Science.gov

Sample records for cooperia curticei railliet

  1. Species-specific PCR for the identification of Cooperia curticei (Nematoda: Trichostrongylidae) in sheep.

    PubMed

    Amarante, M R V; Bassetto, C C; Neves, J H; Amarante, A F T

    2014-12-01

    Agricultural ruminants usually harbour mixed infections of gastrointestinal nematodes. A specific diagnosis is important because distinct species can differ significantly in their fecundity and pathogenicity. Haemonchus spp. and Cooperia spp. are the most important gastrointestinal nematodes infecting ruminants in subtropical/tropical environments. In Brazil, C. punctata is more adapted to cattle than sheep. Additionally, C. spatulata appears to be more adapted to cattle, whereas C. curticei is more adapted to sheep. However, infection of sheep with C. punctata is common when cattle and sheep share the same pasture. Although morphological analyses have been widely used to identify nematodes, molecular methods can overcome technical limitations and help improve species-specific diagnoses. Genetic markers in the first and second internal transcribed spacers (ITS-1 and ITS-2, respectively) of nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) have been used successfully to detect helminths. In the present study, the ITS-1 region was analysed and used to design a species-specific oligonucleotide primer pair to identify C. curticei. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product was sequenced and showed 97% similarity to C. oncophora partial ITS-1 clones and 99% similarity to the C. curticei sequence JF680982. The specificity of this primer pair was corroborated by the analysis of 17 species of helminths, including C. curticei, C. punctata and C. spatulata. Species-specific diagnosis, which has implications for rapid and reliable identification, can support studies on the biology, ecology and epidemiology of trichostrongylid nematodes in a particular geographical location.

  2. Mucin biosynthesis in the bovine goblet cell induced by Cooperia oncophora infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mucin hypersecretion is considered to be one of the most common components of the immune response to gastrointestinal nematode infection. However, investigations have not been conducted in the Cattle-Cooperia oncophora system to verify the findings largely derived from murine models. In this study, ...

  3. Regulatory networks and pathways in the bovine small intestine during Cooperia oncophora infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cooperia oncophora is an important parasitic nematode of cattle with a wide distribution in temperate areas. Twenty Holstein nematode-naïve bull calves were experimentally infected with approximately 100,000 infective L3s and infection was allowed to progress for 7, 14, 28, 42 days, respectively. Th...

  4. Photosensitization of cattle in southeast Texas: identification of phototoxic activity associated with Cooperia pedunculata.

    PubMed

    Rowe, L D; Norman, J O; Corrier, D E; Casteel, S W; Rector, B S; Bailey, E M; Schuster, J L; Reagor, J C

    1987-11-01

    A microbiological assay (Candida albicans) was used to screen plants in southeast Texas where bovine photosensitization (PS) of unknown cause was a recurring problem. Phototoxic activity was identified associated with dead leaf tips of Cooperia pedunculata, a native, perennial forb of the Amaryllis family (Amaryllidaceae) from central, southeast, and south Texas and parts of Mexico. A syndrome compatible with naturally occurring PS in cattle was induced in laboratory mice after oral administration of dead leaf material from C pedunculata. Availability and phototoxic activity of dead leaf material of C pedunculata corresponded with occurrence of PS in cattle. Seemingly, C pedunculata was involved in recurring PS.

  5. Splice variants and regulatory networks associated with host resistance to the intestinal worm Cooperia oncophora in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of host resistance, we characterized the jejunal transcriptome of Angus cattle selected for parasite resistance for over 20 years in response to infection caused by the intestinal worm Cooperia oncophora. The transcript abundance of 56 genes, such as that of muc...

  6. Analysis of the protective immune response following intramuscular vaccination of calves against the intestinal parasite Cooperia oncophora

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anthelmintic resistance in the bovine parasite Cooperia oncophora is developing and spreading rapidly worldwide. Vaccination is therefore often put forward as a cost-effective alternative for chemical drugs. Recently we reported the successful evaluation of a double domain activation-associated secr...

  7. A temporal shift in regulatory networks and pathways in the bovine small intestine during Cooperia oncophora infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cooperia oncophora is an important parasitic nematode of ruminants with a worldwide distribution. Twenty Holstein nematode-naïve bull calves were experimentally infected with approximately 100,000 L3 stage infective larvae for 7, 14, 28, 42 days, respectively. The experiment was conducted in order t...

  8. Cytoskeleton remodling and alterations in smooth muscle contractility in the bovine jejunum during the early stage of Cooperia oncophora infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gastrointestinal nematodes of the genus Cooperia are arguably the most important parasites of cattle. We characterized the bovine jejunal transcriptome in response to C. oncophora infection using RNA-seq technology. Approximately 71% of the 25,670 bovine genes were detected in the jejunal transcript...

  9. Elucidation of Leucaena leucocephala anthelmintic-like phytochemicals and the ultrastructural damage generated to eggs of Cooperia spp.

    PubMed

    von Son-de Fernex, Elke; Alonso-Díaz, Miguel Ángel; Mendoza-de Gives, Pedro; Valles-de la Mora, Braulio; González-Cortazar, Manases; Zamilpa, Alejandro; Castillo Gallegos, Epigmenio

    2015-11-30

    Leucaena leucocephala is a tropical forage legume suggested as an alternative method to control gastrointestinal parasitism in ruminants. This study: (1) performed a bio-guided fractionation of an aqueous extract of L. leucocephala using the egg hatch assay (EHA) to identify the anthelmintic (AH)-like phytochemicals present in fresh leaves, and (2) assessed the ultrastructural damage to eggs of Cooperia spp. after incubation with the final fraction. Phytochemicals were isolated using silica gel columns and identified using high performance liquid chromatography and standards for comparison. The final fraction was evaluated using EHA at 0.06, 0.125, 0.250, 0.500 and 1.1 mg ml(-1). The lethal concentration to inhibit 50% of Cooperia spp. egg hatching (LC50) was calculated using a Probit analysis. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed the ultrastructural changes present in Cooperia spp. eggs. Bio-guided isolation procedures led to the recognition of an active fraction (LlC1F3) mainly composed of quercetin (82.21%) and caffeic acid (13.42%) which inhibited 90.49 ± 2.8% of Cooperia spp. egg hatching (P<0.05), and an LC50 of 0.06 ± 0.14 mg ml(-1). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed eggs exposed to the active fraction had an irregular external layer with small projections and ruptures of lateral eggshell walls. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed changes to Cooperia spp. eggs in electro-density, including the thickness of the eggshell layers and fractures after incubation with the final fraction (LlC1F3). Changes in bioactivity after purification suggest synergistic interactions between quercetin and caffeic acid.

  10. The vitamin D receptor and inducible nitric oxide synthase associated pathways in acquired resistance to Cooperia oncophora infection in cattle

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cooperia oncophora is an economically important gastrointestinal nematode in ruminants. Acquired resistance to Cooperia oncophora infection in cattle develops rapidly as a result of prior infections. Naïve cattle, when given a primary infection of high-dose infective L3 larvae, develop a strong immunity to subsequent reinfection. Compared to primary infection, reinfection resulted in a marked reduction in worm establishment. In order to understand molecular mechanisms underlying the development of acquired resistance, we characterized the transcriptomic responses of the bovine small intestine to a primary infection and reinfection. A total of 23 pathways were significantly impacted during infection. The vitamin D receptor activation was strongly induced only during reinfection, suggesting that this pathway may play an important role in the development of acquired resistance via its potential roles in immune regulation and intestinal mucosal integrity maintenance. The expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) was strongly induced during reinfection but not during primary infection. As a result, several canonical pathways associated with NOS2 were impacted. The genes involved in eicosanoid synthesis, including prostaglandin synthase 2 (PTGS2 or COX2), remained largely unchanged during infection. The rapid development of acquired resistance may help explain the lack of relative pathogenicity by Cooperia oncophora infection in cattle. Our findings facilitate the understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the development of acquired resistance, which could have an important implication in vaccine design. PMID:21414188

  11. The role of temperature and light on inhibition of development of Cooperia oncophora.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, H J

    1978-01-01

    Infective Cooperia oncophora larvae were temperature and light conditioned by holding them at various temperatures and daily light intensities for up to 56 days prior to administration to parasite-free calves via stomach tube. The calves were killed either on day 20 or day 21 postinfection. A marked (up to 80.5%) inhibition of development occurred in larvae held at 4 degrees C while little or no inhibition occurred in larvae held at room temperature or in fresh larvae. Marked inhibition also occurred in larvae held at 15 degrees C for 56 days while a low rate of inhibition occurred in larvae held at 17 degrees C for 42 days. Low incidence of inhibition was recorded in two of four calves given larvae held at ambient temperatures of mid-summer while appreciable inhibition of development of larvae occurred in two calves permitted to graze during the second and third week of September in 1975. Temperature conditioning of C. oncophora eggs for 27 days did not result in inhibition of development of infective larvae subsequently cultured from the eggs. Photoperiod or the presence of light did not have any appreciable effect on the development of inhibition of C. oncophora under the conditions of these investigations. PMID:567519

  12. Transcriptome analyses reveal protein and domain families that delineate stage-related development in the economically important parasitic nematodes, Ostertagia ostertagi and Cooperia oncophora

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cooperia oncophora and Ostertagia ostertagi are among the most important gastrointestinal nematodes of cattle worldwide. The economic losses caused by these parasites are on the order of hundreds of millions of dollars per year. Conventional treatment of these parasites is through anthelmintic drug...

  13. Presence and species identification of the gapeworm Mammomonogamus laryngeus (Railliet, 1899) (Syngamidae: Nematoda) in a semi-wild population of Sumatran orangutan (Pongo abelii) in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Foitová, I; Koubková, B; Barus, V; Nurcahyo, W

    2008-04-01

    One adult syngamid nematode parasite couple was found during routine clinical observation in quarantine at the former Bohorok Rehabilitation Station from sputum of Pongo abelli and determined as Mammomonogamus laryngeus [Railliet, A., 1899. Syngame laryngieu du boeuf. Comptes Rendus Hebdomadaires des Séances et Mémoires de la Société de Biologie 11, 18-21]. This finding confirmed previous record of ova and adult syngamid nematodes, determined by Collet et al. [Collet, J.-Z., Galdikas, B.M.F., Sugarjito, J., Jojosudharmo, S., 1986. A coprological study of parasitism in orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) in Indonesia. Journal of Medical Primatology 15, 121-129] as Mammomonogamus sp. only, in orangutans kept in the Bohorok Orangutan Rehabilitation Centre (Northern Sumatra, Indonesia) and presented a serious health hazard to rehabilitants in this locality. Morphometrical features and the first description of the parasite from orang-utan were presented and documented. Coprological monitoring of infection in rehabilitants in this area as well as among the wild population of orangutan is necessary.

  14. In-Depth Proteomic and Glycomic Analysis of the Adult-Stage Cooperia oncophora Excretome/Secretome

    PubMed Central

    Borloo, Jimmy; De Graef, Jessie; Peelaers, Iris; Nguyen, D. Linh; Mitreva, Makedonka; Devreese, Bart; Hokke, Cornelis H.; Vercruysse, Jozef; Claerebout, Edwin; Geldhof, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Cooperia oncophora is one of the most common intestinal parasitic nematodes in cattle worldwide. To date, C. oncophora infections are treated using broad-spectrum anthelmintics. However, during the past decade, reports of anthelmintic resistance in this parasite species have emerged worldwide, necessitating new avenues for its control, possibly through vaccination. In this frame, we analyzed the adult-stage C. oncophora excretome/secretome (ES), covering both the protein and glycan components, since this fraction constitutes the primary interface between parasite and host and may hold potential vaccine candidates. Two-dimensional gel electrophoretic separation of the ES material enabled the MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS)-directed identification of 12 distinct proteins, grouped in three separate molecular weight fractions: (i) a high molecular weight fraction consisting of a double-domain activation-associated secreted protein (ASP), (ii) a midmolecular weight fraction predominantly containing a single-domain ASP, a thioredoxin peroxidase and innexin, and (iii) a low molecular weight protein pool essentially holding two distinct low molecular weight antigens. Further MS-driven glycan analysis mapped a variety of N-glycans to the midmolecular weight single-domain ASP, with Man6GlcNAc2 oligomannosyl glycans as the major species. The predominance of the nonglycosylated double-domain ASP in the high-molecular weight fraction renders it ideal for advancement toward vaccine trials and development. PMID:23895670

  15. Splice variants and regulatory networks associated with host resistance to the intestinal worm Cooperia oncophora in cattle.

    PubMed

    Li, Robert W; Wu, Sitao; Li, Cong-Jun; Li, Weizhong; Schroeder, Steven G

    2015-07-30

    To elucidate the molecular mechanism of host resistance, we characterized the jejunal transcriptome of Angus cattle selected for parasite resistance for over 20 years in response to infection caused by the intestinal worm Cooperia oncophora. The transcript abundance of 56 genes, such as that of mucin 12 (MUC12) and intestinal alkaline phosphatase (ALPI), was significantly higher in resistant cattle. Novel splicing variants, exon skipping events, and gene fusion events, were also detected. An algorithm for the reconstruction of accurate cellular networks (ARACNE) was used to infer de novo regulatory molecular networks in the interactome between the parasite and host. Under a combined cutoff of an error tolerance (ϵ = 0.10) and a stringent P-value threshold of mutual information (1.0 × 10(-5)), a total of 229,100 direct interactions controlled by 20,288 hub genes were identified. Among these hub genes, 7651 genes had ≥ 100 direct neighbors while the top 9778 hub genes controlled more than 50% of total direct interactions. Three lysozyme genes (LYZ1, LYZ2, and LYZ3), which are co-located in bovine chromosome 5 in tandem and are strongly upregulated in resistant cattle, shared a common regulatory network of 55 genes. These ancient antimicrobials were likely involved in regulating host-parasite interactions by affecting host gut microbiome. Notably, ALPI, known as a gut mucosal defense factor, controlled a molecular network consisting 410 genes, including 14 transcription factors (TF) and 10 genes that were significantly regulated in resistant cattle. Several large regulatory networks were controlled by TF, such as STAT6, SREBF1, and ELF4. Gene ontology (GO) processes significantly enriched in the regulatory network controlled by STAT6 included lipid metabolism. Our findings provide insights into the immune regulation of host-parasite interactions and the molecular mechanisms of host resistance in cattle.

  16. Gene expression analysis of ABC transporters in a resistant Cooperia oncophora isolate following in vivo and in vitro exposure to macrocyclic lactones.

    PubMed

    De Graef, J; Demeler, J; Skuce, P; Mitreva, M; Von Samson-Himmelstjerna, G; Vercruysse, J; Claerebout, E; Geldhof, P

    2013-04-01

    Members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family (P-glycoproteins, Half-transporters and Multidrug Resistant Proteins) potentially play a role in the development of anthelmintic resistance. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible involvement of ABC transporters in anthelmintic resistance in the bovine parasite, Cooperia oncophora. Partial sequences of 15 members of the ABC transporter protein family were identified, by mining a transcriptome dataset combined with a degenerate PCR approach. Reverse transcriptase PCR showed that most of the ABC transporters identified were constitutively transcribed throughout the life cycle of C. oncophora. Constitutive differences in gene transcript levels between a susceptible and resistant isolate were only observed for Con-haf-9 and Con-mrp-1 in eggs of the resistant isolate, while no differences were observed in L3 or the adult life stage. Analysis of resistant adult worms, collected from calves 14 days after treatment with either ivermectin or moxidectin, showed a significant 3- to 5-fold increase in the transcript levels of Con-pgp-11 compared to non-exposed worms. Interestingly, a 4-fold transcriptional up-regulation of Con-pgp-11 was also observed in L3 of the resistant isolate, after in vitro exposure to different concentrations of ivermectin, whereas this effect was not observed in exposed L3 of the susceptible isolate. The results suggest that the worms of this particular resistant isolate have acquired the ability to up-regulate Con-pgp-11 upon exposure to macrocyclic lactones. Further work is needed to understand the genetic basis underpinning this process and the functional role of PGP-11.

  17. Efficacy of oral moxidectin against benzimidazole-resistant isolates of gastrointestinal nematodes in sheep.

    PubMed

    Kerboeuf, D; Hubert, J; Cardinaud, B; Blond, F

    1995-01-07

    The efficacy of orally administered moxidectin was determined against four benzimidazole-resistant nematode isolates. At the start of the trial, 30 lambs were each infected experimentally with 20,000 third stage larvae (5000 Haemonchus contortus, 7000 Teladorsagia circumcincta, 3000 Trichostrongylus colubriformis and 5000 Cooperia curticei); 28 days later they were allocated randomly to three groups of 10: one untreated group, one group treated orally with fenbendazole (5 mg/kg bodyweight) and one group treated orally with moxidectin (0.2 mg/kg). Samples of faeces were taken five and 10 days after treatment and the lambs were killed 10 days after treatment. Fenbendazole reduced the average number of nematode eggs in faeces by 95 per cent and the average number of worms by 25 to 45 per cent according to the species. The efficacy of moxidectin against these benzimidazole-resistant isolates was 100 per cent. No adverse reactions to either of the drugs were observed.

  18. Occurrence of Aelurostrongylus abstrusus (Railliet, 1898) in Danish cats: A modified lung digestion method for isolating adult worms.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Caroline Salling; Willesen, Jakob L; Pipper, Christian B; Mejer, Helena

    2015-05-30

    As Aelurostrongylus abstrusus has not previously received any attention in Denmark, the study investigated the occurrence of A. abstrusus amongst outdoor cats from three regions (Zealand, Møn and Falster). Faeces and lungs were collected from a total of 147 feral (n=125) and domesticated cats (n=22) that were euthanized for reasons outside of this project. Using a modified Baermann technique 13.6% of the cats was found to be positive. A new lung digestion technique was developed to isolate eggs, L1 and adult worms from the lungs and this revealed a prevalence of 15.6% although with regional differences. There was no difference between feral and domesticated cats just as sex and age did not appear to influence prevalence and worm burden. Lungs from 87% of the positive cats had the gross appearance compatible with A. abstrusus and the severity of lung damage was proportional to LPG and number of adult worms. Within the current range of worm burdens (0-22) with a mean intensity of 7 per cat, there was a correlation with faecal excretion levels of L1 that ranged from 0-39,000 with a mean of 3586 per cat. The results did not indicate that the infection levels of the naturally infected cats were substantially affected by acquired immunity, but further studies are needed to determine the importance of host immune responses in regulating parasite populations.

  19. A new species of Rhabdochona Railliet, 1916 (Nematoda: Rhabdochonidae) from endemic goodeids (Cyprinodontiformes) from two Mexican lakes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Alvarez, A; García-Prieto, L; Pérez-Ponce de León, G

    1998-08-01

    A new species of Rhabdochona from 2 species of freshwater fishes, Alloophorus robustus and Goodea atripinnis, is described from 2 lakes of the Mesa Central of Mexico. Rhabdochona lichtenfelsi n. sp. belongs to a group of species possessing inconspicuous bifurcated deirids and a prostom armed with 10 large teeth. It is distinguished from them because the left spicule is shorter, the tip is bifurcate, and both spicules lack a reflected dorsal barb. The new species most closely resembles Rhabdochona catostomi and Rhabdochona milleri but differs from them because the former possesses a left spicule tip with ventral barb, right spicule with reflected distal barb, and 5 pairs of postanal papillae, whereas R. milleri has 14 prostomal teeth, eggs rounded, and left spicule with slightly outlined bifurcation and right with a dorsal barb. Previous records of R. milleri in Mexico must be referred to R. lichtenfelsi.

  20. Prevalence and seasonal changes in the gastro-intestinal helminths of Nigerian goats.

    PubMed

    Nwosu, C O; Ogunrinade, A F; Fagbemi, B O

    1996-12-01

    A total of 120 gastro-intestinal tracts and 960 faecal samples were examined to assess the prevalence and seasonal changes in the gastro-intestinal helminth parasites of Red Sokoto (maradi) goats slaughtered at Ibadan between May 1991 and April 1992. Egg types of strongyles, Strongyloides, Trichuris, Skrjabinema, Dicrocoelium and Moniezia were encountered in 93%, 83%, 44%, 0.9%, 2.3% and 31% of the faecal samples respectively. However, only strongyle, Strongyloides and Trichuris eggs occurred in large numbers and were more common during the rainy season than in the dry season. The parasites recorded and their prevalences were Haemonchus contortus (90.0%), H. ovis (5.0%), Strongyloides papillosus (80.8%), Trichostrongylus colubriformis (78.3%), T. axei (69.2%), Trichuris ovis (72.5%), T. globulosa (38.3%), Oesophagostomum columbianum (67.5%), Cooperia curticei (58.3%) Gaigeria pachyscelis (40.8%), Skrjabinema ovis (5.0%), Nematodirus battus (5.8%), Moniezia expansa (29.2%), M. benedeni (10.0%), Paramphistomum spp. (5.0%) and Cysticercus tenuicollis (33.3%). Haemonchus ovis is reported for the first time in Nigeria. Mixed infections were most prevalent. Young goats were more commonly infected and had higher worm counts than adult goats. Only Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Strongyloides and Cooperia spp. occurred in large numbers. Irrespective of the age of the goats, higher worm counts were generally encountered during the rainy season than in the dry season. The results are discussed in relation to the control of helminthiasis in grazing animals in Nigeria.

  1. Linear distribution of nematodes in the gastrointestinal tract of tracer lambs.

    PubMed

    Makovcová, Katerina; Langrová, Iva; Vadlejch, Jaroslav; Jankovská, Ivana; Lytvynets, Andriy; Borkovcová, Marie

    2008-12-01

    Forty-eight tracer lambs were killed in 2004-2007. The abomasum, duodenum, small intestine (jejunum and ileum), colon and caecum were collected and processed for parasites enumeration and identification-mucosal scrapings of both abomasums and intestines were digested. Out of 48 gastrointestinal tracts examined, all were found to be positive for nematode infection. Seventeen species of gastrointestinal nematodes were recovered: Bunostomum trigonocephalum, Cooperia curticei, Haemonchus contortus, Chabertia ovina, Nematodirus battus, Nematodirus filicollis, Oesophagostomum venulosum, Teladorsagia circumcincta, Trichostrongylus axei, Trichostrongylus colubriformis, Trichostrongylus vitrinus, Strongyloides papillosus, Trichuris ovis, Trichuris globulosa, Trichuris skrjabini and Skrjabinema ovis. All species were searched for in the entire gastrointestinal tract. Six species of nematodes were recovered from abnormal sites, naturally in small numbers of lambs as well as in small amounts: Nematodirus battus in the abomasums (6.67% of lambs), N. filicollis in the caecum and in the colon (%4 and 8%, respectively), T. axei in the colon (9.52%), T. colubriformis in the colon (13.89%), T. vitrinus in the caecum (16.67%), in the colon (20.00%) and in the abomasum (3.33%). T. ovis was found in one case in the small intestine.

  2. Establishment rate of sheep gastrointestinal nematodes in farmed red deer (Cervus elaphus).

    PubMed

    Tapia-Escárate, D; Pomroy, W E; Scott, I; Wilson, P R; Lopez-Villalobos, N

    2015-04-15

    To investigate the establishment of sheep gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) in red deer, five red deer and five sheep aged 5-6 months were challenged with a mixed burden of sheep GIN at a rate of 327L3/kg bodyweight. The LSmean (SE) establishment rates (%) for Haemonchus contortus, Teladorsagia circumcincta, Cooperia curticei, Trichostrongylus spp. and Oesophagostomum+Chabertia spp. were 18.6 (0.03), 35.5 (0.04), 30.7 (0.04), 74.9 (0.05), 19.9 (0.06), respectively in sheep and 10.5 (0.03), 1.0 (0.04), 0.1 (0.04), 1.0 (0.05), 4.8 (0.06) respectively, in deer. Establishment rates were significantly different (p<0.05) between hosts for all genera. No Trichostrongylus colubriformis or Trichostrongylus vitrinus were seen in any deer but were present in all sheep. Trichostrongylus axei were seen in both hosts but there were relatively more which established in sheep than in deer (p<0.01). No Chabertia ovina were seen in any deer but were present in four of five sheep in low numbers. The only species of Oesophagostomum seen in either host was Oesophagostomum venulosum. These results suggest that the sheep GIN most likely to infect red deer grazing the same pastures are H. contortus, T. axei and O. venulosum.

  3. Genetic basis of benzimidazole resistance in Teladorsagia circumcincta in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Keegan, Jason D; Good, Barbara; de Waal, Theo; Fanning, June; Keane, Orla M

    2017-01-01

    Resistance to benzimidazole (BZ) anthelmintics is common in ovine nematodes of economic importance. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) at three positions in the isotype 1 β- tubulin gene have been associated with BZ resistance and molecular tests for the detection of BZ resistance have been developed. In order to determine if such tests are practicable in Ireland the polymorphisms associated with BZ resistance must be identified. To this end, BZ-resistant nematodes were recovered from four farms in Ireland. Resistant Teladorsagia circumcincta, Cooperia curticei and Trichostrongylus colubriformis were recovered, with resistant T. circumcincta the most common and the only species studied further. Sequencing of the isotype 1 β-tubulin gene from resistant T. circumcincta identified a T - A transition, resulting in an F200Y substitution known to be responsible for BZ-resistance, on three of the farms. However, on the fourth farm the frequency of the resistant A allele was only 0.33 indicating another BZ resistance mechanism may be present on this farm. An additional polymorphism resulting in a substitution of glutamate for leucine (E198L) was also found on this farm at low frequency (0.17). No polymorphisms at position 167 were identified on any farm. Therefore, molecular tests to detect BZ resistance in T. circumcincta in Ireland could prove useful; however, they may result in some instances of resistance remaining undetected.

  4. Redescription and molecular characterization of Anoplocephala manubriata, Railliet et al., 1914 (Cestoda: Anoplocephalidae) from a Sri Lankan wild elephant (Elephas maximus).

