Science.gov

Sample records for cooperative sequential adsorption

  1. Random sequential adsorption on fractals.

    PubMed

    Ciesla, Michal; Barbasz, Jakub

    2012-07-28

    Irreversible adsorption of spheres on flat collectors having dimension d < 2 is studied. Molecules are adsorbed on Sierpinski's triangle and carpet-like fractals (1 < d < 2), and on general Cantor set (d < 1). Adsorption process is modeled numerically using random sequential adsorption (RSA) algorithm. The paper concentrates on measurement of fundamental properties of coverages, i.e., maximal random coverage ratio and density autocorrelation function, as well as RSA kinetics. Obtained results allow to improve phenomenological relation between maximal random coverage ratio and collector dimension. Moreover, simulations show that, in general, most of known dimensional properties of adsorbed monolayers are valid for non-integer dimensions.

  2. Random sequential adsorption of trimers and hexamers.

    PubMed

    Cieśla, Michał; Barbasz, Jakub

    2013-12-01

    Adsorption of trimers and hexamers built of identical spheres was studied numerically using the random sequential adsorption (RSA) algorithm. Particles were adsorbed on a two-dimensional, flat and homogeneous surface. Numerical simulations allowed us to determine the maximal random coverage ratio, RSA kinetics as well as the available surface function (ASF), which is crucial for determining the kinetics of the adsorption process obtained experimentally. Additionally, the density autocorrelation function was measured. All the results were compared with previous results obtained for spheres, dimers and tetramers.

  3. Managing numerical errors in random sequential adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieśla, Michał; Nowak, Aleksandra

    2016-09-01

    Aim of this study is to examine the influence of a finite surface size and a finite simulation time on a packing fraction estimated using random sequential adsorption simulations. The goal of particular interest is providing hints on simulation setup to achieve desired level of accuracy. The analysis is based on properties of saturated random packing of disks on continuous and flat surfaces of different sizes.

  4. Random sequential adsorption on partially covered surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Weroński, Paweł

    1998-06-01

    The random sequential adsorption (RSA) approach was used to analyze adsorption of hard spheres at surfaces precovered with smaller sized particles. Numerical simulations were performed to determine the available surface function φl of larger particles for various particle size ratios λ=al/as and surface concentration of smaller particles θs. It was found that the numerical results were in a reasonable agreement with the formula stemming from the scaled particle theory with the modification for the sphere/sphere geometry. Particle adsorption kinetics was also determined in terms of the RSA simulations. By extrapolating the θl vs τ-1/2 dependencies, the jamming concentrations of larger spheres θl∞ were determined as a function of the initial smaller sphere concentration. It was found that θl∞ were considerably reduced by the presence of smaller sized particles, especially for λ≫1. The pair correlation function g of larger particles in the jamming state was also determined, showing more short range ordering (at the same θl) in comparison with monodisperse systems. The theoretical predictions stemming from our calculations suggest that the presence of trace amounts of very small particles may exert a decisive influence on adsorption of larger particles.

  5. Random sequential adsorption on imprecise lattice.

    PubMed

    Privman, Vladimir; Yan, Han

    2016-06-28

    We report a surprising result, established by numerical simulations and analytical arguments for a one-dimensional lattice model of random sequential adsorption, that even an arbitrarily small imprecision in the lattice-site localization changes the convergence to jamming from fast, exponential, to slow, power-law, with, for some parameter values, a discontinuous jump in the jamming coverage value. This finding has implications for irreversible deposition on patterned substrates with pre-made landing sites for particle attachment. We also consider a general problem of the particle (depositing object) size not an exact multiple of the lattice spacing, and the lattice sites themselves imprecise, broadened into allowed-deposition intervals. Regions of exponential vs. power-law convergence to jamming are identified, and certain conclusions regarding the jamming coverage are argued for analytically and confirmed numerically. PMID:27369530

  6. Random sequential adsorption on imprecise lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privman, Vladimir; Yan, Han

    2016-06-01

    We report a surprising result, established by numerical simulations and analytical arguments for a one-dimensional lattice model of random sequential adsorption, that even an arbitrarily small imprecision in the lattice-site localization changes the convergence to jamming from fast, exponential, to slow, power-law, with, for some parameter values, a discontinuous jump in the jamming coverage value. This finding has implications for irreversible deposition on patterned substrates with pre-made landing sites for particle attachment. We also consider a general problem of the particle (depositing object) size not an exact multiple of the lattice spacing, and the lattice sites themselves imprecise, broadened into allowed-deposition intervals. Regions of exponential vs. power-law convergence to jamming are identified, and certain conclusions regarding the jamming coverage are argued for analytically and confirmed numerically.

  7. Ligand Binding to Macromolecules: Allosteric and Sequential Models of Cooperativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, V. L.; Szabo, Attila

    1979-01-01

    A simple model is described for the binding of ligands to macromolecules. The model is applied to the cooperative binding by hemoglobin and aspartate transcarbamylase. The sequential and allosteric models of cooperative binding are considered. (BB)

  8. Cooperation induced by random sequential exclusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kun; Cong, Rui; Wang, Long

    2016-06-01

    Social exclusion is a common and powerful tool to penalize deviators in human societies, and thus to effectively elevate collaborative efforts. Current models on the evolution of exclusion behaviors mostly assume that each peer excluder independently makes the decision to expel the defectors, but has no idea what others in the group would do or how the actual punishment effect will be. Thus, a more realistic model, random sequential exclusion, is proposed. In this mechanism, each excluder has to pay an extra scheduling cost and then all the excluders are arranged in a random order to implement the exclusion actions. If one free rider has already been excluded by an excluder, the remaining excluders will not participate in expelling this defector. We find that this mechanism can help stabilize cooperation under more unfavorable conditions than the normal peer exclusion can do, either in well-mixed population or on social networks. However, too large a scheduling cost may undermine the advantage of this mechanism. Our work validates the fact that collaborative practice among punishers plays an important role in further boosting cooperation.

  9. Sequential anaerobic-adsorption treatment of chemical industry wastewater.

    PubMed

    Daga, Kailash; Pallavi, V; Patel, Dharmendra

    2011-10-01

    Treatment technologies needed to reduce the pollutant load of chemical industry effluent have been found to involve exorbitantly high costs. The present investigation aimed to treat the wastewater from chemical industry by cost effective sequential anaerobic-adsorption treatment. Wastewaters from chemical industry that are rich in biodegradable organics are tested for anaerobic treatability. The efficiency of anaerobic reactor is relatively lower 79.3%, and therefore post treatment of effluent was done by adsorption using Poly vinyl alcohol coated Datura stramonium (PVAC-DS) as an adsorbent. An overall COD removal of 93.8 % was achieved after sequential Anaerobic-Adsorption treatment, which lead to a better final effluent and a more economical treatment system. PMID:23505831

  10. Sequential anaerobic-adsorption treatment of chemical industry wastewater.

    PubMed

    Daga, Kailash; Pallavi, V; Patel, Dharmendra

    2011-10-01

    Treatment technologies needed to reduce the pollutant load of chemical industry effluent have been found to involve exorbitantly high costs. The present investigation aimed to treat the wastewater from chemical industry by cost effective sequential anaerobic-adsorption treatment. Wastewaters from chemical industry that are rich in biodegradable organics are tested for anaerobic treatability. The efficiency of anaerobic reactor is relatively lower 79.3%, and therefore post treatment of effluent was done by adsorption using Poly vinyl alcohol coated Datura stramonium (PVAC-DS) as an adsorbent. An overall COD removal of 93.8 % was achieved after sequential Anaerobic-Adsorption treatment, which lead to a better final effluent and a more economical treatment system.

  11. Random sequential adsorption of spheroidal particles: Kinetics and jamming limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Weroński, Paweł

    1996-10-01

    Localized adsorption of hard (noninteracting) spheroidal particles on homogeneous interfaces was analyzed theoretically. In contrast to previous studies concentrated on flat (side on) adsorption in the present approach an unoriented (quasi-three-dimensional) adsorption of prolate and oblate spheroids was considered. By applying the random sequential adsorption (RSA) approach asymptotic analytic expressions were derived for the available surface function (surface blocking parameter) and adsorption kinetics in the limit of low and moderate surface concentrations. The range of validity of the approximate analytical results was determined by numerical simulations of adsorption kinetics performed using the Monte Carlo RSA technique. It was revealed by this comparison that the analytical approximation can be used with a good accuracy for the dimensionless adsorption time τ smaller than two. The numerical calculations also enabled us to determine the maximum (jamming) surface concentrations for unoriented adsorption of spheroids as a function of the elongation or flattening parameter A. It was demonstrated that these jamming concentrations θ∞ are approached for long adsorption times as τ-1/4, therefore deviating considerably from the Langmuir model used often in the literature.

  12. Sequential and competitive adsorption of peptides at pendant PEO layers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiangming; Ryder, Matthew P; McGuire, Joseph; Snider, Joshua L; Schilke, Karl F

    2015-06-01

    Earlier work provided direction for development of responsive drug delivery systems based on modulation of the structure, amphiphilicity, and surface density of bioactive peptides entrapped within pendant polyethylene oxide (PEO) brush layers. In this work, we describe the sequential and competitive adsorption behavior of such peptides at pendant PEO layers. Three cationic peptides were used for this purpose: the arginine-rich, amphiphilic peptide WLBU2, a peptide chemically identical to WLBU2 but of scrambled sequence (S-WLBU2), and the non-amphiphilic peptide poly-L-arginine (PLR). Optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy (OWLS) was used to quantify the rate and extent of peptide adsorption and elution at surfaces coated with PEO. UV spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) were used to quantify the extent of peptide exchange during the course of sequential and competitive adsorption. Circular dichroism (CD) was used to evaluate conformational changes after adsorption of peptide mixtures at PEO-coated silica nanoparticles. Results indicated that amphiphilic peptides are able to displace adsorbed, non-amphiphilic peptides in PEO layers, while non-amphiphilic peptides were not able to displace more amphiphilic peptides. In addition, peptides of greater amphiphilicity dominated the adsorption at the PEO layer from mixtures with less amphiphilic or non-amphiphilic peptides.

  13. Sequential programmable self-assembly: Role of cooperative interactions.

    PubMed

    Halverson, Jonathan D; Tkachenko, Alexei V

    2016-03-01

    We propose a general strategy of "sequential programmable self-assembly" that enables a bottom-up design of arbitrary multi-particle architectures on nano- and microscales. We show that a naive realization of this scheme, based on the pairwise additive interactions between particles, has fundamental limitations that lead to a relatively high error rate. This can be overcome by using cooperative interparticle binding. The cooperativity is a well known feature of many biochemical processes, responsible, e.g., for signaling and regulations in living systems. Here we propose to utilize a similar strategy for high precision self-assembly, and show that DNA-mediated interactions provide a convenient platform for its implementation. In particular, we outline a specific design of a DNA-based complex which we call "DNA spider," that acts as a smart interparticle linker and provides a built-in cooperativity of binding. We demonstrate versatility of the sequential self-assembly based on spider-functionalized particles by designing several mesostructures of increasing complexity and simulating their assembly process. This includes a number of finite and repeating structures, in particular, the so-called tetrahelix and its several derivatives. Due to its generality, this approach allows one to design and successfully self-assemble virtually any structure made of a "GEOMAG" magnetic construction toy, out of nanoparticles. According to our results, once the binding cooperativity is strong enough, the sequential self-assembly becomes essentially error-free.

  14. Sequential programmable self-assembly: Role of cooperative interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halverson, Jonathan D.; Tkachenko, Alexei V.

    2016-03-01

    We propose a general strategy of "sequential programmable self-assembly" that enables a bottom-up design of arbitrary multi-particle architectures on nano- and microscales. We show that a naive realization of this scheme, based on the pairwise additive interactions between particles, has fundamental limitations that lead to a relatively high error rate. This can be overcome by using cooperative interparticle binding. The cooperativity is a well known feature of many biochemical processes, responsible, e.g., for signaling and regulations in living systems. Here we propose to utilize a similar strategy for high precision self-assembly, and show that DNA-mediated interactions provide a convenient platform for its implementation. In particular, we outline a specific design of a DNA-based complex which we call "DNA spider," that acts as a smart interparticle linker and provides a built-in cooperativity of binding. We demonstrate versatility of the sequential self-assembly based on spider-functionalized particles by designing several mesostructures of increasing complexity and simulating their assembly process. This includes a number of finite and repeating structures, in particular, the so-called tetrahelix and its several derivatives. Due to its generality, this approach allows one to design and successfully self-assemble virtually any structure made of a "GEOMAG" magnetic construction toy, out of nanoparticles. According to our results, once the binding cooperativity is strong enough, the sequential self-assembly becomes essentially error-free.

  15. Random sequential adsorption of n-star objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelke, Pradip B.

    2016-02-01

    Random sequential adsorption (RSA) of n-star objects (consisting of n arms of equal lengths l, originating radially outward from the center with a uniform angular spacing of 2π/n) on a two-dimensional continuum substrate is studied. For all the values of n ranging from 3 to 200, the dynamics of adsorption is found to follow a power law ρ(∞) - ρ(t) ∼ t- p, where ρ(∞) and ρ(t) are respectively saturated and instantaneous number densities of the adsorbed objects. The exponent p is found to increase monotonically with n but still remains significantly lower than 0.5, the exponent for RSA of circular discs, indicating that RSA dynamics of this class of objects is totally different than that of circular discs. The exponent p does not follow the law p = 1/df, where df is degrees of freedom of the object. Also ρ(∞) reveals a systematic n dependence and an attempt is made to understand the same. Analytical and simulation results are found to be in fair agreement, however the treatment given is based on crude approximation and more profound theory is to be sought for better understanding of the dynamics of the process.

  16. Sequential programmable self-assembly: Role of cooperative interactions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jonathan D. Halverson; Tkachenko, Alexei V.

    2016-03-04

    Here, we propose a general strategy of “sequential programmable self-assembly” that enables a bottom-up design of arbitrary multi-particle architectures on nano- and microscales. We show that a naive realization of this scheme, based on the pairwise additive interactions between particles, has fundamental limitations that lead to a relatively high error rate. This can be overcome by using cooperative interparticle binding. The cooperativity is a well known feature of many biochemical processes, responsible, e.g., for signaling and regulations in living systems. Here we propose to utilize a similar strategy for high precision self-assembly, and show that DNA-mediated interactions provide a convenientmore » platform for its implementation. In particular, we outline a specific design of a DNA-based complex which we call “DNA spider,” that acts as a smart interparticle linker and provides a built-in cooperativity of binding. We demonstrate versatility of the sequential self-assembly based on spider-functionalized particles by designing several mesostructures of increasing complexity and simulating their assembly process. This includes a number of finite and repeating structures, in particular, the so-called tetrahelix and its several derivatives. Due to its generality, this approach allows one to design and successfully self-assemble virtually any structure made of a “GEOMAG” magnetic construction toy, out of nanoparticles. According to our results, once the binding cooperativity is strong enough, the sequential self-assembly becomes essentially error-free.« less

  17. Scaling behavior of jamming fluctuations upon random sequential adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loscar, E. S.; Borzi, R. A.; Albano, E. V.

    2003-11-01

    It is shown that the fluctuations of the jamming coverage upon Random Sequential Adsorption (RSA) (σ_{θ_J}), decay with the lattice size according to the power-law σ_{θ_J} ∝ L^{-1/νJ}, with νJ = 2/2D - d_f,where D is the dimension of the substrate and d_f is the fractal dimension of the set of sites belonging to the substrate where the RSA process actually takes place. This result is in excellent agreement with the figure recently reported by Vandewalle et al. [Eur. Phys. J. B 14, 407 (2000)], namely νJ = 1.0 ± 0.1 for the RSA of needles with D = 2 and d_f = 2, that gives νJ = 1. Furthermore, our prediction is in excellent agreement with different previous numerical results. The derived relationships are also confirmed by means of extensive numerical simulations applied to the RSA of dimers on both stochastic and deterministic fractal substrates.

  18. Use of model solutions in random sequential adsorption on a lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Y.; Percus, J.K. )

    1991-09-23

    We consider random sequential adsorption on a lattice. We use analytical results on the Bethe lattice and cactus as references to develop systematic perturbationlike expansions which are very rapidly convergent. The latter produces the jamming density of a square lattice with an accuracy within 10{sup {minus}5}. This expansion is based on both physical and mathematical considerations and is not restricted to random sequential adsorption.

  19. Random sequential adsorption of polydisperse mixtures on lattices.

    PubMed

    Hart, R C; Aarão Reis, F D A

    2016-08-01

    Random sequential adsorption of linear and square particles with excluded volume interaction is studied numerically on planar lattices considering Gaussian distributions of lateral sizes of the incident particles, with several values of the average μ and of the width-to-average ratio w. When the coverage θ is plotted as function of the logarithm of time t, the maximum slope is attained at a time t_{M} of the same order of the time τ of incidence of one monolayer, which is related to the molecular flux and/or sticking coefficients. For various μ and w, we obtain 1.5τ

  20. Random sequential adsorption of polydisperse mixtures on lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, R. C.; Aarão Reis, F. D. A.

    2016-08-01

    Random sequential adsorption of linear and square particles with excluded volume interaction is studied numerically on planar lattices considering Gaussian distributions of lateral sizes of the incident particles, with several values of the average μ and of the width-to-average ratio w . When the coverage θ is plotted as function of the logarithm of time t , the maximum slope is attained at a time tM of the same order of the time τ of incidence of one monolayer, which is related to the molecular flux and/or sticking coefficients. For various μ and w , we obtain 1.5 τ

  1. Cooperation within von Willebrand factors enhances adsorption mechanism.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Maziar; Mehrbod, Mehrdad; Ejtehadi, Mohammad Reza; Mofrad, Mohammad R K

    2015-08-01

    von Willebrand factor (VWF) is a naturally collapsed protein that participates in primary haemostasis and coagulation events. The clotting process is triggered by the adsorption and conformational changes of the plasma VWFs localized to the collagen fibres found near the site of injury. We develop coarse-grained models to simulate the adsorption dynamics of VWF flowing near the adhesive collagen fibres at different shear rates and investigate the effect of factors such as interaction and cooperativity of VWFs on the success of adsorption events. The adsorption probability of a flowing VWF confined to the receptor field is enhanced when it encounters an adhered VWF in proximity to the collagen receptors. This enhancement is observed within a wide range of shear rates and is mostly controlled by the attractive van der Waals interactions rather than the hydrodynamic interactions among VWF monomers. The cooperativity between the VWFs acts as an effective mechanism for enhancing VWF adsorption to the collagen fibres. Additionally, this implies that the adsorption of such molecules is nonlinearly dependent on the density of flowing VWFs. These findings are important for studies of primary haemostasis as well as general adsorption dynamics processes in polymer physics.

  2. Jamming and percolation in generalized models of random sequential adsorption of linear k -mers on a square lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebovka, Nikolai I.; Tarasevich, Yuri Yu.; Dubinin, Dmitri O.; Laptev, Valeri V.; Vygornitskii, Nikolai V.

    2015-12-01

    The jamming and percolation for two generalized models of random sequential adsorption (RSA) of linear k -mers (particles occupying k adjacent sites) on a square lattice are studied by means of Monte Carlo simulation. The classical RSA model assumes the absence of overlapping of the new incoming particle with the previously deposited ones. The first model is a generalized variant of the RSA model for both k -mers and a lattice with defects. Some of the occupying k adjacent sites are considered as insulating and some of the lattice sites are occupied by defects (impurities). For this model even a small concentration of defects can inhibit percolation for relatively long k -mers. The second model is the cooperative sequential adsorption one where, for each new k -mer, only a restricted number of lateral contacts z with previously deposited k -mers is allowed. Deposition occurs in the case when z ≤(1 -d ) zm where zm=2 (k +1 ) is the maximum numbers of the contacts of k -mer, and d is the fraction of forbidden contacts. Percolation is observed only at some interval kmin≤k ≤kmax where the values kmin and kmax depend upon the fraction of forbidden contacts d . The value kmax decreases as d increases. A logarithmic dependence of the type log10(kmax) =a +b d , where a =4.04 ±0.22 ,b =-4.93 ±0.57 , is obtained.

  3. Random sequential adsorption of human adenovirus 2 onto polyvinylidene fluoride surface influenced by extracellular polymeric substances.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ruiqing; Li, Qi; Nguyen, Thanh H

    2016-03-15

    Virus removal by membrane bioreactors depends on virus-membrane and virus-foulant interactions. The adsorption of human adenovirus 2 (HAdV-2) on polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane and a major membrane foulant, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), were measured in a quartz crystal microbalance. In 3-100mM CaCl2 solutions, irreversible adsorption of HAdV-2 was observed on both pristine and EPS-fouled PVDF surfaces. The HAdV-2 adsorption kinetics was successfully fitted with the random sequential adsorption (RSA) model. The applicability of the RSA model for HAdV-2 adsorption is confirmed by comparing the two fitting parameters, adsorption rate constant k(a) and area occupied by each adsorbed HAdV-2 particle a, with experimentally measured parameters. A linear correlation between the fitting parameter k(a) and the measured attachment efficiency was found, suggesting that the RSA model correctly describes the interaction forces dominating the HAdV-2 adsorption. By comparing the fitting parameter d(ads) with the hydrodynamic diameter of HAdV-2, we conclude that virus-virus and virus-surface interactions determine the area occupied by each adsorbed HAdV-2 particle, and thus influence the adsorption capacity. These results provide insights into virus retention and will benefit improving virus removal in membrane filtration.

  4. Random sequential adsorption of human adenovirus 2 onto polyvinylidene fluoride surface influenced by extracellular polymeric substances.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ruiqing; Li, Qi; Nguyen, Thanh H

    2016-03-15

    Virus removal by membrane bioreactors depends on virus-membrane and virus-foulant interactions. The adsorption of human adenovirus 2 (HAdV-2) on polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane and a major membrane foulant, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), were measured in a quartz crystal microbalance. In 3-100mM CaCl2 solutions, irreversible adsorption of HAdV-2 was observed on both pristine and EPS-fouled PVDF surfaces. The HAdV-2 adsorption kinetics was successfully fitted with the random sequential adsorption (RSA) model. The applicability of the RSA model for HAdV-2 adsorption is confirmed by comparing the two fitting parameters, adsorption rate constant k(a) and area occupied by each adsorbed HAdV-2 particle a, with experimentally measured parameters. A linear correlation between the fitting parameter k(a) and the measured attachment efficiency was found, suggesting that the RSA model correctly describes the interaction forces dominating the HAdV-2 adsorption. By comparing the fitting parameter d(ads) with the hydrodynamic diameter of HAdV-2, we conclude that virus-virus and virus-surface interactions determine the area occupied by each adsorbed HAdV-2 particle, and thus influence the adsorption capacity. These results provide insights into virus retention and will benefit improving virus removal in membrane filtration. PMID:26720514

  5. Continuum random sequential adsorption of polymer on a flat and homogeneous surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieśla, Michał

    2013-05-01

    Random sequential adsorption (RSA) of polymer, modeled as a chain of identical spheres, is systematically studied. In order to control precisely anisotropy and number of degrees of freedom, two different kinds of polymers are used. In the first one, monomers are placed along a straight line, whereas in the second, relative orientations of particles are random. Such polymers fill a flat homogeneous surface randomly. The paper focuses on maximal random coverage ratio and adsorption kinetics dependence on polymer size, shape anisotropy, and numbers of degrees of freedom. Obtained results were discussed and compared with other numerical experiments and theoretical predictions.

  6. Sequential treatment of olive oil mill wastewater with adsorption and biological and photo-Fenton oxidation.

    PubMed

    Aytar, Pınar; Gedikli, Serap; Sam, Mesut; Farizoğlu, Burhanettin; Çabuk, Ahmet

    2013-05-01

    Olive oil mill wastewater (OMWW), a recalcitrant pollutant, has features including high phenolic content and dark color; thereby, several chemical or physical treatments or biological processes were not able to remediate it. In this study, the treatment efficiencies of three treatments, including adsorption, biological application, and photo-Fenton oxidation were sequentially evaluated for OMWW. Adsorption, biological treatment, and photo-Fenton caused decreasing phenolic contents of 48.69 %, 59.40 %, and 95 %, respectively. However, after three sequential treatments were performed, higher reduction percentages in phenolic (total 99 %) and organic contents (90 %) were observed. Although the studied fungus has not induced significant color reduction, photo-Fenton oxidation was considered to be an attractive solution, especially for color reduction. Besides, toxicity of OMWW treatment was significantly reduced. PMID:23054778

  7. Sequential treatment of olive oil mill wastewater with adsorption and biological and photo-Fenton oxidation.

    PubMed

    Aytar, Pınar; Gedikli, Serap; Sam, Mesut; Farizoğlu, Burhanettin; Çabuk, Ahmet

    2013-05-01

    Olive oil mill wastewater (OMWW), a recalcitrant pollutant, has features including high phenolic content and dark color; thereby, several chemical or physical treatments or biological processes were not able to remediate it. In this study, the treatment efficiencies of three treatments, including adsorption, biological application, and photo-Fenton oxidation were sequentially evaluated for OMWW. Adsorption, biological treatment, and photo-Fenton caused decreasing phenolic contents of 48.69 %, 59.40 %, and 95 %, respectively. However, after three sequential treatments were performed, higher reduction percentages in phenolic (total 99 %) and organic contents (90 %) were observed. Although the studied fungus has not induced significant color reduction, photo-Fenton oxidation was considered to be an attractive solution, especially for color reduction. Besides, toxicity of OMWW treatment was significantly reduced.

  8. Sequential shape-selective adsorption and photocatalytic transformation of acrylonitrile production wastewater.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yunrong; Song, Yonghui; Tu, Xiang; Jiang, Yanpeng; Yuan, Yu

    2015-11-15

    Acrylonitrile production wastewater has been widely recognized as one type of refractory organic wastewater because of its complicated composition and low bioavailability. It usually contains plenty of micromolecular nitrile and pyridine, resulting in high chemical oxygen demand (CODCr), total organic carbon (TOC) and total nitrogen (TN) concentrations. In this study, a novel microporous zeolite, CS-Z1, was developed as an adsorbent for rapidly shape-selective adsorption of the micromolecular pollutants from the acrylonitrile production wastewater, and a visible light-driven Ti-β-Bi2O3 photocatalysis was introduced to sequentially treat the residual macromolecular pollutants for complete purification. The adsorption processes by CS-Z1 were mostly achieved within the first 5 min, and the equilibrium was reached quickly after 30 min, where the CODCr, TOC and TN removal efficiencies of the wastewater were as high as 93.5%, 92.2% and 96.8%, respectively, much higher than those by other adsorbents. Furthermore, the adsorption efficiencies of CS-Z1 were barely affected by the variation of pH value and temperature, which was mainly attributed to the shape-selective adsorption mechanism of the CS-Z1 zeolite. The Ti-β-Bi2O3 photocatalysis could remove more than 95% of the residual macromolecular pollutants in the wastewater, where a synergistic mechanism of reduction-oxidation/polymerization was proposed. In a 108 h of CS-Z1 adsorption and Ti-β-Bi2O3 photocatalysis sequential process, the CODCr, TOC and TN concentrations was reduced to below 20, 7 and 5 mg L(-1), respectively, demonstrating the excellent practical potential of the sequential treatment system for acrylonitrile production wastewater.

  9. Study of random sequential adsorption by means of the gradient method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loscar, E. S.; Guisoni, N.; Albano, E. V.

    2012-02-01

    By using the gradient method (GM) we study random sequential adsorption (RSA) processes in two dimensions under a gradient constraint that is imposed on the adsorption probability along one axis of the sample. The GM has previously been applied successfully to absorbing phase transitions (both first and second order), and also to the percolation transition. Now, we show that by using the GM the two transitions involved in RSA processes, namely percolation and jamming, can be studied simultaneously by means of the same set of simulations and by using the same theoretical background. For this purpose we theoretically derive the relevant scaling relationships for the RSA of monomers and we tested our analytical results by means of numerical simulations performed upon RSA of both monomers and dimers. We also show that two differently defined interfaces, which run in the direction perpendicular to the axis where the adsorption probability gradient is applied and separate the high-density (large-adsorption probability) and the low-density (low-adsorption probability) regimes, capture the main features of the jamming and percolation transitions, respectively. According to the GM, the scaling behaviour of those interfaces is governed by the roughness exponent α = 1/(1 + ν), where ν is the suitable correlation length exponent. Besides, we present and discuss in a brief overview some achievements of the GM as applied to different physical situations, including a comparison of the critical exponents determined in the present paper with those already published in the literature.

  10. Jamming and percolation in generalized models of random sequential adsorption of linear k-mers on a square lattice.

    PubMed

    Lebovka, Nikolai I; Tarasevich, Yuri Yu; Dubinin, Dmitri O; Laptev, Valeri V; Vygornitskii, Nikolai V

    2015-12-01

    The jamming and percolation for two generalized models of random sequential adsorption (RSA) of linear k-mers (particles occupying k adjacent sites) on a square lattice are studied by means of Monte Carlo simulation. The classical RSA model assumes the absence of overlapping of the new incoming particle with the previously deposited ones. The first model is a generalized variant of the RSA model for both k-mers and a lattice with defects. Some of the occupying k adjacent sites are considered as insulating and some of the lattice sites are occupied by defects (impurities). For this model even a small concentration of defects can inhibit percolation for relatively long k-mers. The second model is the cooperative sequential adsorption one where, for each new k-mer, only a restricted number of lateral contacts z with previously deposited k-mers is allowed. Deposition occurs in the case when z≤(1-d)z(m) where z(m)=2(k+1) is the maximum numbers of the contacts of k-mer, and d is the fraction of forbidden contacts. Percolation is observed only at some interval k(min)≤k≤k(max) where the values k(min) and k(max) depend upon the fraction of forbidden contacts d. The value k(max) decreases as d increases. A logarithmic dependence of the type log(10)(k(max))=a+bd, where a=4.04±0.22,b=-4.93±0.57, is obtained. PMID:26764641

  11. Generalized Random Sequential Adsorption on Erdős-Rényi Random Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhara, Souvik; van Leeuwaarden, Johan S. H.; Mukherjee, Debankur

    2016-09-01

    We investigate random sequential adsorption (RSA) on a random graph via the following greedy algorithm: Order the n vertices at random, and sequentially declare each vertex either active or frozen, depending on some local rule in terms of the state of the neighboring vertices. The classical RSA rule declares a vertex active if none of its neighbors is, in which case the set of active nodes forms an independent set of the graph. We generalize this nearest-neighbor blocking rule in three ways and apply it to the Erdős-Rényi random graph. We consider these generalizations in the large-graph limit n→ ∞ and characterize the jamming constant, the limiting proportion of active vertices in the maximal greedy set.

  12. Percolation in random sequential adsorption of extended objects on a triangular lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budinski-Petković, Lj.; Lončarević, I.; Petković, M.; Jakšić, Z. M.; Vrhovac, S. B.

    2012-06-01

    The percolation aspect of random sequential adsorption of extended objects on a triangular lattice is studied by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The depositing objects are formed by self-avoiding lattice steps on the lattice. Jamming coverage θjam, percolation threshold θp*, and their ratio θp*/θjam are determined for objects of various shapes and sizes. We find that the percolation threshold θp* may decrease or increase with the object size, depending on the local geometry of the objects. We demonstrate that for various objects of the same length, the threshold θp* of more compact shapes exceeds the θp* of elongated ones. In addition, we study polydisperse mixtures in which the size of line segments making up the mixture gradually increases with the number of components. It is found that the percolation threshold decreases, while the jamming coverage increases, with the number of components in the mixture.

  13. Applicability of random sequential adsorption algorithm for simulation of surface plasma polishing kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minárik, Stanislav; Vaňa, Dušan

    2015-11-01

    Applicability of random sequential adsorption (RSA) model for the material removal during a surface plasma polishing is discussed. The mechanical nature of plasma polishing process is taken into consideration in modified version of RSA model. During the plasma polishing the surface layer is aligned such that molecules of material are removed from the surface mechanically as a consequence of the surface deformation induced by plasma particles impact. We propose modification of RSA technique to describe the reduction of material on the surface provided that sequential character of molecules release from the surface is maintained throughout the polishing process. This empirical model is able to estimate depth profile of material density on the surface during the plasma polishing. We have shown that preliminary results obtained from this model are in good agreement with experimental results. We believe that molecular dynamics simulation of the polishing process, possibly also other types of surface treatment, can be based on this model. However influence of material parameters and processing conditions (including plasma characteristics) must be taken into account using appropriate model variables.

  14. Random sequential adsorption with two components: asymptotic analysis and finite size effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeve, Louise; Wattis, Jonathan A. D.

    2015-06-01

    We consider the model of random sequential adsorption (RSA) in which two lengths of rod-like polymer compete for binding on a long straight rigid one-dimensional substrate. We take all lengths to be discrete, assume that binding is irreversible, and short or long polymers are chosen at random with some probability. We consider both the cases where the polymers have similar lengths and when the lengths are vastly different. We use a combination of numerical simulations, computation and asymptotic analysis to study the adsorption process, specifically, analysing how competition between the two polymer lengths affects the final coverage, and how the coverage depends on the relative sizes of the two species and their relative binding rates. We find that the final coverage is always higher than in the one-species RSA, and that the highest coverage is achieved when the rate of binding of the longer polymer is higher. We find that for many binding rates and relative lengths of binding species, the coverage due to the shorter species decreases with increasing substrate length, although there is a small region of parameter space in which all coverages increase with substrate length.

  15. Structure and adsorption properties of a porous cooper hexacyanoferrate polymorph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roque-Malherbe, R.; Carballo, E.; Polanco, R.; Lugo, F.; Lozano, C.

    2015-11-01

    The key questions addressed here were: the structure elucidation and the investigation of the adsorption space and framework expansion effect of a Cu(II) hexacyanoferrate (III) polymorph (labeled Cu-PBA-I). The structural analysis was performed with a broad set of characterization methods. Additionally, a low and high pressure carbon dioxide adsorption investigation was performed, assuming, to comprehend the adsorption experiments, that the adsorbent plus the adsorbed phase were a solid solution. We concluded: that the Cu-PBA-I presented the following composition, K1/4 Cu (II)[ Fe (III)(CN)6 ] 3 / 4⋄1/4 nH2 O , exhibited an antiferromagnetic behavior and displayed a thermally stable I 4 bar m 2 space group lattice in the degassed state. Moreover, the low pressure adsorption study allowed the calculation of the micropore volume, W=0.09 cm3/g and the isosteric heat of adsorption, qiso=19 kJ/mol; further, the high pressure adsorption data revealed an extremely high adsorption capacity owing to a framework expansion effect. Finally, the DRIFTS spectrum of adsorbed CO2 displayed peaks corresponding to carbon dioxide physically adsorbed and interacting with electron accepting Lewis acid sites. Hence, was produced an excellent adsorbent which combine porosity and anti-ferromagnetism, antagonist properties rarely found together.

  16. Fluctuations of jamming coverage upon random sequential adsorption on homogeneous and heterogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loscar, Ernesto S.; Borzi, Rodolfo A.; Albano, Ezequiel V.

    2003-10-01

    The fluctuations of the jamming coverage upon random sequential adsorption (RSA) are studied using both analytical and numerical techniques. Our main result shows that these fluctuations (characterized by σθJ) decay with the lattice size according to the power law σθJ∝L-1/ν. The exponent ν depends on the dimensionality D of the substrate and the fractal dimension of the set where the RSA process actually takes place (df) according to ν=2/(2D-df). This theoretical result is confirmed by means of extensive numerical simulations applied to the RSA of dimers on homogeneous and stochastic fractal substrates. Furthermore, our predictions are in excellent agreement with different previous numerical results. It is also shown that, studying correlated stochastic processes, one can define various fluctuating quantities designed to capture either the underlying physics of individual processes or that of the whole system. So, subtle differences in the definitions may lead to dramatically different physical interpretations of the results. Here, this statement is demonstrated for the case of RSA of dimers on binary alloys.

  17. Random sequential adsorption of straight rigid rods on a simple cubic lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, G. D.; Sanchez-Varretti, F. O.; Centres, P. M.; Ramirez-Pastor, A. J.

    2015-10-01

    Random sequential adsorption of straight rigid rods of length k (k-mers) on a simple cubic lattice has been studied by numerical simulations and finite-size scaling analysis. The k-mers were irreversibly and isotropically deposited into the lattice. The calculations were performed by using a new theoretical scheme, whose accuracy was verified by comparison with rigorous analytical data. The results, obtained for k ranging from 2 to 64, revealed that (i) the jamming coverage for dimers (k = 2) is θj = 0.918388(16) . Our result corrects the previously reported value of θj = 0.799(2) (Tarasevich and Cherkasova, 2007); (ii) θj exhibits a decreasing function when it is plotted in terms of the k-mer size, being θj(∞) = 0.4045(19) the value of the limit coverage for large k's; and (iii) the ratio between percolation threshold and jamming coverage shows a non-universal behavior, monotonically decreasing to zero with increasing k.

  18. Simulation study of anisotropic random sequential adsorption of extended objects on a triangular lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budinski-Petković, Lj.; Lončarević, I.; Jakšić, Z. M.; Vrhovac, S. B.; Švrakić, N. M.

    2011-11-01

    The properties of the anisotropic random sequential adsorption (RSA) of objects of various shapes on a two-dimensional triangular lattice are studied numerically by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The depositing objects are formed by self-avoiding lattice steps, whereby the first step determines the orientation of the object. Anisotropy is introduced by positing unequal probabilities for orientation of depositing objects along different directions of the lattice. This probability is equal p or (1-p)/2, depending on whether the randomly chosen orientation is horizontal or not, respectively. Approach of the coverage θ(t) to the jamming limit θjam is found to be exponential θjam-θ(t)∝exp(-t/σ), for all probabilities p. It was shown that the relaxation time σ increases with the degree of anisotropy in the case of elongated and asymmetrical shapes. However, for rounded and symmetrical shapes, values of σ and θjam are not affected by the presence of anisotropy. We finally analyze the properties of the anisotropic RSA of polydisperse mixtures of k-mers. Strong dependencies of the parameter σ and the jamming coverage θjam on the degree of anisotropy are obtained. It is found that anisotropic constraints lead to the increased contribution of the longer k-mers in the total coverage fraction of the mixture.

  19. Feasibility of bioengineered two-stages sequential batch reactor and filtration-adsorption process for complex agrochemical effluent.

    PubMed

    Manekar, Pravin; Biswas, Rima; Urewar, Chaitali; Pal, Sukdeb; Nandy, Tapas

    2013-11-01

    In the present study, the feasibility of a bioengineered two-stages sequential batch reactor (BTSSBR) followed by filtration-adsorption process was investigated to treat the agrochemical effluent by overcoming factor affecting process stability such as microbial imbalance and substrate sensitivity. An air stripper stripped 90% of toxic ammonia, and combined with other streams for bio-oxidation and filtration-adsorption. The BTSSBR system achieved bio-oxidation at 6 days hydraulic retention time by fending off microbial imbalance and substrate sensitivity. The maximum reduction in COD and BOD by heterotrophic bacteria in the first reactor was 87% and 90%, respectively. Removal of toxic ammoniacal-nitrogen by autotrophic bacteria in a post-second stage bio-oxidation was 97%. The optimum filtration and adsorption of pollutants were achieved at a filtration rate of 10 and 9 m(3)m(-2)h(-1), respectively. The treatment scheme comprising air stripper, BTSSBR and filtration-adsorption process showed a great promise for treating the agrochemical effluent.

  20. Sequential adsorption of an irreversibly adsorbed nonionic surfactant and an anionic surfactant at an oil/aqueous interface.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Stephanie M; Anna, Shelley L; Walker, Lynn M

    2015-04-14

    Aerosol-OT (AOT) and Tween 80 are two of the main surfactants in commercial dispersants used in response to oil spills. Understanding how multicomponent surfactant systems interact at oil/aqueous interfaces is crucial for improving both dispersant design and application efficacy. This is true of many multicomponent formulations; a lack of understanding of competition for the oil/water interface hinders formulation optimization. In this study, we have characterized the sequential adsorption behavior of AOT on squalane/aqueous interfaces that have been precoated with Tween 80. A microtensiometer is used to measure the dynamic interfacial tension of the system. Tween 80 either partially or completely irreversibly adsorbs to squalane/aqueous interfaces when rinsed with deionized water. These Tween 80 coated interfaces are then exposed to AOT. AOT adsorption increases with AOT concentration for all Tween 80 coverages, and the resulting steady-state interfacial tension values are interpreted using a Langmuir isotherm model. In the presence of 0.5 M NaCl, AOT adsorption significantly increases due to counterion charge screening of the negatively charged head groups. The presence of Tween 80 on the interface inhibits AOT adsorption, reducing the maximum surface coverage as compared to a clean interface. Tween 80 persists on the interface even after exposure to high concentrations of AOT.

  1. Sequential adsorption of an irreversibly adsorbed nonionic surfactant and an anionic surfactant at an oil/aqueous interface.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Stephanie M; Anna, Shelley L; Walker, Lynn M

    2015-04-14

    Aerosol-OT (AOT) and Tween 80 are two of the main surfactants in commercial dispersants used in response to oil spills. Understanding how multicomponent surfactant systems interact at oil/aqueous interfaces is crucial for improving both dispersant design and application efficacy. This is true of many multicomponent formulations; a lack of understanding of competition for the oil/water interface hinders formulation optimization. In this study, we have characterized the sequential adsorption behavior of AOT on squalane/aqueous interfaces that have been precoated with Tween 80. A microtensiometer is used to measure the dynamic interfacial tension of the system. Tween 80 either partially or completely irreversibly adsorbs to squalane/aqueous interfaces when rinsed with deionized water. These Tween 80 coated interfaces are then exposed to AOT. AOT adsorption increases with AOT concentration for all Tween 80 coverages, and the resulting steady-state interfacial tension values are interpreted using a Langmuir isotherm model. In the presence of 0.5 M NaCl, AOT adsorption significantly increases due to counterion charge screening of the negatively charged head groups. The presence of Tween 80 on the interface inhibits AOT adsorption, reducing the maximum surface coverage as compared to a clean interface. Tween 80 persists on the interface even after exposure to high concentrations of AOT. PMID:25798716

  2. Toluene removal by sequential adsorption-plasma catalytic process: Effects of Ag and Mn impregnation sequence on Ag-Mn/γ-Al2O3.

    PubMed

    Qin, Caihong; Huang, Xuemin; Dang, Xiaoqing; Huang, Jiayu; Teng, Jingjing; Kang, Zhongli

    2016-11-01

    A series of Ag-Mn/γ-Al2O3 were prepared under different Ag/Mn impregnation sequence and tested in the sequential adsorption-plasma catalytic removal of toluene. When Mn was impregnated first, the resulting catalyst, Ag-Mn(F)/γ-Al2O3, had longer breakthrough time, gave less emission of toluene, had higher CO2 selectivity, and had better carbon balance and COx yield compared to catalysts prepared via other impregnation sequences. After 120 min of NTP treatment, the carbon balance of Ag-Mn(F)/γ-Al2O3 was 91%, with 87% as COx contributions. A Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results show that, the impregnation sequence impacts the BET surface area and the ratio and existing state of Ag on the surface of the catalysts. The longer breakthrough time when using Ag-Mn(F)/γ-Al2O3 as catalyst is attributed to the large amount of Ag(+) on the surface. Ag(+) is a new active site for toluene adsorption. When Ag was impregnated first (Ag(F)-Mn/γ-Al2O3) or Ag and Mn co-impregnated (Ag-Mn-C/γ-Al2O3), the predominant specie was Ag(+). Both Ag(0) and Ag(+) species were detected on Ag-Mn(F)/γ-Al2O3. Ag(0) cooperation with MnOx may promote the migration of surface active oxygen. This would facilitate the oxidation of adsorbed toluene with CC bond already weakened by Ag(+) and would result in higher CO2 selectivity and better carbon balance as seen in the Ag-Mn(F)/γ-Al2O3 system. PMID:27494312

  3. Toluene removal by sequential adsorption-plasma catalytic process: Effects of Ag and Mn impregnation sequence on Ag-Mn/γ-Al2O3.

    PubMed

    Qin, Caihong; Huang, Xuemin; Dang, Xiaoqing; Huang, Jiayu; Teng, Jingjing; Kang, Zhongli

    2016-11-01

    A series of Ag-Mn/γ-Al2O3 were prepared under different Ag/Mn impregnation sequence and tested in the sequential adsorption-plasma catalytic removal of toluene. When Mn was impregnated first, the resulting catalyst, Ag-Mn(F)/γ-Al2O3, had longer breakthrough time, gave less emission of toluene, had higher CO2 selectivity, and had better carbon balance and COx yield compared to catalysts prepared via other impregnation sequences. After 120 min of NTP treatment, the carbon balance of Ag-Mn(F)/γ-Al2O3 was 91%, with 87% as COx contributions. A Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results show that, the impregnation sequence impacts the BET surface area and the ratio and existing state of Ag on the surface of the catalysts. The longer breakthrough time when using Ag-Mn(F)/γ-Al2O3 as catalyst is attributed to the large amount of Ag(+) on the surface. Ag(+) is a new active site for toluene adsorption. When Ag was impregnated first (Ag(F)-Mn/γ-Al2O3) or Ag and Mn co-impregnated (Ag-Mn-C/γ-Al2O3), the predominant specie was Ag(+). Both Ag(0) and Ag(+) species were detected on Ag-Mn(F)/γ-Al2O3. Ag(0) cooperation with MnOx may promote the migration of surface active oxygen. This would facilitate the oxidation of adsorbed toluene with CC bond already weakened by Ag(+) and would result in higher CO2 selectivity and better carbon balance as seen in the Ag-Mn(F)/γ-Al2O3 system.

  4. Degradation of paracetamol by catalytic wet air oxidation and sequential adsorption - Catalytic wet air oxidation on activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Quesada-Peñate, I; Julcour-Lebigue, C; Jáuregui-Haza, U J; Wilhelm, A M; Delmas, H

    2012-06-30

    The concern about the fate of pharmaceutical products has raised owing to the increasing contamination of rivers, lakes and groundwater. The aim of this paper is to evaluate two different processes for paracetamol removal. The catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of paracetamol on activated carbon was investigated both as a water treatment technique using an autoclave reactor and as a regenerative treatment of the carbon after adsorption in a sequential fixed bed process. Three activated carbons (ACs) from different source materials were used as catalysts: two microporous basic ACs (S23 and C1) and a meso- and micro-porous acidic one (L27). During the first CWAO experiment the adsorption capacity and catalytic performance of fresh S23 and C1 were higher than those of fresh L27 despite its higher surface area. This situation changed after AC reuse, as finally L27 gave the best results after five CWAO cycles. Respirometry tests with activated sludge revealed that in the studied conditions the use of CWAO enhanced the aerobic biodegradability of the effluent. In the ADOX process L27 also showed better oxidation performances and regeneration efficiency. This different ageing was examined through AC physico-chemical properties.

  5. Jamming and percolation in random sequential adsorption of extended objects on a triangular lattice with quenched impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budinski-Petković, Lj; Lončarević, I.; Jakšić, Z. M.; Vrhovac, S. B.

    2016-05-01

    Random sequential adsorption (RSA) on a triangular lattice with defects is studied by Monte Carlo simulations. The lattice is initially randomly covered by point-like impurities at a certain concentration p. The deposited objects are formed by self-avoiding random walks on the lattice. Jamming coverage {θ\\text{jam}} and percolation threshold θ \\text{p}\\ast are determined for a wide range of impurity concentrations p for various object shapes. Rapidity of the approach to the jamming state is found to be independent on the impurity concentration. The jamming coverage {θ\\text{jam}} decreases with the impurity concentration p and this decrease is more prominent for objects of larger size. For a certain defect concentration, decrease of the jamming coverage with the length of the walk \\ell making the object is found to obey an exponential law, {θ\\text{jam}}={θ0}+{θ1}{{\\text{e}}-\\ell /r} . The results for RSA of polydisperse mixtures of objects of various sizes suggest that, in the presence of impurities, partial jamming coverage of small objects can have even larger values than in the case of an ideal lattice. Percolation in the presence of impurities is also studied and it is found that the percolation threshold θ \\text{p}\\ast is practically insensitive to the concentration of point defects p. Percolation can be reached at highest impurity concentrations with angled objects, and the critical defect concentration p c is lowest for the most compact objects.

  6. Cooperative and competitive adsorption of amino acids with Ca²⁺ on rutile (α-TiO₂).

    PubMed

    Lee, Namhey; Sverjensky, Dimitri A; Hazen, Robert M

    2014-08-19

    The interactions of biomolecules such as amino acids with mineral surfaces in the near-surface environment are an important part of the short and long-term carbon cycles. Amino acid-mineral surface interactions also play an important role in biomineralization, biomedicine, and in assembling the building blocks of life in the prebiotic era. Although the pH effects during adsorption of amino acids onto mineral surfaces have been studied, little is known about the effects of environmentally important divalent cations. In this study, we investigated the adsorption of the oppositely charged amino acids glutamate and lysine with and without the addition of divalent calcium. Without calcium, glutamate shows a maximum in adsorption at a pH of ∼4 and lysine shows a maximum in adsorption at a pH of ∼9.4. In comparison, with calcium present, glutamate showed maxima in adsorption at both low and high pH, whereas lysine showed no adsorption at all. These dramatic effects can be described as cooperative adsorption between glutamate and Ca(2+) and as competitive adsorption between lysine and Ca(2+). The origin of these effects can be attributed to electrostatic phenomena. Adsorption of Ca(2+) at high pH makes the rutile surface more positive, which attracts glutamate and repels lysine. Our results indicate that the interactions of biomolecules with mineral surfaces in the environment will be strongly affected by the major dissolved species in natural waters.

  7. Electrical conductivity of a monolayer produced by random sequential adsorption of linear k -mers onto a square lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasevich, Yuri Yu.; Goltseva, Valeria A.; Laptev, Valeri V.; Lebovka, Nikolai I.

    2016-10-01

    The electrical conductivity of a monolayer produced by the random sequential adsorption (RSA) of linear k -mers (particles occupying k adjacent adsorption sites) onto a square lattice was studied by means of computer simulation. Overlapping with predeposited k -mers and detachment from the surface were forbidden. The RSA process continued until the saturation jamming limit, pj. The isotropic (equiprobable orientations of k -mers along x and y axes) and anisotropic (all k -mers aligned along the y axis) depositions for two different models—of an insulating substrate and conducting k -mers (C model) and of a conducting substrate and insulating k -mers (I model)—were examined. The Frank-Lobb algorithm was applied to calculate the electrical conductivity in both the x and y directions for different lengths (k =1 - 128) and concentrations (p =0 - pj) of the k -mers. The "intrinsic electrical conductivity" and concentration dependence of the relative electrical conductivity Σ (p ) (Σ =σ /σm for the C model and Σ =σm/σ for the I model, where σm is the electrical conductivity of substrate) in different directions were analyzed. At large values of k the Σ (p ) curves became very similar and they almost coincided at k =128 . Moreover, for both models the greater the length of the k -mers the smoother the functions Σx y(p ) ,Σx(p ) and Σy(p ) . For the more practically important C model, the other interesting findings are (i) for large values of k (k =64 ,128 ), the values of Σx y and Σy increase rapidly with the initial increase of p from 0 to 0.1; (ii) for k ≥16 , all the Σx y(p ) and Σx(p ) curves intersect with each other at the same isoconductivity points; (iii) for anisotropic deposition, the percolation concentrations are the same in the x and y directions, whereas, at the percolation point the greater the length of the k -mers the larger the anisotropy of the electrical conductivity, i.e., the ratio σy/σx (>1 ).

  8. Cooperative adsorption behavior of phosphopeptides on TiO2 leads to biased enrichment, detection and quantification.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, A I K; Edwards, K; Agmo Hernández, V

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of phosphopeptides onto TiO2 surfaces was studied using the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) as the main experimental technique. The main focus is the characterization of the emergence of positive cooperativity under conditions where the peptides have a positively charged C-term. It is shown that when carrying no net charge, small water-soluble peptides as a rule develop positive cooperativity. The impact of the adsorption mechanism on the outcome of TiO2 based enrichment methods was investigated with the help of matrix assisted laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). The data presented illustrate how the phosphopeptide profile in the enriched material may deviate from that in the native sample, as cooperative phosphopeptides are overrepresented in the former. Furthermore, commonly employed washing and elution solutions may facilitate preferential release of certain peptides, leading to further bias in the recovered sample. Taken together, the results of the present study demonstrate that thorough understanding of the mechanisms behind the adsorption of phosphopeptides on the enrichment material is necessary in order to develop reliable qualitative and quantitative methods for phosphoproteomics.

  9. Sequential and simultaneous adsorption of Sb(III) and Sb(V) on ferrihydrite: Implications for oxidation and competition.

    PubMed

    Qi, Pengfei; Pichler, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Antimony (Sb) is a naturally occurring element of growing environmental concern whose toxicity, adsorption behavior and other chemical properties are similar to that of arsenic (As). However, less is known about Sb compared to As. Individual and simultaneous adsorption experiments with Sb(III) and Sb(V) were conducted in batch mode with focus on the Sb speciation of the remaining liquid phase during individual Sb(III) adsorption experiments. The simultaneous adsorption and oxidation of Sb(III) was confirmed by the appearance of Sb(V) in the solution at varying Fe/Sb ratios (500, 100 and 8) and varying pH values (3.8, 7 and 9). This newly formed Sb(V) was subsequently removed from solution at a Fe/Sb ratio of 500 or at a pH of 3.8. However, more or less only Sb(V) was observed in the liquid phase at the end of the experiments at lower Fe/Sb ratios and higher pH, indicating that competition took place between the newly formed Sb(V) and Sb(III), and that Sb(III) outcompeted Sb(V). This was independently confirmed by simultaneous adsorption experiments of Sb(III) and Sb(V) in binary systems. Under such conditions, the presence of Sb(V) had no influence on the adsorption of Sb(III) while Sb(V) adsorption was significantly inhibited by Sb(III) over a wide pH range (4-10). Thus, in the presence of ferrihydrite and under redox conditions, which allow the presence of both Sb species, Sb(V) should be the dominant species in aquatic environments, since Sb(III) is adsorbed preferentially and at the same time oxidized to Sb(V).

  10. Sequential adsorption of bovine mucin and lactoperoxidase to various substrates studied with quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation.

    PubMed

    Halthur, Tobias J; Arnebrant, Thomas; Macakova, Lubica; Feiler, Adam

    2010-04-01

    Mucin and lactoperoxidase are both natively present in the human saliva. Mucin provides lubricating and antiadhesive function, while lactoperoxidase has antimicrobial activity. We propose that combined films of the two proteins can be used as a strategy for surface modification in biomedical applications such as implants or biosensors. In order to design and ultilize mixed protein films, it is necessary to understand the variation in adsorption behavior of the proteins onto different surfaces and how it affects their interaction. The quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) technique has been used to extract information of the adsorption properties of bovine mucin (BSM) and lactoperoxidase (LPO) to gold, silica, and hydrophobized silica surfaces. The information has further been used to retrieve information of the viscoelastic properties of the adsorbed film. The adsorption and compaction of BSM were found to vary depending on the nature of the underlying bare surface, adsorbing as a thick highly hydrated film with loops and tails extending out in the bulk on gold and as a thinner film with much lower adsorbed amount on silica; and on hydrophobic surfaces, BSM adsorbs as a flat and much more compact layer. On gold and silica, the highly hydrated BSM film is cross-linked and compacted by the addition of LPO, whereas the compaction is not as pronounced on the already more compact film formed on hydrophobic surfaces. The adsorption of LPO to bare surfaces also varied depending on the type of surface. The adsorption profile of BSM onto LPO-coated surfaces mimicked the adsorption to the underlying surface, implying little interaction between the LPO and BSM. The interaction between the protein layers was interpreted as a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, which was in turn influenced by the interaction of the proteins with the different substrates.

