling engine integrated with a linear actuator that produces electrical power output) had shown the promise of that technology for high-power space applications. A dual use for terrestrial applications exists for compact Stirling converters for onsite combined heat and power units. The Stirling cycle is also usable in reverse as a refrigeration cycle suitable for cryogenic cooling, so this Stirling converter work promised double benefits as well as dual uses. The uses for cryogenic coolers within NASA abound; commercial applications are similarly wide-ranging, from cooling liquid oxygen and nitrogen, to cryobiology and bio-storage, cryosurgery, instrument and detector cooling, semiconductor manufacturing, and support service for cooled superconducting power systems.

  13. Actively Cooled SLMS(TM) Technology for HEL Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacoby, Marc T.; Goodman, William A.; Reily, Jack C.; Kegley, Jeffrey R.; Haight, Harlan J.; Tucker, John; Wright, Ernest R.; Hogue, William D.

    2005-01-01

    Mr. Jacoby is the Chief Scientist for Schafer's Lightweight Optical Systems business area with twenty four years experience in laser and optical systems for space and military applications. He and colleague Dr. Goodman conceived and developed Silicon Lightweight Mirrors (SLMS(TM)) technologies for space applications from the extreme UV to FAR IR wavelengths. Schafer has demonstrated two different methods for actively cooling our Silicon Lightweight Mirrors (SLMS(TM)) technology. Direct internal cooling was accomplished by flowing liquid nitrogen through the continuous open cell core of the SLMS(TM) mirror. Indirect external cooling was accomplished by flowing liquid nitrogen through a CTE matched Cesic square-tube manifold that was bonded to the back of the mirror in the center. Testing was done in the small 4-foot thermal/vacuum chamber located at the NASA/MSFC X-Ray Calibration Facility. Seven thermal diodes were located over the front side of the 5 inch diameter mirror and one was placed on the outlet side of the Cesic manifold. Results indicate that the mirror reaches steady state at 82K in less than four minutes for both cooling methods. The maximum temperature difference of the eight diodes was less than 200 mK when the mirror was internally cooled and covered with MLI to insulate it from the large 300 K aluminum plate that was used to mount it.

  14. Collapsible Towers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    NASA needed a means of orbiting a large radio telescope antenna. Astro Research Corporation developed a new structure that was strong, lightweight, folded into a small storage space, and could be erected by rotation. Later they adapted it to commercial use. Today the "Astromast" tower consists of tubular aluminum alloy and stainless steel members that deploy into small three-sided bays, each made rigid by six diagonal cables. All joints are flexible to permit folding and unfolding. Tower packs into container 5% of its height, can be erected without tools and is reusable. Tower has won "Design of the Year" award from Machine Design. Variations include portable emergency bridges and commercial scaffolding.

  15. New Directions for Evaporative Cooling Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robison, Rita

    1981-01-01

    New energy saving technology can be applied to older cooling towers; in addition, evaporative chilling, a process that links a cooling tower to the chilling equipment, can reduce energy use by 80 percent. (Author/MLF)

  16. Applications for Solid Propellant Cool Gas Generator Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der List, M.; van Vliet, L. D.; Sanders, H. M.; Put, P. A. G.; Elst, J. W. E. C.

    2004-10-01

    In 2002 and 2003, Bradford Engineering B.V. conducted, in corporation with the Dutch research institute TNO Prins Maurits Laboratory (PML) a SME study for ESA-ESTEC for the identification of spaceflight applications and on-ground demonstration of Solid Propellant Cool Gas Generator (SPCGG) technology. This innovative technology has been developed by TNO-PML while Bradford Engineering also brought in its experience in spaceflight hardware development and manufacturing. The Solid Propellant Cool Gas Generator (SPCGG) technology allows for pure gas generation at ambient temperatures, as opposed to conventional solid propellant gas generators. This makes the SPCGG technology interesting for a wide range of terrestrial spaceflight applications. During the first part of the study, a variety of potential applications have been identified and three applications were selected for a more detailed quantitative study. In the third phase a ground demonstration was performed successfully for a cold gas propulsion system application. During the actual demonstration test, 10 cool gas generators were mounted and all operated successfully in sequence, demonstrating good repeatability of the produced amount of gas and pressure.

  17. Building heating and cooling applications thermal energy storage program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eissenberg, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal energy storage technology and development of building heating and cooling applications in the residential and commercial sectors is outlined. Three elements are identified to undergo an applications assessment, technology development, and demonstration. Emphasis is given to utility load management thermal energy system application where the stress is on the 'customer side of the meter'. Thermal storage subsystems for space conditioning and conservation means of increased thermal mass within the building envelope and by means of low-grade waste heat recovery are covered.

  18. Towering Infernos

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-11-09

    This majestic false-color image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the "mountains" where stars are born. Dubbed "Mountains of Creation" by Spitzer scientists, these towering pillars of cool gas and dust are illuminated at their tips with light from warm embryonic stars. The new infrared picture is reminiscent of Hubble's iconic visible-light image of the Eagle Nebula, which also features a star-forming region, or nebula, that is being sculpted into pillars by radiation and winds from hot, massive stars. The pillars in the Spitzer image are part of a region called W5, in the Cassiopeia constellation 7,000 light-years away and 50 light-years across. They are more than 10 times in the size of those in the Eagle Nebula (shown to scale here). The Spitzer's view differs from Hubble's because infrared light penetrates dust, whereas visible light is blocked by it. In the Spitzer image, hundreds of forming stars (white/yellow) can seen for the first time inside the central pillar, and dozens inside the tall pillar to the left. Scientists believe these star clusters were triggered into existence by radiation and winds from an "initiator" star more than 10 times the mass of our Sun. This star is not pictured, but the finger-like pillars "point" toward its location above the image frame. The Spitzer picture also reveals stars (blue) a bit older than the ones in the pillar tips in the evacuated areas between the clouds. Scientists believe these stars were born around the same time as the massive initiator star not pictured. A third group of young stars occupies the bright area below the central pillar. It is not known whether these stars formed in a related or separate event. Some of the blue dots are foreground stars that are not members of this nebula. The red color in the Spitzer image represents organic molecules known as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. These building blocks of life are often found in star-forming clouds of gas and dust. Like small dust grains

  19. Tower counts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woody, Carol Ann; Johnson, D.H.; Shrier, Brianna M.; O'Neal, Jennifer S.; Knutzen, John A.; Augerot, Xanthippe; O'Neal, Thomas A.; Pearsons, Todd N.

    2007-01-01

    Counting towers provide an accurate, low-cost, low-maintenance, low-technology, and easily mobilized escapement estimation program compared to other methods (e.g., weirs, hydroacoustics, mark-recapture, and aerial surveys) (Thompson 1962; Siebel 1967; Cousens et al. 1982; Symons and Waldichuk 1984; Anderson 2000; Alaska Department of Fish and Game 2003). Counting tower data has been found to be consistent with that of digital video counts (Edwards 2005). Counting towers do not interfere with natural fish migration patterns, nor are fish handled or stressed; however, their use is generally limited to clear rivers that meet specific site selection criteria. The data provided by counting tower sampling allow fishery managers to determine reproductive population size, estimate total return (escapement + catch) and its uncertainty, evaluate population productivity and trends, set harvest rates, determine spawning escapement goals, and forecast future returns (Alaska Department of Fish and Game 1974-2000 and 1975-2004). The number of spawning fish is determined by subtracting subsistence, sport-caught fish, and prespawn mortality from the total estimated escapement. The methods outlined in this protocol for tower counts can be used to provide reasonable estimates ( plus or minus 6%-10%) of reproductive salmon population size and run timing in clear rivers. 

  20. Preliminary design package for solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Summarized preliminary design information on activities associated with the development, delivery and support of solar heating and cooling systems is given. These systems are for single family dwellings and commercial applications. The heating/cooling system use a reversible vapor compression heat pump that is driven in the cooling mode by a Rankine power loop, and in the heating mode by a variable speed electric motor. The heating/cooling systems differ from the heating-only systems in the arrangement of the heat pump subsystem and the addition of a cooling tower to provide the heat sink for cooling mode operation.

  1. Neural Network Expert System in the Application of Tower Fault Diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoyang; Xia, Zhongwu; Tao, Zhiyong; Zhao, Zhenlian

    For the corresponding fuzzy relationship between the fault symptoms and the fault causes in the process of tower crane operation, this paper puts forward a kind of rapid new method of fast detection and diagnosis for common fault based on neural network expert system. This paper makes full use of expert system and neural network advantages, and briefly introduces the structure, function, algorithm and realization of the adopted system. Results show that the new algorithm is feasible and can achieve rapid faults diagnosis.

  2. Conductively cooled lasers for space-based applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovis, Floyd E.; Martin, Nigel; Burnham, Ralph

    2005-05-01

    The design of the diode-pumped gain medium is critical to the successful deployment of lasers in space-based missions. We have developed a number of diode-pumped, conductively cooled zigzag slab designs for this application. These designs include both one-sided and two-side pumped and cooled designs. In one of the one-sided pumped and cooled amplifier designs we optimized the efficiency by maximizing the overlap between the extracting beam and the diode pumps at the total internal reflection (TIR) surface, a so-called "pump on bounce" approach. With this approach we achieved an electrical to optical efficiency from the amplifier of over 11% with an output beam M2 of approximately 3. By reducing the size of the extracting beam to reduce diffraction effects in the slab the beam quality could be improved to an M2 of 1.5 but the amplifier electrical to optical efficiency dropped to 6.7%. The other one-sided approach we have investigated is a near Brewster angle slab that incorporates beam propagation parallel to the slab axis and achieves good efficiency by a high overall volume fill factor. In a high beam quality oscillator (M2 = 1.2) we achieved over 6% electrical to optical efficiency with a Brewster angle head design. Modeling of the thermal effects in both approaches has been performed and will be reported on. The final design approach we have investigated is based on two-sided pumping and cooling. Both modeling and preliminary experimental results indicate that this approach will allow scaling to higher average powers while still maintaining beam qualities and extraction efficiencies at least as good as those obtained with the one-sided pumped and cooled approaches. From the results of these tests and analyses, we have developed a design for a space-qualifiable 1 J, 100 Hz laser operating at 1064 nm.

  3. Cooled variable nozzle radial turbine for rotor craft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogo, C.

    1981-01-01

    An advanced, small 2.27 kb/sec (5 lbs/sec), high temperature, variable area radial turbine was studied for a rotor craft application. Variable capacity cycles including single-shaft and free-turbine engine configurations were analyzed to define an optimum engine design configuration. Parametric optimizations were made on cooled and uncooled rotor configurations. A detailed structural and heat transfer analysis was conducted to provide a 4000-hour life HP turbine with material properties of the 1988 time frame. A pivoted vane and a moveable sidewall geometry were analyzed. Cooling and variable geometry penalties were included in the cycle analysis. A variable geometry free-turbine engine configuration with a design 1477K (2200 F) inlet temperature and a compressor pressure ratio of 16:1 was selected. An uncooled HP radial turbine rotor with a moveable sidewall nozzle showed the highest performance potential for a time weighted duty cycle.

  4. Surface cooled, vacuum impregnated superconducting magnet systems: Design, construction, applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dam, Jacobus Adrianus Maria; Pieterman, Karel

    The design and construction of three superconducting magnet systems for applications in the fields of medical imaging, plasma physics and nuclear physics are described. All three systems have vacuum impregnated, intrinsically stable coils with cooling at the outer surfaces of the winding package with liquid helium, and are all coupled in some way to closed cycle cooling systems. General theories are discussed. The techniques used in both the design and the construction of the different magnet systems, are given. The use of numerical methods for the calculation of thermal and mechanical properties of superconducting coil systems, is emphasized. The experimental results obtained with the Delft magnetic resonance imaging system are described and examples of images showing sagittal sections of the human head, successfully produced with this system, are given.

  5. Towering Arches

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-04-06

    This still image from an animation from NASA GSFC Solar Dynamics Observatory shows arches of magnetic field lines towered over the edge of the Sun as a pair of active regions began to rotate into view Apr. 5-6, 2016.

  6. Rapunzel's Tower

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Depp, Sheryl

    2007-01-01

    Children's literature often inspires the author's lessons, and reading to her primary students motivates their participation. In this article, the author presents and describes her lesson which is based on the book "Falling for Rapunzel" by Leah Wilcox. Students created a fairy tale tower in this lesson, which took place over three class periods.…

  7. Solar thermal power towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreith, F.; Meyer, R. T.

    1984-07-01

    The solar thermal central receiver technology, known as solar power towers, is rapidly evolving to a state of near-term energy availability for electrical power generation and industrial process heat applications. The systems consist of field arrays of heliostat reflectors, a central receiver boiler, short term thermal storage devices, and either turbine-generators or heat exchangers. Fluid temperatures up to 550 C are currently achievable, and technology developments are underway to reach 1100 C. Six solar power towers are now under construction or in test operation in five countries around the world.

  8. Experiences in solar cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, D. S.

    The results of performance evaluations for nine solar cooling systems are presented, and reasons fow low or high net energy balances are discussed. Six of the nine systems are noted to have performed unfavorably compared to standard cooling systems due to thermal storage losses, excessive system electrical demands, inappropriate control strategies, poor system-to-load matching, and poor chiller performance. A reduction in heat losses in one residential unit increased the total system efficiency by 2.5%, while eliminating heat losses to the building interior increased the efficiency by 3.3%. The best system incorporated a lithium bromide absorption chiller and a Rankine cycle compression unit for a commercial application. Improvements in the cooling tower and fan configurations to increase the solar cooling system efficiency are indicated. Best performances are expected to occur in climates inducing high annual cooling loads.

  9. Virtual Tower

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne, R.A.

    1997-08-01

    The primary responsibility of an intrusion detection system (IDS) operator is to monitor the system, assess alarms, and summon and coordinate the response team when a threat is acknowledged. The tools currently provided to the operator are somewhat limited: monitors must be switched, keystrokes must be entered to call up intrusion sensor data, and communication with the response force must be maintained. The Virtual tower is an operator interface assembled from low-cost commercial-off-the-shelf hardware and software; it enables large amounts of data to be displayed in a virtual manner that provides instant recognition for the operator and increases assessment accuracy in alarm annunciator and control systems. This is accomplished by correlating and fusing the data into a 360-degree visual representation that employs color, auxiliary attributes, video, and directional audio to prompt the operator. The Virtual Tower would be a valuable low-cost enhancement to existing systems.

  10. Third international workshop on ice storage for cooling applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gorski, A.J.

    1986-04-01

    The third international workshop on ice storage for cooling applications which was informal and interactive in nature, was open to persons interested in all ice-growing technologies and in ice storage, both seasonal and diurnal. Presentations were made on some 20 topics, ranging from freezers in Alaska to ice cooling of commercial jet aircraft. Workshop tours included visits to ice-storage systems at Commonwealth Edison's facilities in Bolingbrook and Des Plaines Valley, the A.C. Neilsen builing in Northbrook, and the new State of Illinois Center in Chicago. The first workshop in the present series considered the future of ice storage and predicted applications in the agricultural sector, desalinization, and commercial ice production. Progress has been rapid in the intervening two years, and an important topic at the third workshop was the possible use of ''warm ices'' (clathrate hydrates) for energy storage. This report consists primarily of abstracts of presentations made at the workshop. Persons wishing to obtain further information about particular papers should contact the speakers directly; speakers' addresses and telephone numbers are listed in this report.

  11. Simulation of Laser Cooling and Trapping in Engineering Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jaime; Kohel, James; Thompson, Robert; Yu, Nan; Lunblad, Nathan

    2005-01-01

    An advanced computer code is undergoing development for numerically simulating laser cooling and trapping of large numbers of atoms. The code is expected to be useful in practical engineering applications and to contribute to understanding of the roles that light, atomic collisions, background pressure, and numbers of particles play in experiments using laser-cooled and -trapped atoms. The code is based on semiclassical theories of the forces exerted on atoms by magnetic and optical fields. Whereas computer codes developed previously for the same purpose account for only a few physical mechanisms, this code incorporates many more physical mechanisms (including atomic collisions, sub-Doppler cooling mechanisms, Stark and Zeeman energy shifts, gravitation, and evanescent-wave phenomena) that affect laser-matter interactions and the cooling of atoms to submillikelvin temperatures. Moreover, whereas the prior codes can simulate the interactions of at most a few atoms with a resonant light field, the number of atoms that can be included in a simulation by the present code is limited only by computer memory. Hence, the present code represents more nearly completely the complex physics involved when using laser-cooled and -trapped atoms in engineering applications. Another advantage that the code incorporates is the possibility to analyze the interaction between cold atoms of different atomic number. Some properties that cold atoms of different atomic species have, like cross sections and the particular excited states they can occupy when interacting with each other and light fields, play important roles not yet completely understood in the new experiments that are under way in laboratories worldwide to form ultracold molecules. Other research efforts use cold atoms as holders of quantum information, and more recent developments in cavity quantum electrodynamics also use ultracold atoms to explore and expand new information-technology ideas. These experiments give a hint

  12. Laser Diode Cooling For High Average Power Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundinger, David C.; Beach, Raymond J.; Benett, William J.; Solarz, Richard W.; Sperry, Verry

    1989-06-01

    Many applications for semiconductor lasers that require high average power are limited by the inability to remove the waste heat generated by the diode lasers. In order to reduce the cost and complexity of these applications a heat sink package has been developed which is based on water cooled silicon microstructures. Thermal resistivities of less than 0.025°C/01/cm2) have been measured which should be adequate for up to CW operation of diode laser arrays. This concept can easily be scaled to large areas and is ideal for high average power solid state laser pumping. Several packages which illustrate the essential features of this design have been fabricated and tested. The theory of operation will be briefly covered, and several conceptual designs will be described. Also the fabrication and assembly procedures and measured levels of performance will be discussed.

  13. Application of cooled IR focal plane arrays in thermographic cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollheim, B.; Gaertner, M.; Dammass, G.; Krausz, M.

    2016-05-01

    The usage of cooled IR Focal Plane Array detectors in thermographic or radiometric thermal imaging cameras, respectively, leads to special demands on these detectors, which are discussed in this paper. For a radiometric calibration of wide temperature measuring ranges from -40 up to 2,000 °C, a linear and time-stable response of the photodiode array has to be ensured for low as well as high radiation intensities. The maximum detectable photon flux is limited by the allowed shift of the photodiode's bias that should remain in the linear part of the photodiode's I(V) curve even for the highest photocurrent. This limits the measurable highest object temperature in practice earlier than the minimum possible integration time. Higher temperature measuring ranges are realized by means of neutral or spectral filters. Defense and Security applications normally provide images at the given ambient temperature with small hot spots. The usage of radiometric thermal imagers for thermography often feature larger objects with a high temperature contrast to the background. This should not generate artifacts in the image, like pixel patterns or stripes. Further issues concern the clock regime or the sub-frame capabilities of the Read-Out-Circuit and the frame rate dependency of the signal. We will briefly describe the demands on the lens design for thermal imaging cameras when using cooled IR Focal Plane Array detectors with large apertures.

  14. 40 CFR 463.10 - Applicability; description of the contact cooling and heating water subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... contact cooling and heating water subcategory. 463.10 Section 463.10 Protection of Environment... FORMING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Contact Cooling and Heating Water Subcategory § 463.10 Applicability; description of the contact cooling and heating water subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges...

  15. 40 CFR 463.10 - Applicability; description of the contact cooling and heating water subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... contact cooling and heating water subcategory. 463.10 Section 463.10 Protection of Environment... FORMING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Contact Cooling and Heating Water Subcategory § 463.10 Applicability; description of the contact cooling and heating water subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges...

  16. Application of metallic nanoparticle suspensions in advanced cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; Choi, S.U.S.

    1996-12-31

    In the development of energy-efficient heat transfer fluids that are required in many cooling applications, low thermal conductivity is a primary limitation. However, it is well known that at room temperature, metals in solid form have orders-of-magnitude higher thermal conductivities than those of fluids. Therefore, the thermal conductivities of fluids that contain suspended solid metallic particles are expected to be significantly enhanced over those of conventional heat transfer fluids. In fact, numerous theoretical and experimental studies of the effective thermal conductivity of dispersions that contain solid particles have been conducted since Maxwell`s theoretical was published more than 100 years ago. However, all of the studies on thermal conductivity of suspensions have been confined to millimeter- or micrometer-sized particles.

  17. High temperature gas-cooled reactor: gas turbine application study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    The high-temperature capability of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a distinguishing characteristic which has long been recognized as significant both within the US and within foreign nuclear energy programs. This high-temperature capability of the HTGR concept leads to increased efficiency in conventional applications and, in addition, makes possible a number of unique applications in both electrical generation and industrial process heat. In particular, coupling the HTGR nuclear heat source to the Brayton (gas turbine) Cycle offers significant potential benefits to operating utilities. This HTGR-GT Application Study documents the effort to evaluate the appropriateness of the HTGR-GT as an HTGR Lead Project. The scope of this effort included evaluation of the HTGR-GT technology, evaluation of potential HTGR-GT markets, assessment of the economics of commercial HTGR-GT plants, and evaluation of the program and expenditures necessary to establish HTGR-GT technology through the completion of the Lead Project.

  18. Drop tower with no aerodynamic drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, J. M., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Cooling air accelerated to match velocity of falling object eliminates drag. 3 meter drop tower with suction fan and specific geometry causes air to accelerate downward at 1 g. Although cooling of molten material released from top is slow because surrounding air moves with it, drop remains nearly spherical.

  19. Air-cooled heat exchangers: Conventional and unconventional

    SciTech Connect

    Kals, W. )

    1994-08-01

    Wet-surface air-cooled heat exchangers, presently thought of as unconventional, should be considered for applications where fin-tube air coolers are not used. Wet-Surface coolers have advantages where fin-tube exchangers may not supply enough duty, especially during hot weather. They can also cool to temperatures below the capability of cooling water exchangers. Air-cooled heat exchangers made their first appearance in petroleum refineries and chemical processing plants in the US thirty years ago. Their rapidly increasing use is due to the desire of plant designers and operators to avoid problems associated with cooling water. With air as the cooling medium, process heat is surrendered directly to the atmosphere. No additional thermal load is added to existing cooling towers. The paper describes air-cooled exchangers, design features, applications, and limitations.

  20. State waste discharge permit application: 400 Area secondary cooling water

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    This document constitutes the Washington Administrative Code 173-216 State Waste Discharge Permit Application that serves as interim compliance as required by the Consent Order DE 91NM-177, for the 400 Area Secondary Cooling Water stream. As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permitting Program. As a result of this decision, the Washington State Department of Ecology and the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office entered in to Consent Order DE 91NM-177. The Consent Order DE 91NM-177 requires a series of permitting activities for liquid effluent discharges.

  1. State waste discharge permit application for cooling water and condensate discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Haggard, R.D.

    1996-08-12

    The following presents the Categorical State Waste Discharge Permit (SWDP) Application for the Cooling Water and Condensate Discharges on the Hanford Site. This application is intended to cover existing cooling water and condensate discharges as well as similar future discharges meeting the criteria set forth in this document.