    PubMed

    Perera, K U E; Wickramasinghe, Susiji; Perera, B V P; Bandara, K B A T; Rajapakse, R P V J

    2017-02-28

    The present work provides a detailed morphological and molecular description of Anoplocephala manubriata in elephants. Adult worms were recovered during an autopsy of a wild elephant in Elephant Transit Home, Udawalawe, Sri Lanka. Necropsy findings revealed a severe cestode infection in the small intestine. These tapeworms were tightly attached to the intestinal mucosae, resulted in hyperemic thickened intestinal mucosae, variable size irregular well-demarcated multifocal ulcerative regions sometimes covered with necrotic membranes and variable size, diffuse, well-demarcated raised nodular masses were evident in the small intestine. The article provides an account of the biology of A. manubriata and a comparative analysis of the morphology and morphometrics of Anoplocephala species that occur in different hosts. Phylogenetic analysis of the second internal transcribed spacer region (ITS-2), a portion of the 28S region and cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COX1) genes revealed that A. manubriata is closely associated with Anoplocephala species in horse in comparison to other Anoplocephalines. This study will enhance the current knowledge in taxonomy of elephant tapeworms and contribute to future phylogenetic studies.

  5. Haemonchus longistipes Railliet & Henry, 1909 (Nematoda, Trichostrongylidae) from the Egyptian dromedary, Camelus dromedarius (Artiodactyla: Camelidae), first identification on the basis of light and ultrastructural data.

    PubMed

    Morsy, Kareem; Bashtar, Abdel-Rahman; Fol, Mona; Yehia, Salma

    2014-12-01

    Haemonchus longistipes is a gastrointestinal abomasal nematode which is one of the most prevalent and pathogenic parasites infesting the stomach of ruminants. On the basis of light and ultrastructural data, the objective of the present study was to introduce a first identification of the cameline haemonchosis caused by H. longistipes. Abomasa of 42 Egyptian camels Camelus dromedarius (Artiodactyla: Camelidae) were collected monthly from September 2013 to April 2014 from the main slaughter house of Cairo, Egypt. Adult male and female nematode worms were recovered from 26 (62%) specimens of the examined abomasa. The parasites were of yellow color; the body was filiform (slender) tapered towards the anterior end in male and towards both ends in female. Buccal capsules absent, the buccal cavity was small with a conspicuous dorsal lancet extended from dorsal wall. The cervical papillae were prominent and spine-like. The body length of the female worm was 16.6-20.5 (18.5 ± 0.3) mm. The anterior end to the cervical papillae was 3.19-4.30 (4.12 ± 0.5) mm. The vulva of the female had a linguiform process or flap, the tail is without a spine, and the anal pore at the posterior end of the body had a simple dorsal rim. The body of male was 10.4-14.7 (13.9 ± 2.0) mm in length. The male bursa had elongated lobes supported by long, slender rays. The small dorsal lobe was asymmetrical with Y-shaped dorsal rays. The spicules were long with a length of 0.52-0.54 (0.53 ± 0.05) mm, each provided with a small barb and pore near its extremity. Synlophe was bilaterally and dorsoventrally symmetrical; it extended from cephalic expansion over anterior 50% of prebursal or prevulvar body and consisted of a maximum of 42 ridges. The described species herein was compared with the three morphologically similar species Haemonchus mitchelli, Haemonchus okapiae, and H. longistipes with their synlophes consist of 42 ridges distributed over the anterior half of the body. These species can be separated by unique structural characteristics of their synlophes, spicules, and copulatory bursa. The most morphologically similar species to the recovered worm was H. longistipes. Also, some of the parameters with regard to morphology and morphometry of this parasite were described for the first time.

  6. Effects of age, sex, lactation and social dominance on faecal egg count patterns of gastrointestinal nematodes in farmed eland (Taurotragus oryx).

    PubMed

    Vadlejch, J; Kotrba, R; Čadková, Z; Růžičková, A; Langrová, I

    2015-10-01

    The eland is a large African antelope that can be bred in a temperate climate, under similar conditions and production systems as cattle. However, knowledge of parasites in farmed elands outside the area of their native habitat is still limited, and information concerning factors that influence these parasites is lacking. Therefore, faecal samples from an entire herd of elands, including calves and adult females and males, were examined monthly over a one year period. Almost 84% of the animals were found to be positive for gastrointestinal nematodes. Strongyle-type eggs were most frequently detected (prevalence 75%), followed by Capillaria sp., Nematodirus sp. and Trichuris sp. eggs. Following culturing eggs to infective larvae, Teladorsagia sp., Trichostrongylus sp., Nematodirus sp., Cooperia sp. and Oesophagostomum sp. were identified. Following necropsy of two calves that died during the study one abomasal nematode (Teladorsagia circumcincta), five small intestinal nematode species (Nematodirus helvetianus, N. spathiger, Cooperia oncophora, C. curticei and Capillaria bovis) and two large intestinal nematodes (Oesophagostomum venulosum and Trichuris ovis) were recovered. From these findings, it is evident that the eland harbours nematodes that are typical for domestic cattle and small ruminants. Morphological and morphometric analyses of recovered nematodes revealed that these parasites do not require any special morphological adaptation to establish infection in elands. The faecal output of strongyle-type and Nematodirus sp. eggs was seasonal, with the highest egg production taking place during spring and summer. Calves had higher faecal egg counts (for all the monitored nematode species) than adults did. Lactation in females was significantly (P<0.0001) associated with higher strongyle nematode egg shedding. Social dominance also affected faecal egg count patterns. The lower the hierarchical position among adults (regardless of sex), the higher the risk of

  7. The effects of birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus) and chicory (Cichorium intybus) when compared with perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) on ovine gastrointestinal parasite development, survival and migration.

    PubMed

    Marley, C L; Cook, R; Barrett, J; Keatinge, R; Lampkin, N H

    2006-06-15

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of birdsfoot trefoil and chicory on parasitic nematode development, survival and migration when compared with perennial ryegrass. In experiment one, sheep faeces, containing 10,385 Cooperia curticei eggs were added to 25 cm diameter pots containing birdsfoot trefoil, chicory or ryegrass, and the pots maintained under optimal conditions for nematode parasite development. Replicate pots of each forage type were destructively sampled on day 8, 16, 20, 28 and 37 to collect the nematode larvae. When forages were compared on a dry matter basis, by day 16 there were 31% and 19% fewer larvae on birdsfoot trefoil and chicory than on ryegrass, respectively (P<0.01). In the second experiment, replicate 1m(2) field plots of birdsfoot trefoil, chicory and ryegrass were sub-sampled on day 14, 21, 35 and 49 for larval counts following the application of sheep faeces containing 585,000 Teladorsagia circumcincta eggs to each plot on day 0. Results showed there were a minimum of 58% and 63% fewer infective stage parasitic larvae on birdsfoot trefoil and chicory, respectively, compared with ryegrass on day 14 and 35 when forages were compared on a forage dry matter, plot area sampled and leaf area basis (P<0.01). Overall, these results indicate that the number of infective stage larvae on birdsfoot trefoil and chicory pasture was reduced by the effect of their sward structure on the development/survival/migration of ovine parasitic nematodes. These effects may be one of the ways in which these forages may affect parasitic infections in grazing livestock.

  8. Comparative efficacy of moxidectin 2% equine oral gel and ivermectin 2% equine oral paste against Onchocerca cervicalis (Railliet and Henry, 1910) microfilariae in horses with naturally acquired infections in Formosa (Argentina).

    PubMed

    Mancebo, O A; Verdi, J H; Bulman, G M

    1997-12-31

    On the basis of positive skin snips for Onchocerca cervicalis microfilariae (MF), 45 horses were chosen from 48 in a total of 257 screened on 12 locations in the northeast Province of Formosa (Argentina), and randomly assigned to two treatment groups of 20 horses each, and a nontreated control group of five horses. On Day 14 post-treatment (PT), skin snip samples in the ivermectin-treated (0.2 mg/kg) group were negative for normal viable microfilariae (MF), while horses in the control group maintained their pretreatment level of infection. On the same Day in the moxidectin-treated (0.4 mg/kg) group, 18 horses were negative for MF, but the remaining two had a total of 1 and 2 MF, respectively (equivalent to 10 and 20 MF/g of skin), but all three parasites showed marked cuticular and structural damage. Both horses were negative in a repeat biopsy on Day 21. From Day 3 PT, one ivermectin-treated horse (5%) evidenced an approximate 15 x 2 x 3 cm-sized, apparently nonpainful, oedematous swelling on the ventral midline, 20 cm in front of the navel, which remained unchanged on Day 14 PT. Adverse reactions were not observed in the moxidectin-treated group. Parasitaemia was found in 18.7% of sampled horses (48 of 257), and the number of MF varied between 10-1820/g of skin snip (mean 172). Similar prevalence and total counts had been described previously in 1985 and 1986 in cattle-farm horses in the same area of Argentina; in surveys in Texas (1974) and Louisiana (1995) in the USA, infection rates were also similar, but total counts much higher. It is concluded that moxidectin 2% equine oral gel and ivermectin 2% equine oral paste, were equally 100% effective in the control of O. cervicalis MF. Contrary to ivermectin, moxidectin did not cause post-treatment dermal reactions.

  9. Genetic relationships among species of Contracaecum Railliet & Henry, 1912 and Phocascaris Höst, 1932 (Nematoda: Anisakidae) from pinnipeds inferred from mitochondrial cox2 sequences, and congruence with allozyme data.

    PubMed

    Mattiucci, S; Paoletti, M; Webb, S C; Sardella, N; Timi, J T; Berland, B; Nascetti, G

    2008-09-01

    The genetic relationships among 11 taxa, belonging to the genus Contracaecum (C. osculatum A, C. osculatum B, C. osculatum (s.s.), C. osculatum D, C. osculatum E, C. osculatum baicalensis, C. mirounga, C. radiatum, C. ogmorhini (s.s.), C. margolisi) and Phocascoris (Phocoscris cystophorae), parasites as adults of seals, were inferred from sequence analysis 1519 bp) of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (mtDNA cox2) gene. Phylogenetic analyses obtained from Parsimony (MP) and Neighbour-Joining (NJ) K2P distance values generated similar topologies, each well supported at major nodes. All analyses delineated two main clades: the first encompassing the parasites of the phocid seals, i.e. the C. osculatum species complex, C. osculatum boicolensis, C. mirounga and C. radiatum, with the latter two species forming a separate subclade; the second including the parasites of otarids, i.e. C. ogmorhini (s.s.) and C. margolisi. An overall high congruence between mtDNA inferred tree topologies and those produced from nuclear data sets (20 allozyme loci) was observed. Comparison of the phylogenetic hypothesis here produced for Controcaecum spp. plus Phocascaris with those currently available for their definitive hosts (pinnipeds) suggests parallelism between hosts and parasite phylogenetic tree topologies.

  10. A novel snapback primer probe assay for the detection and discrimination of sympatric Haemonchus species using DNA melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Pichler, Rudolf; Silbermayr, Katja; Periasamy, Kathiravan

    2017-02-20

    Different sympatric species of Haemonchus parasites infecting ruminants and camels can be distinguished morphologically, but involves tedious microscopic examinations, measurements and several other limitations. Information on internal transcribed spacer-2 (ITS-2) sequence provides confirmatory differentiation of sympatric Haemonchus species. The present study introduces a novel, snapback primer probe based, real time PCR assay for the differentiation of three sympatric Haemonchus species, H. contortus (Hco), H. placei (Hpl) and H. longistipes (Hlo). The assay was designed to amplify a region of 130bp within the ITS-2 gene that included three diagnostic mutational sites capable of discriminating Hco, Hpl and Hlo. Following melt curve analysis, species-specific diagnostic melt peaks were obtained for Hco, Hpl and Hlo with a mean melting temperature of 56.6±0.3°C, 64.4±0.1°C and 54.4±0.1°C respectively. The test for analytical sensitivity revealed the ability of the assay to detect up to 5 copies per reaction. To evaluate the discriminating power of the assay, 174 samples from adult worms and 3rd stage larvae belonging to different Haemonchus species and various other nematode species including Cooperia curticei, Trichostrongylus axei, Trichostrongylus colubriformis, and Teladorsagia circumcincta were tested. Additionally, DNA extracted from 25 fecal egg samples was also tested and the specificity of the assay was verified by sequencing the ITS-2 gene of all the Haemonchus positive and non-Haemonchus samples. The assay worked accurately with 100% specificity in at least three real time PCR platforms. The assay is an effective alternative to the sequencing approach and is expected to be helpful for the screening of individual adult and larval Haemonchus parasites. However, caution needs to be applied while interpreting the results from fecal egg samples due to varying levels of sympatric co-infections from different Haemonchus species. The present study is the

  11. 21 CFR 520.905c - Fenbendazole paste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... lungworms (Dictyocaulus viviparus), stomach worms (Haemonchus contortus, Ostertagia ostertagi, Trichostrongylus axei), and intestinal worms (Bunostomum phlebotomum, Nematodirus helvetianus, Cooperia punctata,...

  12. 21 CFR 520.905c - Fenbendazole paste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... lungworms (Dictyocaulus viviparus), stomach worms (Haemonchus contortus, Ostertagia ostertagi, Trichostrongylus axei), and intestinal worms (Bunostomum phlebotomum, Nematodirus helvetianus, Cooperia punctata,...

  13. 21 CFR 520.905c - Fenbendazole paste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... lungworms (Dictyocaulus viviparus), stomach worms (Haemonchus contortus, Ostertagia ostertagi, Trichostrongylus axei), and intestinal worms (Bunostomum phlebotomum, Nematodirus helvetianus, Cooperia punctata,...

  14. 21 CFR 520.905c - Fenbendazole paste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... lungworms (Dictyocaulus viviparus), stomach worms (Haemonchus contortus, Ostertagia ostertagi, Trichostrongylus axei), and intestinal worms (Bunostomum phlebotomum, Nematodirus helvetianus, Cooperia punctata,...

  15. 21 CFR 520.905c - Fenbendazole paste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... lungworms (Dictyocaulus viviparus), stomach worms (Haemonchus contortus, Ostertagia ostertagi, Trichostrongylus axei), and intestinal worms (Bunostomum phlebotomum, Nematodirus helvetianus, Cooperia punctata,...

  16. Nematode burdens and immunological responses following natural challenge in Romney lambs selectively bred for low or high faecal worm egg count.

    PubMed

    Bisset, S A; Vlassoff, A; Douch, P G; Jonas, W E; West, C J; Green, R S

    1996-02-01

    Breeding lines of Romney sheep, selected as lambs for consistently low or high faecal nematode egg count (FEC) following periods of natural challenge, have been maintained at Wallaceville for some years. In order to determine the extent to which FECs in low and high genotypes reflected their ability to resist the establishment of gastro-intestinal nematode burdens, we investigated the infection status and immune responses in 8- to 9-month-old progeny of selected rams from low and high FEC breeding lines following a period of grazing without anthelmintic treatment in autumn/early winter. In each of the 2 years of the study, outcross male progeny of the two lowest FEC (LFEC) (i.e. most 'resistant') and two highest FEC (HFEC) (i.e. most 'susceptible') rams from the divergent lines were slaughtered shortly after autumn/early winter FECs had been analysed. Post-mortem worm counts and examination of intestinal histology were then undertaken. Blood samples collected before slaughter in the second year of the study were assayed to measure serum levels of Trichostrongylus colubriformis-specific antibody and immunoglobulins (IgG1 and IgM), and numbers of circulating eosinophils. Overall, correlations between pre-slaughter FEC and total trichostrongyle burdens in the lambs proved to be very high (0.91 and 0.85, respectively, for the 2 years studied). In the first year, LFEC lambs, which were shedding only 28.6% as many strongyle eggs as their HFEC counterparts at slaughter, were found to harbour 37.6% as many adult trichostrongyle worms, while in the second year, LFEC lambs, which were shedding 16.1% as many strongyle eggs as their HFEC counterparts at slaughter, were found to harbour 33.5% as many adult trichostrongyle worms. Results, particularly in the second year, confirmed that significantly fewer worms of most of the important abomasal and small intestinal nematode species which infest lambs in New Zealand (i.e. Haemonchus contortus, Ostertagia circumcincta, Cooperia

  17. 21 CFR 520.1242b - Levamisole hydrochloride tablet or oblet (bolus).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... against the following nematode infections: Stomach worms (Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia), intestinal worms (Trichostrongylus, Cooperia, Nematodirus, Bunostomum, Oesophagostomum), and lungworms... infections: Stomach worms (Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia), intestinal worms...

  18. 21 CFR 520.1242b - Levamisole hydrochloride tablet or oblet (bolus).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... against the following nematode infections: Stomach worms (Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia), intestinal worms (Trichostrongylus, Cooperia, Nematodirus, Bunostomum, Oesophagostomum), and lungworms... infections: Stomach worms (Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia), intestinal worms...

  19. 21 CFR 520.1242b - Levamisole hydrochloride tablet or oblet (bolus).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... against the following nematode infections: Stomach worms (Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia), intestinal worms (Trichostrongylus, Cooperia, Nematodirus, Bunostomum, Oesophagostomum), and lungworms... infections: Stomach worms (Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia), intestinal worms...

  20. Comparative analyses of transcriptomic profiles of the bovine small intestine in response to both a primary infection and a drug-attenuated reinfection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cooperia oncophora is an economically important gastrointestinal nematode in ruminants. Acquired resistance to Cooperia oncophora infection in cattle develops rapidly as a result of prior infections. Naïve cattle, when given a primary infection of high-dose infective L3 larvae, develop a strong immu...

  1. 21 CFR 520.1242f - Levamisole hydrochloride gel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... effective against the following nematode infections: Stomach worms (Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia), intestinal worms (Trichostrongylus, Cooperia, Nematodirus, Bunostomum, Oesophagostomum), and lungworms... with the following nematodes: Large roundworms (Ascaris suum), nodular worms (Oesophagostomum...

  2. 21 CFR 558.360 - Morantel tartrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... control of mature gastrointestinal nematode infections of cattle including stomach worms (Haemonchus spp., Ostertagia spp., Trichostrongylus spp.), worms of the small intestine (Cooperia spp., Trichostrongylus spp., Nematodirus spp.), and worms of the large intestine (Oesophagostomum radiatum). (ii) Goats. For removal...

  3. 21 CFR 558.360 - Morantel tartrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... control of mature gastrointestinal nematode infections of cattle including stomach worms (Haemonchus spp., Ostertagia spp., Trichostrongylus spp.), worms of the small intestine (Cooperia spp., Trichostrongylus spp., Nematodirus spp.), and worms of the large intestine (Oesophagostomum radiatum). (ii) Goats. For removal...

  4. 21 CFR 558.360 - Morantel tartrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... control of mature gastrointestinal nematode infections of cattle including stomach worms (Haemonchus spp., Ostertagia spp., Trichostrongylus spp.), worms of the small intestine (Cooperia spp., Trichostrongylus spp., Nematodirus spp.), and worms of the large intestine (Oesophagostomum radiatum). (ii) Goats. For removal...

  5. 21 CFR 558.360 - Morantel tartrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... control of mature gastrointestinal nematode infections of cattle including stomach worms (Haemonchus spp., Ostertagia spp., Trichostrongylus spp.), worms of the small intestine (Cooperia spp., Trichostrongylus spp., Nematodirus spp.), and worms of the large intestine (Oesophagostomum radiatum). (ii) Goats. For removal...

  6. 21 CFR 520.1450a - Morantel tartrate bolus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... control of mature gastrointestinal nematode infections of cattle including stomach worms (Haemonchus spp., Ostertagia spp., Trichostrongylus spp.), worms of the small intestine (Cooperia spp., Trichostrongylus spp., Nematodirus spp.), and worms of the large intestine (Oesophagostomum radiatum). (3) Limitations. Conditions...

  7. 21 CFR 520.1242f - Levamisole hydrochloride gel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... effective against the following nematode infections: Stomach worms (Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia), intestinal worms (Trichostrongylus, Cooperia, Nematodirus, Bunostomum, Oesophagostomum), and lungworms... with the following nematodes: Large roundworms (Ascaris suum), nodular worms (Oesophagostomum...

  8. 21 CFR 522.1242 - Levamisole.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... is used as an anthelmintic in cattle for treatment of the following parasites: stomach worms (Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia), intestinal worms (Trichostrongylus, Cooperia, Nematodirus... used as an anthelmintic in cattle for treatment of the following parasites: stomach worms...

  9. 21 CFR 520.1242f - Levamisole hydrochloride gel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... effective against the following nematode infections: Stomach worms (Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia), intestinal worms (Trichostrongylus, Cooperia, Nematodirus, Bunostomum, Oesophagostomum), and lungworms... with the following nematodes: Large roundworms (Ascaris suum), nodular worms (Oesophagostomum...

  10. 21 CFR 520.1450a - Morantel tartrate bolus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... control of mature gastrointestinal nematode infections of cattle including stomach worms (Haemonchus spp., Ostertagia spp., Trichostrongylus spp.), worms of the small intestine (Cooperia spp., Trichostrongylus spp., Nematodirus spp.), and worms of the large intestine (Oesophagostomum radiatum). (3) Limitations. Conditions...

  11. 21 CFR 520.1450a - Morantel tartrate bolus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... control of mature gastrointestinal nematode infections of cattle including stomach worms (Haemonchus spp., Ostertagia spp., Trichostrongylus spp.), worms of the small intestine (Cooperia spp., Trichostrongylus spp., Nematodirus spp.), and worms of the large intestine (Oesophagostomum radiatum). (3) Limitations. Conditions...

  12. 21 CFR 520.1242f - Levamisole hydrochloride gel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... effective against the following nematode infections: Stomach worms (Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia), intestinal worms (Trichostrongylus, Cooperia, Nematodirus, Bunostomum, Oesophagostomum), and lungworms... with the following nematodes: Large roundworms (Ascaris suum), nodular worms (Oesophagostomum...

  13. 21 CFR 520.1450a - Morantel tartrate bolus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... control of mature gastrointestinal nematode infections of cattle including stomach worms (Haemonchus spp., Ostertagia spp., Trichostrongylus spp.), worms of the small intestine (Cooperia spp., Trichostrongylus spp., Nematodirus spp.), and worms of the large intestine (Oesophagostomum radiatum). (3) Limitations. Conditions...

  14. On two nematodes from Brazilian birds and description of a new species (Acuarioidea, Schistorophinae) parasitizing Laterallus viridis (Müller, 1776) (Gruiformes, Rallidae).

    PubMed

    Pinto, R M; Vicente, J J; Muniz-Pereira, L C; Noronha, D

    1999-01-01

    The present paper reports acuarioid nematodes recovered from avian hosts. A new species of the genus Schistorophus Railliet, 1916 is proposed based mainly on findings referring to ptilina, spicules and vagina. Ancyracanthopsis coronata (Molin, 1860) Chabaud & Petter, 1959 is referred again in Brazil since its proposition in 1860, from specimens recovered from a Brazilian bird. A revised key to the species of the genus Schistorophus is also presented.

  15. Nematodes of the small intestine of African buffaloes, Syncerus caffer, in the Kruger National Park, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Taylor, William A; Skinner, John D; Boomker, Joop

    2013-05-16

    The abundance and distribution of parasitic helminths in populations of African buffaloes, Syncerus caffer, have not been well documented. A total of 28 buffaloes of different ages and sexeswere sampled in the Kruger National Park, South Africa, for nematodes of the small intestine. Three nematode species were identified, namely Cooperia fuelleborni, Cooperia hungi and Trichostrongylus deflexus, with C. hungi being a new country record for African buffalo in South Africa. The overall prevalence was 71%and the average number of worms was 2346 (range: 0-15 980). This is a small burden for such a large mammal. Sex, age and body condition of the buffaloes had no significant effect on worm occurrence.

  16. A new host record of Camelostrongylus mentulatus (Nematoda; Trichostrongyloidea) from abomasum of a giraffe at a zoo in Japan.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, S; Uchida, T; Ohbayashi, M; Ikebe, Y; Sasano, S

    1996-12-01

    Camelostrongylus mentulatus (Railliet et Henry, 1909) Orloff, 1933 (Nematoda; Trichostrongyloidea) was found from the abomasum of a three-year-old female cape giraffe, Giraffa camelopardalis giraffa, born and died in a zoo park in Yamaguchi prefecture, Japan. This is the new host record from Giraffidae and geographical distribution of C. mentulatus. Present case of C. mentulatus might be infected from other ruminants, e.g., camels, antelopes and goats, kept at a same paddock in the zoo. Risk of imported parasitic diseases by the zoo animals from outside of Japan is discussed.

  17. On a new species of the genus Cobboldina (Nematoda: Atractidae) from Hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius Linnaeus, 1758) captivated at the Alipore Zoological Garden, Kolkata, West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Sagata; Manna, Buddhadeb

    2012-10-01

    The specimens of the genus Cobboldina Leiper, 1911 and family Atractidae (Railliet, 1917) Travassos, 1919 recovered from the faecal matter of Hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius Linnaeus, 1758) from the Alipore Zoological Garden, Kolkata, India recognized as a new species after careful observation. The collected nematode differs from the only valid species Cobboldina vivipara Leiper, 1911, in the presence of gubernaculum (13.2-29.7 μm in length) and the number of caudal papillae (10 pairs) and named as Cobboldina gubernacularia sp. n., This is the second species of the genus Cobboldina recorded from the host Hippopotamus amphibius Linnaeus, 1758 remaining captive in the Alipore Zoological Garden, Kolkata, India.

  18. 21 CFR 524.1240 - Levamisole.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... chapter. (c) Related tolerances. See § 556.350 of this chapter. (d) Conditions of use. Cattle—(1) Amount... stomach worms (Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia), intestinal worms (Trichostrongylus, Cooperia.... Conditions of constant helminth exposure may require retreatment within 2 to 4 weeks after the...

  19. 21 CFR 524.1240 - Levamisole.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... chapter. (c) Related tolerances. See § 556.350 of this chapter. (d) Conditions of use. Cattle—(1) Amount... stomach worms (Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia), intestinal worms (Trichostrongylus, Cooperia.... Conditions of constant helminth exposure may require retreatment within 2 to 4 weeks after the...

  20. 21 CFR 524.1240 - Levamisole.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... chapter. (c) Related tolerances. See § 556.350 of this chapter. (d) Conditions of use. Cattle—(1) Amount... stomach worms (Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia), intestinal worms (Trichostrongylus, Cooperia.... Conditions of constant helminth exposure may require retreatment within 2 to 4 weeks after the...

  1. 21 CFR 524.1240 - Levamisole.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... chapter. (c) Related tolerances. See § 556.350 of this chapter. (d) Conditions of use. Cattle—(1) Amount... stomach worms (Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia), intestinal worms (Trichostrongylus, Cooperia.... Conditions of constant helminth exposure may require retreatment within 2 to 4 weeks after the...

  2. 21 CFR 524.1240 - Levamisole.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... chapter. (c) Related tolerances. See § 556.350 of this chapter. (d) Conditions of use. Cattle—(1) Amount... stomach worms (Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia), intestinal worms (Trichostrongylus, Cooperia.... Conditions of constant helminth exposure may require retreatment within 2 to 4 weeks after the...