  11. Selective adsorption of protein by a high-efficiency Cu(2+) -cooperated magnetic imprinted nanomaterial.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lu; Tang, Yuhai; Hao, Yi; He, Gaiyan; Gao, Ruixia; Tang, Xiaoshuang

    2016-07-01

    We report a core-shell magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer with high affinity through a facile sol-gel method for the selective adsorption of bovine hemoglobin from real bovine blood. Copper ions grafted on the surface of the matrix could immobilize template protein through chelation, which greatly enhances the orderliness of imprinted cavities and affinity of polymers. The obtained products exhibit a desired level of magnetic susceptibility, resulting in the highly efficient adsorption process. The results of adsorption experiments show that the saturation adsorption capacity of imprinted products could reach 116.3 mg/g within 30 min. Meanwhile, the specific binding experiment demonstrates the high selectivity of polymers for bovine hemoglobin. Furthermore, satisfactory reusability is demonstrated by ten adsorption-desorption cycles with no obvious deterioration in binding capacity. Electrophoretic analysis suggests the polymer could be used successfully in separation and enrichment of bovine hemoglobin from the bovine blood sample, which exhibits potential application in pretreatment of proteomics.

  12. Claus catalysis. 3. An FTIR study on the sequential adsorption of SO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S on the alumina catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, A.; Cavell, R.G.

    1985-01-31

    The sequential adsorption of H/sub 2/S and SO/sub 2/ on ..gamma..-alumina catalyst activated at 400/sup 0/C has been studied by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. When incremental amounts of H/sub 2/S were added to a sample of alumina upon which SO/sub 2/ had been preadsorbed, the Claus reaction took place but the species responsible for the band at 1055 cm-/sup 1/ (characteristic of SO/sub 2/ adsorbed on alumina) showed very low reactivity toward H/sub 2/S. No infrared bands due to adsorbed H/sub 2/S were observed, but this cannot be taken as conclusive evidence for the absence of adsorbed H/sub 2/O. On addition of SO/sub 2/ to an alumina sample on which H/sub 2/S had been preadsorbed, the Claus reaction also proceeded but to a much lesser extent probably because of the dissociative adsorption of part of the preadsorbed H/sub 2/S. Also, in this case bands due to adsorbed SO/sub 2/ were observed throughout the reaction. The dependence of the rate of the Claus reaction on the activation temperature of the catalyst, the nature and mechanism of catalyst poisoning, and an alternative approach for carrying out the Claus reaction are also discussed. 13 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Description of Chemically and Thermally Treated Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Using Sequential Decomposition of Adsorption Isotherms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albesa, Alberto G.; Rafti, Matías; Vicente, José Luis

    2016-03-01

    The effect of wet acid oxidation by means of sulfuric/nitric acid mixtures, and high-temperature treatment of commercial arc-discharge synthesized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was studied. In order to analyze the adsorption capacities of differently treated MWCNTs, we employed a multistep method that considers separately different pressure ranges (zones) on the experimentally obtained isotherms. The method is based on simple gas isotherm measurements (N2, CO2, CH4, etc.). Low pressure ranges can be described using Dubinin’s model, while high pressure regimes can be fitted using different models such as BET multilayer and Freundlich equations. This analysis allows to elucidate how different substrate treatments (chemical and thermal) can affect the adsorbate-adsorbent interactions; moreover, theoretical description of adsorbate-adsorbate interactions can be improved if a combination of adsorption mechanisms are used instead of a unique model. The results hereby presented also show that, while MWCNTs are a promising material for storage applications, gas separation applications should carefully consider the effect of wide nanotube size distribution present on samples after activation procedures.

  14. Tailoring the chain packing in ultrathin polyelectrolyte films formed by sequential adsorption: nanoscale probing by positron annihilation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Quinn, John F; Pas, Steven J; Quinn, Anthony; Yap, Heng Pho; Suzuki, Ryoichi; Tuomisto, Filip; Shekibi, Bijan S; Mardel, James I; Hill, Anita J; Caruso, Frank

    2012-12-01

    Depth profiling experiments by positron annihilation spectroscopy have been used to investigate the free volume element size and concentration in films assembled using the layer-by-layer (LbL) adsorption method. Films prepared from strong polyelectrolytes, weak polyelectrolytes, hydrogen-bonding polymers, and blended polyelectrolyte multilayers have different chain packing that is reflected in the free volume characteristics. The influence of various parameters on free volume, such as number of bilayers, salt concentration, solution pH, and molecular weight, has been systematically studied. The free volume cavity diameters vary from 4 to 6 Å, and the free volume concentrations vary from (1.1-4.3) × 10(20) cm(-3), depending on the choice of assembly polymers and conditions. Films assembled from strong polyelectrolytes have fewer free volume cavities with a larger average size than films prepared from weak polyelectrolytes. Blending the weak polyanion poly(acrylic acid), PAA, with the strong polyanion poly(styrene sulfonate), PSS, to layer alternately with the polycation poly(allyamine hydrochloride), PAH, is shown to be a viable method to achieve intermediate free volume characteristics in these LbL films. An increase in salt concentration of the adsorption solutions for films prepared from strong polyelectrolytes makes these films tend toward weaker polyelectrolyte free volume characteristics. Hydrogen-bonded layered films show larger free volume element size and concentration than do their electrostatically bonded counterparts, while reducing the molecular weight of these hydrogen-bonded polymers results in slightly reduced free volume size and concentration. A study of the effect of solution pH on films prepared from weak polyelectrolytes shows that when both polyelectrolytes are substantially charged in solution (assembly pH = 7.5), the chains pack similarly to strong polyelectrolytes (i.e., lower free volume concentration), but with smaller average cavity

  15. Cooperative adsorption of critical metal ions using archaeal poly-γ-glutamate.

    PubMed

    Hakumai, Yuichi; Oike, Shota; Shibata, Yuka; Ashiuchi, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    Antimony, beryllium, chromium, cobalt (Co), gallium (Ga), germanium, indium (In), lithium, niobium, tantalum, the platinoids, the rare-earth elements (including dysprosium, Dy), and tungsten are generally regarded to be critical (rare) metals, and the ions of some of these metals are stabilized in acidic solutions. We examined the adsorption capacities of three water-soluble functional polymers, namely archaeal poly-γ-glutamate (L-PGA), polyacrylate (PAC), and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), for six valuable metal ions (Co(2+), Ni(2+), Mn(2+), Ga(3+), In(3+), and Dy(3+)). All three polymers showed apparently little or no capacity for divalent cations, whereas L-PGA and PAC showed the potential to adsorb trivalent cations, implying the beneficial valence-dependent selectivity of anionic polyelectrolytes with multiple carboxylates for metal ions. PVA did not adsorb metal ions, indicating that the crucial role played by carboxyl groups in the adsorption of crucial metal ions cannot be replaced by hydroxyl groups under the conditions. In addition, equilibrium studies using the non-ideal competitive adsorption model indicated that the potential for L-PGA to be used for the removal (or collection) of water-soluble critical metal ions (e.g., Ga(3+), In(3+), and Dy(3+)) was far superior to that of any other industrially-versatile PAC materials. PMID:27013333

  16. Dynamics of Random Sequential Adsorption (RSA) of linear chains consisting of n circular discs - Role of aspect ratio and departure from convexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelke, Pradip B.; Limaye, A. V.

    2015-07-01

    We study Random Sequential Adsorption (RSA) of linear chains consisting of n circular discs on a two-dimensional continuum substrate. The study has been carried out for n = 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 25, 30, 50, 70, 100 and 300. For all values of n, instantaneous coverage, Θ(t), in late time regime, is found to approach to jammed state coverage, Θ(∞), in a power law fashion, Θ(∞) - Θ(t) ~ t- p. It is observed that, with the increase in n, the exponent p goes on decreasing from the value 0.33 for n = 2 to the value 0.20 for n = 20 and then again starts rising to reach the value of 0.33 for large n. It is also found that for n ≤ 20, the exponent p has near perfect correlation with the coefficient of departure from convexity. On the other hand the jammed state coverage Θ(∞) is found to depend both on the coefficient of departure from convexity as well as on the aspect ratio of the chain.

  17. Sequential expression and cooperative interaction of c-Ha-ras and c-erbB genes in in vivo chemical carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Husain, Z.; Fei, Y.; Roy, S.; Biswas, D.K. ); Solt, D.B.; Polverini, P.J. )

    1989-02-01

    The level of expression of several cellular protooncogenes is examined at different stages of 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA)-induced tumor development in hamster buccal pouch epithelium (HBPE). Results presented demonstrate overexpression of c-Ha-ras gene at a very early stage of tumor development, and this elevated level of expression of the gene persists throughout the tumorigenesis process. The expression of the cellular protooncogene c-erbB, on the other hand, can be detected only after 8-10 weeks of DMBA treatment of the tissue and increases with the progression of the disease. The overexpression of c-erbB gene can be correlated with the stage of extensive proliferation and subsequent invasion of the HBPE cells into the underlying connective tissue. This sequential pattern of stage-specific expression of the two cellular protooncogenes can be observed in (i) treated tissues, (ii) stage-representative cultured cells, and (iii) NIH 3T3 transformants derived with DNA from HBPE cells. The sequential overexpression of c-Ha-ras and c-erbB genes in a stage-specific manner and their cooperative interaction in the DMBA-induced in vivo oral carcinogenesis have been demonstrated.

  18. Molecular mechanics of the cooperative adsorption of a Pro-Hyp-Gly tripeptide on a hydroxylated rutile TiO2(110) surface mediated by calcium ions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ting; Wu, Chunya; Chen, Mingjun; Zhang, Yu; Cummings, Peter T

    2016-07-20

    The interaction of amino acids with inorganic materials at interfaces plays an important role in enhancing the biocompatibility of titanium-based alloys. The adsorption of a tripeptide, i.e. Pro-Hyp-Gly, on the hydroxylated rutile TiO2(110) surface was investigated by the MD simulations. The changes in free energy during the adsorption of both the tripeptide and calcium ions were calculated by using the PMF method in order to obtain the adsorption strength. The results suggested that the adsorption of the tripeptide on the TiO2 surface through the carboxyl groups in glycine residues can be more stable compared with other binding conformations. Special attention was focused on the cooperative adsorption of the tripeptide with the assistance of calcium ions. Calcium ions preferred to absorb at the tetradentate or monodentate sites on the negatively charged TiO2 surface. As a result of the strong attraction between the carboxyl group and calcium ions, the tripeptide can be pulled down to the surface by following the trajectory of the calcium ions, forming an indirect interaction with a sandwich structure of peptide-cation-TiO2. However, this indirect interaction could eventually transform to the direct adsorption of the tripeptide on the TiO2 surface with higher binding energy. The results may help to interpret the adsorption of peptides on inorganic materials in aqueous solution with ions. PMID:27383367

  19. Application of high silica zeolite ZSM-5 in a hybrid treatment process based on sequential adsorption and ozonation for VOCs elimination.

    PubMed

    Zaitan, Hicham; Manero, Marie Hélène; Valdés, Héctor

    2016-03-01

    In this study, a hydrophobic synthetic zeolite, namely ZSM-5 is chosen as an adsorbent/catalyst for toluene removal. Experimental results showed that toluene adsorption onto ZSM-5 was favourable, following a Langmuir adsorption isotherm model. ZSM-5 zeolite was regenerated using gaseous ozone at low temperature. Adsorbed toluene was oxidised, releasing mainly CO2 and H2O. Traces of oxidation by-products such as acetic acid and acetaldehyde were formed and remained adsorbed after the oxidativate regeneration with ozone. After four successive cycles of adsorption/ozonation, the adsorption efficiency was not affected (92%-99%). These results showed that volatile organic compound (VOC) removal by adsorption onto ZSM-5 zeolite followed by ozone regeneration could be used as a promising hybrid process for the control of VOC emissions in terms of efficiency.

  20. Substrate-Mediated Cooperative Adsorption of Sodium Cholate on (6,5) Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Bergler, Felix F; Stahl, Sabine; Goy, Annika; Schöppler, Friedrich; Hertel, Tobias

    2016-09-20

    The interaction of sodium cholate (NaC) with (6,5) single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is investigated using photoluminescence spectroscopy. Dilution of SWNT-NaC suspensions is accompanied by changes in the exciton PL quantum yield and peak emission energy. An abrupt change of the exciton emission peak energy at NaC concentrations between 10 and 14 mM indicates strongly cooperative formation of a micellar phase on (6,5) SWNT surfaces with a Hill coefficient of nH = 65 ± 6. This is in contrast to the formation of free NaC micelles with aggregation numbers of only about 4 and suggests that the cooperativity of NaC micelle formation on nanotube surfaces is strongly substrate-enhanced. The temperature dependence of this previously unobserved transition is used for a determination of ΔmicG(⊖)/(1 + β) = -(11.4 ± 0.2) kJ·mol(-1) which, for typical Na(+) counterion binding with β ≈ 0.2, yields a free SWNT-NaC micellization enthalpy ΔmicG(⊖) of -13.7 kJ·mol(-1).

  1. Substrate-Mediated Cooperative Adsorption of Sodium Cholate on (6,5) Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Bergler, Felix F; Stahl, Sabine; Goy, Annika; Schöppler, Friedrich; Hertel, Tobias

    2016-09-20

    The interaction of sodium cholate (NaC) with (6,5) single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is investigated using photoluminescence spectroscopy. Dilution of SWNT-NaC suspensions is accompanied by changes in the exciton PL quantum yield and peak emission energy. An abrupt change of the exciton emission peak energy at NaC concentrations between 10 and 14 mM indicates strongly cooperative formation of a micellar phase on (6,5) SWNT surfaces with a Hill coefficient of nH = 65 ± 6. This is in contrast to the formation of free NaC micelles with aggregation numbers of only about 4 and suggests that the cooperativity of NaC micelle formation on nanotube surfaces is strongly substrate-enhanced. The temperature dependence of this previously unobserved transition is used for a determination of ΔmicG(⊖)/(1 + β) = -(11.4 ± 0.2) kJ·mol(-1) which, for typical Na(+) counterion binding with β ≈ 0.2, yields a free SWNT-NaC micellization enthalpy ΔmicG(⊖) of -13.7 kJ·mol(-1). PMID:27575847

  2. Collaborative, Sequential and Isolated Decisions in Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Kemper; Mistree, Farrokh

    1997-01-01

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Commission on Industrial Productivity, in their report Made in America, found that six recurring weaknesses were hampering American manufacturing industries. The two weaknesses most relevant to product development were 1) technological weakness in development and production, and 2) failures in cooperation. The remedies to these weaknesses are considered the essential twin pillars of CE: 1) improved development process, and 2) closer cooperation. In the MIT report, it is recognized that total cooperation among teams in a CE environment is rare in American industry, while the majority of the design research in mathematically modeling CE has assumed total cooperation. In this paper, we present mathematical constructs, based on game theoretic principles, to model degrees of collaboration characterized by approximate cooperation, sequential decision making and isolation. The design of a pressure vessel and a passenger aircraft are included as illustrative examples.

  3. Globalization and human cooperation.

    PubMed

    Buchan, Nancy R; Grimalda, Gianluca; Wilson, Rick; Brewer, Marilynn; Fatas, Enrique; Foddy, Margaret

    2009-03-17

    Globalization magnifies the problems that affect all people and that require large-scale human cooperation, for example, the overharvesting of natural resources and human-induced global warming. However, what does globalization imply for the cooperation needed to address such global social dilemmas? Two competing hypotheses are offered. One hypothesis is that globalization prompts reactionary movements that reinforce parochial distinctions among people. Large-scale cooperation then focuses on favoring one's own ethnic, racial, or language group. The alternative hypothesis suggests that globalization strengthens cosmopolitan attitudes by weakening the relevance of ethnicity, locality, or nationhood as sources of identification. In essence, globalization, the increasing interconnectedness of people worldwide, broadens the group boundaries within which individuals perceive they belong. We test these hypotheses by measuring globalization at both the country and individual levels and analyzing the relationship between globalization and individual cooperation with distal others in multilevel sequential cooperation experiments in which players can contribute to individual, local, and/or global accounts. Our samples were drawn from the general populations of the United States, Italy, Russia, Argentina, South Africa, and Iran. We find that as country and individual levels of globalization increase, so too does individual cooperation at the global level vis-à-vis the local level. In essence, "globalized" individuals draw broader group boundaries than others, eschewing parochial motivations in favor of cosmopolitan ones. Globalization may thus be fundamental in shaping contemporary large-scale cooperation and may be a positive force toward the provision of global public goods. PMID:19255433

  4. Globalization and human cooperation.

    PubMed

    Buchan, Nancy R; Grimalda, Gianluca; Wilson, Rick; Brewer, Marilynn; Fatas, Enrique; Foddy, Margaret

    2009-03-17

    Globalization magnifies the problems that affect all people and that require large-scale human cooperation, for example, the overharvesting of natural resources and human-induced global warming. However, what does globalization imply for the cooperation needed to address such global social dilemmas? Two competing hypotheses are offered. One hypothesis is that globalization prompts reactionary movements that reinforce parochial distinctions among people. Large-scale cooperation then focuses on favoring one's own ethnic, racial, or language group. The alternative hypothesis suggests that globalization strengthens cosmopolitan attitudes by weakening the relevance of ethnicity, locality, or nationhood as sources of identification. In essence, globalization, the increasing interconnectedness of people worldwide, broadens the group boundaries within which individuals perceive they belong. We test these hypotheses by measuring globalization at both the country and individual levels and analyzing the relationship between globalization and individual cooperation with distal others in multilevel sequential cooperation experiments in which players can contribute to individual, local, and/or global accounts. Our samples were drawn from the general populations of the United States, Italy, Russia, Argentina, South Africa, and Iran. We find that as country and individual levels of globalization increase, so too does individual cooperation at the global level vis-à-vis the local level. In essence, "globalized" individuals draw broader group boundaries than others, eschewing parochial motivations in favor of cosmopolitan ones. Globalization may thus be fundamental in shaping contemporary large-scale cooperation and may be a positive force toward the provision of global public goods.

  5. Polymer adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joanny, Jean-Francois

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this talk is to review Pierre-Gilles deGennes' work on polymer adsorption and the impact that it has now in our understanding of this problem. We will first present the self-consistent mean-field theory and its applications to adsorption and depletion. De Gennes most important contribution is probably the derivation of the self-similar power law density profile for adsorbed polymer layers that we will present next, emphasizing the differences between the tail sections and the loop sections of the adsorbed polymers. We will then discuss the kinetics of polymer adsorption and the penetration of a new polymer chain in an adsobed layer that DeGennes described very elegantly in analogy with a quantum tunneling problem. Finally, we will discuss the role of polymer adsorption for colloid stabilization.

  6. Sequential inductive learning

    SciTech Connect

    Gratch, J.

    1996-12-31

    This article advocates a new model for inductive learning. Called sequential induction, it helps bridge classical fixed-sample learning techniques (which are efficient but difficult to formally characterize), and worst-case approaches (which provide strong statistical guarantees but are too inefficient for practical use). Learning proceeds as a sequence of decisions which are informed by training data. By analyzing induction at the level of these decisions, and by utilizing the only enough data to make each decision, sequential induction provides statistical guarantees but with substantially less data than worst-case methods require. The sequential inductive model is also useful as a method for determining a sufficient sample size for inductive learning and as such, is relevant to learning problems where the preponderance of data or the cost of gathering data precludes the use of traditional methods.

  7. Sequential elution process

    DOEpatents

    Kingsley, I.S.

    1987-01-06

    A process and apparatus are disclosed for the separation of complex mixtures of carbonaceous material by sequential elution with successively stronger solvents. In the process, a column containing glass beads is maintained in a fluidized state by a rapidly flowing stream of a weak solvent, and the sample is injected into this flowing stream such that a portion of the sample is dissolved therein and the remainder of the sample is precipitated therein and collected as a uniform deposit on the glass beads. Successively stronger solvents are then passed through the column to sequentially elute less soluble materials. 1 fig.

  8. Sequential memory: Binding dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afraimovich, Valentin; Gong, Xue; Rabinovich, Mikhail

    2015-10-01

    Temporal order memories are critical for everyday animal and human functioning. Experiments and our own experience show that the binding or association of various features of an event together and the maintaining of multimodality events in sequential order are the key components of any sequential memories—episodic, semantic, working, etc. We study a robustness of binding sequential dynamics based on our previously introduced model in the form of generalized Lotka-Volterra equations. In the phase space of the model, there exists a multi-dimensional binding heteroclinic network consisting of saddle equilibrium points and heteroclinic trajectories joining them. We prove here the robustness of the binding sequential dynamics, i.e., the feasibility phenomenon for coupled heteroclinic networks: for each collection of successive heteroclinic trajectories inside the unified networks, there is an open set of initial points such that the trajectory going through each of them follows the prescribed collection staying in a small neighborhood of it. We show also that the symbolic complexity function of the system restricted to this neighborhood is a polynomial of degree L - 1, where L is the number of modalities.

  9. Sequential Dependencies in Driving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doshi, Anup; Tran, Cuong; Wilder, Matthew H.; Mozer, Michael C.; Trivedi, Mohan M.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of recent experience on current behavior has been studied extensively in simple laboratory tasks. We explore the nature of sequential effects in the more naturalistic setting of automobile driving. Driving is a safety-critical task in which delayed response times may have severe consequences. Using a realistic driving simulator, we find…

  10. Sequential memory: Binding dynamics.

    PubMed

    Afraimovich, Valentin; Gong, Xue; Rabinovich, Mikhail

    2015-10-01

    Temporal order memories are critical for everyday animal and human functioning. Experiments and our own experience show that the binding or association of various features of an event together and the maintaining of multimodality events in sequential order are the key components of any sequential memories-episodic, semantic, working, etc. We study a robustness of binding sequential dynamics based on our previously introduced model in the form of generalized Lotka-Volterra equations. In the phase space of the model, there exists a multi-dimensional binding heteroclinic network consisting of saddle equilibrium points and heteroclinic trajectories joining them. We prove here the robustness of the binding sequential dynamics, i.e., the feasibility phenomenon for coupled heteroclinic networks: for each collection of successive heteroclinic trajectories inside the unified networks, there is an open set of initial points such that the trajectory going through each of them follows the prescribed collection staying in a small neighborhood of it. We show also that the symbolic complexity function of the system restricted to this neighborhood is a polynomial of degree L - 1, where L is the number of modalities. PMID:26520084

  11. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lacks, S.A.

    1991-12-31

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA and chromosomal DNA cloned by this method are disclosed. The method includes the selection of a target organism having a segment of chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned. A first DNA segment, having a first restriction enzyme site on either side. homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  12. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, Sanford A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism's chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  13. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, S.A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes. 9 figs.

  14. NDMA TREATMENT BY SEQUENTIAL GAC ADSORPTION AND FENTON DRIVEN DESTRUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) is a highly toxic microcontaminant that was first detected in groundwater tainted by rocket fuel manufacturing wastes. More recently NDMA has been detected as a by-product of other industrial processes including the chlorination of treated wastewater...

  15. Cooperative Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwen, Pam

    1989-01-01

    Describes "cooperative poetry," a group poetry-writing exercise combining brainstorming, rehearsing, choral reading, assisted reading, memorization, sequencing, and vocabulary development, as well as providing an opportunity for group cooperation. (MM)

  16. The structure of sequential effects.

    PubMed

    Gökaydin, Dinis; Navarro, Daniel J; Ma-Wyatt, Anna; Perfors, Amy

    2016-01-01

    There is a long history of research into sequential effects, extending more than one hundred years. The pattern of sequential effects varies widely with both experimental conditions as well as for different individuals performing the same experiment. Yet this great diversity of results is poorly understood, particularly with respect to individual variation, which save for some passing mentions has largely gone unreported in the literature. Here we seek to understand the way in which sequential effects vary by identifying the causes underlying the differences observed in sequential effects. In order to achieve this goal we perform principal component analysis on a dataset of 158 individual results from participants performing different experiments with the aim of identifying hidden variables responsible for sequential effects. We find a latent structure consisting of 3 components related to sequential effects-2 main and 1 minor. A relationship between the 2 main components and the separate processing of stimuli and of responses is proposed on the basis of previous empirical evidence. It is further speculated that the minor component of sequential effects arises as the consequence of processing delays. Independently of the explanation for the latent variables encountered, this work provides a unified descriptive model for a wide range of different types of sequential effects previously identified in the literature. In addition to explaining individual differences themselves, it is demonstrated how the latent structure uncovered here is useful in understanding the classical problem of the dependence of sequential effects on the interval between successive stimuli. PMID:26523425

  17. Multi-Attribute Sequential Search

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bearden, J. Neil; Connolly, Terry

    2007-01-01

    This article describes empirical and theoretical results from two multi-attribute sequential search tasks. In both tasks, the DM sequentially encounters options described by two attributes and must pay to learn the values of the attributes. In the "continuous" version of the task the DM learns the precise numerical value of an attribute when she…

  18. Feedback in sequential machine realizations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harlow, C. A.; Coates, C. L., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A method is described for determining the realizability of a sequential machine with trigger or set-reset flip-flop memory elements when the feedback of the machine is given by a Boolean function. Feedbacks in several types of sequential machines with different memory elements are compared, showing the memory specifications allowing the realization of such machines.

  19. Adaptive sequential controller

    DOEpatents

    El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Xing, Jian; Butler, Nicholas G.; Rodriguez, Alonso

    1994-01-01

    An adaptive sequential controller (50/50') for controlling a circuit breaker (52) or other switching device to substantially eliminate transients on a distribution line caused by closing and opening the circuit breaker. The device adaptively compensates for changes in the response time of the circuit breaker due to aging and environmental effects. A potential transformer (70) provides a reference signal corresponding to the zero crossing of the voltage waveform, and a phase shift comparator circuit (96) compares the reference signal to the time at which any transient was produced when the circuit breaker closed, producing a signal indicative of the adaptive adjustment that should be made. Similarly, in controlling the opening of the circuit breaker, a current transformer (88) provides a reference signal that is compared against the time at which any transient is detected when the circuit breaker last opened. An adaptive adjustment circuit (102) produces a compensation time that is appropriately modified to account for changes in the circuit breaker response, including the effect of ambient conditions and aging. When next opened or closed, the circuit breaker is activated at an appropriately compensated time, so that it closes when the voltage crosses zero and opens when the current crosses zero, minimizing any transients on the distribution line. Phase angle can be used to control the opening of the circuit breaker relative to the reference signal provided by the potential transformer.

  20. A novel sequential process for remediating rare-earth wastewater.

    PubMed

    Cui, Mingcan; Jang, Min; Kang, Kyounglim; Kim, Dukmin; Snyder, Shane A; Khim, Jeehyeong

    2016-02-01

    A novel and economic sequential process consisting of precipitation, adsorption, and oxidation was developed to remediate actual rare-earth (RE) wastewater containing various toxic pollutants, including radioactive species. In the precipitation step, porous air stones (PAS) containing waste oyster shell (WOS), PASWOS, was prepared and used to precipitate most heavy metals with >97% removal efficiencies. The SEM-EDS analysis revealed that PAS plays a key role in preventing the surface coating of precipitants on the surface of WOS and in releasing the dissolved species of WOS successively. For the adsorption step, a polyurethane (PU) impregnated by coal mine drainage sludge (CMDS), PUCMDS, was synthesized and applied to deplete fluoride (F), arsenic (As), uranium (U), and thorium (Th) that remained after precipitation. The continuous-mode sequential process using PAS(WOS), PU(CMDS), and ozone (O3) had 99.9-100% removal efficiencies of heavy metals, 99.3-99.9% of F and As, 95.8-99.4% of U and Th, and 92.4% of COD(Cr) for 100 days. The sequential process can treat RE wastewater economically and effectively without stirred-tank reactors, pH controller, continuous injection of chemicals, and significant sludge generation, as well as the quality of the outlet met the EPA recommended limits.

  1. A novel sequential process for remediating rare-earth wastewater.

    PubMed

    Cui, Mingcan; Jang, Min; Kang, Kyounglim; Kim, Dukmin; Snyder, Shane A; Khim, Jeehyeong

    2016-02-01

    A novel and economic sequential process consisting of precipitation, adsorption, and oxidation was developed to remediate actual rare-earth (RE) wastewater containing various toxic pollutants, including radioactive species. In the precipitation step, porous air stones (PAS) containing waste oyster shell (WOS), PASWOS, was prepared and used to precipitate most heavy metals with >97% removal efficiencies. The SEM-EDS analysis revealed that PAS plays a key role in preventing the surface coating of precipitants on the surface of WOS and in releasing the dissolved species of WOS successively. For the adsorption step, a polyurethane (PU) impregnated by coal mine drainage sludge (CMDS), PUCMDS, was synthesized and applied to deplete fluoride (F), arsenic (As), uranium (U), and thorium (Th) that remained after precipitation. The continuous-mode sequential process using PAS(WOS), PU(CMDS), and ozone (O3) had 99.9-100% removal efficiencies of heavy metals, 99.3-99.9% of F and As, 95.8-99.4% of U and Th, and 92.4% of COD(Cr) for 100 days. The sequential process can treat RE wastewater economically and effectively without stirred-tank reactors, pH controller, continuous injection of chemicals, and significant sludge generation, as well as the quality of the outlet met the EPA recommended limits. PMID:26583290

  2. Sequential biases in accumulating evidence

    PubMed Central

    Huggins, Richard; Dogo, Samson Henry

    2015-01-01

    Whilst it is common in clinical trials to use the results of tests at one phase to decide whether to continue to the next phase and to subsequently design the next phase, we show that this can lead to biased results in evidence synthesis. Two new kinds of bias associated with accumulating evidence, termed ‘sequential decision bias’ and ‘sequential design bias’, are identified. Both kinds of bias are the result of making decisions on the usefulness of a new study, or its design, based on the previous studies. Sequential decision bias is determined by the correlation between the value of the current estimated effect and the probability of conducting an additional study. Sequential design bias arises from using the estimated value instead of the clinically relevant value of an effect in sample size calculations. We considered both the fixed‐effect and the random‐effects models of meta‐analysis and demonstrated analytically and by simulations that in both settings the problems due to sequential biases are apparent. According to our simulations, the sequential biases increase with increased heterogeneity. Minimisation of sequential biases arises as a new and important research area necessary for successful evidence‐based approaches to the development of science. © 2015 The Authors. Research Synthesis Methods Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26626562

  3. Cooperative Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Cooperative education programs, a nontraditional blending of practice and theory, have become an important feature of current higher education. Some educators estimate that by 1984 half of the higher education institutions in the United States will have developed some form of cooperative education. The Federal government's recent involvement in…

  4. Sequentially pulsed traveling wave accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Nelson, Scott D.; Poole, Brian R.

    2009-08-18

    A sequentially pulsed traveling wave compact accelerator having two or more pulse forming lines each with a switch for producing a short acceleration pulse along a short length of a beam tube, and a trigger mechanism for sequentially triggering the switches so that a traveling axial electric field is produced along the beam tube in synchronism with an axially traversing pulsed beam of charged particles to serially impart energy to the particle beam.

  5. Augment railgun and sequential discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, K.

    1993-01-01

    Proprietary R&D efforts toward the creation of tactical weapon systems-applicable railguns are presented. Attention is given to measures taken for projectile velocity maximization and sequential-discharge operation, and to an augmenting railgun which has demonstrated a 66-percent efficiency improvement over the two-rail baseline railgun system. This device is characterized by strong interaction between capacitor bank submodules during sequential discharge.

  6. Sequential desorption energy of hydrogen from nickel clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Deepika,; Kumar, Rakesh; R, Kamal Raj.; Kumar, T. J. Dhilip

    2015-06-24

    We report reversible Hydrogen adsorption on Nickel clusters, which act as a catalyst for solid state storage of Hydrogen on a substrate. First-principles technique is employed to investigate the maximum number of chemically adsorbed Hydrogen molecules on Nickel cluster. We observe a maximum of four Hydrogen molecules adsorbed per Nickel atom, but the average Hydrogen molecules adsorbed per Nickel atom decrease with cluster size. The dissociative chemisorption energy per Hydrogen molecule and sequential desorption energy per Hydrogen atom on Nickel cluster is found to decrease with number of adsorbed Hydrogen molecules, which on optimization may help in economical storage and regeneration of Hydrogen as a clean energy carrier.

  7. Sequential Syndrome Decoding of Convolutional Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, I. S.; Truong, T. K.

    1984-01-01

    The algebraic structure of convolutional codes are reviewed and sequential syndrome decoding is applied to those codes. These concepts are then used to realize by example actual sequential decoding, using the stack algorithm. The Fano metric for use in sequential decoding is modified so that it can be utilized to sequentially find the minimum weight error sequence.

  8. A bit serial sequential circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, S.; Whitaker, S.

    1990-01-01

    Normally a sequential circuit with n state variables consists of n unique hardware realizations, one for each state variable. All variables are processed in parallel. This paper introduces a new sequential circuit architecture that allows the state variables to be realized in a serial manner using only one next state logic circuit. The action of processing the state variables in a serial manner has never been addressed before. This paper presents a general design procedure for circuit construction and initialization. Utilizing pass transistors to form the combinational next state forming logic in synchronous sequential machines, a bit serial state machine can be realized with a single NMOS pass transistor network connected to shift registers. The bit serial state machine occupies less area than other realizations which perform parallel operations. Moreover, the logical circuit of the bit serial state machine can be modified by simply changing the circuit input matrix to develop an adaptive state machine.

  9. Time Data Sequential Processor /TDSP/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, A. E.; Pavlovitch, T.; Roth, R. Y.; Sturms, F. M., Jr.

    1970-01-01

    Time Data Sequential Processor /TDSP/ computer program provides preflight predictions for lunar trajectories from injection to impact, and for planetary escape trajectories for up to 100 hours from launch. One of the major options TDSP performs is the determination of tracking station view periods.

  10. Sequential Effects in Essay Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attali, Yigal

    2011-01-01

    Contrary to previous research on sequential ratings of student performance, this study found that professional essay raters of a large-scale standardized testing program produced ratings that were drawn toward previous ratings, creating an assimilation effect. Longer intervals between the two adjacent ratings and higher degree of agreement with…

  11. Sequential triangulation of orbital photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajan, M.; Junkins, J. L.; Turner, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of structuring the satellite photogrammetric triangulation as an iterative Extended Kalman estimation algorithm is demonstrated. Comparative numerical results of the sequential against batch estimation algorithm are presented. Difficulty of accurately modeling of the attitude motion is overcome by utilizing the on-board angular rate measurements. Solutions of the differential equations and the evaluation of state transition matrix are carried out numerically.

  12. Manifestations of sequential electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Thurnauer, M.C.; Tang, J.

    1996-05-01

    An essential feature of efficient photo-initiated charge separation is sequential electron transfer. Charge separation is initiated by photoexcitation of an electron donor followed by rapid electron transfer steps from the excited donor through a series of electron acceptors, so that, after one or two successive steps, charge separation is stabilized by the physical separation between the oxidized donor and reduced acceptor. The prime example of this process is the sequential electron transfer that takes place in the purple photosynthetic bacterial reaction center, resulting in the charge separation between P{sup +} and Q{sub A}{sup -} across a biological membrane. We have developed magnetic resonance tools to monitor sequential electron transfer. We are applying these techniques to study charge separation in natural photo-synthetic systems in order to gain insights into the features of the reaction center proteins that promote efficient charge separation. As we establish what some of these factors are, we are beginning to design artificial photosynthetic systems that undergo photoinduced sequential electron transfer steps.

  13. Teacher Cooperatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Beth

    2009-01-01

    Twenty years ago, when the late Albert Shanker endorsed the notion of innovative schools operating outside conventional district bureaucracies, his aim was to put teachers at the helm. Today there are nearly 80 teacher-governed charter schools around the country. Although most are legally constituted as worker cooperatives, they better resemble…

  14. Cooperative Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Robert L.

    Cooperative education involves on-campus instruction and off-campus work experience. These programs can be referred to as work study, field work, or work experience. The student has the advantage of applying his knowledge in a work situation; the college gains financial benefits; and the employer has the opportunity to influence the student to…

  15. Cooperative Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavin, Robert E.

    1980-01-01

    Small-group cooperative learning methods have improved achievement, low and high level cognitive learning, race relations and mutual student concern. Most of the research focuses on four approaches: Teams Games Tournament (DeVries), Student Teams Achievement Divisions (Slavin), Jigsaw (Aronson) and Small Group Teaching (Sharan). (Author/CP)

  16. Cooperative pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Michael; Glaser, Steffen J.

    2010-11-01

    We introduce the concept of cooperative (COOP) pulses which are designed to compensate each other's imperfections. In multi-scan experiments, COOP pulses can cancel undesired signal contributions, complementing and generalizing phase cycles. COOP pulses can be efficiently optimized using an extended version of the optimal-control-based gradient ascent pulse engineering (GRAPE) algorithm. The advantage of the COOP approach is experimentally demonstrated for broadband and band-selective pulses.

  17. International cooperation.

    PubMed

    1999-04-01

    As the most densely populated country in the world, China actively conducts international exchanges and cooperation. It takes every opportunity to publicize its family planning policies and practices during international forums. Moreover, the country's State Family Planning Commission has been collaborating with the United Nations Population Fund in implementing health and family planning programs. This program covers public awareness campaigns, technical services, sex education for the youth, and social marketing. For years, China has also been cooperating with WHO in the area of family planning and reproductive health, and has established partnership with the Japanese Organization for International Cooperation in Family Planning. In addition, the State Family Planning Commission has worked with the Public Media Center of the US as well as with the Rockefeller Foundation and Ford Foundation in introducing "contraceptive methods by informed choice" and "male participation in family planning" in the rural areas of the country. China has also worked closely with many other developing countries on population issues. In October 1998, China collaborated with the Partners in Population and Development for a reporting mission that was attended by journalists from 11 countries.

  18. Nonequilibrium structure in sequential assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Alexander V.; Craven, Galen T.; Hernandez, Rigoberto

    2015-11-01

    The assembly of monomeric constituents into molecular superstructures through sequential-arrival processes has been simulated and theoretically characterized. When the energetic interactions allow for complete overlap of the particles, the model is equivalent to that of the sequential absorption of soft particles on a surface. In the present work, we consider more general cases by including arbitrary aggregating geometries and varying prescriptions of the connectivity network. The resulting theory accounts for the evolution and final-state configurations through a system of equations governing structural generation. We find that particle geometries differ significantly from those in equilibrium. In particular, variations of structural rigidity and morphology tune particle energetics and result in significant variation in the nonequilibrium distributions of the assembly in comparison to the corresponding equilibrium case.

  19. Robustness of the Sequential Lineup Advantage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gronlund, Scott D.; Carlson, Curt A.; Dailey, Sarah B.; Goodsell, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    A growing movement in the United States and around the world involves promoting the advantages of conducting an eyewitness lineup in a sequential manner. We conducted a large study (N = 2,529) that included 24 comparisons of sequential versus simultaneous lineups. A liberal statistical criterion revealed only 2 significant sequential lineup…

  20. Adsorption Refrigeration System

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Kai; Vineyard, Edward Allan

    2011-01-01

    Adsorption refrigeration is an environmentally friendly cooling technology which could be driven by recovered waste heat or low-grade heat such as solar energy. In comparison with absorption system, an adsorption system has no problems such as corrosion at high temperature and salt crystallization. In comparison with vapor compression refrigeration system, it has the advantages of simple control, no moving parts and less noise. This paper introduces the basic theory of adsorption cycle as well as the advanced adsorption cycles such as heat and mass recovery cycle, thermal wave cycle and convection thermal wave cycle. The types, characteristics, advantages and drawbacks of different adsorbents used in adsorption refrigeration systems are also summarized. This article will increase the awareness of this emerging cooling technology among the HVAC engineers and help them select appropriate adsorption systems in energy-efficient building design.

  1. Blocking for Sequential Political Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sally A.

    2013-01-01

    In typical political experiments, researchers randomize a set of households, precincts, or individuals to treatments all at once, and characteristics of all units are known at the time of randomization. However, in many other experiments, subjects “trickle in” to be randomized to treatment conditions, usually via complete randomization. To take advantage of the rich background data that researchers often have (but underutilize) in these experiments, we develop methods that use continuous covariates to assign treatments sequentially. We build on biased coin and minimization procedures for discrete covariates and demonstrate that our methods outperform complete randomization, producing better covariate balance in simulated data. We then describe how we selected and deployed a sequential blocking method in a clinical trial and demonstrate the advantages of our having done so. Further, we show how that method would have performed in two larger sequential political trials. Finally, we compare causal effect estimates from differences in means, augmented inverse propensity weighted estimators, and randomization test inversion. PMID:24143061

  2. Such Stuff as Habits Are Made on: A Reply to Cooper and Shallice (2006)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botvinick, Matthew M.; Plaut, David C.

    2006-01-01

    The representations and mechanisms guiding everyday routine sequential action remain incompletely understood. In recent work, the authors proposed a computational model of routine sequential behavior that took the form of a recurrent neural network (M. Botvinick & D. C. Plaut, 2004). Subsequently, R. P. Cooper and T. Shallice (2006) put forth a…

  3. A Simple Adsorption Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guirado, Gonzalo; Ayllon, Jose A.

    2011-01-01

    The study of adsorption phenomenon is one of the most relevant and traditional physical chemistry experiments performed by chemistry undergraduate students in laboratory courses. In this article, we describe an easy, inexpensive, and straightforward way to experimentally determine adsorption isotherms using pieces of filter paper as the adsorbent…

  4. Sequential ranging: How it works

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baugh, Harold W.

    1993-01-01

    This publication is directed to the users of data from the Sequential Ranging Assembly (SRA), and to others who have a general interest in range measurements. It covers the hardware, the software, and the processes used in acquiring range data; it does not cover analytical aspects such as the theory of modulation, detection, noise spectral density, and other highly technical subjects. In other words, it covers how ranging is done, but not the details of why it works. The publication also includes an appendix that gives a brief discussion of PN ranging, a capability now under development.

  5. Enhanced saturation coverages in adsorption-desorption processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Tassel, Paul R.; Viot, Pascal; Tarjus, Gilles; Ramsden, Jeremy J.; Talbot, Julian

    2000-01-01

    Many experimental studies of protein deposition on solid surfaces involve alternating adsorption/desorption steps. In this paper, we investigate the effect of a desorption step (separating two adsorption steps) on the kinetics, the adsorbed-layer structure, and the saturation density. Our theoretical approach involves a density expansion of the pair distribution function and an application of an interpolation formula to estimate the saturation density as a function of the density at which the desorption process commences, ρ1, and the density of the depleted configuration, ρ2. The theory predicts an enhancement of the saturation density compared with that of a simple, uninterrupted random sequential adsorption (RSA) process and a maximum in the saturation density when ρ2=(2/3)ρ1. The theoretical results are in qualitative and semiquantitative agreement with the results of numerical simulations.

  6. Structural features of sequential weak measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diósi, Lajos

    2016-07-01

    We discuss the abstract structure of sequential weak measurement (WM) of general observables. In all orders, the sequential WM correlations without postselection yield the corresponding correlations of the Wigner function, offering direct quantum tomography through the moments of the canonical variables. Correlations in spin-1/2 sequential weak measurements coincide with those in strong measurements, they are constrained kinematically, and they are equivalent with single measurements. In sequential WMs with postselection, an anomaly occurs, different from the weak value anomaly of single WMs. In particular, the spread of polarization σ ̂ as measured in double WMs of σ ̂ will diverge for certain orthogonal pre- and postselected states.

  7. Isolation of Polyvalent Bacteriophages by Sequential Multiple-Host Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Pingfeng; Li, Mengyan; Dai, Zhaoyi; Alvarez, Pedro J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Many studies on phage biology are based on isolation methods that may inadvertently select for narrow-host-range phages. Consequently, broad-host-range phages, whose ecological significance is largely unexplored, are consistently overlooked. To enhance research on such polyvalent phages, we developed two sequential multihost isolation methods and tested both culture-dependent and culture-independent phage libraries for broad infectivity. Lytic phages isolated from activated sludge were capable of interspecies or even interorder infectivity without a significant reduction in the efficiency of plating (0.45 to 1.15). Two polyvalent phages (PX1 of the Podoviridae family and PEf1 of the Siphoviridae family) were characterized in terms of adsorption rate (3.54 × 10−10 to 8.53 × 10−10 ml/min), latent time (40 to 55 min), and burst size (45 to 99 PFU/cell), using different hosts. These phages were enriched with a nonpathogenic host (Pseudomonas putida F1 or Escherichia coli K-12) and subsequently used to infect model problematic bacteria. By using a multiplicity of infection of 10 in bacterial challenge tests, >60% lethality was observed for Pseudomonas aeruginosa relative to uninfected controls. The corresponding lethality for Pseudomonas syringae was ∼50%. Overall, this work suggests that polyvalent phages may be readily isolated from the environment by using different sequential hosts, and this approach should facilitate the study of their ecological significance as well as enable novel applications. PMID:26590277

  8. Isolation of Polyvalent Bacteriophages by Sequential Multiple-Host Approaches.

    PubMed

    Yu, Pingfeng; Mathieu, Jacques; Li, Mengyan; Dai, Zhaoyi; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2015-11-20

    Many studies on phage biology are based on isolation methods that may inadvertently select for narrow-host-range phages. Consequently, broad-host-range phages, whose ecological significance is largely unexplored, are consistently overlooked. To enhance research on such polyvalent phages, we developed two sequential multihost isolation methods and tested both culture-dependent and culture-independent phage libraries for broad infectivity. Lytic phages isolated from activated sludge were capable of interspecies or even interorder infectivity without a significant reduction in the efficiency of plating (0.45 to 1.15). Two polyvalent phages (PX1 of the Podoviridae family and PEf1 of the Siphoviridae family) were characterized in terms of adsorption rate (3.54 × 10(-10) to 8.53 × 10(-10) ml/min), latent time (40 to 55 min), and burst size (45 to 99 PFU/cell), using different hosts. These phages were enriched with a nonpathogenic host (Pseudomonas putida F1 or Escherichia coli K-12) and subsequently used to infect model problematic bacteria. By using a multiplicity of infection of 10 in bacterial challenge tests, >60% lethality was observed for Pseudomonas aeruginosa relative to uninfected controls. The corresponding lethality for Pseudomonas syringae was ∼ 50%. Overall, this work suggests that polyvalent phages may be readily isolated from the environment by using different sequential hosts, and this approach should facilitate the study of their ecological significance as well as enable novel applications.

  9. Sequential visibility-graph motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacovacci, Jacopo; Lacasa, Lucas

    2016-04-01

    Visibility algorithms transform time series into graphs and encode dynamical information in their topology, paving the way for graph-theoretical time series analysis as well as building a bridge between nonlinear dynamics and network science. In this work we introduce and study the concept of sequential visibility-graph motifs, smaller substructures of n consecutive nodes that appear with characteristic frequencies. We develop a theory to compute in an exact way the motif profiles associated with general classes of deterministic and stochastic dynamics. We find that this simple property is indeed a highly informative and computationally efficient feature capable of distinguishing among different dynamics and robust against noise contamination. We finally confirm that it can be used in practice to perform unsupervised learning, by extracting motif profiles from experimental heart-rate series and being able, accordingly, to disentangle meditative from other relaxation states. Applications of this general theory include the automatic classification and description of physical, biological, and financial time series.

  10. Sequential Consequences of Therapists' Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Milbrath, Constance; Bond, Michael; Cooper, Steven; Znoj, Hans J.; Horowitz, Mardi J.; Perry, J. Christopher

    1999-01-01

    Using sequential analysis, the authors examined how therapists' actions related to the verbal disclosure and defensive patterns that followed therapists' interventions within a single therapy hour for 20 patients. At the same time, a new measure, the Psychodynamic Intervention Rating Scale (PIRS), was tested for reliability and construct validity. Results indicated that therapists fit their styles of intervention to patients' levels of distress and functioning. Within the session, patient's emotional elaboration was followed by therapist's defense interpretation, followed by more patient emotional elaboration. Patient elaboration of significance was followed by more transference interpretation, followed by more patient elaboration of significance. Noninterpretive interventions were followed by patient's disclosure of facts, not emotion. Both interpretive intervention process sequences and therapist's use of support predicted posttreatment symptom reduction. The PIRS was shown to have satisfactory reliability and construct validity. (The Journal of Psychotherapy Practice and Research 1999; 8:40–54) PMID:9888106

  11. Sequentially Executed Model Evaluation Framework

    SciTech Connect

    2015-10-20

    Provides a message passing framework between generic input, model and output drivers, and specifies an API for developing such drivers. Also provides batch and real-time controllers which step the model and I/O through the time domain (or other discrete domain), and sample I/O drivers. This is a library framework, and does not, itself, solve any problems or execute any modeling. The SeMe framework aids in development of models which operate on sequential information, such as time-series, where evaluation is based on prior results combined with new data for this iteration. Has applications in quality monitoring, and was developed as part of the CANARY-EDS software, where real-time water quality data is being analyzed for anomalies.

  12. Experimental multiparty sequential state discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solís-Prosser, M. A.; González, P.; Fuenzalida, J.; Gómez, S.; Xavier, G. B.; Delgado, A.; Lima, G.

    2016-10-01

    Recently, a protocol for quantum state discrimination (QSD) in a multiparty scenario has been introduced [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 100501 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.100501]. In this protocol, Alice generates a quantum system in one of two predefined nonorthogonal qubit states, and the goal is to send the generated state information to different parties without classical communication exchanged between them during the protocol's session. The interesting feature is that, by resorting to sequential generalized measurements onto this single system, there is a nonvanishing probability that all observers identify the state prepared by Alice. Here, we present the experimental implementation of this protocol based on polarization single-photon states. Our scheme works over an optical network, and since QSD lies in the core of many protocols, it represents a step towards experimental multiparty quantum information processing.

  13. Sequential detection of web defects

    DOEpatents

    Eichel, Paul H.; Sleefe, Gerard E.; Stalker, K. Terry; Yee, Amy A.

    2001-01-01

    A system for detecting defects on a moving web having a sequential series of identical frames uses an imaging device to form a real-time camera image of a frame and a comparitor to comparing elements of the camera image with corresponding elements of an image of an exemplar frame. The comparitor provides an acceptable indication if the pair of elements are determined to be statistically identical; and a defective indication if the pair of elements are determined to be statistically not identical. If the pair of elements is neither acceptable nor defective, the comparitor recursively compares the element of said exemplar frame with corresponding elements of other frames on said web until one of the acceptable or defective indications occur.

  14. Sequentially Executed Model Evaluation Framework

    SciTech Connect

    2014-02-14

    Provides a message passing framework between generic input, model and output drivers, and specifies an API for developing such drivers. Also provides batch and real-time controllers which step the model and 1/0 through the time domain (or other discrete domain), and sample 1/0 drivers. This is a Framework library framework, and does not, itself, solve any problems or execute any modelling. The SeMe framework aids in development of models which operate on sequential information, such as time-series, where evaluation is based on prior results combined with new data for this iteration. Ha) applications in quality monitoring, and was developed as part of the CANARY-EDS software, where real-time water quality data is being analyzed

  15. Sequential power-up circuit

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1992-06-02

    A sequential power-up circuit for starting several electrical load elements in series to avoid excessive current surge, comprising a voltage ramp generator and a set of voltage comparators, each comparator having a different reference voltage and interfacing with a switch that is capable of turning on one of the load elements. As the voltage rises, it passes the reference voltages one at a time and causes the switch corresponding to that voltage to turn on its load element. The ramp is turned on and off by a single switch or by a logic-level electrical signal. The ramp rate for turning on the load element is relatively slow and the rate for turning the elements off is relatively fast. Optionally, the duration of each interval of time between the turning on of the load elements is programmable. 2 figs.

  16. Sequential power-up circuit

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1992-01-01

    A sequential power-up circuit for starting several electrical load elements in series to avoid excessive current surge, comprising a voltage ramp generator and a set of voltage comparators, each comparator having a different reference voltage and interfacing with a switch that is capable of turning on one of the load elements. As the voltage rises, it passes the reference voltages one at a time and causes the switch corresponding to that voltage to turn on its load element. The ramp is turned on and off by a single switch or by a logic-level electrical signal. The ramp rate for turning on the load element is relatively slow and the rate for turning the elements off is relatively fast. Optionally, the duration of each interval of time between the turning on of the load elements is programmable.

  17. Sequentially Executed Model Evaluation Framework

    2014-02-14

    Provides a message passing framework between generic input, model and output drivers, and specifies an API for developing such drivers. Also provides batch and real-time controllers which step the model and 1/0 through the time domain (or other discrete domain), and sample 1/0 drivers. This is a Framework library framework, and does not, itself, solve any problems or execute any modelling. The SeMe framework aids in development of models which operate on sequential information, suchmore » as time-series, where evaluation is based on prior results combined with new data for this iteration. Ha) applications in quality monitoring, and was developed as part of the CANARY-EDS software, where real-time water quality data is being analyzed« less

  18. Sequentially Executed Model Evaluation Framework

    2015-10-20

    Provides a message passing framework between generic input, model and output drivers, and specifies an API for developing such drivers. Also provides batch and real-time controllers which step the model and I/O through the time domain (or other discrete domain), and sample I/O drivers. This is a library framework, and does not, itself, solve any problems or execute any modeling. The SeMe framework aids in development of models which operate on sequential information, such asmore » time-series, where evaluation is based on prior results combined with new data for this iteration. Has applications in quality monitoring, and was developed as part of the CANARY-EDS software, where real-time water quality data is being analyzed for anomalies.« less

  19. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  20. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    DOEpatents

    Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak; Harale, Aadesh; Park, Byoung-Gi; Liu, Paul K. T.

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  1. Possibility of using adsorption refrigeration unit in district heating network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzebielec, Andrzej; Rusowicz, Artur; Jaworski, Maciej; Laskowski, Rafał

    2015-09-01

    Adsorption refrigeration systems are able to work with heat sources of temperature starting with 50 °C. The aim of the article is to determine whether in terms of technical and economic issues adsorption refrigeration equipment can work as elements that produce cold using hot water from the district heating network. For this purpose, examined was the work of the adsorption air conditioning equipment cooperating with drycooler, and the opportunities offered by the district heating network in Warsaw during the summer. It turns out that the efficiency of the adsorption device from the economic perspective is not sufficient for production of cold even during the transitional period. The main problem is not the low temperature of the water supply, but the large difference between the coefficients of performance, COPs, of adsorption device and a traditional compressor air conditioning unit. When outside air temperature is 25 °C, the COP of the compressor type reaches a value of 4.49, whereas that of the adsorption device in the same conditions is 0.14. The ratio of the COPs is 32. At the same time ratio between the price of 1 kWh of electric power and 1 kWh of heat is only 2.85. Adsorption refrigeration equipment to be able to compete with compressor devices, should feature COPads efficiency to be greater than 1.52. At such a low driving temperature and even changing the drycooler into the evaporative cooler it is not currently possible to achieve.