  2. Solid oxide fuel cell application in district cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Qattan, Ayman; ElSherbini, Abdelrahman; Al-Ajmi, Kholoud

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents analysis of the performance of a combined cooling and power (CCP) system for district cooling. The cogeneration system is designed to provide cooling for a low-rise residential district of 27,300 RT (96 MWc). A solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) generates electric power to operate chillers, and the exhaust fuel and heat from the SOFC run gas turbines and absorption chillers. Thermal energy storage is utilized to reduce system capacity. Part-load operation strategies target maximizing energy efficiency. The operation of the system is compared through an hourly simulation to that of packaged air-conditioning units typically used to cool homes. The CCP system with the district cooling arrangement improves the cooling-to-fuel efficiency by 346%. The peak power requirement is reduced by 57% (24 MW) and the total fuel energy is reduced by 54% (750 TJ y-1). The system cuts annual carbon dioxide emissions to less than half and reduces other harmful emissions. A cost analysis of the system components and operation resulted in a 53% reduction in the cost per ton-hour of cooling over traditional systems.

  3. AFCATT (Anti-Fouling Chemical Additive Test Tower)

    SciTech Connect

    Philpot, E.F.; Newton, M.T.; Noble, R.T.

    1995-06-01

    Polyvinylchloride (PVC) film-type cellular fill is the fill of choice in replacing cement asbestos board fill in existing cooling towers and in new cooling towers because of its high thermal performance, ease of installation, and low initial cost. However, PVC fill has been found to foul quickly with biological and sediment material, significantly reducing tower performance and the fill`s useful life. The Anti-Fouling Chemical Additives Test Tower (AFCATT) has been build to study accumulation rates of fouling deposits in corrugated PVC film fill and to study methods of cleaning and preventing the fouling deposits. This small mechanical draft cooling tower is located next to the Unit 4 natural draft cooling tower at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Bowen. The once-through mechanical draft tower receives hot water from the condenser and returns the cold water to the basin of the host tower. The pilot tower is divided into four chambers allowing for three different treatment programs and one control to be run simultaneously. PVC fill packs are suspended from load cells to allow the weight of the fill packs to be measured continuously. Six vendors participated in the summer 1993 test program. Each proposed different methods of cleaning the fouled fill and were given the opportunity to try their proposed method of fill cleaning. To determine the success of these different treatment programs, statistical analyses were performed on the collected data and the changes in the accumulation rates compared.

  4. Liquid metal cooled reactors for space power applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, S.; Vaidyanathan, S.; Van Hoomissen, J.

    1985-01-01

    The technology basis for evaluation of liquid metal cooled space reactors is summarized. Requirements for space nuclear power which are relevant to selection of the reactor subsystem are then reviewed. The attributes of liquid metal cooled reactors are considered in relation to these requirements in the areas of liquid metal properties, neutron spectrum characteristics, and fuel form. Key features of typical reactor designs are illustrated. It is concluded that liquid metal cooled fast spectrum reactors provide a high confidence, flexible option for meeting requirements for SP-100 and beyond.

  5. Radiant Cooling for Closed-Loop Water Containment: Exploration of Possible Application in Dry Docks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-20

    Radiant Cooling For Closed-Loop Water Containment: Exploration of Possible Application in Dry Docks by Trevor R. Murphy, Mechanical...Organization: SPAWAR Sponsoring Organization: NESDI Keywords: Dry Dock Cooling , Heat Transfer, Closed Loop, Pipe System, Cost, Pareto List of Programs...provide data for estimating the cost of implementing a closed-loop radiant cooling system for ships in dry docks. Depending on the material used, pipe

  6. New developments in caloric materials for cooling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crossley, S.; Mathur, N. D.; Moya, X.

    2015-06-01

    Caloric materials are in the spotlight as candidates for future environmentally friendly cooling technologies. We describe stimulating recent developments in the three caloric strands that are now being studied collectively, namely magnetocaloric, electrocaloric and mechanocaloric (elastocaloric or barocaloric) effects.

  7. CFD Model Development and validation for High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, Yassin; Corradini, Michael; Tokuhiro, Akira; Wei, Thomas Y.C.

    2014-07-14

    The Reactor Cavity Cooling Systems (RCCS) is a passive safety system that will be incorporated in the VTHR design. The system was designed to remove the heat from the reactor cavity and maintain the temperature of structures and concrete walls under desired limits during normal operation (steady-state) and accident scenarios. A small scale (1:23) water-cooled experimental facility was scaled, designed, and constructed in order to study the complex thermohydraulic phenomena taking place in the RCCS during steady-state and transient conditions. The facility represents a portion of the reactor vessel with nine stainless steel coolant risers and utilizes water as coolant. The facility was equipped with instrumentation to measure temperatures and flow rates and a general verification was completed during the shakedown. A model of the experimental facility was prepared using RELAP5-3D and simulations were performed to validate the scaling procedure. The experimental data produced during the steady-state run were compared with the simulation results obtained using RELAP5-3D. The overall behavior of the facility met the expectations. The facility capabilities were confirmed to be very promising in performing additional experimental tests, including flow visualization, and produce data for code validation.

  8. Structural active cooling applications for the Space Shuttle.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masek, R. V.; Niblock, G. A.; Huneidi, F.

    1972-01-01

    Analytic and experimental studies have been conducted to evaluate a number of active cooling approaches to structural thermal protection for the Space Shuttle. The primary emphasis was directed toward the thermal protection system. Trade study results are presented for various heat shield material and TPS arrangements. Both metallic and reusable surface insulation (RSI) concepts were considered. Active systems heat sinks consisted of hydrogen, phase change materials, and expendable water. If consideration is given only to controlling the surface temperature, passive TPS was found to provide the most efficient system. Use of active cooling which incorporates some interior temperature control made the thermally less efficient RSI system more attractive.

  9. Typical Mid Tower Elevation & Section, Typical Mid Tower Footing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Typical Mid Tower Elevation & Section, Typical Mid Tower Footing Section & Elevation, South Tower Section & Elevation, and North Tower Sections & Elevation - Cape Arago Light Station Footbridge, Gregory Point, Charleston, Coos County, OR

  10. Long-term ice storage for cooling applications

    DOEpatents

    Schertz, William W.

    1981-01-01

    A device is providing for cooling a stored material and then for later use of the cold thus stored. The device includes a tank containing a liquid such as water which is frozen by means of a reflux condenser heat pipe.

  11. Long-term ice storage for cooling applications

    DOEpatents

    Schertz, W.W.

    A device is described for cooling a stored material and then for later use of the cold thus stored. The device includes a tank containing a liquid such as water which is frozen by means of a reflux condenser heat pipe.

  12. Current status of flow convergence for clinical applications: is it a leaning tower of "PISA"?

    PubMed

    Simpson, I A; Shiota, T; Gharib, M; Sahn, D J

    1996-02-01

    Spatial appreciation of flow velocities using Doppler color flow mapping has led to quantitative evaluation of the zone of flow convergence proximal to a regurgitant orifice. Based on the theory of conservation of mass, geometric analysis, assuming a series of hemispheric shells of increasing velocity as flow converges on the orifice--the so-called proximal isovelocity surface area (PISA) effect--has yielded methods promising noninvasive measurement of regurgitant flow rate. When combined with conventional Doppler ultrasound to measure orifice velocity, regurgitant orifice area, the major predictor of regurgitation severity, can also be estimated. The high temporal resolution of color M-mode can be used to evaluate dynamic changes in orifice area, as seen in many pathologic conditions, which enhances our appreciation of the pathophysiology of regurgitation. The PISA methodology is potentially applicable to any restrictive orifice and has gained some credibility in the quantitative evaluation of other valve pathology, particularly mitral and tricuspid regurgitation, and in congenital heart disease. Although the current limitations of PISA estimates of regurgitation have tempered its introduction as a valuable clinical tool, considerable efforts in in vitro and clinical research have improved our understanding of the problems and limitations of the PISA methodology and provided a firm platform for continuing research into the accurate quantitative assessment of valve regurgitation and the expanding clinical role of quantitative Doppler color flow mapping.

  13. Power Module Cooling for Future Electric Vehicle Applications: A Coolant Comparison of Oil and PGW

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    POWER MODULE COOLING FOR FUTURE ELECTRIC VEHICLE APPLICATIONS: A COOLANT COMPARISON OF OIL AND PGW T. E. Salem U. S. Naval Academy 105...and efficient power converters are being developed to support the needs of future ground vehicle systems. This progress is being driven by...2006 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Power Module Cooling For Future Electric Vehicle Applications: A Coolant

  14. Cellular Phone Towers

    MedlinePlus

    ... the call. How are people exposed to the energy from cellular phone towers? As people use cell ... where people can be exposed to them. The energy from a cellular phone tower antenna, like that ...

  15. Active Control of Jets in Cross-Flow for Film Cooling Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikitopoulos, Dimitris E.

    2003-01-01

    Jets in cross-flow have applications in film cooling of gas turbine vanes, blades and combustor liners. Their cooling effectiveness depends on the extent to which the cool jet-fluid adheres to the cooled component surface. Lift-off of the cooling jet flow or other mechanisms promoting mixing, cause loss of cooling effectiveness as they allow the hot "free-stream" fluid to come in contact with the component surface. The premise of this project is that cooling effectiveness can be improved by actively controlling (e.9. forcing, pulsing) the jet flow. Active control can be applied to prevent/delay lift-off and suppress mixing. Furthermore, an actively controlled film-cooling system coupled with appropriate sensory input (e.g. temperature or heat flux) can adapt to spatial and temporal variations of the hot-gas path. Thus, it is conceivable that the efficiency of film-cooling systems can be improved, resulting in coolant fluid economy. It is envisioned that Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) will play a role in the realization of such systems. As a first step, a feasibility study will be conducted to evaluate the concept, identify actuation and sensory elements and develop a control strategy. Part of this study will be the design of a proof-of-concept experiment and collection of necessary data.

  16. Performance specification for control tower display systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleva, Denise L.; Meyer, Frederick M.

    2003-09-01

    Personnel in airport control towers monitor and direct the takeoff of outgoing aircraft, landing of incoming aircraft and all movements of aircraft on the ground. Although the primary source of information for the Local Controller, Assistant Local Controller and the Ground Controller is the real world viewed through the windows of the control tower, electronic displays are also used to provide situation awareness. Due to the criticality of the work to be performed by the controllers and the rather unique environment of the air traffic control tower, display hardware standards, which have been developed for general use, are not directly applicable. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) requested assistance of Air Force Research Laboratory Human Effectiveness Directorate in producing a document which can be adopted as a Tower Display Standard usable by display engineers, human factors practitioners and system integrators. Particular emphasis was placed on human factors issues applicable to the control tower environment and controller task demands.

  17. High performance infrared fast cooled detectors for missile applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reibel, Yann; Espuno, Laurent; Taalat, Rachid; Sultan, Ahmad; Cassaigne, Pierre; Matallah, Noura

    2016-05-01

    SOFRADIR was selected in the late 90's for the production of 320×256 MW detectors for major European missile programs. This experience has established our company as a key player in the field of missile programs. SOFRADIR has since developed a vast portfolio of lightweight, compact and high performance JT-based solutions for missiles. ALTAN is a 384x288 Mid Wave infrared detector with 15μm pixel pitch, and is offered in a miniature ultra-fast Joule- Thomson cooled Dewar. Since Sofradir offers both Indium Antimonide (InSb) and Mercury Cadmium Telluride technologies (MCT), we are able to deliver the detectors best suited to customers' needs. In this paper we are discussing different figures of merit for very compact and innovative JT-cooled detectors and are highlighting the challenges for infrared detection technologies.

  18. Sorption-cooled continuous miniature dilution refrigeration for astrophysical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Andrew J.; Calisse, Paolo G.; Coppi, Gabriele; Haynes, Vic; Martinis, Lorenzo; McCulloch, Mark A.; Melhuish, Simon J.; Piccirillo, Lucio

    2016-07-01

    A progress report is provided on the development of a tiltable continuous miniature dilution refrigerator and associated 3He/4He sorption coolers. These systems are currently being developed to provide sub-Kelvin cooling of the bolometer arrays for several ground- and balloon-based experiments which aim to measure the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (QUBIC, LSPE and POLARBEAR-2). The novel tiltable miniaturised system benefits from a lack of external circulation pumps and a mechanically simple design. The condenser of the twin-pumped recirculating diluter is cooled continuously by two 3He/4He sorption coolers. The sorption pumps are operated by convective heat switches. The dilution unit features a thermally separated mixing chamber, still and step heat exchangers. The designs and analyses of both the sorption coolers and the diluter are reported; both systems have been manufactured and are presently under test.

  19. A Modified Cooling Method and Its Application in "Drosophila" Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qu, Wen-hui; Zhu, Tong-bo; Yang, Da-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Chilling is a cost-effective and safe method of immobilising flies in "Drosophila" experiments. However, should condensation form on the plate, it would be fatal to the flies. Here we describe a modified cooling method using reusable commercial ice pack(s) (ca. 400 ml, 2-3 cm tall) rather than crushed ice. The ice pack is covered with a…

  20. A Modified Cooling Method and Its Application in "Drosophila" Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qu, Wen-hui; Zhu, Tong-bo; Yang, Da-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Chilling is a cost-effective and safe method of immobilising flies in "Drosophila" experiments. However, should condensation form on the plate, it would be fatal to the flies. Here we describe a modified cooling method using reusable commercial ice pack(s) (ca. 400 ml, 2-3 cm tall) rather than crushed ice. The ice pack is covered with a…

  1. Survey of power tower technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrandt, A. F.; Dasgupta, S.

    1980-05-01

    The history of the power tower programs is reviewed, and attention is given to the current state of heliostat, receiver, and storage design. Economic considerations are discussed, as are simulation studies and implications. Also dealt with are alternate applications for the power tower and some financing and energy aspects of solar electric conversion. It is noted that with a national commitment to solar energy, the power tower concept could generate 40 GW of electricity and double this amount in process heat by the year 2000. Calculations show an energy amplification factor of 20 for solar energy plants; that is, the ratio of the electric energy produced over the lifetime of a power plant to the thermal energy required to produce the plant.

  2. Research on the application of vortex tube type of cooling jacket in coal mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Xiaojie

    2017-08-01

    The problem of heat damage in high temperature mine has been attached more and more concern to. In addition, the existing solutions also have problems which are large initial investment and poor safety performance. Vortex tube type of mine cooling jacket, studied in this paper, using vortex tube refrigeration principle. It used compressed exhaust gas as the gas source, which can solve the problem of the large-scale cooling equipment which rely on electricity, and may not emit toxic gases at the same time. Thereby, by using the method of observation and questionnaire survey, the parameters of the vortex tube were optimized for optimal cooling effect. In conclusion, the features of security, reliability, energy saving and environmental protection can be realized by the vortex tube type of cooling jacket. What's more important, we had investigated the feasibility of the application of vortex tube type of mine cooling jacket.

  3. Geology of Devils Tower National Monument, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Charles Sherwood

    1956-01-01

    Devils Tower is a steep-sided mass of igneous rock that rises above the surrounding hills and the valley of the Belle Fourche River in Crook County, Wyo. It is composed of a crystalline rock, classified as phonolite porphyry, that when fresh is gray but which weathers to green or brown. Vertical joints divide the rock mass into polygonal columns that extend from just above the base to the top of the Tower. The hills in the vicinity and at the base of the Tower are composed of red, yellow, green, or gray sedimentary rocks that consist of sandstone, shale, or gypsum. These rocks, in aggregate about 400 feet thick, include, from oldest to youngest, the upper part of the Spearfish formation, of Triassic age, the Gypsum Spring formation, of Middle Jurassic age, and the Sundance formation, of Late Jurassic age. The Sundance formation consists of the Stockade Beaver shale member, the Hulett sandstone member, the Lak member, and the Redwater shale member. The formations have been only slightly deformed by faulting and folding. Within 2,000 to 3.000 feet of the Tower, the strata for the most part dip at 3 deg - 5 deg towards the Tower. Beyond this distance, they dip at 2 deg - 5 deg from the Tower. The Tower is believed to have been formed by the intrusion of magma into the sedimentary rocks, and the shape of the igneous mass formed by the cooled magma is believed to have been essentially the same as the Tower today. Devils Tower owes its impressiveness to its resistance to erosion as compared with the surrounding sedimentary rocks, and to the contrast of the somber color of the igneous column to the brightly colored bands of sedimentary rocks.

  4. Novel Applications of Buffer-gas Cooling to Cold Atoms, Diatomic Molecules, and Large Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drayna, Garrett Korda

    Cold gases of atoms and molecules provide a system for the exploration of a diverse set of physical phenomena. For example, cold gasses of magnetically and electrically polar atoms and molecules are ideal systems for quantum simulation and quantum computation experiments, and cold gasses of large polar molecules allow for novel spectroscopic techniques. Buffer-gas cooling is a robust and widely applicable method for cooling atoms and molecules to temperatures of approximately 1 Kelvin. In this thesis, I present novel applications of buffer-gas cooling to obtaining gases of trapped, ultracold atoms and diatomic molecules, as well as the study of the cooling of large organic molecules. In the first experiment of this thesis, a buffer-gas beam source of atoms is used to directly load a magneto-optical trap. Due to the versatility of the buffer-gas beam source, we obtain trapped, sub-milliKelvin gases of four different lanthanide species using the same experimental apparatus. In the second experiment of this thesis, a buffer-gas beam is used as the initial stage of an experiment to directly laser cool and magneto-optically trap the diatomic molecule CaF. In the third experiment of this thesis, buffer-gas cooling is used to study the cooling of the conformational state of large organic molecules. We directly observe conformational relaxation of gas-phase 1,2-propanediol due to cold collisions with helium gas. Lastly, I present preliminary results on a variety of novel applications of buffer-gas cooling, such as mixture analysis, separation of chiral mixtures, the measurement of parity-violation in chiral molecules, and the cooling and spectroscopy of highly unstable reaction intermediates.

  5. Thermal energy storage technologies for heating and cooling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomlinson, John J.

    1990-12-01

    Recent results from selected thermal energy storage (TES) research activities in Germany and Sweden are discussed. In addition, several new technologies for heating and cooling of buildings and automobiles were reviewed and found to benefit similar efforts in the United states. Details of a meeting with Didier-Werke AG, a leading German ceramics manufacturer who will provide TES media necessary for the United States to complete field tests of an advanced high temperature latent heat storage material, are presented. Finally, an overview of the December 1990 International Energy Agency (IEA) Executive Committee deliberations on TES is presented.

  6. (Thermal energy storage technologies for heating and cooling applications)

    SciTech Connect

    Tomlinson, J.J.

    1990-12-19

    Recent results from selected TES research activities in Germany and Sweden under an associated IEA annex are discussed. In addition, several new technologies for heating and cooling of buildings and automobiles were reviewed and found to benefit similar efforts in the United states. Details of a meeting with Didier-Werke AG, a leading German ceramics manufacturer who will provide TES media necessary for the United States to complete field tests of an advanced high temperature latent heat storage material, are presented. Finally, an overview of the December 1990 IEA Executive Committee deliberations on TES is presented.

  7. Passive coolers for pre-cooling of JT loops for deep space infrared imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Burt; Larson, Melora; Rodriguez, Jose

    2010-09-01

    Infrared instruments (IR) for deep space imaging missions, such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and Planck, require cryogenic cooling for proper operation of their focal plane arrays (FPA) in far infrared and sub-millimeter wavelength ranges. The FPA is sometimes located meters away from the spacecraft. To meet such remote cooling requirement, a Joule-Thomson (J-T) loop becomes a convenient choice for either direct cooling for the FPA or for serving as a heat sink for a cascade cooling system. The refrigerant lines of the JT loop inevitably suffer parasitic heat leak primarily due to IR backload as they traverse from the spacecraft to the FPA. An actively cooled JT loop using a mechanical pre-cooler located at the spacecraft will experience the highest parasitic heat leak since the lines are cold through the entire length whereas a passively cooled JT loop can utilize a number of radiators to cool the lines down gradually in stages and hence reduce the heat leak. In addition to savings in power and mass, a passive cooler offers consistent and predictable performance with practically no performance degradation in a thermally stable orbit, such as one around the Sun-Earth L2 point. Passive coolers are less popular in low temperature applications when their cooling capacity diminishes rapidly in proportion to T4 until the temperature reaches a point where either the parasitic heat leak becomes so significant or its size becomes so excessive that the passive cooling scheme becomes impractical. Despite the limited capacity, passive cooling may still prove to be a viable alternative to active cooling depending on the operating temperature and heat dissipation rate of the FPA. The current effort aims at evaluating the merit of using passive coolers as an alternative to using a mechanical cooler for pre-cooling of a JT loop for remote IR instrument cooling. A parametric study is conducted to explore the merits of passive cooling of a JT loop in a temperature range

  8. Boiling Heat-Transfer Processes and Their Application in the Cooling of High Heat Flux Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    requires an understanding of the parameters that affect the cooling processes and the determination of the limiting point where the surface fails due...application requires an understanding of the parameters that affect the cooling processes and the determination of the limiting point * where the surface fails...data points within ± 25 percent. 47 AEDC-TR-93-3 (41) Gambill and Lienhard (Ref. 231) presented an interesting semiempirical approach to determining a

  9. Application of thermoelectric cooling theory to the characterization of Peltier effect thermal elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, N.

    1980-04-01

    A synthesis of the theory of thermoelectric cooling is applied to the practical as well as numerical characterization of cooling systems that work by the Peltier effect. A computerized calculation procedure for determining the coefficient of performance of a Peltier module, given its Seebeck coefficient, its conductivity, its resistance, and its J coefficient of merit, is outlined. An example of application is drawn from the design analysis of a SPACELAB experiment package. Calculation results are in good agreement with test results.

  10. Handbook of heat transfer applications (2nd edition)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohsenow, W. M.; Hartnett, J. P.; Ganic, E. N.

    The applications of heat transfer in engineering problems are considered. Among the applications discussed are: mass transfer cooling; heat exchangers; and heat pipes. Consideration is also given to: heat transfer in nonNewtonian fluids; fluidized and packed beds; thermal energy storage; and heat transfer in solar collectors. Additional topics include: heat transfer in buildings; cooling towers and ponds; and geothermal heat transfer.

  11. Steam-Electric Power-Plant-Cooling Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnichsen, J.C.; Carlson, H.A.; Charles, P.D.; Jacobson, L.D.; Tadlock, L.A.

    1982-02-01

    The Steam-Electric Power Plant Cooling Handbook provides summary data on steam-electric power plant capacity, generation and number of plants for each cooling means, by Electric Regions, Water Resource Regions and National Electric Reliability Council Areas. Water consumption by once-through cooling, cooling ponds and wet evaporative towers is discussed and a methodology for computation of water consumption is provided for a typical steam-electric plant which uses a wet evaporative tower or cooling pond for cooling.