  3. Anthelmintic efficiency of doramectin, fenbendazole, and nitroxynil, in combination or individually, in sheep worm control.

    PubMed

    Holsback, Luciane; Luppi, Pedro Alex Ramsey; Silva, Camile Sanches; Negrão, Gustavo Kremer; Conde, Gabriel; Gabriel, Hugo Vinícius; Balestrieri, João Vitor; Tomazella, Lucas

    2016-01-01

    The anthelmintic efficiency of doramectin, fenbendazole, and nitroxynil, used individually or in combination, was determined by the Fecal Egg Count Reduction (FECR) test and cultivation of larvae of anthelminthic-treated sheep grouped as follows: G1 (doramectin), G2 (fenbendazole), G3 (nitroxynil), G4 (doramectin + fenbendazole), G5 (doramectin + nitroxynil), G6 (fenbendazole + nitroxynil), G7 (doramectin + nitroxynil + fenbendazole), G8 (untreated). In addition to individually used doramectin and fenbendazole, the helminths were also resistant to the combination of doramectin + fenbendazole; nitroxynil + fenbendazole; and doramectin + nitroxynil + fenbendazole, with their FECR rates ranging from 62-83%. The helminths showed possible nitroxynil-resistance, but had low resistance when the drug was administered in combination with doramectin. The evaluation of individual helminth species revealed that fenbendazole was fully effective against Cooperia; doramectin (G1), moderately effective against Haemonchus and insufficiently active against Cooperia; nitroxynil, effective against Haemonchus and insufficiently active against Cooperia. It was concluded from the results that herd nematodes are resistant to doramectin, fenbendazole, and nitroxynil, and that the combined use of the drugs not only fails to significantly improve the anthelmintic efficiency against Haemonchus and Cooperia, but is also cost-ineffective.

  4. New Aspidoderidae species parasite of Didelphis aurita (Mammalia: Didelphidae): a light and scanning electron microscopy approach.

    PubMed

    Chagas-Moutinho, V A; Sant'anna, V; Oliveira-Menezes, A; De Souza, W

    2014-02-01

    Nematodes of the family Aspidoderidae (Nematoda: Heterakoidea) Skrjabin and Schikobalova, 1947, are widely distributed in the Americas. The family Aspidoderidae includes the subfamilies Aspidoderinae Skrjabin and Schikobalova, 1947, and Lauroiinae Skrjabin and Schikobalova, 1951. These two subfamilies are delineated by the presence or absence of cephalic cordons at the anterior region. The nematodes in the subfamily Aspidoderinae, which includes the genus AspidoderaRailliet and Henry, 1912, are represented by nematodes with anterior cephalic cordons at the anterior end. The nematodes of the genus AspidoderaRailliet and Henry, 1912, are found in the cecum and large intestine of mammals of the orders Edentata, Marsupialia and Rodentia. Species within this genus have many morphological similarities. The use of scanning electron microscopy allows the specific characterization of the species within this genus. In the present work, we describe a new species of Aspidodera parasite of the large intestine of Didelphis aurita (Mammalia: Didelphidae) Wied-Neuwied, 1826, collected from Cachoeiras de Macacu, Rio de Janeiro. The combination of light and scanning electron microscopy allowed us a detailed analysis of this nematode.

  5. Redescription of Rhabdochona papuanensis (Nematoda: Thelazioidea), a parasite of rainbow fishes (Melanotaenia spp.); the first record of the species of Rhabdochona in Australia.

    PubMed

    Moravec, František; Adlard, Robert

    2016-12-01

    Numerous specimens of the parasitic nematode Rhabdochona papuanensis Moravec, Riha et Kuchta, 2008 (Spirurida: Rhabdochonidae) were collected from the intestines of the Australian endemic freshwater fish (eastern rainbow fish) Melanotaenia splendida (Peters) (Melanotaeniidae, Atheriniformes) in the Behana Creek, North Queesland during November of 2015. Although many species of Rhabdochona Railliet, 1916 are known to be common parasites of fishes in other continents, the present finding of R. papuanensis represents the first record of the species belonging to this genus from the Australian mainland. Light and scanning electron microscopical examinations of these newly collected specimens made it possible to redescribe in detail this nematode species, originally incompletely described from a congeneric host in Papua New Guinea. Fully developed, filamented eggs of R. papuanensis and the conspecific fourth-stage larva are described for the first time. The present finding of R. papuanensis in M. splendida from Australia represents new host and geographical records.

  6. Redescription of Raphidascaris gigi Fujita, 1928 (Nematoda: Anisakidae), a parasite of freshwater fishes in Japan.

    PubMed

    Moravec, Frantisek; Nagasawa, Kazuya

    2002-07-01

    A redescription is given of Raphidascaris gigi Fujita, 1928 based on newly collected specimens from the intestine of masu salmon Oncorhynchus masou (Brevoort) in the Kinu River in Japan. The species is characterised by the absence of interlabia and lateral alae, by the presence of lips without lateral membranous flanges and by numerous pre-anal and postanal papillae in the male. Although the general morphology of this species resembles that of Ichthyascaris spp. as defined by Bruce (1990), who transferred R. biwakoensis (= R. gigi) to this genus, the absence of the alae uniting close the ventrolateral lips shows clearly that it belongs to Raphidascaris Railliet & Henry, 1915. Ichthyascaris Wu, 1949 is here considered a subgenus of Raphidascaris, and two species described in the former genus are transferred to the latter as R. gymnocraniae (Bruce, 1990) n. comb. and R. sillagoides (Bruce, 1990) n. comb. The finding of R. gigi in O. masou represents a new host record.

  7. Intestinal macro- and microparasites of wolves (Canis lupus L.) from north-eastern Poland recovered by coprological study.

    PubMed

    Kloch, Agnieszka; Bednarska, Małgorzata; Bajer, Anna

    2005-01-01

    Wolf scats collected during ecological studies in Mazury lake district in NE Poland were analysed for intestinal micro- and macroparasites. Five nematode species were identified: Ancylostoma caninum (Ercolani, 1859), Uncinaria stenocephala (Railliet, 1884), Trichuris vulpis (Froelich, 1789), Toxocara canis (Werner, 1782) and Toxascaris leonina (von Linstow, 1902). Among cestode species there were identified infections with Dipylidium caninum (Linnaeus, 1785). The overall helminth prevalence was 63.5 % and average intensity was 15.4 +/- 8.0 eggs /1g of sample. The most prevalent parasite was T. vulpis (38.5 %) and the most abundant infections were by T. canis. Almost 55 % of samples (28/51) were positive for C. parvum oocysts and 46.7 % (14/30) for Giardia spp. cysts. The pack factor affected the distribution of some of macro- and microparasites. The identified parasite fauna of wolves in Mazury lake district consists of several micro- and macroparasites of interest for public health.

  8. Phenotypic and genotypic characterisation of Haemonchus spp. and other gastrointestinal nematodes resistant to benzimidazole in infected calves from the tropical regions of Campeche State, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Encalada-Mena, Lisandro; Tuyub-Solis, Henry; Ramirez-Vargas, Gabriel; Mendoza-de-Gives, Pedro; Aguilar-Marcelino, Liliana; López-Arellano, Ma Eugenia

    2014-09-15

    The aim of this study was to identify the presence of anthelmintic resistance to benzimidazole (BZ) in gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) from naturally infected calves in the tropical regions of Campeche State of Mexico. The faecal egg count reduction test (FECRT) was conducted at 10 livestock farms localised in the Carmen, Candelaria, Champotón, Escárcega and Palizada municipalities of Campeche. The assessed anthelmintic was albendazole. The trial period was between August and November 2012. Infected calves were allocated into two groups, control and treated, on each farm. The number of eggs excreted per g of faeces was estimated by the McMaster technique at 0 and 14 days pre- and post- treatment, respectively. Recovered infective larvae (L3) (pre- and post-treatment) were identified using taxonomic keys and a genomic DNA (gDNA) template from a pool of L3 species prior to BZ treatment. Additionally, BZ-resistance polymorphisms in Haemonchus were determined by Allele Specific PCR (AS-PCR) at codon 200 and by end-point PCR at codons 200, 198 and 167 from isotype 1 of the β-tubulin gene. Morphological identification revealed Haemonchus, Cooperia, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia and Oesophagostumum L3 species before BZ treatment, and Haemonchus and Cooperia L3 species after treatment. Additionally, of the GIN populations, three exhibited BZ resistance, and seven were BZ-susceptible by FECRT. Molecular analysis identified mutations in Haemonchus populations on nine farms at codon 200 (TTC to TAC) by AS-PCR, while no changes were observed at 167 (TTC to TAC) or 198 (GAA to GCA) codons in any population. In conclusion, resistance to BZ was determined in Haemonchus and Cooperia nematodes in infected cattle in five tropical regions of Campeche State.

  9. Anthelmintic resistance in gastrointestinal nematodes from grazing beef cattle in Campeche State, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Muñiz-Lagunes, Abel; González-Garduño, Roberto; López-Arellano, Maria Eugenia; Ramírez-Valverde, Rodolfo; Ruíz-Flores, Agustín; García-Muñiz, Guadalupe; Ramírez-Vargas, Gabriel; Mendoza-de Gives, Pedro; Torres-Hernández, Glafiro

    2015-08-01

    Production of beef cattle is one of the most important economic activities in Mexico. However, anthelmintic resistance (AR) has affected animal productivity. The aim of this study was to determine the presence of AR in gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) of beef cattle in Candelaria Municipality of Campeche State, Mexico. Sixty-five-month-old beef calves were selected for the faecal egg count reduction test (FECRT) and the inhibition of egg hatch (IEH) assay. These parameters were determined using albendazole (benzimidazole, BZ), ivermectin (IVM, Macrocyclic lactone, ML) and levamisole (LEV, imidazothiazole, IMZ). Allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) confirmed polymorphisms at codon 200 of isotype 1 of the β-tubulin gene of Haemonchus placei. The results showed 32 % IVM toxicity by FECRT, indicating problems of AR in the GIN population. In contrast, BZ and LEV showed 95 and 100 % toxicity, respectively, against GIN from infected beef calves. The infective larvae (L3) of Cooperia, Haemonchus and Oesophagostomum were identified before anthelmintic treatment, and Cooperia L3 larvae were identified after treatment with IVM. The IEH assays had lethal dose 50 (LD50) of 187 nM to BZ, confirming the ovicidal effect of BZ. In contrast, the LD50 for LEV and IVM were 3.3 and 0.4 mM, respectively. The results obtained by AS-PCR confirmed two DNA fragments of 250 and 550 bp, corresponding to the resistant and susceptible alleles in the H. placei population. The nematode Cooperia showed AR against IVM, while the toxicity effect of BZ against GIN with both FECRT and IEH was confirmed.

  10. The helminth parasites of various artiodactylids from some South African nature reserves.

    PubMed

    Boomker, J; Horak, I G; De Vos, V

    1986-06-01

    The helminth species composition and helminth burdens of 4 grey duikers, 12 bushbuck, 2 nyala, 2 giraffe, a steenbok, an oribi, a waterbuck and a tsessebe from the Kruger National Park (KNP); of a steenbok and a greater kudu from the farm Riekerts Laager, Transvaal; of a single blue duiker from the Tsitsikama Forest National Park, and of a blue wildebeest, a red hartebeest, a gemsbok and 2 springbok from the Kalahari Gemsbok National Park (KGNP) were collected, counted and identified. New parasite records are: Agriostomum equidentatum from the gemsbok, Cooperia neitzi from the bushbuck, Cooperia sp. from the gemsbok and the red hartebeest, Cooperia yoshidai from the waterbuck and the tsessebe, Dictyocaulus viviparus from the bushbuck, Haemonchus bedfordi from the waterbuck, Haemonchus contortus from the gemsbok, Haemonchus krugeri from the steenbok from the KNP, Impalaia nudicollis from the gemsbok and the red hartebeest, Impalaia tuberculata from the oribi and the waterbuck, Impalaia spp. from the kudu, Longistrongylus meyeri from the steenbok from Riekerts Laager and the gemsbok, Longistrongylus sabie from the steenbok from the KNP, Longistrongylus schrenki from the tsessebe, Parabronema sp. from the tsessebe and the red hartebeest, Paracooperia serrata from the gemsbok and the steenbok from the KGNP, Pneumostrongylus calcaratus from the bushbuck, Strongyloides sp. from the gemsbok, Trichostrongylus sp. from the gemsbok, the red hartebeest and the steenbok from the KGNP, Trichostrongylus axei from the blue duiker, Trichostrongylus falculatus from the bushbuck and the oribi, Trichostrongylus instabilis from the bushbuck, the steenbok from the KNP and the oribi and Trichostrongylus thomasi from the grey duikers and tsessebe. Host specificity of the parasites was not marked and crossinfestation was common. This was not true for the giraffe, since none of the helminths of these animals were found in the antelope and vice versa.

  11. The effect of treatment with a 1% injectable formulation of moxidectin during the rainy season and at the beginning of the dry season on gastrointestinal nematodes in cattle from communal areas in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Moyo, D Z; Hendrikx, W M L; Obwolo, M J; Eysker, M

    2003-02-01

    The effect of 1% moxidectin/cydectin at 0.2 mg/kg live weight on gastrointestinal nematodes and on the growth of calves, weaners and cows was investigated in five communal areas on the highveld of Zimbabwe. Three field experiments were carried out between March 1996 and June 1997. In experiment 1, treatment was administered in all five areas at the end of the rainy season in March 1996, followed by a further treatment at the beginning of the dry season in May/June 1996. In experiment 2, the treatment was administered in three areas at the end of the rainy season in March 1997. In experiment 3, treatment was administcred in one area at the beginning of the dry season in April 1997. Large numbers of eggs were present in the faeces of calves and weaners at the start of experiments 1 and 2. Epg values were lower in cows and in all age categories in experiment 3. There was a statistically significant reduction in epg values in calves, weaners and cows following treatment with a reduction of 90-99% in all cases except in cows in experiment 3, where no meaningful assessment was possible owing to the low egg counts in both the treated and control cows. The dominating larval types in faecal cultures were Cooperia and Haemonchus. Trichostrongylus, Oesophagostomum and Bunostomum were also found. Following treatment, Haemonchus was suppressed far more than Cooperia. This may be related to a longer residual effect against abomasal parasites like Haemonchus in comparison to small intestinal worms like Cooperia. Anthelmintic treatment conferred significant weight gain advantages (p < 0.05) on treated calves. weaners and cows. The weight gains are discussed in relation to disease and nutrition.

  12. [Effectiveness of fenbendazole (Panacur) in cattle invaded by gastrointestinal and pulmonary nematodes].

    PubMed

    Corba, J; Reisz, T; Krupicer, I; Pacenovský, J; Breza, M

    1977-04-01

    The effectiveness of the new anthelmintic fenbendazole (Panacur) produced by Hoechst, W. Germany, was tested in cattle naturally invaded by gastro-intestinal and pulmonary nematodes. The single dose of 5.7 mg per kg or 7.5 mg per kg body weight administered either in the form of a 10% suspension or in pellets containing 1.5% of the active substance gave 100% intenseffectiveness and 100% extenseffectiveness in the control of Dictyocaulus viviparus, Haemonchus contortus, Trichostrongylus spp., Ostertagia spp., Oesophagostomum spp. and Cooperia spp. The animals tolerated the administration of both drug forms without showing any undesirable symptoms.

  13. Helminth parasites of gemsbok (Oryx gazella) in the Klein Karoo.

    PubMed

    Ellis, M B; Boomker, J

    2006-12-01

    The number and species of helminth parasites from three gemsbok (Oryx gazella) were recorded, and their faecal nematode egg counts and the level of pasture contamination determined. Six nematode genera were recovered and four species identified, of which Trichostrongylus rugatus was the most prevalent. Other nematode species recovered were Cooperia sp., Agriostomum sp., Haemonchus contortus, Nematodirus spathiger and Ostertagia ostertagi. None of the worms were present in all animals studied, and no new host associations were found. Cysticerci were recovered from the mesenteries of one gemsbok and a further two unidentifiable helminths were recovered from the abomasum and the kidney fat layer of another antelope.

  14. Gastrointestinal nematode infection and performance of weaned stocker calves in response to anthelmintic control strategies.

    PubMed

    Walker, R S; Miller, J E; Monlezun, C J; LaMay, D; Navarre, C; Ensley, D

    2013-10-18

    Gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) parasite control recommendations are in a state of flux because of the increase in anthelmintic resistant cattle parasites, such as Cooperia spp. In addition, Cooperia spp. infection is typically high in warm-season grass pastures and can affect growth performance of grazing stocker calves in the Gulf Coast Region. This study evaluated the effects of moxidectin pour-on, oxfendazole oral suspension, or a combination of the two given at separate times on infection and performance of weaned beef calves grazing summer forages. Steers (n=42) and heifers (n=31) were stratified by sex, d-11 fecal egg count (FEC), and d-1 shrunk body weight (BW) to one of 10 pastures with four anthelmintic treatments and one control. Treatments included: (1) oxfendazole given on d 0 and moxidectin on d 73 (O+M), (2) moxidectin given on d 0 and oxfendazole on d 73 (M+O), (3) moxidectin given on d 0 (M), (4) oxfendazole given on d 0 (O) and (5) no anthelmintic given (CON). Calves grazed for d-110 beginning May 27th. Response variables were FEC (collected on d-11, 14, 31, 45, 59, 73, 87 and 108), coprocultures (evaluated for d 87 and 108), final shrunk BW, shrunk BW gain, average daily gain (ADG), and full BW gain (collected on d 31, 59, 73, 87, and 108). Calves treated with either oxfendazole (O+M and O) or moxidectin (M+O and M) on d 0 had significantly lower (P<0.001) FEC than the CON calves on d 14, 31 and 45. However, the M+O treated calves had significantly higher (P<0.001) FEC than both oxfendazole treated groups. In addition, calves treated with a second dewormer on d 73 (O+M and M+O) had significantly lower (P<0.001) FEC by d 87 than the CON or M treated calves. Shrunk BW gain and ADG were significantly greater (P=0.005) for the O+M compared to the M treated and CON calves, but comparable with the M+O and O treated calves, respectively. Coprocultures sampled on d 87 and 108 for calves not receiving a second dewormer were predominantly Cooperia spp. and

  15. [Knowledge of the endoparasitic fauna of Lama guanicoe Muller, 1776, from the Mitre Peninsula, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina].

    PubMed

    Navone, G T; Merino, M L

    1989-01-01

    Parasitological fauna of Lama guanicoe in the Peninsula Mitre, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, is analyzed in this paper. Coproparasitological tests of 58 samples were performed, and on this basis, the presence of the following genera was determined: Haemonchus, Marshallagia, Cooperia, Nematodirus, Ostertagia, Trichostrongylus, Oesophagostomun and Chavertia. Marshallagia and Chabertia are reported for the first time for this host. The dung piles are not considered as parasitic barriers. Infections occur in two seasons: at the beginning of the spring and at the beginning of summer, as a survival strategy of parasitic nematodes. Parasites of L. guanicoe would be secondarily acquired form cattle.

  16. The anthelmintic efficacy of albendazole against gastrointestinal roundworms, tapeworms, lungworms and liverflukes in sheep.

    PubMed

    van Schalkwyk, P C; Geyser, T L; Récio, M; Erasmus, F P

    1979-03-01

    Anthelmintic trials were carried out to evaluate the efficacy of albendazole against helmi of 2,5 to 3,8 mg/kg administered orally, resulted in a 98,8 to 100% reduction of adult parasites of the genera Haemonchus, Ostertagia, Trichostrongylus, Nematodirus, Gaigeria, Oesophagostomum, Chabertia, Marshallagia and Cooperia. Against the immature stages of these genera, except for Marshallagia and Cooperia, which were not tested, a dose level of 2,5 to 3,8 mg/kg was 83,9-100% effective. Albendazole at 2,5 mg/kg was 99,0% effective against adult stages of Dictyocaulus; its activity at a dose of 3,8 mg/kg against the immature stages of D. filaria was 89,3%. In sheep naturally infested with Moniezia, 100% elimination was obtained at a dose level of 2,5 mg/kg. Dose levels of 3,8 mg/kg and higher were more than 76% effective against adult Fasciola hepatica, while a dose of 4,8 mg/kg was 63% effective against adult Fasciola gigantica.

  17. Prevalence of internal parasites in beef cows in the United States: Results of the National Animal Health Monitoring System's (NAHMS) beef study, 2007-2008.

    PubMed

    Stromberg, Bert E; Gasbarre, Louis C; Ballweber, Lora R; Dargatz, David A; Rodriguez, Judith M; Kopral, Christine A; Zarlenga, Dante S

    2015-10-01

    During the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Animal Health Monitoring System's (NAHMS) 2007-2008 beef study, 567 producers from 24 US States were offered the opportunity to collect fecal samples from weaned beef calves and have them evaluated for the presence of parasite eggs (Phase 1). Participating producers were provided with instructions and materials for sample collection. Up to 20 fresh fecal samples were collected from each of the 99 participating operations. Fresh fecal samples were submitted to one of 3 randomly assigned laboratories for evaluation. Upon arrival at the laboratories, all samples were processed for the enumeration of strongyle, Nematodirus, and Trichuris eggs using the modified Wisconsin technique. The presence or absence of coccidian oocysts and tapeworm eggs was also noted. In submissions where the strongyle eggs per gram exceeded 30, aliquots from 2 to 6 animals were pooled for DNA extraction. Extracted DNA was subjected to genus level polymerase chain reaction (PCR) identification for the presence of Ostertagia, Cooperia, Haemonchus, Oesophagostomum, and Trichostrongylus. In this study, 85.6% of the samples had strongyle type, Nematodirus, and Trichuris eggs. Among the samples evaluated, 91% had Cooperia, 79% Ostertagia, 53% Haemonchus, 38% Oesophagostomum, 18% Nematodirus, 7% Trichuris, and 3% Trichostrongylus. The prevalence of coccidia and tapeworm eggs was 59.9% and 13.7%, respectively.

  18. Prevalence of internal parasites in beef cows in the United States: Results of the National Animal Health Monitoring System’s (NAHMS) beef study, 2007–2008

    PubMed Central

    Stromberg, Bert E.; Gasbarre, Louis C.; Ballweber, Lora R.; Dargatz, David A.; Rodriguez, Judith M.; Kopral, Christine A.; Zarlenga, Dante S.

    2015-01-01

    During the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Animal Health Monitoring System’s (NAHMS) 2007–2008 beef study, 567 producers from 24 US States were offered the opportunity to collect fecal samples from weaned beef calves and have them evaluated for the presence of parasite eggs (Phase 1). Participating producers were provided with instructions and materials for sample collection. Up to 20 fresh fecal samples were collected from each of the 99 participating operations. Fresh fecal samples were submitted to one of 3 randomly assigned laboratories for evaluation. Upon arrival at the laboratories, all samples were processed for the enumeration of strongyle, Nematodirus, and Trichuris eggs using the modified Wisconsin technique. The presence or absence of coccidian oocysts and tapeworm eggs was also noted. In submissions where the strongyle eggs per gram exceeded 30, aliquots from 2 to 6 animals were pooled for DNA extraction. Extracted DNA was subjected to genus level polymerase chain reaction (PCR) identification for the presence of Ostertagia, Cooperia, Haemonchus, Oesophagostomum, and Trichostrongylus. In this study, 85.6% of the samples had strongyle type, Nematodirus, and Trichuris eggs. Among the samples evaluated, 91% had Cooperia, 79% Ostertagia, 53% Haemonchus, 38% Oesophagostomum, 18% Nematodirus, 7% Trichuris, and 3% Trichostrongylus. The prevalence of coccidia and tapeworm eggs was 59.9% and 13.7%, respectively. PMID:26424909

  19. Anisakid nematodes (Nematoda: Anisakidae) from the marine fishes Plectropomus laevis Lacépède (Serranidae) and Sphyraena qenie Klunzinger (Sphyraenidae) off New Caledonia, including two new species of Hysterothylacium Ward & Magath, 1917.

    PubMed

    Moravec, František; Justine, Jean-Lou

    2015-11-01

    Based on light and scanning electron microscopical studies, two new species of Hysterothylacium Ward & Magath, 1917 (Nematoda: Anisakidae) are described from the digestive tract of perciform fishes off New Caledonia: H. alatum n. sp. from Plectropomus laevis (Lacépède) (Serranidae) and H. sphyraenae n. sp. from Sphyraena qenie Klunzinger (Sphyraenidae). The former species (H. alatum) is mainly characterised by its large body (male 42.05 mm, gravid females 51.18-87.38 mm long), the shape of the dorsal lip, conspicuously broad cervical alae, a short caecum and a long ventricular appendix, the length of the spicules (925 µm), the number (25 pairs) and distribution of the genital papillae and the tail tip bearing numerous minute cuticular protuberances. The other species (H. sphyraenae) is mainly characterised by the presence of narrow lateral alae, a short caecum and a long ventricular appendix, the length (762-830 µm) and shape of the spicules, the number (37-38 pairs) and arrangement of the genital papillae, and by the tail tip which lacks any distinct cuticular projections visible under the light microscope. In addition, and unidentifiable at the species level, conspicuously large (45.71-66.10 mm long) larvae of Contracaecum Railliet & Henry, 1912, were found in the body cavity of P. laevis, which serves as a paratenic host for this parasite.

  20. Description of Rhabdochona (Globochona) rasborae sp. n. (Nematoda: Rhabdochonidae) from the freshwater cyprinid fish Rasbora paviana Tirant in southern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Moravec, Frantisek; Kamchoo, Kanda

    2012-09-01

    A new nematode species, Rhabdochona (Globochona) rasborae sp. n. (Rhabdochonidae), is described from the intestine of the freshwater cyprinid fish (sidestripe rasbora) Rasbora paviana Tirant in the Bangbaimai Subdistrict, Muang District, Surat Thani Province, southern Thailand. It differs from other representatives of the subgenus Globochona Moravec, 1972 which possess eggs provided with lateral swellings in having a spinose formation at the tail tip of both sexes and in some other morphological features, such as the body length of gravid female (8.6-23.7 mm), presence of two-three swellings on the egg, eight anterior prostomal teeth, length ratio of spicules (1:5.3-6.7) and arrangement of male genital papillae. This is the third nominal species of Rhabdochona Railliet, 1916 and the second species of the subgenus Globochona reported from fishes in Thailand. The three species of Rhabdochona recently described from fishes in Pakistan, viz. R. annai Kakar, Bilqees et Khan, 2012, R. bifurcatum [sic] Kakar et Bilqees, 2012, and R. pakistanica Kakar, Bilqees et Khan, 2012, are considered to be species inquirendae.