  2. Plant cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    The study of plant behaviour will be aided by conceptual approaches and terminology for cooperation, altruism and helping. The plant literature has a rich discussion of helping between species while the animal literature has an extensive and somewhat contentious discussion of within-species helping. Here, I identify and synthesize concepts, terminology and some practical methodology for speaking about helping in plant populations and measuring the costs and benefits. I use Lehmann and Keller's (2006) classification scheme for animal helping and McIntire and Fajardo's (2014) synthesis of facilitation to provide starting points for classifying the mechanisms of how and why organisms help each other. Contextual theory is discussed as a mechanism for understanding and measuring the fitness consequences of helping. I synthesize helping into four categories. The act of helping can be costly to the helper. If the helper gains indirect fitness by helping relatives but loses direct fitness, this is altruism, and it only occurs within species. Helpers can exchange costly help, which is called mutualism when between species, and reciprocation when within a species. The act of helping can directly benefit the helper as well as the recipient, either as an epiphenomenon resulting from behaviours under natural selection for other reasons, or because the helper is creating a mutual benefit, such as satiating predators or supporting a mutualism. Facilitation between species by stress amelioration, creation of novel ecosystems and habitat complexity often meets the definition of epiphenomenon helping. Within species, this kind of helping is called by-product mutualism. If the helping is under selection to create a mutual benefit shared by others, between species this is facilitation with service sharing or access to resources and within species, direct benefits by mutual benefits. These classifications provide a clear starting point for addressing the subject of helping behaviours

  3. Plant cooperation.

    PubMed

    Dudley, Susan A

    2015-01-01

    The study of plant behaviour will be aided by conceptual approaches and terminology for cooperation, altruism and helping. The plant literature has a rich discussion of helping between species while the animal literature has an extensive and somewhat contentious discussion of within-species helping. Here, I identify and synthesize concepts, terminology and some practical methodology for speaking about helping in plant populations and measuring the costs and benefits. I use Lehmann and Keller's (2006) classification scheme for animal helping and McIntire and Fajardo's (2014) synthesis of facilitation to provide starting points for classifying the mechanisms of how and why organisms help each other. Contextual theory is discussed as a mechanism for understanding and measuring the fitness consequences of helping. I synthesize helping into four categories. The act of helping can be costly to the helper. If the helper gains indirect fitness by helping relatives but loses direct fitness, this is altruism, and it only occurs within species. Helpers can exchange costly help, which is called mutualism when between species, and reciprocation when within a species. The act of helping can directly benefit the helper as well as the recipient, either as an epiphenomenon resulting from behaviours under natural selection for other reasons, or because the helper is creating a mutual benefit, such as satiating predators or supporting a mutualism. Facilitation between species by stress amelioration, creation of novel ecosystems and habitat complexity often meets the definition of epiphenomenon helping. Within species, this kind of helping is called by-product mutualism. If the helping is under selection to create a mutual benefit shared by others, between species this is facilitation with service sharing or access to resources and within species, direct benefits by mutual benefits. These classifications provide a clear starting point for addressing the subject of helping behaviours

  4. An automatic, refrigerated, sequential precipitation sampler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coscio, M. R.; Pratt, G. C.; Krupa, S. V.

    The design and characteristics of an automated, refrigerated, sequential precipitation sampler are described. This sampler can collect rainfall on an event basis or as sequential segments within a rain event. Samples are sealed upon collection to prevent gas exchange and are refrigerated in situ at 4 ± 2° C. This sampler is commercially available.

  5. Trial Sequential Methods for Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulinskaya, Elena; Wood, John

    2014-01-01

    Statistical methods for sequential meta-analysis have applications also for the design of new trials. Existing methods are based on group sequential methods developed for single trials and start with the calculation of a required information size. This works satisfactorily within the framework of fixed effects meta-analysis, but conceptual…

  6. Critical analysis of the apoferritin adsorption at solid-liquid interfaces in the framework of a particular adsorption model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavalle, Ph.; Gergely, C.; Lustig, A.; Ball, V.

    2000-11-01

    The adsorption mechanism of horse spleen apoferritin on smooth Si(Ti)O2 surfaces was investigated by means of optical wave guide lightmode spectroscopy (OWLS) as well as with atomic force microscopy (AFM), for which images of high resolution were obtained on muscovite mica surfaces. By the use of both experimental methods, the adsorption process could be studied from a kinetic as well as from a statistical thermodynamics point of view. This approach allowed to test the hypothesis of the occurrence of a particular type of deposition mechanism, namely the random sequential adsorption (RSA), by evaluating all the requirements that should be fulfilled in such a process. Only the requirement relative to the kinetics of the adsorption process, and subsequently, the estimation of the surface coverage at saturation is fulfilled by our experiments. From the fit of the theoretical kinetic equations corresponding to the RSA model to the experimental adsorption kinetics we find that the apoferritin molecules occupy an area of 140±30 nm2, in agreement with the values found by counting the number of particles per unit area in the AFM experiments and also with the saturation level of the adsorption isotherm. From our experiments we found that the evolution of the surface coverage close to saturation did not follow the expected power law evolution with time in the framework of the RSA model. Moreover, the dependence of the density fluctuations on the sub-surface area in the AFM image is not consistent with the expected evolution obtained by computer simulations based on the RSA model. These results emphasize the difficulty to study the adsorption mechanism of proteins at solid—liquid interfaces in the framework of any given adsorption model.

  7. No place to hide: when shame causes proselfs to cooperate.

    PubMed

    Declerck, Carolyn Henriette; Boone, Christophe; Kiyonari, Toko

    2014-01-01

    Shame is considered a social emotion with action tendencies that elicit socially beneficial behavior. Yet, unlike other social emotions, prior experimental studies do not indicate that incidental shame boosts prosocial behavior. Based on the affect as information theory, we hypothesize that incidental feelings of shame can increase cooperation, but only for self-interested individuals, and only in a context where shame is relevant with regards to its action tendency. To test this hypothesis, cooperation levels are compared between a simultaneous prisoner's dilemma (where "defect" may result from multiple motives) and a sequential prisoner's dilemma (where "second player defect" is the result of intentional greediness). As hypothesized, shame positively affected proselfs in a sequential prisoner's dilemma. Hence ashamed proselfs become inclined to cooperate when they believe they have no way to hide their greediness, and not necessarily because they want to make up for earlier wrong-doing. PMID:24689338

  8. Adsorption of hydrophobin/β-casein mixtures at the solid-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Tucker, I M; Petkov, J T; Penfold, J; Thomas, R K; Cox, A R; Hedges, N

    2016-09-15

    The adsorption behaviour of mixtures of the proteins β-casein and hydrophobin at the hydrophilic solid-liquid surface have been studied by neutron reflectivity. The results of measurements from sequential adsorption and co-adsorption from solution are contrasted. The adsorption properties of protein mixtures are important for a wide range of applications. Because of competing factors the adsorption behaviour of protein mixtures at interfaces is often difficult to predict. This is particularly true for mixtures containing hydrophobin as hydrophobin possesses some unusual surface properties. At β-casein concentrations ⩾0.1wt% β-casein largely displaces a pre-adsorbed layer of hydrophobin at the interface, similar to that observed in hydrophobin-surfactant mixtures. In the composition and concentration range studied here for the co-adsorption of β-casein-hydrophobin mixtures the adsorption is dominated by the β-casein adsorption. The results provide an important insight into how the competitive adsorption in protein mixtures of hydrophobin and β-casein can impact upon the modification of solid surface properties and the potential for a wide range of colloid stabilisation applications. PMID:27288573

  9. Adsorption of hydrophobin/β-casein mixtures at the solid-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Tucker, I M; Petkov, J T; Penfold, J; Thomas, R K; Cox, A R; Hedges, N

    2016-09-15

    The adsorption behaviour of mixtures of the proteins β-casein and hydrophobin at the hydrophilic solid-liquid surface have been studied by neutron reflectivity. The results of measurements from sequential adsorption and co-adsorption from solution are contrasted. The adsorption properties of protein mixtures are important for a wide range of applications. Because of competing factors the adsorption behaviour of protein mixtures at interfaces is often difficult to predict. This is particularly true for mixtures containing hydrophobin as hydrophobin possesses some unusual surface properties. At β-casein concentrations ⩾0.1wt% β-casein largely displaces a pre-adsorbed layer of hydrophobin at the interface, similar to that observed in hydrophobin-surfactant mixtures. In the composition and concentration range studied here for the co-adsorption of β-casein-hydrophobin mixtures the adsorption is dominated by the β-casein adsorption. The results provide an important insight into how the competitive adsorption in protein mixtures of hydrophobin and β-casein can impact upon the modification of solid surface properties and the potential for a wide range of colloid stabilisation applications.

  10. PREFACE: Cooperative dynamics Cooperative dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gov, Nir

    2011-09-01

    The dynamics within living cells are dominated by non-equilibrium processes that consume chemical energy (usually in the form of ATP, adenosine triphosphate) and convert it into mechanical forces and motion. The mechanisms that allow this conversion process are mostly driven by the components of the cytoskeleton: (i) directed (polar) polymerization of filaments (either actin or microtubules) and (ii) molecular motors. The forces and motions produced by these two components of the cytoskeleton give rise to the formation of cellular shapes, and drive the intracellular transport and organization. It is clear that these systems present a multi-scale challenge, from the physics of the molecular processes to the organization of many interacting units. Understanding the physical nature of these systems will have a large impact on many fundamental problems in biology and break new grounds in the field of non-equilibrium physics. This field of research has seen a rapid development over the last ten years. Activities in this area range from theoretical and experimental work on the underlying fundamental (bio)physics at the single-molecule level, to investigations (in vivo and in vitro) of the dynamics and patterns of macroscopic pieces of 'living matter'. In this special issue we have gathered contributions that span the whole spectrum of length- and complexity-scales in this field. Some of the works demonstrate how active forces self-organize within the polymerizing cytoskeleton, on the level of cooperative cargo transport via motors or due to active fluxes at the cell membrane. On a larger scale, it is shown that polar filaments coupled to molecular motors give rise to a huge variety of surprising dynamics and patterns: spontaneously looping rings of gliding microtubules, and emergent phases of self-organized filaments and motors in different geometries. All of these articles share the common feature of being out-of-equilibrium, driven by metabolism. As demonstrated here

  11. Multilevel sequential Monte Carlo samplers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Beskos, Alexandros; Jasra, Ajay; Law, Kody; Tempone, Raul; Zhou, Yan

    2016-08-24

    Here, we study the approximation of expectations w.r.t. probability distributions associated to the solution of partial differential equations (PDEs); this scenario appears routinely in Bayesian inverse problems. In practice, one often has to solve the associated PDE numerically, using, for instance finite element methods and leading to a discretisation bias, with the step-size level hL. In addition, the expectation cannot be computed analytically and one often resorts to Monte Carlo methods. In the context of this problem, it is known that the introduction of the multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) method can reduce the amount of computational effort to estimate expectations, for a given level of error. This is achieved via a telescoping identity associated to a Monte Carlo approximation of a sequence of probability distributions with discretisation levelsmore » $${\\infty}$$ >h0>h1 ...>hL. In many practical problems of interest, one cannot achieve an i.i.d. sampling of the associated sequence of probability distributions. A sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) version of the MLMC method is introduced to deal with this problem. In conclusion, it is shown that under appropriate assumptions, the attractive property of a reduction of the amount of computational effort to estimate expectations, for a given level of error, can be maintained within the SMC context.« less

  12. Multienzyme kinetics and sequential metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wienkers, Larry C; Rock, Brooke

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes are the catalysts of biological systems and are extremely efficient. A typical enzyme accelerates the rate of a reaction by factors of at least a million compared to the rate of the same reaction in the absence of the enzyme. In contrast to traditional catalytic enzymes, the family of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes are catalytically promiscuous, and thus they possess remarkable versatility in substrates. The great diversity of reactions catalyzed by CYP enzymes appears to be based on two unique properties of these heme proteins, the ability of their iron to exist under multiple oxidation states with different reactivities and a flexible active site that can accommodate a wide variety of substrates. Herein is a discussion of two distinct types of kinetics observed with CYP enzymes. The first example is of CYP complex kinetic profiles when multiple CYP enzymes form the sample product. The second is sequential metabolism, in other words, the formation of multiple products from one CYP enzyme. Given the degree of CYP enzyme promiscuity, it is hardly surprising that there is also a high degree of complex kinetic profiles generated during the catalytic cycle.

  13. Stability models for sequential storage.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Emil M; Shum, Sam C

    2011-03-01

    Some drugs are intended for sequential storage under two different storage conditions. If the data for each condition are analyzed separately, predicting assay and other responses after T1 months at one condition followed by T2 months at the other condition is non-trivial for several reasons. First, the two analyses will give different intercept terms. What should one do about that? Second, how would one calculate the confidence limits for combined storage? Third, what if prior storage at one condition affects the slope at the other condition? This paper proposes a simple ANCOVA model containing two slope terms, one for each storage condition. When multiple batches and/or packages are involved, it is easily generalized to two sets of slope terms. Confidence limits are straightforward and can be calculated using existing commercial software. With properly designed data, one can test whether prior storage at one condition affects the slope at the other condition. If no such effect is significant, very useful extrapolations can be made. Temperature excursions, model reduction and curvilinear dependencies are discussed.

  14. A universal property for sequential measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerbaan, Abraham; Westerbaan, Bas

    2016-09-01

    We study the sequential product the operation p ∗ q = √{ p } q √{ p } on the set of effects, [0, 1]𝒜, of a von Neumann algebra 𝒜 that represents sequential measurement of first p and then q. In their work [J. Math. Phys. 49(5), 052106 (2008)], Gudder and Latrémolière give a list of axioms based on physical grounds that completely determines the sequential product on a von Neumann algebra of type I, that is, a von Neumann algebra ℬ(ℋ) of all bounded operators on some Hilbert space ℋ. In this paper we give a list of axioms that completely determines the sequential product on all von Neumann algebras simultaneously (Theorem 4).

  15. New Adsorption Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wankat, Phillip C.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses a simple method for following the movement of a solute in an adsorption or ion exchange system. This movement is used to study a variety of operational methods, including continuous flow and pulsed flow counter-current operations and simulated counter-current systems. Effect of changing thermodynamic variables is also considered. (JM)

  16. Sulfate adsorption on goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Rietra, R.P.J.J.; Hiemstra, T.; Riemsdijk, W.H. van

    1999-10-15

    Recent spectroscopic work has suggested that only one surface species of sulfate is dominant on hematite. Sulfate is therefore a very suitable anion to test and develop adsorption models for variable charge minerals. The authors have studied sulfate adsorption on goethite covering a large range of sulfate concentrations, surface coverages, pH values, and electrolyte concentrations. Four different techniques were used to cover the entire range of conditions. For characterization at low sulfate concentrations, below the detection limit of sulfate with ICP-AES, the authors used proton-sulfate titrations at constant pH. Adsorption isotherms were studied for the intermediate sulfate concentration range. Acid-base titrations in sodium sulfate and electromobility were used for high sulfate concentrations. All the data can be modeled with one adsorbed species if it is assumed that the charge of adsorbed sulfate is spatially distributed in the interface. The charge distribution of sulfate follows directly from modeling the proton-sulfate adsorption stoichoimemtry sine this stoichiometry is independent of the intrinsic affinity constant of sulfate. The charge distribution can be related to the structure of the surface complex by use of the Pauling bond valence concept and is in accordance with the microscopic structure found by spectroscopy. The intrinsic affinity constant follows from the other measurements. Modeling of the proton-ion stoichoimetry with the commonly used 2-pK models, where adsorbed ions are treated as point charges, is possible only if at least two surface species for sulfate are used.

  17. SEPARATION BY ADSORPTION

    DOEpatents

    Lowe, C.S.

    1959-06-16

    Separation of Pu from fission products by adsorption on hydrous aluminum silicate is described. The Pu in a HNO/sub 3/ solution is oxidized to the hexavalent state and contacted with the silicate which adsorbs fission products. (T.R.H.)

  18. SOPIE: Sequential Off-Pulse Interval Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutte, Willem D.

    2016-07-01

    SOPIE (Sequential Off-Pulse Interval Estimation) provides functions to non-parametrically estimate the off-pulse interval of a source function originating from a pulsar. The technique is based on a sequential application of P-values obtained from goodness-of-fit tests for the uniform distribution, such as the Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Cramér-von Mises, Anderson-Darling and Rayleigh goodness-of-fit tests.

  19. Automated ILA design for synchronous sequential circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, M. N.; Liu, K. Z.; Maki, G. K.; Whitaker, S. R.

    1991-01-01

    An iterative logic array (ILA) architecture for synchronous sequential circuits is presented. This technique utilizes linear algebra to produce the design equations. The ILA realization of synchronous sequential logic can be fully automated with a computer program. A programmable design procedure is proposed to fullfill the design task and layout generation. A software algorithm in the C language has been developed and tested to generate 1 micron CMOS layouts using the Hewlett-Packard FUNGEN module generator shell.

  20. Sequential effects in face-attractiveness judgment.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Aki; Takahashi, Kohske; Watanabe, Katsumi

    2012-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that current-trial responses are biased toward the response of the preceding trial in perceptual decisionmaking tasks (the sequential effect-Holland and Lockhead, 1968 Perception & Psychophysics 3 409-414). The sequential effect has been widely observed in evaluation of the physical properties of stimuli as well as more complex properties. However, it is unclear whether subjective decisions (e.g., attractiveness judgments) are also susceptible to the sequential effect. Here, we examined whether the sequential effect would occur in face-attractiveness judgments. Forty-eight pictures of male and female faces were presented successively. Participants rated the attractiveness of each face on a 7-point scale. The results showed that the attractiveness rating of a given face assimilated toward the rating of the preceding trial. In a separate experiment, we provided the average attractiveness rating by others for each trial as feedback. The feedback weakened the sequential effect. These findings suggest that attractiveness judgment is also biased toward the preceding judgment, and hence the sequential effect can be extended into the domain of subjective decisionmaking. PMID:22611662

  1. Eyewitness confidence in simultaneous and sequential lineups: a criterion shift account for sequential mistaken identification overconfidence.

    PubMed

    Dobolyi, David G; Dodson, Chad S

    2013-12-01

    Confidence judgments for eyewitness identifications play an integral role in determining guilt during legal proceedings. Past research has shown that confidence in positive identifications is strongly associated with accuracy. Using a standard lineup recognition paradigm, we investigated accuracy using signal detection and ROC analyses, along with the tendency to choose a face with both simultaneous and sequential lineups. We replicated past findings of reduced rates of choosing with sequential as compared to simultaneous lineups, but notably found an accuracy advantage in favor of simultaneous lineups. Moreover, our analysis of the confidence-accuracy relationship revealed two key findings. First, we observed a sequential mistaken identification overconfidence effect: despite an overall reduction in false alarms, confidence for false alarms that did occur was higher with sequential lineups than with simultaneous lineups, with no differences in confidence for correct identifications. This sequential mistaken identification overconfidence effect is an expected byproduct of the use of a more conservative identification criterion with sequential than with simultaneous lineups. Second, we found a steady drop in confidence for mistaken identifications (i.e., foil identifications and false alarms) from the first to the last face in sequential lineups, whereas confidence in and accuracy of correct identifications remained relatively stable. Overall, we observed that sequential lineups are both less accurate and produce higher confidence false identifications than do simultaneous lineups. Given the increasing prominence of sequential lineups in our legal system, our data argue for increased scrutiny and possibly a wholesale reevaluation of this lineup format.

  2. Eyewitness confidence in simultaneous and sequential lineups: a criterion shift account for sequential mistaken identification overconfidence.

    PubMed

    Dobolyi, David G; Dodson, Chad S

    2013-12-01

    Confidence judgments for eyewitness identifications play an integral role in determining guilt during legal proceedings. Past research has shown that confidence in positive identifications is strongly associated with accuracy. Using a standard lineup recognition paradigm, we investigated accuracy using signal detection and ROC analyses, along with the tendency to choose a face with both simultaneous and sequential lineups. We replicated past findings of reduced rates of choosing with sequential as compared to simultaneous lineups, but notably found an accuracy advantage in favor of simultaneous lineups. Moreover, our analysis of the confidence-accuracy relationship revealed two key findings. First, we observed a sequential mistaken identification overconfidence effect: despite an overall reduction in false alarms, confidence for false alarms that did occur was higher with sequential lineups than with simultaneous lineups, with no differences in confidence for correct identifications. This sequential mistaken identification overconfidence effect is an expected byproduct of the use of a more conservative identification criterion with sequential than with simultaneous lineups. Second, we found a steady drop in confidence for mistaken identifications (i.e., foil identifications and false alarms) from the first to the last face in sequential lineups, whereas confidence in and accuracy of correct identifications remained relatively stable. Overall, we observed that sequential lineups are both less accurate and produce higher confidence false identifications than do simultaneous lineups. Given the increasing prominence of sequential lineups in our legal system, our data argue for increased scrutiny and possibly a wholesale reevaluation of this lineup format. PMID:24188335

  3. Carbonaceous materials for adsorptive refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buczek, B.; Wolak, E.

    2012-06-01

    Carbon monoliths prepared from hard coal precursors were obtained. The porous structure of the monoliths was evaluated on the basis of nitrogen adsorption — desorption equilibrium data. The investigated monoliths have a well-developed microporous structure with significant specific surface area (S BET ). Equilibrium studies of methanol vapour adsorption were used to characterize the methanol adsorptive capacity that was determined using a volumetric method. The heat of wetting by methanol was determined in order to estimate the energetic effects of the adsorption process. The results of the investigations show that all monoliths exhibit high adsorption capacity and high heat of wetting with methanol.

  4. Uranium isotopic distribution in the mineral phases of granitic fracture fillings by a sequential extraction procedure.

    PubMed

    Crespo, M T; Pérez del Villar, L; Jiménez, A; Pelayo, M; Quejido, A; Sánchez, M

    1996-01-01

    In order to study the recent rock-water interaction processes in the E1 Berrocal site, a sequential leaching method has been applied to granitic fracture fillings to obtain the U isotopic distribution in the mineral phases of these samples. Based on the mineralogical composition of these materials, six dissolution steps have been chosen to extract U as exchangeable cation, from carbonates, amorphous Fe-oxyhydroxides, labile resistates and highly insoluble resistates. In this way, the processes involved in the rock-water interaction phenomena, mainly dissolution, precipitation, coprecipitation and adsorption can be distinguished and even approximately dated.

  5. Imaging sequential dehydrogenation of methanol on Cu(110) with a scanning tunneling microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaguchi, Y.; Shiotari, A.; Okuyama, H.; Hatta, S.; Aruga, T.

    2011-05-01

    Adsorption of methanol and its dehydrogenation on Cu(110) were studied by using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Upon adsorption at 12 K, methanol preferentially forms clusters on the surface. The STM could induce dehydrogenation of methanol sequentially to methoxy and formaldehyde. This enabled us to study the binding structures of these products in a single-molecule limit. Methoxy was imaged as a pair of protrusion and depression along the [001] direction. This feature is fully consistent with the previous result that it adsorbs on the short-bridge site with the C-O axis tilted along the [001] direction. The axis was induced to flip back and forth by vibrational excitations with the STM. Two configurations were observed for formaldehyde, whose structures were proposed based on their characteristic images and motions.

  6. Implementing Cooperative Learning Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Paul R.

    This paper identifies the bases and rationale for the concept of cooperative learning; describes the dynamics of the cooperative learning approach; and proposes methods that college faculty can use to enhance student motivation and learning. Cooperative learning is defined and is reported to have positive effects on student achievement, human…

  7. Advising People about Cooperatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkman, C. H., Jr.; Mohn, Paul O.

    This document provides background and references for educational programs on cooperatives. Seven major topics are covered: Cooperatives Are Distinctive Business Corporations, Types of Cooperatives (such as agricultural, credit, housing, crafts, health, memorial association, fishing, forestry, recreation, labor, buying clubs, consumer, student, and…

  8. Learning to Learn Cooperatively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Anne Hammond

    2009-01-01

    Cooperative learning, put quite simply, is a type of instruction whereby students work together in small groups to achieve a common goal. Cooperative learning has become increasingly popular as a feature of Communicative Language Teaching (CLT) with benefits that include increased student interest due to the quick pace of cooperative tasks,…

  9. Cooperative Agreements Study Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawton, R. E.; Magruder, D.

    During the 1983 meeting of the Florida Legislature, action was taken to begin a systematic study of the level of cooperation between the Florida public schools K-12 program and the community and junior colleges. The goals and objectives of the Cooperative Agreements Study were to review and compile a list of the cooperative agreements and identify…

  10. Effect of organic matter and calcium carbonate on behaviors of cadmium adsorption-desorption on/from purple paddy soils.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiulan; Jiang, Tao; Du, Bin

    2014-03-01

    Batch experiments and sequential extraction analysis were employed to investigate the effects of soil organic matter and CaCO3 on the adsorption and desorption of cadmium (Cd(2+)) onto and from two purple paddy soils, an acidic purple paddy soil (APPS) and a calcareous purple paddy soil (CPPS). The Cd(2+) adsorption isotherms on both soils could be well-described by the Langmuir and Freundlich equations. CPPS had a higher capacity and a stronger affinity for Cd(2+) adsorption compared with APPS. The adsorption process of Cd(2+) on APPS was dominated by electrostatic attractions, whereas the adsorption mechanism varied depending on the Cd(2+) concentrations in equilibrium solutions on CPPS. At low equilibrium concentrations, the adsorption process was primarily specific adsorption, but nonspecific adsorption dominated at high equilibrium concentrations. Removal of organic matter decreased the amount of Cd(2+) adsorption on both of the soils, slightly affected the Cd(2+) desorption rate and exchangeable Cd (EXC-Cd) in APPS and increased the desorption rate and EXC-Cd in CPPS, suggesting that the effect of organic matter on Cd(2+) adsorption-desorption depends on the soils. CPPS and APPS containing CaCO3 exhibited higher adsorption amounts but lower desorption rates and lower proportions of EXC-Cd than those of their corresponding soils without CaCO3, demonstrating that CaCO3 played an important role in Cd(2+) specific adsorption on soil. The changes in the thermodynamic parameters, including free energy (ΔG(0)), enthalpy (ΔH(0)) and entropy (ΔS(0)), as evaluated by the Van't Hoff equations, indicated that the adsorption was a spontaneous and endothermic process with the primary interaction forces of dipole interactions and hydrogen bonds on APPS, whereas both physical and chemical interactions dominated the adsorption on CPPS.

  11. Modern Sequential Analysis and Its Applications to Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartroff, Jay; Finkelman, Matthew; Lai, Tze Leung

    2008-01-01

    After a brief review of recent advances in sequential analysis involving sequential generalized likelihood ratio tests, we discuss their use in psychometric testing and extend the asymptotic optimality theory of these sequential tests to the case of sequentially generated experiments, of particular interest in computerized adaptive testing. We…

  12. Extracorporeal adsorption of endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Staubach, K H; Rosenfeldt, J A; Veit, O; Bruch, H P

    1997-02-01

    In a porcine endotoxin shock model using a continuous intravenous endotoxin infusion of 250 ng/kg body weight per hour, the cardiorespiratory and hematologic parameters were studied while applying a new on-line polymyxin B immobilized adsorption system. This preliminary report shows that the new adsorbent can remove endotoxin selectively from the circulation and confers a good amount of protection from endotoxin-induced cardiopulmonary decompensation as well as hematologic alterations. Survival time could be extended from 216 min to 313 min. Whereas cardiac output and mean arterial pressure declined critically after 3 h in the controls, the treated group remained stable for another 3 h. These data show that endotoxin adsorption by polymyxin B coupled covalently to acrylic spheres as an adjunctive on-line measure in the septic syndrome seems feasible. PMID:10225785

  13. Regenerable adsorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roychoudhury, Subir (Inventor); Perry, Jay (Inventor); Walsh, Dennis (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A method for regenerable adsorption includes providing a substrate that defines at least one layer of ultra short channel length mesh capable of conducting an electrical current therethrough, coating at least a portion of the substrate with a desired sorbent for trace contaminant control or CO.sub.2 sorption, resistively heating the substrate, and passing a flowstream through the substrate and in contact with the sorbent.

  14. Disinfection of water by adsorption combined with electrochemical treatment.

    PubMed

    Hussain, S N; de Las Heras, N; Asghar, H M A; Brown, N W; Roberts, E P L

    2014-05-01

    The disinfection performance of a unique process of adsorption combined with electrochemical treatment is evaluated. A flake graphite intercalation compound adsorbent was used, which is effective for the removal of organic contaminants and is amenable to anodic electrochemical regeneration. Adsorption of Escherichia coli on the graphite flake was followed by electrochemical treatment under a range of experimental conditions in a sequential batch reactor. The adsorption of E. coli cells was found to be a fast process and was capable of removing >99.98% of cells from solution after 5 min with a ca. 6.5-log10 reduction in E. coli concentration after 10 min. With electrochemical treatment the adsorbent could be reused, with no decrease in E. coli adsorption observed over five cycles. In the presence of chloride, >8.5-log10 reduction of E. coli concentration was achieved. Disinfection was found to be less effective in the absence of chloride. However, selection of appropriate operating conditions enabled effective disinfection in a chloride free system, reducing the potential for formation of disinfection by-products. The energy consumption required to achieve >8.5-log10 disinfection was 2-7 kWh m(-3).

  15. Optimal sequential Bayesian analysis for degradation tests.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Narciso, Silvia; Christen, J Andrés

    2016-07-01

    Degradation tests are especially difficult to conduct for items with high reliability. Test costs, caused mainly by prolonged item duration and item destruction costs, establish the necessity of sequential degradation test designs. We propose a methodology that sequentially selects the optimal observation times to measure the degradation, using a convenient rule that maximizes the inference precision and minimizes test costs. In particular our objective is to estimate a quantile of the time to failure distribution, where the degradation process is modelled as a linear model using Bayesian inference. The proposed sequential analysis is based on an index that measures the expected discrepancy between the estimated quantile and its corresponding prediction, using Monte Carlo methods. The procedure was successfully implemented for simulated and real data.

  16. Batch sequential designs for computer experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Leslie M; Williams, Brian J; Loeppky, Jason L

    2009-01-01

    Computer models simulating a physical process are used in many areas of science. Due to the complex nature of these codes it is often necessary to approximate the code, which is typically done using a Gaussian process. In many situations the number of code runs available to build the Guassian process approximation is limited. When the initial design is small or the underlying response surface is complicated this can lead to poor approximations of the code output. In order to improve the fit of the model, sequential design strategies must be employed. In this paper we introduce two simple distance based metrics that can be used to augment an initial design in a batch sequential manner. In addition we propose a sequential updating strategy to an orthogonal array based Latin hypercube sample. We show via various real and simulated examples that the distance metrics and the extension of the orthogonal array based Latin hypercubes work well in practice.

  17. Sequential sampling designs based on space reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haitao; Xu, Shengli; Wang, Xiaofang

    2015-07-01

    In the field of engineering design and optimization, metamodels are widely used to replace expensive simulation models in order to reduce computing costs. To improve the accuracy of metamodels effectively and efficiently, sequential sampling designs have been developed. In this article, a sequential sampling design using the Monte Carlo method and space reduction strategy (MCSR) is implemented and discussed in detail. The space reduction strategy not only maintains good sampling properties but also improves the efficiency of the sampling process. Furthermore, a local boundary search (LBS) algorithm is proposed to efficiently improve the performance of MCSR, which is called LBS-MCSR. Comparative results with several sequential sampling approaches from low to high dimensions indicate that the space reduction strategy generates samples with better sampling properties (and thus better metamodel accuracy) in less computing time.

  18. Automatic defensive control of asynchronous sequential machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Control theoretic techniques are utilised to develop automatic controllers that counteract robotic adversarial interventions in the operation of asynchronous sequential machines. The scenario centres on automatic protection against pre-programmed adversarial agents that attempt to subvert the operation of an asynchronous computing system. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of defensive controllers that automatically defeat such adversarial agents are derived. These conditions are stated in terms of skeleton matrices - matrices of zeros and ones obtained directly from the given description of the asynchronous sequential machine being protected. When defensive controllers exist, a procedure for their design is outlined.

  19. Probing Angular Correlations in Sequential Double Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischer, A.; Woerner, H. J.; Arissian, L.; Liu, L. R.; Meckel, M.; Rippert, A.; Doerner, R.; Villeneuve, D. M.; Corkum, P. B.; Staudte, A.

    2011-09-09

    We study electron correlation in sequential double ionization of noble gas atoms and HCl in intense, femtosecond laser pulses. We measure the photoelectron angular distributions of Ne{sup +} relative to the first electron in a pump-probe experiment with 8 fs, 800 nm, circularly polarized laser pulses at a peak intensity of a few 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. Using a linear-linear pump-probe setup, we further study He, Ar, and HCl. We find a clear angular correlation between the two ionization steps in the sequential double ionization intensity regime.

  20. Adsorption of methylene blue on biochar microparticles derived from different waste materials.

    PubMed

    Lonappan, Linson; Rouissi, Tarek; Das, Ratul Kumar; Brar, Satinder K; Ramirez, Antonio Avalos; Verma, Mausam; Surampalli, Rao Y; Valero, José R

    2016-03-01

    Biochar microparticles were prepared from three different types of biochar, derived from waste materials, such as pine wood (BC-PW), pig manure (BC-PM) and cardboard (BC-PD) under various pyrolysis conditions. The microparticles were prepared by dry grinding and sequential sieving through various ASTM sieves. Particle size and specific surface area were analyzed using laser particle size analyzer. The particles were further characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM). The adsorption capacity of each class of adsorbent was determined by methylene blue adsorption tests in comparison with commercially available activated carbon. Experimental results showed that dye adsorption increased with initial concentration of the adsorbate and biochar dosage. Biochar microparticles prepared from different sources exhibited improvement in adsorption capacity (7.8±0.5 mg g(-1) to 25±1.3 mg g(-1)) in comparison with raw biochar and commercially available activated carbon. The adsorption capacity varied with source material and method of production of biochar. The maximum adsorption capacity was 25 mg g(-1) for BC-PM microparticles at 25°C for an adsorbate concentration of 500 mg L(-1) in comparison with 48.30±3.6 mg g(-1) for activated carbon. The equilibrium adsorption data were best described by Langmuir model for BC-PM and BC-PD and Freundlich model for BC-PW.

  1. Adsorption of methylene blue on biochar microparticles derived from different waste materials.

    PubMed

    Lonappan, Linson; Rouissi, Tarek; Das, Ratul Kumar; Brar, Satinder K; Ramirez, Antonio Avalos; Verma, Mausam; Surampalli, Rao Y; Valero, José R

    2016-03-01

    Biochar microparticles were prepared from three different types of biochar, derived from waste materials, such as pine wood (BC-PW), pig manure (BC-PM) and cardboard (BC-PD) under various pyrolysis conditions. The microparticles were prepared by dry grinding and sequential sieving through various ASTM sieves. Particle size and specific surface area were analyzed using laser particle size analyzer. The particles were further characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM). The adsorption capacity of each class of adsorbent was determined by methylene blue adsorption tests in comparison with commercially available activated carbon. Experimental results showed that dye adsorption increased with initial concentration of the adsorbate and biochar dosage. Biochar microparticles prepared from different sources exhibited improvement in adsorption capacity (7.8±0.5 mg g(-1) to 25±1.3 mg g(-1)) in comparison with raw biochar and commercially available activated carbon. The adsorption capacity varied with source material and method of production of biochar. The maximum adsorption capacity was 25 mg g(-1) for BC-PM microparticles at 25°C for an adsorbate concentration of 500 mg L(-1) in comparison with 48.30±3.6 mg g(-1) for activated carbon. The equilibrium adsorption data were best described by Langmuir model for BC-PM and BC-PD and Freundlich model for BC-PW. PMID:26818183

  2. Adsorption of Se species on crushed granite: a direct linkage with its internal iron-related minerals.

    PubMed

    Jan, Yi-Lin; Wang, Tsing-Hai; Li, Ming-Hsu; Tsai, Shih-Chin; Wei, Yuan-Yaw; Teng, Shi-Ping

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption of selenium species on crushed granite is investigated directly linking to its internal iron-related minerals. Experimental results demonstrated that granite has higher affinity toward Se(IV) adsorption than Se(VI) adsorption. Se(IV) adsorption on granite is insensitive to background electrolytes while the effect of ionic strength on Se(VI) adsorption is not observed, which is attributed to the overloading of Se(VI) ions. Results of chemical sequential extraction showed that the removal of crystalline iron oxides dramatically reduces Se(IV) adsorption, which corresponds to the disappearance of goethite signal within XRD pattern. Based on our results, it is proposed that goethite within granite dominates Se adsorption in crushed granite. Although these goethites probably stem from some sample preparation processes including drilling in situ, crushing, washing and drying granite samples in laboratory, the formation of goethite enhances the granite affinity toward Se species adsorption. Images of SEM/EDS furthermore revealed that goethite is embedded within the fractures. In addition, quantification by standard addition method by spiking goethite suspension indicates that only around 20% of goethite minerals are available during Se(IV) adsorption.

  3. Passive Baited Sequential Filth Fly Trap

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Filth fly control measures may be optimized with a better understanding of fly population dynamics measured throughout the day. We describe the modification of a commercial motorized sequential mosquito trap to accept liquid odorous bait and leverage a classic inverted cone design to passively confi...

  4. Mathematical Problem Solving through Sequential Process Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Codina, A.; Cañadas, M. C.; Castro, E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The macroscopic perspective is one of the frameworks for research on problem solving in mathematics education. Coming from this perspective, our study addresses the stages of thought in mathematical problem solving, offering an innovative approach because we apply sequential relations and global interrelations between the different…

  5. Adult Word Recognition and Visual Sequential Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, V. M.

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted investigating the role of visual sequential memory skill in the word recognition efficiency of undergraduate university students. Word recognition was assessed in a lexical decision task using regularly and strangely spelt words, and nonwords that were either standard orthographically legal strings or items made from…

  6. Terminating Sequential Delphi Survey Data Collection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalaian, Sema A.; Kasim, Rafa M.

    2012-01-01

    The Delphi survey technique is an iterative mail or electronic (e-mail or web-based) survey method used to obtain agreement or consensus among a group of experts in a specific field on a particular issue through a well-designed and systematic multiple sequential rounds of survey administrations. Each of the multiple rounds of the Delphi survey…

  7. An Inexpensive Remote Sequential Air Sampler

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, George A.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Describes a remote air sampling device constructed of a number of spring loaded syringes which are released sequentially by the motion of a rotary mechanical timer. The unit can take accurate samples automatically and contain the samples without leakage for periods up to 18 hours in an outdoor environment. (SLH)

  8. Adaptive sequential testing for multiple comparisons.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ping; Liu, Lingyun; Mehta, Cyrus

    2014-01-01

    We propose a Markov process theory-based adaptive sequential testing procedure for multiple comparisons. The procedure can be used for confirmative trials involving multi-comparisons, including dose selection or population enrichment. Dose or subpopulation selection and sample size modification can be made at any interim analysis. Type I error control is exact. PMID:24926848

  9. Futures for energy cooperatives

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    A listing of Federal agencies and programs with potential funding for community-scale cooperatives using conservation measures and solar technologies is presented in Section 1. Section 2 presents profiles of existing community energy cooperatives describing their location, history, membership, services, sources of finance and technical assistance. A condensed summary from a recent conference on Energy Cooperatives featuring notes on co-op members' experiences, problems, and opportunities is presented in Section 3. Section 4 lists contacts for additional information. A National Consumer Cooperative Bank Load Application is shown in the appendix.

  10. Synthetic Yeast Cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shou, Wenying; Burton, Justin

    2010-03-01

    Cooperation is wide-spread and has been postulated to drive major transitions in evolution. However, Darwinian selection favors ``cheaters'' that consume benefits without paying a fair cost. How did cooperation evolve against the threat of cheaters? To investigate the evolutionary trajectories of cooperation, we created a genetically tractable system that can be observed as it evolves from inception. The system consists of two engineered yeast strains -- a red-fluorescent strain that requires adenine and releases lysine and a yellow-fluorescent strain that requires lysine and releases adenine. Cells that consume but not supply metabolites would be cheaters. From the properties of two cooperating strains, we calculated and experimentally verified the minimal initial cell densities required for the viability of the cooperative system in the absence of exogenously added adenine and lysine. Strikingly, evolved cooperative systems were viable at 100-fold lower initial cell densities than their ancestors. We are investigating the nature and diversity of pro-cooperation changes, the dynamics of cooperator-cheater cocultures, and the effects of spatial environment on cooperation and cheating.

  11. Cd adsorption onto bacterial surfaces: A universal adsorption edge?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Nathan; Fein, Jeremy

    2001-07-01

    In this study, we measure the thermodynamic stability constants for proton and Cd binding onto the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus megaturium, Streptococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Sporosarcina ureae, and Bacillus cereus. Potentiometric titrations and Cd-bacteria adsorption experiments yield average values for the carboxyl site pK a, site concentration, and log stability constant for the bacterial surface Cd-carboxyl complex of 5.0, 2.0 × 10 -3 mol/g and 4.0 respectively. Our results indicate that a wide range of bacterial species exhibit nearly identical Cd adsorption behavior as a function of pH. We propose that metal-bacteria adsorption is not dependent on the bacterial species involved, and we develop a generalized adsorption model which may greatly simplify the task of quantifying the effects of bacterial adsorption on dissolved mass transport in realistic geologic systems.

  12. Rethinking Critical Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, Carl; Peach, Sarah; Polak, Robert D.

    1996-03-01

    Recent reflectivity experiments on near-critical mixtures of carbon disulfide and nitromethane contained in glass cells footnote Niraj S. Desai, Sarah Peach, and Carl Franck, Phys. Rev. E 52, 4129 (1995) have shown that preferential adsorption of one liquid component onto the wall can be controlled by chemical modification of the glass. The glass was treated with varying amounts of hexamethyldisilazane to decrease surface polarity and therefore enhance the adsorption of carbon disulfide in a surprisingly continuous way. The effect of the glass wall on the local liquid composition can be described by two different scaling hypotheses: using a short range field on the liquid closest to the wall, or pinning the amplitude of the order parameter at the surface. We have found that only the second approach is consistent with the experimental data, although this is difficult to reconcile with observed wetting critical phenomena. We also have reexamined the issue of substrate inhomogeneity and conclude that the substrates were indeed homogeneous on relevant length scales. Supported by the NSF under DMR-9320910 and the central facilities of the Materials Science Center at Cornell University.

  13. Global versus local adsorption selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauzat, Françoise; Marloie, Gael; Markovits, Alexis; Ellinger, Yves

    2015-10-01

    The origin of the enantiomeric excess found in the amino acids present in the organic matter of carbonaceous meteorites is still unclear. Selective adsorption of one of the two enantiomers existing after a racemic formation could be part of the answer. Hereafter we report a comparative study of the adsorption of the R and S enantiomers of α-alanine and lactic acid on the hydroxylated { } chiral surface of α-quartz using numerical simulation techniques. Structurally different adsorption sites were found with opposite R versus S selectivity for the same molecule-surface couple, raising the problem of whether to consider adsorption as a local property or as a global response characteristic of the whole surface. To deal with the second term of this alternative, a statistical approach was designed, based on the occurrence of each adsorption site whose energy was calculated using first principle periodic density functional theory. It was found that R-alanine and S-lactic acid are the enantiomers preferentially adsorbed, even if the adsorption process on the quartz { } surface stays with a disappointingly poor enantio-selectivity. Nevertheless, it highlighted the important point that considering adsorption as a global property changes perspectives in the search for more efficient enantio-selective supports and more generally changes the way to apprehend adsorption processes in astro-chemistry/biology.

  14. Design method for adsorption beds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakely, R. L.; Jackson, J. K.

    1970-01-01

    Regenerable adsorption beds for long-term life support systems include synthetic geolite to remove carbon dioxide and silica gel to dehumidify the atmospheric gas prior to its passage through the geolite beds. Bed performance is evaluated from adsorption characteristics, heat and mass transfer, and pressure drop.

  15. Liquid-Phase Adsorption Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooney, David O.

    1987-01-01

    Describes an experiment developed and used in the unit operations laboratory course at the University of Wyoming. Involves the liquid-phase adsorption of an organic compound from aqueous solution on activated carbon, and is relevant to adsorption processes in general. (TW)

  16. Sequential Analysis: A Tool for Monitoring Program Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Holly L.; Hoff, Margaret B.

    1981-01-01

    The sensitivity and simplicity of Wald's sequential analysis test in monitoring a preventive health care program are discussed. Data exemplifying the usefulness and expedience of employing sequential methods are presented. (Author/GK)

  17. Educational Cooperatives. PREP-23

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Educational Communication (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC.

    Dr. Larry W. Hughes and Dr. C. M. Achilles of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, conducted a national survey for the Office of Education on educational cooperatives--studying and reporting on the nature and kind of cooperative endeavors, their organization, governance, financial arrangements, services, and personnel. Their study focused upon…

  18. Making Cooperative Learning Powerful

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavin, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Just about everyone loves the "idea" of cooperative learning, children working productively and excitedly in groups, everyone getting along and enthusiastically helping one another learn. This article presents five strategies that teachers can use to get the greatest benefit possible from cooperative learning and ensure that…

  19. Cooperative Science Lesson Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooperative Learning, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Offers several elementary level cooperative science lesson plans. The article includes a recipe for cooperative class learning, instructions for making a compost pile, directions for finding evidence of energy, experiments in math and science using oranges to test density, and discussions of buoyancy using eggs. (SM)

  20. Montana Cooperative Education Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Ron, Ed.

    This revised handbook was developed to help teachers and administrators in Montana conduct cooperative education programs. The handbook is organized in 13 sections. In narrative style, the first 11 sections cover the following topics: introduction to cooperative education, advisory committees, related instruction, coordination of activities,…

  1. Cooperative Vocational Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Adult, Vocational, and Technical Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    Cooperative education, said to be a "sleeping giant" in vocational education, received special authorization in Public Law 90 576 and was made a priority in vocational education. This publication summarizes information to assist the states in planning development of cooperative vocational education: definitions, funding sources, program content,…

  2. Evaluating Cooperative Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvir, Howard P.

    This document defines cooperative education as any form of occupational or professional activity that required the cooperation of both school and the labor market. In some cases, this might be the school and industry or business. In this process, evaluation is defined as the improvement of learner success through measurement of program components.…

  3. Cooperative Learning Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Buckley; O'Farrell, Gail

    1990-01-01

    Presents essential characteristics and types of cooperative learning strategies for use in elementary social studies. Outlines exercises for forming teams and building team spirit. Points out such methods promote group interdependence and student responsibility for learning and teaching others. Highlights two cooperative group strategies, Jigsaw…

  4. The cooperative brain.

    PubMed

    Stallen, Mirre; Sanfey, Alan G

    2013-06-01

    Cooperation is essential for the functioning of human societies. To better understand how cooperation both succeeds and fails, recent research in cognitive neuroscience has begun to explore novel paradigms to examine how cooperative mechanisms may be encoded in the brain. By combining functional neuroimaging techniques with simple but realistic tasks adapted from experimental economics, this approach allows for the discrimination and modeling of processes that are important in cooperative behavior. Here, we review evidence demonstrating that many of the processes underlying cooperation overlap with rather fundamental brain mechanisms, such as, for example, those involved in reward, punishment and learning. In addition, we review how social expectations induced by an interactive context and the experience of social emotions may influence cooperation and its associated underlying neural circuitry, and we describe factors that appear important for generating cooperation, such as the provision of incentives. These findings illustrate how cognitive neuroscience can contribute to the development of more accurate, brain-based, models of cooperative decision making.

  5. The cooperative brain.

    PubMed

    Stallen, Mirre; Sanfey, Alan G

    2013-06-01

    Cooperation is essential for the functioning of human societies. To better understand how cooperation both succeeds and fails, recent research in cognitive neuroscience has begun to explore novel paradigms to examine how cooperative mechanisms may be encoded in the brain. By combining functional neuroimaging techniques with simple but realistic tasks adapted from experimental economics, this approach allows for the discrimination and modeling of processes that are important in cooperative behavior. Here, we review evidence demonstrating that many of the processes underlying cooperation overlap with rather fundamental brain mechanisms, such as, for example, those involved in reward, punishment and learning. In addition, we review how social expectations induced by an interactive context and the experience of social emotions may influence cooperation and its associated underlying neural circuitry, and we describe factors that appear important for generating cooperation, such as the provision of incentives. These findings illustrate how cognitive neuroscience can contribute to the development of more accurate, brain-based, models of cooperative decision making. PMID:23300215

  6. Managing Cooperative Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Child Labor Committee, New York, NY.

    This manual presents concepts, tools, and techniques that are useful in the management of cooperative education programs at the state department of education, school district, and secondary school levels. Section I is a general discussion of the management role in cooperative education. In section II focus is on the nature of the internal and…

  7. Readings in Cooperative Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leventhal, Jerome I.

    Twenty-three journal articles on cooperative education were selected in a review of the literature by two Temple University graduate classes in the fall of 1975 and the spring of 1976 for those interested in the role of coordinating cooperative education programs. The journal readings consist of articles on theory/planning (6), implementation…

  8. Helping Children Cooperate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pica, Rae

    2011-01-01

    There are occasions in life when the competitive process is appropriate. But when people consider the relationships in their lives--with friends, family members, coworkers, and the larger community--they realize the value of cooperation. When adults give children the chance to cooperate, to work together toward a solution or a common goal like…

  9. Culture and cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Gächter, Simon; Herrmann, Benedikt; Thöni, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Does the cultural background influence the success with which genetically unrelated individuals cooperate in social dilemma situations? In this paper, we provide an answer by analysing the data of Herrmann et al. (2008a), who studied cooperation and punishment in 16 subject pools from six different world cultures (as classified by Inglehart & Baker (2000)). We use analysis of variance to disentangle the importance of cultural background relative to individual heterogeneity and group-level differences in cooperation. We find that culture has a substantial influence on the extent of cooperation, in addition to individual heterogeneity and group-level differences identified by previous research. The significance of this result is that cultural background has a substantial influence on cooperation in otherwise identical environments. This is particularly true in the presence of punishment opportunities. PMID:20679109

  10. Culture and cooperation.

    PubMed

    Gächter, Simon; Herrmann, Benedikt; Thöni, Christian

    2010-09-12

    Does the cultural background influence the success with which genetically unrelated individuals cooperate in social dilemma situations? In this paper, we provide an answer by analysing the data of Herrmann et al. (2008a), who studied cooperation and punishment in 16 subject pools from six different world cultures (as classified by Inglehart & Baker (2000)). We use analysis of variance to disentangle the importance of cultural background relative to individual heterogeneity and group-level differences in cooperation. We find that culture has a substantial influence on the extent of cooperation, in addition to individual heterogeneity and group-level differences identified by previous research. The significance of this result is that cultural background has a substantial influence on cooperation in otherwise identical environments. This is particularly true in the presence of punishment opportunities.

  11. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-12-31

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with super-heated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200{degrees}C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220{degrees}C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: (1) At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. (2) There is no significant temperature effect. (3) Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. (4) Pores smaller than 15 {Angstrom} do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  12. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-01-24

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with superheated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200 °C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220 °C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: 1. At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. 2. There is no significant temperature effect. 3. Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. 4. Pores smaller than 15 Å do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  13. Cooperative binding of drugs on human serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, L. M.; Pérez-Rodríguez, M.; García, M.

    In order to explain the adsorption isotherms of the amphiphilic penicillins nafcillin and cloxacillin onto human serum albumin (HSA), a cooperative multilayer adsorption model is introduced, combining the Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) adsorption isotherm with an amphiphilic ionic adsorbate, whose chemical potential is derived from Guggenheim's theory. The non-cooperative model has been previously proved to qualitatively predict the measured adsorption maxima of these drugs [Varela, L. M., García, M., Pérez-Rodríguez, M., Taboada, P., Ruso, J. M., and Mosquera, V., 2001, J. chem. Phys., 114, 7682]. The surface interactions among adsorbed drug molecules are modelled in a mean-field fashion, so the chemical potential of the adsorbate is assumed to include a term proportional to the surface coverage, the constant of proportionality being the lateral interaction energy between bound molecules. The interaction energies obtained from the empirical binding isotherms are of the order of tenths of the thermal energy, therefore suggesting the principal role of van der Waals forces in the binding process.

  14. Sequential shrink photolithography for plastic microlens arrays.

    PubMed

    Dyer, David; Shreim, Samir; Jayadev, Shreshta; Lew, Valerie; Botvinick, Elliot; Khine, Michelle

    2011-07-18

    Endeavoring to push the boundaries of microfabrication with shrinkable polymers, we have developed a sequential shrink photolithography process. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by rapidly fabricating plastic microlens arrays. First, we create a mask out of the children's toy Shrinky Dinks by simply printing dots using a standard desktop printer. Upon retraction of this pre-stressed thermoplastic sheet, the dots shrink to a fraction of their original size, which we then lithographically transfer onto photoresist-coated commodity shrink wrap film. This shrink film reduces in area by 95% when briefly heated, creating smooth convex photoresist bumps down to 30 µm. Taken together, this sequential shrink process provides a complete process to create microlenses, with an almost 99% reduction in area from the original pattern size. Finally, with a lithography molding step, we emboss these bumps into optical grade plastics such as cyclic olefin copolymer for functional microlens arrays.

  15. Info-Greedy Sequential Adaptive Compressed Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Gabor; Pokutta, Sebastian; Xie, Yao

    2015-06-01

    We present an information-theoretic framework for sequential adaptive compressed sensing, Info-Greedy Sensing, where measurements are chosen to maximize the extracted information conditioned on the previous measurements. We show that the widely used bisection approach is Info-Greedy for a family of $k$-sparse signals by connecting compressed sensing and blackbox complexity of sequential query algorithms, and present Info-Greedy algorithms for Gaussian and Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) signals, as well as ways to design sparse Info-Greedy measurements. Numerical examples demonstrate the good performance of the proposed algorithms using simulated and real data: Info-Greedy Sensing shows significant improvement over random projection for signals with sparse and low-rank covariance matrices, and adaptivity brings robustness when there is a mismatch between the assumed and the true distributions.

  16. Sequential shrink photolithography for plastic microlens arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, David; Shreim, Samir; Jayadev, Shreshta; Lew, Valerie; Botvinick, Elliot; Khine, Michelle

    2011-07-01

    Endeavoring to push the boundaries of microfabrication with shrinkable polymers, we have developed a sequential shrink photolithography process. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by rapidly fabricating plastic microlens arrays. First, we create a mask out of the children's toy Shrinky Dinks by simply printing dots using a standard desktop printer. Upon retraction of this pre-stressed thermoplastic sheet, the dots shrink to a fraction of their original size, which we then lithographically transfer onto photoresist-coated commodity shrink wrap film. This shrink film reduces in area by 95% when briefly heated, creating smooth convex photoresist bumps down to 30 µm. Taken together, this sequential shrink process provides a complete process to create microlenses, with an almost 99% reduction in area from the original pattern size. Finally, with a lithography molding step, we emboss these bumps into optical grade plastics such as cyclic olefin copolymer for functional microlens arrays.