  12. Cooled echelle grating spectrometer. [for space telescope applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, R. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A cooled echelle grating spectrometer for detecting wavelengths between one micron and fifteen microns is disclosed. More specifically, the spectrometer has a cross-dispersing grating for ordering infrared energy and an echelle grating for further ordering of the infrared energy. Ordered radiation from the echelle grating is sensed by a detecting means. Also disclosed is use of a Schmidt camera for focusing the further ordered radiation from the echelle grating onto a detector array having individual detectors dispersed on a plane which substantially corresponds to a curved focal plane of the Schmidt camera. A spectrometer constructed according to the teachings of the present invention will continuously cover the spectrum between one micron and fifteen microns and have a resolution of 0.1/cm.

  13. Applications of atom interferometry using an improved laser cooling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Kengyeow

    Using a novel method of Raman sideband cooling in a moving optical lattice followed by adiabatic release, atoms launched from a molasses are cooled to about 150 nK, a factor of 10 better than that obtained in the best molasses launch. The atoms move with a velocity spread of about 3 mm/s to a height of 1.3 m above the trap region. With these cold atoms, we have measured g, the acceleration due to gravity with a resolution of 60 parts per trillion after 2 days of integration time. This is performed with an atom interferometer using the π/2-π-π/2 sequence of stimulated Raman transition pulses with an interrogation time of 800 ms. The noise of a single launch of about a billion atoms is 1.0 × 10 -8 g, a factor of 2 better than any previous results. Taking advantage of the long interferometer time, we have also measured the gravity gradient with a ``double diamond'' configuration using the π/2-π-π-π/2 pulse sequence. This is the first demonstration of a gravity gradient measurement using this method. The sensitivity is about 2 × 10-6s-2/ Hz . A ``triple diamond configuration'' with π/2-π-π-π-π/2 pulse sequence is also demonstrated as a feasible method to measure gravity gradient. Different systematic effects that are important in these two methods are discussed. Proposals to obtain a more sensitive measurement in gravity gradient by simultaneously measuring the phase shifts of two groups of atoms launched in the same setup and in the fine structure constant by simultaneously measuring the recoils in atoms absorbing photons in opposite directions are presented.

  14. A multifunction wall system for application with solar heating and ground cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, J. F.; Schubert, R. P.

    1985-01-01

    The research presented in this report is an exploration of one alternative energy building system concept which is attempting to produce performance characteristics in a way closely approaching those of conventional fossil fuel heating and cooling systems. This alternative energy building system is a multifunction wall system for application with solar-heating and ground-cooling. The concept of the system is to expand the use of structure and enclosure elements of a building to function additionally as: (1) the ductwork for the solar-heated or earth-cooled air; (2) the heat transfer membrane between the heated or cooled air and the living environment of the building; (3) the heat storage medium (in winter); and (4) the temperature leveling and control medium. All these functions are integrated into a single wall construction using a new concrete block, surface-bonding cement, and the exterior insulation system. This report presents the series of experiments conducted on the Multifunction Wall System.

  15. Salt Water Drift From Cooling Towers

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  16. Comparison of waste heat driven and electrically driven cooling systems for a high ambient temperature, off-grid application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, Christopher P.

    Forward army bases in off-grid locations with high temperatures require power and cooling capacity. Each gallon of fuel providing electrical power passes through a complex network, introducing issues of safety and reliability if this network is interrupted. Instead of using an engine and an electrically powered cooling system, a more efficient combined heat and power (CHP) configuration with a smaller engine and LiBr/Water absorption system (AS) powered by waste heat could be used. These two configurations were simulated in both steady state and transient conditions, in ambient temperatures up to 52°C, providing up to 3 kW of non-cooling electricity, and 5.3 kW of cooling. Unlike conventional AS's which crystallize at high temperatures and use bulky cooling towers, the proposed AS's avoid crystallization and have air-cooled HXs for portability. For the hottest transient week, the results showed fuel savings of 34-37%, weight reduction of 11-19%, and a volumetric footprint 3-10% smaller.

  17. Nano-PCMs for passive electronic cooling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colla, L.; Fedele, L.; Mancin, S.; Buonomo, B.; Ercole, D.; Manca, O.

    2015-11-01

    The present work aims at investigating a new challenging use of oxide (TiO2, Al2O3, etc.) nanoparticles to enhance the thermal properties: thermal conductivity, specific heat, and latent heat of pure paraffin waxes to obtain a new class of Phase Change Materials (PCMs), the so-called nano-PCMs. The nano-PCMs were obtained by seeding different amounts of oxide nanoparticles in a paraffin wax having a melting temperature of 45°C. The thermophysical properties such as latent heat and thermal conductivity were then measured to understand the effects of the nanoparticles on the thermal properties of both the solid and liquid PCM. Finally, a numerical comparison between the use of the pure paraffin wax and the nano-PCM in a typical electronics passive cooling device was implemented. Numerical simulations were carried out using the Ansys-Fluent 15.0 code. Results in terms of solid and liquid phase temperatures, melting time and junction temperature were reported. Moreover, a comparison with experimental results was also performed.

  18. An automatic and effective approach in identifying tower cranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Bo; Niu, Zheng; Wang, Li; Liu, Yaqi

    2012-04-01

    A method which can distinguish tower cranes from other objects in an image is proposed in this paper. It synthesizes the advantages of both morphological theory and geometrical characters to identify tower cranes accurately. The algorithm uses morphological theory to remove noise and segment images. Moreover, geometrical characters are adopted to extract tower cranes with thresholds. To test the algorithm's practical applicability, we apply it to another image to check the result. The experiments show that the approach can locate the position of tower cranes precisely and calculate the number of cranes at 100% accuracy rate. It can be applied to identifying tower cranes in small regions.

  19. Low-cost Triangular Lattice Towers for Small Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Ram Chandra

    capacity or smaller. This study concludes that further work on joining of bamboo sections and weathering is required to fully utilize bamboo in practice. In comparison to steel towers, bamboo towers are economically feasible and easy to build. The tower is extremely lightweight, which justifies its application in remote areas, where the transportation is difficult.

  20. 13. INTERIOR VIEW OF TOWER OFFICE SHOWING CONTROL TOWER DESK, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. INTERIOR VIEW OF TOWER OFFICE SHOWING CONTROL TOWER DESK, FACING NORTHWEST. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Signal Tower, Corner of Seventh Street & Avenue D east of Drydock No. 1, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  1. 43. TOP OF SOUTHEAST TOWER FROM SOUTH TOWER ROOF, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. TOP OF SOUTHEAST TOWER FROM SOUTH TOWER ROOF, LOOKING EAST - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  2. 36. FLAG TOWER CLOCK ZONE FROM SOUTH TOWER ROOF, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. FLAG TOWER CLOCK ZONE FROM SOUTH TOWER ROOF, LOOKING NORTH - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  3. 37. NORTH TOWER UPPER ZONE FROM SOUTH TOWER ROOF, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. NORTH TOWER UPPER ZONE FROM SOUTH TOWER ROOF, LOOKING NORTH - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  4. 47. NORTHWEST TOWER FROM SOUTH TOWER ROOF, LOOKING NORTH BY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. NORTHWEST TOWER FROM SOUTH TOWER ROOF, LOOKING NORTH BY NORTHWEST - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  5. 40. CAMPANILE & SOUTHEAST TOWER FROM SOUTH TOWER ROOF, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. CAMPANILE & SOUTHEAST TOWER FROM SOUTH TOWER ROOF, LOOKING EAST BY NORTHEAST - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  6. 19. NORTH TOWER, PORTE COCHERE & FLAG TOWER, LOOKING SOUTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. NORTH TOWER, PORTE COCHERE & FLAG TOWER, LOOKING SOUTHWEST - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  7. 18. NORTH TOWER, PORTE COCHERE & FLAG TOWER, LOOKING SOUTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. NORTH TOWER, PORTE COCHERE & FLAG TOWER, LOOKING SOUTHWEST BY WEST - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  8. Kaluza-Klein towers in the early universe: Phase transitions, relic abundances, and applications to axion cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dienes, Keith R.; Kost, Jeff; Thomas, Brooks

    2017-06-01

    We study the early-universe cosmology of a Kaluza-Klein (KK) tower of scalar fields in the presence of a mass-generating phase transition, focusing on the time development of the total tower energy density (or relic abundance) as well as its distribution across the different KK modes. We find that both of these features are extremely sensitive to the details of the phase transition and can behave in a variety of ways significant for late-time cosmology. In particular, we find that the interplay between the temporal properties of the phase transition and the mixing it generates are responsible for both enhancements and suppressions in the late-time abundances, sometimes by many orders of magnitude. We map out the complete model parameter space and determine where traditional analytical approximations are valid and where they fail. In the latter cases we also provide new analytical approximations which successfully model our results. Finally, we apply this machinery to the example of an axion-like field in the bulk, mapping these phenomena over an enlarged axion parameter space that extends beyond that accessible to standard treatments. An important by-product of our analysis is the development of an alternate "UV-based" effective truncation of KK theories which has a number of interesting theoretical properties that distinguish it from the more traditional "IR-based" truncation typically used in the extra-dimension literature.

  9. Applications of heat pipes to cool PWBS and hybrid microcircuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekhon, K. S.

    1986-01-01

    Some of the advanced thermal management techniques used to reduce operating junction temperature under extreme environmental temperature conditions are discussed. Heat pipes in actual electronic packaging applications, and those under development, are discussed. Performance characteristics of heat pipes are given, and examples are described of how thermal problems in electronic packaging are solved through the use of heat pipes.

  10. Operating manual for the Tower Shielding Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-12-01

    This manual provides information necessary to operate and perform maintenance on the reactor systems and all equipment or systems which can affect their operation or the safety of personnel at the Tower Shielding Facility. The first four chapters consist of introductory and descriptive material of benefit to personnel in training, the qualifications required for training, the responsibilities of the personnel in the organization, and the procedures for reviewing proposed experiments. Chapter 8, Emergency Procedures, is also a necessary part of the indoctrination of personnel. The procedures for operation of the Tower Shielding Reactor (TSR-II), its water cooling system, and the main tower hoists are outlined in Chapters 5, 6, and 7. The Technical Specification surveillance requirements for the TSR-II are summarized in Chapter 9. The maintenance and calibration schedule is spelled out in Chapter 10. The procedures for assembly and disassembly of the TSR-II are outlined in Chapter 11.

  11. Update on Legionnaires' disease and cooling systems: Case history reviews -- What happened/what to do and current guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Puckorius, P.R.

    1999-07-01

    Along with a brief history of Legionnaires' disease, this paper presents a detailed review of several outbreaks in the US since 1995 relative to cooling tower systems. Discussion of these systems, water treatment programs before the outbreaks, important system design and operation considerations, investigative finds, and corrective actions after the outbreaks are given in detail. What happened can be a lesson on what should be done. Specific guidelines, incorporating current knowledge and practices in cooling tower water treatment, LB testing, system operation, and verification of treatment application, are provided.

  12. Confusion at the Tower

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Loretta F.

    2014-01-01

    This study will explore the omission of the Tower of Babel narrative from middle and secondary school world history, world studies, and world geography textbooks and will consider what might be learned from inclusion of the story in the curriculum. A total of 17 textbooks are analyzed. The Tower of Babel narrative is examined within the context of…

  13. Leaning Tower of PESA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, John

    2009-01-01

    There is a certain similarity between the Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia (PESA) and the leaning tower of Pisa. Both have a certain presence on the landscape: the tower has a commanding appearance on the Italian countryside while PESA has left its mark on the academic fabric of Australasia. Both are much loved: Pisa by visiting…

  14. Drop Tower Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dittrich, William A.

    2014-01-01

    The drop towers of yesteryear were used to make lead shot for muskets, as described in "The Physics Teacher" in April 2012. However, modern drop towers are essentially elevators designed so that the cable can "break" on demand, creating an environment with microgravity for a short period of time, currently up to nine seconds at…

  15. Drop Tower Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dittrich, William A.

    2014-01-01

    The drop towers of yesteryear were used to make lead shot for muskets, as described in "The Physics Teacher" in April 2012. However, modern drop towers are essentially elevators designed so that the cable can "break" on demand, creating an environment with microgravity for a short period of time, currently up to nine seconds at…

  16. Confusion at the Tower

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Loretta F.

    2014-01-01

    This study will explore the omission of the Tower of Babel narrative from middle and secondary school world history, world studies, and world geography textbooks and will consider what might be learned from inclusion of the story in the curriculum. A total of 17 textbooks are analyzed. The Tower of Babel narrative is examined within the context of…

  17. Potential Application of a Thermoelectric Generator in Passive Cooling System of Nuclear Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongqing; Liu, Yu; Jiang, Jin; Pang, Wei; Lau, Woon Ming; Mei, Jun

    2016-12-01

    In the design of nuclear power plants, various natural circulation passive cooling systems are considered to remove residual heat from the reactor core in the event of a power loss and maintain the plant's safety. These passive systems rely on gravity differences of fluids, resulting from density differentials, rather than using an external power-driven system. Unfortunately, a major drawback of such systems is their weak driving force, which can negatively impact safety. In such systems, there is a temperature difference between the heat source and the heat sink, which potentially offers a natural platform for thermoelectric generator (TEG) applications. While a previous study designed and analyzed a TEG-based passive core cooling system, this paper considers TEG applications in other passive cooling systems of nuclear power plants, after which the concept of a TEG-based passive cooling system is proposed. In such a system, electricity is produced using the system's temperature differences through the TEG, and this electricity is used to further enhance the cooling process.

  18. A review of gas-cooled reactor concepts for SDI (Strategic Defense Initiative) applications

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, A.C.

    1989-08-01

    We have completed a review of multimegawatt gas-cooled reactor concepts proposed for SDI applications. Our study concluded that the principal reason for considering gas-cooled reactors for burst-mode operation was the potential for significant system mass savings over closed-cycle systems if open-cycle gas-cooled operation (effluent exhausted to space) is acceptable. The principal reason for considering gas-cooled reactors for steady-state operation is that they may represent a lower technology risk than other approaches. In the review, nine gas-cooled reactor concepts were compared to identify the most promising. For burst-mode operation, the NERVA (Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application) derivative reactor concept emerged as a strong first choice since its performance exceeds the anticipated operational requirements and the technology has been demonstrated and is retrievable. Although the NERVA derivative concepts were determined to be the lead candidates for the Multimegawatt Steady-State (MMWSS) mode as well, their lead over the other candidates is not as great as for the burst mode. 90 refs., 2 figs., 10 tabs.

  19. Potential Application of a Thermoelectric Generator in Passive Cooling System of Nuclear Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongqing; Liu, Yu; Jiang, Jin; Pang, Wei; Lau, Woon Ming; Mei, Jun

    2017-05-01

    In the design of nuclear power plants, various natural circulation passive cooling systems are considered to remove residual heat from the reactor core in the event of a power loss and maintain the plant's safety. These passive systems rely on gravity differences of fluids, resulting from density differentials, rather than using an external power-driven system. Unfortunately, a major drawback of such systems is their weak driving force, which can negatively impact safety. In such systems, there is a temperature difference between the heat source and the heat sink, which potentially offers a natural platform for thermoelectric generator (TEG) applications. While a previous study designed and analyzed a TEG-based passive core cooling system, this paper considers TEG applications in other passive cooling systems of nuclear power plants, after which the concept of a TEG-based passive cooling system is proposed. In such a system, electricity is produced using the system's temperature differences through the TEG, and this electricity is used to further enhance the cooling process.

  20. Key technologies and applications of laser cooling and trapping {sup 87}Rb atomic system

    SciTech Connect

    Ru, Ning Zhang, Li; Wang, Yu; Fan, Shangchun

    2016-06-28

    Atom Interferometry is proved to be a potential method for measuring the acceleration of atoms due to Gravity, we are now building a feasible system of cold atom gravimeter. In this paper development and the important applications of laser cooling and trapping atoms are introduced, some key techniques which are used to obtain {sup 87}Rb cold atoms in our experiments are also discussed.

  1. Wind tower service lift

    DOEpatents

    Oliphant, David; Quilter, Jared; Andersen, Todd; Conroy, Thomas

    2011-09-13

    An apparatus used for maintaining a wind tower structure wherein the wind tower structure may have a plurality of legs and may be configured to support a wind turbine above the ground in a better position to interface with winds. The lift structure may be configured for carrying objects and have a guide system and drive system for mechanically communicating with a primary cable, rail or other first elongate member attached to the wind tower structure. The drive system and guide system may transmit forces that move the lift relative to the cable and thereby relative to the wind tower structure. A control interface may be included for controlling the amount and direction of the power into the guide system and drive system thereby causing the guide system and drive system to move the lift relative to said first elongate member such that said lift moves relative to said wind tower structure.

  2. Novel Magnetic Materials for Sensing and Cooling Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaturvedi, Anurag

    2011-12-01

    The overall goals of the present PhD research are to explore the giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) and giant magnetocaloric (GMC) effects in functional magnetic materials and provide guidance on the optimization of the material properties for use in advanced magnetic sensor and refrigeration applications. GMI has attracted growing interest due to its promising applications in high-performance magnetic sensors. Research in this field is focused on the development of new materials with properties appropriate for practical GMI sensor applications. In this project, we have successfully set up a new magneto-impedance measurement system in the Functional Materials Laboratory at USF. We have established, for the first time, the correlation between sample surface, magnetic softness, critical length, and GMI in Co-based amorphous ribbon materials, which provide a good handle on selecting the suitable operating frequency range of magnetic materials for GMI-based field sensor applications. The impact of field-induced magnetic anisotropy on the GMI effect in Co-based nanocrystalline ribbon materials has also been investigated, providing an important understanding of the correlation between the microstructure, magnetic anisotropy, and GMI in these materials. We have shown that coating a thin layer of magnetic metal on the surface of a magnetic ribbon can reduce stray fields due to surface irregularities and enhance the magnetic flux paths closure of the bilayer structure, both of which, in effect, increase the GMI and its field sensitivity. This finding provides a new way for tailoring GMI in surface-modified soft ferromagnetic ribbons for use in highly sensitive magnetic sensors. We have also introduced the new concepts of incorporating GMI technology with superparamagnetic nanoparticles for biosensing applications and with carbon nanotubes for gas and chemical sensing applications. GMC forms the basis for developing advanced magnetic refrigeration technology and research in this

  3. The Prospects of Alternatives to Vapor Compression Technology for Space Cooling and Food Refrigeration Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Daryl R.; Stout, Tyson E.; Dirks, James A.; Fernandez, Nicholas

    2012-12-01

    This article identifies and describes five alternative cooling technologies (magnetic, thermionic, thermoacoustic, thermoelectric, and thermotunnel) and qualitatively assesses the prospects of each technology relative to vapor compression for space cooling and food refrigeration applications. Assessment of the alternatives was based on the theoretical maximum % of Carnot efficiency, the current state of development, the best % of Carnot efficiency currently achieved, developmental barriers, and the extent of development activity. The prospect for each alternative was assigned an overall qualitative rating based on the subjective, composite view of the five characteristics.

  4. Internally gas-cooled radiofrequency applicators as an alternative to conventional radiofrequency and microwave ablation devices: an in vivo comparison.

    PubMed

    Rempp, Hansjörg; Voigtländer, Matthias; Schenk, Martin; Enderle, Markus D; Scharpf, Marcus; Greiner, Tim O; Neugebauer, Alexander; Hoffmann, Rüdiger; Claussen, Claus D; Clasen, Stephan

    2013-08-01

    To test the efficacy of internally CO2-cooled radiofrequency (RF) ablation in vivo and to compare its effectiveness to a standard water-cooled RF probe and to a gas-cooled microwave (MW) device. 49 ablations were performed on 15 pigs under general anesthesia using 15G monopolar CO2-cooled RF applicators, 17G monopolar water-cooled RF applicators and 15G internally CO2-cooled microwave devices. The power of the MW device was 45W, the current of the gas-cooled RF device was 1200-1600mA. At the water-cooled RF probe, maximum power of 200W was set. Ablation time was 15min. The short and long axes of the ablation zone were measured. Histological analyses and NADH-staining were performed. The diameters and the ablation volumes were compared using an analysis of variance. No spots of untreated tissue were observed close to the cooled needle track in any of the ablation zones. The largest short axis diameter was 3.4±0.5cm achieved with the gas-cooled monopolar applicator. With the water-cooled applicators, short axis diameter was significantly smaller, reaching 2.5±0.4cm. Gas-cooled MW probes achieved 2.9±1.0cm. The largest ablation volume was 31.5±12ml (gas-cooled RF), and the smallest was 12.7±4ml (water-cooled RF). Short/long axis ratio was largest for gas-cooled RF probes with 0.73±0.08 versus 0.64±0.04 for the water-cooled probes and 0.49±0.25 for the microwave applicator. Gas-cooled RF applicators may have a higher potential for effective destruction of liver lesions than comparable water-cooled RF systems, and may be an alternative to standard RF and MW ablation devices. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Thermostructural applications of heat pipes for cooling leading edges of high-speed aerospace vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, Charles J.; Glass, David E.

    1992-01-01

    Heat pipes have been considered for use on wing leading edge for over 20 years. Early concepts envisioned metal heat pipes cooling a metallic leading edge. Several superalloy/sodium heat pipes were fabricated and successfully tested for wing leading edge cooling. Results of radiant heat and aerothermal testing indicate the feasibility of using heat pipes to cool the stagnation region of shuttle-type space transportation systems. The test model withstood a total seven radiant heating tests, eight aerothermal tests, and twenty-seven supplemental radiant heating tests. Cold-wall heating rates ranged from 21 to 57 Btu/sq ft-s and maximum operating temperatures ranged from 1090 to 1520 F. Follow-on studies investigated the application of heat pipes to cool the stagnation regions of single-stage-to-orbit and advanced shuttle vehicles. Results of those studies indicate that a 'D-shaped' structural design can reduce the mass of the heat-pipe concept by over 44 percent compared to a circular heat-pipe geometry. Simple analytical models for heat-pipe startup from the frozen state (working fluid initially frozen) were adequate to approximate transient, startup, and steady-state heat-pipe performance. Improvement in analysis methods has resulted in the development of a finite-element analysis technique to predict heat-pipe startup from the frozen state. However, current requirements of light-weight design and reliability suggest that metallic heat pipes embedded in a refractory composite material should be used. This concept is the concept presently being evaluated for NASP. A refractory-composite/heat-pipe-cooled wing leading edge is currently being considered for the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP). This concept uses high-temperature refractory-metal/lithium heat pipes embedded within a refractory-composite structure and is significantly lighter than an actively cooled wing leading edge because it eliminates the need for active cooling during ascent and descent. Since the

  6. Operating characteristics of an air-cooling PEMFC for portable applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Young-Jun; Park, Gu-Gon; Yang, Tae-Hyun; Yoon, Young-Gi; Lee, Won-Yong; Yim, Sung-Dae; Kim, Chang-Soo

    Optimal design and proper operation is important to get designed output power of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack. The air-cooling fuel cell stack is widely used in sub kW PEMFC systems. The purpose of this study is to analyze the operating conditions affecting the performance of an air-cooling PEMFC which is designed for portable applications. It is difficult to maintain well balanced operating conditions. These parameters are the relative humidity, the temperature of the stack, the utility ratio of the reactant gas and so on. In this study a 500 W rate air-cooling PEMFC was fabricated and tested to evaluate the design performance and to determine optimal operating conditions. Moreover, basic modeling also is carried out. These results can be used as design criteria and optimal operating conditions for portable PEMFCs.