  1. The life cycle of Ohbayashinema erbaevae (Nematoda, Heligmosomoidea, Heligmosomidae) in Ochotona rufescens rufescens (Ochotonidae).

    PubMed

    Audebert, F; Cassone, J; Baccam, D; Kerboeuf, D; Durette-Desset, M C

    2001-12-01

    The morphogenesis and the chronology of the life cycle of Ohbayashinema erbaevoe Durette-Desset et al, 2000, a parasite of Ochotona daurica from Buriatia were studied in detail in an experimental host, Ochotona rufescens rufescens. Worm-free pikas were each infected per os with O. erbaevae larvae and were killed at one day post infection (DPI 1) and every 12 hours from 1.5 to 8 days post infection. By DPI 1, all the larvae were exsheathed and in the small intestine. The third moult occurred in 2.5-3.0 days. The last moult occurred in 4.0-4.5 days. The prepatent period was eight days and the patent period lasted between two and 12 weeks. The distribution of O. erbaevae along the small intestine of the pikas was assessed. For each experiment, a morphological description of the different stages of the life cycle was provided. The morphogenesis and the chronology of the life cycle of O. erbaevae appear to be identical with those of two other genera of the family of the Heligmosomidae, Heligmosomum Railliet & Henry, 1909 and Heligmosomoides Hall, 1916. They confirm that the three genera belong to the same family. The presence of an abortive posterior genital branch in the female of O. erbaevae, which represents the posterior part of the genital primordium of the didelphic females, supports the systematic position of the genus Ohbayashinema between the didelphic genus Citellinema Hall, 1916 and the monodelphic genera Heligmosomum and Heligmosomoides.

  2. Raphidascaris (Raphidascaris) macrouri n. sp. (Nematoda: Anisakidae) from two deep-sea macrourid fishes in the Western Mediterranean: Morphological and molecular characterisations.

    PubMed

    Pérez-i-García, David; Constenla, María; Carrassón, Maite; Montero, Francisco E; Soler-Membrives, Anna; González-Solís, David

    2015-10-01

    A new nematode species, Raphidascaris (Raphidascaris) macrouri n. sp. (Anisakidae), is described from male and female specimens found in the intestine, and occasionally in stomach and pyloric caeca, of two deep-water macrourid fishes (Gadiformes) off Barcelona, Mediterranean Sea: Nezumia aequalis (Günther) (type-host) and Trachyrincus scabrus (Rafinesque). Based on light and scanning electron microscopy examination, the new species shows similar morphological features as the other four valid species of the subgenus Raphidascaris Railliet & Henry, 1915, but it differs from Raphidascaris (Raphidascaris) acus (Bloch, 1779), Raphidascaris (Raphidascaris) lutjani Olsen, 1952 and Raphidascaris (Raphidascaris) mediterraneus Lèbre & Petter, 1983 in the high number of precloacal papillae (23-32) and from Raphidascaris (Raphidascaris) gigi Fujita, 1928 in the length of the spicules. Moreover, Raphidascaris (Raphidascaris) macrouri n. sp. exhibits a high variability on the number and distribution of caudal papillae, which was not recorded in the other four mentioned species. This is the first species of this subgenus reported from the family Macrouridae. Sequences of ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region are analysed and compared with closely related nematode species. Molecular analysis confirmed the uniformity of the R. (R.) macrouri n. sp. between hosts.

  3. Rhabdochona (Rhabdochona) hypsibarbi n. sp. (Nematoda: Rhabdochonidae) from the freshwater cyprinid fish Hypsibarbus wetmorei (Smith) in northeast Thailand.

    PubMed

    Moravec, František; Pachanawan, Adithepchaikarn; Kamchoo, Kanda

    2013-04-01

    A new nematode species, Rhabdochona (Rhabdochona) hypsibarbi n. sp. (Rhabdochonidae), is described from the intestine of the freshwater cyprinid fish Hypsibarbus wetmorei (Smith) in the Mekong River, Nakhon Phanom Province, northeast Thailand. It is mainly characterized by medium-sized, bifurcate deirids, the presence of 14 anterior prostomal teeth and distinct basal teeth, length ratio of the muscular and glandular portions of esophagus (1:6-9), length of the left spicule (669-774 μm), absence of a dorsal barb on the right spicule, length ratio of spicules (1:4.9-6.0), arrangement of genital papillae, and smooth eggs without filaments or swellings. In addition, specifically unidentified fourth-stage larvae of Rhabdochona (Rhabdochona) sp., morphologically similar to R. hypsibarbi, were recorded from the red-tailed tinfoil Barbonymus altus (Günther) (Cyprinidae) in the Mekong River, Nakhon Phanom Province, northeast Thailand. Rhabdochona hypsibarbi is the fourth nominal species of Rhabdochona Railliet, 1916 reported from fishes in Thailand and the second species of the nominotypical subgenus found in this country.

  4. Parasites of Chamois in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Clark, W C; Clarke, C M H

    1981-01-08

    Abstract Sir, - Andrews'((2)) checklist of helminth parasites of wild ruminants in New Zealand recorded the presence of 10 species of gastrointestinal nematodes in chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra rupicapra L.) from "Central South Island". In October 1978 we examined 28 freshly-shot chamois cadavers from the Harper-Avoca watershed in the headwaters of the Rakaia River. Six of the nematode species reported by Andrews were found again; viz. Ostertagia ostertagi, O. circumcincta, O. trifurcata, Nematodirus filicollis, Oesophagostomum venulosum and Trichuris ovis. The 4 species found by Andrews that were not recovered by us from the animals we examined were: Trichostrongylus axei, T. vitrinus, Spiculotragia spiculoptera and S. asymmetrica. On the other hand we found 4 helminths not encountered by Andrews: 3 nematodes: Nematodirus spathiger (Railliet, 1896), N. abnormalis (May, 1920), and Chabertia ovina (Fabricius, 1794), and 7 specimens of the cestode Moniezia expansa (Rud., 1805). Nematodirus spathiger was the most commonly encountered Nematodirus species, but generally the numbers of all 3 species encountered were low as might be expected in a sample of adult and almost year-old animals. It is probable that most of the adults had acquired some measure of immunity((3)), and the most susceptible group, the kids, would not be born until late November. Because peptic digestion was not used to recover juveniles from the intestinal submucosa, only small numbers of adults were obtained.

  5. A new species of Atriotaenia (Cestoda: Anoplocephalidae) from the hog-nosed skunk Conepatus chinga (Carnivora: Mephitidae) in Peru.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Puerta, Luis A; Ticona, Daniel S; Lopez-Urbina, Maria T; Gonzalez, Armando E

    2012-08-01

    Atriotaenia sanmarci n. sp. (Cestoda: Anoplocephalidae) is described as a parasite of the Andean hog-nosed skunk, Conepatus chinga (Carnivora: Mephitidae), from Cusco, Perú. The new species is primarily distinguished from related species by the distribution, and greater number, of testes, i.e., 194-223 versus 40-60 in Atriotaenia sandgroundi (Sandground, 1926) Baer, 1935, 47-73 in Atriotaenia procyonis (Chandler, 1942) Spasskii, 1951, and 21-84 in Atriotaenia incisa Railliet, 1899. Also, there are differences with respect to the larger dimensions of suckers (300-371 µm vs. 140 in A. sandgroundi, 83-134 in A. procyonis, 70-140 in A. incisa, and 155-192 in Atriotaenia hastati Vaucher, 1982) and in the cirrus pouch length (204-732 µm vs. 90 in A. sandgroundi, 200-220 in A. procyonis, 100-180 in A. incisa, and 150-205 in A. hastati). The new species differs from A. sandgroundi and A. hastati in having a larger body size (122-133 mm vs. 10.6 and 10, respectively). This cestode is the fifth species of Atriotaenia Sandground, 1926.

  6. New species of Spauligodon Skrjabin, Schikhobalova & Lagodovskaja, 1960 and Thubunea Seurat, 1914 (Nematoda) from the gastro-intestinal tract of lizards in Iran.

    PubMed

    Pazoki, Samaneh; Rahimian, Hassan

    2014-11-01

    As part of a faunistic study on helminth parasites of Iranian lizards collected from localities in the north of Isfahan province in Iran, two new nematode species belonging to two different families, Pharyngodonidae Travassos, 1919 and Physalopteroidae Railliet, 1893, were found and are, hereby, described. Spauligodon persiensis n. sp. from the large intestine of Cyrtopodion scabrum Heyden is characterised by its imperceptible lateral alae, lack of spicule, different shape of the genital curtain, position of last pair of papillae, aspinose tail in males, position of the vulva and excretory pore, and a tail filament with six to nine spines in females. Thubunea mobedii n. sp. from the stomach of Laudakia nupta nupta (De Filipi) differs from the other species in the genus by possessing a vulva at level of the posterior portion of the oesophageal-intestinal junction in females, lacking spicules, and having a different number of papillae in males. The present paper provides the results of detailed morphological examination of the two new nematode species, using both light and scanning electron microscopy. Taxonomically important characteristics for the members of the two nematode genera, Spauligodon Skrjabin, Schikhobalova & Lagodovskaja, 1960 and Thubunea Seurat, 1914, are also reviewed.

  7. Larval Contracaecum sp. (Nematoda: Anisakidae) in the Great Cormorant [Phalacrocorax carbo (L., 1758)] from north-eastern Poland: a morphological and morphometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Kanarek, Gerard; Bohdanowicz, Jerzy

    2009-12-03

    Stomachs of the Great Cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo) from north-eastern Poland were found to contain adult nematode Contracaecum rudolphii [Hartwich, G., 1964. Revision der Vogelparasitischen Nematoden Mitteleuropas II. Die Gattung Contracaecum Railliet & Henry, 1912. Mitt. Zool. Mus. Berlin 40, 15-53.] sensu lato and nematode larvae which, based on their morphology, were identified as the third (L3) and fourth (L4) stage larvae of Contracaecum sp. Morphology and biometry of the L3 isolated from the Great Cormorant were very similar to those of the L3 of C. rudolphii described by Bartlett [Bartlett, C.M., 1996. Morphogenesis of Contracaecum rudolphii (Nematoda: Ascaridoidea), a parasite of fish-eating birds, in its copepod precursor and fish intermediate hosts. Parasite 4, 367-376.]. In our opinion, L3 and L4 to be larval stages of C. rudolphii. The paper contains detailed descriptions of the L3 and L4 stages of C. rudolphii; the L4 morphology is described in detail for the first time ever. The descriptions are supplemented by drawings and SEM images. Morphology and biometry of larvae were compared with the literature data and discussed.

  8. Occurrences of Eimeria spp. and gastrointestinal nematodes in dairy calves in southern Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bruhn, Fábio Raphael Pascoti; Silva Júnior, Fidelis Antônio; Carvalho, André Henrique de Oliveira; Orlando, Débora Ribeiro; Rocha, Christiane Maria Barcellos Magalhães da; Guimarães, Antônio Marcos

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional observational study was to determine the frequency and factors associated with infection by Eimeria spp. and gastrointestinal nematodes in 356 calves on 20 dairy farms located in southern Minas Gerais, Brazil. Ten species of Eimeria spp. were identified, of which E. bovis (37.6%) and E. zuernii (17.9%) were the most frequent. From fecal cultures, four genera of gastrointestinal nematodes were recovered, of which Cooperia spp. (74.6%) and Haemonchus (19.4%) were the most frequent. Variables relating to higher levels of technology used on dairy farms showed a significant association (p < 0.05) with higher OPG and EPG counts, and are discussed in this study.

  9. Frequency of cattle farms with ivermectin resistant gastrointestinal nematodes in Veracruz, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Díaz, M A; Arnaud-Ochoa, R A; Becerra-Nava, R; Torres-Acosta, J F J; Rodriguez-Vivas, R I; Quiroz-Romero, R H

    2015-09-15

    This study reports the percentage of cattle farms with ivermectin (IVM) resistant gastrointestinal nematodes (GINs) in Veracruz, Mexico, and identifies the GIN genera involved in the resistances. It also describes management practices of anthelmintic (AH) use on the surveyed farms. Twenty-one farms were assessed by means of the faecal egg count reduction test using the McMaster technique. Only two farms had GIN populations susceptible to IVM (9.5%). The proportion of farms with IVM resistant GIN was 71.4% (15/21). Seven of these farms had less than 80% egg count reductions. Haemonchus and Cooperia were the genera most commonly found in the resistant populations, followed by Oesophagostomum. Inappropriate AH treatment practices were identified from the completed questionnaires. Further management practices such as selective treatment and quarantine treatments are proposed to further reduce the spread of IVM resistance between farms.

  10. Multispecies resistance of cattle gastrointestinal nematodes to long-acting avermectin formulations in Mato Grosso do Sul.

    PubMed

    Borges, Fernando de Almeida; Borges, Dyego Gonçalves Lino; Heckler, Rafael Pereira; Neves, Juliana Paniago Lordello; Lopes, Fernando Gonçalves; Onizuka, Marcel Kenzo Vilalba

    2015-09-15

    The use of long-acting avermectins (AVMs) in cattle to treat infections with gastrointestinal nematodes was common in Brazil until its prohibition by state authorities. The prohibition; however, was rescinded in 2015, but a scientific discussion of the pros and cons of the use of these formulations is necessary. We evaluated the levels of resistance to 1.0 and 3.5% doramectin and to 3.15% ivermectin in cattle. The worms in animals treated with 3.5% doramectin were characterized by the suppression of oviposition and by a higher proportion of adult females carrying no eggs. Haemonchus placei, Cooperia punctata, C. pectinata, C. spatulata, and Oesophagostomum radiatum were resistant to the above compositions. The administration of long-acting AVM formulations did not result in a higher efficacy against these helminth populations.

  11. Efficacy of moxidectin pour-on against nematode infections in cattle.

    PubMed

    Hubert, J; Kerboueuf, D; Le Stang, J P; Cardinaud, B; Blond, F

    1995-06-24

    Three groups of eight calves, naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes and artificially infected with Dictyocaulus viviparus were used to evaluate the efficacy of moxidectin pour-on at dose rates of 0.35 mg/kg and 0.5 mg/kg bodyweight. With both doses the efficacy was 100 per cent against adult D viviparus, Trichostrongylus axei, Ostertagia species and Nematodirus helvetianus. It was more than 99 per cent against Ostertagia and Nematodirus species fourth stage larvae. A small number of Cooperia species were found after treatment, and for this parasite, the efficacy of moxidectin ranged from 97.6 per cent against the larval stages to 98.8 per cent against the adults. No adverse reactions to the moxidectin treatment were observed.

  12. Effects of single or concurrent infections with Eimeria alabamensis and gastrointestinal nematodes on the performance of calves on pasture.

    PubMed

    Larsson, A; Dimander, S-O; Uggla, A; Waller, P; Höglund, J

    2006-06-01

    Twenty-four calves unexposed to pasture were allocated to four groups and inoculated with either two doses of 5 million Eimeria alabamensis oocysts at turn-out (E), 90,000 L3 of Ostertagia ostertagi and Cooperia oncophora divided on six occasions (N) or both oocysts and larvae as above (E + N). A control group was left uninoculated (C). For 10 weeks, the groups grazed in separate uniform paddocks not previously grazed by cattle. By day 5, most calves in groups E and E + N developed clinical coccidiosis that resulted in reduced weight gain compared to C and N. Mean trichostrongylid faecal egg counts in groups N and E + N never exceeded 300 eggs per gram of faeces, and average serum pepsinogen levels were less than 3.8 U tyrosine. This experiment demonstrates the potential impact of E. alabamensis on the performance of previously unexposed calves, whereas no aggravated effects were observed due to concurrent infections with gastrointestinal nematodes.

  13. Effect of a controlled-release albendazole capsule on parasitism and productivity of sheep.

    PubMed

    Corba, J; Krupicer, I; Legény, J; Juris, P; Veselý, L

    1991-11-01

    The efficacy of intraruminal albendazole (ABZ) capsules (Profitril-Captec) and the effect of treatment on productivity were studied in 300 ewes infected with gastrointestinal nematodes and the trematode Dicrocoelium dendriticum. Coprological tests revealed that treated animals remained negative for 10 weeks after the administration of capsules. Contamination of pasture with nematode larvae was significantly reduced during the whole experiment. Necropsy of 14 animals (seven treated and seven untreated) showed 96.9-99.2% efficacy against the nematodes Nematodirus spp., Oesophagostomum spp., Cooperia spp., Trichostrongylus spp. and Trichuris ovis, while efficacy was 88.5% against D. dendriticum. During the 6 month pasture season (May-October 1989), treated ewes produced on average 2.56 kg cheese and 0.6 kg wool per ewe more than untreated controls. Our study confirms the reliability of the ABZ slow-release capsules over 90 days and the positive effect of treatment on nematode contamination of pasture and ewe productivity.

  14. [Effect of bolus administration of albendazole into the rumen on gastrointestinal nematodes and the Dicrocoelium dendriticum trematode in sheep].

    PubMed

    Corba, J; Krupicer, I; Várady, M; Pet'ko, B

    1994-01-01

    The efficacy of intraruminal albendazole (ABZ) capsules (Proftril-Captec) and the effect of treatment on productivity parameters were studied in two experiments totally on 466 ewes naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes and trematodes D. dendriticum. Ovoscopical tests revealed that treated animals remained negative during 10-12 weeks after the administration of capsules and that pasture contamination with helminths was significantly reduced. Necropsy revealed 96.9-99.2% efficacy against nematodes Nematodirus spp., Oesophagostomum spp., Cooperia spp., Trichostrongylus spp. and Trichuris ovis. Priority finding is the efficacy of ABZ capsules against trematodes D. dendriticum which was in the first experiment 88.5% and in the second experiment 91.8%. During the 6-month pasture season treated ewes produced on average 2.56 kg cheese and 0.6 kg wool per ewe more than untreated controls.

  15. Analysis of putative inhibitors of anthelmintic resistance mechanisms in cattle gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    AlGusbi, Salha; Krücken, Jürgen; Ramünke, Sabrina; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Demeler, Janina

    2014-08-01

    Effects of the cytochrome P450 inhibitor piperonyl butoxide and the P-glycoprotein inhibitor verapamil on the efficacy of ivermectin and thiabendazole were studied in vitro in susceptible and resistant isolates of the cattle parasitic nematodes Cooperia oncophora and Ostertagia ostertagi. The effects of combined use of drug and piperonyl butoxide/verapamil, respectively, were investigated in the Egg Hatch Assay, the Larval Development Assay and the Larval Migration Inhibition Assay. The effects of piperonyl butoxide and verapamil as inhibitors of thiabendazole and ivermectin responses were particularly marked for larval development, where both inhibitors were able to completely eliminate all differences between susceptible and resistant isolates. Even the lowest concentrations of anthelmintics used in combination with inhibitors caused complete inhibition of development. Differences and/or similarities among responses in different isolates were only obtained in the two other assays: in the Egg Hatch Assay piperonyl butoxide caused a shift in concentration-response curves obtained with thiabendazole to the left for all isolates tested, changing relative differences between isolates. In contrast, an effect of verapamil in the Egg Hatch Assay was only apparent for benzimidazole-resistant isolates. In the Larval Migration Inhibition Assay only ivermectin was tested and piperonyl butoxide shifted the concentration-response curves for all isolates to the left, again eliminating differences in EC50 values between susceptible and resistant isolates. This was not the case using verapamil as an inhibitor, where curves for both susceptible and benzimidazole-resistant isolates shifted to the left in Ostertagia isolates. In Cooperia the picture was more complex with ivermectin-resistant isolates showing a larger shift than the susceptible isolate. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the β-tubulin isotype 1 gene were investigated. Significantly increased frequencies of

  16. Gastrointestinal nematode infection in beef cattle of different genetic groups in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, M C S; Alencar, M M; Chagas, A C S; Giglioti, R; Oliveira, H N

    2009-12-23

    Resistance to natural infection by gastrointestinal nematodes was compared in 67 female calves of the following genetic groups: Nelore (NX); 1/2 Senepol+1/2 Nelore (SN); and 1/2 Aberdeen Angus+1/2 Nelore (AN). The NX (n=26), SN (n=23) and AN (n=18) animals were monitored for 14 months, during which they remained without treatment, allowed to graze in a tropical environment. Eggs per gram of feces (EPG), coprocultures and packed cell volume (PCV) were carried out monthly. No significant effects of the interaction between the genetic groups and month/year of collection and the genetic group on the EPG were found, but there was a significant influence of the month of collection (P<0.01). The monthly PCV measurements did not differ for the animals of the three genetic groups and there was no association found between the EPG and PCV. The animals of the SN and NX groups showed similar numbers of EPG with results zero, while for the AN group these numbers were significantly lower (P<0.05). Although the NX group had a large number of EPG with results zero, it also contained many animals with high counts, meaning this group had higher averages during the entire study period. The following nematode genera were found in the coprocultures: Haemonchus, Cooperia, Oesophagostomum and Trichostrongylus, the latter in smallest proportion. There was no significant difference between the genetic groups for averages of all parasites identified, except Cooperia, which were present in higher numbers in the animals of the NX group (P<0.05). The results obtained in this experiment suggest that the use of Bos taurus x Bos indicus crossbreeds can be a good strategy to reduce the use of chemical control in Brazil.

  17. Phylogenetic Characterization of β-Tubulins and Development of Pyrosequencing Assays for Benzimidazole Resistance in Cattle Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Demeler, Janina; Krüger, Nina; Krücken, Jürgen; von der Heyden, Vera C.; Ramünke, Sabrina; Küttler, Ursula; Miltsch, Sandra; López Cepeda, Michael; Knox, Malcolm; Vercruysse, Jozef; Geldhof, Peter; Harder, Achim; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg

    2013-01-01

    Control of helminth infections is a major task in livestock production to prevent health constraints and economic losses. However, resistance to established anthelmintic substances already impedes effective anthelmintic treatment in many regions worldwide. Thus, there is an obvious need for sensitive and reliable methods to assess the resistance status of at least the most important nematode populations. Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the β-tubulin isotype 1 gene of various nematodes correlate with resistance to benzimidazoles (BZ), a major anthelmintic class. Here we describe the full-length β-tubulin isotype 1 and 2 and α-tubulin coding sequences of the cattle nematode Ostertagia ostertagi. Additionally, the Cooperia oncophora α-tubulin coding sequence was identified. Phylogenetic maximum-likelihood analysis revealed that both isotype 1 and 2 are orthologs to the Caenorhabditis elegans ben-1 gene which is also associated with BZ resistance upon mutation. In contrast, a Trichuris trichiura cDNA, postulated to be β-tubulin isotype 1 involved in BZ resistance in this human parasite, turned out to be closely related to C. elegans β-tubulins tbb-4 and mec-7 and would therefore represent the first non-ben-1-like β-tubulin to be under selection through treatment with BZs. A pyrosequencing assay was established to detect BZ resistance associated SNPs in β-tubulin isotype 1 codons 167, 198 and 200 of C. oncophora and O. ostertagi. PCR-fragments representing either of the two alleles were combined in defined ratios to evaluate the pyrosequencing assay. The correlation between the given and the measured allele frequencies of the respective SNPs was very high. Subsequently laboratory isolates and field populations with known resistance status were analyzed. With the exception of codon 167 in Cooperia, increases of resistance associated alleles were detected for all codons in at least one of the phenotypically resistant population. Pyrosequencing

  18. Effectiveness of current anthelmintic treatment programs on reducing fecal egg counts in United States cow-calf operations.

    PubMed

    Gasbarre, Louis C; Ballweber, Lora R; Stromberg, Bert E; Dargatz, David A; Rodriguez, Judy M; Kopral, Christine A; Zarlenga, Dante S

    2015-10-01

    During the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Animal Health Monitoring System's (NAHMS) 2007-2008 beef study, producers from 24 states were offered the opportunity to evaluate their animals for internal parasites and for overall responses to treatment with anthelmintics. A lapse of 45 d was required between initial sampling and any previous treatments. Choice of anthelmintic (oral benzimidazoles, and both injectable and pour-on endectocides) was at the discretion of the producer so as not to alter the local control programs. Fresh fecal samples were collected from 20 animals, or from the entire group if less than 20, then randomly assigned to 1 of 3 participating laboratories for examination. Analyses consisted of double centrifugation flotation followed by enumeration of strongyle, Nematodirus, and Trichuris eggs (the presence of coccidian oocysts and tapeworm eggs was also noted). Where strongyle eggs per gram (epg) exceeded 30, aliquots from 2 to 6 animals were pooled for egg isolation and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis for the presence of Ostertagia, Cooperia, Haemonchus, Oesophagostomum, and Trichostrongylus. Results from 72 producers (19 States) indicated that fecal egg count reductions were < 90% in 1/3 of the operations. All operations exhibiting less than a 90% reduction had used pour-on macrocyclic lactones as the anthelmintic treatment. While some of these less than expected reductions could have been the result of improper drug application, PCR analyses of the parasite populations surviving treatment, coupled with follow-up studies at a limited number of sites, indicated that less than expected reductions were most likely due to anthelmintic resistance in Cooperia spp. and possibly Haemonchus spp.

  19. [Forming of gastro-intestinal nematodes fauna of free ranging European bison in Bialowieza Primeval Forest during last 17 years (1984-2001)].

    PubMed

    Drózdz, Jan; Demiaszkiewicz, Aleksander W; Lachowicz, Jacek

    2002-01-01

    28 European bison of both sexes and in different age shot in Białowieza Primeval Forest in January 1984, (10 animals), January 1992 (10 animals) and in January and the beginning of February 2001 (8 animals) have been necropsied. The examined animals in mentioned years were of similar age. There were examined abomasa and duodena of shot animals. All necropsied bison were infected with gastro-intestinal nematodes. The highest intensity of infection with nematodes of abomasum was found in 1992 year and with nematodes of duodenum in 2001 year. In the examined period were found as many as 21 species of gastro-intestinal nematodes, and 15 of them occurred in 1984, 16 in 1992 and 17 in 2001; 12 species, namely: Trichostrongylus axei, T. capricola, Ostertagia ostertagi, O. lyrata, O. leptospicularis, O. kolchida, Spiculopteragia boehmi, Cooperia oncophora, Nematodirus helventianus, N. roscidus, N. europaeus and Aonchotheca bilobata occurred in all 3 examined years. The highest mean intensity of infection and the percentage index of intensity of these 12 species of nematodes showed O. leptospicularis which was 45% to 47% of all Ostertagiinae. Beyond of these 12 species of nematodes which occurred in all examined years, there were found 9 species more: Ostertagia antipini, Spiculopteragia mathevossiani, S. asymmetrica, Mazamastrongylus dagestanicus, Cooperia surnabada, C. punctata, C. pectinata, Haemonchus placei and Ashworthius sidemi. They occurred sporadically and in low density. During the examined period, bison have adapted 10 species of parasites from Cervides. Mazamastrongylus dagestanicus - parasite primary typical for moose, was for the first time found in bison.