  17. Hyperspectral target detection using sequential approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haskett, Hanna T.; Sood, Arun K.; Habib, Mohammad K.

    1999-08-01

    This paper describes an automatic target detection algorithm based on the sequential multi-stage approach. Each stage of the algorithm uses more spectral bands than the previous stage. To ensure high probability of detection and low false alarm rate, Chebyshev's inequality test is applied. The sequential approach enables a significant reduction in computational time of a hyperspectral detection system. The Forest Radiance I database collected with the HYDICE hyperspectral sensor at the U.S. Army Proving Ground in Aberdeen, Maryland is utilized. Scenarios include targets in the open, with footprints of 1 m and different times of day. The total area coverage and the number of targets used in this evaluation are approximately 6 km2 and 126, respectively.

  18. Sequential shrink photolithography for plastic microlens arrays

    PubMed Central

    Dyer, David; Shreim, Samir; Jayadev, Shreshta; Lew, Valerie; Botvinick, Elliot; Khine, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Endeavoring to push the boundaries of microfabrication with shrinkable polymers, we have developed a sequential shrink photolithography process. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by rapidly fabricating plastic microlens arrays. First, we create a mask out of the children’s toy Shrinky Dinks by simply printing dots using a standard desktop printer. Upon retraction of this pre-stressed thermoplastic sheet, the dots shrink to a fraction of their original size, which we then lithographically transfer onto photoresist-coated commodity shrink wrap film. This shrink film reduces in area by 95% when briefly heated, creating smooth convex photoresist bumps down to 30 µm. Taken together, this sequential shrink process provides a complete process to create microlenses, with an almost 99% reduction in area from the original pattern size. Finally, with a lithography molding step, we emboss these bumps into optical grade plastics such as cyclic olefin copolymer for functional microlens arrays. PMID:21863126

  19. Applying the Minimax Principle to Sequential Mastery Testing. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vos, Hans J.

    This paper derives optimal rules for sequential mastery tests. In a sequential mastery test, the decision is to classify a subject as a master or a nonmaster or to continue sampling and administering another random item. The framework of minimax sequential decision theory (minimum information approach) is used; that is, optimal rules are obtained…

  20. Lung Volume Measured during Sequential Swallowing in Healthy Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hegland, Karen Wheeler; Huber, Jessica E.; Pitts, Teresa; Davenport, Paul W.; Sapienza, Christine M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Outcomes from studying the coordinative relationship between respiratory and swallow subsystems are inconsistent for sequential swallows, and the lung volume at the initiation of sequential swallowing remains undefined. The first goal of this study was to quantify the lung volume at initiation of sequential swallowing ingestion cycles and…

  1. GENERAL: Mutual Information and Relative Entropy of Sequential Effect Algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jia-Mei; Wu, Jun-De; Cho, Minhyung

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, we introduce and investigate the mutual information and relative entropy on the sequential effect algebra, we also give a comparison of these mutual information and relative entropy with the classical ones by the venn diagrams. Finally, a nice example shows that the entropies of sequential effect algebra depend extremely on the order of its sequential product.

  2. Efficient Enantioselective Synthesis of Oxahelicenes Using Redox/Acid Cooperative Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Sako, Makoto; Takeuchi, Yoshiki; Tsujihara, Tetsuya; Kodera, Junpei; Kawano, Tomikazu; Takizawa, Shinobu; Sasai, Hiroaki

    2016-09-14

    An efficient and enantioselective synthesis of oxa[9]helicenes has been established via vanadium(V)-catalyzed oxidative coupling/intramolecular cyclization of polycyclic phenols. A newly developed vanadium complex cooperatively functions as both a redox and Lewis acid catalyst to promote the present sequential reaction and afford oxa[9]helicenes in good yields with up to 94% ee. PMID:27574874

  3. Heat accumulation during sequential cortical bone drilling.

    PubMed

    Palmisano, Andrew C; Tai, Bruce L; Belmont, Barry; Irwin, Todd A; Shih, Albert; Holmes, James R

    2016-03-01

    Significant research exists regarding heat production during single-hole bone drilling. No published data exist regarding repetitive sequential drilling. This study elucidates the phenomenon of heat accumulation for sequential drilling with both Kirschner wires (K wires) and standard two-flute twist drills. It was hypothesized that cumulative heat would result in a higher temperature with each subsequent drill pass. Nine holes in a 3 × 3 array were drilled sequentially on moistened cadaveric tibia bone kept at body temperature (about 37 °C). Four thermocouples were placed at the center of four adjacent holes and 2 mm below the surface. A battery-driven hand drill guided by a servo-controlled motion system was used. Six samples were drilled with each tool (2.0 mm K wire and 2.0 and 2.5 mm standard drills). K wire drilling increased temperature from 5 °C at the first hole to 20 °C at holes 6 through 9. A similar trend was found in standard drills with less significant increments. The maximum temperatures of both tools increased from <0.5 °C to nearly 13 °C. The difference between drill sizes was found to be insignificant (P > 0.05). In conclusion, heat accumulated during sequential drilling, with size difference being insignificant. K wire produced more heat than its twist-drill counterparts. This study has demonstrated the heat accumulation phenomenon and its significant effect on temperature. Maximizing the drilling field and reducing the number of drill passes may decrease bone injury.

  4. Analytic sequential methods for detecting network intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xinjia; Walker, Ernest

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we propose an analytic sequential methods for detecting port-scan attackers which routinely perform random "portscans" of IP addresses to find vulnerable servers to compromise. In addition to rigorously control the probability of falsely implicating benign remote hosts as malicious, our method performs significantly faster than other current solutions. We have developed explicit formulae for quick determination of the parameters of the new detection algorithm.

  5. Sequential decision making and stochastic networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmaghraby, S.

    1980-01-01

    To solve the problems inherent in working with sequential decision processes, it is proposed to (1) utilize concepts of dominance through bounding in the decision processes (DP) formalism to reduce the amount of computing required. This advocates the marrying of DP recursion and Branch-and-Bound methodology; and (2) relax the requirement of strict optimality in the search over the state space, and be content with a tolerable error.

  6. Heat accumulation during sequential cortical bone drilling.

    PubMed

    Palmisano, Andrew C; Tai, Bruce L; Belmont, Barry; Irwin, Todd A; Shih, Albert; Holmes, James R

    2016-03-01

    Significant research exists regarding heat production during single-hole bone drilling. No published data exist regarding repetitive sequential drilling. This study elucidates the phenomenon of heat accumulation for sequential drilling with both Kirschner wires (K wires) and standard two-flute twist drills. It was hypothesized that cumulative heat would result in a higher temperature with each subsequent drill pass. Nine holes in a 3 × 3 array were drilled sequentially on moistened cadaveric tibia bone kept at body temperature (about 37 °C). Four thermocouples were placed at the center of four adjacent holes and 2 mm below the surface. A battery-driven hand drill guided by a servo-controlled motion system was used. Six samples were drilled with each tool (2.0 mm K wire and 2.0 and 2.5 mm standard drills). K wire drilling increased temperature from 5 °C at the first hole to 20 °C at holes 6 through 9. A similar trend was found in standard drills with less significant increments. The maximum temperatures of both tools increased from <0.5 °C to nearly 13 °C. The difference between drill sizes was found to be insignificant (P > 0.05). In conclusion, heat accumulated during sequential drilling, with size difference being insignificant. K wire produced more heat than its twist-drill counterparts. This study has demonstrated the heat accumulation phenomenon and its significant effect on temperature. Maximizing the drilling field and reducing the number of drill passes may decrease bone injury. PMID:26334198

  7. Disentangling the Correlated Evolution of Monogamy and Cooperation.

    PubMed

    Dillard, Jacqueline R; Westneat, David F

    2016-07-01

    Lifetime genetic monogamy, by increasing sibling relatedness, has been proposed as an important causal factor in the evolution of altruism. Monogamy, however, could influence the subsequent evolution of cooperation in other ways. We present several alternative, non-mutually exclusive, evolutionary processes that could explain the correlated evolution of monogamy and cooperation. Our analysis of these possibilities reveals that many ecological or social factors can affect all three variables of Hamilton's Rule simultaneously, thus calling for a more holistic, systems-level approach to studying the evolution of social traits. This perspective reveals novel dimensions to coevolutionary relationships and provides solutions for assigning causality in complex cases of correlated social trait evolution, such as the sequential evolution of monogamy and cooperation. PMID:27156754

  8. Disentangling the Correlated Evolution of Monogamy and Cooperation.

    PubMed

    Dillard, Jacqueline R; Westneat, David F

    2016-07-01

    Lifetime genetic monogamy, by increasing sibling relatedness, has been proposed as an important causal factor in the evolution of altruism. Monogamy, however, could influence the subsequent evolution of cooperation in other ways. We present several alternative, non-mutually exclusive, evolutionary processes that could explain the correlated evolution of monogamy and cooperation. Our analysis of these possibilities reveals that many ecological or social factors can affect all three variables of Hamilton's Rule simultaneously, thus calling for a more holistic, systems-level approach to studying the evolution of social traits. This perspective reveals novel dimensions to coevolutionary relationships and provides solutions for assigning causality in complex cases of correlated social trait evolution, such as the sequential evolution of monogamy and cooperation.

  9. Compressive Sequential Learning for Action Similarity Labeling.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jie; Liu, Li; Zhang, Zhaoxiang; Wang, Yunhong; Shao, Ling

    2016-02-01

    Human action recognition in videos has been extensively studied in recent years due to its wide range of applications. Instead of classifying video sequences into a number of action categories, in this paper, we focus on a particular problem of action similarity labeling (ASLAN), which aims at verifying whether a pair of videos contain the same type of action or not. To address this challenge, a novel approach called compressive sequential learning (CSL) is proposed by leveraging the compressive sensing theory and sequential learning. We first project data points to a low-dimensional space by effectively exploring an important property in compressive sensing: the restricted isometry property. In particular, a very sparse measurement matrix is adopted to reduce the dimensionality efficiently. We then learn an ensemble classifier for measuring similarities between pairwise videos by iteratively minimizing its empirical risk with the AdaBoost strategy on the training set. Unlike conventional AdaBoost, the weak learner for each iteration is not explicitly defined and its parameters are learned through greedy optimization. Furthermore, an alternative of CSL named compressive sequential encoding is developed as an encoding technique and followed by a linear classifier to address the similarity-labeling problem. Our method has been systematically evaluated on four action data sets: ASLAN, KTH, HMDB51, and Hollywood2, and the results show the effectiveness and superiority of our method for ASLAN.

  10. Multiple-acid equilibria in adsorption of carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Husson, S.M.; King, C.J.

    1999-02-01

    Equilibria were measured for adsorption of carboxylic acids from aqueous, binary-acid mixtures of lactic and succinic acids and acetic and formic acids onto basic polymeric sorbents. The experimentally determined adsorption isotherms compared well with model predictions, confirming that simple extensions from adsorption of individual acids apply. Fixed-bed studies were carried out that establish the efficacy of chromatographic fractionation of lactic and succinic acids using basic polymeric sorbents. Finally, sequential thermal and solvent regeneration of lactic and acetic acid-laden sorbents was investigated as a method to fractionate among coadsorbed volatile and nonvolatile acids. Essentially complete removal of the acetic acid from the acid-laden sorbent was achieved by vaporization under the conditions used; a small amount of loss of lactic acid (about 11%) was observed.

  11. Persistent cooperators in nature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinsheng; Guo, Wanlin

    2010-12-21

    The evolution and maintenance of cooperation fascinated researchers for several decades. Recently, theoretical models and experimental evidence show that costly punishment may facilitate cooperation in human societies. The puzzle how the costly punishment behaviour evolves can be solved under voluntary participation. Could the punishers emerge if participation is compulsory? Is the punishment inevitably a selfish behaviour or an altruistic behaviour? The motivations behind punishment are still an enigma. Based on public goods interactions, we present a model in which just a certain portion of the public good is divided equally among all members. The other portion is distributed to contributors when paying a second cost. The contributors who are willing to pay a second cost are called the persistent cooperators (PC), indicating their desire to retrieve the proportion of the payoff derived from their own contributions with persistent efforts. We show that the persistent cooperators can be costly punishers, which may account for the origin of human costly punishment behaviour under compulsory participation. In this sense our models may show theoretically that the original motivation behind punishment is to retrieve deserved payoff from their own contributions, a selfish incentive. But the persistent cooperators can also flourish or dominate the population in other situations. We list many real examples in which contributors are the persistent cooperators, and they benefit. This indicates a simple norm promoting cooperation: contributing more and gaining more.

  12. Network modularity promotes cooperation.

    PubMed

    Marcoux, Marianne; Lusseau, David

    2013-05-01

    Cooperation in animals and humans is widely observed even if evolutionary biology theories predict the evolution of selfish individuals. Previous game theory models have shown that cooperation can evolve when the game takes place in a structured population such as a social network because it limits interactions between individuals. Modularity, the natural division of a network into groups, is a key characteristic of all social networks but the influence of this crucial social feature on the evolution of cooperation has never been investigated. Here, we provide novel pieces of evidence that network modularity promotes the evolution of cooperation in 2-person prisoner's dilemma games. By simulating games on social networks of different structures, we show that modularity shapes interactions between individuals favouring the evolution of cooperation. Modularity provides a simple mechanism for the evolution of cooperation without having to invoke complicated mechanisms such as reputation or punishment, or requiring genetic similarity among individuals. Thus, cooperation can evolve over wider social contexts than previously reported.

  13. Adsorption of chlorophenol, chloroaniline and methylene blue on fuel oil fly ash.

    PubMed

    Andini, Salvatore; Cioffi, Raffaele; Colangelo, Francesco; Montagnaro, Fabio; Santoro, Luciano

    2008-09-15

    Fuel oil fly ash has been tested as low-cost carbon-based adsorbent of 2-chlorophenol (CP), 2-chloroaniline (CA) and methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solutions. In all the cases the adsorption was found to be of cooperative type. Different adsorption capacities were found for the three organics. Specifically, it was highest for 2-chlorophenol, reaching about 70 mg g(-1), and quite lower in the other two cases, that is about 47 and 36 mg g(-1) for methylene blue and 2-chloroaniline, respectively. Varying the initial pH and adding KCl were found to have different effects on the adsorption of the three organics. In particular, the presence of other ions had no effect on the adsorption of methylene blue, adverse effect in the case of 2-chlorophenol and enhancing effect in the case of 2-chloroaniline.

  14. Optimal scheduling of multispacecraft refueling based on cooperative maneuver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Bingxiao; Zhao, Yong; Dutta, Atri; Yu, Jing; Chen, Xiaoqian

    2015-06-01

    The scheduling of multispacecraft refueling based on cooperative maneuver in a circular orbit is studied in this paper. In the proposed scheme, both of the single service vehicle (SSV) and the target satellite (TS) perform the orbital transfer to complete the rendezvous at the service places. When a TS is refueled by the SSV, it returns to its original working slot to continue its normal function. In this way, the SSV refuels the TS one by one. A MINLP model for the mission is first built, then a two-level hybrid optimization approach is proposed for determining the strategy, and the optimal solution is successfully obtained by using an algorithm which is a combination of Multi-island Genetic Algorithm and Sequential Quadratic Programming. Results show the cooperative strategy can save around 27.31% in fuel, compared with the non-cooperative strategy in which only the SSV would maneuver in the example considered. Three conclusions can be drawn based on the numerical simulations for the evenly distributed constellations. Firstly, in the cooperative strategy one of the service positions is the initial location of the SSV, other service positions are also target slots, i.e. not all targets need to maneuver, and there may be more than one TS serviced in a given service position. Secondly, the efficiency gains for the cooperative strategy are higher for larger transferred fuel mass. Thirdly, the cooperative strategy is less efficient for targets with larger spacecraft mass.

  15. Correlated pay-offs are key to cooperation.

    PubMed

    Taborsky, Michael; Frommen, Joachim G; Riehl, Christina

    2016-02-01

    The general belief that cooperation and altruism in social groups result primarily from kin selection has recently been challenged, not least because results from cooperatively breeding insects and vertebrates have shown that groups may be composed mainly of non-relatives. This allows testing predictions of reciprocity theory without the confounding effect of relatedness. Here, we review complementary and alternative evolutionary mechanisms to kin selection theory and provide empirical examples of cooperative behaviour among unrelated individuals in a wide range of taxa. In particular, we focus on the different forms of reciprocity and on their underlying decision rules, asking about evolutionary stability, the conditions selecting for reciprocity and the factors constraining reciprocal cooperation. We find that neither the cognitive requirements of reciprocal cooperation nor the often sequential nature of interactions are insuperable stumbling blocks for the evolution of reciprocity. We argue that simple decision rules such as 'help anyone if helped by someone' should get more attention in future research, because empirical studies show that animals apply such rules, and theoretical models find that they can create stable levels of cooperation under a wide range of conditions. Owing to its simplicity, behaviour based on such a heuristic may in fact be ubiquitous. Finally, we argue that the evolution of exchange and trading of service and commodities among social partners needs greater scientific focus. PMID:26729924

  16. Protein Adsorption in Three Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Vogler, Erwin A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical work clarifying the physical chemistry of blood-protein adsorption from aqueous-buffer solution to various kinds of surfaces is reviewed and interpreted within the context of biomaterial applications, especially toward development of cardiovascular biomaterials. The importance of this subject in biomaterials surface science is emphasized by reducing the “protein-adsorption problem” to three core questions that require quantitative answer. An overview of the protein-adsorption literature identifies some of the sources of inconsistency among many investigators participating in more than five decades of focused research. A tutorial on the fundamental biophysical chemistry of protein adsorption sets the stage for a detailed discussion of the kinetics and thermodynamics of protein adsorption, including adsorption competition between two proteins for the same adsorbent immersed in a binary-protein mixture. Both kinetics and steady-state adsorption can be rationalized using a single interpretive paradigm asserting that protein molecules partition from solution into a three-dimensional (3D) interphase separating bulk solution from the physical-adsorbent surface. Adsorbed protein collects in one-or-more adsorbed layers, depending on protein size, solution concentration, and adsorbent surface energy (water wettability). The adsorption process begins with the hydration of an adsorbent surface brought into contact with an aqueous-protein solution. Surface hydration reactions instantaneously form a thin, pseudo-2D interface between the adsorbent and protein solution. Protein molecules rapidly diffuse into this newly-formed interface, creating a truly 3D interphase that inflates with arriving proteins and fills to capacity within milliseconds at mg/mL bulk-solution concentrations CB. This inflated interphase subsequently undergoes time-dependent (minutes-to-hours) decrease in volume VI by expulsion of either-or-both interphase water and

  17. Competitive adsorption of arsenate and phosphate onto calcite; experimental results and modeling with CCM and CD-MUSIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sø, Helle Ugilt; Postma, Dieke; Jakobsen, Rasmus; Larsen, Flemming

    2012-09-01

    The competitive adsorption of arsenate and phosphate onto calcite was studied in batch experiments using calcite-equilibrated solutions. The solutions had circum-neutral pH (7-8.3) and covered a wide span in the activity of Ca2+ and CO32-. The results show that the adsorption of arsenate onto calcite is strongly reduced by the presence of phosphate, whereas phosphate adsorption is only slightly reduced by arsenate addition. Simultaneous and sequential addition (3 h apart) yields the same reduction in adsorption, underlining the high reversibility of the system. The reduction in adsorption of both arsenate and phosphate is most likely due to competition for the same sorption sites at the calcite surface, considering the similarity in sorption edges, pKa's and geometry of the two anions. The strong reduction in arsenate adsorption by competition with phosphate suggests that adsorption of arsenate onto calcite is of minor importance in most groundwater aquifers, as phosphate is often present at concentration levels sufficient to significantly reduce arsenate adsorption. The CD-MUSIC model for calcite was used successfully to model adsorption of arsenate and phosphate separately. By combining the models for single sorbate systems the competitive adsorption of phosphate and arsenate onto calcite in the binary system could be predicted. This is in contrast to the constant capacitance model (CCM) which under-predicted the competition when combining the models for single sorbate systems. This study clearly shows the importance of performing competitive adsorption studies for validation of multi-component models and for estimating the mobility of an ion in the environment.

  18. Centrifugal Adsorption Cartridge System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Tsao, Yow-Min D.; Lee, Wenshan

    2004-01-01

    The centrifugal adsorption cartridge system (CACS) is an apparatus that recovers one or more bioproduct(s) from a dilute aqueous solution or suspension flowing from a bioreactor. The CACS can be used both on Earth in unit gravity and in space in low gravity. The CACS can be connected downstream from the bioreactor; alternatively, it can be connected into a flow loop that includes the bioreactor so that the liquid can be recycled. A centrifugal adsorption cartridge in the CACS (see figure) includes two concentric cylinders with a spiral ramp between them. The volume between the inner and outer cylinders, and between the turns of the spiral ramp is packed with an adsorbent material. The inner cylinder is a sieve tube covered with a gas-permeable, hydrophobic membrane. During operation, the liquid effluent from the bioreactor is introduced at one end of the spiral ramp, which then constrains the liquid to flow along the spiral path through the adsorbent material. The spiral ramp also makes the flow more nearly uniform than it would otherwise be, and it minimizes any channeling other than that of the spiral flow itself. The adsorbent material is formulated to selectively capture the bioproduct(s) of interest. The bioproduct(s) can then be stored in bound form in the cartridge or else eluted from the cartridge. The centrifugal effect of the spiral flow is utilized to remove gas bubbles from the liquid. The centrifugal effect forces the bubbles radially inward, toward and through the membrane of the inner cylinder. The gas-permeable, hydrophobic membrane allows the bubbles to enter the inner cylinder while keeping the liquid out. The bubbles that thus enter the cylinder are vented to the atmosphere. The spacing between the ramps determines rate of flow along the spiral, and thereby affects the air-bubble-removal efficiency. The spacing between the ramps also determines the length of the fluid path through the cartridge adsorbent, and thus affects the bioproduct

  19. Sequential Bayesian Detection: A Model-Based Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, E J; Candy, J V

    2007-08-13

    Sequential detection theory has been known for a long time evolving in the late 1940's by Wald and followed by Middleton's classic exposition in the 1960's coupled with the concurrent enabling technology of digital computer systems and the development of sequential processors. Its development, when coupled to modern sequential model-based processors, offers a reasonable way to attack physics-based problems. In this chapter, the fundamentals of the sequential detection are reviewed from the Neyman-Pearson theoretical perspective and formulated for both linear and nonlinear (approximate) Gauss-Markov, state-space representations. We review the development of modern sequential detectors and incorporate the sequential model-based processors as an integral part of their solution. Motivated by a wealth of physics-based detection problems, we show how both linear and nonlinear processors can seamlessly be embedded into the sequential detection framework to provide a powerful approach to solving non-stationary detection problems.

  20. Sequential Bayesian Detection: A Model-Based Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J V

    2008-12-08

    Sequential detection theory has been known for a long time evolving in the late 1940's by Wald and followed by Middleton's classic exposition in the 1960's coupled with the concurrent enabling technology of digital computer systems and the development of sequential processors. Its development, when coupled to modern sequential model-based processors, offers a reasonable way to attack physics-based problems. In this chapter, the fundamentals of the sequential detection are reviewed from the Neyman-Pearson theoretical perspective and formulated for both linear and nonlinear (approximate) Gauss-Markov, state-space representations. We review the development of modern sequential detectors and incorporate the sequential model-based processors as an integral part of their solution. Motivated by a wealth of physics-based detection problems, we show how both linear and nonlinear processors can seamlessly be embedded into the sequential detection framework to provide a powerful approach to solving non-stationary detection problems.

  1. Cooperative Learning Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Sandra

    2003-01-01

    Describes the effectiveness of cooperative learning on discipline problems, interdependence between students, and teacher-student interactions. Explains how to group students and introduces a laboratory activity on covalent and ionic bonds. (YDS)

  2. Cooperative processing data bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasta, Juzar

    1991-01-01

    Cooperative processing for the 1990's using client-server technology is addressed. The main theme is concepts of downsizing from mainframes and minicomputers to workstations on a local area network (LAN). This document is presented in view graph form.

  3. Cooperative Education: Industry Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Geoffrey; McClelland, Alan L.

    1980-01-01

    Contains information from three large chemical companies having a long-standing interest in cooperative education with chemistry students. Questions and answers are provided for specific information regarding DuPont, 3M, and Dow Chemical. (CS)

  4. How Myxobacteria Cooperate.

    PubMed

    Cao, Pengbo; Dey, Arup; Vassallo, Christopher N; Wall, Daniel

    2015-11-20

    Prokaryotes often reside in groups where a high degree of relatedness has allowed the evolution of cooperative behaviors. However, very few bacteria or archaea have made the successful transition from unicellular to obligate multicellular life. A notable exception is the myxobacteria, in which cells cooperate to perform group functions highlighted by fruiting body development, an obligate multicellular function. Like all multicellular organisms, myxobacteria face challenges in how to organize and maintain multicellularity. These challenges include maintaining population homeostasis, carrying out tissue repair and regulating the behavior of non-cooperators. Here, we describe the major cooperative behaviors that myxobacteria use: motility, predation and development. In addition, this review emphasizes recent discoveries in the social behavior of outer membrane exchange, wherein kin share outer membrane contents. Finally, we review evidence that outer membrane exchange may be involved in regulating population homeostasis, thus serving as a social tool for myxobacteria to make the cyclic transitions from unicellular to multicellular states. PMID:26254571

  5. Cooperative Education Abroad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowles, Asa S.

    1978-01-01

    Although cooperative education may be uniquely American, other nations place great importance on relating work and education. Types of programs, calendars and schedules are reviewed, and global patterns are described. (Author/LBH)

  6. Cooperative Learning in Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeler, Carolyn M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Formal use of cooperative learning techniques proved effective in improving student performance and retention in a freshman level statistics course. Lectures interspersed with group activities proved effective in increasing conceptual understanding and overall class performance. (11 references) (Author)

  7. An EXAFS study on the effects of natural organic matter and the expandability of clay minerals on cesium adsorption and mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Q. H.; Tanaka, M.; Tanaka, K.; Sakaguchi, A.; Takahashi, Y.

    2014-06-01

    The relationship between cesium (Cs) adsorption on clay minerals with various expandabilities and Cs mobility in environment was investigated using sequential extraction, batch adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), generalized adsorption model (GAM), and Cs LIII-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analyses with molecular simulations using the density functional theory (DFT). In particular, the difference between the affinities of illite (non-expansion) and vermiculite (intermediate expansion) for Cs and the effect of humic acid (HA) addition on the Cs/clay mineral system were highlighted in this study. These two factors affect Cs mobility and bioavailability in surface soil and sediments. The batch adsorption results showed that Cs adsorption was inhibited to some extent in the ternary clay + HA + Cs system because of (i) the blocked access of Cs to the frayed edge site (FES) and type II site [inner-sphere (IS) complex in GAM] by HA, and (ii) the reduced availability of the interlayer site in vermiculite. EXAFS analysis further confirmed that the adsorbed Cs in clay minerals was drastically changed by the sequential addition of HA. In addition, the dominant IS complex in the illite + Cs and illite + Cs + HA systems (in which HA was added after Cs adsorption on illite) can be converted to the outer-sphere (OS) complex largely in the illite + HA + Cs system (in which HA was added prior to Cs adsorption). These results are consistent with the sequential extraction and GAM results. The IS complex of dehydrated Cs+ mainly formed at the FES and interlayer site on illite (non-expansion) without resulting in any illite structural changes. However, on vermiculite (intermediate expansion), the dehydrated Cs+ can be adsorbed as an IS complex associated with the siloxane group of the di-trigonal cavity in the tetrahedral SiO4 sheet. This adsorption is accompanied by collapse of the layer, which can be easily coated by HA molecules to prevent Cs fixation

  8. Cooperating mobile robots

    DOEpatents

    Harrington, John J.; Eskridge, Steven E.; Hurtado, John E.; Byrne, Raymond H.

    2004-02-03

    A miniature mobile robot provides a relatively inexpensive mobile robot. A mobile robot for searching an area provides a way for multiple mobile robots in cooperating teams. A robotic system with a team of mobile robots communicating information among each other provides a way to locate a source in cooperation. A mobile robot with a sensor, a communication system, and a processor, provides a way to execute a strategy for searching an area.

  9. Short-Cycle Adsorption Refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, C. K.

    1988-01-01

    Modular adsorption/Joule-Thomson-effect refrigerator offers fast regeneration; adsorption/desorption cycle time expected to be 1 minute. Pressurized hydrogen generated by bank of compressor modules during heating phase passes through system of check valves and expands in Joule-Thomson junction as it enters refrigeration chamber. Hydrogen absorbs heat from load before it is sucked out by another bank of compressor modules in cooling phase.

  10. Surfactant adsorption kinetics in microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Riechers, Birte; Maes, Florine; Akoury, Elias; Semin, Benoît; Gruner, Philipp; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions. Their lifetimes are directly related to the dynamics of surfactants. We design a microfluidic method to measure the kinetics of adsorption of surfactants to the droplet interface, a key process involved in foaming, emulsification, and droplet coarsening. The method is based on the pH decay in the droplet as a direct measurement of the adsorption of a carboxylic acid surfactant to the interface. From the kinetic measurement of the bulk equilibration of the pH, we fully determine the adsorption process of the surfactant. The small droplet size and the convection during the droplet flow ensure that the transport of surfactant through the bulk is not limiting the kinetics of adsorption. To validate our measurements, we show that the adsorption process determines the timescale required to stabilize droplets against coalescence, and we show that the interface should be covered at more than 90% to prevent coalescence. We therefore quantitatively link the process of adsorption/desorption, the stabilization of emulsions, and the kinetics of solute partitioning—here through ion exchange—unraveling the timescales governing these processes. Our method can be further generalized to other surfactants, including nonionic surfactants, by making use of fluorophore–surfactant interactions. PMID:27688765

  11. PDMS compound adsorption in context.

    PubMed

    Li, Nianzhen; Schwartz, Michael; Ionescu-Zanetti, Cristian

    2009-02-01

    Soft lithography of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), an elastomeric polymer, has enabled rapid and inexpensive fabrication of microfluidic devices for various biotechnology applications. However, concerns remain about adsorption of compounds on PDMS surfaces because of its porosity and hydrophobicity. Here, the adsorption of 2 small fluorescent dyes of different hydrophobicity (calcein and 5- (and 6-)carboxytetramethylrhodamine (TMR)) on PDMS surface has been systematically characterized, and PDMS adsorption has been compared with 2 traditional substrates: glass and polystyrene. To characterize adsorption in a regimen that is more relevant to microfluidic applications, the adsorption and desorption of the 2 compounds in PDMS microfluidic channels under flow conditions were also studied. Results showed that there was minimal adsorption of the hydrophilic compound calcein on PDMS, whereas the more hydrophobic TMR adsorbed on PDMS up to 4 times of that on glass or polystyrene. Under flow conditions, the desorption profiles and times needed to drop desorbed compound concentrations to negligible levels (desorption time constant, 10-42 s) were characterized. In the worst case scenario, after a 4-min exposure to TMR, 4 min of continuous wash resulted in compound concentrations in the microchannels to drop to values below 2 x 10(- 5) of the initial concentration.

  12. A sequential nonparametric pattern classification algorithm based on the Wald SPRT. [Sequential Probability Ratio Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poage, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    A sequential nonparametric pattern classification procedure is presented. The method presented is an estimated version of the Wald sequential probability ratio test (SPRT). This method utilizes density function estimates, and the density estimate used is discussed, including a proof of convergence in probability of the estimate to the true density function. The classification procedure proposed makes use of the theory of order statistics, and estimates of the probabilities of misclassification are given. The procedure was tested on discriminating between two classes of Gaussian samples and on discriminating between two kinds of electroencephalogram (EEG) responses.

  13. Cooperation and the common good.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Rufus A; Rodrigues, António M M

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we draw the attention of biologists to a result from the economic literature, which suggests that when individuals are engaged in a communal activity of benefit to all, selection may favour cooperative sharing of resources even among non-relatives. Provided that group members all invest some resources in the public good, they should refrain from conflict over the division of these resources. The reason is that, given diminishing returns on investment in public and private goods, claiming (or ceding) a greater share of total resources only leads to the actor (or its competitors) investing more in the public good, such that the marginal costs and benefits of investment remain in balance. This cancels out any individual benefits of resource competition. We illustrate how this idea may be applied in the context of biparental care, using a sequential game in which parents first compete with one another over resources, and then choose how to allocate the resources they each obtain to care of their joint young (public good) versus their own survival and future reproductive success (private good). We show that when the two parents both invest in care to some extent, they should refrain from any conflict over the division of resources. The same effect can also support asymmetric outcomes in which one parent competes for resources and invests in care, whereas the other does not invest but refrains from competition. The fact that the caring parent gains higher fitness pay-offs at these equilibria suggests that abandoning a partner is not always to the latter's detriment, when the potential for resource competition is taken into account, but may instead be of benefit to the 'abandoned' mate. PMID:26729926

  14. A wireless sequentially actuated microvalve system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Seung-Ki; Yoon, Yong-Kyu; Jeon, Hye-Seon; Seo, Soonmin; Park, Jung-Hwan

    2013-04-01

    A wireless microvalve system was fabricated based on induction heating for flow control in microfluidics by sequential valve opening. In this approach, we used paraffin wax as a flow plug, which can be changed from solid to liquid with adjacent heating elements operated by induction heating. Programmable opening of valves was devised by using different thermal responses of metal discs to a magnetic field. Copper and nickel discs with a diameter of 2.5 mm and various thicknesses (50, 100 and 200 µm) were prepared as heating elements by a laser cutting method, and they were integrated in the microfluidic channel as part of the microvalve. A calorimetric test was used to measure the thermal properties of the discs in terms of kinds of metal and disc thickness. Sequential openings of the microvalves were performed using the difference in the thermal response of 100 µm thick copper disc and 50 µm thick nickel disc for short-interval openings and 200 µm thick copper disc and 100-µm-thick nickel disc for long-interval openings. The thermal effect on fluid samples as a result of induction heating of the discs was studied by investigating lysozyme denaturation. More heat was generated in heating elements made of copper than in those made of nickel, implying differences in the thermal response of heating elements made of copper and nickel. Also, the thickness of the heating elements affected the thermal response in the elements. Valve openings for short intervals of 1-5 s and long intervals of 15-23 s were achieved by using two sets of heating elements. There was no significant change in lysozyme activity by increasing the temperature of the heating discs. This study demonstrates that a wireless sequentially actuated microvalve system can provide programmed valve opening, portability, ease of fabrication and operation, disposability, and low cost.

  15. Protein Adsorption in Three Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Vogler, Erwin A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical work clarifying the physical chemistry of blood-protein adsorption from aqueous-buffer solution to various kinds of surfaces is reviewed and interpreted within the context of biomaterial applications, especially toward development of cardiovascular biomaterials. The importance of this subject in biomaterials surface science is emphasized by reducing the “protein-adsorption problem” to three core questions that require quantitative answer. An overview of the protein-adsorption literature identifies some of the sources of inconsistency among many investigators participating in more than five decades of focused research. A tutorial on the fundamental biophysical chemistry of protein adsorption sets the stage for a detailed discussion of the kinetics and thermodynamics of protein adsorption, including adsorption competition between two proteins for the same adsorbent immersed in a binary-protein mixture. Both kinetics and steady-state adsorption can be rationalized using a single interpretive paradigm asserting that protein molecules partition from solution into a three-dimensional (3D) interphase separating bulk solution from the physical-adsorbent surface. Adsorbed protein collects in one-or-more adsorbed layers, depending on protein size, solution concentration, and adsorbent surface energy (water wettability). The adsorption process begins with the hydration of an adsorbent surface brought into contact with an aqueous-protein solution. Surface hydration reactions instantaneously form a thin, pseudo-2D interface between the adsorbent and protein solution. Protein molecules rapidly diffuse into this newly-formed interface, creating a truly 3D interphase that inflates with arriving proteins and fills to capacity within milliseconds at mg/mL bulk-solution concentrations CB. This inflated interphase subsequently undergoes time-dependent (minutes-to-hours) decrease in volume VI by expulsion of either-or-both interphase water and

  16. Sequential cooling insert for turbine stator vane

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Russell B; Krueger, Judson J; Plank, William L

    2014-04-01

    A sequential impingement cooling insert for a turbine stator vane that forms a double impingement for the pressure and suction sides of the vane or a triple impingement. The insert is formed from a sheet metal formed in a zigzag shape that forms a series of alternating impingement cooling channels with return air channels, where pressure side and suction side impingement cooling plates are secured over the zigzag shaped main piece. Another embodiment includes the insert formed from one or two blocks of material in which the impingement channels and return air channels are machined into each block.

  17. Sequential decision rules for failure detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, E. Y.; Willsky, A. S.

    1981-01-01

    The formulation of the decision making of a failure detection process as a Bayes sequential decision problem (BSDP) provides a simple conceptualization of the decision rule design problem. As the optimal Bayes rule is not computable, a methodology that is based on the Baysian approach and aimed at a reduced computational requirement is developed for designing suboptimal rules. A numerical algorithm is constructed to facilitate the design and performance evaluation of these suboptimal rules. The result of applying this design methodology to an example shows that this approach is a useful one.

  18. Nonlinear sequential laminates reproducing hollow sphere assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idiart, Martín I.

    2007-07-01

    A special class of nonlinear porous materials with isotropic 'sequentially laminated' microstructures is found to reproduce exactly the hydrostatic behavior of 'hollow sphere assemblages'. It is then argued that this result supports the conjecture that Gurson's approximate criterion for plastic porous materials, and its viscoplastic extension of Leblond et al. (1994), may actually yield rigorous upper bounds for the hydrostatic flow stress of porous materials containing an isotropic, but otherwise arbitrary, distribution of porosity. To cite this article: M.I. Idiart, C. R. Mecanique 335 (2007).

  19. Estimation After a Group Sequential Trial

    PubMed Central

    Milanzi, Elasma; Molenberghs, Geert; Alonso, Ariel; Kenward, Michael G.; Tsiatis, Anastasios A.; Davidian, Marie; Verbeke, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Group sequential trials are one important instance of studies for which the sample size is not fixed a priori but rather takes one of a finite set of pre-specified values, dependent on the observed data. Much work has been devoted to the inferential consequences of this design feature. Molenberghs et al (2012) and Milanzi et al (2012) reviewed and extended the existing literature, focusing on a collection of seemingly disparate, but related, settings, namely completely random sample sizes, group sequential studies with deterministic and random stopping rules, incomplete data, and random cluster sizes. They showed that the ordinary sample average is a viable option for estimation following a group sequential trial, for a wide class of stopping rules and for random outcomes with a distribution in the exponential family. Their results are somewhat surprising in the sense that the sample average is not optimal, and further, there does not exist an optimal, or even, unbiased linear estimator. However, the sample average is asymptotically unbiased, both conditionally upon the observed sample size as well as marginalized over it. By exploiting ignorability they showed that the sample average is the conventional maximum likelihood estimator. They also showed that a conditional maximum likelihood estimator is finite sample unbiased, but is less efficient than the sample average and has the larger mean squared error. Asymptotically, the sample average and the conditional maximum likelihood estimator are equivalent. This previous work is restricted, however, to the situation in which the the random sample size can take only two values, N = n or N = 2n. In this paper, we consider the more practically useful setting of sample sizes in a the finite set {n1, n2, …, nL}. It is shown that the sample average is then a justifiable estimator , in the sense that it follows from joint likelihood estimation, and it is consistent and asymptotically unbiased. We also show why simulations

  20. Sequential quantum teleportation of optical coherent states

    SciTech Connect

    Yonezawa, Hidehiro; Furusawa, Akira; Loock, Peter van

    2007-09-15

    We demonstrate a sequence of two quantum teleportations of optical coherent states, combining two high-fidelity teleporters for continuous variables. In our experiment, the individual teleportation fidelities are evaluated as F{sub 1}=0.70{+-}0.02 and F{sub 2}=0.75{+-}0.02, while the fidelity between the input and the sequentially teleported states is determined as F{sup (2)}=0.57{+-}0.02. This still exceeds the optimal fidelity of one half for classical teleportation of arbitrary coherent states and almost attains the value of the first (unsequential) quantum teleportation experiment with optical coherent states.

  1. Sequential cooling insert for turbine stator vane

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Russel B; Krueger, Judson J; Plank, William L

    2014-11-04

    A sequential impingement cooling insert for a turbine stator vane that forms a double impingement for the pressure and suction sides of the vane or a triple impingement. The insert is formed from a sheet metal formed in a zigzag shape that forms a series of alternating impingement cooling channels with return air channels, where pressure side and suction side impingement cooling plates are secured over the zigzag shaped main piece. Another embodiment includes the insert formed from one or two blocks of material in which the impingement channels and return air channels are machined into each block.

  2. Human fibrinogen adsorption on positively charged latex particles.

    PubMed

    Zeliszewska, Paulina; Bratek-Skicki, Anna; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Cieśla, Michał

    2014-09-23

    Fibrinogen (Fb) adsorption on positively charged latex particles (average diameter of 800 nm) was studied using the microelectrophoretic and the concentration depletion methods based on AFM imaging. Monolayers on latex were adsorbed from diluted bulk solutions at pH 7.4 and an ionic strength in the range of 10(-3) to 0.15 M where fibrinogen molecules exhibited an average negative charge. The electrophoretic mobility of the latex after controlled fibrinogen adsorption was systematically measured. A monotonic decrease in the electrophoretic mobility of fibrinogen-covered latex was observed for all ionic strengths. The results of these experiments were interpreted according to the three-dimensional electrokinetic model. It was also determined using the concentration depletion method that fibrinogen adsorption was irreversible and the maximum coverage was equal to 0.6 mg m(-2) for ionic strength 10(-3) M and 1.3 mg m(-2) for ionic strength 0.15 M. The increase of the maximum coverage was confirmed by theoretical modeling based on the random sequential adsorption approach. Paradoxically, the maximum coverage of fibrinogen on positively charged latex particles was more than two times lower than the maximum coverage obtained for negative latex particles (3.2 mg m(-2)) at pH 7.4 and ionic strength of 0.15 M. This was interpreted as a result of the side-on adsorption of fibrinogen molecules with their negatively charged core attached to the positively charged latex surface. The stability and acid base properties of fibrinogen monolayers on latex were also determined in pH cycling experiments where it was observed that there were no irreversible conformational changes in the fibrinogen monolayers. Additionally, the zeta potential of monolayers was more positive than the zeta potential of fibrinogen in the bulk, which proves a heterogeneous charge distribution. These experimental data reveal a new, side-on adsorption mechanism of fibrinogen on positively charged surfaces and

  3. Hybrid Computerized Adaptive Testing: From Group Sequential Design to Fully Sequential Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Shiyu; Lin, Haiyan; Chang, Hua-Hua; Douglas, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Computerized adaptive testing (CAT) and multistage testing (MST) have become two of the most popular modes in large-scale computer-based sequential testing. Though most designs of CAT and MST exhibit strength and weakness in recent large-scale implementations, there is no simple answer to the question of which design is better because different…

  4. Efficient Controls for Finitely Convergent Sequential Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Herman, Gabor T.

    2010-01-01

    Finding a feasible point that satisfies a set of constraints is a common task in scientific computing: examples are the linear feasibility problem and the convex feasibility problem. Finitely convergent sequential algorithms can be used for solving such problems; an example of such an algorithm is ART3, which is defined in such a way that its control is cyclic in the sense that during its execution it repeatedly cycles through the given constraints. Previously we found a variant of ART3 whose control is no longer cyclic, but which is still finitely convergent and in practice it usually converges faster than ART3 does. In this paper we propose a general methodology for automatic transformation of finitely convergent sequential algorithms in such a way that (i) finite convergence is retained and (ii) the speed of convergence is improved. The first of these two properties is proven by mathematical theorems, the second is illustrated by applying the algorithms to a practical problem. PMID:20953327

  5. Continuous sequential boundaries for vaccine safety surveillance.

    PubMed

    Li, Rongxia; Stewart, Brock; Weintraub, Eric; McNeil, Michael M

    2014-08-30

    Various recently developed sequential methods have been used to detect signals for post-marketing surveillance in drug and vaccine safety. Among these, the maximized sequential probability ratio test (MaxSPRT) has been used to detect elevated risks of adverse events following vaccination using large healthcare databases. However, a limitation of MaxSPRT is that it only provides a time-invariant flat boundary. In this study, we propose the use of time-varying boundaries for controlling how type I error is distributed throughout the surveillance period. This is especially useful in two scenarios: (i) when we desire generally larger sample sizes before a signal is generated, for example, when early adopters are not representative of the larger population; and (ii) when it is desired for a signal to be generated as early as possible, for example, when the adverse event is considered rare but serious. We consider four specific time-varying boundaries (which we call critical value functions), and we study their statistical power and average time to signal detection. The methodology we present here can be viewed as a generalization or flexible extension of MaxSPRT. PMID:24691986

  6. Multiplexed protein profiling by sequential affinity capture

    PubMed Central

    Ayoglu, Burcu; Birgersson, Elin; Mezger, Anja; Nilsson, Mats; Uhlén, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Antibody microarrays enable parallelized and miniaturized analysis of clinical samples, and have proven to provide novel insights for the analysis of different proteomes. However, there are concerns that the performance of such direct labeling and single antibody assays are prone to off‐target binding due to the sample context. To improve selectivity and sensitivity while maintaining the possibility to conduct multiplexed protein profiling, we developed a multiplexed and semi‐automated sequential capture assay. This novel bead‐based procedure encompasses a first antigen capture, labeling of captured protein targets on magnetic particles, combinatorial target elution and a read‐out by a secondary capture bead array. We demonstrate in a proof‐of‐concept setting that target detection via two sequential affinity interactions reduced off‐target contribution, while lowered background and noise levels, improved correlation to clinical values compared to single binder assays. We also compared sensitivity levels with single binder and classical sandwich assays, explored the possibility for DNA‐based signal amplification, and demonstrate the applicability of the dual capture bead‐based antibody microarray for biomarker analysis. Hence, the described concept enhances the possibilities for antibody array assays to be utilized for protein profiling in body fluids and beyond. PMID:26935855

  7. Noncommutative Biology: Sequential Regulation of Complex Networks.

    PubMed

    Letsou, William; Cai, Long

    2016-08-01

    Single-cell variability in gene expression is important for generating distinct cell types, but it is unclear how cells use the same set of regulatory molecules to specifically control similarly regulated genes. While combinatorial binding of transcription factors at promoters has been proposed as a solution for cell-type specific gene expression, we found that such models resulted in substantial information bottlenecks. We sought to understand the consequences of adopting sequential logic wherein the time-ordering of factors informs the final outcome. We showed that with noncommutative control, it is possible to independently control targets that would otherwise be activated simultaneously using combinatorial logic. Consequently, sequential logic overcomes the information bottleneck inherent in complex networks. We derived scaling laws for two noncommutative models of regulation, motivated by phosphorylation/neural networks and chromosome folding, respectively, and showed that they scale super-exponentially in the number of regulators. We also showed that specificity in control is robust to the loss of a regulator. Lastly, we connected these theoretical results to real biological networks that demonstrate specificity in the context of promiscuity. These results show that achieving a desired outcome often necessitates roundabout steps. PMID:27560383

  8. Noncommutative Biology: Sequential Regulation of Complex Networks

    PubMed Central

    Letsou, William; Cai, Long

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell variability in gene expression is important for generating distinct cell types, but it is unclear how cells use the same set of regulatory molecules to specifically control similarly regulated genes. While combinatorial binding of transcription factors at promoters has been proposed as a solution for cell-type specific gene expression, we found that such models resulted in substantial information bottlenecks. We sought to understand the consequences of adopting sequential logic wherein the time-ordering of factors informs the final outcome. We showed that with noncommutative control, it is possible to independently control targets that would otherwise be activated simultaneously using combinatorial logic. Consequently, sequential logic overcomes the information bottleneck inherent in complex networks. We derived scaling laws for two noncommutative models of regulation, motivated by phosphorylation/neural networks and chromosome folding, respectively, and showed that they scale super-exponentially in the number of regulators. We also showed that specificity in control is robust to the loss of a regulator. Lastly, we connected these theoretical results to real biological networks that demonstrate specificity in the context of promiscuity. These results show that achieving a desired outcome often necessitates roundabout steps. PMID:27560383

  9. Sequential Stenting for Extensive Malignant Airway Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Takahama, Makoto; Nakajima, Ryu; Kimura, Michitaka; Tei, Keiko; Yamamoto, Ryoji

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Malignant airway stenosis extending from the bronchial bifurcation to the lower lobar orifice was treated with airway stenting. We herein examine the effectiveness of airway stenting for extensive malignant airway stenosis. Methods: Twelve patients with extensive malignant airway stenosis underwent placement of a silicone Dumon Y stent (Novatech, La Ciotat, France) at the tracheal bifurcation and a metallic Spiral Z-stent (Medico’s Hirata, Osaka, Japan) at either distal side of the Y stent. We retrospectively analyzed the therapeutic efficacy of the sequential placement of these silicone and metallic stents in these 12 patients. Results: The primary disease was lung cancer in eight patients, breast cancer in two patients, tracheal cancer in one patient, and thyroid cancer in one patient. The median survival period after airway stent placement was 46 days. The Hugh–Jones classification and performance status improved in nine patients after airway stenting. One patient had prolonged hemoptysis and died of respiratory tract hemorrhage 15 days after the treatment. Conclusion: Because the initial disease was advanced and aggressive, the prognosis after sequential airway stent placement was significantly poor. However, because respiratory distress decreased after the treatment in most patients, this treatment may be acceptable for selected patients with extensive malignant airway stenosis. PMID:25273272

  10. Irreversible adsorption-driven assembly of nanoparticles at fluid interfaces revealed by a dynamic surface tension probe.

    PubMed

    Bizmark, Navid; Ioannidis, Marios A; Henneke, Dale E

    2014-01-28

    Adsorption-driven self-assembly of nanoparticles at fluid interfaces is a promising bottom-up approach for the preparation of advanced functional materials and devices. Full realization of its potential requires quantitative understanding of the parameters controlling the self-assembly, the structure of nanoparticles at the interface, the barrier properties of the assembly, and the rate of particle attachment. We argue that models of dynamic surface or interfacial tension (DST) appropriate for molecular species break down when the adsorption energy greatly exceeds the mean energy of thermal fluctuations and validate alternative models extending the application of generalized random sequential adsorption theory to nanoparticle adsorption at fluid interfaces. Using a model colloidal system of hydrophobic, charge-stabilized ethyl cellulose nanoparticles at neutral pH, we demonstrate the potential of DST measurements to reveal information on the energy of adsorption, the adsorption rate constant, and the energy of particle-interface interaction at different degrees of nanoparticle coverage of the interface. These findings have significant implications for the quantitative description of nanoparticle adsorption at fluid interfaces.

  11. International Cooperation at NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawney, Timothy; Feldstein, Karen

    International cooperation is a cornerstone principle of NASA’s activities, especially within the activities of the Science Mission Directorate. Nearly two thirds of the flight missions in which NASA leads or participates involve international cooperation. Numerous ground based activities also rely on international cooperation, whether because of unique expertise, unique geography, or the need for a global response. Going forward, in an era of tighter budgets and a more integrated global perspective, NASA and the rest of the space agencies around the world will be forced to work more closely together, in a broader array of activities than ever before, in order to be able to afford to push the boundaries of space exploration. The goal of this presentation is to provide an overview of NASA’s current international science cooperative activities. It will include a discussion of why NASA conducts international cooperation and look at the mechanisms through which international cooperation can occur at NASA, including peer-to-peer development of relationships. It will also discuss some of the limiting factors of international cooperation, such as export control, and ways in which to manage those constraints. Finally, the presentation would look at some of the present examples where NASA is working to increase international cooperation and improve coordination. Case studies will be used to demonstrate these mechanisms and concepts. For example, NASA continues to participate in international coordination groups such as the International Mars Exploration Working Group (IMEWG) and International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG), but is expanding into new areas as well. NASA is one of the leaders in expanding and improving international coordination in the area of Near-Earth Object detection, characterization, and mitigation. Having participated in the first meetings of such groups as the International Asteroid Warning Network (IAWN) and Space Missions Planning

  12. From Sequential Extraction to Transport Modeling, Monitored Natural Attenuation as a Remediation Approach for Inorganic Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    POWELL, KIMBERLYR.

    2004-05-25

    Implementation of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) as a remediation method requires a mechanistic understanding of the natural attenuation processes occurring at a given site. For inorganic contaminants, natural attenuation typically involves a decrease in metal toxicity and/or mobility. These natural processes include dilution, dispersion, sorption (including adsorption, absorption, and precipitation), and redox processes. In order to better quantify these processes in terms of metal availability, sequential extraction experiments were carried out on subsurface soil samples impacted by a low pH, high sulfate, metals (Be, Ni, U, As) plume associated with the long-term operation of a coal plant at the Savannah River Site. These laboratory scale studies provide mechanistic information regarding the solid phases in the soils associated with natural attenuation of the contaminant metals. This data provides input to be evaluated in the definition of the contaminant source term as well as transport of contaminants for site transport models.

  13. Removal of polychlorinated phenols in sequential anaerobic-aerobic biofilm reactors packed with tire chips

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, H.S.; Yoo, K.S.; Park, J.K.

    1999-05-01

    Scrap vehicle tire chips were used as packing material for sequential anaerobic-aerobic biofilm reactors to remove persistent chlorinated hydrocarbons. Adsorption capacity of scrap tires was greater under acidic conditions than under basic conditions. However, it was only approximately 0.04 to 0.3% of that of activated carbon. The amount of biomass that attached to the surface of scrap tires was 3.16 and 3.72 mg volatile suspended solids/cm{sup 2} after 14 and 37 days, respectively. Two laboratory-scale, down-flow anaerobic-aerobic biofilm reactors packed with tire chips were operated to remove 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP) and 4-chlorophenol (CP). More than 98% of DCP was dehalogenated to CP in the anaerobic reactor, 70 to 98% of which was subsequently degraded in the aerobic reactor. Scrap tires did not cause any operational problems when used as biofilter media.

  14. Cooper Pair Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valles, James

    One of the recent advances in the field of the Superconductor to Insulator Transition (SIT) has been the discovery and characterization of the Cooper Pair Insulator phase. This bosonic insulator, which consists of localized Cooper pairs, exhibits activated transport and a giant magneto-resistance peak. These features differ markedly from the weakly localized transport that emerges as pairs break at a ``fermionic'' SIT. I will describe how our experiments on films nano-patterned with a nearly triangular array of holes have enabled us to 1) distinguish bosonic insulators from fermionic insulators, 2) show that Cooper pairs, rather than quasi-particles dominate the transport in the Cooper Pair insulator phase, 3) demonstrate that very weak, sub nano-meter thickness inhomogeneities control whether a bosonic or fermionic insulator forms at an SIT and 4) reveal that Cooper pairs disintegrate rather than becoming more tightly bound deep in the localized phase. We have also developed a method, using a magnetic field, to tune flux disorder reversibly in these films. I will present our latest results on the influence of magnetic flux disorder and random gauge fields on phenomena near bosonic SITs. This work was performed in collaboration with M. D. Stewart, Jr., Hung Q. Nguyen, Shawna M. Hollen, Jimmy Joy, Xue Zhang, Gustavo Fernandez, Jeffrey Shainline and Jimmy Xu. It was supported by NSF Grants DMR 1307290 and DMR-0907357.