  7. Survey of Cooling Options for Application in a Low-TC Squid System for Fetal Magnetocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijpma, A. P.; Uzunbajakau, S.; ter Brake, H. J. M.; Peters, M. J.; Rogalla, H.

    2004-06-01

    As part of the development of a low-Tc SQUID-based magnetometer system for measuring fetal heart activity, the means of cooling is evaluated. To lower the threshold for the clinical application of this fetal heart monitor, it should be simple to operate. It is, therefore, deemed necessary to replace the liquid helium by a closed-cycle refrigerator. In this paper, the requirements with respect to the cryogenic system are defined. These include operating temperature (4 K), temperature stability (<0.2 K), cooling power (>0.1 W) and requirements on magnetic and mechanical interference. The paper also reviews the most relevant options for the realization of the cryogenic system. After comparison, we selected a 4-K mechanical cooler. To reduce the interference, it is placed at several meters from the magnetometer. The cooling power is to be transferred by circulation of helium.

  8. The Application of Downdraught Cooling in Vernacular Skywell Dwellings in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, H.; Lv, A. M.

    2017-05-01

    Traditional skywell dwellings in the hot climate regions of China represent an important cultural heritage. Achieving indoor comfort meeting occupants’ expectations, can contribute to the preservation of this unique traditional architecture. Improvement of ventilation and indoor temperatures through natural, sustainable and low impact solutions is an opportunity in achieving building thermal comfort in these traditional dwellings. The existence of skywells provides a good opportunity for the incorporation of downdraught cooling with minor interventions, and thus by avoiding extensive ductwork, saving energy and improving indoor temperatures, it can contribute to the preservation of traditional dwellings. Applicability of downdraught cooling, the history of traditional ventilation solutions, layout and space features of skywell dwelling are discussed and the way of incorporating downdraught cooling as an alternative to air-conditioning into these buildings is investigated.

  9. Mixed cryogen cooling systems for HTS power applications: A status report of progress in Korea University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jung-Bin; Lee, Haigun

    2012-12-01

    A cooling system employing a solid cryogen (SC), such as solid nitrogen (SN2), was recently reported for high-temperature superconducting (HTS) applications. However, thermal contact between the SC and the HTS can be degraded by repeated overcurrent runs, resulting in 'thermal dry-out'. Novel cryogens, SC with small amounts of liquid cryogen, have been suggested to overcome this problem. Such cooling systems rely on the small amount of liquid cryogen to facilitate heat exchange so as to fully exploit the heat capacity of the solid cryogen. This paper presents a description and summary of recent activities at Korea University related to cooling systems employing mixed cryogens of solid-liquid nitrogen, solid argon-liquid nitrogen, and solid nitrogen-liquid neon.

  10. Extensible Wind Towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinagra, Marco; Tucciarelli, Tullio

    The diffusion of wind energy generators is restricted by their strong landscape impact. The PERIMA project is about the development of an extensible wind tower able to support a wind machine for several hundred kW at its optimal working height, up to more than 50 m. The wind tower has a telescopic structure, made by several tubes located inside each other with their axis in vertical direction. The lifting force is given by a jack-up system confined inside a shaft, drilled below the ground level. In the retracted tower configuration, at rest, tower tubes are hidden in the foundation of the telescopic structure, located below the ground surface, and the wind machine is the only emerging part of the system. The lifting system is based on a couple of oleodynamic cylinders that jack-up a central tube connected to the top of the tower by a spring, with a diameter smaller than the minimum tower diameter and with a length a bit greater than the length of the extended telescopic structure. The central tube works as plunger and lifts all telescopic elements. The constraint between the telescopic elements is ensured by special parts, which are kept in traction by the force of the spring and provide the resisting moment. The most evident benefit of the proposed system is attained with the use of a two-blade propeller, which can be kept horizontal in the retracted tower configuration.

  11. View of Nevada rim towers from Arizona side. Left tower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Nevada rim towers from Arizona side. Left tower supports Circuit 6, middle tower supports Circuit 5, and right tower supports Circuits 4 and 15, view north - Hoover Dam, Circuits 1-15, U.S. Highway 93, Boulder City, Clark County, NV

  12. Tower Camera Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Moudry, D

    2005-01-01

    The tower camera in Barrow provides hourly images of ground surrounding the tower. These images may be used to determine fractional snow cover as winter arrives, for comparison with the albedo that can be calculated from downward-looking radiometers, as well as some indication of present weather. Similarly, during spring time, the camera images show the changes in the ground albedo as the snow melts. The tower images are saved in hourly intervals. In addition, two other cameras, the skydeck camera in Barrow and the piling camera in Atqasuk, show the current conditions at those sites.

  13. Feasibility of Actively Cooled Silicon Nitride Airfoil for Turbine Applications Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    2001-01-01

    Nickel-base superalloys currently limit gas turbine engine performance. Active cooling has extended the temperature range of service of nickel-base superalloys in current gas turbine engines, but the margin for further improvement appears modest. Therefore, significant advancements in materials technology are needed to raise turbine inlet temperatures above 2400 F to increase engine specific thrust and operating efficiency. Because of their low density and high-temperature strength and thermal conductivity, in situ toughened silicon nitride ceramics have received a great deal of attention for cooled structures. However, the high processing costs and low impact resistance of silicon nitride ceramics have proven to be major obstacles for widespread applications. Advanced rapid prototyping technology in combination with conventional gel casting and sintering can reduce high processing costs and may offer an affordable manufacturing approach. Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center, in cooperation with a local university and an aerospace company, are developing actively cooled and functionally graded ceramic structures. The objective of this program is to develop cost-effective manufacturing technology and experimental and analytical capabilities for environmentally stable, aerodynamically efficient, foreign-object-damage-resistant, in situ toughened silicon nitride turbine nozzle vanes, and to test these vanes under simulated engine conditions. Starting with computer aided design (CAD) files of an airfoil and a flat plate with internal cooling passages, the permanent and removable mold components for gel casting ceramic slips were made by stereolithography and Sanders machines, respectively. The gel-cast part was dried and sintered to final shape. Several in situ toughened silicon nitride generic airfoils with internal cooling passages have been fabricated. The uncoated and thermal barrier coated airfoils and flat plates were burner rig tested for 30 min without

  14. DETAIL VIEW OF AERIAL TRAM SUPPORT TOWER SIX WITH TOWERS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF AERIAL TRAM SUPPORT TOWER SIX WITH TOWERS SEVEN,EIGHT, NINE, TEN, AND BREAK OVER TOWER IN DISTANCE, LOOKING NORTH. TOWER SIX IS THE LAST BEFORE A DEEP CHASM, AS IS SEEN BY THE DISTANCE BETWEEN TOWERS SIX AND SEVEN. SEE CA-291-48 (CT) FOR IDENTICAL COLOR TRANSPARENCY. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  15. DETAIL VIEW OF AERIAL TRAM SUPPORT TOWER SIX WITH TOWERS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF AERIAL TRAM SUPPORT TOWER SIX WITH TOWERS SEVEN, EIGHT, NINE, TEN, AND BREAK OVER TOWER IN DISTANCE, LOOKING NORTH. TOWER SIX IS THE LAST BEFORE A DEEP CHASM, AS IS SEEN BY THE DISTANCE BETWEEN TOWERS SIX AND SEVEN. SEE CA-291-21 FOR IDENTICAL B&W NEGATIVE. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  16. Experimental investigation of interfacial phenomena in evaporating sessile droplets for evaporative cooling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Brendan; Mahmud, Md. Almostasim

    2016-11-01

    Evaporation of sessile droplets has applications in many fields, including evaporative cooling technology. An example from nature is human perspiration. Evaporative cooling applications typically operate at atmospheric pressure and 20 to 80°C, and systems that mimic perspiration require droplets that are continuously fed fluid. A number of studies have investigated phenomena associated with evaporating sessile droplets including (1) interfacial energy transport, (2) distribution of the evaporation flux along the interface, and (3) temperature discontinuities at the liquid-vapor interface; however, many of these studies were not undertaken in the regime relevant to evaporative cooling and used low pressures and temperatures or droplets that were not continuously fed fluid and changed shape as they were depleted. We will present the results from our experimental study, which examined these phenomena in the regime relevant to evaporative cooling to determine if they are present and if they have an impact on the evaporation behavior. In this regime we found that conduction provided a majority of the energy required for evaporation, the local evaporation flux changed depending on thermocapillary convection, and interfacial temperature discontinuities were present.

  17. Aquarius: Tower Rollback

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The mobile service tower at NASA's Launch Complex-2 at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California is being moved away from the ULA Delta II rocket with the Aquarius/SAC-D spacecraft atop, in preparati...

  18. Drop Tower Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David

    2013-01-01

    Ground based microgravity facilities are an important proving ground for space experiments, ground-based research and space hardware risk mitigation. An overview of existing platforms will be discussed with an emphasis on drop tower capabilities. The potential for extension to partial gravity conditions will be discussed. Input will be solicited from attendees for their potential to use drop towers in the future and the need for enhanced capabilities (e.g. partial gravity)

  19. The numerical model of biosorption of Zn2+ and its application to the bio-electro tower reactor (BETR).

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Hui; Li, Chunqing; Liu, Bo-Tan

    2016-03-01

    A 2-D numerical kinetic model considering flow velocity and adsorption is developed to simulate the bio-electro tower reactor (BETR). This new model considers the adsorbed amount when equilibrium qe as transient variable, which is superior to the old pseudo-first-order and the pseudo-second-order model which regards qe as a constant. We did research on the intensifying effect of electric field upon heavy metal ions adsorption process. The calculation result matches well with the experimental data. BETR is a coupling technique whose mechanism is that outer electric field can enhance the mass transfer rate when the solute is metal ions. Two kinds of carriers, pottery ball and 3-dimensional electrode (3DE), were used to support the biofilm layer; and organic wastewater that contains Zn(2+) is selected as a sample to validate the model. The 3DE carriers can be polarized by outer electric field, but pottery ball cannot. It is found that Zn(2+) transfers faster in 3DE carriers than in pottery ball (insulation materials); and an intensifying coefficientη is introduced to describe this effect in BETR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Towers for Antarctic Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerschlag, R. H.; Bettonvil, F. C. M.; Jägers, A. P. L.; Nielsen, G.

    To take advantage of the exceptional seeing above the boundary layer on Antarctic sites, a high-resolution telescope must be mounted on a support tower. An open transparent tower of framework minimizes the upward temperature-disturbed airflow. A typical minimum height is 30m. The tower platform has to be extremely stable against wind-induced rotational motions, which have to be less than fractions of an arc second, unusually small from a mechanical engineering viewpoint. In a traditional structure, structural deflections result in angular deflections of the telescope platform, which introduce tip and tilt motions in the telescope. However, a structure that is designed to deflect with parallel motion relative to the horizontal plane will undergo solely translation deflections in the telescope platform and thus will not degrade the image. The use of a parallel motion structure has been effectively demonstrated in the design of the 15-m tower for the Dutch Open Telescope (DOT) on La Palma. Special framework geometries are developed, which make it possible to construct high towers in stories having platforms with extreme stability against wind-induced tilt. These geometric solutions lead to constructions, being no more massive than a normal steel framework carrying the same load. Consequently, these lightweight towers are well suited to difficult sites as on Antarctica. A geometry with 4 stories has been worked out.

  1. The Prospects of Alternatives to Vapor Compression Technology for Space Cooling and Food Refrigeration Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Daryl R.; Dirks, James A.; Fernandez, Nicholas; Stout, Tyson E.

    2010-03-31

    Five alternatives to vapor compression technology were qualitatively evaluated to determine their prospects for being better than vapor compression for space cooling and food refrigeration applications. The results of the assessment are summarized in the report. Overall, thermoacoustic and magnetic technologies were judged to have the best prospects for competing with vapor compression technology, with thermotunneling, thermoelectric, and thermionic technologies trailing behind in that order.

  2. Multi-physics design of microvascular materials for active cooling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragón, Alejandro M.; Smith, Kyle J.; Geubelle, Philippe H.; White, Scott R.

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes a framework for the design of microvascular polymeric components for active cooling applications. The design of the embedded networks involves complex and competing objectives that are associated with various physical processes. The optimization tool includes a PDE solver based on advanced finite element techniques coupled to a multi-objective constrained genetic algorithm. The resulting Pareto-optimal fronts are investigated in the optimization of these materials for void volume fraction, flow efficiency, maximum temperature, and surface convection objective functions.

  3. Renewable Heating and Cooling

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Renewable heating and cooling is a set of alternative resources and technologies that can be used in place of conventional heating and cooling technologies for common applications such as water heating, space heating, space cooling and process heat.

  4. Improving Geothermal Heat Pump Air Conditioning Efficiency with Wintertime Cooling using Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES). Application Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-11-01

    APPLICATION MANUAL Improving Geothermal Heat Pump Air Conditioning Efficiency with Wintertime Cooling using Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage... Energy Storage (STES) Ronald W. Falta and Fred Molz Clemson University Charles Newell GSI Environmental, Inc. Clemson University P.O. Box...manual is to describe the use of the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) technology, particularly through the employment of wintertime cooling

  5. Comments on ionization cooling channels

    DOE PAGES

    Neuffer, David

    2017-09-25

    Ionization cooling channels with a wide variety of characteristics and cooling properties are being developed. These channels can produce cooling performances that are largely consistent with the linear ionization cooling theory developed previously. In this study, we review ionization cooling theory, discuss its application to presently developing cooling channels, and discuss criteria for optimizing cooling.

  6. Comments on ionization cooling channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuffer, D.

    2017-09-01

    Ionization cooling channels with a wide variety of characteristics and cooling properties are being developed. These channels can produce cooling performances that are largely consistent with the linear ionization cooling theory developed previously. In this paper we review ionization cooling theory, discuss its application to presently developing cooling channels, and discuss criteria for optimizing cooling.

  7. Liquid jet impingement cooling with diamond substrates for extremely high heat flux applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lienhard, J.H. V; Khounsary, A.M.

    1993-09-01

    The combination of impinging jets and diamond substrates may provide an effective solution to a class of extremely high heat flux problems in which very localized heat loads must be removed. Some potential applications include the cooling of high-heat-load components in synchrotron x-ray, fusion, and semiconductor laser systems. Impinging liquid jets are a very effective vehicle for removing high heat fluxes. The liquid supply arrangement is relatively simple, and low thermal resistances can be routinely achieved. A jet`s cooling ability is a strong function of the size of the cooled area relative to the jet diameter. For relatively large area targets, the critical heat fluxes can approach 20 W/mm{sup 2}. In this situation, burnout usually originates at the outer edge of the cooled region as increasing heat flux inhibits the liquid supply. Limitations from liquid supply are minimized when heating is restricted to the jet stagnation zone. The high stagnation pressure and high velocity gradients appear to suppress critical flux phenomena, and fluxes of up to 400 W/mm{sup 2} have been reached without evidence of burnout. Instead, the restrictions on heat flux are closely related to properties of the cooled target. Target properties become an issue owing to the large temperatures and large temperature gradients that accompany heat fluxes over 100 W/mm{sup 2}. These conditions necessitate a target with both high thermal conductivity to prevent excessive temperatures and good mechanical properties to prevent mechanical failures. Recent developments in synthetic diamond technology present a possible solution to some of the solid-side constraints on heat flux. Polycrystalline diamond foils can now be produced by chemical vapor deposition in reasonable quantity and at reasonable cost. Synthetic single crystal diamonds as large as 1 cm{sup 2} are also available.

  8. Vanadium dioxide based Fabry-Perot emitter for dynamic radiative cooling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Sydney; Yang, Yue; Wang, Liping

    2017-08-01

    An asymmetric Fabry-Perot emitter is proposed with a lossless dielectric spacer inserted between a vanadium dioxide (VO2) thin film and an opaque aluminum substrate. Switchable mid-infrared emittance has been achieved due to the insulator-to-metal transition of VO2. When VO2 is dielectric below 341 K, the structure is highly reflective, thereby minimizing thermal radiation loss. Above 345 K, the VO2 becomes metallic and forms a Fabry-Perot resonance cavity with high broadband emissivity around 10 μm wavelength, providing a radiative cooling effect due to enhanced thermal emission. The radiative properties are calculated via a uniaxial transfer matrix method and Bruggeman effective medium theory. The physical mechanisms that provide the observed absorption enhancements are elucidated by examining the total phase shift in the multilayer structure and the phonon modes of VO2. When experiencing the VO2 phase transition, the radiative power of the proposed coating achieves a 6.5 fold enhancement for extraterrestrial spacecraft systems, and 7.3 fold enhancement for terrestrial systems such as buildings, making it a promising choice for dynamic radiative cooling applications in a variable environment. The findings here will facilitate research and development of novel coating materials for radiative cooling applications.

  9. Experimental investigation of Demon-like Algorithmic Quantum Cooling and its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan-Feng

    2015-03-01

    Simulation of the low-temperature properties of many-body systems remains one of the major challenges in theoretical and experimental quantum information science. Firstly we demonstrate experimentally a Demon-like algorithmic cooling method that is applicable to any physical system that can be simulated by a quantum computer. This method allows us to distil and eliminate hot components of quantum states like a quantum Maxwell's demon. The experimental implementation is realized with a quantum optical network, and the results are in full agreement with theoretical predictions (with fidelity higher than 0.978). Secondly, we use the demon-like algorithmic cooling method to experimentally investigate Majorana zero modes exhibiting a fundamental property of non-Abelian statistics. This work was supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (2011CB921200), the CAS, The National Natural Science Foundaton of China.

  10. Effect of local application of superoxide dismutase on dielectric parameters of cooled skin in rats.

    PubMed

    Paramonov, B A; Turkovski, I I; Doroshkevich, O S; Taranova, V N; Pomorski, K P

    2008-11-01

    The effect of on Changes in dielectric parameters of the skin (modulus of complex dielectric permittivity |e| and dielectric loss tangent tgd) were studied on rats with local surface contact cooling followed by treatment with various cream formulations. Addition of antioxidant superoxide dismutase (SOD) to the cream significantly prevented the shifts in these parameters, which attested to less pronounced changes in the water balance in SOD-treated skin. Application of SOD during the early terms after cooling accelerated wound healing. Histological examination performed on posttraumatic day 60 revealed better integrity of the skin structures (hair follicle, sweat and sebaceous gland), which indicates ability of SOD to prevent and ameliorate the degree of cold-induced damage in the skin.

  11. Flow visualization of discrete hole film cooling for gas turbine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colladay, R. S.; Russell, L. M.

    1975-01-01

    Film injection from discrete holes in a three row staggered array with 5-diameter spacing is studied. The boundary layer thickness-to-hole diameter ratio and Reynolds number are typical of gas turbine film cooling applications. Two different injection locations are studied to evaluate the effect of boundary layer thickness on film penetration and mixing. Detailed streaklines showing the turbulent motion of the injected air are obtained by photographing neutrally buoyant helium filled soap bubbles which follow the flow field. The bubble streaklines passing downstream injection locations are clearly identifiable and can be traced back to their origin. Visualization of surface temperature patterns obtained from infrared photographs of a similar film cooled surface are also included.

  12. 26. STATIC TEST TOWER CONTROL PANELS AT REAR OF TOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. STATIC TEST TOWER CONTROL PANELS AT REAR OF TOWER UNDERNEATH SHED ROOF. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn Propulsion & Structural Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  13. 69. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE ABSORPTION TOWER BUILDING, ABSORPTION TOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE ABSORPTION TOWER BUILDING, ABSORPTION TOWER UNDER CONSTRUCTION. (DATE UNKNOWN). - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  14. 8. GENERAL VIEW OF TOWER 32, LEFT, AND TOWER 31, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. GENERAL VIEW OF TOWER 32, LEFT, AND TOWER 31, RIGHT. VIEW LOOKING NORTH SHOWING AERIAL WIRE DESIGN WITH VERTICAL 'TOP HAT' WIRES IN CENTER. - Chollas Heights Naval Radio Transmitting Facility, 6410 Zero Road, San Diego, San Diego County, CA

  15. 3. VIEW NORTHWEST, height finder radar towers, and radar tower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW NORTHWEST, height finder radar towers, and radar tower (unknown function) - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  16. 41. SOUTHEAST TOWER & EAST WING FROM SOUTH TOWER ROOF, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. SOUTHEAST TOWER & EAST WING FROM SOUTH TOWER ROOF, LOOKING EAST BY NORTHEAST - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  17. 46. OCTAGONAL & WEST TOWERS FROM SOUTH TOWER ROOF, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. OCTAGONAL & WEST TOWERS FROM SOUTH TOWER ROOF, LOOKING NORTHWEST, WITH WEST WING ROOF - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  18. 42. SOUTHEAST TOWER & EAST WING ROOF FROM SOUTH TOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. SOUTHEAST TOWER & EAST WING ROOF FROM SOUTH TOWER ROOF, LOOKING EAST BY NORTHEAST - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  19. View of the north tower porte cochere and flag tower, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of the north tower porte cochere and flag tower, looking southwest (duplicate of HABS No. DC-141-19) - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  20. 45. OCTAGONAL, WEST & NORTHWEST TOWERS FROM SOUTH TOWER ROOF, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. OCTAGONAL, WEST & NORTHWEST TOWERS FROM SOUTH TOWER ROOF, LOOKING WEST BY NORTHWEST - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  1. 47 CFR 5.109 - Antenna and tower requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Antenna and tower requirements. 5.109 Section 5... BROADCAST) Technical Standards and Operating Requirements § 5.109 Antenna and tower requirements. (a) Applicants with fixed stations that use antennas that exceed 6 meters in height above the ground level...

  2. 47 CFR 5.109 - Antenna and tower requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Antenna and tower requirements. 5.109 Section 5... BROADCAST) Technical Standards and Operating Requirements § 5.109 Antenna and tower requirements. (a) Applicants with fixed stations that use antennas that exceed 6 meters in height above the ground level...

  3. 47 CFR 5.109 - Antenna and tower requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Antenna and tower requirements. 5.109 Section 5... BROADCAST) Technical Standards and Operating Requirements § 5.109 Antenna and tower requirements. (a) Applicants with fixed stations that use antennas that exceed 6 meters in height above the ground level...