  20. Evaluation of clinical safety and anthelmintic efficacy of aurixazole administed orally at 24 mg/kg in cattle.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Claudio Alessandro M; Lopes, Welber Daniel Zanetti; Buzzulini, Carolina; Cruz, Breno Cayeiro; Felippelli, Gustavo; Teixeira, Weslen F; Silva, Helenara Machado; Santana, Luis Fernando; Soares, Vando Edésio; Henrique, Carlos Henrique; de Oliveira, Gilson Pereira; da Costa, Alvimar José

    2014-06-01

    The current study evaluated, in vivo, the clinical safety and the anthelmintic efficacy of 24% aurixazole (24 mg/kg), administered orally, in bovines. Two experiments were conducted: the first one evaluating the clinical safety of 24% aurixazole (24 mg/kg) in cattle, and a second one evaluating the anthelmintic efficacy of aurixazole (24 mg/kg) against gastrointestinal nematodes on naturally infected cattle. Based on the results of clinical safety, no alterations on clinical and haematological signs and on the biochemical values obtained in animals treated orally with aurixazole 24 mg/kg were observed. Regarding the results of reduction or efficacy, obtained by eggs per gram of faeces (EPG) counts, the formulation of aurixazole reached values superior to 99% (arithmetic means) in all post-treatment dates. In two occasions, this formulation reached maximum efficacy (100%). Comparing these results with the reduction percentages obtained by EPG counts, it is possible to verify that the values obtained by all three formulations were compatible with the efficacy results. Aurixazole reached maximum efficacy (100%) against Haemonchus placei, Cooperia spatulata and Oesophagostomum radiatum. Against Cooperia punctata, this formulation reached an efficacy index of 99.99%. Regarding aurixazole, no specific trials were conducted on the field in order to evaluate the behaviour of this molecule against helminths that are resistant to other molecules, specially isolated levamisole and disophenolat. Due to this fact, future studies will be necessary to assess the effectiveness of aurixazole against strains of nematodes that are resistant to levamisole and disophenolat, but the results of clinical safety and efficacy described in this study allow us to conclude that the aurixazole molecule, concomitantly with other measures and orally administered formulations, can be another important tool in the control of nematodes parasitizing bovines.

  1. Effectiveness of current anthelmintic treatment programs on reducing fecal egg counts in United States cow-calf operations

    PubMed Central

    Gasbarre, Louis C.; Ballweber, Lora R.; Stromberg, Bert E.; Dargatz, David A.; Rodriguez, Judy M.; Kopral, Christine A.; Zarlenga, Dante S.

    2015-01-01

    During the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Animal Health Monitoring System’s (NAHMS) 2007–2008 beef study, producers from 24 states were offered the opportunity to evaluate their animals for internal parasites and for overall responses to treatment with anthelmintics. A lapse of 45 d was required between initial sampling and any previous treatments. Choice of anthelmintic (oral benzimidazoles, and both injectable and pour-on endectocides) was at the discretion of the producer so as not to alter the local control programs. Fresh fecal samples were collected from 20 animals, or from the entire group if less than 20, then randomly assigned to 1 of 3 participating laboratories for examination. Analyses consisted of double centrifugation flotation followed by enumeration of strongyle, Nematodirus, and Trichuris eggs (the presence of coccidian oocysts and tapeworm eggs was also noted). Where strongyle eggs per gram (epg) exceeded 30, aliquots from 2 to 6 animals were pooled for egg isolation and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis for the presence of Ostertagia, Cooperia, Haemonchus, Oesophagostomum, and Trichostrongylus. Results from 72 producers (19 States) indicated that fecal egg count reductions were < 90% in 1/3 of the operations. All operations exhibiting less than a 90% reduction had used pour-on macrocyclic lactones as the anthelmintic treatment. While some of these less than expected reductions could have been the result of improper drug application, PCR analyses of the parasite populations surviving treatment, coupled with follow-up studies at a limited number of sites, indicated that less than expected reductions were most likely due to anthelmintic resistance in Cooperia spp. and possibly Haemonchus spp. PMID:26424910

  2. Laoxyuris laonasti n. gen., n. sp. (Nematoda: Syphaciinae) parasite of Laonastes aenigmamus (Rodentia: Diatomyidae): morphology, biology, taxonomy, phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Hugot, Jean Pierre; Feliu, Carlos; Douangboupha, Bounneuang; Ribas, Alexis

    2013-06-01

    A new Oxyurid genus and species are described in a rodent recently discovered in Lao PDR: Laonastes aenigmamus which happens to be the single survivor of the Diatomyidae, a family considered to be extinct since the Miocene. The morphological characters of the new parasite species allow classifying it within the Syphaciinae Railliet, 1916, a subfamily whose members are exclusively parasites of Lagomorpha and Rodents. Male Syphaciinae have developed several types of ventral cuticular ornamentation used to firmly grip the female during mating. The ornamental characters observed in the new species include a finger like appendix, which, until now, has not been described in the subfamily. The originality of this apparatus justifies the creation of a new genus and a new species for the pinworm parasite of Laonastes. Using morphological characters, the new species is analyzed phylogenetically to describe its affinities with representatives of the main groups distinguished within the Syphaciinae. The phylogenetic study produces a cladogram similar to the phylogeny recently proposed for the hosts of the subfamily and in agreement with a close association of the Diatomyidae with the Ctenodactylidae. Such a phenomenon of cophylogeny is interpreted as the result of the existence of a strict specificity between the Syphaciinae and their respective hosts, due to the very close adaptation of their life cycle with the behaviors of their hosts. In Lagomorpha and Rodents, caecotrophy and grooming activities allow a direct transmission of the parasite eggs and favor successive self-infestations, increasing the chances for the parasite to maintain itself in the same host species but decreasing the probability of host switching. The resulting high host specificity allowed the Syphaciinae to out-compete other pinworms and maintain themselves in their specific host over millions of years.

  3. Biodiversity of trematodes in their intermediate mollusc and fish hosts in the freshwater ecosystems of Europe.

    PubMed

    Faltýnková, Anna; Sures, Bernd; Kostadinova, Aneta

    2016-03-01

    We analysed two novel databases containing 2,380 and 8,202 host-parasite-locality records for trematode parasites of molluscs and fishes, respectively, to assess the biodiversity of trematodes in their intermediate mollusc and fish hosts in the freshwater environment in Europe. The "mollusc" dataset covers large numbers of pulmonate (29 spp.), "prosobranch" (15 spp.) and bivalve (11 spp.) molluscs acting as first intermediate hosts for 171 trematode species of 89 genera and 35 families. Of these, 23 and 40 species utilise freshwater fishes as definitive and second intermediate hosts, respectively. The most frequently recorded families are the Echinostomatidae Looss, 1899, Diplostomidae Poirier, 1886 and Schistosomatidae Stilles & Hassal, 1898, and the most frequently recorded species are Diplostomum spathaceum (Rudolphi, 1819), D. pseudospathaceum Niewiadomska, 1984 and Echinoparyphium recurvatum (von Linstow, 1873). Four snail species harbour extremely rich trematode faunas: Lymnaea stagnalis (L.) (41 spp.); Planorbis planorbis (L.) (39 spp.); Radix peregra (O.F. Müller) (33 spp.); and R. ovata (Draparnaud) (31 spp.). The "fish" dataset covers 99 fish species of 63 genera and 19 families acting as second intermediate hosts for 66 species of 33 genera and nine families. The most frequently recorded families are the Diplostomidae Poirier, 1886, Strigeidae Railliet, 1919 and Bucephalidae Poche, 1907, and the most frequently recorded species are Diplostomum spathaceum (Rudolphi, 1819), Tylodelphys clavata (von Nordmann, 1832) and Posthodiplostomum cuticola (von Nordmann, 1832). Four cyprinid fishes exhibit the highest species richness of larval trematodes: Rutilus rutilus (L.) (41 spp.); Abramis brama (L.) (34 spp.); Blicca bjoerkna (L.) (33 spp.); and Scardinius erythrophthalmus (L.) (33 spp.). Larval stages of 50 species reported in fish are also reported in freshwater molluscs, thus indicating a relatively good knowledge of the life-cycles of fish trematodes in

  4. Resistance of beef cattle of two genetic groups to ectoparasites and gastrointestinal nematodes in the state of São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, M C S; Alencar, M M; Giglioti, R; Beraldo, M C D; Aníbal, F F; Correia, R O; Boschini, L; Chagas, A C S; Bilhassi, T B; Oliveira, H N

    2013-10-18

    . The average EPG values were only influenced by CO (P<0.01). The coprocultures revealed the presence of the following endoparasites: Haemonchus spp., Cooperia spp., Oesophagostomum spp. and Trichostrongylus spp., the last in smaller proportion. There were no significant differences between the genetic groups for the endoparasite loads, except for Cooperia spp., which were present in greater number (P<0.05) in the NI group. The results obtained in this experiment confirm previous findings of greater susceptibility of the Nelore breed to Cooperia spp. and high resistance to ectoparasites.

  5. The identification of cattle nematode parasites resistant to multiple classes of anthelmintics in a commercial cattle population in the US.

    PubMed

    Gasbarre, Louis C; Smith, Larry L; Lichtenfels, J Ralph; Pilitt, Patricia A

    2009-12-23

    . contortus. In addition, all avermectin-treated groups contained significant numbers of Cooperia punctata, and smaller numbers of C. oncophora and C. spatulata. These results imply that the pastures studied contain substantial numbers of H. contortus resistant to both avermectins and benzimidazoles, and H. placei and Cooperia sp. resistant to all the commonly used avermectin anthelmintics. This is the first report of anthelmintic resistance in American cattle parasites.

  6. [Ecology of Thelazia spp. in cattle and their vectors in Italy].

    PubMed

    Giangaspero, A; Traversa, D; Otranto, D

    2004-06-01

    The genus Thelazia (Spirurida, Thelaziidae) includes a cosmopolitan group of eyeworm spirurids responsible for ocular infections in domestic and wild animals and transmitted by different species of muscids. Bovine thelaziosis is caused by Thelazia rhodesi Desmarest 1828, Thelazia gulosa Railliet & Henry 1910, and Thelazia skrjabini Erschow 1928, which occur in many countries; T. gulosa and T. skrjabini have been reported mainly in the New World, while T. rhodesi is particularly common in the Old World. In Italy, T. rhodesi was reported in southern regions a long time ago and, recently, T. gulosa and T. skrjabini have been identified in autochthonous cattle first in Apulia and then in Sardinia. Thirteen species of Musca are listed as intermediate hosts of eyeworms, but only Musca autumnalis and Musca larvipara have been demonstrated to act as vectors of Thelazia in the ex-URSS, North America, ex-Czechoslovakia and more recently in Sweden. In Italy, after the reports of T. gulosa and T. skrjabini in southern regions, the intermediate hosts of bovine eyeworms were initially only suspected as the predominant secretophagous Muscidae collected from the periocular region of cattle with thelaziosis were the face flies, M. autumnalis and M. larvipara, followed by Musca osiris, Musca tempestiva and Musca domestica. The well-known constraints in the identification of immature eyeworms to species by fly dissection and also the time-consuming techniques used constitute important obstacles to epidemiological field studies (i.e. vector identification and/or role, prevalence and pattern of infection in flies, etc.). Molecular studies have recently permitted to further investigations into this area. A PCR-RFLP analysis of the ribosomal ITS-1 sequence was developed to differentiate the 3 species of Thelazia (i.e. T. gulosa, T. rhodesi and T. skrjabini) found in Italy, then a molecular epidemiological survey has recently been carried out in field conditions throughout five seasons of

  7. Morphological variability and molecular identification of Uncinaria spp. (Nematoda: Ancylostomatidae) from grizzly and black bears: new species or phenotypic plasticity?

    PubMed

    Catalano, Stefano; Lejeune, Manigandan; van Paridon, Bradley; Pagan, Christopher A; Wasmuth, James D; Tizzani, Paolo; Duignan, Pádraig J; Nadler, Steven A

    2015-04-01

    The hookworms Uncinaria rauschi Olsen, 1968 and Uncinaria yukonensis ( Wolfgang, 1956 ) were formally described from grizzly ( Ursus arctos horribilis) and black bears ( Ursus americanus ) of North America. We analyzed the intestinal tracts of 4 grizzly and 9 black bears from Alberta and British Columbia, Canada and isolated Uncinaria specimens with anatomical traits never previously documented. We applied morphological and molecular techniques to investigate the taxonomy and phylogeny of these Uncinaria parasites. The morphological analysis supported polymorphism at the vulvar region for females of both U. rauschi and U. yukonensis. The hypothesis of morphological plasticity for U. rauschi and U. yukonensis was confirmed by genetic analysis of the internal transcribed spacers (ITS-1 and ITS-2) of the nuclear ribosomal DNA. Two distinct genotypes were identified, differing at 5 fixed sites for ITS-1 (432 base pairs [bp]) and 7 for ITS-2 (274 bp). Morphometric data for U. rauschi revealed host-related size differences: adult U. rauschi were significantly larger in black bears than in grizzly bears. Interpretation of these results, considering the historical biogeography of North American bears, suggests a relatively recent host-switching event of U. rauschi from black bears to grizzly bears which likely occurred after the end of the Wisconsin glaciation. Phylogenetic maximum parsimony (MP) and maximum likelihood (ML) analyses of the concatenated ITS-1 and ITS-2 datasets strongly supported monophyly of U. rauschi and U. yukonensis and their close relationship with Uncinaria stenocephala (Railliet, 1884), the latter a parasite primarily of canids and felids. Relationships among species within this group, although resolved by ML, were unsupported by MP and bootstrap resampling. The clade of U. rauschi, U. yukonensis, and U. stenocephala was recovered as sister to the clade represented by Uncinaria spp. from otariid pinnipeds. These results support the absence of strict

  8. Molecular insight into systematics, host associations, life cycles and geographic distribution of the nematode family Rhabdiasidae.

    PubMed

    Tkach, Vasyl V; Kuzmin, Yuriy; Snyder, Scott D

    2014-04-01

    Rhabdiasidae Railliet, 1915 is a globally distributed group of up to 100 known species of nematodes parasitic in amphibians and reptiles. This work presents the results of a molecular phylogenetic analysis of 36 species of Rhabdiasidae from reptiles and amphibians from six continents. New DNA sequences encompassing partial 18S rDNA, ITS1, 5.8S rDNA, ITS2 and partial 28S rDNA regions of nuclear ribosomal DNA were obtained from 27 species and pre-existing sequences for nine species were incorporated. The broad taxonomic, host and geographical coverage of the specimens allowed us to address long-standing questions in rhabdiasid systematics, evolution, geographic distribution, and patterns of host association. Our analysis demonstrated that rhabdiasids parasitic in snakes are an independent genus sister to the rest of the Rhabdiasidae, a status supported by life cycle data. Based on the combined evidence of molecular phylogeny, morphology and life cycle characteristics, a new genus Serpentirhabdias gen. nov. with the type species Serpentirhabdias elaphe (Sharpilo, 1976) comb. nov. is established. The phylogeny supports the monophyly of Entomelas Travassos, 1930, Pneumonema Johnston, 1916 and the largest genus of the family, Rhabdias Stiles and Hassall, 1905. DNA sequence comparisons demonstrate the presence of more than one species in the previously monotypic Pneumonema from Australian scincid lizards. The distribution of some morphological characters in the genus Rhabdias shows little consistency within the phylogenetic tree topology, in particular the apical structures widely used in rhabdiasid systematics. Our data suggest that some of the characters, while valuable for species differentiation, are not appropriate for differentiation among higher taxa and are of limited phylogenetic utility. Rhabdias is the only genus with a cosmopolitan distribution, but some of the lineages within Rhabdias are distributed on a single continent or a group of adjacent

  9. Observations on the free-living stages of cattle gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Fiel, C A; Fernández, A S; Rodríguez, E M; Fusé, L A; Steffan, P E

    2012-06-08

    A 4-year study on the free-living stages of cattle gastrointestinal nematodes was conducted to determine (a) the development time from egg to infective larvae (L3) inside the faecal pats, (b) the pasture infectivity levels over time, and (c) the survival of L3 on pasture. Naturally infected calves were allowed to contaminate 16 plots on monthly basis. Weekly monitoring of eggs per gram of faeces (epg) values and faecal cultures from these animals provided data for the contamination patterns and the relative nematode population composition. At the same time, faecal pats were shaped and deposited monthly onto herbage and sampled weekly to determine the development time from egg to L3. Herbage samples were collected fortnightly over a 16-month period after deposition to evaluate the pasture larval infectivity and survival of L3 over time. The development time from egg to L3 was 1-2 weeks in summer, 3-5 weeks in autumn, 4-6 weeks in winter, and 1-4 weeks in spring. The levels of contamination and pasture infectivity showed a clear seasonality during autumn-winter and spring, whilst a high mortality of larvae on pasture occurred in summer. Ostertagia spp., Cooperia spp. and Trichostrongylus spp. were predominant and a survival of L3 on pasture over a 1-year period was recorded in this study.

  10. Gastrointestinal nematodes in grazing dairy cattle from small and medium-sized farms in southern Poland.

    PubMed

    Piekarska, J; Płoneczka-Janeczko, K; Kantyka, M; Kuczaj, M; Gorczykowski, M; Janeczko, K

    2013-11-15

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of gastrointestinal nematodes and the intensity of infection in grazing dairy cattle from small and medium-sized farms in southern Poland. The level of antibodies against Ostertagia ostertagi in the bulk tank milk (BTM) from the animals was also assessed. Rectal fecal samples collected from 361 cows on 20 farms were examined using Willis-Schlaaf flotation and the McMaster method. BTM samples were tested for the presence of O. ostertagi antibodies using ELISA. Multiplex PCR was used to identify the third-stage larvae (L3) of gastrointestinal nematodes derived from the culture of pooled fecal samples from sampled farms. Gastrointestinal nematode eggs were found in the samples from 18 of the 20 herds with a prevalence range from 20.4 to 94.5%. The average number of eggs excreted in the feces of the herds was 200 eggs per gram (EPG). Antibodies to O. ostertagi were found in 20 of the examined herds (100%), of which 6 had optical density ratios (ODR) greater than 0.5. PCR results showed the presence of three nematode species: Ostertagia ostertagi, Cooperia oncophora and Oesophagostomum radiatum.

  11. In vitro larvicidal effect of a hydroalcoholic extract from Acacia cochliacantha leaf against ruminant parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Olmedo-Juárez, Agustín; Rojo-Rubio, Rolando; Zamilpa, Alejandro; Mendoza de Gives, Pedro; Arece-García, Javier; López-Arellano, María Eugenia; von Son-de Fernex, Elke

    2017-04-08

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro lethal effect of a hydroalcoholic extract (HAE) from Acacia cochliacantha leaf against three gastrointestinal nematodes species (Haemonchus contortus, H. placei and Cooperia punctata) of domestic ruminants. The HAE was assessed using five concentrations: 100, 125, 175, 150 and 200 mg/ml; 0.5% Ivermectin was used as a positive control and distilled water, as negative control. The data were normalized using the square root and analysed with a completely randomized design through ANOVA analysis using the general lineal model (GLM) of the SAS program. The HAE tannin content was determined through spectrophotometry (UV-visible) and the other major phenols, were identified by chromatographic processes. The results showed an in vitro larvicidal activity of the HAE against the three assessed nematode species with all assessed concentrations. A clear HAE increased concentration dependence effect was observed. The highest activity of the HAE was obtained at the highest concentration (close to 100%, P < 0.05). This result was similar to the one obtained with Ivermectin. On the other hand, the chemical analysis of HAE showed the presence of tannins, caffeoyls and coumaroyl derivates and quercetin as the main compounds. The results suggest that the HAE from this plant species possess in vitro anthelmintic properties. The identified compounds in this study would good candidates for further in vivo researches.

  12. Dose determination of the persistent activity of moxidectin long-acting injectable formulations against various nematode species in cattle.

    PubMed

    Yazwinski, T A; Williams, J C; Smith, L L; Tucker, C; Loyacano, A F; Derosa, A; Peterson, P; Bruer, D J; Delay, R L

    2006-04-30

    The effectiveness, safety and production-enhancing benefit (improved weight gains) of moxidectin long-acting injection given subcutaneously in the ear at the rates of 0.75, 1.0 and 1.5mg/kg bw were evaluated in three studies under common protocol. The only adverse reaction to treatment was a mild (<2 tablespoons in volume), and for the most part transient (<28 days for the treatment rate of 1.0mg/kg bw) injection site swelling as noted in a minority of the animals (12.2% of the animals treated at the rate of 1.0mg/kg bw). Regardless of study site, post-treatment interval or dose rate, average daily gains were improved over control cattle by approximately 33%. Reductions in strongyle EPG counts relative to controls were > or = 90% for all dose rates of moxidectin for a post-treatment period of 42 days (Wisconsin), 84 days (Arkansas) and 140 days (Louisiana). In Arkansas and Louisiana, the majority (>80%) of post-treatment strongyle eggs, as determined by coproculture, were Cooperia spp. As determined by sequential necropsies, periods of continuous, post-treatment protection (> or = 90% efficacy in at least two out of three studies) for moxidectin long-acting injection given at the rate of 1.0 mg/kg bw were 90 days (adult Haemonchus spp.), 120 days (Dictyocaulus viviparus and adult Ostertagia and Oesophagostomum) and 150 days (Ostertagia spp. EL4).

  13. Study of gastrointestinal parasites in water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) reared under Mexican humid tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Ojeda-Robertos, Nadia Florencia; Torres-Chablé, Oswaldo Margarito; Peralta-Torres, Jorge Alonso; Luna-Palomera, Carlos; Aguilar-Cabrales, Aguilar; Chay-Canul, Alfonso Juventino; González-Garduño, Roberto; Machain-Williams, Carlos; Cámara-Sarmiento, Ramón

    2017-03-01

    The objective was to determine the frequency of gastrointestinal parasites (GP) genera affecting water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) reared under humid tropical conditions of Mexico. Three hundred eighty-three Munrah breed water buffalo were included, 251 adult females and 132 calves. Feces were directly collected form the rectum of the animals and processed by the McMaster technique. Coprocultures were made to identify the genera of the nematodes. The frequency of GP in B. bubalis was 42%, independently of their age, 60% of calves resulted parasitized. Age had a strong association with the presence of GP (Xi(2) = 77.4014, d.f. = 1, p = 0.001). The family Trichostrongylidae was found in both age groups. The genera identified were Strongyloides sp. (47.2%), Cooperia sp. (33.9%), and Haemonchus sp. (10.4%), as well as Eimeria sp., Moniezia sp., Trichuris sp., and Strongyloides sp. The highest parasite burden corresponded to the genus Strongyloides sp. with 1108.9 EPG. There is a need to carry out further studies in order to know the prevalence and incidence of nematode affecting to B. bubalis as an introduced animal species to Mexican tropics.

  14. Low-level parasitic worm burdens may reduce body condition in free-ranging red deer (Cervus elaphus).

    PubMed

    Irvine, R J; Corbishley, H; Pilkington, J G; Albon, S D

    2006-10-01

    Regulation of ungulate populations by parasites relies on establishing a density-dependent relationship between infection and vital demographic rates which may act through the effect of parasites on body condition. We examine evidence for parasite impacts in 285 red deer (Cervus elaphus) harvested during 1991 and 1992 on the Isle of Rum. In the abomasa, prevalence of nematodes was 100% and the most abundant genus observed were Ostertagia species, however, mean intensity of infection was low (less than 1000) relative to other studies. Additional species, also present in low numbers, included Nematodirus spp., Capillaria spp., Cooperia spp., Monieza expanza, Oesophagostomum venulosum and Trichuris ovis. Lungworm (Dictyocaulus spp.) and tissue worm (Elaphostronygylus cervi) larvae were also observed in faecal samples. There was no evidence for acquired immunity to abomasal nematodes. Despite low levels of infection, both adult male and female deer showed significant negative correlation between indices of condition (kidney fat index, dressed carcass weight and larder weight) and intensity of Ostertagia spp. infection. However, there was no evidence that pregnancy rate in females was related to intensity of infection. For calves, there was no relationship between body condition and intensity of infection. The apparent subclinical effects of low-level parasite infection on red deer performance could alternatively be due to animals in poorer nutritional state being more susceptible to infection. Either way the results suggest that further studies of wild populations are justified, in particular where high local host densities exist or alternative ungulate hosts are present, and, where experimental treatments are tractable.

  15. Using Duddingtonia flagrans in calves under an organic milk farm production system in the Mexican tropics.

    PubMed

    Ortiz Pérez, Diego Otoniel; Sánchez Muñoz, Bernardo; Nahed Toral, José; Orantes Zebadúa, Miguel Ángel; Cruz López, José Luis; Reyes García, María Eréndira; Mendoza de Gives, Pedro

    2017-04-01

    The reduction of the gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) larvae population in faeces of cattle treated with Duddingtonia flagrans chlamydospores on a farm under an organic production system in Chiapas, Mexico, was assessed. Seventeen Cebu/Swiss crossbreed grazing calves naturally infected with GIN, were randomly distributed into two groups and treated as follows: Group 1, an oral administration of 2 × 10(6)D. flagrans chlamydospores/kg BW, every two days for 30 days; group 2, Control, without any treatment. Results indicated that the epg values in both groups remained similar (p > 0.05). The average number of (L3) from coprocultures from the group treated with D. flagrans had an important reduction (53.8%) with respect to the control group and it reached 75.3% maximum larval reduction at the 14th sampling; although, no statistic significance was observed (p > 0.05). Likewise, the average of larvae (L3) recovered from grass corresponding to the animals treated with D. flagrans diminished at 25.1% with respect to the control group (p > 0.05). A mixture of GIN genera including Strongyloides sp., Haemonchus sp., Cooperia sp., Trichostrongylus sp., Oesophagostomum sp. and Mecistocirrus sp., were identified from coprocultures. It was concluded that treatment with D. flagrans chlamydospores reduces the GIN larvae population in grass and in faeces of calves maintained under an organic milk production system.