  15. Sequential probability ratio controllers for safeguards radiation monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fehlau, P.E.; Coop, K.L.; Nixon, K.V.

    1984-01-01

    Sequential hypothesis tests applied to nuclear safeguards accounting methods make the methods more sensitive to detecting diversion. The sequential tests also improve transient signal detection in safeguards radiation monitors. This paper describes three microprocessor control units with sequential probability-ratio tests for detecting transient increases in radiation intensity. The control units are designed for three specific applications: low-intensity monitoring with Poisson probability ratios, higher intensity gamma-ray monitoring where fixed counting intervals are shortened by sequential testing, and monitoring moving traffic where the sequential technique responds to variable-duration signals. The fixed-interval controller shortens a customary 50-s monitoring time to an average of 18 s, making the monitoring delay less bothersome. The controller for monitoring moving vehicles benefits from the sequential technique by maintaining more than half its sensitivity when the normal passage speed doubles.

  16. G-sequentially connectedness for topological groups with operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucuk, Osman; Cakalli, Huseyin

    2016-08-01

    It is a well-known fact that for a Hausdorff topological group X, the limits of convergent sequences in X define a function denoted by lim from the set of all convergent sequences in X to X. This notion has been modified by Connor and Grosse-Erdmann for real functions by replacing lim with an arbitrary linear functional G defined on a linear subspace of the vector space of all real sequences. Recently some authors have extended the concept to the topological group setting and introduced the concepts of G-sequential continuity, G-sequential compactness and G-sequential connectedness. In this work, we present some results about G-sequentially closures, G-sequentially connectedness and fundamental system of G-sequentially open neighbourhoods for topological group with operations which include topological groups, topological rings without identity, R-modules, Lie algebras, Jordan algebras, and many others.

  17. Metal adsorption on mosses: Toward a universal adsorption model.

    PubMed

    González, A G; Pokrovsky, O S

    2014-02-01

    This study quantifies the adsorption of heavy metals on 4 typical moss species used for environmental monitoring in the moss bag technique. The adsorption of Cu(2+), Cd(2+), Ni(2+), Pb(2+) and Zn(2+) onto Hypnum sp., Sphagnum sp., Pseudoscleropodium purum and Brachytecium rutabulum has been investigated using a batch reactor in a wide range of pH (1.3-11.0) and metal concentrations in solution (1.6μM-3.8mM). A Linear Programming Model (LPM) was applied for the experimental data to derive equilibrium constants and the number of surface binding sites. The surface acid-base titration performed for 4 mosses at a pH range of 3-10 in 0.1M NaNO3 demonstrated that Sphagnum sp. is the most efficient adsorbent as it has the maximal number of proton-binding sites on the surface (0.65mmol g(-1)). The pKa computed for all the moss species suggested the presence of 5 major functional groups: phosphodiester, carboxyl, phosphoryl, amine and polyphenols. The results of pH-edge experiments demonstrated that B. rutabulum exhibits the highest percentage of metal adsorption and has the highest number of available sites for most of the metals studied. However, according to the results of the constant pH "Langmuirian" isotherm, Sphagnum sp. can be considered as the strongest adsorbent, although the relative difference from other mosses is within 20%. The LPM was found to satisfactorily fit the experimental data in the full range of the studied solution parameters. The results of this study demonstrate a rather similar pattern of five metal adsorptions on mosses, both as a function of pH and as a metal concentration, which is further corroborated by similar values of adsorption constants. Therefore, despite the species and geographic differences between the mosses, a universal adsorption edge and constant pH adsorption isotherm can be recommended for 4 studied mosses. The quantitative comparison of metal adsorption with other common natural organic and inorganic materials demonstrates

  18. Cooper Pairs in Insulators?!

    SciTech Connect

    James Valles

    2008-07-23

    Nearly 50 years elapsed between the discovery of superconductivity and the emergence of the microscopic theory describing this zero resistance state. The explanation required a novel phase of matter in which conduction electrons joined in weakly bound pairs and condensed with other pairs into a single quantum state. Surprisingly, this Cooper pair formation has also been invoked to account for recently uncovered high-resistance or insulating phases of matter. To address this possibility, we have used nanotechnology to create an insulating system that we can probe directly for Cooper pairs. I will present the evidence that Cooper pairs exist and dominate the electrical transport in these insulators and I will discuss how these findings provide new insight into superconductor to insulator quantum phase transitions. 

  19. Cooper Pairs in Insulators?!

    ScienceCinema

    James Valles

    2016-07-12

    Nearly 50 years elapsed between the discovery of superconductivity and the emergence of the microscopic theory describing this zero resistance state. The explanation required a novel phase of matter in which conduction electrons joined in weakly bound pairs and condensed with other pairs into a single quantum state. Surprisingly, this Cooper pair formation has also been invoked to account for recently uncovered high-resistance or insulating phases of matter. To address this possibility, we have used nanotechnology to create an insulating system that we can probe directly for Cooper pairs. I will present the evidence that Cooper pairs exist and dominate the electrical transport in these insulators and I will discuss how these findings provide new insight into superconductor to insulator quantum phase transitions. 

  20. Competitive adsorption, release and speciation of heavy metals in the Yellow River sediments, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Qingyun; He, Jiang; Xue, Hongxi; Lü, Changwei; Liang, Ying; Saruli; Sun, Ying; Shen, Lili

    2007-10-01

    The competitive adsorption and the release of selected heavy metals and their speciation distribution before and after adsorption in the Yellow River sediments are discussed. The adsorption of metals onto sediments increases with increasing pH value and decreases with increasing ionic strength. The competitive coefficient K c and the distribution coefficient K d are obtained to analyze the competitive abilities of selected heavy metals, which are ranked as Pb > Cu >> Zn > Cd. The competition among selected heavy metals becomes more impetuous with increasing ion concentration in water. Speciation analysis was done by an improved analytical procedure involving five steps of sequential extraction. Cu, Pb and Zn were mainly transformed into the carbonate-bound form (50.8-87.7%) in adsorption. Most of (60.7-77.3%) Cd was transformed into the exchangeable form, and the percentage of carbonate-bound Cd was 19.7-30.4%. The release reaction was so quick that the release capacity of selected heavy metals from sediments to aqueous solution reached half of the maximum value only in 30 s. As opposed to adsorption, the release capacities of selected heavy metals were ranked as Cd > Zn >> Cu > Pb. In this study, Cd produces the most severe environmental hazards, because its concentration in the release solution is 85.8 times more than the human health criteria of US EPA.

  1. Fractional Statistical Theory of Adsorption of Polyatomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardo, J. L.; Ramirez-Pastor, A. J.; Romá, F.

    2004-10-01

    A new theoretical description of fractional statistical theory of adsorption (FSTA) phenomena is presented based on Haldane’s statistics. Thermodynamic functions for adsorption of polyatomics are analytically developed. The entropy is characterized by an exclusion parameter g, which relates to the configuration of the admolecules and surface geometry. FSTA provides a simple framework to address a large class of complex adsorption systems. Comparisons of theoretical adsorption isotherms with experiments and simulations indicate that adsorption configuration and adsorption energy can accurately be assessed from this theory.

  2. Fractional statistical theory of adsorption of polyatomics.

    PubMed

    Riccardo, J L; Ramirez-Pastor, A J; Romá, F

    2004-10-29

    A new theoretical description of fractional statistical theory of adsorption (FSTA) phenomena is presented based on Haldane's statistics. Thermodynamic functions for adsorption of polyatomics are analytically developed. The entropy is characterized by an exclusion parameter g, which relates to the configuration of the admolecules and surface geometry. FSTA provides a simple framework to address a large class of complex adsorption systems. Comparisons of theoretical adsorption isotherms with experiments and simulations indicate that adsorption configuration and adsorption energy can accurately be assessed from this theory. PMID:15525184

  3. Discrimination between sequential and simultaneous virtual channels with electrical hearing

    PubMed Central

    Landsberger, David; Galvin, John J.

    2011-01-01

    In cochlear implants (CIs), simultaneous or sequential stimulation of adjacent electrodes can produce intermediate pitch percepts between those of the component electrodes. However, it is unclear whether simultaneous and sequential virtual channels (VCs) can be discriminated. In this study, CI users were asked to discriminate simultaneous and sequential VCs; discrimination was measured for monopolar (MP) and bipolar + 1 stimulation (BP + 1), i.e., relatively broad and focused stimulation modes. For sequential VCs, the interpulse interval (IPI) varied between 0.0 and 1.8 ms. All stimuli were presented at comfortably loud, loudness-balanced levels at a 250 pulse per second per electrode (ppse) stimulation rate. On average, CI subjects were able to reliably discriminate between sequential and simultaneous VCs. While there was no significant effect of IPI or stimulation mode on VC discrimination, some subjects exhibited better VC discrimination with BP + 1 stimulation. Subjects’ discrimination between sequential and simultaneous VCs was correlated with electrode discrimination, suggesting that spatial selectivity may influence perception of sequential VCs. To maintain equal loudness, sequential VC amplitudes were nearly double those of simultaneous VCs, presumably resulting in a broader spread of excitation. These results suggest that perceptual differences between simultaneous and sequential VCs might be explained by differences in the spread of excitation. PMID:21895094

  4. Sequential generation of matrix-product states in cavity QED

    SciTech Connect

    Schoen, C.; Hammerer, K.; Wolf, M. M.; Cirac, J. I.; Solano, E.

    2007-03-15

    We study the sequential generation of entangled photonic and atomic multiqubit states in the realm of cavity QED. We extend the work of C. Schoen et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 110503 (2005)], where it was shown that all states generated in a sequential manner can be classified efficiently in terms of matrix-product states. In particular, we consider two scenarios: photonic multiqubit states sequentially generated at the cavity output of a single-photon source and atomic multiqubit states generated by their sequential interaction with the same cavity mode.

  5. Host receptors for bacteriophage adsorption.

    PubMed

    Bertozzi Silva, Juliano; Storms, Zachary; Sauvageau, Dominic

    2016-02-01

    The adsorption of bacteriophages (phages) onto host cells is, in all but a few rare cases, a sine qua non condition for the onset of the infection process. Understanding the mechanisms involved and the factors affecting it is, thus, crucial for the investigation of host-phage interactions. This review provides a survey of the phage host receptors involved in recognition and adsorption and their interactions during attachment. Comprehension of the whole infection process, starting with the adsorption step, can enable and accelerate our understanding of phage ecology and the development of phage-based technologies. To assist in this effort, we have established an open-access resource--the Phage Receptor Database (PhReD)--to serve as a repository for information on known and newly identified phage receptors. PMID:26755501

  6. Adsorption-induced colloidal aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, B. M.; Petit, J.-M.; Beysens, D.

    1998-03-01

    Reversible colloidal aggregation in binary liquid mixtures has been studied for a number of years. As the phase separation temperature of the liquid mixture is approached the thickness of an adsorption layer around the colloidal particles increases. Beysens and coworkers have demonstrated experimentally that this adsorption layer is intimately connected with the aggregation of the colloidal particles, however, no definitive theory has been available which can explain all of the experimental observations. In this contribution we describe an extension of the Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek theory of colloidal aggregation which takes into account the presence of the adsorption layer and which more realistically models the attractive dispersion interactions. This modified theory can quantitatively account for many of the observed experimental features such as the characteristics of the aggregated state, the general shape of the aggregation line, and the temperature dependence of the second virial coefficient for a lutidine-water mixture containing a small volume fraction of silica colloidal particles.

  7. Neural basis of conditional cooperation.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shinsuke; Niki, Kazuhisa; Fujisaki, Syoken; Akiyama, Eizo

    2011-06-01

    Cooperation among genetically unrelated individuals is a fundamental aspect of society, but it has been a longstanding puzzle in biological and social sciences. Recently, theoretical studies in biology and economics showed that conditional cooperation-cooperating only with those who have exhibited cooperative behavior-can spread over a society. Furthermore, experimental studies in psychology demonstrated that people are actually conditional cooperators. In this study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the neural system underlying conditional cooperation by scanning participants during interaction with cooperative, neutral and non-cooperative opponents in prisoner's dilemma games. The results showed that: (i) participants cooperated more frequently with both cooperative and neutral opponents than with non-cooperative opponents; and (ii) a brain area related to cognitive inhibition of pre-potent responses (right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex) showed greater activation, especially when participants confronted non-cooperative opponents. Consequently, we suggest that cognitive inhibition of the motivation to cooperate with non-cooperators drives the conditional behavior.

  8. Social penalty promotes cooperation in a cooperative society.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiromu; Yoshimura, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Why cooperation is well developed in human society is an unsolved question in biological and human sciences. Vast studies in game theory have revealed that in non-cooperative games selfish behavior generally dominates over cooperation and cooperation can be evolved only under very limited conditions. These studies ask the origin of cooperation; whether cooperation can evolve in a group of selfish individuals. In this paper, instead of asking the origin of cooperation, we consider the enhancement of cooperation in a small already cooperative society. We ask whether cooperative behavior is further promoted in a small cooperative society in which social penalty is devised. We analyze hawk-dove game and prisoner's dilemma introducing social penalty. We then expand it for non-cooperative games in general. The results indicate that cooperation is universally favored if penalty is further imposed. We discuss the current result in terms of the moral, laws, rules and regulations in a society, e.g., criminology and traffic violation. PMID:26238521

  9. Social penalty promotes cooperation in a cooperative society.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiromu; Yoshimura, Jin

    2015-08-04

    Why cooperation is well developed in human society is an unsolved question in biological and human sciences. Vast studies in game theory have revealed that in non-cooperative games selfish behavior generally dominates over cooperation and cooperation can be evolved only under very limited conditions. These studies ask the origin of cooperation; whether cooperation can evolve in a group of selfish individuals. In this paper, instead of asking the origin of cooperation, we consider the enhancement of cooperation in a small already cooperative society. We ask whether cooperative behavior is further promoted in a small cooperative society in which social penalty is devised. We analyze hawk-dove game and prisoner's dilemma introducing social penalty. We then expand it for non-cooperative games in general. The results indicate that cooperation is universally favored if penalty is further imposed. We discuss the current result in terms of the moral, laws, rules and regulations in a society, e.g., criminology and traffic violation.

  10. Social penalty promotes cooperation in a cooperative society

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hiromu; Yoshimura, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Why cooperation is well developed in human society is an unsolved question in biological and human sciences. Vast studies in game theory have revealed that in non-cooperative games selfish behavior generally dominates over cooperation and cooperation can be evolved only under very limited conditions. These studies ask the origin of cooperation; whether cooperation can evolve in a group of selfish individuals. In this paper, instead of asking the origin of cooperation, we consider the enhancement of cooperation in a small already cooperative society. We ask whether cooperative behavior is further promoted in a small cooperative society in which social penalty is devised. We analyze hawk-dove game and prisoner’s dilemma introducing social penalty. We then expand it for non-cooperative games in general. The results indicate that cooperation is universally favored if penalty is further imposed. We discuss the current result in terms of the moral, laws, rules and regulations in a society, e.g., criminology and traffic violation. PMID:26238521

  11. Randomness in the network inhibits cooperation based on the bounded rational collective altruistic decision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohdaira, Tetsushi

    2014-07-01

    Previous studies discussing cooperation employ the best decision that every player knows all information regarding the payoff matrix and selects the strategy of the highest payoff. Therefore, they do not discuss cooperation based on the altruistic decision with limited information (bounded rational altruistic decision). In addition, they do not cover the case where every player can submit his/her strategy several times in a match of the game. This paper is based on Ohdaira's reconsideration of the bounded rational altruistic decision, and also employs the framework of the prisoner's dilemma game (PDG) with sequential strategy. The distinction between this study and the Ohdaira's reconsideration is that the former covers the model of multiple groups, but the latter deals with the model of only two groups. Ohdaira's reconsideration shows that the bounded rational altruistic decision facilitates much more cooperation in the PDG with sequential strategy than Ohdaira and Terano's bounded rational second-best decision does. However, the detail of cooperation of multiple groups based on the bounded rational altruistic decision has not been resolved yet. This study, therefore, shows how randomness in the network composed of multiple groups affects the increase of the average frequency of mutual cooperation (cooperation between groups) based on the bounded rational altruistic decision of multiple groups. We also discuss the results of the model in comparison with related studies which employ the best decision.

  12. Generic sequential sampling for metamodel approximations

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, C. J.; Campbell, M. I.

    2003-01-01

    Metamodels approximate complex multivariate data sets from simulations and experiments. These data sets often are not based on an explicitly defined function. The resulting metamodel represents a complex system's behavior for subsequent analysis or optimization. Often an exhaustive data search to obtain the data for the metalnodel is impossible, so an intelligent sampling strategy is necessary. While inultiple approaches have been advocated, the majority of these approaches were developed in support of a particular class of metamodel, known as a Kriging. A more generic, cotninonsense approach to this problem allows sequential sampling techniques to be applied to other types of metamodeis. This research compares recent search techniques for Kriging inetamodels with a generic, inulti-criteria approach combined with a new type of B-spline metamodel. This B-spline metamodel is competitive with prior results obtained with a Kriging metamodel. Furthermore, the results of this research highlight several important features necessary for these techniques to be extended to more complex domains.

  13. Lipid peroxidation in experimental uveitis: sequential studies.

    PubMed

    Goto, H; Wu, G S; Chen, F; Kristeva, M; Sevanian, A; Rao, N A

    1992-06-01

    Previously we have detected the occurrence of retinal lipid peroxidation initiated by phagocyte-derived oxygen radicals in experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). In the current studies, the confirmation of inflammation-mediated lipid peroxidation was proceeded further to include measurement of multiple parameters, including conjugated dienes, ketodienes, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and fluorescent chromolipids. The assay for myeloperoxidase, a measure for the number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the inflammatory sites was also carried out. The levels of all these parameters were followed through the course of EAU development. The sequential evaluation of histologic changes using both light and electron microscopy was also carried out and the results were correlated with lipid peroxidation indices. These data suggest that the retinal lipid peroxidation plays a causative role in the subsequent retinal degeneration.

  14. Prosody and alignment: a sequential perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczepek Reed, Beatrice

    2010-12-01

    In their analysis of a corpus of classroom interactions in an inner city high school, Roth and Tobin describe how teachers and students accomplish interactional alignment by prosodically matching each other's turns. Prosodic matching, and specific prosodic patterns are interpreted as signs of, and contributions to successful interactional outcomes and positive emotions. Lack of prosodic matching, and other specific prosodic patterns are interpreted as features of unsuccessful interactions, and negative emotions. This forum focuses on the article's analysis of the relation between interpersonal alignment, emotion and prosody. It argues that prosodic matching, and other prosodic linking practices, play a primarily sequential role, i.e. one that displays the way in which participants place and design their turns in relation to other participants' turns. Prosodic matching, rather than being a conversational action in itself, is argued to be an interactional practice (Schegloff 1997), which is not always employed for the accomplishment of `positive', or aligning actions.

  15. Sequential sampling and paradoxes of risky choice.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Sudeep

    2014-10-01

    The common-ratio, common-consequence, reflection, and event-splitting effects are some of the best-known findings in decision-making research. They represent robust violations of expected utility theory, and together form a benchmark against which descriptive theories of risky choice are tested. These effects are not currently predicted by sequential sampling models of risky choice, such as decision field theory (Busemeyer & Townsend 1993). This paper, however, shows that a minor extension to decision field theory, which allows for stochastic error in event sampling, can provide a parsimonious, cognitively plausible explanation for these effects. Moreover, these effects are guaranteed to emerge for a large range of parameter values, including best-fit parameters obtained from preexisting choice data. PMID:24898202

  16. Particle smoothers in sequential geoacoustic inversion.

    PubMed

    Yardim, Caglar; Gerstoft, Peter; Hodgkiss, William S

    2013-08-01

    Sequential Bayesian methods such as particle filters have been used to track a moving source in an unknown and space/time-evolving ocean environment. These methods treat both the source and the ocean parameters as non-stationary unknown random variables and track them via the multivariate posterior probability density function. Particle filters are numerical methods that can operate on nonlinear systems with non-Gaussian probability density functions. Particle smoothers are a natural extension to these filters. A smoother is appropriate in applications where data before and after the time of interest are readily available. Both past and "future" measurements are exploited in smoothers, whereas filters just use past measurements. Geoacoustic and source tracking is performed here using two smoother algorithms, the forward-backward smoother and the two-filter smoother. Smoothing is demonstrated on experimental data from both the SWellEx-96 and SW06 experiments where the parameter uncertainty is reduced relative to just filtering alone.

  17. Adaptive sequential methods for detecting network intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xinjia; Walker, Ernest

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we propose new sequential methods for detecting port-scan attackers which routinely perform random "portscans" of IP addresses to find vulnerable servers to compromise. In addition to rigorously control the probability of falsely implicating benign remote hosts as malicious, our method performs significantly faster than other current solutions. Moreover, our method guarantees that the maximum amount of observational time is bounded. In contrast to the previous most effective method, Threshold Random Walk Algorithm, which is explicit and analytical in nature, our proposed algorithm involve parameters to be determined by numerical methods. We have introduced computational techniques such as iterative minimax optimization for quick determination of the parameters of the new detection algorithm. A framework of multi-valued decision for detecting portscanners and DoS attacks is also proposed.

  18. Mechanistic studies on a sequential PDT protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessel, David

    2016-03-01

    A low (~LD15) PDT dose resulting in selective lysosomal photodamage can markedly promote photokilling by subsequent photodamage targeted to mitochondria. Experimental data are consistent with the proposal that cleavage of the autophagyassociated protein ATG5 to a pro-apoptotic fragment is responsible for this effect. This process is known to be dependent on the proteolytic activity of calpain. We have proposed that Ca2+ released from photodamaged lysosomes is the trigger for ATG5 cleavage. We can now document the conversion of ATG5 to the truncated form after lysosomal photodamage. Photofrin, a photosensitizer that targets both mitochondria and lysosomes, can be used for either phase of the sequential PDT process. The ability of Photofrin to target both loci may explain the well-documented efficacy of this agent.

  19. Sequential monitoring of beach litter using webcams.

    PubMed

    Kako, Shin'ichiro; Isobe, Atsuhiko; Magome, Shinya

    2010-05-01

    This study attempts to establish a system for the sequential monitoring of beach litter using webcams placed at the Ookushi beach, Goto Islands, Japan, to establish the temporal variability in the quantities of beach litter every 90 min over a one and a half year period. The time series of the quantities of beach litter, computed by counting pixels with a greater lightness than a threshold value in photographs, shows that litter does not increase monotonically on the beach, but fluctuates mainly on a monthly time scale or less. To investigate what factors influence this variability, the time derivative of the quantity of beach litter is compared with satellite-derived wind speeds. It is found that the beach litter quantities vary largely with winds, but there may be other influencing factors. PMID:20392465

  20. Sequential composition of dynamically dexterous robot behaviors

    SciTech Connect

    Burridge, R.R.; Rizzi, A.A.; Koditschek, D.E.

    1999-06-01

    The authors report on efforts to develop a sequential robot controller-composition technique in the context of dexterous batting maneuvers. A robot with a flat paddle is required to strike repeatedly at a thrown ball until the ball is brought to rest on the paddle at a specified location. The robot`s reachable workspace is blocked by an obstacle that disconnects the free space formed when the ball and paddle remain in contact, forcing the machine to let go for a time to bring the ball to the desired state. The controller compositions the authors create guarantee that a ball introduced in the safe workspace remains there and is ultimately brought to the goal. They report on experimental results from an implementation of these formal composition methods, and present descriptive statistics characterizing the experiments.

  1. Prototype color field sequential television lens assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The design, development, and evaluation of a prototype modular lens assembly with a self-contained field sequential color wheel is presented. The design of a color wheel of maximum efficiency, the selection of spectral filters, and the design of a quiet, efficient wheel drive system are included. Design tradeoffs considered for each aspect of the modular assembly are discussed. Emphasis is placed on achieving a design which can be attached directly to an unmodified camera, thus permitting use of the assembly in evaluating various candidate camera and sensor designs. A technique is described which permits maintaining high optical efficiency with an unmodified camera. A motor synchronization system is developed which requires only the vertical synchronization signal as a reference frequency input. Equations and tradeoff curves are developed to permit optimizing the filter wheel aperture shapes for a variety of different design conditions.

  2. Sequential Double lonization: The Timing of Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, A.

    2011-05-01

    The timing of electron release in strong field double ionization poses great challenges both for conceptual definition and for conducting experimental measurement. Here we present coincidence momentum measurements of the doubly charged ion and of the two electrons arising from double ionization of Argon using elliptically (close to circularly) polarized laser pulses. Based on a semi-classical model, the ionization times are calculated from the measured electron momenta across a large intensity range. Exploiting the attoclock technique we have direct access to timings on a coarse and on a fine scale, similar to the hour and the minute hand of a clock. In our attoclock, the magnitude of the electron momenta follows the envelope of the laser pulse and gives a coarse timing for the electron releases (the hour hand), while the fine timing (the minute hand) is provided by the emission angle of the electrons. The first of our findings is that due to depletion the averaged ionization time moves towards the beginning of the pulse with increasing intensity, confirming the results of Maharjan et al., and that the ion momentum distribution projected onto the minor polarization axis shows a bifurcation from a 3-peak to a 4-peak structure. This effect can be fully understood by modeling the process semi-classically in the independent electron approximation following the simple man's model. The ionization time measurement performed with the attoclock shows that the release time of the first electron is in good agreement with the semi-classical simulation performed on the basis of Sequential Double lonization (SDI), whereas the ionization of the second electron occurs significantly earlier than predicted. This observation suggests that electron correlation and other Non-Sequential Double lonization (NSDI) mechanisms may play an important role also in the case of strong field double ionization by close-to-circularly polarized laser pulses. The timing of electron release in strong

  3. Automatic exposure control for space sequential camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcatee, G. E., Jr.; Stoap, L. J.; Solheim, C. D.; Sharpsteen, J. T.

    1975-01-01

    The final report for the automatic exposure control study for space sequential cameras, for the NASA Johnson Space Center is presented. The material is shown in the same sequence that the work was performed. The purpose of the automatic exposure control is to automatically control the lens iris as well as the camera shutter so that the subject is properly exposed on the film. A study of design approaches is presented. Analysis of the light range of the spectrum covered indicates that the practical range would be from approximately 20 to 6,000 foot-lamberts, or about nine f-stops. Observation of film available from space flights shows that optimum scene illumination is apparently not present in vehicle interior photography as well as in vehicle-to-vehicle situations. The evaluation test procedure for a breadboard, and the results, which provided information for the design of a brassboard are given.

  4. Sequential pattern formation governed by signaling gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jörg, David J.; Oates, Andrew C.; Jülicher, Frank

    2016-10-01

    Rhythmic and sequential segmentation of the embryonic body plan is a vital developmental patterning process in all vertebrate species. However, a theoretical framework capturing the emergence of dynamic patterns of gene expression from the interplay of cell oscillations with tissue elongation and shortening and with signaling gradients, is still missing. Here we show that a set of coupled genetic oscillators in an elongating tissue that is regulated by diffusing and advected signaling molecules can account for segmentation as a self-organized patterning process. This system can form a finite number of segments and the dynamics of segmentation and the total number of segments formed depend strongly on kinetic parameters describing tissue elongation and signaling molecules. The model accounts for existing experimental perturbations to signaling gradients, and makes testable predictions about novel perturbations. The variety of different patterns formed in our model can account for the variability of segmentation between different animal species.

  5. Simultaneous better than sequential for brief presentations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, George K.; Wilder, Joseph; Curry, Reates; Julesz, Bela

    1995-03-01

    During perceptually intensive tasks such as reading, there is a bottleneck in the information transfer between the large number of alphanumeric characters available and the acquiring of these characters. This is due mainly to the limited number of characters that one can report at a glance (also known as the "magic number 7 +/- 2") [Psychol. Rev. 63, 81 (1956)]. To examine where in the perceptual pathway this bottleneck occurred, several investigators tested and compared performance with simultaneous and with sequential target presentations [J. Exp. Psychol. 79, 1 (1969); 93, 72 (1972); Percept. Psychophys. 14, 231 (1973)]. They found that performance was nearly equal in the two cases and concluded that the bottleneck must be due to the limitation of short-term memory. However, these studies were

  6. Upper bounds on sequential decoding performance parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jelinek, F.

    1974-01-01

    This paper presents the best obtainable random coding and expurgated upper bounds on the probabilities of undetectable error, of t-order failure (advance to depth t into an incorrect subset), and of likelihood rise in the incorrect subset, applicable to sequential decoding when the metric bias G is arbitrary. Upper bounds on the Pareto exponent are also presented. The G-values optimizing each of the parameters of interest are determined, and are shown to lie in intervals that in general have nonzero widths. The G-optimal expurgated bound on undetectable error is shown to agree with that for maximum likelihood decoding of convolutional codes, and that on failure agrees with the block code expurgated bound. Included are curves evaluating the bounds for interesting choices of G and SNR for a binary-input quantized-output Gaussian additive noise channel.

  7. Giant intracranial aneurysms: rapid sequential computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, R.S.; Cohen, W.A.; Kricheff, I.I.; Redington, R.W.; Berninger, W.H.

    1982-11-01

    Giant intracranial aneurysms often present as mass lesions rather than with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Routine computed tomographic (CT) scans with contrast material will generally detect them, but erroneous diagnosis of basal meningioma is possible. Rapid sequential scanning (dynamic CT) after bolus injection of 40 ml of Renografin-76 can conclusively demonstrate an intracranial aneurysm, differentiating it from other lesions by transit-time analysis of the passage of contrast medium. In five patients, the dynamics of contrast bolus transit in aneurysms were consistently different from the dynamics in pituitary tumors, craniopharyngiomas, and meningiomas, thereby allowing a specific diagnosis. Dynamic CT was also useful after treatment of the aneurysms by carotid artery ligation and may be used as an alternative to angiographic evaluation in determining luminal patency or thrombosis.

  8. Sequential scintigraphic staging of small cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bitran, J.D.; Bekerman, C.; Pinsky, S.

    1981-04-15

    Thirty patients with small cell carcinoma (SCC) of the lung were sequentially staged following a history and physical exam with liver, bran, bone, and gallium-67 citrate scans. Scintigraphic evaluation disclosed 7 of 30 patients (23%) with advanced disease, stage IIIM1. When Gallium-67 scans were used as the sole criteria for staging, they proved to be accurate and identified six of the seven patients with occult metastatic disease. Gallium-67 scans proved to be accurate in detecting thoracic and extrathoracic metastases in the 30 patients with SCC, especially within the liver and lymph node-bearing area. The diagnostic accuracy of gallium-67 fell in regions such as bone or brain. Despite the limitations of gallium-67 scanning, the authors conclude that these scans are useful in staging patients with SCC and should be the initial scans used in staging such patients.

  9. Adsorption on a stepped substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merikoski, J.; Timonen, J.; Kaski, K.

    1994-09-01

    The effect of substrate steps on the adsorption of particles is considered. The problem is formulated as a lattice-gas model with nearest neighbor interactions and it is studied by a numerical transfer-matrix method. In particular, the influence of the substrate-induced row potential on adsorbed monolayers is discussed. It is found that strong row-transition-like features appear in the presence of a row potential and it is suggested that these may be seen in adsorption on vicinal faces.

  10. Sequential Leaching of Chromium Contaminated Sediments - A Study Characterizing Natural Attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musa, D.; Ding, M.; Beroff, S.; Rearick, M.; Perkins, G.; WoldeGabriel, G. W.; Ware, D.; Harris, R.; Kluk, E.; Katzman, D.; Reimus, P. W.; Heikoop, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Natural attenuation is an important process in slowing down the transport of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), an anthropogenic environmental contaminant, either by adsorption of Cr(VI) to sediments, or by reduction to nontoxic trivalent chromium, Cr(III). The capacity and mechanism of attenuation is explored in this sequential leaching study of different particle size fractions of chromium contaminated sediments and similar uncontaminated sediments from the regional aquifer near Los Alamos, New Mexico. Using this leaching protocol each sediment sample is split in two: one half is leached three times using a 0.1 M sodium bicarbonate/carbonate solution, while the second half is leached three times using a 0.01 M nitric acid, followed by two consecutively increasing magnitudes of nitric acid concentrations. Based on the amphoteric nature of chromium, alkaline leaching is used to establish the amount of Cr(VI) sorbed on the sediment, whereas acid leaching is used to establish the amount of Cr(III). The weak acid is predicted to release the attenuated anthropogenic Cr(III), without affecting Cr-bearing minerals. The sequential, stronger, acid is anticipated to leach Cr(III)-incorporated in the minerals. The efficiency and validation of the sequential leaching method is assessed by comparing the leaching behavior of bentonite and biotite samples, with and without loaded Cr(VI). A 97% chromium mass balance of leached Cr(VI)-loaded bentonite and biotite proves the viability of this method for further use on leaching contaminated sediments. By comparing contaminated and uncontaminated sediment leachate results, of chromium and other major and trace elements, the signature of anthropogenic chromium is determined. Further mineralogical characterization of the sediments provides a quantitative measure of the natural attenuation capacity for chromium. Understanding these results is pertinent in delineating the optimal procedure for the remediation of Cr(VI) in the regional aquifer

  11. Adsorption Removal of Environmental Hormones of Dimethyl Phthalate Using Novel Magnetic Adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Chi; Tseng, Jyi-Yeong; Ji, Dar-Ren; Chiu, Chun-Yu; Lu, De-Sheng; Chang, Ching-Yuan; Yuan, Min-Hao; Chang, Chiung-Fen; Chiou, Chyow-San; Chen, Yi-Hung; Shie, Je-Lueng

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic polyvinyl alcohol adsorbent M-PVAL was employed to remove and concentrate dimethyl phthalate DMP. The M-PVAL was prepared after sequential syntheses of magnetic Fe3O4 (M) and polyvinyl acetate (M-PVAC). The saturated magnetizations of M, M-PVAC, and M-PVAL are 57.2, 26.0, and 43.2 emu g(-1) with superparamagnetism, respectively. The average size of M-PVAL by number is 0.75 μm in micro size. Adsorption experiments include three cases: (1) adjustment of initial pH (pH0) of solution to 5, (2) no adjustment of pH0 with value in 6.04-6.64, and (3) adjusted pH0 = 7. The corresponding saturated amounts of adsorption of unimolecular layer of Langmuir isotherm are 4.01, 5.21, and 4.22 mg g(-1), respectively. Values of heterogeneity factor of Freundlich isotherm are 2.59, 2.19, and 2.59 which are greater than 1, revealing the favorable adsorption of DMP/M-PVAL system. Values of adsorption activation energy per mole of Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm are, respectively, of low values of 7.04, 6.48, and 7.19 kJ mol(-1), indicating the natural occurring of the adsorption process studied. The tiny size of adsorbent makes the adsorption take place easily while its superparamagnetism is beneficial for the separation and recovery of micro adsorbent from liquid by applying magnetic field after completion of adsorption. PMID:26258169

  12. Adsorption of human fibrinogen and albumin onto hydrophobic and hydrophilic Ti6Al4V powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, Jesús; Gallardo-Moreno, Amparo M.; Bruque, José M.; González-Martín, M. Luisa

    2016-07-01

    Adsorption of proteins on solid surfaces has been widely studied because of its importance in various biotechnological, medical and technical applications, such as medical implants or biosensors. One of the main problems is the adsorption-induced conformational changes because they often modify the biological activity of the proteins, which is believed to be a key factor on the subsequent cellular adhesion. The aim of this work is the study of the adsorption of human fibrinogen (Fg) and human serum albumin (HSA) onto Ti6Al4V particles, commercially available on different size, that are used to elaborate scaffolds to provide structural support to cell proliferation, promoting tissue development and bone regeneration among others. The study was done through the analysis of the adsorption isotherms and the electrical characterization of surfaces after adsorption in terms of the zeta potential (ζ). From this analysis it seems that Fg adsorbs preferentially vertically oriented (end-on) and HSA moves sequentially over the surface of the Ti6Al4V particles through dimmer formation, allowing adsorption progress over this initial bilayer. The zeta potential values of both proteins remain constant when the monolayer is formed. The study also extends the analysis of both adsorption behaviour and ζ potential characterization factors to the influence of the substrate hydrophobicity as this property can be modified for the Ti6Al4V by irradiating it with ultraviolet light (UV-C) without changes on its chemical composition [1,2]. Differences at low protein concentrations were found for both isotherms and zeta-potential values.

  13. Adsorption Removal of Environmental Hormones of Dimethyl Phthalate Using Novel Magnetic Adsorbent

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Chi; Tseng, Jyi-Yeong; Ji, Dar-Ren; Chiu, Chun-Yu; Lu, De-Sheng; Chang, Ching-Yuan; Yuan, Min-Hao; Chang, Chiung-Fen; Chiou, Chyow-San; Chen, Yi-Hung; Shie, Je-Lueng

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic polyvinyl alcohol adsorbent M-PVAL was employed to remove and concentrate dimethyl phthalate DMP. The M-PVAL was prepared after sequential syntheses of magnetic Fe3O4 (M) and polyvinyl acetate (M-PVAC). The saturated magnetizations of M, M-PVAC, and M-PVAL are 57.2, 26.0, and 43.2 emu g−1 with superparamagnetism, respectively. The average size of M-PVAL by number is 0.75 μm in micro size. Adsorption experiments include three cases: (1) adjustment of initial pH (pH0) of solution to 5, (2) no adjustment of pH0 with value in 6.04–6.64, and (3) adjusted pH0 = 7. The corresponding saturated amounts of adsorption of unimolecular layer of Langmuir isotherm are 4.01, 5.21, and 4.22 mg g−1, respectively. Values of heterogeneity factor of Freundlich isotherm are 2.59, 2.19, and 2.59 which are greater than 1, revealing the favorable adsorption of DMP/M-PVAL system. Values of adsorption activation energy per mole of Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm are, respectively, of low values of 7.04, 6.48, and 7.19 kJ mol−1, indicating the natural occurring of the adsorption process studied. The tiny size of adsorbent makes the adsorption take place easily while its superparamagnetism is beneficial for the separation and recovery of micro adsorbent from liquid by applying magnetic field after completion of adsorption. PMID:26258169

  14. Fractional statistical theory of adsorption applied to protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Quiroga, E; Centres, P M; Ochoa, N A; Ramirez-Pastor, A J

    2013-01-15

    Experimental adsorption isotherms of bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorbed on sulfonated microspheres were described by means of two analytical models: the first is the well-known Langmuir-Freundlich model (LF), and the second, called fractional statistical theory of adsorption (FSTA), is a statistical thermodynamics model developed recently by Ramirez-Pastor et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 (2004) 186101]. The experimental data, obtained by Hu et al. [Biochem. Eng. J. 23 (2005) 259] for different concentrations of sulfonate group on the surface of the microspheres, were correlated by using a fitting algorithm based on least-squares statistics. The combination of LF and FSTA models, along with the choice of an adequate fitting procedure, allowed us to obtain several conclusions: (i) as previously reported in the literature, the maximum amount adsorbed increases as the amount of sulfonate group increases; (ii) the equilibrium constant does not appear as a sensitive parameter to the amount of sulfonate group on the surface of the microspheres; and (iii) the values of the fitting parameters obtained from FSTA may be indicative of a mismatch between the equilibrium separation of the intermolecular interaction and the distance between the adsorption sites. The exhaustive study presented here has shown that FSTA model is a good one considering the complexity of the physical situation, which is intended to be described and could be more useful in interpreting experimental data of adsorption of molecules with different sizes and shapes. PMID:23084559

  15. Chemistry-specific surface adsorption of the barnacle settlement-inducing protein complex

    PubMed Central

    Petrone, Luigi; Aldred, Nick; Emami, Kaveh; Enander, Karin; Ederth, Thomas; Clare, Anthony S.

    2015-01-01

    Gregarious settlement in barnacle larvae (cyprids) is induced by a contact pheromone, the settlement-inducing protein complex (SIPC). The SIPC has been identified both in the cuticle of adult barnacles and in the temporary adhesive secretion (footprint) of cyprids. Besides acting as a settlement inducer, the presence of the SIPC in footprints points to its additional involvement in the adhesion process. SIPC adsorption behaviour was therefore investigated on a series of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) by surface plasmon resonance at the pH of seawater (8.3). Fibrinogen and α2-macroglobulin (A2M) (blood complement protease inhibitors with which the SIPC shares 29% sequence homology) were used in the adsorption experiments as positive and negative standards, respectively. The mass uptake of the SIPC was comparable to that of fibrinogen, with adsorption observed even on the protein-resistant oligo(ethylene glycol) surface. Notably, on the positively charged SAM the SIPC showed a kinetic overshoot, indicating a metastable configuration causing the amount of adsorbed protein to temporarily exceed its equilibrium value. A2M adsorption was low or negligible on all SAMs tested, except for the positively charged surface, indicating that A2M adsorption is mainly driven by electrostatics. Evaluation of SIPC non-specific adsorption kinetics revealed that it adsorbed irreversibly and non-cooperatively on all surfaces tested. PMID:25657832

  16. Chemistry-specific surface adsorption of the barnacle settlement-inducing protein complex.

    PubMed

    Petrone, Luigi; Aldred, Nick; Emami, Kaveh; Enander, Karin; Ederth, Thomas; Clare, Anthony S

    2015-02-01

    Gregarious settlement in barnacle larvae (cyprids) is induced by a contact pheromone, the settlement-inducing protein complex (SIPC). The SIPC has been identified both in the cuticle of adult barnacles and in the temporary adhesive secretion (footprint) of cyprids. Besides acting as a settlement inducer, the presence of the SIPC in footprints points to its additional involvement in the adhesion process. SIPC adsorption behaviour was therefore investigated on a series of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) by surface plasmon resonance at the pH of seawater (8.3). Fibrinogen and α2-macroglobulin (A2M) (blood complement protease inhibitors with which the SIPC shares 29% sequence homology) were used in the adsorption experiments as positive and negative standards, respectively. The mass uptake of the SIPC was comparable to that of fibrinogen, with adsorption observed even on the protein-resistant oligo(ethylene glycol) surface. Notably, on the positively charged SAM the SIPC showed a kinetic overshoot, indicating a metastable configuration causing the amount of adsorbed protein to temporarily exceed its equilibrium value. A2M adsorption was low or negligible on all SAMs tested, except for the positively charged surface, indicating that A2M adsorption is mainly driven by electrostatics. Evaluation of SIPC non-specific adsorption kinetics revealed that it adsorbed irreversibly and non-cooperatively on all surfaces tested. PMID:25657832

  17. The Power of Cooperation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevin, John A.

    2010-01-01

    In "The Power of Cooperation," Tony Nevin tells how the townspeople of Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts, are attempting to replicate a successful alternative-energy project in Samso, Denmark, where thinking about ways to reduce fossil-fuel use "became a kind of sport." Nevin says that thinking and acting locally helps people to identify and pursue…

  18. Cooperative Education. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stauber, Dick T.

    In order to investigate the feasibility of adding a cooperative education option to the curricular offerings of Moraine Park Technical Institute (MPTI), interviews were conducted with randomly selected representatives of 12 industries and 17 employers in the marketing and merchandising businesses located in the MPTI service area. In addition,…

  19. Superpower cooperation often overlooked

    SciTech Connect

    Jamgotch, N. Jr.

    1986-02-01

    At the conclusion of the Geneva summit in November 1985, President Reagan and General Secretary Gorbachev signed an Agreement on Contacts and Exchanges in Scientific, Educational, and Cultural Fields. Since details of the agreements must still be worked out, it remains to be seen whether these statements signal a new era of US-Soviet cooperation. Still, the lack of media or even official attention to these broad areas of agreement repeats a pattern that has contributed to the continuing pervasive hostility and mistrust between the two nations. There are understandable reasons for the tendency to concentrate on conflict and crises rather than cooperation. While a cooperative agreement may be noted by an occasional news story, it is outshone be the more flash newsworthiness of political confrontation. The author points to the considerable successes of past US/USSR wide-ranging agreements, and notes that cooperative activities must be reported and analyzed more fully to counteract distrust and to overcome outmoded ideologies. 6 references.

  20. Cooperative Mobile Sensing Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, R S; Kent, C A; Jones, E D; Cunningham, C T; Armstrong, G W

    2003-02-10

    A cooperative control architecture is presented that allows a fleet of Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs) to collect data in a parallel, coordinated and optimal manner. The architecture is designed to react to a set of unpredictable events thereby allowing data collection to continue in an optimal manner.

  1. Combat or Cooperation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tate, Thomas F.; Copas, Randall L.

    2010-01-01

    The best intentioned efforts of adults are often sabotaged by coercive climates of bullying among peers and conflict with adults. The solution is to create cultures where youth cooperate with authority and treat one another with respect. In this article, the authors stress the task of the staff to create a condition in which students see more…

  2. Predicting Human Cooperation.

    PubMed

    Nay, John J; Vorobeychik, Yevgeniy

    2016-01-01

    The Prisoner's Dilemma has been a subject of extensive research due to its importance in understanding the ever-present tension between individual self-interest and social benefit. A strictly dominant strategy in a Prisoner's Dilemma (defection), when played by both players, is mutually harmful. Repetition of the Prisoner's Dilemma can give rise to cooperation as an equilibrium, but defection is as well, and this ambiguity is difficult to resolve. The numerous behavioral experiments investigating the Prisoner's Dilemma highlight that players often cooperate, but the level of cooperation varies significantly with the specifics of the experimental predicament. We present the first computational model of human behavior in repeated Prisoner's Dilemma games that unifies the diversity of experimental observations in a systematic and quantitatively reliable manner. Our model relies on data we integrated from many experiments, comprising 168,386 individual decisions. The model is composed of two pieces: the first predicts the first-period action using solely the structural game parameters, while the second predicts dynamic actions using both game parameters and history of play. Our model is successful not merely at fitting the data, but in predicting behavior at multiple scales in experimental designs not used for calibration, using only information about the game structure. We demonstrate the power of our approach through a simulation analysis revealing how to best promote human cooperation. PMID:27171417

  3. Predicting Human Cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Nay, John J.; Vorobeychik, Yevgeniy

    2016-01-01

    The Prisoner’s Dilemma has been a subject of extensive research due to its importance in understanding the ever-present tension between individual self-interest and social benefit. A strictly dominant strategy in a Prisoner’s Dilemma (defection), when played by both players, is mutually harmful. Repetition of the Prisoner’s Dilemma can give rise to cooperation as an equilibrium, but defection is as well, and this ambiguity is difficult to resolve. The numerous behavioral experiments investigating the Prisoner’s Dilemma highlight that players often cooperate, but the level of cooperation varies significantly with the specifics of the experimental predicament. We present the first computational model of human behavior in repeated Prisoner’s Dilemma games that unifies the diversity of experimental observations in a systematic and quantitatively reliable manner. Our model relies on data we integrated from many experiments, comprising 168,386 individual decisions. The model is composed of two pieces: the first predicts the first-period action using solely the structural game parameters, while the second predicts dynamic actions using both game parameters and history of play. Our model is successful not merely at fitting the data, but in predicting behavior at multiple scales in experimental designs not used for calibration, using only information about the game structure. We demonstrate the power of our approach through a simulation analysis revealing how to best promote human cooperation. PMID:27171417

  4. Cooperative Learning and Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, G. M.; Kimura, H.

    2013-01-01

    In and out of the classroom, life would be unthinkable without interacting with fellow humans. This book urges more cooperative and group activities in the English language classroom for all the advantages: students use the target language more, help each other with comprehension, receive attention from peers as well as the teacher, are motivated…

  5. International Cooperation in Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willenbrock, F. Karl

    1987-01-01

    Reports on a study by the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) into various relationships in engineering that the United States has with countries that have comparable or superior levels of technology. Discusses competition, cooperation, information flow, symmetry, language and cultural barriers, research opportunities, and professional…

  6. Cooper Egressing 'Faith 7'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Astronaut L. Gordon Cooper is assisted in backing out of his Mecury capsule 'Faith 7' after a 600,000 mile, 22.9 orbit journey around the Earth. He elected to remain in the spacecraft until it was hoisted to the deck of the Kearsarge, as did Astronaut Walter Schirra during the previous mission.

  7. To Cooperate or Not to Cooperate: Why Behavioural Mechanisms Matter

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Mutualistic cooperation often requires multiple individuals to behave in a coordinated fashion. Hence, while the evolutionary stability of mutualistic cooperation poses no particular theoretical difficulty, its evolutionary emergence faces a chicken and egg problem: an individual cannot benefit from cooperating unless other individuals already do so. Here, we use evolutionary robotic simulations to study the consequences of this problem for the evolution of cooperation. In contrast with standard game-theoretic results, we find that the transition from solitary to cooperative strategies is very unlikely, whether interacting individuals are genetically related (cooperation evolves in 20% of all simulations) or unrelated (only 3% of all simulations). We also observe that successful cooperation between individuals requires the evolution of a specific and rather complex behaviour. This behavioural complexity creates a large fitness valley between solitary and cooperative strategies, making the evolutionary transition difficult. These results reveal the need for research on biological mechanisms which may facilitate this transition. PMID:27148874

  8. [Social cooperatives in Italy].

    PubMed

    Villotti, P; Zaniboni, S; Fraccaroli, F

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the role of social cooperatives in Italy as a type of economic, non-profit organization and their role in contributing to the economic and social growth of the country. The purpose of this paper is to learn more about the experience of the Italian social cooperatives in promoting the work integration process of disadvantaged workers, especially those suffering from mental disorders, from a theoretical and an empirical point of view. Social enterprise is the most popular and consolidated legal and organizational model for social enterprises in Italy, introduced by Law 381/91. Developed during the early 1980s, and formally recognized by law in the early 1990s, social cooperatives aim at pursuing the general interest of the community to promote the human needs and social inclusion of citizens. They are orientated towards aims that go beyond the interest of the business owners, the primary beneficiary of their activities is the community, or groups of disadvantaged people. In Italy, Law 381/91 distinguishes between two categories of social cooperatives, those producing goods of social utility, such as culture, welfare and educational services (A-type), and those providing economic activities for the integration of disadvantaged people into employment (B-type). The main purpose of B-type social cooperatives is to integrate disadvantaged people into the open labour market. This goal is reached after a period of training and working experience inside the firm, during which the staff works to improve both the social and professional abilities of disadvantaged people. During the years, B-type social co-ops acquired a particular relevance in the care of people with mental disorders by offering them with job opportunities. Having a job is central in the recovery process of people suffering from mental diseases, meaning that B-type social co-ops in Italy play an important rehabilitative and integrative role for this vulnerable population of workers. The

  9. [Social cooperatives in Italy].

    PubMed

    Villotti, P; Zaniboni, S; Fraccaroli, F

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the role of social cooperatives in Italy as a type of economic, non-profit organization and their role in contributing to the economic and social growth of the country. The purpose of this paper is to learn more about the experience of the Italian social cooperatives in promoting the work integration process of disadvantaged workers, especially those suffering from mental disorders, from a theoretical and an empirical point of view. Social enterprise is the most popular and consolidated legal and organizational model for social enterprises in Italy, introduced by Law 381/91. Developed during the early 1980s, and formally recognized by law in the early 1990s, social cooperatives aim at pursuing the general interest of the community to promote the human needs and social inclusion of citizens. They are orientated towards aims that go beyond the interest of the business owners, the primary beneficiary of their activities is the community, or groups of disadvantaged people. In Italy, Law 381/91 distinguishes between two categories of social cooperatives, those producing goods of social utility, such as culture, welfare and educational services (A-type), and those providing economic activities for the integration of disadvantaged people into employment (B-type). The main purpose of B-type social cooperatives is to integrate disadvantaged people into the open labour market. This goal is reached after a period of training and working experience inside the firm, during which the staff works to improve both the social and professional abilities of disadvantaged people. During the years, B-type social co-ops acquired a particular relevance in the care of people with mental disorders by offering them with job opportunities. Having a job is central in the recovery process of people suffering from mental diseases, meaning that B-type social co-ops in Italy play an important rehabilitative and integrative role for this vulnerable population of workers. The

  10. Adsorption of Organics from Domestic Water Supplies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Michael J.; Suffet, Irwin H.

    1978-01-01

    This article discusses the current state of the art of organics removal by adsorption. Various theoretical explanations of the adsorption process are given, along with practical results from laboratory, pilot-scale, and full-scale applications. (CS)

  11. CONTAMINANT ADSORPTION AND OXIDATION VIA FENTON REACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A ground water treatment process is proposed involving two cgemical processes: adsorption and oxidation. Adsorption of an organic compound onto granulated activated carbon (GAC) containing iron conveniently results in immobilizing and concentrating contaminants from the ground w...

  12. Neural basis of conditional cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Niki, Kazuhisa; Fujisaki, Syoken; Akiyama, Eizo

    2011-01-01

    Cooperation among genetically unrelated individuals is a fundamental aspect of society, but it has been a longstanding puzzle in biological and social sciences. Recently, theoretical studies in biology and economics showed that conditional cooperation—cooperating only with those who have exhibited cooperative behavior—can spread over a society. Furthermore, experimental studies in psychology demonstrated that people are actually conditional cooperators. In this study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the neural system underlying conditional cooperation by scanning participants during interaction with cooperative, neutral and non-cooperative opponents in prisoner's dilemma games. The results showed that: (i) participants cooperated more frequently with both cooperative and neutral opponents than with non-cooperative opponents; and (ii) a brain area related to cognitive inhibition of pre-potent responses (right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex) showed greater activation, especially when participants confronted non-cooperative opponents. Consequently, we suggest that cognitive inhibition of the motivation to cooperate with non-cooperators drives the conditional behavior. PMID:20501484

  13. A Course of Study in Cooperation and Cooperatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjoraker, Walter T., Ed.

    Designed for teachers with limited experience in cooperatives, this course of study was prepared by seminar students for use in high school or adult education programs, and emphasizes the principles of cooperation, the operation and management of cooperatives, and the communication required for their effective functioning. Units requiring a total…

  14. Multilayer adsorption by Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-Mateo, J.; Salmerón Sánchez, M.; Monleón Pradas, M.; Torregrosa Cabanilles, C.

    2012-10-01

    Adsorption phenomena are characterized by models that include free parameters trying to reproduce experimental results. In order to understand the relationship between the model parameters and the material properties, the adsorption of small molecules on a crystalline plane surface has been simulated using the bond fluctuation model. A direct comparison between the Guggenheim-Anderson-de Boer (GAB) model for multilayer adsorption and computer simulations allowed us to establish correlations between the adsorption model parameters and the simulated interaction potentials.

  15. Derivation of sequential, real-time, process-control programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzullo, Keith; Schneider, Fred B.; Budhiraja, Navin

    1991-01-01

    The use of weakest-precondition predicate transformers in the derivation of sequential, process-control software is discussed. Only one extension to Dijkstra's calculus for deriving ordinary sequential programs was found to be necessary: function-valued auxiliary variables. These auxiliary variables are needed for reasoning about states of a physical process that exists during program transitions.