  4. THE TOWER HOUSE, LOOKING WEST. The tower house provided a ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    THE TOWER HOUSE, LOOKING WEST. The tower house provided a water tank on the second floor that gravity fed water to the Kineth house and farm buildings. The one-story addition to the west of the tower provided workshop space. The hog shed is seen on the left of the image and the concrete foundation of the upright silo is in the foreground on the right. - Kineth Farm, Tower House, 19162 State Route 20, Coupeville, Island County, WA

  5. 5. VIEW EAST, height finder radar towers, radar tower (unknown ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW EAST, height finder radar towers, radar tower (unknown function), prime search radar tower, operations building, and central heating plant - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  6. State waste discharge permit application 400 Area secondary cooling water. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This document constitutes the Washington Administrative Code 173-216 State Waste Discharge Permit Application that serves as interim compliance as required by Consent Order DE 91NM-177, for the 400 Area Secondary Cooling Water stream. As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site that affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permitting Program. As a result of this decision, the Washington State Department of Ecology and the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office entered into Consent Order DE 91NM-177. The Consent Order DE 91NM-177 requires a series of permitting activities for liquid effluent discharges. Based upon compositional and flow rate characteristics, liquid effluent streams on the Hanford Site have been categorized into Phase 1, Phase 2, and Miscellaneous streams. This document only addresses the 400 Area Secondary Cooling Water stream, which has been identified as a Phase 2 stream. The 400 Area Secondary Cooling Water stream includes contribution streams from the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility, the Maintenance and Storage Facility, the 481-A pump house, and the Fast Flux Test Facility.

  7. FIRE_ACE_UTRECHT_TOWER

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-10-28

    FIRE_ACE_UTRECHT_TOWER Project Title:  FIRE II ACE Discipline:  ... L3 Platform:  SHEBA Ship Site; Meteorological tower Instrument:  Eppley precision pyrgeometers Meteorological tower Spatial Coverage:  Fairbanks, Alaska and the surrounding ...

  8. Ivory Basements and Ivory Towers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Tanya

    2012-01-01

    The metaphors of the ivory tower and ivory basement are used in this chapter to reflect how many women understand and experience the academy. The ivory tower signifies a place that is protected, a place of privilege and authority and a place removed from the outside world (and consequently the rigours of the market place). The ivory tower, by…

  9. Ivory Basements and Ivory Towers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Tanya

    2012-01-01

    The metaphors of the ivory tower and ivory basement are used in this chapter to reflect how many women understand and experience the academy. The ivory tower signifies a place that is protected, a place of privilege and authority and a place removed from the outside world (and consequently the rigours of the market place). The ivory tower, by…

  10. An Experimental Investigation of Rectangular Exhaust-Gas Ejectors Applicable for Engine Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manganiello, Eugene J; Bogatsky, Donald

    1945-01-01

    An experimental investigation of rectangular exhaust-gas ejector pumps was conducted to provide data that would serve as a guide to the design of ejector applications for aircraft engines with marginal cooling. The pumping characteristics of rectangular ejectors actuated by the exhaust of a single-cylinder aircraft engine were determined for a range of ejector mixing-section area from 20 to 50 square inches, over-all length from 12 to 42 inches, aspect ratio from 1 to 5, diffusing exit area from 20 to 81 square inches, and exhaust-nozzle aspect ratio from 1 to 42.

  11. The Ivory Tower Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chantler, Abigail

    2016-01-01

    The corollary of the concept of the "ivory tower", as reflected in the writings of Plato and Newman amongst others, was, paradoxically, the vital importance of the university for wider society. Nevertheless from the mid-twentieth century, the esteem in which a "liberal" university education was held was diminished by rising…

  12. Cell Towers and Songbirds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klosterman, Michelle; Mesa, Jennifer; Milton, Katie

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how our common addiction to cell phones was used to launch a discussion about their use, impacts on the environment, and connections to issues of civic concern. By encouraging middle school science students to adopt the perspectives of special-interest groups debating communication tower restrictions designed to protect…

  13. The Towers of Hanoi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, George C.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an investigation carried out with a group of able mathematics students who were studying at a level 1 year in advance of their peers. The purpose was to investigate the extension of usual three peg Towers of Hanoi to four pegs and attempt to find a rule that could be used to predict the minimum number of moves required to…

  14. Talking Towers, Making Withs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemke, J. L.

    The notion of a linguistic "register" is useful in posing questions about how the ways language is used differ from one kind of human activity to another. This paper analyzes a videotaped segment of male grade 4/5 students (n=3) who are talking as they work to build a tower from plastic drinking straws and pins. Discussion of the…

  15. Cell Towers and Songbirds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klosterman, Michelle; Mesa, Jennifer; Milton, Katie

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how our common addiction to cell phones was used to launch a discussion about their use, impacts on the environment, and connections to issues of civic concern. By encouraging middle school science students to adopt the perspectives of special-interest groups debating communication tower restrictions designed to protect…

  16. Drop Tower Facility at Queensland University of Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plagens, Owen; Castillo, Martin; Steinberg, Theodore; Ong, Teng-Cheong

    The Queensland University of Technology (QUT) Drop Tower Facility is a {raise.17exscriptstyle˜}2.1 second, 21.3 m fall, dual capsule drop tower system. The dual capsule comprises of an uncoupled exterior hollow drag shield that experiences drag by the ambient atmosphere with the experimental capsule falling within the drag shield. The dual capsule system is lifted to the top of the drop tower via a mechanical crane and the dropping process is initiated by the cutting of a wire coupling the experimental package and suspending the drag shield. The internal experimental capsule reaches the bottom of the drag shield floor just prior to the deceleration stage at the air bag and during this time experience gravity levels of {raise.17exscriptstyle˜}10textsuperscript{-6} g. The deceleration system utilizes an inflatable airbag where experimental packages can be designed to experience a maximum deceleration of {raise.17exscriptstyle˜}10textsuperscript{18} g for {raise.17exscriptstyle˜}0.1 seconds. The drag shield can house experimental packages with a maximum diameter of 0.8 m and height of 0.9 m. The drag shield can also be used in foam mode, where the walls are lined with foam and small experiments can be dropped completely untethered. This mode is generally used for the study of microsatellite manipulation. Payloads can be powered by on-board power systems with power delivered to the experiment until free fall occurs. Experimental data that can be collected includes but is not limited to video, temperature, pressure, voltage/current from the power supply, and triggering mechanisms outputs which are simultaneously collected via data logging systems and high speed video recording systems. Academic and commercial projects are currently under investigation at the QUT Drop Tower Facility and collaboration is openly welcome at this facility. Current research includes the study of heterogeneously burning metals in oxygen which is aimed at fire safety applications and

  17. Design of a Prototype EHD Air Pump for Electronic Chip Cooling Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmanouil, D. Fylladitakis; Antonios, X. Moronis; Konstantinos, Kiousis

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents the design, optimization and fabrication of an EHD air pump intended for high-power electronic chip cooling applications. Suitable high-voltage electrode configurations were selected and studied, in terms of the characteristics of the generated electric field, which play an important role in ionic wind flow. For this purpose, dedicated software is used to implement finite element analysis. Critical design parameters, such as the electric field intensity, wind velocity, current flow and power consumption are investigated. Two different laboratory prototypes are fabricated and their performances experimentally assessed. This procedure leads to the fabrication of a final prototype, which is then tested as a replacement of a typical fan for cooling a high power density electronic chip. To assist towards that end, an experimental thermal testing setup is designed and constructed to simulate the size of a personal computer's CPU core of variable power. The parametric study leads to the fabrication of experimental single-stage EHD pumps, the optimal design of which is capable of delivering an air flow of 51 CFM with an operating voltage of 10.5 kV. Finally, the theoretical and experimental results are evaluated and potential applications are proposed.

  18. Effects of menthol application on the skin during prolonged immersion in cool and cold water.

    PubMed

    Botonis, P G; Kounalakis, S N; Cherouveim, E D; Koskolou, M D; Geladas, N D

    2017-09-20

    The aim of the study was to compare the effect of skin surface menthol application on rectal temperature (Tre) during prolonged immersion in cool and cold water. We hypothesized that menthol application would lead to a slower Tre decline due to the reduced heat loss as a consequence of the menthol-induced vasoconstriction and that this effect would be attenuated during cold-water immersion. Six male subjects were immersed for 55 minutes in stirred cool (24°C) or cold (14°C) water immediately after attaining a Tre of 38°C by cycling at 60% of maximum heart rate on two occasions: without (ΝM) and with (M) whole-body skin application of menthol cream. Tre, the proximal-distal skin temperature gradient, and oxygen uptake were continuously measured. ANOVA with repeated measures was employed to detect differences among variables. Significance level was set at 0.05. The area under the curve for Tre was calculated and was greater in 24°C M (-1.81 ± 8.22 a.u) compared to 24°C NM (-27.09 ± 19.09 a.u., P = .03, r = .90), 14°C NM (-18.08 ± 10.85 a.u., P = .03, r = .90), and 14°C M (-11.71 ± 12.58 a.u, P = .05, r = .81). In cool water, oxygen uptake and local vasoconstriction were increased (P ≤ .05) by 39 ± 25% and 56 ± 37%, respectively, with menthol compared to ΝM, while no differences were observed in cold water. Menthol application on the skin before prolonged immersion reduces heat loss resulting in a blunted Tre decline. However, such a response is less obvious at 14°C water immersion, possibly because high-threshold cold-sensitive fibers are already maximally recruited and the majority of cold receptors saturated. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Evaluation of multielement catheter-cooled interstitial ultrasound applicators for high-temperature thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Nau, W H; Diederich, C J; Burdette, E C

    2001-07-01

    Catheter-cooled (CC) interstitial ultrasound applicators were evaluated for their use in high-temperature coagulative thermal therapy of tissue. Studies in ex vivo beef muscle were conducted to determine the influences of applied electrical power levels (5-20 W per element), catheter flow rate (20-60 ml min(-1)), circulating water temperature (7-40 degrees C), and frequency (7-9 MHz) on temperature distribution and thermal lesion geometry. The feasibility of using multiple interstitial applicators to thermally coagulate a predetermined volume of tissue was also investigated. Results of these studies revealed that the directional shape of the thermal lesions is maintained with increasing time and power. Radial depths of the thermal lesions ranged from 10.7 +/- 0.7 mm after heating for 4 min with an applied power level of 5 W, to 16.2 +/- 1.4 mm with 20 W. The axial length of the thermal lesions is controlled tightly by the number of active transducers. A catheter flow rate of 20 to 40 ml min(-1) (52.2 +/- 5.5 kPa at 40 ml min(-1)) with 22 degrees C water was determined to provide sufficient cooling of the transducers for power levels used in this study. In vivo temperatures measured in the center of a 3-cm-diam peripheral implant of four applicators in pig thigh muscle reached 89.3 degrees C after 4 min of heating, with boundaries of coagulation clearly defined by applicator position and directivity. Conformability of heating in a clinically relevant model was demonstrated by inserting two directional CC applicators with a 2 cm separation within an in vivo canine prostate, and generating a thermal lesion measuring 3.8 cm x 2.2 cm in cross section while directing energy away from, and protecting the rectum. Maximum measured temperatures at midgland exceeded 90 degrees C within 20 min of heating. The results of this study demonstrate the utility of single or multiple CC applicators for conformal thermal coagulation and high temperature thermal therapy, with potential

  20. Application of Gamma code coupled with turbomachinery models for high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Oh

    2008-02-01

    The very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) is envisioned as a single- or dual-purpose reactor for electricity and hydrogen generation. The concept has average coolant temperatures above 9000C and operational fuel temperatures above 12500C. The concept provides the potential for increased energy conversion efficiency and for high-temperature process heat application in addition to power generation. While all the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) concepts have sufficiently high temperature to support process heat applications, such as coal gasification, desalination or cogenerative processes, the VHTR’s higher temperatures allow broader applications, including thermochemical hydrogen production. However, the very high temperatures of this reactor concept can be detrimental to safety if a loss-ofcoolant accident (LOCA) occurs. Following the loss of coolant through the break and coolant depressurization, air will enter the core through the break by molecular diffusion and ultimately by natural convection, leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. The oxidation will accelerate heatup of the reactor core and the release of a toxic gas, CO, and fission products. Thus, without any effective countermeasures, a pipe break may lead to significant fuel damage and fission product release. Prior to the start of this Korean/United States collaboration, no computer codes were available that had been sufficiently developed and validated to reliably simulate a LOCA in the VHTR. Therefore, we have worked for the past three years on developing and validating advanced computational methods for simulating LOCAs in a VHTR. GAMMA code is being developed to implement turbomachinery models in the power conversion unit (PCU) and ultimately models associated with the hydrogen plant. Some preliminary results will be described in this paper.

  1. A high brightness laser-cooled atomic beam for application in high resolution FIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wouters, Steinar; Geer, Bas; Haaf, Gijs; Jansen, Bart; Mutsaers, Peter

    2013-05-01

    A new type of high-brightness ion source is under development which employs transverse laser cooling and compression of a thermal atomic rubidium beam, followed by in-field photo-ionization. When attached to a focusing column, this Focused Ion Beam (FIB) has the advantage of supplying a higher current in a smaller spot compared to conventional LMIS-based FIBs, thus increasing both the resolution and the speed of the FIB. Furthermore, different types of ion species can be used, broadening the range of applications of the FIB. Simulations using a 10 cm long laser cooling and compression stage and a realistic ionization and acceleration structure, predict an achievable brightness for 87Rb+ of order 107 A/m2 sr eV at an energy spread of less than 1 eV and a current of tens of pA. This would lead to a spot size below 5 nm. Simulations and modeling on the ionization process have led to a better understanding of stochastic heating. Experimental realization of the compact ion source has recently started with the development of an efficient high-flux atom source and a 2D laser cooler and compressor. Progress on simulations and experimental results will be reported.

  2. High-power laser phosphor light source with liquid cooling for digital cinema applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kenneth

    2014-02-01

    Laser excited phosphor has been used to excite phosphor material, producing high intensity light output with smaller etendue than that of LEDs with the same long lifetime. But due to the high intensity of the laser light, phosphor with organic binder burns at low power, which requires the phosphor to be deposited on a rotating wheel in practical applications. Phosphor with inorganic binders, commonly known as ceramic phosphor, on the other hand, does not burn, but efficiency goes down as temperature goes up under high power excitation. This paper describes cooling schemes in sealed chambers such that the phosphor materials using organic or inorganic binders can be liquid cooled for high efficiency operations. Confined air bubbles are introduced into the sealed chamber accommodating the differential thermal expansion of the liquid and the chamber. For even higher power operation suitable for digital cinema, a suspension of phosphor in liquid is described suitable for screen brightness of over 30,000 lumens. The aging issues of phosphor can also be solved by using replaceable phosphor cartridges.

  3. Design and characterization of an electrohydrodynamic (EHD) micropump for cryogenic spot cooling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foroughi, Parisa

    High-temperature superconducting (HTSC) components are being incorporated into communication and monitoring electronic devices to increase their signal-to-noise ratio or their channel capacity. Those devices must be maintained at cryogenic temperatures to prevent the loss of their superconducting properties and retain their performance superiority. They are conventionally cooled via direct heat conduction, which leads to undesirable temperature differences among the various components being cooled. Compact micropumps capable of pumping liquid nitrogen at 77 K into liquid-cooling circuits would enable a much more compact and lightweight method of maintaining a uniform temperature across the cooling circuit. These pumps can also address the demand for delivering small doses of LN2 to particular spots in bioengineering applications. One of the main objectives of the present study was to develop an electrohydrodynamic (EHD) ion-drag micropump with LN2 as the working liquid. EHD ion-drag pumping phenomenon refers to liquid motion caused by an interaction between electric and hydrodynamic fields in a dielectric liquid. To investigate the effect of each design parameter on the performance of the micropump, several prototypes with four distinct designs were fabricated and packaged. The designs included a variety of emitter shapes, inter-electrode spacings, electrode-pair spacings, and channel heights. The micropumps were tested at different DC voltages ranging from 0 to 2.5 kV. Two test rigs with novel measurement techniques were also designed, built, and calibrated to measure the generated static pressure head, electric current, and flow rate with an acceptable level of accuracy. The relationships between pressure/current (P-I) and pressure/voltage (P-V) for various designs were investigated experimentally. The results showed good agreement with the general analytical trends reported for EHD pumping in the literature. The experimental results also demonstrated that

  4. Characterization of an inline row impingement channel for turbine blade cooling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricklick, Mark A.

    height effects on the performance of the channel side walls, effects of bulk temperature increase on heat transfer coefficients, circumferential heat variation effects, and effects on the uniformity of the heat transfer distribution. The main objectives of this dissertation are to explore the various previously unstudied characteristics of impingement channels, in order to sufficiently predict their performance in a wide range of applications. The potential exists, therefore, for a designer to develop a blade with cooling characteristics specifically tailored to the expected component thermal loads. Temperature sensitive paint (TSP) is one of several non-intrusive optical temperature measurements techniques that have gained a significant amount of popularity in the last decade. By employing the use of TSP, we have the ability to provide very accurate (less than 1 degree Celsius uncertainty), high resolution full-field temperature measurements. This has allowed us to investigate the local heat transfer characteristics of the various channel surfaces under a variety of steady state testing conditions. The comparison of thermal performance and uniformity for each impingement channel configuration then highlights the benefits and disadvantages of various configurations. Through these investigations, it has been shown that the channel side walls provide heat transfer coefficients comparable to those found on the target surface, especially at small impingement heights. Although the side walls suffer from highly non uniform performance near the start of the channel, the profiles become very uniform as the cross flow develops and becomes a dominating contributor to the heat transfer coefficient. Increases in channel height result in increased non-uniformity in the streamwise direction and decreased heat transfer levels. Bulk temperature increases have also been shown to be an important consideration when investigating surfaces dominated by cross flow heat transfer effects, as

  5. Measuring the anti-Stokes luminescence of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots for laser cooling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontenot, Ross S.; Mathur, Veerendra K.; Barkyoumb, John H.; Mungan, Carl E.; Tran, Thanh N.

    2016-05-01

    The first demonstration of laser cooling of solids was of an ytterbium doped fluorozirconate glass. While this groundbreaking work successfully showed that it is possible to cool solids using laser cooling, rare-earth materials are governed by Boltzmann statistics limiting their cooling ability to about 100 K. Direct-bandgap semiconductors, on the other hand, are governed by Fermi-Dirac statistics, which allows for a theoretical cooling limit of 10 K as well as higher cooling efficiencies. Recently, it was demonstrated that it is possible to cool CdS nanoribbons by 40 K. That success was attributed to CdS strong electron-phonon coupling, which makes it possible to resonantly annihilate more than one longitudinal optical phonon during each up conversion cycle. To further increase the cooling power, large external quantum efficiency is required. A nanostructure is preferred because it creates confined excitons of tunable wavelength and reduces the self-absorption of the anti-Stokes fluorescence owing to the shorter path length for photons to escape the crystal. However, organically passivated quantum dots have a low quantum yield due to surface related trap states. A core-shell nanostructure alleviates this problem by passivating the surface trap states and protecting against environmental changes and photo-oxidative degradation. As such, we chose to investigate CdSe/ZnS core shell structure for laser cooling applications. This article highlights the measurement of the anti-Stokes luminescence, the dependence of the laser wavelength on the anti-Stokes emission of colloidal quantum dots, and the successful incorporation of CdSe/ZnS into polymers.

  6. Reliable cool-down of GridPix detectors for cryogenic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schön, R.; Schmitz, J.; Smits, S.; Bilevych, Y.; van Bakel, N.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we present thermal cycling experiments of GridPix radiation imaging detectors, in view of a potential application in a cryogenic experiment. The robustness of the GridPix detector is studied for various grid designs, as well as various mechanical and thermal surroundings. The grid design variations had insignificant effect on the grid strength. A low cool-down rate as well as good thermal contact are crucial for the durability of the grid. Further, additional strengthening at the grid edges proved necessary to maintain the integrity of the structure during thermal cycling, which was done using globtop adhesive. The combination of these measures led to 100% survival rate after thermal cycling down to -130 °C.

  7. Characterization of selected application of biomass energy technologies and a solar district heating and cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-09-01

    An assessment is made of four applications of biomass and solar energy conversion technologies. The first is an energy self-sufficient farm that provides all of its space heating and hot water needs by burning wood obtained by selective timber cutting on the farm acreage. The heating system is a commerical boiler furnace. A Purox gasification system is described which uses wood feedstock with a capacity of 850 dry tons/day. This system requires 2,000 farms, each with 30 acres of wooded land having a sustainable capacity of 5 dry tons/day per acre. The efficiency of silviculture plantations is then addressed in regard to different conversion strategies. Finally, a solar heat and cooling system designed for a one story school building is assessed. Land and materials requirements, climatology, and economic factors are discussed.

  8. Low-Temperature Thermoelectric Properties of PtSb2- x Te x for Cryogenic Peltier Cooling Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldrop, Spencer; Morelli, Donald

    2015-06-01

    PtSb2 is a potential material for cryogenic Peltier cooling applications because of its semimetal character with a high Seebeck coefficient and low electrical resistivity. To investigate the effects of n-type doping we studied PtSb2- x Te x with x between 0 and 0.04. A clear doping effect was observed, and the power factor was maximized for samples with x = 0.005, 0.02, and 0.04. If thermal conductivity reduction techniques can be used, this material may be a promising candidate for cryogenic Peltier cooling applications.

  9. Sustained Growth of the Ex Vivo Ablation Zones' Critical Short Axis Using Gas-cooled Radiofrequency Applicators

    SciTech Connect

    Rempp, Hansjoerg; Scharpf, Marcus; Voigtlaender, Matthias; Schraml, Christina; Schmidt, Diethard; Fend, Falko; Claussen, Claus D.; Enderle, Markus D.; Pereira, Philippe L.; Clasen, Stephan

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the ablation zones created with a gas-cooled bipolar radiofrequency applicator performed on ex vivo bovine liver tissue. Materials and Methods: A total of 320 ablations with an internally gas-cooled bipolar radiofrequency applicator were performed on fresh ex vivo bovine liver tissue, varying the ablation time (5, 10, 15, and 20 min), power (20, 30, 40, and 50 W), and gas pressure of the CO{sub 2} used for cooling (585, 600, 615, 630, 645 psi), leading to a total of 80 different parameter combinations. Size and shape of the white coagulation zone were assessed. Results: The largest complete ablation zone was achieved after 20 min of implementing 50 W and 645 psi, resulting in a short axis of mean 46 {+-} 1 mm and a long axis of 56 {+-} 2 mm (mean {+-} standard deviation). Short-axis diameters increased between 5 and 20 min of ablation time at 585 psi (increase of the short axis was 45% at 30 W, 29% at 40 W, and 39% at 50 W). This increase was larger at 645 psi (113% at 30 W, 67% at 40 W, and 70% at 50 W). Macroscopic assessment and NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) staining revealed incompletely ablated tissue along the needle track in 18 parameter combinations including low-power settings (20 and 30 W) and different cooling levels and ablation times. Conclusion: Gas-cooled radiofrequency applicators increase the short-axis diameter of coagulation in an ex vivo setting if appropriate parameters are selected.

  10. Buoyant tower being developed for water depths to 10,000 ft

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    A buoyant tower with a sub-surface wellhead is being developed for oil exploration and production applications. The tower consists of a central stack of cylindrical buoyant chambers connected in a series. Twelve well conductors are positioned around the periphery of the central chamber and run vertically. Installation of the tower is accomplished by a dynamically-positioned crane barge with a buoyant collar. The collar assists in attaching sections of the tower at the surface and lowering the tower to the seabed as it is assembled at the top. The barge is then replaced with a dynamically-positioned drillship, which piles the base to the seafloor and begins drilling.