  16. The parasitic fauna of the European bison (Bison bonasus) (Linnaeus, 1758) and their impact on the conservation. Part 1. The summarising list of parasites noted.

    PubMed

    Karbowiak, Grzegorz; Demiaszkiewicz, Aleksander W; Pyziel, Anna M; Wita, Irena; Moskwa, Bożena; Werszko, Joanna; Bień, Justyna; Goździk, Katarzyna; Lachowicz, Jacek; Cabaj, Władysław

    2014-09-01

    During the current century, 88 species of parasites have been recorded in Bison bonasus. These are 22 species of protozoa (Trypanosoma wrublewskii, T. theileri, Giardia sp., Sarcocystis cruzi, S. hirsuta, S. hominis, S. fusiformis, Neospora caninum, Toxoplasma gondii, Cryptosporidium sp., Eimeria cylindrica, E. subspherica, E. bovis, E. zuernii, E. canadensis, E. ellipsoidalis, E. alabamensis, E. bukidnonensis, E. auburnensis, E. pellita, E. brasiliensis, Babesia divergens), 4 trematodes species (Dicrocoelium dendriticum, Fasciola hepatica, Parafasciolopsis fasciolaemorpha, Paramphistomum cervi), 4 cestodes species (Taenia hydatigena larvae, Moniezia benedeni, M. expansa, Moniezia sp.), 43 nematodes species (Bunostomum trigonocephalum, B. phlebotomum, Chabertia ovina, Oesophagostomum radiatum, O. venulosum, Dictyocaulus filaria, D.viviparus, Nematodirella alcidis, Nematodirus europaeus, N. helvetianus, N. roscidus, N. filicollis, N. spathiger, Cooperia oncophora, C. pectinata, C. punctata, C. surnabada, Haemonchus contortus, Mazamastrongylus dagestanicus, Ostertagia lyrata, O. ostertagi, O. antipini, O. leptospicularis, O. kolchida, O. circumcincta, O. trifurcata, Spiculopteragia boehmi, S. mathevossiani, S. asymmetrica, Trichostrongylus axei, T. askivali, T. capricola, T. vitrinus, Ashworthius sidemi, Onchocerca lienalis, O. gutturosa, Setaria labiatopapillosa, Gongylonema pulchrum, Thelazia gulosa, T. skrjabini, T. rhodesi, Aonchotheca bilobata, Trichuris ovis), 7 mites (Demodex bisonianus, D. bovis, Demodex sp., Chorioptes bovis, Psoroptes equi, P. ovis, Sarcoptes scabiei), 4 Ixodidae ticks (Ixodes ricinus, I. persulcatus, I. hexagonus, Dermacentor reticulatus), 1 Mallophaga species (Bisonicola sedecimdecembrii), 1 Anoplura (Haematopinus eurysternus), and 2 Hippoboscidae flies (Lipoptena cervi, Melophagus ovinus). There are few monoxenous parasites, many typical for cattle and many newly acquired from Cervidae.

  17. Nematode infection among ruminants in monsoon climate (Ban-Lahanam, Lao PDR) and its role as food-borne zoonosis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Marcello Otake; Sato, Megumi; Chaisiri, Kittipong; Maipanich, Wanna; Yoonuan, Tippayarat; Sanguankiat, Surapol; Pongvongsa, Tiengkham; Boupha, Boungnong; Moji, Kazuhiko; Waikagul, Jitra

    2014-03-01

    Trichostrongylids infection has gained significant public health importance since Trichostrongylus spp. infections have been reported in humans in Lao PDR. In this study, gastrointestinal nematodes were identified and the intensity of infections was determined in goats and cattle, which are animals greatly used for meat production in Lahanam Village, Lao PDR. The total number of goats and bovines was 23 and 29, respectively, pertaining to 32 households surveyed in the area. Feacal samples were randomly collected from 14 goats and 11 bovines. Ninety three percent (13/14) of goats and 36% (3/11) of cattle were infected, with an average of 1,728 and 86 eggs per gram of faeces (EPG), respectively. Coproculture showed Trichostrongylus spp. (goats 16%; bovines 48%), Haemonchus spp. (goats 69%; bovines 37%), Cooperia spp. (bovines 8%) and Oesophagostomum spp. (goats 15%; bovines 6%). After performing the necropsy on an adult goat, Trichuris spp. was also found. We confirmed the presence of Oesophagostomum spp., H. contortus and T. colubriformis by morphology and DNA sequencing analysis of the ITS region of rDNA. Due to interactions between humans and goats in Lahanam Village and high EPG results, the diagnosis of species and the intensity of gastrointestinal nematode infection in these animals are important public-health issues. Other ruminant parasites, such as Oesophagostomum and Haemonchus, found in caprines and bovines, are reported to be causes of zoonosis and their presence in humans should be investigated in future field surveys in this area.

  18. Assessment of the impact of plant species composition and drought stress on survival of strongylid third-stage larvae in a greenhouse experiment.

    PubMed

    Knapp-Lawitzke, Friederike; Küchenmeister, Frank; Küchenmeister, Kai; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Demeler, Janina

    2014-11-01

    Grazing livestock is always exposed to infective parasite stages. Depending on the general health status of the animal, the farm management, environmental conditions and pasture exposure, the impact ranges from non-affected to almost moribund animals. The greenhouse experiment was performed to investigate how climatic changes and plant composition influence the occurrence/survival of strongylid third-stage larvae (L3) on pasture. Ten different types of plant species compositions (eight replicates for each) were inoculated with approximately 10,000 Cooperia oncophora L3. The different plant compositions can be assorted to two groups: without legume content and with legume content (52-62% legume content). Half of the replicates were watered adequately, while the other half was hold under drought stress (DS), mimicking longer dry periods. During the DS cycles, the respective containers were not watered until they reached the wilting point. Grass samples were taken 1, 4 and 6 weeks after inoculation, soil samples were taken only once after 6 weeks and all samples were examined for occurrence of L3. After the second DS cycle, the number of L3 present on herbage samples was reduced significantly. The higher the legume content of the pasture composition, the higher is the L3 occurrence on pasture. Independent of the watering scheme, the soil served as the most important reservoir with consistently higher numbers of L3 in the soil compared to herbage.

  19. [Helminth fauna of free living European bison Bison bonasus (L.) in Bieszczady Mountains (Karpatian Mountains, Poland)].

    PubMed

    Drózdz, J; Demiaszkiewicz, A W; Lachowicz, J

    2000-01-01

    Four free living European bison from Białowieza/Caucasus line shot in February 1997 within Lutowiska Forestry District in the Bieszczady Mountains were used in investigations. All examined animals were infected with helminths. There were found 10 species of parasites. Five species of them Ostertagia leptospicularis, O. kolchida, Spiculopteragia boehmi, Cooperia pectinata and Ashworthius sidemi are thypical parasites of Cervides, and from them were infected bison in Bieszczady. In all necropsied animals was found invasion of nematode A. sidemi, with mean intensity 1542 specimens. It is the first registration of A. sidemi in Poland and European bison is a new host for this parasite. It seems that the source of infection A. sidemi in European bison in Bieszczady is the local population of deer, which during their migrations could bring this parasite from neighbouring Ukraine and Slovakia, where this nematode have been introduced together with deer Cervus nippon. There are also presented results of coproscopic examinations of 17 fecal samples from free living European bison in Bieszczady.

  20. The Development, Clinical Signs and Economic Losses of Gastrointestinal Parasitism in Feeder Cattle on Irrigated and Non-irrigated Dikeland and Upland Pastures

    PubMed Central

    Smith, H. J.; Calder, F. W.

    1972-01-01

    Investigations were carried out over three grazing seasons with parasitized and treated (control) steers on irrigated and non-irrigated upland and dikeland pastures. The stocking rate in each paddock was adjusted by either adding or removing animals so as to maintain as uniform a sward and rate of grazing as possible. Animals were weighed on and off the pastures and fortnightly during the grazing seasons. During the first grazing season clinically normal steers shedding low numbers of gastrointestinal worm eggs contaminated the parasite-free pastures sufficiently to give rise to large residual pasture infections and clinical parasitic gastroenteritis in grazing stock during the second grazing season. Worm burdens of 100,000 to 200,000 Ostertagia ostertagi and Cooperia oncophora were established in several steers showing marked clinical signs. In spite of treatments with high dosages of thiabendazole in attempts to keep worm burdens at a minimum, there was a slow but gradual buildup of pasture infections in the paddocks grazed by the control steers over the three year period. During the second and third grazing seasons there were significant differences in the daily rate of gain between the parasitized and control animals on both upland and dikeland pastures. The parasitized groups of steers had daily rates of gain ranging from 0.29 to 0.80 pounds less than their comparable control groups. Under Maritime conditions, irrigation did not have a consistent effect on weight gains and development of parasitism. PMID:4263919

  1. Resistant nematodes in cattle: Pharmaco-therapeutic assessment of the ivermectin- ricobendazole combination.

    PubMed

    Canton, Candela; Ceballos, Laura; Fiel, César; Moreno, Laura; Domingo Yagüez, Pablo; Bernat, Gisele; Lanusse, Carlos; Alvarez, Luis

    2017-01-30

    Nematodicidal combinations have been proposed as a valid strategy to achieve effective nematode control in the presence of drug resistance. The goals of this study were: (1) to compare the clinical efficacy (therapeutic response) of ivermectin (IVM) and ricobendazole (RBZ) given subcutaneously either by separate or combined administration to calves naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes resistant to IVM, and (2) to evaluate the potential pharmacokinetic (PK) and/or pharmacodynamic (PD) interactions occurring after the co-administration of both anthelmintics. Sixty male calves naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes resistant to IVM were randomly allocated into four groups (n=15). Untreated control: animals not receiving anthelmintic treatment; IVM alone: animals treated with IVM by subcutaneous (SC) injection (0.2mg/kg); RBZ alone: animals received RBZ by the SC route (3.75mg/kg); IVM+RBZ: animals treated with IVM and RBZ (0.2 and 3.75mg/kg, respectively), by SC injection in two separates sites. Eight animals of each treated group were randomly selected to perform the PK study. Plasma samples were taken from those animals up to 28days post-treatment. IVM and RBZ plasma concentrations were quantified by HPLC. The therapeutic response was determined by faecal egg count reduction test (FECRT). The proportions of third-stage larvae (L3) recovered from coprocultures were used to calculate the efficacy against the main parasite genera. The daily total egg deposition for each experimental group was estimated. Similar pharmacokinetic trends were obtained for both IVM and RBZ allying the single-drug and the combined treatments, which indicates the absence of PK interactions between both anthelmintics. The observed overall clinical drug efficacies were 48% (IVM alone), 94% (RBZ alone) and 98% (IVM+RBZ). Haemonchus spp. and Cooperia spp. were recovered in the coproculture after IVM treatment, suggesting that resistance to IVM includes both genera. In

  2. Anthelmintic resistance in gastrointestinal nematodes of beef cattle in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Fernanda; Portella, Luiza Pires; Rodrigues, Fernando de Souza; Reginato, Caroline Zamperete; Pötter, Luciana; Cezar, Alfredo Skrebsky; Sangioni, Luís Antônio; Vogel, Fernanda Silveira Flores

    2016-04-01

    Gastrointestinal nematodes resistant to anthelmintics have been reported in several regions of Brazil, and they may be associated with economic losses for the cattle industry. This study aimed to evaluate the resistance status of gastrointestinal nematodes from naturally infected beef cattle to several commercially available anthelmintics, as well as to test the efficacy of combinations of anthelmintics against multi-resistant gastrointestinal nematodes. Ten farms located in Rio Grande do Sul state were selected by: farmers' consent; extensive raising system; availability of calves aged from 7 to 9 months naturally infected by gastrointestinal nematodes; absence of anthelmintic treatment for 60 days before the study; and presence of 70-100 calves or more of both genders with ≥ 200 eggs per gram of feces (EPG) (sensitivity of 50 EPG). These calves were distributed into 10 groups (of 7-10 animals) per farm and treated with ivermectin, doramectin, eprinomectin, fenbendazole, closantel, nitroxynil, disophenol, levamisole, albendazole, or moxidectin. Feces were collected 2 days before treatment and 14 days after treatment. Additional groups of 7-10 calves were used to test six different two-drug combinations at four of the studied farms. In general terms, fenbendazole was the most effective drug, followed by levamisole, disophenol, and moxidectin. However, parasite resistance to multiple drugs was found in all herds, especially in the genera Cooperia spp., Trichostrongylus spp., and Haemonchus spp.. Some of the two-drug combinations were effective against nematode populations identified as resistant to the same compounds when used as single drugs. The most effective combinations were moxidectin + levamisole, doramectin + fenbendazole, and levamisole + closantel. In this study, parasites resistant to the main commercially available anthelmintics were found in all herds, and some combinations of two active components belonging to different chemical groups were effective

  3. Gastrointestinal nematodes in rotationally grazing ewes in the mountainous region of central Mexico.

    PubMed

    Acevedo-Ramírez, P M C; Quiroz-Romero, H; Cruz-Mendoza, I; Ulloa-Arvizu, R; Ibarra-Velarde, F

    2013-03-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the frequency of egg shedding (percentage of egg-positive faecal samples) and faecal egg counts (FEC) over 13 months in two different breeds of ewes, both pregnant and non-pregnant, in a mountainous region of central Mexico. Additionally, the effect of ivermectin and albendazole treatments on FEC reduction was recorded. The study also aimed to relate temperature and rainfall to FEC. The gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) third-stage larvae genera recovered from both faeces and grassland pastures in a temperate region were also assessed. Faecal samples were collected from ewes at monthly intervals for 13 months to investigate the FEC population of GIN larvae, their concentration and genera in grass samples collected from grazed and rested pastures. Egg-shedding frequency ranged from 0 to 92% and FEC from 0 to 12,000 eggs per g faeces (epg), with counts in Suffolk higher than in Dorset ewes. The identified genera were Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Teladorsagia, Cooperia, Oesophagostomum, Bunostomum, Nematodirus and Strongyloides. Haemonchus and Trichostrongylus were the most common genera. The number of L3 was higher in grazing lands than in those at rest. The highest FEC were recorded in the dry season due to peripartum, but the highest L3 counts were recorded in the rainy season. The coexistence of species of different geographical distributions at this site may be because there is a confluence of Nearctic and Neotropical geographic regions; thus, despite the temperate climate, tropical species can be found. Additionally, this study suggests that increasing temperatures could favour the presence of different tropical GIN species together with typical temperate-zone GIN species.

  4. Resistance against gastrointestinal nematodes in Crioulo Lageano and crossbred Angus cattle in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Cristina P; Silva, Bruna F; Trinca, Luzia A; Amarante, Alessandro F T

    2013-02-18

    Gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) infection is a major cause of production losses in cattle. This study was carried out to evaluate the natural resistance against nematode infection in Crioulo Lageano and crossbred Angus male calves. Crioulo Lageano is a local cattle breed in the state of Santa Catarina, in southern Brazil. Ten weaned calves of each breed were grazed together on pasture and naturally infected with nematodes between July 2009 and December 2010. Once every 28 days, we collected fecal and blood samples for parasitological and immunological tests, as well as recording body weights. After 19 samplings, all animals were slaughtered for quantification and identification of GINs. We found that the animals had been infected with the following nematode species, in decreasing order by the mean number of specimens: Trichostrongylus axei, Cooperia punctata, Ostertagia ostertagi, Haemonchus placei, Oesophagostomum radiatum, and Trichuris spp. There were no significant differences between the Crioulo Lageano and crossbred Angus groups in terms of worm burden or nematode fecal egg count, nor in terms of the mean levels of immunoglobulin (G and A) against C. punctata and H. placei antigens, except in IgA mean level in abomasal mucus against H. placei adult worms that was significantly higher in crossbred Angus cattle (p<0.05). At the end of the study, the crossbred Angus cattle were heavier than were the Crioulo Lageano cattle (mean live weight, 507.35 and 390.3 kg, respectively). Comparative parasitological and immunological evaluation revealed no difference between two breeds in terms of their natural resistance against GINs.

  5. Evaluation of the effectiveness of Duddingtonia flagrans and Monacrosporium thaumasium in the biological control of gastrointestinal nematodes in female bovines bred in the semiarid region.

    PubMed

    Silva, Manoel Eduardo da; Braga, Fabio Ribeiro; Borges, Luana Alcântara; Oliveira, Jair Mendes de; Lima, Walter dos Santos; Guimarães, Marcos Pezzi; Araújo, Jackson Victor de

    2014-06-01

    Brazil has a herd of 212 million cattle and 171 million hectares of pastures that produce approximately 96 % of Brazilian beef. The Brazilian production system enables animal infection by endoparasites, which are considered one of the main obstacles for the development of this industry and are responsible for considerable economic losses. The control of parasitic diseases is performed via the administration of antiparasitic drugs, but they leave residues of the products in the treated animal, affect non-target organisms and select resistant strains of the parasites. The species D. flagrans and M. thaumasium are promising and sustainable alternatives for controlling gastrointestinal helminths of ruminants and other herbivores. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of isolates of these species, formulated in a sodium alginate matrix and administered twice a week, to reduce the number of environmental infective larvae of gastrointestinal nematodes that affect prepubescent zebu females. The treated animals presented fewer eggs and a lower number of infective larvae per gram of faeces (p < 0.05). The pastures occupied by treated animals showed a statistically significant reduction (p < 0.05) of the number of L3 and, furthermore, the genera Cooperia sp., Haemonchus sp., and Oesophagostomum sp. were the most prevalent. The average weight of the animals did not differ statistically (p > 0.05) among the treated and control groups. The use of sodium alginate pellets as vehicle for delivery of the fungus mycelia D. flagrans (isolate AC001) and M. thaumasium (isolate NF34A) proved effective in controlling trichostrongylids in prepubescent cows bred in the semi-arid region, with an effective reduction in the number of infective larvae in the pastures.

  6. Efficacy of oral, injectable and pour-on formulations of moxidectin against gastrointestinal nematodes in cattle in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Leathwick, D M; Miller, C M

    2013-01-31

    The efficacy of moxidectin administered by different routes, against naturally acquired infections of gastrointestinal nematode parasites of cattle, was compared using faecal egg count reduction tests on 14 commercial farms throughout New Zealand. On each farm, groups of 15 calves were sampled for faecal nematode egg count and then treated with ivermectin administered orally, or with moxidectin administered either by the oral, subcutaneous injection or topical (pour-on) route. Samples were again collected 14 days after treatment and efficacy was calculated as the percentage reduction in-group mean egg count between the pre- and post-treatment samples. In addition, efficacy was calculated for individual animals, in order to compare the variability of the different treatments. On four farms untreated control groups were run and five animals from each of the control and all of the moxidectin-treated groups were bled over time to estimate plasma-moxidectin concentrations. Averaged across all tests, the reduction in faecal egg count was significantly greater after treatment with moxidectin oral (91.1%) than following treatment with moxidectin injection (55.5%) or with moxidectin pour-on (51.3%). Low efficacies were invariably against Cooperia oncophora. The oral treatments were significantly less variable in efficacy than the injection and pour-on treatments. Moxidectin concentrations in plasma were highest following subcutaneous injection and lowest following pour-on administration. Plasma levels following oral administration were intermediate, being significantly lower than post-injection and significantly higher than post-pour-on. There was no evidence of transfer of moxidectin to untreated animals through licking. Based on these results, along with those of other studies, it is proposed that oral administration of macrocyclic lactone anthelmintics results in higher concentrations of active reaching the target worms in the gastrointestinal tract than following either

  7. Efficacy of an energy block containing Duddingtonia flagrans in the control of gastrointestinal nematodes of sheep.

    PubMed

    Sagüés, María F; Fusé, Luis A; Fernández, Alicia S; Iglesias, Lucía E; Moreno, Fabiana C; Saumell, Carlos A

    2011-09-01

    The efficacy of the nematode-trapping fungus Duddingtonia flagrans incorporated into an energy block was evaluated for the control of gastrointestinal nematodes in sheep. Four naturally parasitised sheep with average nematode egg counts of 2,470 eggs per gram grazed by pairs on two similar parasite-free paddocks for 30 days. During that period, one pair of sheep (treated animals, T1) received an energy block containing chlamydospores of D. flagrans at a dose of 200,000 chlamydopores/kg bw/day, while the second pair (control animals, C1) received a fungus-free energy block. The animals in both groups were taken off the paddocks after contaminating the pastures for a month with either nematode eggs plus fungal chlamydospores (T1) or nematode eggs alone (C1). Twelve parasite-free sheep were divided into two groups of six animals each, the treated group (T2) was placed on the paddock previously contaminated with parasites and fungus, while the control group (C2) was placed on the parasite-only paddock. These two groups grazed on their respective paddocks during 30 days and were then housed for 15 days, after which period they were slaughtered in order to determine the parasite burden present in each animal. Results showed that animals in group T2 harboured significantly less nematodes than their counterpart in group C2. The efficacy of D. flagrans was 92% against the total parasite burden, 100% against Haemonchus contortus and Teladorsagia circumcincta, 89.9% against Trichostrongylus colubriformis, 87.5% against Cooperia onchopora, and 90% against Trichostrongylus axei. No efficacy was detected against Nematodirus spathiger, Trichuris ovis and T. skrjabini.

  8. Persistent efficacy of 3.5% doramectin compared to 3.15% ivermectin against gastrointestinal nematodes in experimentally-infected cattle in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Welber Daniel Zanetti; dos Santos, Thaís Rabelo; Sakamoto, Claudio A M; de Lima, Roberto Cesar Araújo; Valarelli, Rodrigo Lechugo; Paiva, Pablo; da Costa, Alvimar José

    2013-04-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the persistent efficacy of a 3.5% doramectin(*) (700 μg/kg) formulation compared to 3.15% ivermectin(**) (630 μg/kg) treatment, administered subcutaneously at a dose of 1 mL/50 kg body weight in cattle experimentally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes. Seventy-two male crossbred Holstein cattle that were negative for helminth infection were divided into nine groups. Treatments of 3.5% doramectin (Groups 2, 4, 6 and 8) and 3.15% ivermectin (Groups 3, 5, 7 and 9) were administered on days 49, 42, 35 and 28 prior to challenge with infectious nematode larvae (L3). Animals in the control group (Group 1) received saline solution on day 49 before challenge. Beginning on day zero, each animal received 50 mL orally of a mixed culture containing approximately 3,000 third stage larvae (L3) of Haemonchus (60%), Oesophagostomum (20%), Cooperia (15%) and Trichostrongylus (5%) for seven consecutive days, resulting in a total challenge of 21,000 larvae/animal. Due to the large number of cattle, autopsies were performed between days 28 and 35 after the last day of inoculation. The formulation containing doramectin (700 mcg/kg) achieved persistent efficacy against H. placei and C. punctata for 49 and 35 days, respectively. The persistent efficacy of ivermectin (630 mcg/kg) against H. placei lasted for 49 days, but this treatment was ineffective against C. punctata. Both formulations demonstrated persistent efficacy against T. axei for 49 days. The persistent efficacy of doramectin (700 mcg/kg) and ivermectin (630 mcg/kg) lasted for 49 and 42 days against O. radiatum, respectively.

  9. Use of Ivermectin as Endoparasiticide in Tropical Cattle Herds Generates Resistance in Gastrointestinal Nematodes and the Tick Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Alegría-López, M A; Rodríguez-Vivas, R I; Torres-Acosta, J F J; Ojeda-Chi, M M; Rosado-Aguilar, J A

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine simultaneously the status of resistance against ivermectin (IVM) in gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) and Rhipicephalus microplus (Canestrini, 1888) ticks in 12 cattle farms where IVM was used for the control of GIN in the Mexican tropics. Six farms had frequent use of IVM (≥ 4 times per year) and six farms had low frequency of IVM use (1-2 times per year). The fecal egg count reduction test and the larval immersion test were used to determine the resistant status of GIN and R. microplus against IVM, respectively. The results indicated that 100% of the surveyed farms had IVM-resistant GIN (reduction % from 0 to 67%). The genera involved were Haemonchus, Cooperia, Ostertagia, Trichostrongylus, and Oesophagostomum. Although the IVM was never used for the control of ticks, 50% of the surveyed farms presented GIN and R. microplus simultaneously resistant to IVM. Furthermore, two R. microplus populations showed high resistance ratio (RR) to IVM (farm TAT: RR50% = 7 and RR99% = 40.1; and farm SLS: RR50% = 2.4; RR99% = 11.0). A high frequency of IVM use (≥ 4 times per year) seemed to promote IVM resistance amongst R. microplus ticks compared with the farms with low frequency of IVM use (1-2 times per year; 66.6 vs. 25.0%, respectively). However, the number of surveyed farms was insufficient to show clear statistical inferences (odds ratio = 6.00; 95% CI = 0.341-105.5). The use of IVM for the control of GIN promoted simultaneously the development of IVM resistance in the GIN and R. microplus populations of the cattle herds surveyed.

  10. Anthelmintic resistance to ivermectin and moxidectin in gastrointestinal nematodes of cattle in Europe.

    PubMed

    Geurden, Thomas; Chartier, Christophe; Fanke, Jane; di Regalbono, Antonio Frangipane; Traversa, Donato; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Demeler, Janina; Vanimisetti, Hima Bindu; Bartram, David J; Denwood, Matthew J

    2015-12-01

    Anthelmintic resistance has been increasingly reported in cattle worldwide over the last decade, although reports from Europe are more limited. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of injectable formulations of ivermectin and moxidectin at 0.2 mg per kg bodyweight against naturally acquired gastro-intestinal nematodes in cattle. A total of 753 animals on 40 farms were enrolled in Germany (12 farms), the UK (10 farms), Italy (10 farms), and France (8 farms). Animals were selected based on pre-treatment faecal egg counts and were allocated to one of the two treatment groups. Each treatment group consisted of between 7 and 10 animals. A post-treatment faecal egg count was performed 14 days (±2 days) after treatment. The observed percentage reduction was calculated for each treatment group based on the arithmetic mean faecal egg count before and after treatment. The resistance status was evaluated based on the reduction in arithmetic mean faecal egg count and both the lower and upper 95% confidence limits. A decreased efficacy was observed in half or more of the farms in Germany, France and the UK. For moxidectin, resistance was confirmed on 3 farms in France, and on 1 farm in Germany and the UK. For ivermectin, resistance was confirmed on 3 farms in the UK, and on 1 farm in Germany and France. The remaining farms with decreased efficacy were classified as having an inconclusive resistance status based on the available data. After treatment Cooperia spp. larvae were most frequently identified, though Ostertagia ostertagi was also found, in particular within the UK and Germany. The present study reports lower than expected efficacy for ivermectin and moxidectin (based on the reduction in egg excretion after treatment) on European cattle farms, with confirmed anthelmintic resistance on 12.5% of the farms.