  16. Applications of Bayesian Decision Theory to Sequential Mastery Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vos, Hans J.

    1999-01-01

    Formulates optimal sequential rules for mastery testing using an approach derived from Bayesian sequential decision theory to consider both threshold and linear loss structures. Adopts the binomial probability distribution as the psychometric model. Provides an empirical example for concept-learning in medicine. (SLD)

  17. A sequential procedure for monitoring clinical trials against historical controls.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiaoping; Tan, Ming; Boyett, James

    2007-03-30

    In this paper, we develop a sequential procedure to monitor clinical trials against historical controls. When there is a strong ethical concern about randomizing patients to existing treatment because biological and medical evidence suggests that the new treatment is potentially superior to the existing one, or when the enrollment is too limited for randomization of subjects into experimental and control groups, one can monitor the trial sequentially against historical controls if the historical data with required quality and sample size are available to form a valid reference for the trial. This design of trial is sometimes the only alternative to a randomized phase III trial design that is intended but not feasible in situations such as above. Monitoring this type of clinical trial leads to a statistical problem of comparing two population means in a situation in which data from one population are sequentially collected and compared with all data from the other population at each interim look. The proposed sequential procedures is based on the sequential conditional probability ratio test (SCPRT) by which the conclusion of the sequential test would be virtually the same as that arrived at by a non-sequential test based on all data at the planned end of the trial. We develop the sequential procedure by proposing a Brownian motion that emulates the test statistic, and then proposing an SCPRT that is adapted to the special properties of the trial. PMID:16900551

  18. A Bayesian Theory of Sequential Causal Learning and Abstract Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Hongjing; Rojas, Randall R.; Beckers, Tom; Yuille, Alan L.

    2016-01-01

    Two key research issues in the field of causal learning are how people acquire causal knowledge when observing data that are presented sequentially, and the level of abstraction at which learning takes place. Does sequential causal learning solely involve the acquisition of specific cause-effect links, or do learners also acquire knowledge about…

  19. The Relevance of Visual Sequential Memory to Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crispin, Lisa; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Results of three visual sequential memory tests and a group reading test given to 19 elementary students are discussed in terms of task analysis and structuralist approaches to analysis of reading skills. Relation of visual sequential memory to other reading subskills is considered in light of current reasearch. (CMG)

  20. Induction of simultaneous and sequential malolactic fermentation in durian wine.

    PubMed

    Taniasuri, Fransisca; Lee, Pin-Rou; Liu, Shao-Quan

    2016-08-01

    This study represented for the first time the impact of malolactic fermentation (MLF) induced by Oenococcus oeni and its inoculation strategies (simultaneous vs. sequential) on the fermentation performance as well as aroma compound profile of durian wine. There was no negative impact of simultaneous inoculation of O. oeni and Saccharomyces cerevisiae on the growth and fermentation kinetics of S. cerevisiae as compared to sequential fermentation. Simultaneous MLF did not lead to an excessive increase in volatile acidity as compared to sequential MLF. The kinetic changes of organic acids (i.e. malic, lactic, succinic, acetic and α-ketoglutaric acids) varied with simultaneous and sequential MLF relative to yeast alone. MLF, regardless of inoculation mode, resulted in higher production of fermentation-derived volatiles as compared to control (alcoholic fermentation only), including esters, volatile fatty acids, and terpenes, except for higher alcohols. Most indigenous volatile sulphur compounds in durian were decreased to trace levels with little differences among the control, simultaneous and sequential MLF. Among the different wines, the wine with simultaneous MLF had higher concentrations of terpenes and acetate esters while sequential MLF had increased concentrations of medium- and long-chain ethyl esters. Relative to alcoholic fermentation only, both simultaneous and sequential MLF reduced acetaldehyde substantially with sequential MLF being more effective. These findings illustrate that MLF is an effective and novel way of modulating the volatile and aroma compound profile of durian wine. PMID:27104664

  1. Lineup Composition, Suspect Position, and the Sequential Lineup Advantage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Curt A.; Gronlund, Scott D.; Clark, Steven E.

    2008-01-01

    N. M. Steblay, J. Dysart, S. Fulero, and R. C. L. Lindsay (2001) argued that sequential lineups reduce the likelihood of mistaken eyewitness identification. Experiment 1 replicated the design of R. C. L. Lindsay and G. L. Wells (1985), the first study to show the sequential lineup advantage. However, the innocent suspect was chosen at a lower rate…

  2. Decision Making and Learning while Taking Sequential Risks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pleskac, Timothy J.

    2008-01-01

    A sequential risk-taking paradigm used to identify real-world risk takers invokes both learning and decision processes. This article expands the paradigm to a larger class of tasks with different stochastic environments and different learning requirements. Generalizing a Bayesian sequential risk-taking model to the larger set of tasks clarifies…

  3. Adsorption and excess fission xenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podosek, F. A.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Kramer, F. E.

    1982-01-01

    The adsorption of Xe and Kr on lunar soil 10084 was measured by a method that employs only very low fractions of monolayer coverage. Results are presented as parameters for calculation of the Henry constant for adsorption as a function of temperature. The adsorption potentials are about 3 kcal/mole for Kr and 5 kcal/mole for Xe; heating the sample in vacuum increased the Xe potential to nearly 7 kcal/mole. Henry constants at the characteristic lunar temperature are about 0.3 cu cm STP/g-atm. These data were applied to consider whether adsorption is important in producing the excess fission Xe effect characteristic of highland breccias. Sorption equilibrium with a transient lunar atmosphere vented fission Xe produces concentrations seven orders of magnitude lower than observed concentrations. Higher concentrations result because of the resistance of the regolith to upward diffusion of Xe. A diffusion coefficient of 0.26 sq cm/sec is estimated for this process.

  4. ADSORPTIVE MEDIA TECHNOLOGIES: MEDIA SELECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides information on six items to be considered when selecting an adsorptive media for removing arsenic from drinking water; performance, EBCT, pre-treatment, regeneration, residuals, and cost. Each item is discussed in general and data and photographs from th...

  5. Interfacial adsorption in ternary alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.; Cruz, M.O. de la; Voorhees, P.W.

    1999-11-26

    Interfaces of A-B-C ternary alloys decomposed into two and three phases are studied. The effect of the gradient energy coefficients {bar {kappa}}{sub II}, I = A, B, C, on the interface composition profiles of ternary alloys is examined. The adsorption of component C in ternary alloys is obtained numerically by finding steady-state solutions of the nonlinear Cahn-Hilliard equations and by solving the two Euler-Lagrange equations resulting from minimizing the interfacial energy, and analytically near the critical point. It is found that the solutions from both numerical methods are identical for a two-phase system. In symmetric ternary systems (equal interaction energy between each pair of components) with a minority component C, the gradient energy coefficient of C, {bar {kappa}}{sub CC}, can have a very strong influence on the degree of adsorption. In the {alpha} and {beta} two-phase regions, where {alpha} and {beta} are the phases rich in the majority components A and B, respectively, as {bar {kappa}}{sub CC} increases, the adsorption of the minority component C in the {alpha} and {beta} interfaces decreases. Near a critical point, however, the degree of adsorption of minority component C is independent of the gradient energy coefficient.

  6. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANT ON CLAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surfactants used to enhance remediation of soils by soil washing are often lost in the process. Neither the amount nor the cause of this loss is known. It is assumed that clays present in the soil are responsible for the loss of the surfactant. In this papere, adsorption prope...

  7. Cooperation and cheating in microbes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gore, Jeff

    2011-03-01

    Understanding the cooperative and competitive dynamics within and between species is a central challenge in evolutionary biology. Microbial model systems represent a unique opportunity to experimentally test fundamental theories regarding the evolution of cooperative behaviors. In this talk I will describe our experiments probing cooperation in microbes. In particular, I will compare the cooperative growth of yeast in sucrose and the cooperative inactivation of antibiotics by bacteria. In both cases we find that cheater strains---which don't contribute to the public welfare---are able to take advantage of the cooperator strains. However, this ability of cheaters to out-compete cooperators occurs only when cheaters are present at low frequency, thus leading to steady-state coexistence. These microbial experiments provide fresh insight into the evolutionary origin of cooperation.

  8. Adsorption of serum alpha-1-microglobulin onto biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Santin, M; Cannas, M; Wassall, M A; Denyer, S P

    1998-03-01

    The adsorption of alpha-1-microglobulin (alpha-1-m) from serum to the surface of polymers with different physicochemical properties was investigated. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed binding of this protein to the surface of polystyrene (PS), polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and a polyurethane, Chronoflex, after water washing, but only trace levels could be detected on two polymethacrylate derivatives, polymethyl methacrylate and poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate). alpha-1-m was selectively desorbed from the five materials by sequential washes of serum-conditioned surfaces with isopropanol solutions at increasing concentrations. The presence of alpha-1-m in the washing supernatants was detected by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The relative binding strength of alpha-1-m to each surface was evaluated as the isopropanol (IsoPOH) concentration required to desorb the protein from that surface. Analysis of bound proteins by SDS-PAGE conclusively demonstrated the binding of a range of serum proteins, including alpha-1-m, to all polymer systems, but with varying binding strengths. The majority of protein was removed by water washing for the polymethacrylate polymers, while varying concentrations of IsoPOH were required to desorb proteins from PS, PVC and Chronoflex. There was a correlation between the hydrophobic nature of the material, determined by water contact angle measurements, and adsorption of alpha-1-m. Immunoblotting of isopropanol-eluted proteins by alpha-1-m antibodies showed the positive staining of a 29 kDa protein as well as selected bands within a molecular weight range of 40 200 kDa, suggesting the adsorption of this protein as both free and complexed forms. The ability of alpha-1-m to adsorb on to material surfaces and to participate in events relevant to the biocompatibility of a polymer, such as bacterial infection or inflammation control, suggests the need for further characterization of the properties of this

  9. Influence of gender membership on sequential decisions of face attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Aki; Takahashi, Kohske; Watanabe, Katsumi

    2013-10-01

    Responses in a current trial are biased by the stimulus and response in the preceding trial. In a mixed-category sequence, the sequential dependency is weaker when the stimuli of the current and preceding trials fall under different categories. In the present study, we investigated the influence of the gender membership of faces on the sequential dependency. Forty-eight pictures of male and female faces were presented successively. Participants rated the attractiveness, roundness, or intelligence of each face on a 7-point scale. The sequential effect was robustly observed, irrespective of the property to be judged. However, between-gender sequential dependency was weaker than within-gender dependency only in the attractiveness judgment. These findings suggest that the gender of faces serves as a cue for forming category representations when face attractiveness is of interest, and hence that the formation of categories in sequential decisions is an adaptive process that depends on the property to be judged.

  10. Influence of gender membership on sequential decisions of face attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Aki; Takahashi, Kohske; Watanabe, Katsumi

    2013-10-01

    Responses in a current trial are biased by the stimulus and response in the preceding trial. In a mixed-category sequence, the sequential dependency is weaker when the stimuli of the current and preceding trials fall under different categories. In the present study, we investigated the influence of the gender membership of faces on the sequential dependency. Forty-eight pictures of male and female faces were presented successively. Participants rated the attractiveness, roundness, or intelligence of each face on a 7-point scale. The sequential effect was robustly observed, irrespective of the property to be judged. However, between-gender sequential dependency was weaker than within-gender dependency only in the attractiveness judgment. These findings suggest that the gender of faces serves as a cue for forming category representations when face attractiveness is of interest, and hence that the formation of categories in sequential decisions is an adaptive process that depends on the property to be judged. PMID:24037595

  11. Adsorption of nucleotides on biomimetic apatite: The case of adenosine 5‧ monophosphate (AMP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammami, K.; Feki, H. El; Marsan, O.; Drouet, C.

    2015-10-01

    This work investigates the interaction between the nucleotide adenosine 5‧ monophosphate molecule (AMP) and a biomimetic nanocrystalline carbonated apatite as a model for bone mineral. The analogy of the apatite phase used in this work with biological apatite was first pointed out by complementary techniques. AMP adsorption isotherms were then investigated. Obtained data were fitted to a Sips isotherm with an exponent greater than one suggesting positive cooperativity among adsorbed molecules. The data were compared to a previous study relative to the adsorption of another nucleotide, cytidine monophosphate (CMP) onto a similar substrate, evidencing some effect of the chemical nature of the nucleic base. An enhanced adsorption was observed under acidic (pH 6) conditions as opposed to pH 7.4, which parallels the case of DNA adsorption on biomimetic apatite. An estimated standard Gibbs free energy associated to the adsorption process (ΔG°ads ≅ -22 kJ/mol) intermediate between "physisorption" and "chemisorption" was found. The analysis of the solids after adsorption pointed to the preservation of the main characteristics of the apatite substrate but shifts or enhancements of Raman bands attributed to AMP showed the existence of chemical interactions involving both the phosphate and adenine parts of AMP. This contribution adds to the works conducted in view of better understanding the interaction of DNA/RNA and their constitutive nucleotides and the surface of biomimetic apatites. It could prove helpful in disciplines such as bone diagenesis (DNA/apatite interface in aged bones) or nanomedicine (setup of DNA- or RNA-loaded apatite systems). Also, the adsorption of nucleic acids on minerals like apatites could have played a role in the preservation of such biomolecules in the varying conditions known to exist at the origin of life on Earth, underlining the importance of dedicated adsorption studies.

  12. An Odyssey into Cooperative Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemke, Thomas L.; Basile, Carole

    1997-01-01

    An experiment using cooperative learning in a introductory pharmacy course in medicinal chemistry revealed general acceptance of the cooperative learning approach by students, and some perceived advantages for both students and teachers. Although quantitative evidence supporting superiority of the cooperative learning approach was not found,…

  13. Cooperative Learning for LEP Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calderon, Margarita

    1989-01-01

    Substantial evidence suggests that students working together in small cooperative groups can master material better than students working on their own, and that cooperative learning structures higher self-esteem and learning motivation. Cooperative learning (CL) has been proposed for use with language minority children, as well as with other…

  14. Enlightening Advantages of Cooperative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faryadi, Qais

    2007-01-01

    This appraisal discusses the notion that cooperative learning enhances learners' emotional and social performance. It also observes the perception that cooperative learning dramatically improves students' academic accomplishment. This review also examines the definition of cooperative learning and attempts to define it through the lens of renowned…

  15. Communication in Cooperative Learning Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalkowski, Page

    This study explores aspects of the hypothesis that communication in cooperative learning groups mediates effects of cooperative learning. The study develops a taxonomy of the cooperative communications of groups of predominantly Anglo and Hispanic elementary school students attending a public school where teachers were being trained to implement…

  16. Cooperative Learning in Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavin, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Cooperative learning refers to instructional methods in which students work in small groups to help each other learn. Although cooperative learning methods are used for different age groups, they are particularly popular in elementary (primary) schools. This article discusses methods and theoretical perspectives on cooperative learning for the…

  17. Cooperative Learning: Developments in Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillies, Robyn M.

    2014-01-01

    Cooperative learning is widely recognized as a pedagogical practice that promotes socialization and learning among students from kindergarten through to college level and across different subject areas. Cooperative learning involves students working together to achieve common goals or complete group tasks. Interest in cooperative learning has…

  18. International Cooperation: A Positive Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soria, Oscar

    Conditions for developing international university cooperation are identified, along with stages of international cooperation in education. Guidelines to promote cooperation are provided. The dominant focus and new role of universities has become problem-solving and community development, as distinct from the previous institutional-building…

  19. Beam geometry selection using sequential beam addition

    SciTech Connect

    Popple, Richard A. Brezovich, Ivan A.; Fiveash, John B.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The selection of optimal beam geometry has been of interest since the inception of conformal radiotherapy. The authors report on sequential beam addition, a simple beam geometry selection method, for intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods: The sequential beam addition algorithm (SBA) requires definition of an objective function (score) and a set of candidate beam geometries (pool). In the first iteration, the optimal score is determined for each beam in the pool and the beam with the best score selected. In the next iteration, the optimal score is calculated for each beam remaining in the pool combined with the beam selected in the first iteration, and the best scoring beam is selected. The process is repeated until the desired number of beams is reached. The authors selected three treatment sites, breast, lung, and brain, and determined beam arrangements for up to 11 beams from a pool comprised of 25 equiangular transverse beams. For the brain, arrangements were additionally selected from a pool of 22 noncoplanar beams. Scores were determined for geometries comprised equiangular transverse beams (EQA), as well as two tangential beams for the breast case. Results: In all cases, SBA resulted in scores superior to EQA. The breast case had the strongest dependence on beam geometry, for which only the 7-beam EQA geometry had a score better than the two tangential beams, whereas all SBA geometries with more than two beams were superior. In the lung case, EQA and SBA scores monotonically improved with increasing number of beams; however, SBA required fewer beams to achieve scores equivalent to EQA. For the brain case, SBA with a coplanar pool was equivalent to EQA, while the noncoplanar pool resulted in slightly better scores; however, the dose-volume histograms demonstrated that the differences were not clinically significant. Conclusions: For situations in which beam geometry has a significant effect on the objective function, SBA can identify

  20. Cooperative transport in nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Wolfgang R; Nadler, Walter

    2013-07-01

    Channel transport of different species of particles is viewed usually only in terms of competition and selectivity. In this paper we show that transport of one species may be promoted by the presence of another and that both may even mutually cooperate. We investigate a discretized Markovian model of nanochannel transport via in-channel sites, allowing for the simultaneous transport of several different species of particles; interaction between transported particles is included via the condition of single occupancy on a channel site. By numerically solving the model exactly, particularly an analysis of situations of crowding in the channel is possible and we observe three situations: mutual cooperation, promotion of one species at the cost of the other, and mutual competition. The physical situation has a strong nonequilibrium character as Onsager's relations on coupled flows do not hold.

  1. Cooperative photoredox catalysis.

    PubMed

    Lang, Xianjun; Zhao, Jincai; Chen, Xiaodong

    2016-05-31

    Visible-light photoredox catalysis has been experiencing a renaissance in response to topical interest in renewable energy and green chemistry. The latest progress in this area indicates that cooperation between photoredox catalysis and other domains of catalysis could provide effective results. Thus, we advance the concept of cooperative photoredox catalysis for organic transformations. It is important to note that this concept can bridge the gap between visible-light photoredox catalysis and other types of redox catalysis such as transition-metal catalysis, biocatalysis or electrocatalysis. In doing so, one can take advantage of the best of both worlds in establishing organic synthesis with visible-light-induced redox reaction as a crucial step. PMID:27094803

  2. Squaring cooperative binding circles

    PubMed Central

    Deutman, Alexander B. C.; Monnereau, Cyrille; Moalin, Mohamed; Coumans, Ruud G. E.; Veling, Nico; Coenen, Michiel; Smits, Jan M. M.; de Gelder, René; Elemans, Johannes A. A. W.; Ercolani, Gianfranco; Nolte, Roeland J. M.; Rowan, Alan E.

    2009-01-01

    The cooperative binding effects of viologens and pyridines to a synthetic bivalent porphyrin receptor are used as a model system to study how the magnitudes of these effects relate to the experimentally obtained values. The full thermodynamic and kinetic circles concerning both activation and inhibition of the cage of the receptor for the binding of viologens were measured and evaluated. The results strongly emphasize the apparent character of measured binding and rate constants, in which the fractional saturation of receptors with other guests is linearly expressed in these constants. The presented method can be used as a simple tool to better analyze and comprehend the experimentally observed kinetics and thermodynamics of natural and artificial cooperative systems. PMID:19470643

  3. Cooperation in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guastaferro, A.

    1992-01-01

    The topics from the Technical Interchange Meeting for the NASA Space Exploration Initiative are presented in viewgraph form. The objective is to share a perspective of a cost-effective cooperation management structure of NASA and industry as we move towards the 21st century and the national commitment to continue our exploration in space with humans. Some of the topics covered include a personal background, today's culture, new approaches, congressional oversight, programmatic impact, and recommendations.

  4. Automated Cooperative Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Curt; Pahle, Joseph; Brown, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    This presentation is an overview of the Automated Cooperative Trajectories project. An introduction to the phenomena of wake vortices is given, along with a summary of past research into the possibility of extracting energy from the wake by flying close parallel trajectories. Challenges and barriers to adoption of civilian automatic wake surfing technology are identified. A hardware-in-the-loop simulation is described that will support future research. Finally, a roadmap for future research and technology transition is proposed.

  5. Cooperativity in Tetrel Bonds.

    PubMed

    Marín-Luna, Marta; Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José

    2016-02-01

    A theoretical study of the cooperativity in linear chains of (H3SiCN)n and (H3SiNC)n complexes connected by tetrel bonds has been carried out by means of MP2 and CCSD(T) computational methods. In all cases, a favorable cooperativity is observed, especially in some of the largest linear chains of (H3SiNC)n, where the effect is so large that the SiH3 group is almost equidistant to the two surrounding CN groups and it becomes planar. In addition, the combination of tetrel bonds with other weak interactions (halogen, chalcogen, pnicogen, triel, beryllium, lithium, and hydrogen bond) has been explored using ternary complexes, (H3SiCN)2:XY and (H3SiNC)2:XY. In all cases, positive cooperativity is obtained, especially in the (H3SiNC)2:ClF and (H3SiNC)2:SHF ternary complexes, where, respectively, halogen and chalcogen shared complexes are formed. PMID:26756083

  6. Hydrodynamics of Bacterial Cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroff, A.; Libchaber, A.

    2012-12-01

    Over the course of the last several decades, the study of microbial communities has identified countless examples of cooperation between microorganisms. Generally—as in the case of quorum sensing—cooperation is coordinated by a chemical signal that diffuses through the community. Less well understood is a second class of cooperation that is mediated through physical interactions between individuals. To better understand how the bacteria use hydrodynamics to manipulate their environment and coordinate their actions, we study the sulfur-oxidizing bacterium Thiovulum majus. These bacteria live in the diffusive boundary layer just above the muddy bottoms of ponds. As buried organic material decays, sulfide diffuses out of the mud. Oxygen from the pond diffuses into the boundary layer from above. These bacteria form communities—called veils— which are able to transport nutrients through the boundary layer faster than diffusion, thereby increasing their metabolic rate. In these communities, bacteria attach to surfaces and swim in place. As millions of bacteria beat their flagella, the community induces a macroscopic fluid flow, which mix the boundary layer. Here we present experimental observations and mathematical models that elucidate the hydrodynamics linking the behavior of an individual bacterium to the collective dynamics of the community. We begin by characterizing the flow of water around an individual bacterium swimming in place. We then discuss the flow of water and nutrients around a small number of individuals. Finally, we present observations and models detailing the macroscopic dynamics of a Thiovulum veil.

  7. Does insurance against punishment undermine cooperation in the evolution of public goods games?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianlei; Chu, Tianguang; Weissing, Franz J

    2013-03-21

    In a public goods game, cooperation can be a stable outcome if defectors are facing efficient punishment. In some public goods systems, punishment is undermined by an insurance system where speculators buy a policy that sequentially covers all punishment costs. Here, we study a simple model to investigate the question whether stable cooperation can break down in the presence of such speculation. We do indeed find scenarios where speculation either leads to the reduction of the basin of attraction of the cooperative equilibrium or even the loss of stability of this equilibrium. This however only happens if the costs of the insurance are lower than the expected fines faced by a defector. We argue that an insurance of this type is not viable and conclude that under realistic assumptions speculation does not destabilize cooperation.

  8. Multiple Vehicle Cooperative Localization with Spatial Registration Based on a Probability Hypothesis Density Filter

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feihu; Buckl, Christian; Knoll, Alois

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies the problem of multiple vehicle cooperative localization with spatial registration in the formulation of the probability hypothesis density (PHD) filter. Assuming vehicles are equipped with proprioceptive and exteroceptive sensors (with biases) to cooperatively localize positions, a simultaneous solution for joint spatial registration and state estimation is proposed. For this, we rely on the sequential Monte Carlo implementation of the PHD filtering. Compared to other methods, the concept of multiple vehicle cooperative localization with spatial registration is first proposed under Random Finite Set Theory. In addition, the proposed solution also addresses the challenges for multiple vehicle cooperative localization, e.g., the communication bandwidth issue and data association uncertainty. The simulation result demonstrates its reliability and feasibility in large-scale environments. PMID:24406860

  9. DNA-nanostructure-assembly by sequential spotting

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The ability to create nanostructures with biomolecules is one of the key elements in nanobiotechnology. One of the problems is the expensive and mostly custom made equipment which is needed for their development. We intended to reduce material costs and aimed at miniaturization of the necessary tools that are essential for nanofabrication. Thus we combined the capabilities of molecular ink lithography with DNA-self-assembling capabilities to arrange DNA in an independent array which allows addressing molecules in nanoscale dimensions. Results For the construction of DNA based nanostructures a method is presented that allows an arrangement of DNA strands in such a way that they can form a grid that only depends on the spotted pattern of the anchor molecules. An atomic force microscope (AFM) has been used for molecular ink lithography to generate small spots. The sequential spotting process allows the immobilization of several different functional biomolecules with a single AFM-tip. This grid which delivers specific addresses for the prepared DNA-strand serves as a two-dimensional anchor to arrange the sequence according to the pattern. Once the DNA-nanoarray has been formed, it can be functionalized by PNA (peptide nucleic acid) to incorporate advanced structures. Conclusions The production of DNA-nanoarrays is a promising task for nanobiotechnology. The described method allows convenient and low cost preparation of nanoarrays. PNA can be used for complex functionalization purposes as well as a structural element. PMID:22099392

  10. Multifunctional Magnetoliposomes for Sequential Controlled Release.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Annalisa; Montis, Costanza; Berti, Debora; Baglioni, Piero

    2016-08-23

    The simultaneous or sequential delivery of multiple therapeutic active principles to a specific target is one of the main challenges of nanomedicine. This goal requires the construction of complex devices often extremely time and cost consuming. Supramolecular self-assemblies, with building blocks of different nature, each providing a specific function to the final construct, can combine a facile synthetic route with a high tunability and structural control. In this study we provide the proof-of-principle of a drug delivery system, DDS, constituted of (i) liposomes, providing a fully biocompatible lipid scaffold suitable to host both hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs; (ii) a double-stranded DNA conjugated with a cholesteryl unit that spontaneously inserts into the lipid membrane; and (iii) hydrophobic and hydrophilic superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) embedded inside the lipid membrane of liposomes or connected to the DNA, respectively. Upon application of an alternating magnetic field, the SPIONs can trigger, through thermal activation, the release of a DNA strand or of the liposomal payload, depending on the frequency and the application time of the field, as proved by both steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence studies. This feature is due to the different localization of the two kinds of SPIONS within the construct and demonstrates the feasibility of a multifunctional DDS, built up from self-assembly of biocompatible building blocks. PMID:27504891

  11. Sequential detection of learning in cognitive diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Sangbeak; Fellouris, Georgios; Culpepper, Steven; Douglas, Jeff

    2016-05-01

    In order to look more closely at the many particular skills examinees utilize to answer items, cognitive diagnosis models have received much attention, and perhaps are preferable to item response models that ordinarily involve just one or a few broadly defined skills, when the objective is to hasten learning. If these fine-grained skills can be identified, a sharpened focus on learning and remediation can be achieved. The focus here is on how to detect when learning has taken place for a particular attribute and efficiently guide a student through a sequence of items to ultimately attain mastery of all attributes while administering as few items as possible. This can be seen as a problem in sequential change-point detection for which there is a long history and a well-developed literature. Though some ad hoc rules for determining learning may be used, such as stopping after M consecutive items have been successfully answered, more efficient methods that are optimal under various conditions are available. The CUSUM, Shiryaev-Roberts and Shiryaev procedures can dramatically reduce the time required to detect learning while maintaining rigorous Type I error control, and they are studied in this context through simulation. Future directions for modelling and detection of learning are discussed.

  12. Sequential dynamical systems with threshold functions.

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, C. L.; Hunt, H. B.; Marathe, M. V.; Ravi, S. S.; Rosenkrantz, D. J.; Stearns, R. E.

    2001-01-01

    A sequential dynamical system (SDS) (see [BH+01] and the references therein) consists of an undirected graph G(V,E) where each node {nu} {epsilon} V is associated with a Boolean state (s{sub {nu}}) and a symmetric Boolean function f{sub {nu}} (called the local transition function at {nu}). The inputs to f{sub {nu}} are s{sub {nu}} and the states of all the nodes adjacent to {nu}. In each step of the SDS, the nodes update their state values using their local transition functions in the order specified by a given permutation {pi} of the nodes. A configuration of the SDS is an n-tuple (b{sub 1}, b{sub 2}...,b{sub n}) where n = |V| and b{sub i} {epsilon} {l_brace}0,1{r_brace} is the state value of node {nu}{sub i}. The system starts in a specified initial configuration and each step of the SDS produces a (possibly new) configuration.

  13. Social Influences in Sequential Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Schöbel, Markus; Rieskamp, Jörg; Huber, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    People often make decisions in a social environment. The present work examines social influence on people’s decisions in a sequential decision-making situation. In the first experimental study, we implemented an information cascade paradigm, illustrating that people infer information from decisions of others and use this information to make their own decisions. We followed a cognitive modeling approach to elicit the weight people give to social as compared to private individual information. The proposed social influence model shows that participants overweight their own private information relative to social information, contrary to the normative Bayesian account. In our second study, we embedded the abstract decision problem of Study 1 in a medical decision-making problem. We examined whether in a medical situation people also take others’ authority into account in addition to the information that their decisions convey. The social influence model illustrates that people weight social information differentially according to the authority of other decision makers. The influence of authority was strongest when an authority's decision contrasted with private information. Both studies illustrate how the social environment provides sources of information that people integrate differently for their decisions. PMID:26784448

  14. Sequential Auctions in Uncertain Information Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatima, Shaheen; Wooldridge, Michael; Jennings, Nicholas R.

    This paper analyzes sequential auctions for private value objects using second-price sealed-bid rules. Now, the equilibrium bids for such auctions depend on the information uncertainty of the bidders. Specifically, there are three key auction parameters that the bidders could be uncertain about: the valuations of the objects for sale, the number of objects for sale, and the number of participating bidders. We analyse the bidding behaviour for each of these three sources of uncertainty. For each setting, we first find the equilibrium bidding strategies for the individual auctions that comprise a series. Then we analyze the effect of these uncertainties on the computational and economic properties of the equilibrium solution. The former analysis is essential if we want to use software agents to bid on our behalf. The latter is essential because both the auctioneer and the bidders want to know how these uncertainties affect their profits. Thus we compare the outcomes for these settings from the perspective of the bidders (i.e., in terms of their profits), from the perspective of the auctioneer (i.e., in terms of his revenue), and from a global perspective (i.e., in terms of auction efficiency).

  15. Multiscale sequentially-coupled arterial FSI technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tezduyar, Tayfun E.; Takizawa, Kenji; Moorman, Creighton; Wright, Samuel; Christopher, Jason

    2009-10-01

    Multiscale versions of the Sequentially-Coupled Arterial Fluid-Structure Interaction (SCAFSI) technique are presented. The SCAFSI technique was introduced as an approximate FSI approach in arterial fluid mechanics. It is based on the assumption that the arterial deformation during a cardiac cycle is driven mostly by the blood pressure. First we compute a “reference” arterial deformation as a function of time, driven only by the blood pressure profile of the cardiac cycle. Then we compute a sequence of updates involving mesh motion, fluid dynamics calculations, and recomputing the arterial deformation. The SCAFSI technique was developed and tested in conjunction with the stabilized space-time FSI (SSTFSI) technique. Beyond providing a computationally more economical alternative to the fully coupled arterial FSI approach, the SCAFSI technique brings additional flexibility, such as being able to carry out the computations in a spatially or temporally multiscale fashion. In the test computations reported here for the spatially multiscale versions of the SCAFSI technique, we focus on a patient-specific middle cerebral artery segment with aneurysm, where the arterial geometry is based on computed tomography images. The arterial structure is modeled with the continuum element made of hyperelastic (Fung) material.

  16. Optimal power flow using sequential quadratic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejdawi, Imad M.

    1999-11-01

    Optimal power flow (OPF) is an operational as well as a planning tool used by electric utilities to help them operate their network in the most economic and secure mode of operation. Various algorithms to solve the OPF problem evolved over the past three decades; linear programming (LP) techniques were among the major mathematical programming methods utilized. The linear models of the objective function and the linearization of the constraints are the main features of these techniques. The main advantages of the LP approach are simplicity and speed. Nonlinear programming techniques have been applied to OPF solution. The major drawback is the expensive solution of large sparse systems of equations. This research is concerned with the development of a new OPF solution algorithm using sequential quadratic programming (SQP). In this formulation, a small dense system the size of which is equal to the number of control variables is solved in an inner loop. The Jacobian and Hessian terms are calculated in an outer loop. The total number of outer loop iterations is comparable to those in an ordinary load flow in contrast to 20--30 iterations in other nonlinear methods. In addition, the total number of floating point operations is less than that encountered in direct methods by two orders of magnitude. We also model dispatch over a twenty four-hour time horizon in a transmission constrained power network that includes price-responsive loads where large energy customers can operate their loads in time intervals with lowest spot prices.

  17. Testing constrained sequential dominance models of neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björkeroth, Fredrik; King, Stephen F.

    2015-12-01

    Constrained sequential dominance (CSD) is a natural framework for implementing the see-saw mechanism of neutrino masses which allows the mixing angles and phases to be accurately predicted in terms of relatively few input parameters. We analyze a class of CSD(n) models where, in the flavour basis, two right-handed neutrinos are dominantly responsible for the ‘atmospheric’ and ‘solar’ neutrino masses with Yukawa couplings to ({ν }e,{ν }μ ,{ν }τ ) proportional to (0,1,1) and (1,n,n-2), respectively, where n is a positive integer. These coupling patterns may arise in indirect family symmetry models based on A 4. With two right-handed neutrinos, using a χ 2 test, we find a good agreement with data for CSD(3) and CSD(4) where the entire Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata mixing matrix is controlled by a single phase η, which takes simple values, leading to accurate predictions for mixing angles and the magnitude of the oscillation phase | {δ }{CP}| . We carefully study the perturbing effect of a third ‘decoupled’ right-handed neutrino, leading to a bound on the lightest physical neutrino mass {m}1{{≲ }}1 meV for the viable cases, corresponding to a normal neutrino mass hierarchy. We also discuss a direct link between the oscillation phase {δ }{CP} and leptogenesis in CSD(n) due to the same see-saw phase η appearing in both the neutrino mass matrix and leptogenesis.

  18. Bilingual control: sequential memory in language switching.

    PubMed

    Declerck, Mathieu; Philipp, Andrea M; Koch, Iring

    2013-11-01

    To investigate bilingual language control, prior language switching studies presented visual objects, which had to be named in different languages, typically indicated by a visual cue. The present study examined language switching of predictable responses by introducing a novel sequence-based language switching paradigm. In 4 experiments, sequential responses (i.e., weekdays, numbers or new sequences) and an alternating language sequence (e.g., L1-L1-L2-L2) were implemented, both of which were memory based. Our data revealed switch costs, showing that a language switch is associated with worse performance compared with a language repetition, and mixing costs, which constitutes the performance difference between pure and mixed language blocks, even while producing entirely predictable responses (i.e., language and concept). Additionally, we found these switch costs with overlearned and new sequences and found that switch costs were reduced with longer preparation time. The obtained data are consistent with a proactive interference account, such as the inhibitory control model.

  19. Sleep memory processing: the sequential hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Giuditta, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    According to the sequential hypothesis (SH) memories acquired during wakefulness are processed during sleep in two serial steps respectively occurring during slow wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. During SWS memories to be retained are distinguished from irrelevant or competing traces that undergo downgrading or elimination. Processed memories are stored again during REM sleep which integrates them with preexisting memories. The hypothesis received support from a wealth of EEG, behavioral, and biochemical analyses of trained rats. Further evidence was provided by independent studies of human subjects. SH basic premises, data, and interpretations have been compared with corresponding viewpoints of the synaptic homeostatic hypothesis (SHY). Their similarities and differences are presented and discussed within the framework of sleep processing operations. SHY’s emphasis on synaptic renormalization during SWS is acknowledged to underline a key sleep effect, but this cannot marginalize sleep’s main role in selecting memories to be retained from downgrading traces, and in their integration with preexisting memories. In addition, SHY’s synaptic renormalization raises an unsolved dilemma that clashes with the accepted memory storage mechanism exclusively based on modifications of synaptic strength. This difficulty may be bypassed by the assumption that SWS-processed memories are stored again by REM sleep in brain subnuclear quantum particles. Storing of memories in quantum particles may also occur in other vigilance states. Hints are provided on ways to subject the quantum hypothesis to experimental tests. PMID:25565985

  20. Sequential experimental design based generalised ANOVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Souvik; Chowdhury, Rajib

    2016-07-01

    Over the last decade, surrogate modelling technique has gained wide popularity in the field of uncertainty quantification, optimization, model exploration and sensitivity analysis. This approach relies on experimental design to generate training points and regression/interpolation for generating the surrogate. In this work, it is argued that conventional experimental design may render a surrogate model inefficient. In order to address this issue, this paper presents a novel distribution adaptive sequential experimental design (DA-SED). The proposed DA-SED has been coupled with a variant of generalised analysis of variance (G-ANOVA), developed by representing the component function using the generalised polynomial chaos expansion. Moreover, generalised analytical expressions for calculating the first two statistical moments of the response, which are utilized in predicting the probability of failure, have also been developed. The proposed approach has been utilized in predicting probability of failure of three structural mechanics problems. It is observed that the proposed approach yields accurate and computationally efficient estimate of the failure probability.

  1. Sequential half-body irradiation in childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkin, R.D.T.; Berry, M.P.

    1983-12-01

    Single-dose half-body irradiation (HBI), introduced for the palliation of pain from widespread bone metastases in adults, has proved to be successful. The dose-limiting toxicity has proved to be acute radiation pneumonitis, with bone marrow tolerance of lesser importance, in spite of the fact that many patients received previous local irradiation and/or chemotherapy. Palliative HBI has not become a valuable treatment in pediatric malignancies, because of a shorter metastatic phase. Results are described in selected institutions, where HBI has been used in the treatment of pediatric malignancies. A single institution plot study was undertaken at the Princess Margaret Hospital involving 17 patients with Ewing's sarcoma of bone, without overt metastases at diagnosis. Results to date have not been obviously different from overall survival in the first intergroup Ewing's sarcoma study. Overall, the treatment has been shown to be well tolerated and can be given entirely on an out-patient basis. When compared on a historical basis with a previous single dose total body irradiation study, the one year survival rate was increased. HBI appears to be tolerable treatment, when given concurrently with or sequential to local and systemic treatment.

  2. Sequential Immune Responses: The Weapons of Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Charles D.; Ley, Klaus; Buchmann, Kurt; Canton, Johnathan

    2016-01-01

    Sequential immune responses (SIR) is a new model that describes what ‘immunity’ means in higher animals. Existing models, such as self/nonself discrimination or danger, focus on how immune responses are initiated. However, initiation is not protection. SIR describes the actual immune responses that provide protection. SIR resulted from a comprehensive analysis of the evolution of immune systems that revealed that several very different types of host innate responses occur (and at different tempos) which together provide host protection. SIR1 uses rapidly activated enzymes like the NADPH oxidases and is present in all animal cells. SIR2 is mediated by the first ‘immune’ cells: macrophage-like cells. SIR3 evolved in animals like invertebrates and provides enhanced protection through advanced macrophage recognition and killing of pathogens and through other innate immune cells such as neutrophils. Finally, in vertebrates, macrophages developed SIR4: the ability to present antigens to T cells. Though much slower than SIR1–3, adaptive responses provide a unique new protection for higher vertebrates. Importantly, newer SIR responses were added on top of older, evolutionarily conserved functions to provide ‘layers’ of host protection. SIR transcends existing models by elucidating the different weapons of immunity that provide host protection in higher animals. PMID:25871013

  3. The Origin of Sequential Chromospheric Brightening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Michael S.; Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Jackiewicz, Jason; Gilbert, Holly

    2016-05-01

    Sequential Chromospheric Brightenings (SCBs) are often observed in the immediate vicinity of erupting flares and are associated with coronal mass ejections. When SCBs are observed, they routinely appear before the peak emission of the flare and several hours before the first detection of a coupled CME. Since their initial discovery in 2005, there have been several subsequent investigations of SCBs. In each case, these sudden, small-scale brightenings provide vital clues regarding the mechanisms of large-scale energy release in the solar atmosphere. We make use of an automated detection algorithm developed by Kirk et al. (2013) to extract the physical qualities of SCBs in 11 flares of varying size and intensity. Using complementary magnetic field measurements, we also model the potential field beneath these brightenings. We conclude that SCBs originate in the lower corona around 0.1 R⊙ above the photosphere, propagate away from the flare center at speeds 35 ‑ 85 km s‑1, and have typical photosphere magnetic intensities 257± 37 G. In light of these measurements, we conclude that SCBs are distinctive chromospheric signatures of erupting coronal mass ejections.

  4. Cooperative wireless network control based health and activity monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Prakash, R; Ganesh, A Balaji; Girish, Siva V

    2016-10-01

    A real-time cooperative communication based wireless network is presented for monitoring health and activity of an end-user in their environment. The cooperative communication offers better energy consumption and also an opportunity to aware the current location of a user non-intrusively. The link between mobile sensor node and relay node is dynamically established by using Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI) and Link Quality Indicator (LQI) based on adaptive relay selection scheme. The study proposes a Linear Acceleration based Transmission Power Decision Control (LA-TPDC) algorithm to further enhance the energy efficiency of cooperative communication. Further, the occurrences of false alarms are carefully prevented by introducing three stages of sequential warning system. The real-time experiments are carried-out by using the nodes, namely mobile sensor node, relay nodes and a destination node which are indigenously developed by using a CC430 microcontroller integrated with an in-built transceiver at 868 MHz. The wireless node performance characteristics, such as energy consumption, Signal-Noise ratio (SNR), Bit Error Rate (BER), Packet Delivery Ratio (PDR) and transmission offset are evaluated for all the participated nodes. The experimental results observed that the proposed linear acceleration based transmission power decision control algorithm almost doubles the battery life time than energy efficient conventional cooperative communication. PMID:27562484

  5. Cooperative wireless network control based health and activity monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Prakash, R; Ganesh, A Balaji; Girish, Siva V

    2016-10-01

    A real-time cooperative communication based wireless network is presented for monitoring health and activity of an end-user in their environment. The cooperative communication offers better energy consumption and also an opportunity to aware the current location of a user non-intrusively. The link between mobile sensor node and relay node is dynamically established by using Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI) and Link Quality Indicator (LQI) based on adaptive relay selection scheme. The study proposes a Linear Acceleration based Transmission Power Decision Control (LA-TPDC) algorithm to further enhance the energy efficiency of cooperative communication. Further, the occurrences of false alarms are carefully prevented by introducing three stages of sequential warning system. The real-time experiments are carried-out by using the nodes, namely mobile sensor node, relay nodes and a destination node which are indigenously developed by using a CC430 microcontroller integrated with an in-built transceiver at 868 MHz. The wireless node performance characteristics, such as energy consumption, Signal-Noise ratio (SNR), Bit Error Rate (BER), Packet Delivery Ratio (PDR) and transmission offset are evaluated for all the participated nodes. The experimental results observed that the proposed linear acceleration based transmission power decision control algorithm almost doubles the battery life time than energy efficient conventional cooperative communication.

  6. 75 FR 10319 - Cooper Tools-Sumter, Cooper Tools Divisions, a Subsidiary of Cooper Industries, Inc., Including...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-05

    ... published in the Federal Register on September 21, 2006 (71 FR 55216). In order to avoid an overlap in... Employment and Training Administration Cooper Tools--Sumter, Cooper Tools Divisions, a Subsidiary of Cooper... workers of Cooper Tools--Sumter, Cooper Tools Division, a subsidiary of Cooper Industries, Inc.,...

  7. Adsorption of organic chemicals in soils.

    PubMed Central

    Calvet, R

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a review on adsorption of organic chemicals on soils sediments and their constituents. The first part of this review deals with adsorption from gas and liquid phases and gives a discussion on the physical meaning of the shape of adsorption isotherms. Results show that no general rules can be proposed to describe univocally the relation between the shape of isotherms and the nature of adsorbate-adsorbent system. Kinetics of adsorption is discussed through the description of various models. Theoretical developments exist both for the thermodynamics and the kinetics of adsorption, but there is a strong need for experimental results. Possible adsorption mechanisms are ion exchange, interaction with metallic cations, hydrogen bonds, charge transfers, and London-van der Waals dispersion forces/hydrophobic effect. However, direct proofs of a given mechanism are rare. Several factors influence adsorption behavior. Electronic structure of adsorbed molecules, properties of adsorbents, and characteristics of the liquid phase are discussed in relation to adsorption. Such properties as water solubility, organic carbon content of adsorbing materials, and the composition of the liquid phase are particularly important. Evaluation of adsorption can be obtained through either laboratory measurements or use of several correlations. Adsorption measurements must be interpreted, taking into account treatment of adsorbent materials, experimental conditions, and secondary phenomena such as degradations. Correlations between adsorption coefficients and water-octanol partition coefficient or water solubility are numerous. They may be useful tools for prediction purposes. Relations with transport, bioavailability, and degradation are described. PMID:2695323

  8. Phosphate adsorption on lanthanum loaded biochar.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhanghong; Shen, Dekui; Shen, Fei; Li, Tianyu

    2016-05-01

    To attain a low-cost and high-efficient phosphate adsorbent, lanthanum (La) loaded biochar (La-BC) prepared by a chemical precipitation method was developed. La-BC and its pristine biochar (CK-BC) were comparatively characterized using zeta potential, BET surface area, scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The adsorption ability and the mechanisms during adsorption process for the La-BC samples were also investigated. La loaded on the surface of biochar can be termed as La-composites (such as LaOOH, LaONO3 and La(OH)3), leading to the decrease of negative charge and surface area of biochar. La-BC exhibited the high adsorption capacity to phosphate compared to CK-BC. Adsorption isotherm and adsorption kinetic studies showed that the Langmuir isotherm and second order model could well describe the adsorption process of La-BC, indicating that the adsorption was dominated by a homogeneous and chemical process. The calculated maximum adsorption capacity was as high as 46.37 mg g(-1) (computed in P). Thermodynamic analysis revealed that the adsorption was spontaneous and endothermic. SEM, XRD, XPS and FT-IR analysis suggested that the multi-adsorption mechanisms including precipitation, ligand exchange and complexation interactions can be evidenced during the phosphate adsorption process by La-composites in La-BC. PMID:26871732

  9. Adsorption of organic chemicals in soils.

    PubMed

    Calvet, R

    1989-11-01

    This paper presents a review on adsorption of organic chemicals on soils sediments and their constituents. The first part of this review deals with adsorption from gas and liquid phases and gives a discussion on the physical meaning of the shape of adsorption isotherms. Results show that no general rules can be proposed to describe univocally the relation between the shape of isotherms and the nature of adsorbate-adsorbent system. Kinetics of adsorption is discussed through the description of various models. Theoretical developments exist both for the thermodynamics and the kinetics of adsorption, but there is a strong need for experimental results. Possible adsorption mechanisms are ion exchange, interaction with metallic cations, hydrogen bonds, charge transfers, and London-van der Waals dispersion forces/hydrophobic effect. However, direct proofs of a given mechanism are rare. Several factors influence adsorption behavior. Electronic structure of adsorbed molecules, properties of adsorbents, and characteristics of the liquid phase are discussed in relation to adsorption. Such properties as water solubility, organic carbon content of adsorbing materials, and the composition of the liquid phase are particularly important. Evaluation of adsorption can be obtained through either laboratory measurements or use of several correlations. Adsorption measurements must be interpreted, taking into account treatment of adsorbent materials, experimental conditions, and secondary phenomena such as degradations. Correlations between adsorption coefficients and water-octanol partition coefficient or water solubility are numerous. They may be useful tools for prediction purposes. Relations with transport, bioavailability, and degradation are described.

  10. Adsorption Behavior of Nonplanar Phthalocyanines: Competition of Different Adsorption Conformations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Using density functional theory augmented with state-of-the-art van der Waals corrections, we studied the geometric and electronic properties of nonplanar chlorogallium-phthalocyanine GaClPc molecules adsorbed on Cu(111). Comparing these results with published experimental data for adsorption heights, we found indications for breaking of the metal–halogen bond when the molecule is heated during or after the deposition process. Interestingly, the work-function change induced by this dissociated geometry is the same as that computed for an intact adsorbate layer in the “Cl-down” configuration, with both agreeing well with the experimental photoemission data. This is unexpected, as the chemical natures of the adsorbates and the adsorption distances are markedly different in the two cases. The observation is explained as a consequence of Fermi-level pinning due to fractional charge transfer at the interface. Our results show that rationalizing the adsorption configurations on the basis of electronic interface properties alone can be ambiguous and that additional insight from dispersion-corrected DFT simulations is desirable. PMID:27066160

  11. Adsorption of humic acid onto carbonaceous surfaces: atomic force microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiguo; Zu, Yuangang; Meng, Ronghua; Xing, Zhimin; Tan, Shengnan; Zhao, Lin; Sun, Tongze; Zhou, Zhen

    2011-12-01

    The adsorption of humic acid (HA) onto highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces at different concentrations has been studied by atomic force microscopy. When HA concentration was increased from 10 to 1,000 mg/L, HA can sequentially form spherical particles, layered structures, and connected blocks on HOPG surfaces. The findings of the layer structures and small amount of fine chains have been verified and discussed. When HA was acidified by addition of acetic acid, it changed into small rigid particles. These results indicated that HA can be considered as supramolecular associations of self-assembling heterogeneous and relatively small molecules, and a small amount of polymers. The present results are important for understanding HA molecular structures and their adsorption characteristic on carbonaceous surfaces. PMID:22047766

  12. Sequential control by speed drive for ac motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsoum, Nader

    2012-11-01

    The speed drive for ac motor is widely used in the industrial field to allow direct control for the speed and torque without any feedback from the motor shaft. By using the ABB ACS800 speed drive unit, the speed and torque can be controlled using sequential control method. Sequential control is one of the application control method provided in the ABB ACS800 Drive, where a set of events or action performed in a particular order one after the other to control the speed and torque of the ac motor. It was claimed that sequential control method is using the preset seven constant speeds being provided in ABB ACS800 drive to control the speed and torque in a continuous and sequential manner. The characteristics and features of controlling the speed and torque using sequential control method can be investigated by observing the graphs and curves plotted which are obtained from the practical result. Sequential control can run either in the Direct Torque Control (DTC) or Scalar motor control mode. By using sequential control method, the ABB ACS800 drive can be programmed to run the motor automatically according to the time setting of the seven preset constant speeds. Besides, the intention of this project is to generate a new form of the experimental set up.

  13. Sequential therapy: Understanding and appreciating sequential therapy for H. pylori eradication

    PubMed Central

    Graham, David Y.; Rimbara, Emiko

    2011-01-01

    Despite the fact that sequential therapy has been evaluated in more than 2,500 patients and has been shown to on average provide H. pylori eradication in 90 to 94%, some authorities still question whether it should be a first-line anti-H. pylori regimen. Here, we discuss H. pylori eradication using experience and expectations with other common bacterial infections as a frame of reference. H. pylori is no exception and near 100% success is expected for optimized regimens treating susceptible infections. As such, the proper comparator would be the relation to 100% eradication. Superiority to another, often proven inferior, therapy per se provides little or no useful information. Treatment failures in infectious diseases are typically easily explainable and most often relate to the presence of antimicrobial resistance or failure to take the drugs. We provide a model for predicting the results of H. pylori combination therapies in relation to the pattern and prevalence of resistance. The results are consistent with clinical practice and explain why sequential is typically superior and essentially never inferior to triple therapy. We also show when meta-analysis is an inappropriate technique for the analysis of H. pylori clinical trials and discuss how to appropriately use of the technique. Finally, we discuss why the location of studies (e.g., Italy), is unimportant and explain why, from the standpoint of a therapy for an infectious disease, sequential therapy is a significant advance and should be considered one of the replacements for the outdated legacy triple therapy (proton pump inhibitor – clarithromycin – amoxicillin). PMID:21389810

  14. The sequential trauma score - a new instrument for the sequential mortality prediction in major trauma*

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There are several well established scores for the assessment of the prognosis of major trauma patients that all have in common that they can be calculated at the earliest during intensive care unit stay. We intended to develop a sequential trauma score (STS) that allows prognosis at several early stages based on the information that is available at a particular time. Study design In a retrospective, multicenter study using data derived from the Trauma Registry of the German Trauma Society (2002-2006), we identified the most relevant prognostic factors from the patients basic data (P), prehospital phase (A), early (B1), and late (B2) trauma room phase. Univariate and logistic regression models as well as score quality criteria and the explanatory power have been calculated. Results A total of 2,354 patients with complete data were identified. From the patients basic data (P), logistic regression showed that age was a significant predictor of survival (AUCmodel p, area under the curve = 0.63). Logistic regression of the prehospital data (A) showed that blood pressure, pulse rate, Glasgow coma scale (GCS), and anisocoria were significant predictors (AUCmodel A = 0.76; AUCmodel P + A = 0.82). Logistic regression of the early trauma room phase (B1) showed that peripheral oxygen saturation, GCS, anisocoria, base excess, and thromboplastin time to be significant predictors of survival (AUCmodel B1 = 0.78; AUCmodel P +A + B1 = 0.85). Multivariate analysis of the late trauma room phase (B2) detected cardiac massage, abbreviated injury score (AIS) of the head ≥ 3, the maximum AIS, the need for transfusion or massive blood transfusion, to be the most important predictors (AUCmodel B2 = 0.84; AUCfinal model P + A + B1 + B2 = 0.90). The explanatory power - a tool for the assessment of the relative impact of each segment to mortality - is 25% for P, 7% for A, 17% for B1 and 51% for B2. A spreadsheet for the easy calculation of the sequential trauma score is

  15. Adsorption air cleaning from ozone.

    PubMed

    Baltrenas, Pranas; Paliulis, Dainius; Vasarevicius, Saulius; Simaitis, Ramutis

    2003-01-01

    Not much has been written about air cleaning from ozone. The aim of this paper was to demonstrate the possibility of adsorption air cleaning from ozone. The second aim was to investigate the dependence of the efficiency of ozone removal from the air on the height of the adsorber layer and on concentrations of ozone, and to obtain empirical formulas for calculating the efficiency of ozone treatment. Equipment for air cleaning from ozone and nitrogen and sulphur dioxides is suggested.

  16. Studies on Vapor Adsorption Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shamsundar, N.; Ramotowski, M.

    1998-01-01

    The project consisted of performing experiments on single and dual bed vapor adsorption systems, thermodynamic cycle optimization, and thermal modeling. The work was described in a technical paper that appeared in conference proceedings and a Master's thesis, which were previously submitted to NASA. The present report describes some additional thermal modeling work done subsequently, and includes listings of computer codes developed during the project. Recommendations for future work are provided.