  11. Application of Pulsed Electrical Fields for Advanced Cooling and Water Recovery in Coal-Fired Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Young Cho; Alexander Fridman

    2009-04-02

    The overall objective of the present work was to develop technologies to reduce freshwater consumption in a cooling tower of coal-based power plant so that one could significantly reduce the need of make-up water. The specific goal was to develop a scale prevention technology based an integrated system of physical water treatment (PWT) and a novel filtration method so that one could reduce the need for the water blowdown, which accounts approximately 30% of water loss in a cooling tower. The present study investigated if a pulsed spark discharge in water could be used to remove deposits from the filter membrane. The test setup included a circulating water loop and a pulsed power system. The present experiments used artificially hardened water with hardness of 1,000 mg/L of CaCO{sub 3} made from a mixture of calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}) and sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) in order to produce calcium carbonate deposits on the filter membrane. Spark discharge in water was found to produce strong shockwaves in water, and the efficiency of the spark discharge in cleaning filter surface was evaluated by measuring the pressure drop across the filter over time. Results showed that the pressure drop could be reduced to the value corresponding to the initial clean state and after that the filter could be maintained at the initial state almost indefinitely, confirming the validity of the present concept of pulsed spark discharge in water to clean dirty filter. The present study also investigated the effect of a plasma-assisted self-cleaning filter on the performance of physical water treatment (PWT) solenoid coil for the mitigation of mineral fouling in a concentric counterflow heat exchanger. The self-cleaning filter utilized shockwaves produced by pulse-spark discharges in water to continuously remove scale deposits from the surface of the filter, thus keeping the pressure drop across the filter at a relatively low value. Artificial hard water was used in the

  12. Eiffel Tower Plume

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-08-19

    This still image from an animation from NASA GSFC Solar Dynamics Observatory shows a single plume of plasma, many times taller than the diameter of Earth, spewing streams of particles for over two days Aug. 17-19, 2015 before breaking apart. At times, its shape resembled the Eiffel Tower. Other lesser plumes and streams of particles can be seen dancing above the solar surface as well. The action was observed in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19875

  13. 2. Southern Light Tower and Northern Light Tower, view north, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Southern Light Tower and Northern Light Tower, view north, south sides - Kennebec River Light Station, South side of Doubling Point Road, off State Highway 127, 1.8 miles south of U.S. Route 1, Arrowsic, Sagadahoc County, ME

  14. INTERIOR TOWER STAIRS BETWEEN SECOND LEVEL AND TOWER ROOM, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR TOWER STAIRS BETWEEN SECOND LEVEL AND TOWER ROOM, LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  15. INTERIOR TOWER STAIRS BETWEEN TOWER ROOM AND SECOND LEVEL, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR TOWER STAIRS BETWEEN TOWER ROOM AND SECOND LEVEL, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  16. Liquid cooled garments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Liquid cooled garments employed in several applications in which severe heat is encountered are discussed. In particular, the use of the garments to replace air line cooling units in a variety of industrial processing situations is discussed.

  17. Ice Thermal Storage Systems for LWR Supplemental Cooling and Peak Power Shifting

    SciTech Connect

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Phil Sharpe; Blaise Hamanaka; Wei Yan; WoonSeong Jeong

    2010-06-01

    Availability of enough cooling water has been one of the major issues for the nuclear power plant site selection. Cooling water issues have frequently disrupted the normal operation at some nuclear power plants during heat waves and long draught. The issues become more severe due to the new round of nuclear power expansion and global warming. During hot summer days, cooling water leaving a power plant may become too hot to threaten aquatic life so that environmental regulations may force the plant to reduce power output or even temporarily to be shutdown. For new nuclear power plants to be built at areas without enough cooling water, dry cooling can be used to remove waste heat directly into the atmosphere. However, dry cooling will result in much lower thermal efficiency when the weather is hot. One potential solution for the above mentioned issues is to use ice thermal storage systems (ITS) that reduce cooling water requirements and boost the plant’s thermal efficiency in hot hours. ITS uses cheap off-peak electricity to make ice and uses those ice for supplemental cooling during peak demand time. ITS is suitable for supplemental cooling storage due to its very high energy storage density. ITS also provides a way to shift large amount of electricity from off peak time to peak time. Some gas turbine plants already use ITS to increase thermal efficiency during peak hours in summer. ITSs have also been widely used for building cooling to save energy cost. Among three cooling methods for LWR applications: once-through, wet cooling tower, and dry cooling tower, once-through cooling plants near a large water body like an ocean or a large lake and wet cooling plants can maintain the designed turbine backpressure (or condensation temperature) during 99% of the time; therefore, adding ITS to those plants will not generate large benefits. For once-through cooling plants near a limited water body like a river or a small lake, adding ITS can bring significant economic

  18. Cooling vest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmo, J.; Kane, J.; Coverdale, J.

    1977-01-01

    Inexpensive vest of heat-sealable urethane material, when strapped to person's body, presents significant uncomplicated cooling system for environments where heavy accumulation of metabolic heat exists. Garment is applicable to occupations where physical exertion is required under heavy protective clothing.

  19. Archaeoastronomy: the Newport Tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penhallow, William

    1997-07-01

    The Newport Tower is a masonry structure of fieldstone about 28 feet high and 22 feet in diameter located near the top of a hill overlooking the harbor in Newport, Rhode Island. In essence it is a cylinder with Romanesque arches resting on eight pillars. The cylinder has three major openings as well as four smaller ones. On the inside there are eight indentations for beams on a first floor and four for a second,. In addition there are seven niches and a fireplace on the inside. A careful photogrammetric survey of the tower done by the Technical University of Denmark for the Danish National Museum provided data for the calculation of declinations, azimuths and altitudes associated with possible pairs of features. Numerous alignments involving the Sun and Moon indicate an emphasis on determining the location of the nodes of the Moon's orbit. Accurate determination of true north by observing Polaris at upper culmination is evident. Possible observations of Sirius are indicated. These results provide strong evidence that astronomy was involved in the design and use of this intriguing structure first mentioned in Governor Arnold's will in 1677. Further study is clearly warranted. This paper was published in the New England Antiquities Research Association Journal, p. 44, 1994

  20. FLORIDA TOWER FOOTPRINT EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    WATSON,T.B.; DIETZ, R.N.; WILKE, R.; HENDREY, G.; LEWIN, K.; NAGY, J.; LECLERC, M.

    2007-01-01

    The Florida Footprint experiments were a series of field programs in which perfluorocarbon tracers were released in different configurations centered on a flux tower to generate a data set that can be used to test transport and dispersion models. These models are used to determine the sources of the CO{sub 2} that cause the fluxes measured at eddy covariance towers. Experiments were conducted in a managed slash pine forest, 10 km northeast of Gainesville, Florida, in 2002, 2004, and 2006 and in atmospheric conditions that ranged from well mixed, to very stable, including the transition period between convective conditions at midday to stable conditions after sun set. There were a total of 15 experiments. The characteristics of the PFTs, details of sampling and analysis methods, quality control measures, and analytical statistics including confidence limits are presented. Details of the field programs including tracer release rates, tracer source configurations, and configuration of the samplers are discussed. The result of this experiment is a high quality, well documented tracer and meteorological data set that can be used to improve and validate canopy dispersion models.

  1. International Workshop on Cooling-system for HTS Applications 2015 (IWC-HTS 2015) 14-16 October 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamioka, Yasuharu

    2016-12-01

    International Workshop on Cooling-system for HTS Applications 2015 (IWC-HTS 2015) was held on 14-16 October 2015 at Kunibiki Messe (Shimane Prefectural Convention Center), Matsue, Shimane, Japan. The workshop was organized by the local committee on behalf of Cryogenics and Superconductivity Society of Japan (CSSJ).

  2. Potential Applications of the Ceramic Thrust Chamber Technology for Future Transpiration Cooled Rocket Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbertz, Armin; Ortelt, Markus; Müller, Ilja; Hald, Hermann

    The long-term development of ceramic rocket engine thrust chambers at the German Aerospace Center(DLR) currently leads to designs of self-sustaining, transpiration-cooled, fiber-reinforced ceramic rocket engine chamber structures.This paper discusses characteristic issues and potential benefits introduced by this technology. Achievable benefits are the reduction of weight and manufacturing cost, as well as an increased reliability and higher lifetime due to thermal cycle stability.Experiments with porous Ceramic Matrix Composite(CMC) materials for rocket engine chamber walls have been conducted at the DLR since the end of the 1990s.This paper discusses the current status of DLR's ceramic thrust chamber technology and potential applications for high thrust engines.The manufacturing process and the design concept are explained.The impact of variations of engine parameters(chamber pressure and diam-eter)on the required coolant mass flow are discussed.Due to favorable scaling effects a high thrust application utilizes all benefits of the discussed technology, while avoiding the most significant performance drawbacks.

  3. Tower details, sheet 16. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Tower details, sheet 16. San Bernardino Valley Union Junior College, Auditorium Building. Clock and finial details; tower roof plan. G. Stanley Wilson, Architect, A.I.A., Riverside, California. Sheet 16, job no. 692. Various scales. July 15, 1937. Application no. 1446, approved by the State of California, Department of Public Works, Division of Architecture, July 24, 1937. - San Bernardino Valley College, Auditorium, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  4. Cost benefits from applying advanced heat rejection concepts to a wet/dry-cooled binary geothermal plant

    SciTech Connect

    Faletti, D.W.

    1981-03-01

    Optimized ammonia heat rejection system designs were carried out for three water allocations equivalent to 9, 20, and 31% of that of a 100% wet-cooled plant. The Holt/Procon design of a 50-MWe binary geothermal plant for the Heber site was used as a design basis. The optimization process took into account the penalties for replacement power, gas turbine capital, and lost capacity due to increased heat rejection temperature, as well as added base plant capacity and fuel to provide fan and pump power to the heat rejection system. Descriptions of the three plant designs are presented. For comparison, a wet tower loop was costed out for a 100% wet-cooled plant using the parameters of the Holt/Procon design. Wet/dry cooling was found to increase the cost of electricity by 28% above that of a 100% wet-cooled plant for all three of the water allocations studied (9, 20, and 31%). The application selected for a preconceptual evaluation of the BCT (binary cooling tower) system was the use of agricultural waste water from the New River, located in California's Imperial Valley, to cool a 50-MWe binary geothermal plant. Technical and cost evaluations at the preconceptual level indicated that performance estimates provided by Tower Systems Incorporated (TSI) were reasonable and that TSI's tower cost, although 2 to 19% lower than PNL estimates, was also reasonable. Electrical cost comparisonswere made among the BCT system, a conventional 100% wet system, and a 9% wet/dry ammonia system, all using agricultural waste water with solar pond disposal. The BCT system cost the least, yielding a cost of electricity only 13% above that of a conventional wet system using high quality water and 14% less than either the conventional 100% wet or the 9% wet/dry ammonia system.

  5. Measurement of the Trailing Vortex Systems of Large Transport Aircraft, Using Tower Fly-by and Flow Visualization (Summary, Comparison and Application)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-01-01

    flight test techniques used, and results obtained are described in references 1, 2, and 3. NAFEC’s part in that operation included the acquisition of...radii obtained as n approaches unity. Consider a hypothetical large airplane with elliptical lift distribution, having the following weight, span, and...from the tower (upwind). The velocity distributions obtained are presented as an appendix of each individual report, references 6 through 13, and a

  6. Validation of Supersonic Film Cooling Modeling for Liquid Rocket Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Christopher I.; Ruf, Joseph H.

    2010-01-01

    Topics include: upper stage engine key requirements and design drivers; Calspan "stage 1" results, He slot injection into hypersonic flow (air); test articles for shock generator diagram, slot injector details, and instrumentation positions; test conditions; modeling approach; 2-d grid used for film cooling simulations of test article; heat flux profiles from 2-d flat plate simulations (run #4); heat flux profiles from 2-d backward facing step simulations (run #43); isometric sketch of single coolant nozzle, and x-z grid of half-nozzle domain; comparison of 2-d and 3-d simulations of coolant nozzles (run #45); flowfield properties along coolant nozzle centerline (run #45); comparison of 3-d CFD nozzle flow calculations with experimental data; nozzle exit plane reduced to linear profile for use in 2-d film-cooling simulations (run #45); synthetic Schlieren image of coolant injection region (run #45); axial velocity profiles from 2-d film-cooling simulation (run #45); coolant mass fraction profiles from 2-d film-cooling simulation (run #45); heat flux profiles from 2-d film cooling simulations (run #45); heat flux profiles from 2-d film cooling simulations (runs #47, #45, and #47); 3-d grid used for film cooling simulations of test article; heat flux contours from 3-d film-cooling simulation (run #45); and heat flux profiles from 3-d and 2-d film cooling simulations (runs #44, #46, and #47).

  7. Some techniques for reducing the tower shadow of the DOE/NASA mod-0 wind turbine tower. [wind tunnel tests to measure effects of tower structure on wind velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, R. R.; Savino, J. M.; Wagner, L. H.; Diedrich, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    Wind speed profile measurements to measure the effect of a wind turbine tower on the wind velocity are presented. Measurements were made in the wake of scale models of the tower and in the wake of certain full scale components to determine the magnitude of the speed reduction (tower shadow). Shadow abatement techniques tested on the towers included the removal of diagonals, replacement of diagonals and horizontals with round cross section members, installation of elliptical shapes on horizontal members, installation of airfoils on vertical members, and application of surface roughness to vertical members.

  8. Concept for a next-generation drop tower system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Könemann, Thorben; Kaczmarczik, Ulrich; Gierse, Andreas; Greif, Andreas; Lutz, Torsten; Mawn, Simon; Siemer, Jan; Eigenbrod, Christian; von Kampen, Peter; Lämmerzahl, Claus

    2015-03-01

    The concept for a next-generation drop tower system is presented that is motivated by the scientific demand for much higher experiment repetition. This demand resulted in repetition rates of over 100 experiments per day which exceed the current capabilities of operating drop towers by far. High experiment repetition rates can for instance be realized through the novel application of a guided electro-magnetic linear drive system in a fully automatic drop tower operation. Such a new kind of drop tower system combines beneficial technologies of different free fall systems like freely falling drop capsules, capsule-in-capsule systems, and the vertical parabola method as already utilized in ZARM's worldwide unique catapult system. This proposed next-generation drop tower system named GraviTower Bremen does not only enable experiments with an outstanding microgravity quality (10-6 g, where g is the Earth's gravitational acceleration) and a duration of 6 s but also novel experiments under partial gravity conditions (0.1 g to 0.4 g) matching those of Moon or Mars with durations of up to 8.5 s. Due to its linear drive system the GraviTower allows the same very low initial acceleration and following deceleration loads onto the experiment. These can be selected according to the experiment's needs with only 1.5 g or 4 g. The engine power of the linear drive system allows also large payload dimensions and masses. The features and capabilities of the proposed GraviTower Bremen combine all advantages of current drop towers and represent the next technological step forward in ground-based research under space conditions.

  9. Closure temperature in cooling bi-mineralic systems: I. Definition and with application to REE-in-two-pyroxene thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Lijing; Liang, Yan

    2015-08-01

    Closure temperature is an important concept to many diffusion related problems involving cooling. The basic idea and formulation were outlined in the seminal work of Dodson for cooling mono-mineralic systems. The Dodson's equation has been widely used to calculate closure temperatures for igneous and metamorphic rocks that contain more than one mineral. The purpose of this study is to examine closure temperatures in cooling bi-mineralic systems and to investigate the physical meaning of temperatures calculated using the REE-in-two-pyroxene thermometer. We conduct numerical simulations of diffusive redistribution of trace elements between two coexisting minerals under prescribed cooling using temperature-dependent diffusion coefficients and mineral-mineral partition coefficients. Following Dodson's treatment, the closure temperature in bi-mineralic systems can be defined by the evolution of either average trace element concentrations in the two minerals or their ratio. The latter defines an effective partition coefficient. Closure temperatures calculated based on the two definitions are compared for a range of cooling rates, grain sizes, mineral proportions, and temperature-dependent partition coefficients and diffusion coefficients. Temperatures defined by the effective partition coefficient are recommended. Application to diffusive redistribution of rare earth elements (REE) in orthopyroxene-clinopyroxene systems demonstrates that closure temperature differences among REE are small and hence their average value may be used as the closure temperature for the cooling two-pyroxene system. The average closure temperature of REE in the two-pyroxene system is essentially the same as the temperature calculated using the REE-in-two-pyroxene thermometer and practically independent of pyroxene modal abundance in the system. Differences in temperatures calculated using the REE- and major element-based two-pyroxene thermometers can be used to infer cooling rate of two

  10. 40 CFR 463.10 - Applicability; description of the contact cooling and heating water subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... processes in the contact cooling and heating water subcategory to waters of the United States and the introduction of such pollutants into publicly owned treatment works. Processes in the contact cooling and heating water subcategory are processes where process water comes in contact with plastic materials or...

  11. Performance Assessment of a Desiccant Cooling System in a CHP Application with an IC Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Jalalzadeh-Azar, A. A.; Slayzak, S.; Judkoff, R.; Schaffhauser, T.; DeBlasio, R.

    2005-04-01

    Performance of a desiccant cooling system was evaluated in the context of combined heat and power (CHP). The baseline system incorporated a desiccant dehumidifier, a heat exchanger, an indirect evaporative cooler, and a direct evaporative cooler. The desiccant unit was regenerated through heat recovery from a gas-fired reciprocating internal combustion engine. The system offered sufficient sensible and latent cooling capacities for a wide range of climatic conditions, while allowing influx of outside air in excess of what is typically required for commercial buildings. Energy and water efficiencies of the desiccant cooling system were also evaluated and compared with those of a conventional system. The results of parametric assessments revealed the importance of using a heat exchanger for concurrent desiccant post cooling and regeneration air preheating. These functions resulted in enhancement of both the cooling performance and the thermal efficiency, which are essential for fuel utilization improvement. Two approaches for mixing of the return air and outside air were examined, and their impact on the system cooling performance and thermal efficiency was demonstrated. The scope of the parametric analyses also encompassed the impact of improving the indirect evaporative cooling effectiveness on the overall cooling system performance.

  12. Experimental performance and parametric analysis of heat pipe heat exchanger for air conditioning application integrated with evaporative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadhav, Tushar S.; Lele, Mandar M.

    2017-04-01

    The experimental performance of different heat pipe heat exchanger (HPHX) configurations using distilled water as the working fluid is reported in the present study. The three HPHX configurations in the present investigation include HPHX with single wick structure (HPHX 1), HPHX with composite wick structure (HPHX 2) and hybrid HPHX (HPHX 3) which is the combination of HPHX 1 and HPHX 2. The parameters considered for the parametric analysis of HPHX in all the three configurations are outdoor air dry bulb temperature entering the evaporator section of HPHX (OADBT), return air dry bulb temperature entering the condenser section of HPHX (RADBT), outdoor air velocity (Ve) and return air velocity (Vc). The OADBT is varied between 40 and 24 °C and the outdoor & return air velocities between 0.6 and 2.4 m/s. The parametric analysis of HPHX without evaporative cooling is studied for RADBT = 24 °C whereas RADBT is maintained at 20 °C for the parametric analysis of HPHX integrated with evaporative cooling. In comparison with HPHX without evaporative cooling, the performance of HPHX with evaporative cooling is enhanced by 17% for single wick structure (HPHX 1), 47% for composite wick structure (HPHX 2) and 59% for hybrid HPHX (HPHX 3) for OADBT = 40 °C and at Ve = Vc of 0.6 m/s. The results of the experimental analysis highlights the benefits of HPHX integrated with evaporative cooling for achieving significant energy savings in air conditioning application.

  13. Predicting the onset of transformation under noncontinuous cooling conditions. Part 2: Application to the austenite pearlite transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, T.T.; Hawbolt, E.B.; Brimacombe, J.K.

    1995-08-01

    A detailed review of the additivity principle with respect to the incubation of the austenite decomposition was summarized in Part 1 of this two-part series and led to the concept of an ideal time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagram. This curve is characteristic of the chemistry and austenite grain size in the steel and allows nonisothermal behavior to be described assuming additivity holds. The derivation of mathematical relationships between the ideal and experimental cooling data was presented in the first article. In this second article, an ideal curve for the austenite-to-pearlite transformation was derived from cooling data. The applicability of the ideal TTT curve for predicting the start of transformation under continuous cooling conditions was assessed for a range of cooling rates. Experiments were conducted under both isothermal and varying temperature conditions, including an industrial cooling schedule, using a Gleeble Thermal Simulator. Reasonable agreement was found between the predictions and the observed transformation start temperatures; predictions were consistent and compared favorably against other methods which have been frequently used to estimate the transformation start temperature for nonisothermal conditions.

  14. Design Evaluation Using Finite Element Analysis of Cooled Silicon Nitride Plates for a Turbine Blade Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Baaklini, George Y.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    2001-01-01

    Two- and three-dimensional finite element analyses were performed on uncoated and thermal barrier coated (TBC) silicon nitride plates with and without internal cooling by air. Steady-state heat-transfer analyses were done to optimize the size and the geometry of the cooling channels to reduce thermal stresses, and to evaluate the thermal environment experienced by the plate during burner rig testing. The limited experimental data available were used to model the thermal profile exerted by the flame on the plate. Thermal stress analyses were performed to assess the stress response due to thermal loading. Contours for the temperature and the representative stresses for the plates were generated and presented for different cooling hole sizes and shapes. Analysis indicates that the TBC experienced higher stresses, and the temperature gradient was much reduced when the plate was internally cooled by air. The advantages and disadvantages of several cooling channel layouts were evaluated.

  15. Evaluation of water cooled supersonic temperature and pressure probes for application to 1366 K flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagen, Nicholas; Seiner, John M.

    1990-01-01

    Water cooled supersonic probes are developed to investigate total pressure, static pressure, and total temperature in high-temperature jet plumes and thereby determine the mean flow properties. Two probe concepts, designed for operation at up to 1366 K in a Mach 2 flow, are tested on a water cooled nozzle. The two probe designs - the unsymmetric four-tube cooling configuration and the symmetric annular cooling design - take measurements at 755, 1089, and 1366 K of the three parameters. The cooled total and static pressure readings are found to agree with previous test results with uncooled configurations. The total-temperature probe, however, is affected by the introduction of water coolant, and effect which is explained by the increased heat transfer across the thermocouple-bead surface. Further investigation of the effect of coolant on the temperature probe is proposed to mitigate the effect and calculate more accurate temperatures in jet plumes.

  16. Evaluation of water cooled supersonic temperature and pressure probes for application to 1366 K flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagen, Nicholas; Seiner, John M.

    1990-01-01

    Water cooled supersonic probes are developed to investigate total pressure, static pressure, and total temperature in high-temperature jet plumes and thereby determine the mean flow properties. Two probe concepts, designed for operation at up to 1366 K in a Mach 2 flow, are tested on a water cooled nozzle. The two probe designs - the unsymmetric four-tube cooling configuration and the symmetric annular cooling design - take measurements at 755, 1089, and 1366 K of the three parameters. The cooled total and static pressure readings are found to agree with previous test results with uncooled configurations. The total-temperature probe, however, is affected by the introduction of water coolant, and effect which is explained by the increased heat transfer across the thermocouple-bead surface. Further investigation of the effect of coolant on the temperature probe is proposed to mitigate the effect and calculate more accurate temperatures in jet plumes.