  11. First report of anthelmintic resistance in Haemonchus contortus in alpacas in Australia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Parasitic nematodes can cause substantial clinical and subclinical problems in alpacas and anthelmintics are regularly used to control parasitic nematodes in alpacas. Although anthelmintic resistance has been reported in ruminants worldwide, very little is known about anthelmintic resistance in alpacas. The present study was carried out to confirm a suspected case of anthelmintic resistance in Haemonchus contortus in alpacas in Australia. Methods Post mortem examination of an alpaca was conducted to determine the cause of its death. To confirm a suspected case of macrocyclic lactone (ML) resistance in H. contortus in alpacas, a faecal egg count reduction test (FECRT) was performed using closantel (7.5 mg/kg) and ivermectin (0.2 mg/kg). Nematode species were identified by morphological and molecular methods. Results Post mortem examination of a 1-year-old female alpaca that had died following a brief period of lethargy, anorexia and recumbency revealed severe anaemia, hypoproteinaemia and gastric parasitism by adult Haemonchus contortus, despite recent abamectin (0.2 mg/kg) treatment. Based on these findings and the exclusive use of MLs in the herd over the preceding six years, ML resistance in parasitic nematodes of alpacas on this farm was suspected. FECRT revealed that the efficacy of closantel was 99% (95% CI 93-100), whereas that of ivermectin was 35% (95% CI 0-78), indicating that the treatment failure was likely due to the presence of ML-resistant nematodes. Larval culture of faecal samples collected following ivermectin treatment consisted of 99% H. contortus and 1% Cooperia oncophora, a result confirmed using a PCR assay. Conclusions This study provides the first evidence of ML resistance in H. contortus in alpacas in Australia. Based on the extent of anthelmintic resistance in sheep gastrointestinal nematodes in Australia, veterinarians and alpaca owners should be encouraged to implement integrated parasite management strategies to improve

  12. Parasite control in transhumant situations.

    PubMed

    Eckert, J; Hertzberg, H

    1994-08-01

    Transhumance is defined as 'seasonal moving of livestock to regions of different climate'. It is an integral part of livestock production in many parts of the world and takes several forms including moving of livestock from lowland to mountainous pastures or from dry to humid areas. The impact of transhumance on parasite populations of livestock and on parasite control is described, mainly using examples from Europe. The epidemiology of trichostrongylidosis of cattle, mainly caused by Ostertagia ostertagi and Cooperia oncophora, is characterised by prolonged survival of overwintered infective larvae until the end of June. Cattle moved to such contaminated pastures in a transhumant grazing system are exposed to these larvae and may be protected, during the second half of the grazing season until autumn, by a late application (June/July) of an intraruminal drug-release device. Community pastures used in a transhumant system with mixed grazing of young cattle originating from various farms may enhance transmission of dictyocaulosis. Therefore, specific prophylactic measures are required. Hill sheep nematode populations may differ from those in lowland sheep in that Haemonchus contortus generally plays a minor role in hill sheep in which Ostertagia circumcincta and Nematodirus spp. predominate. Infections with Fasciola hepatica and Dicrocoelium dendriticum can be acquired on mountainous pastures by cattle, sheep and other livestock grazing in a transhumant system as intermediate hosts of these parasites may find suitable habitats in these regions. There is evidence that in the prealpine and alpine area both parasites are mainly transmitted in two-season cycles. Further examples for the impact of transhumance on parasite-host inter-relationships include cysticercosis in cattle, echinococcosis, psoroptic manage in sheep, tick-borne fever of cattle, and hypodermosis in cattle. These are described and discussed.

  13. Utilization of computer processed high definition video imaging for measuring motility of microscopic nematode stages on a quantitative scale: “The Worminator”

    PubMed Central

    Storey, Bob; Marcellino, Chris; Miller, Melissa; Maclean, Mary; Mostafa, Eman; Howell, Sue; Sakanari, Judy; Wolstenholme, Adrian; Kaplan, Ray

    2014-01-01

    A major hindrance to evaluating nematode populations for anthelmintic resistance, as well as for screening existing drugs, new compounds, or bioactive plant extracts for anthelmintic properties, is the lack of an efficient, objective, and reproducible in vitro assay that is adaptable to multiple life stages and parasite genera. To address this need we have developed the “Worminator” system, which objectively and quantitatively measures the motility of microscopic stages of parasitic nematodes. The system is built around the computer application “WormAssay”, developed at the Center for Discovery and Innovation in Parasitic Diseases at the University of California, San Francisco. WormAssay was designed to assess motility of macroscopic parasites for the purpose of high throughput screening of potential anthelmintic compounds, utilizing high definition video as an input to assess motion of adult stage (macroscopic) parasites (e.g. Brugia malayi). We adapted this assay for use with microscopic parasites by modifying the software to support a full frame analysis mode that applies the motion algorithm to the entire video frame. Thus, the motility of all parasites in a given well are recorded and measured simultaneously. Assays performed on third-stage larvae (L3) of the bovine intestinal nematode Cooperia spp., as well as microfilariae (mf) of the filarioid nematodes B. malayi and Dirofilaria immitis, yielded reproducible dose responses using the macrocyclic lactones ivermectin, doramectin, and moxidectin, as well as the nicotinic agonists, pyrantel, oxantel, morantel, and tribendimidine. This new computer based-assay is simple to use, requires minimal new investment in equipment, is robust across nematode genera and developmental stage, and does not require subjective scoring of motility by an observer. Thus, the “Worminator” provides a relatively low-cost platform for developing genera- and stage-specific assays with high efficiency and reproducibility, low

  14. Dynamics of infestation of tracers lambs by gastrointestinal helminths under a traditional management system in the North of Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    Akkari, H.; Gharbi, M.; Darghouth, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    The authors present a survey of gastrointestinal helminths of sheep on permanent pastures in the extreme north region of Tunisia (Mediterranean climate). Dynamic infestation of animals has been monitored by using batches of three tracer lambs introduced each two months during 2004 and 2005. These lambs were kept in the pens of veterinary school of Sidi Thabet (Tunisia) during three months and then necropsied. Faecal and blood samples were took from tracer lambs each two months during the whole period, and from animal flock only during 2004. The main helminth genera encountered were Trichostrongylus spp., Teladorsagia spp., Strongyloides papillosus and Anoplocephalidea; occasionaly were found Nematodirus, Oesophagostomum, Chabertia, Cooperia, Trichuris and Paramphistomum. The egg count of the ewes and lambs in the flock showed two peaks. For both ewes and lambs there is a gradual increase from January with a peak in May-June. This first peak is considered to be due to acquisition of infective larvae during the rainy and cold season, as evident from the worm burdens of tracer lambs. The second peak was exclusively observed in ewes during late autumn-early winter (November-December); it has two origins: infestation by third larvae stage and the periparturient rise. The worm burdens of tracer lambs showed that there was a gradual accumulation of nematodes from September- October, reaching a peak in March-April; a very low or naught infection is reported during the dry period (July-August). Infection by Anoplocephalidea was higher during the dry season. This study is primordial for a comprehensive control programme implementation against gastrointestinal helminths. PMID:23193526

  15. Effect of treatment with an ivermectin sustained-release bolus on productivity of stocker beef calves.

    PubMed

    Williams, J C; Loyacano, A F; Broussard, S D; Coombs, D F

    1995-05-01

    Three groups of 30 crossbred beef steers, 8-10 months of age and ranging in weight from 158 to 320 kg, were used to compare effects of treatment with an ivermectin sustained-release bolus or two ivermectin injectable treatments on parasite control and productivity in relation to untreated controls during a 168 day winter-spring grazing period. Each group of 30 consisted of five cattle on each of six separate 1.6 ha pastures. Treatments on Day 0 (12 December) were: Group 1: untreated controls; Group 2: ivermectin injectable at 200 micrograms kg-1 bodyweight, s.c., on Day 0 and Day 56; Group 3: ivermectin sustained-release bolus to deliver ivermectin at 12 mg day-1 over approximately 135 days. All cattle were weighed at 28 day intervals and fecal samples were collected for egg per gram counts (EPG). Geometric mean EPG for Group 3 remained consistently less than 1.0 after Day 0 and were highest (2.4) on Day 168. All group EPG were significantly different (P < 0.01) by Day 56, and EPG of Group 2 had increased to 10.5 following initial treatment and to 42.8 on Day 112. With the exception of a low mean EPG of 6.8 for Group 1 on Day 112, EPG of the group were consistently highest (range 24.9-36.0) to the end of the experiment. Ostertagia ostertagi was predominant, along with smaller proportions of Haemonchus placei and Cooperia spp. Throughout the experiment Group 3 had highest liveweights and gains that were most often different from those of Group 1 at P < 0.01 or greater.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Efficacy of concomitant early summer treatment with fenbendazole and clorsulon against Fasciola hepatica and gastrointestinal nematodes in calves in Louisiana.

    PubMed

    Malone, J B; Williams, J C; Lutz, M; Fagan, N; Jacocks, M; Jones, E; Marbury, K; Willis, E

    1990-01-01

    The efficacy, safety, and compatibility of fenbendazole (FBZ) and clorsulon (CLN) were tested after oral administration of label recommended and of higher (5x) dosage rates to calves naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes and Fasciola hepatica. Results for 42 calves allotted to 4 treatment groups indicated a similar efficacy against mature F hepatica by FBZ (5 mg/kg of body weight) and CLN (7 mg/kg) in a combined oral suspension, compared with CLN (7 mg/kg) alone (100 vs 99% reduction). A lesser efficacy was observed against immature flukes (88.6 and 84.9% reduction, respectively). Calves given 25 mg of FBZ/kg and 35 mg of CLN/kg had nearly complete reduction of both mature (99.6%) and immature flukes (99.1%). Fasciola egg counts were reduced by greater than 99.5% in all treated groups. Against Ostertagia ostertagi, the percentage of efficacy of the combined FBZ (5 mg/kg) and CLN (7 mg/kg) treatment was 94.3% against adults and 81.3% against inhibited larvae. Efficacy against all other nematodes was 100%, except against Cooperia spp adults (98.3%) and immature Oesaphagostomum radiatum (88.0%). At 5 x dosage rates for FBZ and CLN, percentage of removal of adults and inhibited larvae of O ostertagi was 99.3 and 99.0%, respectively, and 99 to 100% for other nematodes. Results indicate that FBZ and CLN are compatible when mixed together and administered as an oral suspension to cattle and that the efficacy is similar to that of the drugs individually. On the basis of further results, we suggest that summer treatment may be superior in preventive value for gastrointestinal nematodes and F hepatica, compared with spring treatment, because of seasonal infection dynamics of the major cattle parasites in Louisiana.

  17. Prevalence of cattle herds with ivermectin resistant nematodes in the hot sub-humid tropics of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Canul-Ku, H L; Rodríguez-Vivas, R I; Torres-Acosta, J F J; Aguilar-Caballero, A J; Pérez-Cogollo, L C; Ojeda-Chi, M M

    2012-02-10

    The objective was to determine the prevalence of semi-intensive Bos indicus and Bos indicus × Bos taurus cattle herds with ivermectin (IVM) resistant nematodes in a sub-humid tropical zone of Mexico using the faecal egg count reduction test (FECRT). Thirty-three herds (28 beef and 5 dual purpose herds) were monitored in a period of 6 months (September 2008 to February, 2009). Only 14 of the 33 herds were included in the trial. The other herds had not enough animals with sufficient nematode eggs per gram of faeces (EPG) to be included in a FECRT. Some farms were visited twice trying to find more animals with egg counts higher than 150 EPG. In the 14 surveyed herds the calves were randomly distributed into two groups: (a) treatment group received 0.2mg of IVM/kg BW sc on day 0, and (b) control group without treatment. Faecal samples were obtained from each animal on days 0 and 14 post-treatment. Reduction percentages (% R) and 95% CI were calculated. The prevalence of cattle herds with IVM resistant nematodes was 78.6%. Those suspected of IVM resistance were 21.4%. All surveyed herds used IVM from two to three times a year (mainly beginning and end of the wet season) during 1-11 consecutive years. The farm with stronger resistance used IVM for 11 consecutive years (% R=0%; 95% CI=0-47%). Genera of nematodes resistant to IVM were: Ostertagia, Haemonchus, Cooperia and Trichostrongylus. A considerable effort is needed to perform FECRT in cattle herds under hot sub-humid tropical conditions.

  18. Anthelmintic resistance to ivermectin and moxidectin in gastrointestinal nematodes of cattle in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Geurden, Thomas; Chartier, Christophe; Fanke, Jane; di Regalbono, Antonio Frangipane; Traversa, Donato; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Demeler, Janina; Vanimisetti, Hima Bindu; Bartram, David J.; Denwood, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Anthelmintic resistance has been increasingly reported in cattle worldwide over the last decade, although reports from Europe are more limited. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of injectable formulations of ivermectin and moxidectin at 0.2 mg per kg bodyweight against naturally acquired gastro-intestinal nematodes in cattle. A total of 753 animals on 40 farms were enrolled in Germany (12 farms), the UK (10 farms), Italy (10 farms), and France (8 farms). Animals were selected based on pre-treatment faecal egg counts and were allocated to one of the two treatment groups. Each treatment group consisted of between 7 and 10 animals. A post-treatment faecal egg count was performed 14 days (±2 days) after treatment. The observed percentage reduction was calculated for each treatment group based on the arithmetic mean faecal egg count before and after treatment. The resistance status was evaluated based on the reduction in arithmetic mean faecal egg count and both the lower and upper 95% confidence limits. A decreased efficacy was observed in half or more of the farms in Germany, France and the UK. For moxidectin, resistance was confirmed on 3 farms in France, and on 1 farm in Germany and the UK. For ivermectin, resistance was confirmed on 3 farms in the UK, and on 1 farm in Germany and France. The remaining farms with decreased efficacy were classified as having an inconclusive resistance status based on the available data. After treatment Cooperia spp. larvae were most frequently identified, though Ostertagia ostertagi was also found, in particular within the UK and Germany. The present study reports lower than expected efficacy for ivermectin and moxidectin (based on the reduction in egg excretion after treatment) on European cattle farms, with confirmed anthelmintic resistance on 12.5% of the farms. PMID:26448902

  19. Prevalence and risk factors associated with gastrointestinal nematode infection in goats raised in Baybay city, Leyte, Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Rupa, Ariel Paul M.; Portugaliza, Harvie P.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Gastrointestinal parasitism is a serious constraint affecting goat production in the Philippines. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and associated risk factors of gastrointestinal nematode infection in goat-populated barangays of Baybay City, Leyte. Materials and Methods: A total of 81 households or farms were interviewed, and 450 goats were sampled for fecalysis. Fecal egg count along with egg morphological identification and coproculture for third stage larvae identification were conducted. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analyses were carried out to determine the farm- and animal-level prevalence and risk factors. Results: Fecalysis revealed the presence of strongyle and Trichuris spp. with a farm-level prevalence of 100% and 4.94%, respectively; and animal-level prevalence of 96.22% and 4.44%, respectively. The identified strongyle genera per barangay were Haemonchus spp. (34.79%), Trichostrongylus spp. (33.29%), Oesophagostomum spp. (24.21%), Cooperia spp. (6.93%), and Chabertia spp. (0.79%). Goats older than 12 months were four times more likely to present high strongyle burden when compared to goats <6 months. With each month increase in goat’s age, the odds of acquiring strongyle infection also increased by 1.07 times. Animals kept in goat house with cemented flooring have lower odds of acquiring strongyle (odds ratio=0.12). Goats raised for leisure purposes and fed with carabao grass (Paspalum conjugatum) were 8.12 and 5.52 times more likely to acquire Trichuris, respectively. Conclusion: Most of the backyard goat raisers in Baybay City, Leyte, do not practice sound helminth control measures as shown by the high prevalence of gastrointestinal nematodes. The most relevant risk factors for gastrointestinal nematode infection were the age of the goat, type of goat house’s flooring, purpose of raising goats, and feeding practices. PMID:27536034

  20. Cloning and characterization of genes encoding alpha and beta subunits of glutamate-gated chloride channel protein in Cylicocyclus nassatus.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Ritesh; LePage, Keith T; Kaplan, Ray M

    2006-11-01

    The invertebrate glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluCls) are receptor molecules and targets for the avermectin-milbemycin (AM) group of anthelmintics. Mutations in GluCls are associated with ivermectin resistance in the soil dwelling nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the parasitic nematode Cooperia oncophora. In this study, full-length cDNAs encoding alpha and beta subunits of GluCl were cloned and sequenced in Cylicocyclus nassatus, a common and important cyathostomin nematode parasite of horses. Both genes possess the sequence characteristics typical of GluCls, and phylogenetic analysis confirms that these genes are evolutionarily closely related to GluCls of other nematodes and flies. Complete coding sequences of C. nassatus GluCl-alpha and GluCl-beta were subcloned into pTL1 mammalian expression vector, and proteins were expressed in COS-7 cells. Ivermectin-binding characteristics were determined by incubating COS-7 cell membranes expressing C. nassatus GluCl-alpha and GluCl-beta proteins with [(3)H]ivermectin. In competitive binding experiments, fitting the data to a one site competition model, C. nassatus GluCl-alpha was found to bind [(3)H]ivermectin with a high amount of displaceable binding (IC(50)=208 pM). Compared to the mock-transfected COS-7 cells, the means of [(3)H]ivermectin binding were significantly different for C. nassatus GluCl-alpha and the Haemonchus contortus GluCl (HcGluCla) (p=0.018 and 0.023, respectively) but not for C. nassatus GluCl-beta (p=0.370). This is the first report of orthologs of GluCl genes and in vitro expression of an ivermectin-binding protein in a cyathostomin species. These data suggest the likelihood of a similar mechanism of action of AM drugs in these parasites, and suggest that mechanisms of resistance may also be similar.

  1. Anthelmintic resistance in gastrointestinal nematodes of beef cattle in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Fernanda; Portella, Luiza Pires; Rodrigues, Fernando de Souza; Reginato, Caroline Zamperete; Pötter, Luciana; Cezar, Alfredo Skrebsky; Sangioni, Luís Antônio; Vogel, Fernanda Silveira Flores

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal nematodes resistant to anthelmintics have been reported in several regions of Brazil, and they may be associated with economic losses for the cattle industry. This study aimed to evaluate the resistance status of gastrointestinal nematodes from naturally infected beef cattle to several commercially available anthelmintics, as well as to test the efficacy of combinations of anthelmintics against multi-resistant gastrointestinal nematodes. Ten farms located in Rio Grande do Sul state were selected by: farmers' consent; extensive raising system; availability of calves aged from 7 to 9 months naturally infected by gastrointestinal nematodes; absence of anthelmintic treatment for 60 days before the study; and presence of 70–100 calves or more of both genders with ≥200 eggs per gram of feces (EPG) (sensitivity of 50 EPG). These calves were distributed into 10 groups (of 7–10 animals) per farm and treated with ivermectin, doramectin, eprinomectin, fenbendazole, closantel, nitroxynil, disophenol, levamisole, albendazole, or moxidectin. Feces were collected 2 days before treatment and 14 days after treatment. Additional groups of 7–10 calves were used to test six different two-drug combinations at four of the studied farms. In general terms, fenbendazole was the most effective drug, followed by levamisole, disophenol, and moxidectin. However, parasite resistance to multiple drugs was found in all herds, especially in the genera Cooperia spp., Trichostrongylus spp., and Haemonchus spp.. Some of the two-drug combinations were effective against nematode populations identified as resistant to the same compounds when used as single drugs. The most effective combinations were moxidectin + levamisole, doramectin + fenbendazole, and levamisole + closantel. In this study, parasites resistant to the main commercially available anthelmintics were found in all herds, and some combinations of two active components belonging to different chemical groups

  2. Gastrointestinal nematode larvae in the grazing land of cattle in Guwahati, Assam

    PubMed Central

    Das, Meena; Deka, D. K.; Islam, S.; Sarmah, P. C.; Bhattacharjee, K.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To know the prevalence of gastrointestinal nematode larvae (L3) in the grazing land of cattle in Guwahati, Kamrup district, Assam. Materials and Methods: Pastures were collected and examined for the presence of nematode larvae (L3) from six localities of Guwahati at monthly interval from August 2012 to July 2013. The counted larvae were then expressed as per kg dry matter of herbage (L3/kg DM). Results: Examination of pastures revealed presence of nematode larvae (L3) in pastures throughout the year which varied from 4.5 L3/kg DM in January to a maximum of 106.33 L3/kg DM in August. The L3 of Haemonchus contortus, Trichostrongylus spp., Oesophagostomum spp., Cooperia spp., and Mecistocirrus spp. were recovered from pastures. The average pasture larval burden (PLB) was 34.75±3.48 L3/kg DM. Season-wise PLB revealed the presence of 23.89±3.01, 67.54±5.41, 26.67±1.92, and 7.28±0.89 L3/kg DM during pre-monsoon, monsoon, post-monsoon, and winter seasons, respectively. Monsoon season has significant (p<0.05) effect on PLB. However, analysis of variance of different locations with respect to season revealed that there was no significant difference but season-wise it was highly significant (p<0.01). Pearson correlation of environmental variables (temperature, relative humidity, and rainfall) with PLB revealed correlation was statistically significant with rainfall (p<0.05). Conclusion: This study reveals the presence of five nematode larvae (L3) in the pastures of Guwahati, Assam throughout the year, statistically significant during monsoon season. PMID:28096603

  3. [The effect of dehelminthizations performed during the year on the seasonal dynamics of natural nematode infections in sheep].

    PubMed

    Kozdon, O; Zajícek, D

    1976-11-01

    In four sheep flocks of two age categories dynamics of natural infections by pulmonary and gastrointestinal nematodes was studied; sheep were kept on a farm in Western Bohemia. Dehelminthizations were performed in different intervals during the grazing period on the basis of the results of quantitative coprologic examinations. Total effectiveness of 80--100% intenseffectiveness (IE) was obtained as a result of single peroral or intraruminal dehelminthization with the following preparations: pyrantel hydrochloricum (Spofa), helmatac (SKF) and nilverm (ICI); the effectiveness concerned gastrointestinal nematodes of the genus Haemonchus, Cooperia, Ostertagia, Trichostrongylus, Bunostomum, Chabertia, Nematodirus, Strongyloides, Oesophagostomum and Trichocephalus. The effectiveness of nilverm on lungworms of D. filaria and P. kochi reached 100%; the preparation was less effective and ineffective on M. capillaris. Dehelminthization practices during three years were more successful as to lowering of incidence of lungworm infections of D. filaria and P. kochi than in gastrointestinal nematodes. If sping dehelminthizations had been postponed till the second half of May or June, the climax of the elimination of ova from summer re-infection was put off till November, with an initial significant increase in September. The third dehelminthization, applied in August, did not result in the increased elimination of ova in autumn, while there was no usual autumnal climax following September dehelminthization. Effective dehelminthization performed at the end of November in all three years maintained low levels of infections during winter housing and significantly influenced the health conditions of ewes before lambing. Dynamics of the elimination of ova after dehelminthization was affected by nematodes with the migration phase in organs and tissues -- S. papillosus, Oesophagostomum sp. and Ostertagia sp.; the same effect was observed, during pasture, in nematodes with relatively

  4. Efficacy and productive performance of moxidectin in feedlot calves infected with nematodes resistant to ivermectin.

    PubMed

    Fazzio, L E; Streitenberger, N; Galvan, W R; Sánchez, R O; Gimeno, E J; Sanabria, R E F

    2016-06-15

    Anthelmintic resistance (AR) of gastrointestinal nematodes to macrocyclic lactones is an increasingly common worldwide phenomenon limiting cattle production. This has motivated the search for alternatives, such as new active compounds, added drug synergisms, different doses, and alternate administration routes. The aim of this study was the assessment of moxidectin (MXD) performance in feedlot calves with a history of AR to ivermectin (IVM). Crossbred female calves aged 6-7 months and weighing 163kg (SD=34kg) were divided into 3 groups of 35 animals each. They were assigned to the following antiparasitic treatment groups: IVM group (0.2mg/kg IVM); MXD group (0.2mg/kg MXD), and ricobendazole+levamisole (RBZ+LEV) group (7.5mg/kg RBZ+8mg/kg LEV). On days 0, 26, and 47, fecal samples were taken and the weight of each animal was registered. Anthelmintic efficacy (by fecal egg count reduction), total weight gain (TWG) and average daily weight gain (AWG) were compared between the groups. A mixed SAS procedure was used for statistical analysis. Fecal egg count reduction 26 days post-treatment (PT) was calculated at 28% for the IVM group, 85% for the MXD group, and 99% for the RBZ+LEV group. AWGs (Standard Error) of 1.095g (56), 1.264g (49), and 1.340g (52) were registered for the IVM, MXD, and RBZ+LEV groups, respectively (p<0.05). Coprocultures revealed that MXD more effectively reduced Haemonchus spp. and Cooperia spp. egg counts than IVM. This resulted in higher AWGs and TWGs for this group; similar results were seen for the RBZ+LEV group as well. In this study, animals treated with MXD gained about 160 more g/day than animals treated with IVM. This represents a gain of 16 USD per animal over the 47 day trial.