  17. Sequential or simultaneous visual processing deficit in developmental dyslexia?

    PubMed

    Lassus-Sangosse, Delphine; N'guyen-Morel, Marie-Ange; Valdois, Sylviane

    2008-03-01

    The ability of dyslexic children with or without phonological problems to process simultaneous and sequential visual information was assessed using two tasks requiring the oral report of simultaneously or sequentially displayed letter-strings. The two groups were found to exhibit a simultaneous visual processing deficit but preserved serial processing skills. However, the impairment in simultaneous processing was larger in the dyslexic group with no phonological disorder. Although sequential and simultaneous processing skills both related to reading performance, simultaneous processing alone significantly contributed to reading speed and accuracy. These findings suggest that a simultaneous processing disorder might contribute to developmental dyslexia.

  18. Aminopyridine modified Spirulina platensis biomass for chromium(VI) adsorption in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Bayramoglu, Gulay; Akbulut, Aydin; Arica, M Yakup

    2016-01-01

    Chemical modification of Spirulina platensis biomass was realized by sequential treatment of algal surface with epichlorohydrin and aminopyridine. Adsorptive properties of Cr(VI) ions on native and aminopyridine modified algal biomass were investigated by varying pH, contact time, ionic strength, initial Cr(VI) concentration, and temperature. FTIR and analytical analysis indicated that carboxyl and amino groups were the major functional groups for Cr(VI) ions adsorption. The optimum adsorption was observed at pH 3.0 for native and modified algal biomasses. The adsorption capacity was found to be 79.6 and 158.7 mg g(-1), for native and modified algal biomasses, respectively. For continuous system studies, the experiments were conducted to study the effect of important design parameters such as flow rate and initial concentration of metal ions, and the maximum sorption capacity was observed at a flow rate of 50 mL h(-1), and Cr(VI) ions concentration 200 mg L(-1) with modified biomass. Experimental data fitted a pseudo-second-order equation. The regeneration performance was observed to be 89.6% and 94.3% for native and modified algal biomass, respectively. PMID:27533866

  19. Kinetic modeling of antimony(V) adsorption-desorption and transport in soils.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Li, Lulu; Zhou, Shiwei

    2014-09-01

    Antimonate [Sb(V)] adsorption-desorption and transport in an acidic red soil (Yingtan) and a calcareous soil (Huanjiang) was investigated using kinetic batch and miscible displacement experiments. Different formulations of a multi-reaction model (MRM) were evaluated for their capabilities of describing the retention and transport mechanisms of Sb(V) in soils. The experimental results showed that adsorption of Sb(V) by two soils was kinetically controlled and largely irreversible. The Sb(V) adsorption capacity and kinetic rate of the acidic red soil was much higher than that of the calcareous soil. The asymmetrical breakthrough curves indicated the strong dominance of non-equilibrium retention of Sb(V). A four step sequential extraction procedure provided evidence that majority of applied Sb(V) was irreversibly retained. A formulation of MRM with two kinetic sorption sites (reversible and irreversible) successfully described Sb(V) adsorption-desorption data. The use of kinetic batch rate coefficients for predictions of breakthrough curves (BTCs) underestimated Sb(V) retention and overestimated its mobility. In an inverse mode with optimized rate coefficients, the MRM formulation was capable of simulating Sb(V) transport in soil columns.

  20. Fibrinogen adsorption mechanisms at the gold substrate revealed by QCM-D measurements and RSA modeling.

    PubMed

    Kubiak, Katarzyna; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Cieśla, Michał

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption kinetics of fibrinogen at a gold substrate at various pHs was thoroughly studied using the QCM-D method. The experimental were interpreted in terms of theoretical calculations performed according to the random sequential adsorption model (RSA). In this way, the hydration functions and water factors of fibrinogen monolayers were quantitatively evaluated at various pHs. It was revealed that for the lower range of fibrinogen coverage the hydration function were considerably lower than previously obtained for the silica sensor [33]. The lower hydration of fibrinogen monolayers on the gold sensor was attributed to its higher roughness. However, for higher fibrinogen coverage the hydration functions for both sensors became identical exhibiting an universal behavior. By using the hydration functions, the fibrinogen adsorption/desorption runs derived from QCM-D measurements were converted to the Γd vs. the time relationships. This allowed to precisely determine the maximum coverage that varied between 1.6mgm(-2) at pH 3.5 and 4.5mgm(-2) at pH 7.4 (for ionic strength of 0.15M). These results agree with theoretical eRSA modeling and previous experimental data derived by using ellipsometry, OWLS and TIRF. Various fibrinogen adsorption mechanisms were revealed by exploiting the maximum coverage data. These results allow one to develop a method for preparing fibrinogen monolayers of well-controlled coverage and molecule orientation.

  1. Protein adsorption onto ceramic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Takami, Y; Yamane, S; Makinouchi, K; Otsuka, G; Glueck, J; Benkowski, R; Nosé, Y

    1998-04-01

    Ceramics seldom have been used as blood-contacting materials. However, alumina ceramic (Al2O3) and polyethylene are incorporated into the pivot bearings of the Gyro centrifugal blood pump. This material combination was chosen based on the high durability of the materials. Due to the stagnant flow that often occurs in a continuous flow condition inside a centrifugal pump, pivot bearing system is extremely critical. To evaluate the thombogenicity of pivot bearings in the Gyro pump, this study sought to investigate protein adsorption, particularly albumin, IgG, fibrinogen, and fibronectin onto ceramic surfaces. Al2O3 and silicon carbide ceramic (SiC) were compared with polyethylene (PE) and polyvinylchloride (PVC). Bicinchoninic acid (BCA) protein assay revealed that the amount of adsorbed proteins onto Al2O3 and SiC was significantly less than that on PVC. The sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) indicated that numerous proteins adsorbed onto PVC compared to PE, Al2O3, and SiC. Identification of adsorbed proteins by Western immunoblotting revealed that the adsorption of albumin was similar on all four materials tested. Western immunoblotting also indicated lesser amounts of IgG, fibrinogen, and fibronectin on Al2O3 and SiC than on PE and PVC. In conclusion, ceramics (Al2O3 and SiC) are expected to be thromboresistant from the viewpoint of protein adsorption. PMID:9511095

  2. Large-scale sequential quadratic programming algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Eldersveld, S.K.

    1992-09-01

    The problem addressed is the general nonlinear programming problem: finding a local minimizer for a nonlinear function subject to a mixture of nonlinear equality and inequality constraints. The methods studied are in the class of sequential quadratic programming (SQP) algorithms, which have previously proved successful for problems of moderate size. Our goal is to devise an SQP algorithm that is applicable to large-scale optimization problems, using sparse data structures and storing less curvature information but maintaining the property of superlinear convergence. The main features are: 1. The use of a quasi-Newton approximation to the reduced Hessian of the Lagrangian function. Only an estimate of the reduced Hessian matrix is required by our algorithm. The impact of not having available the full Hessian approximation is studied and alternative estimates are constructed. 2. The use of a transformation matrix Q. This allows the QP gradient to be computed easily when only the reduced Hessian approximation is maintained. 3. The use of a reduced-gradient form of the basis for the null space of the working set. This choice of basis is more practical than an orthogonal null-space basis for large-scale problems. The continuity condition for this choice is proven. 4. The use of incomplete solutions of quadratic programming subproblems. Certain iterates generated by an active-set method for the QP subproblem are used in place of the QP minimizer to define the search direction for the nonlinear problem. An implementation of the new algorithm has been obtained by modifying the code MINOS. Results and comparisons with MINOS and NPSOL are given for the new algorithm on a set of 92 test problems.

  3. “Shotgun” Versus Sequential Testing

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Phyllis L; Rothberg, Michael B; Friedman, Robert H; Felsenstein, Donna; Pliskin, Joseph S

    2005-01-01

    Background Although vaginitis is a common outpatient problem, only 60% of patients can be diagnosed at the initial office visit of a primary care provider using the office procedures of pH testing, whiff tests, normal saline, and potassium hydroxide preps. Objective To determine the most cost-effective diagnostic and treatment approach for the medical management of vaginitis. Design Decision and cost-effectiveness analyses. Participants Healthy women with symptoms of vaginitis undiagnosed after an initial pelvic exam, wet mount preparations, pH, and the four criteria to diagnose bacterial vaginosis. Setting General office practice. Methods We evaluated 28 diagnostic strategies comprised of combinations of pH testing, vaginal cultures for yeast and Trichomonas vaginalis, Gram's stain for bacterial vaginosis, and DNA probes for Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia. Data sources for the study were confined to English language literature. Measurement The outcome measures were symptom-days and costs. Results The least expensive strategy was to perform yeast culture, gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia probes at the initial visit, and Gram's stain and Trichomonas culture only when the vaginal pH exceeded 4.9 ($330, 7.30 symptom days). Other strategies cost $8 to $76 more and increased duration of symptoms by up to 1.3 days. In probabilistic sensitivity analysis, this strategy was always the most effective strategy and was also least expensive 58% of the time. Conclusions For patients with vaginitis symptoms undiagnosed by pelvic examination, wet mount preparations and related office tests, a comprehensive, pH-guided testing strategy at the initial office visit is less expensive and more effective than ordering tests sequentially. PMID:16117745

  4. Sequential Hybrid Procedure for Persistent Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Bulava, Alan; Mokracek, Ales; Hanis, Jiri; Kurfirst, Vojtech; Eisenberger, Martin; Pesl, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    Background Catheter ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation yields an unsatisfactorily high number of failures. The hybrid approach has recently emerged as a technique that overcomes the limitations of both surgical and catheter procedures alone. Methods and Results We investigated the sequential (staged) hybrid method, which consists of a surgical thoracoscopic radiofrequency ablation procedure followed by radiofrequency catheter ablation 6 to 8 weeks later using the CARTO 3 mapping system. Fifty consecutive patients (mean age 62±7 years, 32 males) with long‐standing persistent atrial fibrillation (41±34 months) and a dilated left atrium (>45 mm) were included and prospectively followed in an unblinded registry. During the electrophysiological part of the study, all 4 pulmonary veins were found to be isolated in 36 (72%) patients and a complete box‐lesion was confirmed in 14 (28%) patients. All gaps were successfully re‐ablated. Twelve months after the completed hybrid ablation, 47 patients (94%) were in normal sinus rhythm (4 patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation required propafenone and 1 patient underwent a redo catheter procedure). The majority of arrhythmias recurred during the first 3 months. Beyond 12 months, there were no arrhythmia recurrences detected. The surgical part of the procedure was complicated by 7 (13.7%) major complications, while no serious adverse events were recorded during the radiofrequency catheter part of the procedure. Conclusions The staged hybrid epicardial–endocardial treatment of long‐standing persistent atrial fibrillation seems to be extremely effective in maintenance of normal sinus rhythm compared to radiofrequency catheter or surgical ablation alone. Epicardial ablation alone cannot guarantee durable transmural lesions. Clinical Trial Registration URL: www.ablace.cz Unique identifier: cz‐060520121617 PMID:25809548

  5. Low vision reading with sequential word presentation.

    PubMed

    Rubin, G S; Turano, K

    1994-07-01

    Individuals with scotomas in the center of their visual fields usually read much more slowly than visually impaired individuals without central scotomas. This study determines the extent to which inefficient eye movements could account for this difference. Using a technique described previously [Rubin and Turano (1992) Vision Research, 32, 895-902] text was presented sequentially, one word at a time at the same location in the visual field. Reading performance for rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) was compared to conventional text presentation (PAGE) in 14 subjects with dense central scotomas (central field loss, CFL) and 9 without central scotomas (noCFL). Reading rates were faster with RSVP compared to PAGE, but CFL subjects improved less (by a factor of 1.5 +/- 0.41) than noCFL subjects (by a factor of 2.1 +/- 0.38). When reading rate (words/min) was converted to average word duration (msec/word) the reduction in word duration for RSVP compared to PAGE text averaged 150 msec for normal subjects, 171 msec for noCFL subjects, and 250 msec for CFL subjects. We hypothesized that the reduction in word duration was attributable to a reduced number of saccades/word. We confirmed this hypothesis by measuring the number of saccades during RSVP and PAGE reading using a scanning laser ophthalmoscope in four subjects with CFL. All of the subjects made fewer saccades during RSVP than PAGE reading (average reduction = 1.3 +/- 0.5 saccades/word). But even with the reduced number of saccades, CFL subjects required longer word durations than noCFL subjects. These results indicate that inefficient eye movements account for only part of the reduction in reading speed caused by CFL. An additional and potentially more important factor is the limited rate at which peripheral retina can perform the pattern decoding tasks required for reading.

  6. Synergistic disinfection and removal of biofilms by a sequential two-step treatment with ozone followed by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Tachikawa, Mariko; Yamanaka, Kenzo

    2014-11-01

    Synergistic disinfection and removal of biofilms by ozone (O3) water in combination with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) solution was studied by determining disinfection rates and observing changes of the biofilm structure in situ by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) using an established biofilm of Pseudomonas fluorescence. The sequential treatment with O3, 1.0-1.7 mg/L, followed by H2O2, 0.8-1.1%, showed synergistic disinfection effects, while the reversed treatment, first H2O2 followed by O3, showed only an additive effect. The decrease of synergistic disinfection effect by addition of methanol (CH3OH), a scavenger of hydroxyl radical (OH), into the H2O2 solution suggested generation of hydroxyl radicals on or in the biofilm by the sequential treatment with O3 followed by H2O2. The primary treatment with O3 increased disinfection rates of H2O2 in the secondary treatment, and the increase of O3 concentration enhanced the rates. The cold temperature of O3 water (14 °C and 8 °C) increased the synergistic effect, suggesting the increase of O3 adsorption and hydroxyl radical generation in the biofilm. CLSM observation showed that the sequential treatment, first with O3 followed by H2O2, loosened the cell connections and thinned the extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) in the biofilm. The hydroxyl radical generation in the biofilm may affect the EPS and biofilm structure and may induce effective disinfection with H2O2. This sequential treatment method may suggest a new practical procedure for disinfection and removal of biofilms by inorganic oxidants such as O3 and H2O2.

  7. How is human cooperation different?

    PubMed Central

    Melis, Alicia P.; Semmann, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Although cooperation is a widespread phenomenon in nature, human cooperation exceeds that of all other species with regard to the scale and range of cooperative activities. Here we review and discuss differences between humans and non-humans in the strategies employed to maintain cooperation and control free-riders. We distinguish forms of cooperative behaviour based on their influence on the immediate payoffs of actor and recipient. If the actor has immediate costs and only the recipient obtains immediate benefits, we term this investment. If the behaviour has immediate positive effects for both actor and recipient, we call this a self-serving mutually beneficial behaviour or mutual cooperation. We argue that humans, in contrast to all other species, employ a wider range of enforcement mechanisms, which allow higher levels of cooperation to evolve and stabilize among unrelated individuals and in large groups. We also discuss proximate mechanisms underlying cooperative behaviour and focus on our experimental work with humans and our closest primate relatives. Differences in the proximate mechanisms also seem to contribute to explaining humans' greater ability to cooperate and enforce cooperation. PMID:20679110

  8. Cooperativity in beryllium bonds.

    PubMed

    Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José; Yáñez, Manuel; Mó, Otilia

    2014-03-01

    A theoretical study of the beryllium bonded clusters of the (iminomethyl)beryllium hydride and (iminomethyl)beryllium fluoride [HC(BeX)=NH, X = H, F] molecules has been carried out at the B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2p) level of theory. Linear and cyclic clusters have been characterized up to the decamer. The geometric, energetic, electronic and NMR properties of the clusters clearly indicate positive cooperativity. The evolution of the molecular properties, as the size of the cluster increases, is similar to those reported in polymers held together by hydrogen bonds.

  9. Isotherms for adsorption of cellobiohydrolase I and II from Trichoderma reesei on microcrystalline cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Medve, J.; Tjerneld, F.; Stahlberg, J.

    1997-04-01

    Adsorption to microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel) of pure cellobiohydrolase I and II (CBH I and CBH II) from Trichoderma reesei has been studied. Adsorption isotherms of the enzymes were measured at 4{degree}C using CBH I and CBH II alone and in reconstituted equimolar mixtures. Several models (Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, Jovanovic) were tested to describe the experimental adsorption isotherms. The isotherms did not follow the basic (one site) Langmuir equation that has often been used to describe adsorption isotherms of cellulases; correlation coefficients (R{sup 2}) were only 0.926 and 0.947, for CBH I and II, respectively. The experimental isotherms were best described by a model of Langmuir type with two adsorption sites and by a combined Langmuir-Freundlich model (analogous to the Hill equation); using these models the correlation coefficients were in most cases higher than 0.995. Apparent binding parameters derived from the two sites Langmuir model indicated stronger binding of CBH II compared to CBH I; the distribution coefficients were 20.7 and 3.7 L/g for the two enzymes, respectively. The binding capacity was higher for CBH I than for CBH II. The isotherms when analyzed with the combined model indicated presence of unequal binding sites on cellulose and/or negative cooperativity in the binding of the enzyme molecules. 39 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Spatial versus sequential correlations for random access coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, Armin; Marques, Breno; Pawłowski, Marcin; Bourennane, Mohamed

    2016-03-01

    Random access codes are important for a wide range of applications in quantum information. However, their implementation with quantum theory can be made in two very different ways: (i) by distributing data with strong spatial correlations violating a Bell inequality or (ii) using quantum communication channels to create stronger-than-classical sequential correlations between state preparation and measurement outcome. Here we study this duality of the quantum realization. We present a family of Bell inequalities tailored to the task at hand and study their quantum violations. Remarkably, we show that the use of spatial and sequential quantum correlations imposes different limitations on the performance of quantum random access codes: Sequential correlations can outperform spatial correlations. We discuss the physics behind the observed discrepancy between spatial and sequential quantum correlations.

  11. Parallel versus Sequential Processing of Pictures and Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snodgrass, Joan Gay; Antone, George

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to test a proposal by Paivio (1971) that visual memory images are specialized for parallel or spatiol processing, whereas verbal memory codes are specialized for sequential or temporal processing. (Author)

  12. Optimizing Standard Sequential Extraction Protocol With Lake And Ocean Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    The environmental mobility/availability behavior of radionuclides in soils and sediments depends on their speciation. Experiments have been carried out to develop a simple but robust radionuclide sequential extraction method for identification of radionuclide partitioning in sed...

  13. Instrument sequentially samples ac signals from several accelerometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, C. P.

    1967-01-01

    Scanner circuit sequentially samples the ac signals from accelerometers used in conducting noise vibration tests, and provides a time-averaged output signal. The scanner is used in conjunction with other devices for random noise vibration tests.

  14. Age-related differences in arithmetic strategy sequential effects.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    In this article, I review a series of new findings concerning how age-related changes in strategic variations are modulated by sequential effects. Sequential effects refer to how strategy selection and strategy execution on current problems are influenced by which strategy is used on immediately preceding problems. Two sequential effects during strategy selection (i.e., strategy revisions and strategy perseverations) and during strategy execution (i.e., strategy switch costs and modulations of poorer strategy effects) are presented. I also discuss how these effects change with age during adulthood. These phenomena are important, as they shed light on arithmetic processes and how these processes change with age during adulthood. In particular, they speak to the role of executive control while participants select and execute arithmetic strategies. Finally, I discuss the implications of sequential effects for theories of strategies and of arithmetic.

  15. A Sequential Preparation of Organic Compounds for Senior Chemistry Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrigan, Cecilia; Crotty, Patricia

    1971-01-01

    Describes procedures suitable for student preparation of benzaldehyde, benzoic acid, and ethyl benzoate sequentially from benzyl alcohol. Preparation for benzyl chloride also given. All reagents except benzyl alcohol are common inorganic chemicals. (AL)

  16. Heterosexual Relationship Development: Is It Really a Sequential Process?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cate, Rodney M.; Koval, James E.

    1983-01-01

    Reviews three existing sequential models of mate selection: Kerckhoff and Davis' Filter Model, Murstein's Stimulus-Value-Role Model, and Lewis's Premarital Dyadic Formation Model. Challenges the validity of these models and discusses implications for future research. (JAC)

  17. A Note on the Sequential Probability Ratio Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Ewart A. C.

    1975-01-01

    Given reflection symmetry, the moment generating function symmetry is necessary and sufficient for the random walk model to be equivalent to a sequential probability ratio test. For a related article, see TM 501 715. (Author/RC)

  18. Adsorption of nucleotides on biomimetic apatite: The case of cytidine 5' monophosphate (CMP).

    PubMed

    Choimet, Maëla; Tourrette, Audrey; Drouet, Christophe

    2015-10-15

    The chemical interaction between DNA macromolecules and hard tissues in vertebrate is of foremost importance in paleogenetics, as bones and teeth represent a major substrate for the genetic material after cell death. Recently, the empirical hypothesis of DNA "protection" over time thanks to its adsorption on hard tissues was revisited from a physico-chemical viewpoint. In particular, the existence of a strong interaction between phosphate groups of DNA backbone and the surface of apatite nanocrystals (mimicking bone/dentin mineral) was evidenced on an experimental basis. In the field of nanomedicine, DNA or RNA can be used for gene transport into cells, and apatite nanocarriers then appear promising. In order to shed some more light on interactions between DNA molecules and apatite, the present study focuses on the adsorption of a "model" nucleotide, cytidine 5' monophosphate (CMP), on a carbonated biomimetic apatite sample. The follow-up of CMP kinetics of adsorption pointed out the rapidity of interaction with stabilization reached within few minutes. The adsorption isotherm could be realistically fitted to the Sips model (Langmuir-Freundlich) suggesting the influence of surface heterogeneities and adsorption cooperativity in the adsorption process. The desorption study pointed out the reversible character of CMP adsorption on biomimetic apatite. This contribution is intended to prove helpful in view of better apprehending the molecular interaction of DNA fragments and apatite compounds, independently of the application domain, such as bone diagenesis or nanomedicine. This study may also appear informative for researchers interested in the origins of life on Earth and the occurrence and behavior of primitive biomolecules.

  19. Adsorption of nucleotides on biomimetic apatite: The case of cytidine 5' monophosphate (CMP).

    PubMed

    Choimet, Maëla; Tourrette, Audrey; Drouet, Christophe

    2015-10-15

    The chemical interaction between DNA macromolecules and hard tissues in vertebrate is of foremost importance in paleogenetics, as bones and teeth represent a major substrate for the genetic material after cell death. Recently, the empirical hypothesis of DNA "protection" over time thanks to its adsorption on hard tissues was revisited from a physico-chemical viewpoint. In particular, the existence of a strong interaction between phosphate groups of DNA backbone and the surface of apatite nanocrystals (mimicking bone/dentin mineral) was evidenced on an experimental basis. In the field of nanomedicine, DNA or RNA can be used for gene transport into cells, and apatite nanocarriers then appear promising. In order to shed some more light on interactions between DNA molecules and apatite, the present study focuses on the adsorption of a "model" nucleotide, cytidine 5' monophosphate (CMP), on a carbonated biomimetic apatite sample. The follow-up of CMP kinetics of adsorption pointed out the rapidity of interaction with stabilization reached within few minutes. The adsorption isotherm could be realistically fitted to the Sips model (Langmuir-Freundlich) suggesting the influence of surface heterogeneities and adsorption cooperativity in the adsorption process. The desorption study pointed out the reversible character of CMP adsorption on biomimetic apatite. This contribution is intended to prove helpful in view of better apprehending the molecular interaction of DNA fragments and apatite compounds, independently of the application domain, such as bone diagenesis or nanomedicine. This study may also appear informative for researchers interested in the origins of life on Earth and the occurrence and behavior of primitive biomolecules. PMID:26117294

  20. On some classes of sequential spiking neural p systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingyi; Zeng, Xiangxiang; Luo, Bin; Pan, Linqiang

    2014-05-01

    Spiking neural P systems (SN P systems) are a class of distributed parallel computing devices inspired by the way neurons communicate by means of spikes; neurons work in parallel in the sense that each neuron that can fire should fire, but the work in each neuron is sequential in the sense that at most one rule can be applied at each computation step. In this work, with biological inspiration, we consider SN P systems with the restriction that at each step, one of the neurons (i.e., sequential mode) or all neurons (i.e., pseudo-sequential mode) with the maximum (or minimum) number of spikes among the neurons that are active (can spike) will fire. If an active neuron has more than one enabled rule, it nondeterministically chooses one of the enabled rules to be applied, and the chosen rule is applied in an exhaustive manner (a kind of local parallelism): the rule is used as many times as possible. This strategy makes the system sequential or pseudo-sequential from the global view of the whole network and locally parallel at the level of neurons. We obtain four types of SN P systems: maximum/minimum spike number induced sequential/pseudo-sequential SN P systems with exhaustive use of rules. We prove that SN P systems of these four types are all Turing universal as number-generating computation devices. These results illustrate that the restriction of sequentiality may have little effect on the computation power of SN P systems. PMID:24555456

  1. Generalized Sequential Probability Ratio Test for Separate Families of Hypotheses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoou; Liu, Jingchen; Ying, Zhiliang

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of testing two separate families of hypotheses via a generalization of the sequential probability ratio test. In particular, the generalized likelihood ratio statistic is considered and the stopping rule is the first boundary crossing of the generalized likelihood ratio statistic. We show that this sequential test is asymptotically optimal in the sense that it achieves asymptotically the shortest expected sample size as the maximal type I and type II error probabilities tend to zero. PMID:27418716

  2. Mir Cooperative Solar Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skor, Mike; Hoffman, Dave J.

    1997-01-01

    The Mir Cooperative Solar Array (MCSA), produced jointly by the United States and Russia, was deployed on the Mir Russian space station on May 25, 1996. The MCSA is a photovoltaic electrical power system that can generate up to 6 kW. The power from the MCSA is needed to extend Mir's lifetime and to support experiments conducted there by visiting U.S. astronauts. The MCSA was brought to Mir via the Space Shuttle Atlantis on the STS-74 mission, launched November 12, 1995. This cooperative venture combined the best technology of both countries: the United States provided high-efficiency, lightweight photovoltaic panel modules, whereas Russia provided the array structure and deployment mechanism. Technology developed in the Space Station Freedom Program, and now being used in the International Space Station, was used to develop MCSA's photovoltaic panel. Performance data obtained from MCSA operation on Mir will help engineers better understand the performance of the photovoltaic panel modules in orbit. This information will be used to more accurately predict the performance of the International Space Station solar arrays. Managed by the NASA Lewis Research Center for NASA's International Space Station Program Office in Houston, Texas, the MCSA Project was completed on time and under budget despite a very aggressive schedule.

  3. Optical Circuitry Cooperative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, H. M.; Gibson, U.; Peyghambarian, N.; Sarid, D.; Stegeman, G.

    1985-01-01

    An Optical Circuitry Cooperative (OCC) has been formed as an NSF cooperative research center in which six or more companies contribute financial support; NSF provides support which declines to zero in five years. Companies benefit from a center by early access to research results, leverage for their research dollars, participation in research selection, and improved relations with faculty and students. The university receives support for a major research program that increases its research capability, provides reasonably stable funding, and opens more opportunities for graduate students. The potential of optical circuitry has been discussed for many years, but the excitement is growing rapidly on the strength of the success of optical fibers for optical transmission, the generation of subpicosecond opitcal pulses, and the development of promising optical logic elements, such as optical bistable devices. And yet, much research remains to be done to discover the best nonlinear optical materials and fabrication techniques. OCC will perform research to provide a data base to allow the development of optical circuitry devices. The areas encompassed by OCC include all-optical logic, picosecond decision-making, guided-wave preprocessors, opti-cal interconnects within computers (both fiber and whole-array imaging), optical storage, and optical computer architecture and devices.

  4. Cooperative nonproliferation activities

    SciTech Connect

    Ystesund, K.; Furaus, J.; Lucero, R.

    1997-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) under DOE sponsorship is engaged in nuclear nonproliferation activities with the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) of Japan. From 1995 to the present SNL and PNC have been participating in a cooperative project to implement and assess the use of remote monitoring to achieve nuclear nonproliferation objectives. Implementation of remote monitoring at the PNC Joyo facility took place during 1996 and continues to date. An International Fellowship began in the Fall of 1995 and has complemented the nonproliferation study. Plans are underway to extend the Fellowship and to upgrade the existing Remote Monitoring System to include another area at the Joyo facility. SNL and PNC are currently exploring the possibility of exchanging experts with the objective of promoting regional confidence building in Northeast Asia, possibly using some of the same remote monitoring technologies. This paper will provide an overview of these activities and report on the status of cooperative nonproliferation activities being conducted by PNC and SNL.

  5. Resource heterogeneity can facilitate cooperation.

    PubMed

    Kun, Ádám; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    Although social structure is known to promote cooperation, by locally exposing selfish agents to their own deeds, studies to date assumed that all agents have access to the same level of resources. This is clearly unrealistic. Here we find that cooperation can be maintained when some agents have access to more resources than others. Cooperation can then emerge even in populations in which the temptation to defect is so strong that players would act fully selfishly if their resources were distributed uniformly. Resource heterogeneity can thus be crucial for the emergence and maintenance of cooperation. We also show that resource heterogeneity can hinder cooperation once the temptation to defect is significantly lowered. In all cases, the level of cooperation can be maximized by managing resource heterogeneity.

  6. Robust sequential working memory recall in heterogeneous cognitive networks

    PubMed Central

    Rabinovich, Mikhail I.; Sokolov, Yury; Kozma, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders are often caused by partial heterogeneous disinhibition in cognitive networks, controlling sequential and spatial working memory (SWM). Such dynamic connectivity changes suggest that the normal relationship between the neuronal components within the network deteriorates. As a result, competitive network dynamics is qualitatively altered. This dynamics defines the robust recall of the sequential information from memory and, thus, the SWM capacity. To understand pathological and non-pathological bifurcations of the sequential memory dynamics, here we investigate the model of recurrent inhibitory-excitatory networks with heterogeneous inhibition. We consider the ensemble of units with all-to-all inhibitory connections, in which the connection strengths are monotonically distributed at some interval. Based on computer experiments and studying the Lyapunov exponents, we observed and analyzed the new phenomenon—clustered sequential dynamics. The results are interpreted in the context of the winnerless competition principle. Accordingly, clustered sequential dynamics is represented in the phase space of the model by two weakly interacting quasi-attractors. One of them is similar to the sequential heteroclinic chain—the regular image of SWM, while the other is a quasi-chaotic attractor. Coexistence of these quasi-attractors means that the recall of the normal information sequence is intermittently interrupted by episodes with chaotic dynamics. We indicate potential dynamic ways for augmenting damaged working memory and other cognitive functions. PMID:25452717

  7. Robust sequential working memory recall in heterogeneous cognitive networks.

    PubMed

    Rabinovich, Mikhail I; Sokolov, Yury; Kozma, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders are often caused by partial heterogeneous disinhibition in cognitive networks, controlling sequential and spatial working memory (SWM). Such dynamic connectivity changes suggest that the normal relationship between the neuronal components within the network deteriorates. As a result, competitive network dynamics is qualitatively altered. This dynamics defines the robust recall of the sequential information from memory and, thus, the SWM capacity. To understand pathological and non-pathological bifurcations of the sequential memory dynamics, here we investigate the model of recurrent inhibitory-excitatory networks with heterogeneous inhibition. We consider the ensemble of units with all-to-all inhibitory connections, in which the connection strengths are monotonically distributed at some interval. Based on computer experiments and studying the Lyapunov exponents, we observed and analyzed the new phenomenon-clustered sequential dynamics. The results are interpreted in the context of the winnerless competition principle. Accordingly, clustered sequential dynamics is represented in the phase space of the model by two weakly interacting quasi-attractors. One of them is similar to the sequential heteroclinic chain-the regular image of SWM, while the other is a quasi-chaotic attractor. Coexistence of these quasi-attractors means that the recall of the normal information sequence is intermittently interrupted by episodes with chaotic dynamics. We indicate potential dynamic ways for augmenting damaged working memory and other cognitive functions.

  8. Sequential unconstrained minimization algorithms for constrained optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Charles

    2008-02-01

    The problem of minimizing a function f(x):RJ → R, subject to constraints on the vector variable x, occurs frequently in inverse problems. Even without constraints, finding a minimizer of f(x) may require iterative methods. We consider here a general class of iterative algorithms that find a solution to the constrained minimization problem as the limit of a sequence of vectors, each solving an unconstrained minimization problem. Our sequential unconstrained minimization algorithm (SUMMA) is an iterative procedure for constrained minimization. At the kth step we minimize the function G_k(x)=f(x)+g_k(x), to obtain xk. The auxiliary functions gk(x):D ⊆ RJ → R+ are nonnegative on the set D, each xk is assumed to lie within D, and the objective is to minimize the continuous function f:RJ → R over x in the set C=\\overline D , the closure of D. We assume that such minimizers exist, and denote one such by \\hat x . We assume that the functions gk(x) satisfy the inequalities 0\\leq g_k(x)\\leq G_{k-1}(x)-G_{k-1}(x^{k-1}), for k = 2, 3, .... Using this assumption, we show that the sequence {f(xk)} is decreasing and converges to f({\\hat x}) . If the restriction of f(x) to D has bounded level sets, which happens if \\hat x is unique and f(x) is closed, proper and convex, then the sequence {xk} is bounded, and f(x^*)=f({\\hat x}) , for any cluster point x*. Therefore, if \\hat x is unique, x^*={\\hat x} and \\{x^k\\}\\rightarrow {\\hat x} . When \\hat x is not unique, convergence can still be obtained, in particular cases. The SUMMA includes, as particular cases, the well-known barrier- and penalty-function methods, the simultaneous multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (SMART), the proximal minimization algorithm of Censor and Zenios, the entropic proximal methods of Teboulle, as well as certain cases of gradient descent and the Newton-Raphson method. The proof techniques used for SUMMA can be extended to obtain related results for the induced proximal

  9. Adsorption of goethite onto quartz and kaolinite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, M.C.; Weiner, Eugene R.; Boymel, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    The adsorption of colloidal goethite onto quartz and kaolinite substrates has been studied as a function of pH and NaCl concentration. Goethite adsorption was measured quantitatively by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The results indicate that adsorption onto both substrates is due primarily to coulombic forces; however, the pH dependence of adsorption is very different for the two substrates. This is explained by the fact that the surface charge on quartz is entirely pH-dependent, while kaolinite has surface faces which carry a permanent negative charge. Adsorption of goethite on to kaolinite increases markedly with increasing NaCl concentration, while adsorption onto quartz is relatively independent of NaCl concentration. This can be explained by the influence of NaCl concentration upon the development of surface charge on the substrates. A method is described for separating surface-bound goethite from free goethite.

  10. Mechanisms for similarity based cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traulsen, A.

    2008-06-01

    Cooperation based on similarity has been discussed since Richard Dawkins introduced the term “green beard” effect. In these models, individuals cooperate based on an aribtrary signal (or tag) such as the famous green beard. Here, two different models for such tag based cooperation are analysed. As neutral drift is important in both models, a finite population framework is applied. The first model, which we term “cooperative tags” considers a situation in which groups of cooperators are formed by some joint signal. Defectors adopting the signal and exploiting the group can lead to a breakdown of cooperation. In this case, conditions are derived under which the average abundance of the more cooperative strategy exceeds 50%. The second model considers a situation in which individuals start defecting towards others that are not similar to them. This situation is termed “defective tags”. It is shown that in this case, individuals using tags to cooperate exclusively with their own kind dominate over unconditional cooperators.

  11. Ozone adsorption on carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chassard, Guillaume; Gosselin, Sylvie; Visez, Nicolas; Petitprez, Denis

    2014-05-01

    Carbonaceous particles produced by incomplete combustion or thermal decomposition of hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the atmosphere. On these particles are adsorbed hundreds of chemical species. Those of great concern to health are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). During atmospheric transport, particulate PAHs react with gaseous oxidants. The induced chemical transformations may change toxicity and hygroscopicity of these potentially inhalable particles. The interaction between ozone and carbon particles has been extensively investigated in literature. However ozone adsorption and surface reaction mechanisms are still ambiguous. Some studies described a fast catalytic decomposition of ozone initiated by an atomic oxygen chemisorption followed by a molecular oxygen release [1-3]. Others suggested a reversible ozone adsorption according to Langmuir-type behaviour [4,5]. The aim of this present study is a better understanding of ozone interaction with carbon surfaces. An aerosol of carbon nanoparticles was generated by flowing synthetic air in a glass tube containing pure carbon (primary particles < 50 nm), under magnetic stirring. The aerosol was then mixed with ozone in an aerosol flow tube. Ozone uptake experiments were performed with different particles concentrations with a fixed ozone concentration. The influence of several factors on kinetics was examined: initial ozone concentration, particle size (50 nm ≤ Dp ≤ 200 nm) and competitive adsorption (with probe molecule and water). The effect of initial ozone concentration was first studied. Accordingly to literature, it has been observed that the number of gas-phase ozone molecules lost per unit particle surface area tends towards a plateau for high ozone concentration suggesting a reversible ozone adsorption according to a Langmuir mechanism. We calculated the initial reaction probability between O3 and carbon particles.An initial uptake coefficient of 1.10-4 was obtained. Similar experiments were

  12. Adsorption thermodynamics of Methylene Blue onto bentonite.

    PubMed

    Hong, Song; Wen, Cheng; He, Jing; Gan, Fuxing; Ho, Yuh-Shan

    2009-08-15

    The effect of temperature on the equilibrium adsorption of Methylene Blue dye from aqueous solution using bentonite was investigated. The equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed using three widely applied isotherms: Langmuir, Freundlich, and Redlich-Peterson. A non-linear method was used for comparing the best fit of the isotherms. Best fit was found to be Redlich-Peterson isotherm. Thermodynamic parameters, such as DeltaG degrees, DeltaH degrees, and DeltaS degrees were calculated using adsorption equilibrium constant obtained from the Langmuir isotherm. Results suggested that the Methylene Blue adsorption on bentonite was a spontaneous and endothermic process.

  13. Adsorption of phenol on wood surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamleeva, N. A.; Lunin, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption of phenol on aspen and pine wood is investigated. It is shown that adsorption isotherms are described by the Langmuir model. The woods' specific surface areas and adsorption interaction constants are determined. It is found that the sorption of phenol on surfaces of aspen and pine is due to Van der Waals interactions ( S sp = 45 m2/godw for aspen and 85 m2/godw for pine). The difference between the adsorption characteristics is explained by properties of the wood samples' microstructures.

  14. Physical adsorption strength in open systems.

    PubMed

    Knippenberg, M Todd; Stuart, Steven J; Cooper, Alan C; Pez, G P; Cheng, Hansong

    2006-11-23

    For a physical adsorption system, the distances of adsorbates from the surface of a substrate can vary significantly, depending on particle loading and interatomic interactions. Although the total adsorption energy is quantified easily, the normalized, per-particle adsorption energies are more ambiguous if some of these particles are far away from the surface and are interacting only weakly with the substrate. A simple analytical procedure is proposed to characterize the distance dependence of the physisorption strength and effective adsorption capacity. As an example, the method is utilized to describe H2 physisorption in a finite bundle of single-walled carbon nanotubes. PMID:17107125

  15. Adsorption and isotopic fractionation of Xe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.

    1986-01-01

    A theoretical description of the mechanisms of isotopic fractionation arising during adsorption of noble gases in a Henry's Law pressure regime is given. Experimental data on the isotopic composition of Xe adsorbed on activated charcoal in the temperature range 220 K to 350 K are presented. Both theoretical considerations and the experimental data indicate that equilibrium adsorption does not significantly alter the isotopic structure of adsorbed structure of adsorbed noble gases. Therefore, if adsorption is responsible for the elemental noble gas pattern in meteorites and the earth, the heavy noble gas isotopic fractionation between them must have been produced prior to and by a different process than equilibrium adsorption.

  16. Diversified Cooperative Training. Diversified Cooperative Health Occupations. Manual of Operation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Vocational and Adult Education.

    This manual is designed to assist school personnel, employers, parents/guardians, and students in understanding the policies and procedures required to operate effective diversified cooperative training (DCT) and diversified cooperative health occupations (DCHO) programs. Chapter I describes DCT/DCHO programs, their structure, types of program…

  17. Cooperative Cataloging: LC Promotes Cooperation at Asian Materials Seminar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fineberg, Gail

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the Asian Materials Cataloging Seminar that the Library of Congress sponsored to promote the benefits of cooperative cataloging. Highlights include the Program for Cooperative Cataloging (PCC); high-quality, standardized, core-level cataloging records for Asian materials; name authority and subject authority programs; and the CONSER…

  18. Selective adsorption of thiophenic compounds from fuel over TiO2/SiO2 under UV-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Miao, Guang; Ye, Feiyan; Wu, Luoming; Ren, Xiaoling; Xiao, Jing; Li, Zhong; Wang, Haihui

    2015-12-30

    This study investigates selective adsorption of thiophenic compounds from fuel over TiO2/SiO2 under UV-irradiation. The TiO2/SiO2 adsorbents were prepared and then characterized by N2 adsorption, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Adsorption isotherms, selectivity and kinetics of TiO2/SiO2 were measured in a UV built-in batch reactor. It was concluded that (a) with the employment of UV-irradiation, high organosulfur uptake of 5.12 mg/g was achieved on the optimized 0.3TiO2/0.7SiO2 adsorbent at low sulfur concentration of 15 ppmw-S, and its adsorption selectivity over naphthalene was up to 325.5; (b) highly dispersed TiO2 served as the photocatalytic sites for DBT oxidation, while SiO2 acted as the selective adsorption sites for the corresponding oxidized DBT using TiO2 as a promoter, the two types of active sites worked cooperatively to achieve the high adsorption selectivity of TiO2/SiO2; (c) The kinetic rate-determining step for the UV photocatalysis-assisted adsorptive desulfurization (PADS) over TiO2/SiO2 was DBT oxidation; (d) consecutive adsorption-regeneration cycles suggested that the 0.3TiO2/0.7SiO2 adsorbent can be regenerated by acetonitrile washing followed with oxidative air treatment. This work demonstrated an effective PADS approach to greatly enhance adsorption capacity and selectivity of thiophenic compounds at low concentrations for deep desulfurization under ambient conditions.

  19. Charcoal/Nitrogen Adsorption Cryocooler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bard, Steven

    1987-01-01

    Refrigerator with no wear-related moving parts produces 0.5 W of cooling at 118 K. When fully developed, refrigerator needs no electrical power, and life expectancy of more than 10 yr, operates unattended to cool sensitive infrared detectors for long periods. Only moving parts in adsorption cryocooler are check valves. As charcoal is cooled in canister, gas pressure drops, allowing inlet check valve to open and admit more nitrogen. When canister is heated, pressure rises, closing inlet valve and eventually opening outlet valve.

  20. Moisture adsorption in optical coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macleod, H. Angus

    1988-01-01

    The thin film filter is a very large aperture component which is exceedingly useful because of its small size, flexibility and ease of mounting. Thin film components, however, do have defects of performance and especially of stability which can cause problems in systems, particularly where long-term measurements are being made. Of all of the problems, those associated with moisture absorption are the most serious. Moisture absorption occurs in the pore-shaped voids inherent in the columnar structure of the layers. Ion-assisted deposition is a promising technique for substantially reducing moisture adsorption effects in thin film structures.

  1. Cooperative phenomena in swarms

    SciTech Connect

    Millonas, M.M.

    1992-12-01

    A model of the cooperative behavior of a large number of locally acting organisms is proposed. The space in which the organisms move is discretized, and is modeled by a lattice of nodes, or cells. Each cell has a specified volume, and is connected to other cells in the space in a definite way. Organisms move probabilistically between local cells in this space, but with weights dependent on local morphogenic substances, or morphogens. The morphogens are in turn are effected by the passage of an organism. The evolution of the morphogens, and the corresponding flow of the organisms constitutes the collective behavior of the group. The generic properties of such systems are analyzed, and a number of results are obtained. The model has various types of phase transitions and self-organizing properties controlled both by the level of the noise, and other parameters.

  2. Cooperative phenomena in swarms

    SciTech Connect

    Millonas, M.M.

    1992-01-01

    A model of the cooperative behavior of a large number of locally acting organisms is proposed. The space in which the organisms move is discretized, and is modeled by a lattice of nodes, or cells. Each cell has a specified volume, and is connected to other cells in the space in a definite way. Organisms move probabilistically between local cells in this space, but with weights dependent on local morphogenic substances, or morphogens. The morphogens are in turn are effected by the passage of an organism. The evolution of the morphogens, and the corresponding flow of the organisms constitutes the collective behavior of the group. The generic properties of such systems are analyzed, and a number of results are obtained. The model has various types of phase transitions and self-organizing properties controlled both by the level of the noise, and other parameters.

  3. Cooperative runtime monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallé, Sylvain

    2013-11-01

    Requirements on message-based interactions can be formalised as an interface contract that specifies constraints on the sequence of possible messages that can be exchanged by multiple parties. At runtime, each peer can monitor incoming messages and check that the contract is correctly being followed by their respective senders. We introduce cooperative runtime monitoring, where a recipient 'delegates' its monitoring task to the sender, which is required to provide evidence that the message it sends complies with the contract. In turn, this evidence can be quickly checked by the recipient, which is then guaranteed of the sender's compliance to the contract without doing the monitoring computation by itself. A particular application of this concept is shown on web services, where service providers can monitor and enforce contract compliance of third-party clients at a small cost on the server side, while avoiding to certify or digitally sign them.

  4. Allostery and cooperativity revisited

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Qiang; Karplus, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Although phenomenlogical models that account for cooperativity in allosteric systems date back to the early and mid-60's (e.g., the KNF and MWC models), there is resurgent interest in the topic due to the recent experimental and computational studies that attempted to reveal, at an atomistic level, how allostery actually works. In this review, using systems for which atomistic simulations have been carried out in our groups as examples, we describe the current understanding of allostery, how the mechanisms go beyond the classical MWC/Pauling-KNF descriptions, and point out that the “new view” of allostery, emphasizing “population shifts,” is, in fact, an “old view.” The presentation offers not only an up-to-date description of allostery from a theoretical/computational perspective, but also helps to resolve several outstanding issues concerning allostery. PMID:18560010

  5. A Bayesian Theory of Sequential Causal Learning and Abstract Transfer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongjing; Rojas, Randall R; Beckers, Tom; Yuille, Alan L

    2016-03-01

    Two key research issues in the field of causal learning are how people acquire causal knowledge when observing data that are presented sequentially, and the level of abstraction at which learning takes place. Does sequential causal learning solely involve the acquisition of specific cause-effect links, or do learners also acquire knowledge about abstract causal constraints? Recent empirical studies have revealed that experience with one set of causal cues can dramatically alter subsequent learning and performance with entirely different cues, suggesting that learning involves abstract transfer, and such transfer effects involve sequential presentation of distinct sets of causal cues. It has been demonstrated that pre-training (or even post-training) can modulate classic causal learning phenomena such as forward and backward blocking. To account for these effects, we propose a Bayesian theory of sequential causal learning. The theory assumes that humans are able to consider and use several alternative causal generative models, each instantiating a different causal integration rule. Model selection is used to decide which integration rule to use in a given learning environment in order to infer causal knowledge from sequential data. Detailed computer simulations demonstrate that humans rely on the abstract characteristics of outcome variables (e.g., binary vs. continuous) to select a causal integration rule, which in turn alters causal learning in a variety of blocking and overshadowing paradigms. When the nature of the outcome variable is ambiguous, humans select the model that yields the best fit with the recent environment, and then apply it to subsequent learning tasks. Based on sequential patterns of cue-outcome co-occurrence, the theory can account for a range of phenomena in sequential causal learning, including various blocking effects, primacy effects in some experimental conditions, and apparently abstract transfer of causal knowledge.

  6. Surfactant adsorption to soil components and soils.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Munehide; Koopal, Luuk K

    2016-05-01

    Soils are complex and widely varying mixtures of organic matter and inorganic materials; adsorption of surfactants to soils is therefore related to the soil composition. We first discuss the properties of surfactants, including the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and surfactant adsorption on water/air interfaces, the latter gives an impression of surfactant adsorption to a hydrophobic surface and illustrates the importance of the CMC for the adsorption process. Then attention is paid to the most important types of soil particles: humic and fulvic acids, silica, metal oxides and layered aluminosilicates. Information is provided on their structure, surface properties and primary (proton) charge characteristics, which are all important for surfactant binding. Subsequently, the adsorption of different types of surfactants on these individual soil components is discussed in detail, based on mainly experimental results and considering the specific (chemical) and electrostatic interactions, with hydrophobic attraction as an important component of the specific interactions. Adsorption models that can describe the features semi-quantitatively are briefly discussed. In the last part of the paper some trends of surfactant adsorption on soils are briefly discussed together with some complications that may occur and finally the consequences of surfactant adsorption for soil colloidal stability and permeability are considered. When we seek to understand the fate of surfactants in soil and aqueous environments, the hydrophobicity and charge density of the soil or soil particles, must be considered together with the structure, hydrophobicity and charge of the surfactants, because these factors affect the adsorption. The pH and ionic strength are important parameters with respect to the charge density of the particles. As surfactant adsorption influences soil structure and permeability, insight in surfactant adsorption to soil particles is useful for good soil management. PMID

  7. Cooperative Education in Outdoor Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Andy; Flemming, Jenny

    2010-01-01

    Cooperative education is a structured experiential education strategy integrating classroom studies with work place learning. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate how a cooperative education model can be included within an outdoor education undergraduate degree to develop reflective practitioners and to enhance graduate capabilities. Document…

  8. Cooperative Learning in Elementary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadderman, Margaret

    1992-01-01

    Cooperative learning is being recommended as a solution for numerous education problems, from enhancing disadvantaged children's self-esteem to ensuring academic success for all students. Cooperative learning has great potential as a supplement or alternative to traditional teaching methods when students are adequately socialized and motivated.…

  9. Cooperative Learning for Remedial Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiers, Darlene

    1989-01-01

    Offers cooperative learning instructional techniques for teaching the historical novel "The Root Cellar" in a remedial reading classroom. Recommends cooperative learning as a means through which the student can succeed academically while developing interpersonal skills. Suggests that the lesson can be adapted to match the ability level of…

  10. International Cooperation in Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Magnus

    This paper addresses some of the general issues of international cooperation within the context of distance education. Examples of the types of international cooperation are introduced in order to explain some of the pitfalls that can occur when coordinating organizations on an international level. Extensive discussion is undertaken concerning…

  11. Cooperative Learning in Communication Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Patricia L.; And Others

    This paper presents 14 cooperative learning lesson plans and related handouts suitable for use in communication courses. The paper begins with 8 handouts that deal with objectives; criteria; differences between the old paradigm and the new paradigm based on cooperative learning; positive interdependences; group differences between cooperative…

  12. Cooperative Education for the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, James W.

    1999-01-01

    Cooperative education must move into a new era of radically different, technology-driven environments in which work and study are blurred. Characteristics of a new cooperative education include (1) simultaneous study and work; (2) co-op integrated into courses; (3) faculty as consultants on co-op opportunities; (4) change in financial remuneration…

  13. Peter Cooper, the Workingman's Advocate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alemanne, Nicholas

    1985-01-01

    During the 19th century, America was transformed from an agrarian to an urban-industrial society. America became divided into a nation of rich and poor. Peter Cooper assumed the role of a reformer and became the spokesman for the poor. Cooper's reform efforts and his views on unions are discussed. (RM)

  14. Cooperative processes in image segmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, L. S.

    1982-01-01

    Research into the role of cooperative, or relaxation, processes in image segmentation is surveyed. Cooperative processes can be employed at several levels of the segmentation process as a preprocessing enhancement step, during supervised or unsupervised pixel classification and, finally, for the interpretation of image segments based on segment properties and relations.

  15. Cooperative answers in database systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaasterland, Terry; Godfrey, Parke; Minker, Jack; Novik, Lev

    1993-01-01

    A major concern of researchers who seek to improve human-computer communication involves how to move beyond literal interpretations of queries to a level of responsiveness that takes the user's misconceptions, expectations, desires, and interests into consideration. At Maryland, we are investigating how to better meet a user's needs within the framework of the cooperative answering system of Gal and Minker. We have been exploring how to use semantic information about the database to formulate coherent and informative answers. The work has two main thrusts: (1) the construction of a logic formula which embodies the content of a cooperative answer; and (2) the presentation of the logic formula to the user in a natural language form. The information that is available in a deductive database system for building cooperative answers includes integrity constraints, user constraints, the search tree for answers to the query, and false presuppositions that are present in the query. The basic cooperative answering theory of Gal and Minker forms the foundation of a cooperative answering system that integrates the new construction and presentation methods. This paper provides an overview of the cooperative answering strategies used in the CARMIN cooperative answering system, an ongoing research effort at Maryland. Section 2 gives some useful background definitions. Section 3 describes techniques for collecting cooperative logical formulae. Section 4 discusses which natural language generation techniques are useful for presenting the logic formula in natural language text. Section 5 presents a diagram of the system.

  16. Cooperative Education. Instructor Coordinator's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrow, Shirley

    Designed to provide an introduction to North Lake College's (NLC's) Cooperative Education Program, this manual contains information for the instructor/coordinator regarding the Dallas County Community College District's co-op policies and NLC's operational procedures and forms. First, section 1 defines cooperative education, states NLC's…

  17. Automotive Technician Educational Cooperative Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verbeck, Bill

    1998-01-01

    The Automotive Technician Educational Cooperative (ATEC), the premier applied-technology program at Truckee Meadows Community College (Sparks, Nevada), exemplifies what can be accomplished through leadership, cooperation, and dedication of a qualified faculty committed to designing and implementing a program based on standards. (JOW)

  18. Generation Z, Meet Cooperative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Igel, Charles; Urquhart, Vicki

    2012-01-01

    Today's Generation Z teens need to develop teamwork and social learning skills to be successful in the 21st century workplace. Teachers can help students develop these skills and enhance academic achievement by implementing cooperative learning strategies. Three key principles for successful cooperative learning are discussed. (Contains 1 figure.)

  19. Cooperative Learning and Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veenman, Simon; van Benthum, Niek; Bootsma, Dolly; van Dieren, Jildau; van der Kemp, Nicole

    2002-01-01

    Examined the implementation effects of a course on cooperative learning for Dutch student teachers. Data from surveys, pre- and post-course observations, and comparison of treatment of control groups indicated the course was effective in teaching participants to implement cooperative learning. The course positively affected the engagement rates of…

  20. Adsorptive separation in bioprocess engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E.W.Y.

    1987-01-01

    The invention and development of an energy-efficient separation technique for recovery of desired chemicals from biomass conversion would greatly enhance the economic viability of this bioprocess. Adsorptive separation of several chemicals from aqueous solution was studied in this thesis. The desired species were recovered from the dilute aqueous solution by using crosslinked polyvinylpyridine resin to effect selective sorption. The sorbed chemicals were then removed from the resin by either thermal regeneration or elution with some appropriate desorbents. The effects of temperature, pH value, and solute concentration on resin swelling were investigated. The adsorption equilibrium isotherms, resin capacities and resin selectivities of methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, isopropanol, glycerol, acetone, 1-butanol, tert-butanol, and 2,3-butanediol were determined to study the homologies. Furthermore, acetic acid, butyric acid, hydrochloric acid, lactic acid, and sulfuric acid were recovered from very dilute aqueous solutions. The concentration of the sorbed chemical in the stationary phase can be many times higher than in the mobile phase for some acids. Finally, different types of equilibrium isotherms were used to fit the experimental data. A mathematical model was developed by using the theory of interference to predict the breakthrough curves and the process efficiency to provide information for large-scale process design and development.