  17. A new universal formula for efficiency: sensitivity to cooling conditions of nuclear and conventional power stations

    SciTech Connect

    Haidar, N.H.

    1984-10-01

    A new approximate formula is derived for the sensitivity of the net efficiency of fissile- and fossil-fueled condensing power stations to incremental variations in the design temperature of the cooling water or air. It is universal for the three basic modes (open circuit, wet tower, and dry tower) of turbine condenser cooling and incorporates nearly all of the decisive design parameters involved.

  18. Experimental investigation of interfacial energy transport in an evaporating sessile droplet for evaporative cooling applications.

    PubMed

    Mahmud, Md Almostasim; MacDonald, Brendan D

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we experimentally examine evaporation flux distributions and modes of interfacial energy transport for continuously fed evaporating spherical sessile water droplets in a regime that is relevant for applications, particularly for evaporative cooling systems. The contribution of the thermal conduction through the vapor phase was found to be insignificant compared to the thermal conduction through the liquid phase for the conditions we investigated. The local evaporation flux distributions associated with thermal conduction were found to vary along the surface of the droplet. Thermal conduction provided a majority of the energy required for evaporation but did not account for all of the energy transport, contributing 64±3%, 77±3%, and 77±4% of the energy required for the three cases we examined. Based on the temperature profiles measured along the interface we found that thermocapillary flow was predicted to occur in our experiments, and two convection cells were consistent with the temperature distributions for higher substrate temperatures while a single convection cell was consistent with the temperature distributions for a lower substrate temperature.

  19. Development of ytterbium-doped oxyfluoride glasses for laser cooling applications.

    PubMed

    Krishnaiah, Kummara Venkata; de Lima Filho, Elton Soares; Ledemi, Yannick; Nemova, Galina; Messaddeq, Younes; Kashyap, Raman

    2016-02-26

    Oxyfluoride glasses doped with 2, 5, 8, 12, 16 and 20 mol% of ytterbium (Yb(3+)) ions have been prepared by the conventional melt-quenching technique. Their optical, thermal and thermo-mechanical properties were characterized. Luminescence intensity at 1020 nm under laser excitation at 920 nm decreases with increasing Yb(3+) concentration, suggesting a decrease in the photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY). The PLQY of the samples was measured with an integrating sphere using an absolute method. The highest PLQY was found to be 0.99(11) for the 2 mol% Yb(3+): glass and decreases with increasing Yb(3+) concentration. The mean fluorescence wavelength and background absorption of the samples were also evaluated. Upconversion luminescence under 975 nm laser excitation was observed and attributed to the presence of Tm(3+) and Er(3+) ions which exist as impurity traces with YbF3 starting powder. Decay curves for the Yb(3+): (2)F5/2 → (2)F7/2 transition exhibit single exponential behavior for all the samples, although lifetime decrease was observed for the excited level of Yb(3+) with increasing Yb(3+) concentration. Also observed are an increase in the PLQY and a slight decrease in lifetime with increasing the pump power. Finally, the potential of these oxyfluoride glasses with high PLQY and low background absorption for laser cooling applications is discussed.

  20. Development of ytterbium-doped oxyfluoride glasses for laser cooling applications

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaiah, Kummara Venkata; Soares de Lima Filho, Elton; Ledemi, Yannick; Nemova, Galina; Messaddeq, Younes; Kashyap, Raman

    2016-01-01

    Oxyfluoride glasses doped with 2, 5, 8, 12, 16 and 20 mol% of ytterbium (Yb3+) ions have been prepared by the conventional melt-quenching technique. Their optical, thermal and thermo-mechanical properties were characterized. Luminescence intensity at 1020 nm under laser excitation at 920 nm decreases with increasing Yb3+ concentration, suggesting a decrease in the photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY). The PLQY of the samples was measured with an integrating sphere using an absolute method. The highest PLQY was found to be 0.99(11) for the 2 mol% Yb3+: glass and decreases with increasing Yb3+ concentration. The mean fluorescence wavelength and background absorption of the samples were also evaluated. Upconversion luminescence under 975 nm laser excitation was observed and attributed to the presence of Tm3+ and Er3+ ions which exist as impurity traces with YbF3 starting powder. Decay curves for the Yb3+: 2F5/2 → 2F7/2 transition exhibit single exponential behavior for all the samples, although lifetime decrease was observed for the excited level of Yb3+ with increasing Yb3+ concentration. Also observed are an increase in the PLQY and a slight decrease in lifetime with increasing the pump power. Finally, the potential of these oxyfluoride glasses with high PLQY and low background absorption for laser cooling applications is discussed. PMID:26915817

  1. Experimental investigation of interfacial energy transport in an evaporating sessile droplet for evaporative cooling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmud, Md. Almostasim; MacDonald, Brendan D.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we experimentally examine evaporation flux distributions and modes of interfacial energy transport for continuously fed evaporating spherical sessile water droplets in a regime that is relevant for applications, particularly for evaporative cooling systems. The contribution of the thermal conduction through the vapor phase was found to be insignificant compared to the thermal conduction through the liquid phase for the conditions we investigated. The local evaporation flux distributions associated with thermal conduction were found to vary along the surface of the droplet. Thermal conduction provided a majority of the energy required for evaporation but did not account for all of the energy transport, contributing 64 ±3 % , 77 ±3 % , and 77 ±4 % of the energy required for the three cases we examined. Based on the temperature profiles measured along the interface we found that thermocapillary flow was predicted to occur in our experiments, and two convection cells were consistent with the temperature distributions for higher substrate temperatures while a single convection cell was consistent with the temperature distributions for a lower substrate temperature.

  2. A novel trapezoid fin pattern applicable for air-cooled heat sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chien-Hung; Wang, Chi-Chuan

    2015-11-01

    The present study proposed a novel step or trapezoid surface design applicable to air-cooled heat sink under cross flow condition. A total of five heat sinks were made and tested, and the corresponding fin patterns are (a) plate fin; (b) step fin (step 1/3, 3 steps); (c) 2-step fin (step 1/2, 2 steps); (d) trapezoid fin (trap 1/3, cutting 1/3 length from the rear end) and (e) trapezoid fin (trap 1/2, cutting 1/2 length from the rear end). The design is based on the heat transfer augmentation via (1) longer perimeter of entrance region and (2) larger effective temperature difference at the rear part of the heat sink. From the test results, it is found that either step or trapezoid design can provide a higher heat transfer conductance and a lower pressure drop at a specified frontal velocity. The effective conductance of trap 1/3 design exceeds that of plate surface by approximately 38 % at a frontal velocity of 5 m s-1 while retains a lower pressure drop of 20 % with its surface area being reduced by 20.6 %. For comparisons exploiting the overall thermal resistance versus pumping power, the resultant thermal resistance of the proposed trapezoid design 1/3, still reveals a 10 % lower thermal resistance than the plate fin surface at a specified pumping power.

  3. 11. SITE BUILDING 002 SCANNER BUILDING EVAPORATIVE COOLING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. SITE BUILDING 002 - SCANNER BUILDING - EVAPORATIVE COOLING TOWER SYSTEM IN FOREGROUND. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  4. A framework for identifying the applicability of heating or cooling technologies based on initial project information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacace, Katie Meng

    In order to fully achieve the energy savings and human comfort benefits of many alternative heating and cooling technologies, design considerations for these technologies must be made during the conceptual design stage. However, at this stage architects are often faced with challenges that inhibit the integration of such technologies. At the early stages of design, architects have limited time and technical knowledge to research alternative technologies and mechanical engineers are typically not yet part of the design team to offer their expertise. To address these problems, this research developed a framework for a Technology Identifier that would inform an architect about alternative heating and cooling technologies that are applicable to their specific project at the conceptual design stage. The framework is based on the premise that a quantitative relationship between the initial project information and a technology's critical output variable(s) for heat transfer to the space can be established. Therefore, to be included in the framework a technology must possess a component that provides direct heat transfer to the space for the framework to determine if the technology can maintain the desired space temperature. The climatic influences on a technology's performance and the effect of changing a technology's input variables on the heat transfer output variable(s) were also quantified. Existing building energy simulation programs were used in these analyses. The framework develops simulation input files for multiple technologies, utilizes existing simulation programs to predict the performance of these technologies, and then displays the output results along with other information that is useful to designers at the conceptual stage. Each simulation input file is compiled from a template that queries databases and requires minimal user input. The output display includes the space temperature, energy consumption, and design considerations of each technology. A

  5. Self-stabilizing floating tower

    SciTech Connect

    Mougin, G.L.

    1980-12-30

    An offshore floating tower comprises two coaxial cylindrical enclosures interconnected by continuous radial bulkheads forming in the upper portion a ring of damping chambers and in the lower portion a ring of buoyancy tanksaround a bell-shaped chamber which is partially filled with air to produce pneumatic damping of vertical movement of the tower. The upper portion of the tower is separated from the lower portion by a horizontal slab. The upper portion of the internal enclosure is perforated in the vicinity of the horizontal slab.

  6. LDSD on the Launch Tower

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-06-05

    NASA's Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) hangs from a launch tower at U.S. Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility in Kauai, Hawaii. The saucer-shaped vehicle will test two devices for landing heavy payloads on Mars: an inflatable donut-shaped device and a supersonic parachute. The launch tower helps link the vehicle to a balloon; once the balloon floats up, the vehicle is released from the tower and the balloon carries it to high altitudes. The vehicle's rocket takes it to even higher altitudes, to the top of the stratosphere, where the supersonic test begins. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19343

  7. The Drop Tower Bremen -Experiment Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Könemann, Thorben; von Kampen, Peter; Rath, Hans J.

    The idea behind the drop tower facility of the Center of Applied Space Technology and Micro-gravity (ZARM) in Bremen is to provide an inimitable technical opportunity of a daily access to short-term weightlessness on earth. In this way ZARM`s european unique ground-based microgravity laboratory displays an excellent economic alternative for research in space-related conditions at low costs comparable to orbital platforms. Many national and international ex-perimentalists motivated by these prospects decide to benefit from the high-quality and easy accessible microgravity environment only provided by the Drop Tower Bremen. Corresponding experiments in reduced gravity could open new perspectives of investigation methods and give scientists an impressive potential for a future technology and multidisciplinary applications on different research fields like Fundamental Physics, Astrophysics, Fluid Dynamics, Combus-tion, Material Science, Chemistry and Biology. Generally, realizing microgravity experiments at ZARM`s drop tower facility meet new requirements of the experimental hardware and may lead to some technical constraints in the setups. In any case the ZARM Drop Tower Operation and Service Company (ZARM FAB mbH) maintaining the drop tower facility is prepared to as-sist experimentalists by offering own air-conditioned laboratories, clean rooms, workshops and consulting engineers, as well as scientific personal. Furthermore, ZARM`s on-site apartment can be used for accommodations during the experiment campaigns. In terms of approaching drop tower experimenting, consulting of experimentalists is mandatory to successfully accomplish the pursued drop or catapult capsule experiment. For this purpose there will be a lot of expertise and help given by ZARM FAB mbH in strong cooperation to-gether with the experimentalists. However, in comparison to standard laboratory setups the drop or catapult capsule setup seems to be completely different at first view. While defining a

  8. On the applicability of surrogate-based MCMC-Bayesian inversion to the Community Land Model: Case studies at Flux tower sites

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Maoyi; Ray, Jaideep; Hou, Zhangshuan; Ren, Huiying; Liu, Ying; Swiler, Laura

    2016-06-01

    The Community Land Model (CLM) has been widely used in climate and Earth system modeling. Accurate estimation of model parameters is needed for reliable model simulations and predictions under current and future conditions, respectively. In our previous work, a subset of hydrological parameters has been identified to have significant impact on surface energy fluxes at selected flux tower sites based on parameter screening and sensitivity analysis, which indicate that the parameters could potentially be estimated from surface flux observations at the towers. To date, such estimates do not exist. In this paper, we assess the feasibility of applying a Bayesian model calibration technique to estimate CLM parameters at selected flux tower sites under various site conditions. The parameters are estimated as a joint probability density function (PDF) that provides estimates of uncertainty of the parameters being inverted, conditional on climatologically average latent heat fluxes derived from observations. We find that the simulated mean latent heat fluxes from CLM using the calibrated parameters are generally improved at all sites when compared to those obtained with CLM simulations using default parameter sets. Further, our calibration method also results in credibility bounds around the simulated mean fluxes which bracket the measured data. The modes (or maximum a posteriori values) and 95% credibility intervals of the site-specific posterior PDFs are tabulated as suggested parameter values for each site. As a result, analysis of relationships between the posterior PDFs and site conditions suggests that the parameter values are likely correlated with the plant functional type, which needs to be confirmed in future studies by extending the approach to more sites.

  9. On the applicability of surrogate-based Markov chain Monte Carlo-Bayesian inversion to the Community Land Model: Case studies at flux tower sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Maoyi; Ray, Jaideep; Hou, Zhangshuan; Ren, Huiying; Liu, Ying; Swiler, Laura

    2016-07-01

    The Community Land Model (CLM) has been widely used in climate and Earth system modeling. Accurate estimation of model parameters is needed for reliable model simulations and predictions under current and future conditions, respectively. In our previous work, a subset of hydrological parameters has been identified to have significant impact on surface energy fluxes at selected flux tower sites based on parameter screening and sensitivity analysis, which indicate that the parameters could potentially be estimated from surface flux observations at the towers. To date, such estimates do not exist. In this paper, we assess the feasibility of applying a Bayesian model calibration technique to estimate CLM parameters at selected flux tower sites under various site conditions. The parameters are estimated as a joint probability density function (PDF) that provides estimates of uncertainty of the parameters being inverted, conditional on climatologically average latent heat fluxes derived from observations. We find that the simulated mean latent heat fluxes from CLM using the calibrated parameters are generally improved at all sites when compared to those obtained with CLM simulations using default parameter sets. Further, our calibration method also results in credibility bounds around the simulated mean fluxes which bracket the measured data. The modes (or maximum a posteriori values) and 95% credibility intervals of the site-specific posterior PDFs are tabulated as suggested parameter values for each site. Analysis of relationships between the posterior PDFs and site conditions suggests that the parameter values are likely correlated with the plant functional type, which needs to be confirmed in future studies by extending the approach to more sites.

  10. On the applicability of surrogate-based MCMC-Bayesian inversion to the Community Land Model: Case studies at Flux tower sites

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Maoyi; Ray, Jaideep; Hou, Zhangshuan; ...

    2016-06-01

    The Community Land Model (CLM) has been widely used in climate and Earth system modeling. Accurate estimation of model parameters is needed for reliable model simulations and predictions under current and future conditions, respectively. In our previous work, a subset of hydrological parameters has been identified to have significant impact on surface energy fluxes at selected flux tower sites based on parameter screening and sensitivity analysis, which indicate that the parameters could potentially be estimated from surface flux observations at the towers. To date, such estimates do not exist. In this paper, we assess the feasibility of applying a Bayesianmore » model calibration technique to estimate CLM parameters at selected flux tower sites under various site conditions. The parameters are estimated as a joint probability density function (PDF) that provides estimates of uncertainty of the parameters being inverted, conditional on climatologically average latent heat fluxes derived from observations. We find that the simulated mean latent heat fluxes from CLM using the calibrated parameters are generally improved at all sites when compared to those obtained with CLM simulations using default parameter sets. Further, our calibration method also results in credibility bounds around the simulated mean fluxes which bracket the measured data. The modes (or maximum a posteriori values) and 95% credibility intervals of the site-specific posterior PDFs are tabulated as suggested parameter values for each site. As a result, analysis of relationships between the posterior PDFs and site conditions suggests that the parameter values are likely correlated with the plant functional type, which needs to be confirmed in future studies by extending the approach to more sites.« less

  11. On the applicability of surrogate-based MCMC-Bayesian inversion to the Community Land Model: Case studies at Flux tower sites

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Maoyi; Ray, Jaideep; Hou, Zhangshuan; Ren, Huiying; Liu, Ying; Swiler, Laura

    2016-06-01

    The Community Land Model (CLM) has been widely used in climate and Earth system modeling. Accurate estimation of model parameters is needed for reliable model simulations and predictions under current and future conditions, respectively. In our previous work, a subset of hydrological parameters has been identified to have significant impact on surface energy fluxes at selected flux tower sites based on parameter screening and sensitivity analysis, which indicate that the parameters could potentially be estimated from surface flux observations at the towers. To date, such estimates do not exist. In this paper, we assess the feasibility of applying a Bayesian model calibration technique to estimate CLM parameters at selected flux tower sites under various site conditions. The parameters are estimated as a joint probability density function (PDF) that provides estimates of uncertainty of the parameters being inverted, conditional on climatologically-average latent heat fluxes derived from observations. We find that the simulated mean latent heat fluxes from CLM using the calibrated parameters are generally improved at all sites when compared to those obtained with CLM simulations using default parameter sets. Further, our calibration method also results in credibility bounds around the simulated mean fluxes which bracket the measured data. The modes (or maximum a posteriori values) and 95% credibility intervals of the site-specific posterior PDFs are tabulated as suggested parameter values for each site. Lastly, analysis of relationships between the posterior PDFs and site conditions suggests that the parameter values are likely correlated with the plant functional type, which needs to be confirmed in future studies by extending the approach to more sites.

  12. You're a What?: Tower Technician

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vilorio, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about the role and functions of a tower technician. A tower technician climbs up the face of telecommunications towers to remove, install, test, maintain, and repair a variety of equipment--from antennas to light bulbs. Tower technicians also build shelters and radiofrequency shields for electronic equipment, lay…

  13. Characterization of selected application of biomass energy technologies and a solar district heating and cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    D'Alessio, Dr., Gregory J.; Blaunstein, Robert P.

    1980-09-01

    The following systems are discussed: energy self-sufficient farms, wood gasification, energy from high-yield silviculture farms, and solar district heating and cooling. System descriptions and environmental data are included for each one. (MHR)

  14. Evaluation of water cooled supersonic temperature and pressure probes for application to 2000 F flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagen, Nicholas T.; Seiner, John M.

    1990-01-01

    The development of water cooled supersonic probes used to study high temperature jet plumes is addressed. These probes are: total pressure, static pressure, and total temperature. The motivation for these experiments is the determination of high temperature supersonic jet mean flow properties. A 3.54 inch exit diameter water cooled nozzle was used in the tests. It is designed for exit Mach 2 at 2000 F exit total temperature. Tests were conducted using water cooled probes capable of operating in Mach 2 flow, up to 2000 F total temperature. Of the two designs tested, an annular cooling method was chosen as superior. Data at the jet exit planes, and along the jet centerline, were obtained for total temperatures of 900 F, 1500 F, and 2000 F, for each of the probes. The data obtained from the total and static pressure probes are consistent with prior low temperature results. However, the data obtained from the total temperature probe was affected by the water coolant. The total temperature probe was tested up to 2000 F with, and without, the cooling system turned on to better understand the heat transfer process at the thermocouple bead. The rate of heat transfer across the thermocouple bead was greater when the coolant was turned on than when the coolant was turned off. This accounted for the lower temperature measurement by the cooled probe. The velocity and Mach number at the exit plane and centerline locations were determined from the Rayleigh-Pitot tube formula.

  15. Utilizing of inner porous structure in injection moulds for application of special cooling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, M.; Bobek, J.; Šafka, J.; Habr, J.; Nováková, I.; Běhálek, L.

    2016-04-01

    The article is focused on impact evaluation of controlled inner structure of production tools and new cooling method on regulation of thermal processes for injection moulding technology. The mould inserts with porous structure were cooled by means of liquid CO2 which is very progressive cooling method and enables very fast and intensive heat transfer among the plastic product, the production tool and cooling medium. The inserts were created using rapid prototype technology (DLSM) and they had a bi-component structure consisting of thin compact surface layer and defined porous inner structure of open cell character where liquid CO2 was flowing through. This analyse includes the evaluation of cooling efficiency for different inner structures and different time profiles for dosing of liquid CO2 into the porous structure. The thermal processes were monitored using thermocouples and IR thermal analyse of product surface and experimental device. Intensive heat removal influenced also the final structure and the shape and dimensional accuracy of the moulded parts that were made of semi-crystalline polymer. The range of final impacts of using intensive cooling method on the plastic parts was defined by DSC and dimensional analyses.

  16. Application of evaporative cooling technology in super-high power density magnet.

    PubMed

    Xiong, B; Ruan, L; Gu, G B; Guo, S Q; Cao, R; Li, Z G; Lu, W; Zhang, X Z; Sun, L T; Zhao, H W

    2014-02-01

    Evaporative cooling technology utilizes phase-change heat transfer mode to achieve the cooling for heating equipment. The heat transfer capacity of evaporative cooling technology is far more than air or water cooling technology. The Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source magnet is a typical super-high power density magnet, and the evaporative cooling technology is an ideal cooling method for the coils of magnet. In this paper we show the structure and process of coils and the special design of flow channels of coolant for an experiment magnet model. Additionally, the heat transfer circulation is presented and analyzed. By the finite element method, the flow channels are optimized to rationally allocate coolant and to reduce the temperature of coils. For the experiment model, the current density of copper wire of coils is 19 A/mm(2), and the coil-windows current density is larger than 12 A/mm(2). The max temperature of coils is below 80 °C, and the total heat is about 200 kW.

  17. Investigation of a para-ortho hydrogen reactor for application to spacecraft sensor cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nast, T. C.

    1983-01-01

    The utilization of solid hydrogen in space for sensor and instrument cooling is a very efficient technique for long term cooling or for cooling at high heat rates. The solid hydrogen can provide temperatures as low as 7 to 8 K to instruments. Vapor cooling is utilized to reduce parasitic heat inputs to the 7 to 8 K stage and is effective in providing intermediate cooling for instrument components operating at higher temperatures. The use of solid hydrogen in place of helium may lead to weight reductions as large as a factor of ten and an attendent reduction in system volume. The results of an investigation of a catalytic reactor for use with a solid hydrogen cooling system is presented. Trade studies were performed on several configurations of reactor to meet the requirements of high reactor efficiency with low pressure drop. Results for the selected reactor design are presented for both liquid hydrogen systems operating at near atmospheric pressure and the solid hydrogen cooler operating as low as 1 torr.

  18. All-diode-laser cooling of Sr+ isotope ions for analytical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Kyunghun; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Yuta; Miyabe, Masabumi; Wakaida, Ikuo; Hasegawa, Shuichi

    2017-06-01

    Trapping and cooling of Sr+ isotope ions by an all-diode-laser system has been demonstrated in order to develop a novel mass spectrometric technique in combination with ion trap-laser cooling. First, we constructed external cavity diode lasers and associated stabilization apparatus for laser cooling of Sr+ ions. The transition frequencies confirmed by optogalvanic spectroscopy enabled successful cooling of 88Sr+ ions. An image of two trapped ions has been captured by CCD camera. Minor isotopes, 84Sr+ and 86Sr+, were also cooled and trapped. From an analysis of the observed spectra of a string crystal of each isotope, the isotope shifts of the cooling transition (5s 2S1/2 → 5p 2P1/2) of Sr+ ions were determined to be +371(8) MHz for Δν84-88 and +169(8) MHz for Δν86-88. In the case of the repumping transition (4d 2D3/2 → 5p 2P1/2), Δν84-88 and Δν86-88 were measured to be -833(6) and -400(5) MHz, respectively. These values are in good agreement with previously reported values.

  19. The Physics of Shot Towers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipscombe, Trevor C.; Mungan, Carl E.

    2012-01-01

    In the late 18th and throughout the 19th century, lead shot for muskets was prepared by use of a shot tower. Molten lead was poured from the top of a tower and, during its fall, the drops became spherical under the action of surface tension. In this article, we ask and answer the question: "How does the size of the lead shot depend on the height…

  20. The Physics of Shot Towers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipscombe, Trevor C.; Mungan, Carl E.

    2012-01-01

    In the late 18th and throughout the 19th century, lead shot for muskets was prepared by use of a shot tower. Molten lead was poured from the top of a tower and, during its fall, the drops became spherical under the action of surface tension. In this article, we ask and answer the question: "How does the size of the lead shot depend on the height…

  1. Towards Determination of Visual Requirements for Augmented Reality Displays and Virtual Environments for the Airport Tower

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    The visual requirements for augmented reality or virtual environments displays that might be used in real or virtual towers are reviewed with respect... augmented reality displays, an optical see-through display was used in an ATC Tower simulation. Three different binocular fields of view (14 , 28...fields of view much greater than 47 are unlikely to dramatically improve search performance and that partial binocular overlap is a feasible display technique for augmented reality Tower applications.

  2. Heat transfer characteristics of coconut oil as phase change material to room cooling application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irsyad, M.; Harmen

    2017-03-01

    Thermal comfort in a room is one of human needs in the workplace and dwellings, so that the use of air conditioning system in tropical countries is inevitable. This equipment has an impact on the increase of energy consumption. One method of minimizing the energy use is by using the phase change material (PCM) as thermal energy storage. This material utilizes the temperature difference between day and night for the storage and release of thermal energy. PCM development on application as a material for air cooling inlet, partitioning and interior needs to be supported by the study of heat transfer characteristics when PCM absorbs heat from ambient temperature. This study was conducted to determine the heat transfer characteristics on coconut oil as a phase change material. There are three models of experiments performed in this research. Firstly, an experiment was conducted to analyze the time that was needed by material to phase change by varying the temperature. The second experiment analyzed the heat transfer characteristics of air to PCM naturally convection. The third experiment analyzed the forced convection heat transfer on the surface of the PCM container by varying the air velocity. The data of experimental showed that, increasing ambient air temperature resulted in shorter time for phase change. At temperatures of 30°C, the time for phase change of PCM with the thickness of 8 cm was 1700 min, and it was stable at temperatures of 27°C. Increasing air temperature accelerated the phase change in the material. While for the forced convection heat transfer, PCM could reduce the air temperature in the range of 30 to 35°C at about 1 to 2°C, with a velocity of 1-3 m/s.

  3. Tower Temperature and Humidity Sensors (TWR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, DR

    2010-02-01

    Three tall towers are installed at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility: a 60-meter triangular tower at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility (CF), a 21-meter walkup scaffolding tower at the SGP Okmulgee forest site (E21), and a 40-meter triangular tower at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Barrow site. The towers are used for meteorological, radiological, and other measurements.

  4. SWECS tower dynamics analysis methods and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, A. D.; Sexton, J. H.; Butterfield, C. P.; Thresher, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    Several different tower dynamics analysis methods and computer codes were used to determine the natural frequencies and mode shapes of both guyed and freestanding wind turbine towers. These analysis methods are described and the results for two types of towers, a guyed tower and a freestanding tower, are shown. The advantages and disadvantages in the use of and the accuracy of each method are also described.

  5. Comparison of Waste Heat Driven and Electrically Driven Cooling Systems for a High Ambient Temperature, Off-Grid Application

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-10

    carried out for a district CHP application consisting of a 1 MW solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and hot water distribution. The results showed that the two...based upon a need to keep electronics cool and dry, rather than to provide the most comfortable environment for human occupants . Nonetheless, the... occupants , 58.2% of the NC electrical load was dumped into the occupied space by electronic equipment, and the remaining heat load was due to ventilation

  6. Kinetic model for predicting the concentrations of active halogens species in chlorinated saline cooling waters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, W.R.; Lietzke, M.H.

    1981-08-01

    A kinetic model has been developed for describing the speciation of chlorine-produced oxidants in seawater as a function of time. The model is applicable under a broad variety of conditions, including all pH range, salinities, temperatures, ammonia concentrations, organic amine concentrations, and chlorine doses likely to be encountered during power plant cooling water chlorination. However, the effects of sunlight are not considered. The model can also be applied to freshwater and recirculating water systems with cooling towers. The results of the model agree with expectation, however, complete verification is not feasible at the present because analytical methods for some of the predicted species are lacking.

  7. Evaluating Cool Impervious Surfaces: Application to an Energy-Efficient Residential Roof and to City Pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosado, Pablo Javier

    Summer urban heat island (UHI) refers to the phenomenon of having higher urban temperatures compared to the those in surrounding suburban and rural areas. Higher urban air temperatures lead to increased cooling demand, accelerates the formation of smog, and contributes to the generation of greenhouse gas emissions. Dark-colored impervious surfaces cover a significant fraction of an urban fabric, and as hot and dry surfaces, are a major contributor to the UHI effect. Adopting solar-reflective ("cool") roofs and cool pavements, and increasing the urban vegetation, are strategies proven to mitigate urban heat islands. These strategies often have an "indirect" effect (ambient cooling) and "direct" effect (change in solar energy flux entering the conditioned space) on the energy use of buildings. This work investigates some elements of the UHI mitigation strategies, specifically the annual direct effect of a cool roof, and the direct and indirect effects of cool pavements. The first topic researched in this paper consists in an experimental assessment of the direct effects from replacing a conventional dark roof with a highly energy-efficient cool roof. The study measures and calculates the annual benefits of the cool roof on the cooling and heating energy uses, and the associated emission reductions. The energy savings attributed to the cool roof are validated by measuring the difference between the homes in the heat loads that entered the conditioned space through the ceiling and HVAC ducts. Fractional annual cooling energy savings (26%) were 2.6 times the 10% daily cooling energy savings measured in a previous study that used a white coating to increase the albedo of an asphalt shingle roof by the same amount (0.44). The improved cooling energy savings (26% vs. 10%) may be attributed to the cool tile's above-sheathing ventilation, rather than to its high thermal mass. The roof also provided energy savings during the heating season, yielding fractional annual gas

  8. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - This view from the mobile service tower on Launch Complex 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, shows two solid rocket boosters (SRBs) already suspended in the tower while another is being lifted. They are three of nine 46-inch-diameter, stretched SRBs that are being attached to the Delta II Heavy rocket that will launch the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). Consisting of three cryogenically cooled science instruments and an 0.85-meter telescope, SIRTF is one of NASA's largest infrared telescopes to be launched. SIRTF will obtain images and spectra by detecting the infrared energy, or heat, radiated by objects in space. Most of this infrared radiation is blocked by the Earth's atmosphere and cannot be observed from the ground.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-22

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - This view from the mobile service tower on Launch Complex 17-B, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, shows two solid rocket boosters (SRBs) already suspended in the tower while another is being lifted. They are three of nine 46-inch-diameter, stretched SRBs that are being attached to the Delta II Heavy rocket that will launch the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). Consisting of three cryogenically cooled science instruments and an 0.85-meter telescope, SIRTF is one of NASA's largest infrared telescopes to be launched. SIRTF will obtain images and spectra by detecting the infrared energy, or heat, radiated by objects in space. Most of this infrared radiation is blocked by the Earth's atmosphere and cannot be observed from the ground.

  9. Application of the theory of damping of kink oscillations by radiative cooling of coronal loop plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, R. J.; Erdélyi, R.

    2010-09-01

    Aims: We present here a first comparative study between the observed damping of numerous fast kink oscillations and the theoretical model of their damping due to the cooling of coronal loops. The theory of damping of kink oscillations due to radiation of the solar plasma with a temporally varying background is applied here to all known cases of coronal kink oscillations. Methods: A recent dynamic model of cooling coronal loops predicts that transverse oscillations of such loops could be significantly damped due to the radiative cooling process (Morton & Erdélyi 2009, ApJ, 707, 750). The cooling of the loop plasma also has the consequence that the kink oscillation has a time-dependent frequency. The theory is applied to a relatively large number of known and reported examples of TRACE observations of damped kink oscillations. Results: We find that, for cooling timescales that are typical of EUV loops (500-2000 s), the observed damping of the transversal (i.e. kink) oscillations can be accounted for almost entirely by the cooling process in half of the examples. No other dissipative mechanism(s) seems to be needed to model the damping. In the remaining other examples, the cooling process does not appear to be able to account fully for the observed damping, though could still have a significant influence on the damping. In these cases another mechanism(s), e.g. resonant absorption, may be additionally required to account for the complete decay of oscillations. Also, we show that because of the dynamic nature of the background plasma, allowing for a time-dependent frequency provides a better fit profile for the data points of observations than a fit profile with a constant frequency, opening novel avenues for solar magneto-seismology.

  10. Development of solar tower observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfschmidt, Gudrun

    Because the horizontal solar telescope, the Snow Telescope in Yerkes Observatory, was affected by air-currents from the warmed-up soil, George Ellery Hale had the idea of a tower telescope. In 1904, the 60-foot tower in Mt. Wilson was ready, in 1908 the 150-foot tower was built with the help of the Carnegie foundation. After World War I, Germany made heavy efforts to regain its former strong position in the field of science. Already in December 1919 - after the spectacular result of the English eclipse expedition in October 1919 - Erwin Finlay-Freundlich started a successful fund raising (“Einstein-Stiftungrdquo;) among German industrialists. The company Zeiss in Jena was responsible for the instrumentation of the 20-m solar tower, built in 1920-22. The optical design of the Einstein Tower in respect to light intensity surpassed even the Mt. Wilson solar observatory. Also abroad solar tower observatories were built in the 1920s: Utrecht,The Netherlands (1922), Canberra, Australia (1924), Arcetri, Italy (1926), Pasadena, California (1926) and Tokyo, Japan (1928). In the thirties, solar physics became important because of the solar maximum in 1938 and the new observational possibilities created by Bernard Lyot. At the end of the 1930s, Karl-Otto Kiepenheuer proposed to establish a solar tower observatory on Wendelstein in order to improve the predictions of radio interference by observing sunspots. By stressing the importance of the solar research for war efforts, Otto Heckmann of Göttingen observatory finally succeeded in winning the “Reichsluftfahrtministerium” to finance several solar observatories, like Wendelstein, Hainberg/Göttingen, Kanzelhöhe/Villach, and Schauinsland/Freiburg. Solar astronomy profited by the foundation of the new observatories - four of them existed still after the war. Abroad only the solar observatories of Oxford (1935) and the 50 foot tower of the McMath-Hulbert Observatory, University of Michigan (1936) should be mentioned. Only

  11. The influence of focal brain cooling on neurophysiopathology: validation for clinical application.

    PubMed

    Oku, Takayuki; Fujii, Masami; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Imoto, Hirochika; Uchiyama, Joji; Oka, Fumiaki; Kunitsugu, Ichiro; Fujioka, Hiroshi; Nomura, Sadahiro; Kajiwara, Koji; Fujisawa, Hirosuke; Kato, Shoichi; Saito, Takashi; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2009-06-01

    Focal brain cooling has been recognized to have a suppressive effect on epileptiform discharges or a protective effect on brain tissue. However, the precise influence of brain cooling on normal brain function and histology has not yet been thoroughly investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the neurophysiopathological consequences of focal cooling and to detect the threshold temperature that causes irreversible histological change and motor dysfunction. The experiments were performed in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (weighing 250-350 g) after induction of halothane anesthesia. A thermoelectric chip (6 x 6 x 2 mm) was used as a cooling device and was placed on the surface of the sensorimotor cortex after a 10 x 8-mm craniotomy. A thermocouple was placed between the chip and the brain surface. Focal cooling of the cortex was performed at the temperatures of 20, 15, 10, 5, 0, and -5 degrees C for 1 hour (5 rats in each group). Thereafter, the cranial window was repaired. Motor function was evaluated using the beam-walking scale (BWS) every day for 7 days. The rats were killed 7 days after the operation for histological examination with H & E, Klüver-Barrera, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferasemediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling stainings. The authors also euthanized some rats 24 hours after cooling and obtained brain sections by the same methods. The BWS score was decreased on the day after cooling only in the -5 degrees C group (p < 0.05), whereas the score did not change in the other temperature groups. Histologically, the appearance of cryoinjury such as necrosis, apoptosis, loss of neurons, and marked proliferation of astrocytes at the periphery of the lesion was observed only in the -5 degrees C group, while no apparent changes were observed in the other temperature groups. The present study confirmed that the focal cooling of the cortex for 1 hour above the temperature of 0 degrees C did not

  12. Packed tower program eases calculations for diameter, hydraulics of towers

    SciTech Connect

    Petrarca, C.A.

    1986-04-14

    A packed tower program will calculate the diameter and hydraulics of a packed tower, or check the hydraulics of an existing tower for other process conditions. It is written in simple BASIC for an IBM PC and could easily be converted to other PC's. There are approximately 100 statement lines, with memory requirement of approximately 4,100 bytes. The program is presented as an aid, or tool, to reduce tedious calculations in design or revision work. Much has already been written on the specifics of design methods and calculation procedures for packed towers. This article will cover only the program's procedure and calculation method, input requirements, output data, and features. The program first transforms the raw data into consistent units. Gas flow rate in pounds per hour is calculated from the input of standard cubic feet per minute and specific gravity, or moles per hour and molecular weight. Liquid flow rate in pounds per hour is calculated from the gallons per minute and specific gravity input. Using the temperature, pressure, compressibility, and molecular weight inputs, the gas density in pounds per cubic foot is calculated from the ideal gas law equation. Liquid density is calculated directly from the specific gravity. With this data, the program then calculates the ''x'' ordinate of the generalized flooding correlation for packed towers. Using regressed design curves of X vs. Y, which somewhat parallel the flooding curve, the program calculates the Y abscissa function which relates liquid and gas densities, gas mass velocity, packing factor, gravitational constant, and liquid viscosity.

  13. Air pollution modeling and its application III

    SciTech Connect

    De Wispelaere, C.

    1984-01-01

    This book focuses on the Lagrangian modeling of air pollution. Modeling cooling tower and power plant plumes, modeling the dispersion of heavy gases, remote sensing as a tool for air pollution modeling, dispersion modeling including photochemistry, and the evaluation of model performances in practical applications are discussed. Specific topics considered include dispersion in the convective boundary layer, the application of personal computers to Lagrangian modeling, the dynamic interaction of cooling tower and stack plumes, the diffusion of heavy gases, correlation spectrometry as a tool for mesoscale air pollution modeling, Doppler acoustic sounding, tetroon flights, photochemical air quality simulation modeling, acid deposition of photochemical oxidation products, atmospheric diffusion modeling, applications of an integral plume rise model, and the estimation of diffuse hydrocarbon leakages from petrochemical factories. This volume constitutes the proceedings of the Thirteenth International Technical Meeting on Air Pollution Modeling and Its Application held in France in 1982.

  14. Performance evaluation of radiant cooling system application on a university building in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satrio, Pujo; Sholahudin, S.; Nasruddin

    2017-03-01

    The paper describes a study developed to estimate the energy savings potential of a radiant cooling system installed in an institutional building in Indonesia. The simulations were carried out using IESVE to evaluate thermal performance and energy consumption The building model was calibrated using the measured data for the installed radiant system. Then this calibrated model was used to simulate the energy consumption and temperature distribution to determine the proportional energy savings and occupant comfort under different systems. The result was radiant cooling which integrated with a Dedicated Outside Air System (DOAS) could make 41,84% energy savings compared to the installed cooling system. The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation showed that a radiant system integrated with DOAS provides superior human comfort than a radiant system integrated with Variable Air Volume (VAV). Percentage People Dissatisfied was kept below 10% using the proposed system.

  15. Optimised radiative cooling of infrared space telescopes and applications to possible missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawarden, T. G.; Cummings, R. O.; Telesco, C. M.; Thronson, H. A., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Simple guidelines are presented for designing radiatively cooled space telescopes that must reach low temperatures. The limits achievable by such means are explored and secondary issues such as the on-orbit cooling time are examined. Results to date from a program of more detailed model simulations are summarized. These indicate that radiative cooling can indeed lower the temperatures of large-aperture telescopes sufficiently to make the technique of great interest for future IR space missions, while retaining advantages of size and duration, and can attain such low temperatures in quite reasonable times. Possible missions of this type are outlined, including the Edison proposal, the Japanese SMIRT survey mission, and an intermediate-size ESA/NASA mission.

  16. Seeing the Fields and Forests: Application of Surface-Layer Theory and Flux-Tower Data to Calculating Vegetation Canopy Height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennypacker, Sam; Baldocchi, Dennis

    2016-02-01

    Canopy height is an important and dynamic site variable that affects the mass and energy exchanges between vegetation and the atmosphere. We develop a method to estimate canopy height routinely, using surface-layer theory and turbulence measurements made from a collection of flux towers. This tool is based on connecting the logarithmic wind profile generally expected in a neutral surface layer with direct measurements of friction velocity and assumptions about canopy height's relationships with zero-plane displacement and aerodynamic roughness length. Tests over a broad range of canopy types and heights find that calculated values are in good agreement with direct measurements of canopy height, including in a heterogeneous landscape. Based on the various uncertainties associated with our starting assumptions about canopy micrometeorology, we present a blueprint for future work that is necessary for expanding and improving these initial calculations.

  17. Applications of an MPI Enhanced Simulated Annealing Algorithm on nuSTORM and 6D Muon Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, A.

    2015-06-01

    The nuSTORM decay ring is a compact racetrack storage ring with a circumference ~480 m using large aperture ($\\phi$ = 60 cm) magnets. The design goal of the ring is to achieve a momentum acceptance of 3.8 $\\pm$10% GeV/c and a phase space acceptance of 2000 $\\mu$m·rad. The design has many challenges because the acceptance will be affected by many nonlinearity terms with large particle emittance and/or large momentum offset. In this paper, we present the application of a meta-heuristic optimization algorithm to the sextupole correction in the ring. The algorithm is capable of finding a balanced compromise among corrections of the nonlinearity terms, and finding the largest acceptance. This technique can be applied to the design of similar storage rings that store beams with wide transverse phase space and momentum spectra. We also present the recent study on the application of this algorithm to a part of the 6D muon cooling channel. The technique and the cooling concept will be applied to design a cooling channel for the extracted muon beam at nuSTORM in the future study.

  18. A practical application for the chemical treatment of Southern California`s reclaimed, Title 22 water for use as makeup water for recirculating cooling water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zakrzewski, J.; Cosulich, J.; Bartling, E.

    1998-12-31

    Pilot cooling water studies conducted at a Southern California landfill/cogeneration station demonstrated a successful chemical treatment program for recirculating cooling water that used unnitrified, reclaimed, Title 22 water as the primary makeup water source. The constituents in the reclaimed water are supplied by variety of residential and waste water sources resulting in a water quality that may vary to a greater degree than domestic water supplies. This water contains high concentrations of orthophosphate, ammonia, chlorides and suspended solids. The impact of which, under cycled conditions is calcium orthophosphate scaling, high corrosion of yellow metal and mild steel, stress cracking of copper alloys and stainless steel and rapidly growing biological activity. A mobile cooling water testing laboratory with two pilot recirculating water systems modeled the cogeneration station`s cooling tower operating conditions and parameters. The tube and shell, tube side cooling heat exchangers were fitted with 443 admiralty, 90/10 copper nickel, 316 stainless steel and 1202 mild steel heat exchanger tubes. Coupons and Corrater electrodes were also installed. A chemical treatment program consisting of 60/40 AA/AMPS copolymer for scale, deposits and dispersion, sodium tolyltriazole for yellow metal corrosion, and a bromination program to control the biological activity was utilized in the pilot systems. Recirculating water orthophosphate concentrations reached levels of 70 mg/L as PO, and ammonia concentrations reached levels of 35 mg/L, as total NH3. The study successfully demonstrated a chemical treatment program to control scale and deposition, minimize admiralty, 90/10 copper nickel and carbon steel corrosion rates, prevent non-heat transfer yellow metal and stainless steel stress cracking, and control the biological activity in this high nutrient water.

  19. A methodology for accident analysis of fusion breeder blankets and its application to helium-cooled lead–lithium blanket

    DOE PAGES

    Panayotov, Dobromir; Poitevin, Yves; Grief, Andrew; ...

    2016-09-23

    'Fusion for Energy' (F4E) is designing, developing, and implementing the European Helium-Cooled Lead-Lithium (HCLL) and Helium-Cooled Pebble-Bed (HCPB) Test Blanket Systems (TBSs) for ITER (Nuclear Facility INB-174). Safety demonstration is an essential element for the integration of these TBSs into ITER and accident analysis is one of its critical components. A systematic approach to accident analysis has been developed under the F4E contract on TBS safety analyses. F4E technical requirements, together with Amec Foster Wheeler and INL efforts, have resulted in a comprehensive methodology for fusion breeding blanket accident analysis that addresses the specificity of the breeding blanket designs, materials,more » and phenomena while remaining consistent with the approach already applied to ITER accident analyses. Furthermore, the methodology phases are illustrated in the paper by its application to the EU HCLL TBS using both MELCOR and RELAP5 codes.« less

  20. A methodology for accident analysis of fusion breeder blankets and its application to helium-cooled lead–lithium blanket

    SciTech Connect

    Panayotov, Dobromir; Poitevin, Yves; Grief, Andrew; Trow, Martin; Dillistone, Michael; Murgatroyd, Julian T.; Owen, Simon; Peers, Karen; Lyons, Alex; Heaton, Adam; Scott, Richard; Merrill, Brad J.; Humrickhouse, Paul

    2016-09-23

    'Fusion for Energy' (F4E) is designing, developing, and implementing the European Helium-Cooled Lead-Lithium (HCLL) and Helium-Cooled Pebble-Bed (HCPB) Test Blanket Systems (TBSs) for ITER (Nuclear Facility INB-174). Safety demonstration is an essential element for the integration of these TBSs into ITER and accident analysis is one of its critical components. A systematic approach to accident analysis has been developed under the F4E contract on TBS safety analyses. F4E technical requirements, together with Amec Foster Wheeler and INL efforts, have resulted in a comprehensive methodology for fusion breeding blanket accident analysis that addresses the specificity of the breeding blanket designs, materials, and phenomena while remaining consistent with the approach already applied to ITER accident analyses. Furthermore, the methodology phases are illustrated in the paper by its application to the EU HCLL TBS using both MELCOR and RELAP5 codes.