  1. Cooperation in Diffusive Spatial Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainstein, Mendeli H.; Silva, Ana T. C.; Arenzon, Jeferson J.

    2007-05-01

    Random diffusion is shown to be an important mechanism on fostering cooperative behavior among simple agents (memoryless, unconditional cooperators or defectors) living on a spatially structured environment. In particular, under the Prisoner's Dilemma framework, when allowing the agents to move with the simple "always-move" rule, we find that cooperative behavior is not only possible but may even be enhanced. In addition, for a broad range of densities, mobile cooperators can more easily invade a population of mobile defectors, when compared with the fully viscous, immobile case. Thus, such simple mobility pattern may have played a fundamental role both in the onset and development of cooperative behavior, paving the way to more complex, individual and group, motility rules.

  2. Formation of Manganese Oxide Coatings onto Sand for Adsorption of Trace Metals from Groundwater.

    PubMed

    Tilak, A S; Ojewole, S; Williford, C W; Fox, G A; Sobecki, T M; Larson, S L

    2013-11-01

    Manganese oxide (MnO) occurs naturally in soil and has a high affinity for trace metals adsorption. In this work, we quantified the factors (pH; flow rate; use of oxidants such as bleach, HO, and O; initial Mn(II) concentrations; and two types of geologic media) affecting MnO coatings onto Ottawa and aquifer sand using batch and column experiments. The batch experiments consisted of manual and automated titration, and the column experiments mimicked natural MnO adsorption and oxidation cycles as a strategy for in situ adsorption. A Pb solution of 50 mg L was passed through MnO-coated sand at a flow rate of 4 mL min to determine its adsorption capacity. Batch experimental results showed that MnO coatings increased from pH 6 to 8, with maximum MnO coating occurring at pH 8. Regarding MnO coatings, bleach and O were highly effective compared with HO. The Ottawa sand had approximately twice the MnO coating of aquifer sand. The sequential increase in initial Mn(II) concentrations on both sands resulted in incremental buildup of MnO. The automated procedure enhanced MnO coatings by 3.5 times compared with manual batch experiments. Column results showed that MnO coatings were highly dependent on initial Mn(II) and oxidant concentrations, pH, flow rate, number of cycles (h), and the type of geologic media used. Manganese oxide coating exceeded 1700 mg kg for Ottawa sand and 130 mg kg for aquifer sand. The Pb adsorption exceeded 2200 mg kg for the Ottawa sand and 300 mg kg for the aquifer sand. PMID:25602414

  3. Deterministic sequential isolation of floating cancer cells under continuous flow.

    PubMed

    Tran, Quang D; Kong, Tian Fook; Hu, Dinglong; Marcos; Lam, Raymond H W

    2016-08-01

    Isolation of rare cells, such as circulating tumor cells, has been challenging because of their low abundance and limited timeframes of expressions of relevant cell characteristics. In this work, we devise a novel hydrodynamic mechanism to sequentially trap and isolate floating cells in biosamples. We develop a microfluidic device for the sequential isolation of floating cancer cells through a series of microsieves to obtain up to 100% trapping yield and >95% sequential isolation efficiency. We optimize the trappers' dimensions and locations through both computational and experimental analyses using microbeads and cells. Furthermore, we investigated the functional range of flow rates for effective sequential cell isolation by taking the cell deformability into account. We verify the cell isolation ability using the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 with perfect agreement with the microbead results. The viability of the isolated cells can be maintained for direct identification of any cell characteristics within the device. We further demonstrate that this device can be applied to isolate the largest particles from a sample containing multiple sizes of particles, revealing its possible applicability in isolation of circulating tumor cells in cancer patients' blood. Our study provides a promising sequential cell isolation strategy with high potential for rapid detection and analysis of general floating cells, including circulating tumor cells and other rare cell types. PMID:27387093

  4. A practical evaluation of sequential estimation for vision metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmundson, Kenneth; Fraser, Clive S.

    Parameter estimation in photogrammetry is generally accomplished by means of a simultaneous least-squares adjustment in which all observational data must be at hand prior to solution. It follows that, despite the rapid turnaround provided by digital imagery and current measurement technology, the simultaneous adjustment cannot offer an indication of quality until acquisition and measurement are complete. On-line quality control of single-sensor vision metrology (VM) can be implemented effectively through on-line triangulation (OLT) with sequential estimation. In combination with established network design principles, sequential estimation can have a significant positive influence on economy and productivity in the industrial environment. While enhancing the efficiency of the triangulation procedure, the risks of collecting either insufficient or surplus imagery are also diminished. Furthermore, localised weaknesses within the overall network can be isolated and corrected. Sequential estimation is applicable to a variety of VM tasks. Here, in addition to quality control for single-sensor VM, the calibration of real-time, multi-sensor systems is addressed. This paper presents an overview of sequential estimation for VM consisting of a description of the general sequential problem followed by the necessary mathematical derivations. Significant implementational aspects are discussed and evaluations of practical testing are given. Promising experimental results clearly demonstrate that OLT can be an effective and valuable tool in industrial VM.

  5. Ion Exchange and Adsorption of Inorganic Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the first part of the chapter, the fundamentals of ion exchange and adsorption processes are explained, with the goal of demonstrating how these principles influence process design for inorganic contaminant removal. In the second part, ion exchange and adsorption processes th...

  6. Development of facile property calculation model for adsorption chillers based on equilibrium adsorption cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Masato; Hirose, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Minoru; Thermal management technology Team

    Facile property calculation model for adsorption chillers was developed based on equilibrium adsorption cycles. Adsorption chillers are one of promising systems that can use heat energy efficiently because adsorption chillers can generate cooling energy using relatively low temperature heat energy. Properties of adsorption chillers are determined by heat source temperatures, adsorption/desorption properties of adsorbent, and kinetics such as heat transfer rate and adsorption/desorption rate etc. In our model, dependence of adsorption chiller properties on heat source temperatures was represented using approximated equilibrium adsorption cycles instead of solving conventional time-dependent differential equations for temperature changes. In addition to equilibrium cycle calculations, we calculated time constants for temperature changes as functions of heat source temperatures, which represent differences between equilibrium cycles and real cycles that stemmed from kinetic adsorption processes. We found that the present approximated equilibrium model could calculate properties of adsorption chillers (driving energies, cooling energies, and COP etc.) under various driving conditions quickly and accurately within average errors of 6% compared to experimental data.

  7. HUMAN MACHINE COOPERATIVE TELEROBOTICS

    SciTech Connect

    William R. Hamel; Spivey Douglass; Sewoong Kim; Pamela Murray; Yang Shou; Sriram Sridharan; Ge Zhang; Scott Thayer; Rajiv V. Dubey

    2003-06-30

    described as Human Machine Cooperative Telerobotics (HMCTR). The HMCTR combines the telerobot with robotic control techniques to improve the system efficiency and reliability in teleoperation mode. In this topical report, the control strategy, configuration and experimental results of Human Machines Cooperative Telerobotics (HMCTR), which modifies and limits the commands of human operator to follow the predefined constraints in the teleoperation mode, is described. The current implementation is a laboratory-scale system that will be incorporated into an engineering-scale system at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the future.

  8. Adsorption of xenon and krypton on shales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podosek, F. A.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Kramer, F. E.

    1981-01-01

    A method that uses a mass spectrometer as a manometer is employed in the measurement of Xe and Kr adsorption parameters on shales and related samples, where gas partial pressures were lower than 10 to the -11th atm, corresponding adsorption coverages are only small fractions of a monolayer, and Henry's Law behavior is expected and observed. Results show heats of adsorption in the 2-7 kcal/mol range, and Henry constants at 0-25 C of 1 cu cm STP/g per atmosphere are extrapolated. Although the adsorption properties obtained are variable by sample, the range obtained suggests that shales may be capable of an equilibrium adsorption with modern air high enough to account for a significant fraction of the atmospheric inventory of Xe, and perhaps even of Kr. This effect will nevertheless not account for the factor-of-25 defficiency of atmospheric Xe, in comparison with the planetary gas patterns observed in meteorites.

  9. Adsorption kinetics of methyl violet onto perlite.

    PubMed

    Doğan, Mehmet; Alkan, Mahir

    2003-01-01

    This study examines adsorption kinetics and activation parameters of methyl violet on perlite. The effect of process parameters like contact time, concentration of dye, temperature and pH on the extent of methyl violet adsorption from solution has been investigated. Results of the kinetic studies show that the adsorption reaction is first order with respect to dye solution concentration with activation energy of 13.2 kJ mol(-1). This low activation energy value indicates that the adsorption reaction is diffusion controlled. The activation parameters using Arrhenius and Eyring equations have been calculated. Adsorption increases with increase of variables such as contact time, initial dye concentration, temperature and pH.

  10. Protein-loaded microspheres prepared by sequential adsorption of dextran sulphate and protamine on melamine formaldehyde core.

    PubMed

    Balabushevich, Nadezda G; Larionova, Natalia I

    2009-11-01

    Polyelectrolyte multilayer microspheres were fabricated by layer-by-layer self-assembly of a dextran sulphate and a protamine on melamine formaldehyde cores, followed by the partial decomposition of the core. Effects of pH on the encapsulation of proteins and enzymes with different physico-chemical properties (insulin, aprotinin, peroxidase, glucose oxidase (GOD), catalase (Cat)) in the prepared microspheres were then studied. This method of protein encapsulation demonstrated a high loading capacity and efficiency. The protein incorporation and release was regulated by the pH of the solution. Encapsulated enzymes retained a high specific activity depending on the amount of protein incorporated. Bienzyme system GOD/Cat immobilized in the microspheres was suitable for the glucose content assay.

  11. 32 CFR 37.1260 - Cooperative agreement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in This Part § 37.1260 Cooperative... the cooperative agreement. The term does not include “cooperative research and development...

  12. Development of decision making: sequential versus integrative rules.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Brenda R J; van Duijvenvoorde, Anna C K; Huizenga, Hilde M

    2012-01-01

    Decisions can be made by applying a variety of decision-making rules-sequential rules in which decisions are based on a sequential evaluation of choice dimensions and the integrative normative rule in which decisions are based on an integration of choice dimensions. In this study, we investigated the developmental trajectory of such decision-making rules. In the Gambling Machine Task, participants choose between options that differ in three dimensions: frequency of loss, amount of loss, and certain gain. The task was administered to 231 children and adolescents (age range=8-17 years). Latent group analysis of their performance allowed precise classification of the underlying decision rules. The majority of participants used sequential decision rules, and the number of evaluated dimensions in these rules increased with age. Integrative rule use decreased with age. We discuss these results in light of traditional developmental theories and fuzzy trace theory.

  13. Ancilla-assisted sequential approximation of nonlocal unitary operations

    SciTech Connect

    Saberi, Hamed

    2011-09-15

    We consider the recently proposed (no-go) theorem of Lamata et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 180506 (2008)] on the impossibility of sequential implementation of global unitary operations with the aid of an itinerant ancillary system and view the claim within the language of Kraus representation. By virtue of an extremely useful tool for analyzing entanglement properties of quantum operations, namely, operator-Schmidt decomposition, we provide alternative proof to the no-go theorem and also study the role of initial correlations between the qubits and ancilla in sequential preparation of unitary entanglers. Despite the negative response from the no-go theorem, we demonstrate explicitly how the matrix-product operator (MPO) formalism provides a flexible structure to develop protocols for sequential implementation of such entanglers with an optimal fidelity. The proposed numerical technique, which we call variational matrix-product operator (VMPO), offers a computationally efficient tool for characterizing the ''globalness'' and entangling capabilities of nonlocal unitary operations.

  14. A Bayesian sequential processor approach to spectroscopic portal system decisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sale, K; Candy, J; Breitfeller, E; Guidry, B; Manatt, D; Gosnell, T; Chambers, D

    2007-07-31

    The development of faster more reliable techniques to detect radioactive contraband in a portal type scenario is an extremely important problem especially in this era of constant terrorist threats. Towards this goal the development of a model-based, Bayesian sequential data processor for the detection problem is discussed. In the sequential processor each datum (detector energy deposit and pulse arrival time) is used to update the posterior probability distribution over the space of model parameters. The nature of the sequential processor approach is that a detection is produced as soon as it is statistically justified by the data rather than waiting for a fixed counting interval before any analysis is performed. In this paper the Bayesian model-based approach, physics and signal processing models and decision functions are discussed along with the first results of our research.

  15. Finding a Path for Segmentation Through Sequential Learning.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongzhi; Cao, Yu; Syed-Mahmood, Tanveer F

    2015-01-01

    Sequential learning techniques, such as auto-context, that applies the output of an intermediate classifier as contextual features for its subsequent classifier has shown impressive performance for semantic segmentation. We show that these methods can be interpreted as an approximation technique derived from a Bayesian formulation. To improve the effectiveness of applying this approximation technique, we propose a new sequential learning approach for semantic segmentation that solves a segmentation problem by breaking it into a series of simplified segmentation problems. Sequentially solving each of the simplified problems along the path leads to a more effective way for solving the original segmentation problem. To achieve this goal, we also propose a learning-based method to generate simplified segmentation problems by explicitly controlling the complexities of the modeling classifiers. We report promising results on the 2013 SATA canine leg muscle segmentation dataset. PMID:26221697

  16. Laparoscopic endoscopic cooperative surgery.

    PubMed

    Hiki, Naoki; Nunobe, Souya; Matsuda, Tatsuo; Hirasawa, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Yorimasa; Yamaguchi, Toshiharu

    2015-01-01

    Laparoscopic and endoscopic cooperative surgery (LECS) is a newly developed concept for tumor dissection of the gastrointestinal tract that was first investigated for local resection of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). The first reported version of LECS for GIST has been named 'classical LECS' to distinguish it from other modified LECS procedures, such as inverted LECS, a combination of laparoscopic and endoscopic approaches to neoplasia with a non-exposure technique (CLEAN-NET), and non-exposed endoscopic wall-inversion surgery (NEWS). These modified LECS procedures were developed for dissection of malignant tumors which may seed tumor cells into the abdominal cavity. While these LECS-related procedures might prevent tumor seeding, their application is limited by several factors, such as tumor size, location and technical difficulty. Currently, classical LECS is a safe and useful procedure for gastric submucosal tumors without mucosal defects, independent of tumor location, such as proximity to the esophagogastric junction or pyloric ring. For future applications of LECS-related procedures for other malignant diseases with mucosal lesions such as GIST with mucosal defects and gastric cancer, some improvements in the techniques are needed.

  17. Sequential extrusion-microwave pretreatment of switchgrass and big bluestem.

    PubMed

    Karunanithy, C; Muthukumarappan, K; Gibbons, W R

    2014-02-01

    Developing an effective and economical biomass pretreatment method is a significant roadblock to meeting the ever growing demand for transportation fuels. Earlier studies with different feedstocks revealed that in the absence of chemicals, neither extrusion nor microwave could be standalone pretreatments. However, there is potential that the advantages of these individual methods can be harnessed in a sequential pretreatment process. Accordingly, switchgrass and big bluestem were extruded and then subject to microwave pretreatment, under optimal conditions that had been separately determined in prior studies. Pretreated biomass was then subject to enzymatic hydrolysis to understand the effectiveness of the sequential pretreatment on sugar recovery and generation of fermentation inhibitors. Statistical analysis confirmed that moisture content, microwave power level, and exposure time (and their interactions) had significant influence on sugar recovery. Sequential pretreatment of switchgrass (25% moisture, 450W and 2.5min) resulted in a maximum glucose, xylose, and total sugar recovery of 52.6%, 75.5%, and 59.2%, respectively. This was higher by 1.27 and 2.71, 1.21 and 4.60, and 1.25 and 2.87 times compared to extrusion alone and the unpretreated control, respectively. The same sequential pretreatment conditions achieved maximum glucose, xylose, and total sugar recovery of 83.2%, 92.1%, and 68.1%, respectively, for big bluestem. This was 1.14 and 4.1, 1.18 and 2.7, and 1.20 and 3.0 times higher than extrusion alone and the unpretreated control, respectively. This sequential pretreatment process did not aggravate acetic acid formation over levels observed with the individual pretreatments. Furthermore, furfural, HMF, and formic acid were not detected in any of the treatments. Although the sequential pretreatment process enhanced sugar recovery without increasing the levels of potential fermentation inhibitors, the increased energy input for the microwave treatment may

  18. The Hard Problem of Cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Kimmo; Strimling, Pontus

    2012-01-01

    Based on individual variation in cooperative inclinations, we define the “hard problem of cooperation” as that of achieving high levels of cooperation in a group of non-cooperative types. Can the hard problem be solved by institutions with monitoring and sanctions? In a laboratory experiment we find that the answer is affirmative if the institution is imposed on the group but negative if development of the institution is left to the group to vote on. In the experiment, participants were divided into groups of either cooperative types or non-cooperative types depending on their behavior in a public goods game. In these homogeneous groups they repeatedly played a public goods game regulated by an institution that incorporated several of the key properties identified by Ostrom: operational rules, monitoring, rewards, punishments, and (in one condition) change of rules. When change of rules was not possible and punishments were set to be high, groups of both types generally abided by operational rules demanding high contributions to the common good, and thereby achieved high levels of payoffs. Under less severe rules, both types of groups did worse but non-cooperative types did worst. Thus, non-cooperative groups profited the most from being governed by an institution demanding high contributions and employing high punishments. Nevertheless, in a condition where change of rules through voting was made possible, development of the institution in this direction was more often voted down in groups of non-cooperative types. We discuss the relevance of the hard problem and fit our results into a bigger picture of institutional and individual determinants of cooperative behavior. PMID:22792282

  19. Cooperation: the foundation of improvement.

    PubMed

    Clemmer, T P; Spuhler, V J; Berwick, D M; Nolan, T W

    1998-06-15

    Cooperation--working together to produce mutual benefit or attain a common purpose--is almost inseparable from the quest for improvement. Although the case for cooperation can be made on ethical grounds, neither the motivation for nor the effects of cooperation need to be interpreted solely in terms of altruism. Cooperation can be a shrewd and pragmatic strategy for accomplishing personal goals in an interdependent system. Earlier papers in this series have explored the conceptual roots of modern approaches to improvement, which lie in systems theory. To improve systems, we must usually attend first and foremost to interactions. Among humans, "better interaction" is almost synonymous with "better cooperation." Physicians have ample opportunities and, indeed, an obligation to cooperate with other physicians in the same or different specialties, with nurses and other clinical workers, with administrators, and with patients and families. Many intellectual disciplines have made cooperation an object of study. These include anthropology; social psychology; genetics; biology; mathematics; game theory; linguistics; operations research; economics; and, of course, moral and rational philosophy. Scientifically grounded methods to enhance cooperation include developing a shared purpose; creating an open, safe environment; including all who share a common purpose and encouraging diverse viewpoints; negotiating agreement; and insisting on fairness and equity in the application of rules. These methods apply at the organizational level and at the level of the individual physician. This paper describes the application of these methods at the organizational level and focuses on one especially successful example of system-level cooperation in a care delivery site where interactions matter a great deal: the modern intensive care unit. PMID:9625663

  20. Temperature Swing Adsorption Compressor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, John E.; Mulloth, Lila M.; Affleck, Dave L.

    2001-01-01

    Closing the oxygen loop in an air revitalization system based on four-bed molecular sieve and Sabatier reactor technology requires a vacuum pump-compressor that can take the low-pressure CO, from the 4BMS and compress and store for use by a Sabatier reactor. NASA Ames Research Center proposed a solid-state temperature-swing adsorption (TSA) compressor that appears to meet performance requirements, be quiet and reliable, and consume less power than a comparable mechanical compressor/accumulator combination. Under this task, TSA compressor technology is being advanced through development of a complete prototype system. A liquid-cooled TSA compressor has been partially tested, and the rest of the system is being fabricated. An air-cooled TSA compressor is also being designed.

  1. Fluorescence sensor for sequential detection of zinc and phosphate ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Miran; Kim, Bo-Yeon; Seo, Hansol; Helal, Aasif; Kim, Hong-Seok

    2016-12-01

    A new, highly selective turn-on fluorescent chemosensor based on 2-(2‧-tosylamidophenyl)thiazole (1) for the detection of zinc and phosphate ions in ethanol was synthesized and characterized. Sensor 1 showed a high selectivity for zinc compared to other cations and sequentially detected hydrogen pyrophosphate and hydrogen phosphate. The fluorescence mechanism can be explained by two different mechanisms: (i) the inhibition of excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) and (ii) chelation-induced enhanced fluorescence by binding with Zn2 +. The sequential detection of phosphate anions was achieved by the quenching and subsequent revival of ESIPT.

  2. Training neural networks using sequential extended Kalman filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Plumer, E.S.

    1995-03-01

    Recent work has demonstrated the use of the extended Kalman filter (EKF) as an alternative to gradient-descent backpropagation when training multi-layer perceptrons. The EKF approach significantly improves convergence properties but at the cost of greater storage and computational complexity. Feldkamp et al. have described a decoupled version of the EKF which preserves the training advantages of the general EKF but which reduces the storage and computational requirements. This paper reviews the general and decoupled EKF approaches and presents sequentialized versions which provide further computational savings over the batch forms. The usefulness of the sequentialized EKF algorithms is demonstrated on a pattern classification problem.

  3. Testing sequential quantum measurements: how can maximal knowledge be extracted?

    PubMed Central

    Nagali, Eleonora; Felicetti, Simone; de Assis, Pierre-Louis; D'Ambrosio, Vincenzo; Filip, Radim; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    The extraction of information from a quantum system unavoidably implies a modification of the measured system itself. In this framework partial measurements can be carried out in order to extract only a portion of the information encoded in a quantum system, at the cost of inducing a limited amount of disturbance. Here we analyze experimentally the dynamics of sequential partial measurements carried out on a quantum system, focusing on the trade-off between the maximal information extractable and the disturbance. In particular we implement two sequential measurements observing that, by exploiting an adaptive strategy, is possible to find an optimal trade-off between the two quantities. PMID:22720131

  4. Exploring Reputation-Based Cooperation:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilone, Daniele; Giardini, Francesca; Paolucci, Mario

    In dyadic models of indirect reciprocity, the receivers' history of giving has a significant impact on the donor's decision. When the interaction involves more than two agents things become more complicated, and in large groups cooperation can hardly emerge. In this work we use a Public Goods Game to investigate whether publicly available reputation scores may support the evolution of cooperation and whether this is affected by the kind of network structure adopted. Moreover, if agents interact on a bipartite graph with partner selection, cooperation can quickly thrive in large groups.

  5. Complete treatment of olive pomace leachate by coagulation, activated-carbon adsorption and electrochemical oxidation.

    PubMed

    Mavros, Michael; Xekoukoulotakis, Nikolaos P; Mantzavinos, Dionissios; Diamadopoulos, Evan

    2008-06-01

    A battery scheme comprising sequential alum coagulation, activated-carbon adsorption and electrochemical oxidation over boron-doped diamond electrodes to mineralize a leachate from olive pomace processing is demonstrated. The effect of coagulant and adsorbent concentration on treatment efficiency was assessed in the range 0.1-50 mM Al(3+) and 2.5-50 g/L activated-carbon and optimal conditions were established. Coagulation at 7.5mM Al(3+) resulted in substantial solids and color removal (i.e. 80% and 93%, respectively). This was accompanied by only 30% chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction (initial COD was about 3,500 mg/L). The latter increased to 80% though when coagulation was coupled with adsorption at 25 g/L activated carbon. Electrochemical oxidation of the original effluent for 360 min led to 63% and 82% COD reduction at 10 and 20A current intensity, respectively. When this process was tested as a polishing stage following coagulation and adsorption, overall COD removal reached values of 92% and 97%, respectively. The final effluent was also colorless and solids free. However, the treated effluent still exhibited ecotoxicity possibly due to the formation of ecotoxic oxidation products. PMID:18396309

  6. An Equilibrium Model for the Combined Effect of Macromolecular Crowding and Surface Adsorption on the Formation of Linear Protein Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, Travis; Minton, Allen P.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of linear protein fibrils has previously been shown to be enhanced by volume exclusion or crowding in the presence of a high concentration of chemically inert protein or polymer, and by adsorption to membrane surfaces. An equilibrium mesoscopic model for the combined effect of both crowding and adsorption upon the fibrillation of a dilute tracer protein is presented. The model exhibits behavior that differs qualitatively from that observed in the presence of crowding or adsorption alone. The model predicts that in a crowded solution, at critical values of the volume fraction of crowder or intrinsic energy of the tracer-wall interaction, the tracer protein will undergo an extremely cooperative transition—approaching a step function—from existence as a slightly self-associated species in solution to existence as a highly self-associated and completely adsorbed species. Criteria for a valid experimental test of these predictions are presented. PMID:25692600

  7. Neutron reflectometry of anionic surfactants on sapphire: A strong maximum in the adsorption near the critical micelle concentration.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning Ning; Thomas, Robert K; Rennie, Adrian R

    2016-06-01

    The adsorption of the anionic surfactants, lithium, sodium and cesium dodecylsulfates, and sodium decylsulfonate, on the positively charged C-plane (0001) of sapphire (alumina) has been measured using neutron reflection. For each of the four surfactants there is a strong maximum in the adsorption at about the critical micelle concentration. The maximum becomes more marked from lithium to cesium. The measurements were reproduced over a range of different physical conditions and could not be accounted for in terms of impurities. The maximum is explained quantitatively by using the combination of a mass action model to calculate the mean activity of the surfactant, and a cooperative model of the adsorption (Frumkin), in which saturation of the layer is not attained until well above the critical micelle concentration. PMID:26990955

  8. Modeling the adsorption of mixed gases based on pure gas adsorption properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzabar, N.; Holland, H. J.; Vermeer, C. H.; ter Brake, H. J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Sorption-based Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocoolers usually operate with pure gases. A sorption-based compressor has many benefits; however, it is limited by the pressure ratios it can provide. Using a mixed-refrigerant (MR) instead of a pure refrigerant in JT cryocoolers allows working at much lower pressure ratios. Therefore, it is attractive using MRs in sorption- based cryocoolers in order to reduce one of its main limitations. The adsorption of mixed gases is usually investigated under steady-state conditions, mainly for storage and separation processes. However, the process in a sorption compressor goes through various temperatures, pressures and adsorption concentrations; therefore, it differs from the common mixed gases adsorption applications. In order to simulate the sorption process in a compressor a numerical analysis for mixed gases is developed, based on pure gas adsorption characteristics. The pure gas adsorption properties have been measured for four gases (nitrogen, methane, ethane, and propane) with Norit-RB2 activated carbon. A single adsorption model is desired to describe the adsorption of all four gases. This model is further developed to a mixed-gas adsorption model. In future work more adsorbents will be tested using these four gases and the adsorption model will be verified against experimental results of mixed-gas adsorption measurements.

  9. Cooperative robotic sentry vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feddema, John T.; Lewis, Christopher L.; Klarer, Paul; Eisler, G. R.; Caprihan, Rahul

    1999-08-01

    As part of a project for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Sandia National Laboratories' Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center is developing and testing the feasibility of a cooperative team of robotic sentry vehicles to guard a perimeter and to perform a surround task. This paper describes on-going activities in the development of these robotic sentry vehicles. To date, we have developed a robotic perimeter detection system which consists of eight 'Roving All Terrain Lunar Explorer Rovers' (RATLER), a laptop-based base-station, and several Miniature Intrusion Detection Sensors (MIDS). A radio frequency receiver on each of the RATLER vehicles alerts the sentry vehicles of alarms from the hidden MIDS. When an alarm is received, each vehicle decides whether it should investigate the alarm based on the proximity of itself and the other vehicles to the alarm. As one vehicle attends an alarm, the other vehicles adjust their position around the perimeter to better prepare for another alarm. For the surround task, both potential field and A* search path planners have been added to the base-station and vehicles. At the base-station, the operator specifies goal and exclusion regions on a GIS map. The path planner generates vehicles paths that are previewed by the operator. Once the operator has validated the path, the appropriate information is downloaded t the vehicles. For the potential field path planner, the polygons and line segments that represent the obstacles and goals are downloaded to the vehicles, instead of the simulated paths. On board the vehicles, the same potential field path planner generates the path except that it uses the true location of itself and the nearest neighboring vehicle. For the A* path planner, the actual path is downloaded to the vehicles because of limited on-board computational power.

  10. Cooperation Among Theorem Provers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldinger, Richard J.

    1998-01-01

    This is a final report, which supports NASA's PECSEE (Persistent Cognizant Software Engineering Environment) effort and complements the Kestrel Institute project "Inference System Integration via Logic Morphism". The ultimate purpose of the project is to develop a superior logical inference mechanism by combining the diverse abilities of multiple cooperating theorem provers. In many years of research, a number of powerful theorem-proving systems have arisen with differing capabilities and strengths. Resolution theorem provers (such as Kestrel's KITP or SRI's, SNARK) deal with first-order logic with equality but not the principle of mathematical induction. The Boyer-Moore theorem prover excels at proof by induction but cannot deal with full first-order logic. Both are highly automated but cannot accept user guidance easily. The PVS system (from SRI) in only automatic within decidable theories, but it has well-designed interactive capabilities: furthermore, it includes higher-order logic, not just first-order logic. The NuPRL system from Cornell University and the STeP system from Stanford University have facilities for constructive logic and temporal logic, respectively - both are interactive. It is often suggested - for example, in the anonymous "QED Manifesto"-that we should pool the resources of all these theorem provers into a single system, so that the strengths of one can compensate for the weaknesses of others, and so that effort will not be duplicated. However, there is no straightforward way of doing this, because each system relies on its own language and logic for its success. Thus. SNARK uses ordinary first-order logic with equality, PVS uses higher-order logic. and NuPRL uses constructive logic. The purpose of this project, and the companion project at Kestrel, has been to use the category-theoretic notion of logic morphism to combine systems with different logics and languages. Kestrel's SPECWARE system has been the vehicle for the implementation.

  11. Regional Renewable Energy Cooperatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazendonk, P.; Brown, M. B.; Byrne, J. M.; Harrison, T.; Mueller, R.; Peacock, K.; Usher, J.; Yalamova, R.; Kroebel, R.; Larsen, J.; McNaughton, R.

    2014-12-01

    We are building a multidisciplinary research program linking researchers in agriculture, business, earth science, engineering, humanities and social science. Our goal is to match renewable energy supply and reformed energy demands. The program will be focused on (i) understanding and modifying energy demand, (ii) design and implementation of diverse renewable energy networks. Geomatics technology will be used to map existing energy and waste flows on a neighbourhood, municipal, and regional level. Optimal sites and combinations of sites for solar and wind electrical generation (ridges, rooftops, valley walls) will be identified. Geomatics based site and grid analyses will identify best locations for energy production based on efficient production and connectivity to regional grids and transportation. Design of networks for utilization of waste streams of heat, water, animal and human waste for energy production will be investigated. Agriculture, cities and industry produce many waste streams that are not well utilized. Therefore, establishing a renewable energy resource mapping and planning program for electrical generation, waste heat and energy recovery, biomass collection, and biochar, biodiesel and syngas production is critical to regional energy optimization. Electrical storage and demand management are two priorities that will be investigated. Regional scale cooperatives may use electric vehicle batteries and innovations such as pump storage and concentrated solar molten salt heat storage for steam turbine electrical generation. Energy demand management is poorly explored in Canada and elsewhere - our homes and businesses operate on an unrestricted demand. Simple monitoring and energy demand-ranking software can easily reduce peaks demands and move lower ranked uses to non-peak periods, thereby reducing the grid size needed to meet peak demands. Peak demand strains the current energy grid capacity and often requires demand balancing projects and

  12. [Aware and cooperative reduction].

    PubMed

    Tambone, V; Ghilardi, G

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to address the question of reduction in the scientific method, to evaluate its legitimacy as well as its pro and contra from an epistemological point of view. In the first paragraph we classify some kinds of reductionism, analysing their presuppositions and epistemological status and showing some examples of scientific reduction. The presentation includes a classificatory table that shows some of the different forms of biological reductionism. In the second paragraph we study the epistemology of science starting from its modern beginning: the Vienna Circle, focusing on the meaning of methodological reductionism. What did it mean for science to define itself mainly as method, which effects did this new concept of science have on methodology and what kind of problems did this movement bring about. In the third paragraph we examine the reactions triggered by methodological reductionism, we analyze the theoretical consistency of these answers, trying to offer a balanced view. We show how complexity can be seen as a paradigm of the anti-reductionism effort, and we study its epistemological basis. In the fourth paragraph we outline our operative proposal: the reduction that is both aware and cooperative. We point out the main reasons why science cannot avoid being reductive in some way, and therefore how we need to deal with this feature in order to prevent it to degenerate into reductionism. We show some examples of this new proposal taken from the practical realm and from literature, where it is possible to discern the spirit of this alternative methodology. PMID:22964706

  13. Long-term balance in heavy metal adsorption and release in biochar derived from sewage sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohi, Saran; Cleat, Robert; Graham, Margaret; Cross, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    In Europe, sewage sludge has major potential as a resource for producing biochar. Biochar from sludge could offer a means for the controlled recycling of phosphorus to soil, with the additional benefit of carbon stabilisation. Biochar made from contaminated feedstock could, however, also leach heavy metals into soil. Counter to release of metals, biochar from fresh plant biomass has a documented affinity and adsorption capacity. The longer term balance of release and adsorption of metals in sludge-derived biochar has not been established. Our work compared the adsorption and release of both indigenous metals and metals adsorbed to sludge derived biochar. The hypotheses were threefold: (1) the capacity to adsorb metals is lower than the potential to release them, (2) the affinity for indigenous metals is higher than for metals in solution, 3) oxidative ageing of biochar leads to partial release of adsorbed metals. Sludge biochar was produced in a horizontal, externally heated kiln at a feed rate of approx. 0.5 kg/hr. Dry sludge was converted in a 20 min. transit time with peak kiln temperature of 550°C. Elemental analysis using ICP OES (after a published preparation step) showed Zn, Pb and Cu to be the most abundant heavy metals in the biochar. The same elements were assessed in sequential water and Mehlich III extracts. Adsorption of the metals from pure and mixed Zn, Pb and Pb solutions were undertaken before and after the other extractions. All the treatments were applied to the same biochar after oxidative ageing, in which biochar C was also found to be very stable. Extractability of all three metals from fresh biochar was low (less than 5 %), but for two of the metals it was lower after ageing. For one of the metals, ageing increased extractability. For the same metal, adsorption was lower when undertaken with a mixed rather than pure solution. Capacity for adsorption of one of the other metals was higher after biochar ageing; the general capacity for metal

  14. Arsenic Adsorption Equilibrium Concentration and Adsorption Rate of Activated Carbon Coated with Ferric-Aluminum Hydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Sugita, H.; Oguma, T.; Hara, J.; Takahashi, S.

    2015-12-01

    In some areas of developing countries, ground or well water contaminated with arsenic has been reluctantly used as drinking water. It is highly desirable that effective and inexpensive arsenic removal agents should be developed and provided to reduce the potential health risk. Previous studies demonstrated that activated carbon coated with ferric-aluminum hydroxides (Fe-Al-C) has high adsorptive potential for removal of arsenic. In this study, a series of experiments using Fe-Al-C were carried to discuss adsorption equilibrium time, adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorption rate of arsenic for Fe-Al-C. Fe-Al-C used in this study was provided by Astec Co., Ltd. Powder reagent of disodium hydrogen arsenate heptahydrate was dissolved into ion-exchanged water. The solution was then further diluted with ion-exchanged water to be 1 and 10 mg/L as arsenic concentration. The pH of the solution was adjusted to be around 7 by adding HCl and/or NaOH. The solution was used as artificial arsenic contaminated water in two types of experiments (arsenic adsorption equilibrium and arsenic adsorption rate tests). The results of the arsenic equilibrium tests were showed that a time period of about 3 days to reach apparent adsorption equilibrium for arsenic. The apparent adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorbed amount of arsenic on Fe-Al-C adsorbent could be estimated by application of various adsorption isotherms, but the distribution coefficient of arsenic between solid and liquid varies with experimental conditions such as initial concentration of arsenic and addition concentration of adsorbent. An adsorption rate equation that takes into account the reduction in the number of effective adsorption sites on the adsorbent caused by the arsenic adsorption reaction was derived based on the data obtained from the arsenic adsorption rate tests.

  15. The effect of mixed HCl-KCl competitive adsorbate on Pt adsorption and catalytic properties of Pt-Sn/Al2O3 catalysts in propane dehydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangeneh, Farnaz Tahriri; Taeb, Abbas; Gholivand, Khodayar; Sahebdelfar, Saeed

    2015-12-01

    The effect of competitive adsorbate concentration and combination on the adsorption of H2PtCl6 onto γ-Al2O3 in the preparation and performance of PtSnK/γ-Al2O3 catalyst for propane dehydrogenation was investigated. The catalysts were prepared by sequential impregnation of Sn and Pt precursors. The effect of competitor concentration on Pt adsorption was studied by using hydrochloric acid (0.1-0.3 M) and the effect of pH was studied by using KCl/HCl mixtures at constant (0.1 M) total chloride ion concentration. The catalysts were characterized by nitrogen adsorption/desorption, XRD, XRF, SEM and CO chemisorption. The catalytic performance tests were carried out in a fixed-bed quartz reactor under kinetic controlled condition for proper catalyst screening. It was found that the corrosive competitor HCl could be partially substituted with KCl without appreciable impact on catalyst performance with the advantage of lower acid attack on the support and reduced leaching of the deposited tin. A model based on initial concentration and uptake of the adsorbates was developed to obtain the adsorption parameters. Values of 890 μmol/g and 600 lit/mol were obtained for adsorption site concentration of the tin-impregnated support and equilibrium constant for Pt adsorption, respectively, for HCl concentration range of 0.1-0.3 M.

  16. Cooperative strings and glassy interfaces.

    PubMed

    Salez, Thomas; Salez, Justin; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari; Raphaël, Elie; Forrest, James A

    2015-07-01

    We introduce a minimal theory of glass formation based on the ideas of molecular crowding and resultant string-like cooperative rearrangement, and address the effects of free interfaces. In the bulk case, we obtain a scaling expression for the number of particles taking part in cooperative strings, and we recover the Adam-Gibbs description of glassy dynamics. Then, by including thermal dilatation, the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann relation is derived. Moreover, the random and string-like characters of the cooperative rearrangement allow us to predict a temperature-dependent expression for the cooperative length ξ of bulk relaxation. Finally, we explore the influence of sample boundaries when the system size becomes comparable to ξ. The theory is in agreement with measurements of the glass-transition temperature of thin polymer films, and allows quantification of the temperature-dependent thickness hm of the interfacial mobile layer. PMID:26100908

  17. Interorganizational Cooperation: Why and How?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beder, Hal

    1984-01-01

    Describes characteristics of continuing education agencies (resource and organizational insecurity, need for flexibility, autonomy), type of cooperation (cosponsorship, referral, donation, coordination), essential resources (money, learners, staff, information, domain, power), hidden costs (time, dislocation, goal dislocation, goal displacement,…

  18. Cooperative strings and glassy interfaces.

    PubMed

    Salez, Thomas; Salez, Justin; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari; Raphaël, Elie; Forrest, James A

    2015-07-01

    We introduce a minimal theory of glass formation based on the ideas of molecular crowding and resultant string-like cooperative rearrangement, and address the effects of free interfaces. In the bulk case, we obtain a scaling expression for the number of particles taking part in cooperative strings, and we recover the Adam-Gibbs description of glassy dynamics. Then, by including thermal dilatation, the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann relation is derived. Moreover, the random and string-like characters of the cooperative rearrangement allow us to predict a temperature-dependent expression for the cooperative length ξ of bulk relaxation. Finally, we explore the influence of sample boundaries when the system size becomes comparable to ξ. The theory is in agreement with measurements of the glass-transition temperature of thin polymer films, and allows quantification of the temperature-dependent thickness hm of the interfacial mobile layer.

  19. Future Directions in Cooperative Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leventhal, Jerome

    1996-01-01

    Current trends influencing cooperative education include the Workforce Development Act, the school-to-work career paths approach, use of multiple intelligences research in the classroom, and action research to improve program development. (SK)

  20. The Paradoxes of Library Cooperation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Richard M.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    Besides the main article by Richard Dougherty, this mini-symposium on library cooperation contains commentaries by Ralph Blasingame, Thomas J. Galvin, Ellsworth Mason, John F. Anderson and Robert S. Ake. (18 references) (NH)

  1. Enzyme:nanoparticle bioconjugates with two sequential enzymes: stoichiometry and activity of malate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase on Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Keighron, Jacqueline D; Keating, Christine D

    2010-12-21

    We report the synthesis and characterization of bioconjugates in which the enzymes malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and/or citrate synthase (CS) were adsorbed to 30 nm diameter Au nanoparticles. Enzyme:Au stoichiometry and kinetic parameters (specific activity, k(cat), K(M), and activity per particle) were determined for MDH:Au, CS:Au, and three types of dual-activity MDH/CS:Au bioconjugates. For single-activity bioconjugates (MDH:Au and CS:Au), the number of enzyme molecules adsorbed per particle was dependent upon the enzyme concentration in solution, with multilayers forming at high enzyme:Au solution ratios. The specific activity of adsorbed enzyme increased with increasing number adsorbed per particle for CS:Au, but was less sensitive to stoichiometry for MDH:Au. Dual activity bioconjugates were prepared in three ways: (1) by adsorption of MDH followed by CS, (2) by adsorption of CS followed by MDH, and (3) by coadsorption of both enzymes from the same solution. The resulting bioconjugates differed substantially in the number of enzyme molecules adsorbed per particle, the specific activity of the adsorbed enzymes, and also the enzymatic activity per particle. Bioconjugates formed by adding CS to the Au nanoparticles before MDH was added exhibited higher specific activities for both enzymes than those formed by adding the enzymes in the reverse order. These bioconjugates also had 3-fold higher per-particle sequential activity for conversion of malate to citrate, despite substantially fewer copies of both enzymes present.

  2. A cooperated P2P GIS for loose coupled governmental application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chenyu; Xie, Kunqing; Ma, Xiujun; Cai, Cuo; Sun, Yanfeng

    2007-06-01

    Current governmental applications are of large scale and always compute-intensive and data-intensive, and we focus on introducing P2P computing to facilitate loose coupled governmental applications in this paper. As GIS data is always deposited in locationally distributed nodes, which are probably administrated under spatial databases, the global range is divided into regions to eliminate complicated consistency maintenance and unnecessary message exchanging, and hierarchical spatial indexes are designed for efficient locating spatial resources and low control cost. When executing, a user submitted global spatial query are firstly parsed to sequential subtasks refer to distributed spatial index, and then dynamically passed to appropriate nodes and cooperatively accomplished. Nodes intercommunicate by cooperating messages, which are sent directly to the destination. Besides collaboration process of sequential execution, a dynamic alternative participant approach for failure handling of the sequential execution is provided, which saves the expensive rollback or abort. And this paper also designed and implemented a p2p based loose governmental application prototype, in which nodes intercommunicate via p2p network sub layer, also a user interface is implemented to manage the request from user and eventually reply a result.

  3. Feature Extraction in Sequential Multimedia Images: with Applications in Satellite Images and On-line Videos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yu-Li

    Multimedia data is increasingly important in scientific discovery and people's daily lives. Content of massive multimedia is often diverse and noisy, and motion between frames is sometimes crucial in analyzing those data. Among all, still images and videos are commonly used formats. Images are compact in size but do not contain motion information. Videos record motion but are sometimes too big to be analyzed. Sequential images, which are a set of continuous images with low frame rate, stand out because they are smaller than videos and still maintain motion information. This thesis investigates features in different types of noisy sequential images, and the proposed solutions that intelligently combined multiple features to successfully retrieve visual information from on-line videos and cloudy satellite images. The first task is detecting supraglacial lakes above ice sheet in sequential satellite images. The dynamics of supraglacial lakes on the Greenland ice sheet deeply affect glacier movement, which is directly related to sea level rise and global environment change. Detecting lakes above ice is suffering from diverse image qualities and unexpected clouds. A new method is proposed to efficiently extract prominent lake candidates with irregular shapes, heterogeneous backgrounds, and in cloudy images. The proposed system fully automatize the procedure that track lakes with high accuracy. We further cooperated with geoscientists to examine the tracked lakes and found new scientific findings. The second one is detecting obscene content in on-line video chat services, such as Chatroulette, that randomly match pairs of users in video chat sessions. A big problem encountered in such systems is the presence of flashers and obscene content. Because of various obscene content and unstable qualities of videos capture by home web-camera, detecting misbehaving users is a highly challenging task. We propose SafeVchat, which is the first solution that achieves satisfactory

  4. Adsorption of lead over graphite oxide.

    PubMed

    Olanipekun, Opeyemi; Oyefusi, Adebola; Neelgund, Gururaj M; Oki, Aderemi

    2014-01-24

    The adsorption efficiency and kinetics of removal of lead in presence of graphite oxide (GO) was determined using the Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS). The GO was prepared by the chemical oxidation of graphite and characterized using FTIR, SEM, TGA and XRD. The adsorption efficiency of GO for the solution containing 50, 100 and 150 ppm of Pb(2+) was found to be 98%, 91% and 71% respectively. The adsorption ability of GO was found to be higher than graphite. Therefore, the oxidation of activated carbon in removal of heavy metals may be a viable option to reduce pollution in portable water.

  5. Thermodynamics of binary gas adsorption in nanopores.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Sujeet; Lefort, Ronan; Morineau, Denis; Mhanna, Ramona; Merdrignac-Conanec, Odile; Saint-Jalmes, Arnaud; Leclercq, Théo

    2016-09-21

    MCM-41 nanoporous silicas show a very high selectivity for monoalcohols over aprotic molecules during adsorption of a binary mixture in the gas phase. We present here an original use of gravimetric vapour sorption isotherms to characterize the role played by the alcohol hydrogen-bonding network in the adsorption process. Beyond simple selectivity, vapour sorption isotherms measured for various compositions help to completely unravel at the molecular level the step by step adsorption mechanism of the binary system in the nanoporous solid, from the first monolayers to the complete liquid condensation. PMID:27532892

  6. Adsorption in sparse networks. 2: Silica aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, G.W.; Calas, S.; Sempere, R.

    1998-06-15

    The model developed in Part 1 is applied to nitrogen adsorption isotherms obtained for a series of silica aerogels whose densities are varied by partial sintering. The isotherms are adequately described by a cubic network model, with all of the pores falling in the mesopore range; the adsorption and desorption branches are fit by the same pore size distribution. For the least dense gels, a substantial portion of the pore volume is not detected by condensation. The model attributes this effect to the shape of the adsorbate/adsorptive interface, which can adopt zero curvature even in mesopores, because of the shape of the network.

  7. Adsorption affinity of anions on metal oxyhydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechenyuk, S. I.; Semushina, Yu. P.; Kuz'mich, L. F.

    2013-03-01

    The dependences of anion (phosphate, carbonate, sulfate, chromate, oxalate, tartrate, and citrate) adsorption affinity anions from geometric characteristics, acid-base properties, and complex forming ability are generalized. It is shown that adsorption depends on the nature of both the anions and the ionic medium and adsorbent. It is established that anions are generally grouped into the following series of adsorption affinity reduction: PO{4/3-}, CO{3/2-} > C2O{4/2-}, C(OH)(CH2)2(COO){3/3-}, (CHOH)2(COO){2/2-} > CrO{4/2-} ≫ SO{4/2-}.

  8. Cooperative binding: a multiple personality.

    PubMed

    Martini, Johannes W R; Diambra, Luis; Habeck, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Cooperative binding has been described in many publications and has been related to or defined by several different properties of the binding behavior of the ligand to the target molecule. In addition to the commonly used Hill coefficient, other characteristics such as a sigmoidal shape of the overall titration curve in a linear plot, a change of ligand affinity of the other binding sites when a site of the target molecule becomes occupied, or complex roots of the binding polynomial have been used to define or to quantify cooperative binding. In this work, we analyze how the different properties are related in the most general model for binding curves based on the grand canonical partition function and present several examples which highlight differences between the cooperativity characterizing properties which are discussed. Our results mainly show that among the presented definitions there are not two which fully coincide. Moreover, this work poses the question whether it can make sense to distinguish between positive and negative cooperativity based on the macroscopic binding isotherm only. This article shall emphasize that scientists who investigate cooperative effects in biological systems could help avoiding misunderstandings by stating clearly which kind of cooperativity they discuss.

  9. How feeling betrayed affects cooperation.

    PubMed

    Ramazi, Pouria; Hessel, Jop; Cao, Ming

    2015-01-01

    For a population of interacting self-interested agents, we study how the average cooperation level is affected by some individuals' feelings of being betrayed and guilt. We quantify these feelings as adjusted payoffs in asymmetric games, where for different emotions, the payoff matrix takes the structure of that of either a prisoner's dilemma or a snowdrift game. Then we analyze the evolution of cooperation in a well-mixed population of agents, each of whom is associated with such a payoff matrix. At each time-step, an agent is randomly chosen from the population to update her strategy based on the myopic best-response update rule. According to the simulations, decreasing the feeling of being betrayed in a portion of agents does not necessarily increase the level of cooperation in the population. However, this resistance of the population against low-betrayal-level agents is effective only up to some extend that is explicitly determined by the payoff matrices and the number of agents associated with these matrices. Two other models are also considered where the betrayal factor of an agent fluctuates as a function of the number of cooperators and defectors that she encounters. Unstable behaviors are observed for the level of cooperation in these cases; however, we show that one can tune the parameters in the function to make the whole population become cooperative or defective. PMID:25922933

  10. Hormonal mechanisms of cooperative behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Marta C.; Bshary, Redouan; Fusani, Leonida; Goymann, Wolfgang; Hau, Michaela; Hirschenhauser, Katharina; Oliveira, Rui F.

    2010-01-01

    Research on the diversity, evolution and stability of cooperative behaviour has generated a considerable body of work. As concepts simplify the real world, theoretical solutions are typically also simple. Real behaviour, in contrast, is often much more diverse. Such diversity, which is increasingly acknowledged to help in stabilizing cooperative outcomes, warrants detailed research about the proximate mechanisms underlying decision-making. Our aim here is to focus on the potential role of neuroendocrine mechanisms on the regulation of the expression of cooperative behaviour in vertebrates. We first provide a brief introduction into the neuroendocrine basis of social behaviour. We then evaluate how hormones may influence known cognitive modules that are involved in decision-making processes that may lead to cooperative behaviour. Based on this evaluation, we will discuss specific examples of how hormones may contribute to the variability of cooperative behaviour at three different levels: (i) within an individual; (ii) between individuals and (iii) between species. We hope that these ideas spur increased research on the behavioural endocrinology of cooperation. PMID:20679116

  11. The Sequential Probability Ratio Test and Binary Item Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nydick, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    The sequential probability ratio test (SPRT) is a common method for terminating item response theory (IRT)-based adaptive classification tests. To decide whether a classification test should stop, the SPRT compares a simple log-likelihood ratio, based on the classification bound separating two categories, to prespecified critical values. As has…

  12. Application of Sequential Interval Estimation to Adaptive Mastery Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yuan-chin Ivan

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we apply sequential one-sided confidence interval estimation procedures with beta-protection to adaptive mastery testing. The procedures of fixed-width and fixed proportional accuracy confidence interval estimation can be viewed as extensions of one-sided confidence interval procedures. It can be shown that the adaptive mastery…

  13. Multivariate Multinomial Logit Models for Dyadic Sequential Interaction Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Rooij, Mark; Kroonenberg, Pieter M.

    2003-01-01

    The analysis of discrete dyadic sequential behavior and, in particular, the problem of forecasting future behavior from current and past behavior in such data is the main theme of the present article. We propose to use multivariate multinomial logit models and the potential of which will be demonstrated with data on Imagery play therapy. In such a…

  14. Multiple-Category Classification Using a Sequential Probability Ratio Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spray, Judith A.

    Sequential probability ratio testing (PRT), which usually is applied in situations requiring a decision between two simple hypotheses or a single decision point, is extended to include situations involving k decision points and [(k + 1)-choose-2] sets of simultaneous, simple hypotheses, where k>1. The multiple-decision point or multiple-category…

  15. Orthographic Processing and Visual Sequential Memory in Unexpectedly Poor Spellers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Virginia M.; Malone, Aisling M.; Redenbach, Holly

    2008-01-01

    Does unexpectedly poor spelling in adults result from inferior visual sequential memory? In one experiment, unexpectedly poor spellers performed significantly worse than better spellers in the immediate reproduction of sequences of visual symbols, but in a second experiment, the effect was not replicated. Poor spellers were also no worse at the…

  16. Making Career Decisions--A Sequential Elimination Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gati, Itamar

    1986-01-01

    Presents a model for career decision making based on the sequential elimination of occupational alternatives, an adaptation for career decisions of Tversky's (1972) elimination-by-aspects theory of choice. The expected utility approach is reviewed as a representative compensatory model for career decisions. Advantages, disadvantages, and…

  17. The sequential structure of brain activation predicts skill.

    PubMed

    Anderson, John R; Bothell, Daniel; Fincham, Jon M; Moon, Jungaa

    2016-01-29

    In an fMRI study, participants were trained to play a complex video game. They were scanned early and then again after substantial practice. While better players showed greater activation in one region (right dorsal striatum) their relative skill was better diagnosed by considering the sequential structure of whole brain activation. Using a cognitive model that played this game, we extracted a characterization of the mental states that are involved in playing a game and the statistical structure of the transitions among these states. There was a strong correspondence between this measure of sequential structure and the skill of different players. Using multi-voxel pattern analysis, it was possible to recognize, with relatively high accuracy, the cognitive states participants were in during particular scans. We used the sequential structure of these activation-recognized states to predict the skill of individual players. These findings indicate that important features about information-processing strategies can be identified from a model-based analysis of the sequential structure of brain activation. PMID:26707716

  18. Contextual view of Warner's Ranch. Second of three sequential views ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Contextual view of Warner's Ranch. Second of three sequential views (from west to east) of the buildings in relation to the surrounding geography. Ranch house and trading post/barn on left. Note approximate location of Overland Trail crossing left to right. Camera facing north. - Warner Ranch, Ranch House, San Felipe Road (State Highway S2), Warner Springs, San Diego County, CA

  19. Contextual view of Warner's Ranch. First of three sequential views ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Contextual view of Warner's Ranch. First of three sequential views (from west to east) of the buildings in relation to the surrounding geography. Ranch House on right. Note approximate locations of Overland Trail on right and San Diego cutoff branching off to left. Camera facing northwest. - Warner Ranch, Ranch House, San Felipe Road (State Highway S2), Warner Springs, San Diego County, CA

  20. Contextual view of Warner's Ranch. Third of three sequential views ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Contextual view of Warner's Ranch. Third of three sequential views (from west to east) of the buildings in relation to the surrounding geography. Note approximate location of Overland Trail crossing left to right. Camera facing northeast - Warner Ranch, Ranch House, San Felipe Road (State Highway S2), Warner Springs, San Diego County, CA