  5. Economic value and course of infection after treatment of cattle having a low level of nematode parasitism.

    PubMed

    Leland, S E; Davis, G V; Caley, H K; Arnett, D W; Ridley, R K

    1980-04-01

    To determine whether it is economically advantageous to treat calves having inapparent parasitism, we conducted experiments from 1971 to 1976, involving more than 1,800 calves from 30 pens or lots, using formulations of thiabendazole, levamisole, and crufomate (ruelene). Differential egg counts, cultured larvae, and cultured parasitic stages were used to estimate the kind and degree of nematode parasitism. Differentiation of infective larvae consistently established Cooperia as the predominating (%) genus in all fecal samplings. Bunostomum, when initially present, decreased or disappeared, whereas Trichostrongylus increased; other genera fluctuated less consistently. These qualitative generic fluctuations were not primarily the result of treatment, but more likely were seasonal variation. Judged by average daily gain (ADG), anthelmintic treatment was statistically advantageous at one or more points during the observation periods in 10 of 13 treated groups. In seven treated groups, the observation periods were concluded with statistical advantage in ADG, whereas in three groups, compensatory gain by corresponding controls had neutralized earlier advantages. The comparative influence of the various anthelmintics was not consistent from year to year. When total cost/kilogram gain was calculated from feed efficiency measuremnts and other costs, economic treatment advantage was evident in seven of 11 tests (7 of 10 treatment groups) from 1973 through 1976. This financial advantage, due primarily to feed efficiency and noted after 28 to 51 days, justified anthelmintic treatment. This advantage was not likely lost by the animals in subsequent periods (to 218 days) on pasture or in lots, since ADG indicated the treated calves performed either as well as, or better than, the nontreated controls. Considering all aspects of the study, the results indicate calves coming into Kansas from southern states and weighing 184 to 267 kg may possess a level of subclinical (symptomless

  6. A fenbendazole oral drench in addition to an ivermectin pour-on reduces parasite burden and improves feedlot and carcass performance of finishing heifers compared with endectocides alone.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, C D; Hutcheson, J P; Nichols, W T

    2006-08-01

    Two studies utilizing 1,862 yearling heifers were conducted to determine the effects of a fenbendazole oral drench in addition to an ivermectin pour-on (SG+IVPO), compared with an ivermectin pour-on (IVPO) or a doramectin injectable (DMX) alone, on parasite burden, feedlot performance, and carcass merit of feedlot cattle. In the first study, heifers receiving the SG+IVPO had fewer (P = 0.02) cattle retreated for disease and 73% fewer (P = 0.06) worm eggs per fecal sample 98 d after treatment than heifers treated with IVPO. Heifers treated with SG+IVPO consumed more DM, had greater ADG, were heavier at slaughter, and had heavier carcasses than IVPO-treated heifers (P < 0.05). Heifers treated with SG+IVPO also had more (P = 0.07) carcasses grading USDA Prime or Choice than IVPO-treated heifers. In the second study, heifers treated with SG+IVPO had fewer (P < 0.01) worm eggs per fecal sample 35 d after treatment and had fewer numbers of adult and larval Cooperia and Trichostrongylus spp. in the small intestine at slaughter (P < 0.10) compared with heifers treated with DMX. Heifers treated with SG+IVPO consumed more DM, were heavier at slaughter, and had heavier carcasses than DMX-treated heifers (P < 0.01). The SG+IVPO-treated heifers also had greater ADG (P < 0.10). The broad-spectrum effectiveness of a combination of a fenbendazole oral drench and an ivermectin pour-on reduced parasite burden and increased feed intake, ADG, and carcass weight in feedlot heifers compared with treatment with an endectocide alone.

  7. Assessing resistance against macrocyclic lactones in gastro-intestinal nematodes in cattle using the faecal egg count reduction test and the controlled efficacy test.

    PubMed

    De Graef, J; Sarre, C; Mills, B J; Mahabir, S; Casaert, S; De Wilde, N; Van Weyenberg, M; Geldhof, P; Marchiondo, A; Vercruysse, J; Meeus, P; Claerebout, E

    2012-10-26

    The main objective of the present study was to evaluate the accuracy of the faecal egg count reduction test (FECRT) to assess the resistance status of ivermectin (IVM)-resistant isolates of the cattle nematodes Ostertagia ostertagi and Cooperia oncophora, using the controlled efficacy test (worm counts) as a reference. The second objective was to investigate whether both IVM-resistant isolates showed side-resistance against moxidectin (MOX) under controlled conditions. Thirty male Holstein calves were experimentally infected with 25,000 L3 of an IVM-resistant O. ostertagi isolate and 25,000 L3 of an IVM-resistant C. oncophora isolate. Twenty-eight days later the calves were randomly divided into 2 treatment groups and 1 untreated control group. Animals in groups 1 and 2 received MOX (Cydectin(®) 1%, Pfizer) and IVM (Ivomec(®) 1%, Merial) respectively, by subcutaneous injection at a dose rate of 0.2mg/kg bodyweight. Faecal samples were collected 7 and 14 days after treatment and animals were necropsied 14/15 days post-treatment. Both the FECRT and the controlled efficacy test demonstrated that the O. ostertagi and C. oncophora isolates were resistant against IVM, with efficacies below 90%. The IVM-resistant O. ostertagia isolate was still susceptible to MOX treatment, as shown by over 99% reduction in egg counts and worm burden. The FECRT suggested borderline resistance against MOX in the IVM-resistant C. oncophora isolate, with egg count reductions between 97% (95% CI: 76; 100) at day 7 and 86% (95% CI: 49; 96) at day 14. However, the controlled efficacy test clearly showed MOX-resistance, with a decrease of only 31% (95% CI: -12; 57) in C. oncophora worm numbers. After MOX treatment, a significantly lower number of eggs per female C. oncophora worms was counted compared to the control group (43% reduction). Due to this reduced fecundity, the FECRT may fail to detect MOX-resistance.

  8. Anthelmintic effects of forage chicory (Cichorium intybus) against gastrointestinal nematode parasites in experimentally infected cattle.

    PubMed

    Peña-Espinoza, Miguel; Thamsborg, Stig M; Desrues, Olivier; Hansen, Tina V A; Enemark, Heidi L

    2016-09-01

    Two experiments studied the effects of dietary chicory against gastrointestinal nematodes in cattle. In Experiment (Exp.) 1, stabled calves were fed chicory silage (CHI1; n = 9) or ryegrass/clover hay (CTL1; n = 6) with balanced protein/energy intakes between groups. After 16 days, all calves received 10 000 Ostertagia ostertagi and 66 000 Cooperia oncophora third-stage larvae (L3) [day (D) 0 post-infection (p.i.)]. In Exp. 2, calves were assigned to pure chicory (CHI2; n=10) or ryegrass/clover (CTL2; n = 10) pastures. After 7 days, animals received 20 000 O. ostertagi L3/calf (D0 p.i.) and were moved regularly preventing pasture-borne infections. Due to poor regrowth of the chicory pasture, CHI2 was supplemented with chicory silage. At D40 p.i. (Exp. 1) and D35 p.i. (Exp. 2) calves were slaughtered for worm recovery. In Exp.1, fecal egg counts (FEC) were similar between groups. However, O. ostertagi counts were significantly reduced in CHI1 by 60% (geometric mean; P < 0·01), whereas C. oncophora burdens were unaffected (P = 0·12). In Exp. 2, FEC were markedly lowered in CHI2 from D22 p.i onwards (P < 0·01). Ostertagia ostertagi adult burdens were significantly reduced in CHI2 by 66% (P < 0·001). Sesquiterpene lactones were identified only in chicory (fresh/silage). Chicory shows promise as an anti-Ostertagia feed for cattle and further studies should investigate its on-farm use.

  9. Sensitivity and efficiency of selected coproscopical methods-sedimentation, combined zinc sulfate sedimentation-flotation, and McMaster method.

    PubMed

    Becker, Ann-Christin; Kraemer, Amelie; Epe, Christian; Strube, Christina

    2016-07-01

    Coproscopical methods used in veterinary-parasitological diagnostics were validated according to their sensitivity (Se) and egg recovery rate [efficiency (Ef)]. Validation of the combined sedimentation-flotation method and the modified McMaster method was performed by using feces spiked with eggs of Ancylostoma caninum, Uncinaria stenocephala, Cooperia oncophora, cyathostomins, Ascaris suum, Toxascaris leonina, Toxocara canis, Trichuris vulpis, Moniezia expansa, and Anoplocephala perfoliata. For validation of the sedimentation method, Fasciola hepatica eggs were used. With the combined sedimentation-flotation method using ZnSO4 as flotation medium [specific gravity (SG) 1.30], 5 g fecal samples of all tested parasite species (concentration levels 1, 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, and 80 epg) were reproducibly detected "positive" (100 % Se) as of 80 epg. The Ef of the combined sedimentation-flotation method, defined as percentage of rediscovered eggs, revealed clear differences between parasites and showed the highest value for cyathostomins and the lowest for U. stenocephala and T. leonina eggs. The average Ef for all parasite species at 80 epg was 1.50 %. With the McMaster method (concentration levels 1, 30, 50, 80, 100, 500, and 1000 epg), all tested parasite species were detected reliably positive as of 500 epg with a mean Ef of 46.4 %. When evaluating the sedimentation method (concentration levels 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 epg), F. hepatica eggs were reproducibly found in 5 g fecal samples as of 20 epg with 20.0 % Ef. The result that the combined zinc sulfate sedimentation-flotation method (SG 1.30) as flotation medium provides diagnostic certainty only as of 80 epg has to be considered at preventing zoonoses. If pet owners wish to prevent any zoonotic infection ("zero tolerance"), a monthly anthelminthic treatment should be advised instead of monthly fecal examinations.

  10. Utilization of computer processed high definition video imaging for measuring motility of microscopic nematode stages on a quantitative scale: "The Worminator".

    PubMed

    Storey, Bob; Marcellino, Chris; Miller, Melissa; Maclean, Mary; Mostafa, Eman; Howell, Sue; Sakanari, Judy; Wolstenholme, Adrian; Kaplan, Ray

    2014-12-01

    A major hindrance to evaluating nematode populations for anthelmintic resistance, as well as for screening existing drugs, new compounds, or bioactive plant extracts for anthelmintic properties, is the lack of an efficient, objective, and reproducible in vitro assay that is adaptable to multiple life stages and parasite genera. To address this need we have developed the "Worminator" system, which objectively and quantitatively measures the motility of microscopic stages of parasitic nematodes. The system is built around the computer application "WormAssay", developed at the Center for Discovery and Innovation in Parasitic Diseases at the University of California, San Francisco. WormAssay was designed to assess motility of macroscopic parasites for the purpose of high throughput screening of potential anthelmintic compounds, utilizing high definition video as an input to assess motion of adult stage (macroscopic) parasites (e.g. Brugia malayi). We adapted this assay for use with microscopic parasites by modifying the software to support a full frame analysis mode that applies the motion algorithm to the entire video frame. Thus, the motility of all parasites in a given well are recorded and measured simultaneously. Assays performed on third-stage larvae (L3) of the bovine intestinal nematode Cooperia spp., as well as microfilariae (mf) of the filarioid nematodes B. malayi and Dirofilaria immitis, yielded reproducible dose responses using the macrocyclic lactones ivermectin, doramectin, and moxidectin, as well as the nicotinic agonists, pyrantel, oxantel, morantel, and tribendimidine. This new computer based-assay is simple to use, requires minimal new investment in equipment, is robust across nematode genera and developmental stage, and does not require subjective scoring of motility by an observer. Thus, the "Worminator" provides a relatively low-cost platform for developing genera- and stage-specific assays with high efficiency and reproducibility, low labor input

  11. Anthelmintic resistance in cattle nematodes in the US.

    PubMed

    Gasbarre, Louis C

    2014-07-30

    The first documented case of macrocyclic lactone resistance in gastrointestinal (GI) nematodes of cattle was seen in the US approximately 10 years ago. Since that time the increase incidence of anthelmintic resistance has continued at an alarming rate. Currently parasites of the genera Cooperia and/or Haemonchus resistant to generic or brand-name macrocyclic lactones have be demonstrated in more than half of all operations examined. Both of these parasite genera are capable of causing economic losses by decreasing food intake and subsequently animal productivity. Currently, there are no easy and quick means to detect anthelmintic resistant GI nematodes. Definitive identification requires killing of cattle. The most commonly used field detection method is the fecal egg count reduction test (FECRT). This method can be adapted for use as a screening agent for Veterinarians and producers to identify less than desired clearance of the parasites after anthelmintic treatment. Further studies can then define the reasons for persistence of the egg counts. The appearance of anthelmintic resistance is largely due to the development of very effective nematode control programs that have significantly improved the productivity of the US cattle industry, but at the same time has placed a high level of selective pressure on the parasite genome. The challenges ahead include the development of programs that control the anthelmintic resistant nematodes but at the same time result in more sustainable parasite control. The goal is to maintain high levels of productivity but to exert less selective pressures on the parasites. One of the most effective means to slow the development of drug resistance is through the simultaneous use of multiple classes of anthelmintics, each of which has a different mode of action. Reduction of the selective pressure on the parasites can be attained through a more targeted approach to drug treatments where the producer's needs are met by selective

  12. SLO-1-Channels of Parasitic Nematodes Reconstitute Locomotor Behaviour and Emodepside Sensitivity in Caenorhabditis elegans slo-1 Loss of Function Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Schniederjans, Monika; Miltsch, Sandra M.; Krücken, Jürgen; Guest, Marcus; Holden-Dye, Lindy; Harder, Achim; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg

    2011-01-01

    The calcium-gated potassium channel SLO-1 in Caenorhabditis elegans was recently identified as key component for action of emodepside, a new anthelmintic drug with broad spectrum activity. In this study we identified orthologues of slo-1 in Ancylostoma caninum, Cooperia oncophora, and Haemonchus contortus, all important parasitic nematodes in veterinary medicine. Furthermore, functional analyses of these slo-1 orthologues were performed using heterologous expression in C. elegans. We expressed A. caninum and C. oncophora slo-1 in the emodepside-resistant genetic background of the slo-1 loss-of-function mutant NM1968 slo-1(js379). Transformants expressing A. caninum slo-1 from C. elegans slo-1 promoter were highly susceptible (compared to the fully emodepside-resistant slo-1(js379)) and showed no significant difference in their emodepside susceptibility compared to wild-type C. elegans (p = 0.831). Therefore, the SLO-1 channels of A. caninum and C. elegans appear to be completely functionally interchangeable in terms of emodepside sensitivity. Furthermore, we tested the ability of the 5′ flanking regions of A. caninum and C. oncophora slo-1 to drive expression of SLO-1 in C. elegans and confirmed functionality of the putative promoters in this heterologous system. For all transgenic lines tested, expression of either native C. elegans slo-1 or the parasite-derived orthologue rescued emodepside sensitivity in slo-1(js379) and the locomotor phenotype of increased reversal frequency confirming the reconstitution of SLO-1 function in the locomotor circuits. A potent mammalian SLO-1 channel inhibitor, penitrem A, showed emodepside antagonising effects in A. caninum and C. elegans. The study combined the investigation of new anthelmintic targets from parasitic nematodes and experimental use of the respective target genes in C. elegans, therefore closing the gap between research approaches using model nematodes and those using target organisms. Considering the still

  13. Persistent efficacy and production benefits following use of extended-release injectable eprinomectin in grazing beef cattle under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Kunkle, B N; Williams, J C; Johnson, E G; Stromberg, B E; Yazwinski, T A; Smith, L L; Yoon, S; Cramer, L G

    2013-03-01

    Seven studies were conducted in commercial grazing operations to confirm anthelmintic efficacy, assess acceptability, and measure the productivity response of cattle to treatment with eprinomectin in an extended-release injectable formulation (ERI) when exposed to nematode infected pastures for 120 days. The studies were conducted under one protocol in the USA in seven locations (Arkansas, Idaho, Louisiana, Minnesota, Missouri, Oregon, and Wisconsin). Each study had 67-68 naturally infected animals for a total of 475 (226 female, 249 male castrate) Angus or beef-cross cattle. The animals weighed 133-335 kg prior to treatment and were approximately 3-12 months of age. The studies were conducted under a randomized block design based on pre-treatment body weights to sequentially form 17 replicates of four animals each within sex in each study. Animals within a replicate were randomly assigned to treatments, one to Eprinomectin ERI vehicle (control) and three to Eprinomectin ERI (5%, w/v eprinomectin). Treatments were administered at 1 mL/50 kg body weight once subcutaneously anterior to the shoulder. All animals in each study grazed one pasture throughout the observation period of 120 days. Cattle were weighed and fecal samples collected pre-treatment and on 28, 56, 84, and 120 days after treatment for fecal egg and lungworm larval counts. Positive fecal samples generally were cultured en masse to determine the nematode genera attributable to the gastrointestinal helminth infection. Bunostomum, Cooperia, Haemonchus, Nematodirus, Oesophagostomum, Ostertagia, and Trichostrongylus, when present, were referred to as strongylids. At all post-treatment sampling intervals, Eprinomectin ERI-treated cattle had significantly (P<0.05) lower strongylid egg counts than vehicle-treated controls, with ≥95% reduction after 120 days of grazing. Over this same period, Eprinomectin ERI-treated cattle gained more weight (43.9 lb/head) than vehicle-treated controls in all studies. This

  14. Microarray-Based Analysis of Differential Gene Expression between Infective and Noninfective Larvae of Strongyloides stercoralis

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Roshan; Varma, Sudhir; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Myers, Timothy G.; Nolan, Thomas J.; Abraham, David; Lok, James B.; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2011-01-01

    Background Differences between noninfective first-stage (L1) and infective third-stage (L3i) larvae of parasitic nematode Strongyloides stercoralis at the molecular level are relatively uncharacterized. DNA microarrays were developed and utilized for this purpose. Methods and Findings Oligonucleotide hybridization probes for the array were designed to bind 3,571 putative mRNA transcripts predicted by analysis of 11,335 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) obtained as part of the Nematode EST project. RNA obtained from S. stercoralis L3i and L1 was co-hybridized to each array after labeling the individual samples with different fluorescent tags. Bioinformatic predictions of gene function were developed using a novel cDNA Annotation System software. We identified 935 differentially expressed genes (469 L3i-biased; 466 L1-biased) having two-fold expression differences or greater and microarray signals with a p value<0.01. Based on a functional analysis, L1 larvae have a larger number of genes putatively involved in transcription (p = 0.004), and L3i larvae have biased expression of putative heat shock proteins (such as hsp-90). Genes with products known to be immunoreactive in S. stercoralis-infected humans (such as SsIR and NIE) had L3i biased expression. Abundantly expressed L3i contigs of interest included S. stercoralis orthologs of cytochrome oxidase ucr 2.1 and hsp-90, which may be potential chemotherapeutic targets. The S. stercoralis ortholog of fatty acid and retinol binding protein-1, successfully used in a vaccine against Ancylostoma ceylanicum, was identified among the 25 most highly expressed L3i genes. The sperm-containing glycoprotein domain, utilized in a vaccine against the nematode Cooperia punctata, was exclusively found in L3i biased genes and may be a valuable S. stercoralis target of interest. Conclusions A new DNA microarray tool for the examination of S. stercoralis biology has been developed and provides new and valuable insights regarding

  15. Diagnosis of anthelmintic resistance in cattle in Brazil: a comparison of different methodologies.

    PubMed

    das Neves, José Henrique; Carvalho, Nadino; Rinaldi, Laura; Cringoli, Giuseppe; Amarante, Alessandro F T

    2014-12-15

    The occurrence of anthelmintic resistance to levamisole, albendazole, ivermectin and moxidectin was investigated in cattle from 10 farms located in São Paulo State, Brazil, using two techniques for counting eggs in faeces: McMaster with a sensitivity of 50 eggs per gram (EPG) and FLOTAC with a sensitivity of two EPG. We also evaluated the use of different mathematical and test design approaches to determine the efficacy of the anthelmintic treatments: one formula/design that compares post-treatment arithmetic mean EPG counts for the treated and control groups (FECRT1) and two methods to analyse data from pre- and post-treatment EPG counts in the same group (FECRT2 and FECRT3, respectively). Treatment groups received either ivermectin (0.2 mg/kg of body weight (BW); moxidectin (0.2 mg/kg BW); albendazole (2.5 mg/kg BW); levamisole (4.7 mg/kg BW); or no treatment (control group). The number of animals in each group ranged from 8 to 11. Faecal samples from each animal were collected 2 days before the treatment and again 10 and 28 days post-treatment. The FEC reduction (FECR) confidence intervals were usually wider when based on data obtained using the McMaster method than when data were obtained using the FLOTAC method. Efficacy estimated from pre- and post-treatment EPG counts in the same group presented smaller confidence intervals. Ivermectin proved to be totally ineffective in all herds evaluated. Cooperia spp. was the major parasite displaying resistance, followed by Haemonchus spp. The results also indicated the presence of Oesophagostomum spp. and Trichostrongylus spp., meaning they, too, were resistant to ivermectin. Resistance to moxidectin was found on nine of the 10 farms investigated; however, only three farms had previously used moxidectin. In contrast, albendazole and levamisole demonstrated high efficacy on the majority of farms. In surveys for anthelmintic resistance in cattle, the use of a diagnostic method with higher sensitivity to detect eggs is

  16. Effects of gastrointestinal parasites on parasite burden, rectal temperature, and antibody titer responses to vaccination and infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Schutz, J S; Carroll, J A; Gasbarre, L C; Shelton, T A; Nordstrom, S T; Hutcheson, J P; Van Campen, H; Engle, T E

    2012-06-01

    Thirty-three colostrum-deprived Holstein bull calves (initial BW of 131 ± 4 kg) were used to determine the effect of timing of anthelmintic administration relative to vaccination on antibody titer response to vaccine component antigens. When calves were at least 3 mo of age, they were sorted randomly into individual pens and assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups, treatments consisted of 1) dewormed 2 wk before vaccination (DPV), 2) dewormed at the time of vaccination (DV), or 3) control, vaccinated but not dewormed (CONT). All calves were inoculated with infective larvae of brown stomach worms (Ostertagia ostertagi) and intestinal worms (Cooperia spp.) on d 1, 7, 10, 14, and 18 for a total dose of 235,710 infective larvae per calf. Calves (DPV and DV) were dewormed on d 21 or 35 with a 10% fenbendazole suspension at 5 mg/kg of BW. On d 35, all calves were vaccinated with a modified-live virus respiratory vaccine containing IBRV (infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus), BVDV-1 (bovine viral diarrhea virus genotype 1), BVDV-2 (BVDV genotype 2), PI-3 (parainfluenza-3), and BRSV (bovine respiratory syncytial virus). During the 103-d experiment, weekly fecal egg counts, blood, and rectal temperatures were collected and health status was recorded daily. Blood samples were obtained weekly to determine serum neutralizing (SN) antibody titers to IBRV, BVDV-1, BVDV-2, and PI-3 and cytokine levels for IL-4, IL-6, TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-α), and IFN-γ (interferon-gamma). There was a tendency (P < 0.09) for CONT calves to have greater IL-4 concentrations. By design, control calves had greater (P < 0.01) fecal egg counts during the experiment. All calves developed antibody titers to IBRV, BVDV-1, BVDV-2, and PI-3 by d 15 postvaccination. On d 88, all calves were challenged with IBRV and blood samples were obtained on d 88, 89, 90, 93, 95, 98, 99, and 103. All calves had increased rectal temperatures during the final 7 d of the IBRV challenge. However, the CONT group had

  17. Effect of vacuum packing and temperature on survival and hatching of strongyle eggs in faecal samples.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Mita E; Thapa, Sundar; Thamsborg, Stig M; Mejer, Helena

    2016-02-15

    Strongyle eggs of helminths of livestock usually hatch within a few hours or days after deposition with faeces. This poses a problem when faecal sampling is performed in the field. As oxygen is needed for embryonic development, it is recommended to reduce air supply during transport and refrigerate. The present study therefore investigated the combined effect of vacuum packing and temperature on survival of strongyle eggs and their subsequent ability to hatch and develop into L3. Fresh faecal samples were collected from calves infected with Cooperia oncophora, pigs infected with Oesophagostomum dentatum, and horses infected with Strongylus vulgaris and cyathostomins. The samples were allocated into four treatments: vacuum packing and storage at 5 °C or 20 °C (5 V and 20 V); normal packing in plastic gloves closed with a loose knot and storage at 5 °C or 20 °C (5 N and 20 N). The number of eggs per gram faeces (EPG) was estimated every fourth day until day 28 post set up (p.s.) by a concentration McMaster-method. Larval cultures were prepared on day 0, 12 and 28 p.s. and the larval yield determined. For C. oncophora, the EPG was significantly higher in vacuum packed samples after 28 days as compared to normal storage, regardless of temperature. However, O. dentatum EPG was significantly higher in samples kept at 5 °C as compared to 20 °C, irrespective of packing. For the horse strongyles, vacuum packed samples at 5 °C had a significantly higher EPG compared to the other treatments after 28 days. The highest larval yield of O. dentatum and horse strongyles were obtained from fresh faecal samples, however, if storage is necessary prior to setting up larval cultures O. dentatum should be kept at room temperature (aerobic or anaerobic). However, horse strongyle coprocultures should ideally be set up on the day of collection to ensure maximum yield. Eggs of C. oncophora should be kept vacuum packed at room temperature for the highest larval yield.

  18. Endectocide activity of a pour-on formulation containing 1.5 per cent ivermectin +0.5 per cent abamectin in cattle

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Heloisa Cristina; Prette, Nancy; Lopes, Welber Daniel Zanetti; Sakamoto, Cláudio Alessandro M; Buzzulini, Carolina; dos Santos, Thais Rabelo; Cruz, Breno Cayeiro; Teixeira, Weslen F Pires; Felippelli, Gustavo; Carvalho, Rafael Silveira; Maciel, Willian Giquelin; Soares, Vando Edésio; da Costa, Alvimar José

    2015-01-01

    The present work aimed to evaluate, through ten different studies, the therapeutic efficacy of a new pour-on formulation, containing 1.5 per cent ivermectin +0.5 per cent abamectin, against parasites of cattle. Results obtained on trials against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus showed that the pour-on combination of 1.5 per cent ivermectin +0.5 per cent abamectin obtained superior efficacy indexes against this ectoparasite, when compared with formulations containing 0.5 per cent ivermectin, 1 per cent ivermectin and the combination of 1 per cent abamectin +20 per cent levamisole. The results of efficacy of the ivermectin+abamectin and the 0.5 per cent ivermectin against Haematobia irritans were similar. Against Cochliomyia hominivorax larvae, all pour-on formulations tested (1.5 per cent ivermectin +0.5 per cent abamectin, 0.5 per cent ivermectin and 0.5 per cent abamectin), as well as 1 per cent doramectin administered subcutaneously, were considered ineffective. Cattle medicated with 1.5 per cent ivermectin +0.5 per cent abamectin, pour-on, remained free from parasitism by Dermatobia hominis larvae during 42 days (96 per cent efficacy), while values superior to 90 per cent were obtained by 0.5 per cent ivermectin (92 per cent) and 0.5 per cent abamectin (93 per cent) until the 42nd and 35th days post treatment, respectively. Against Haemonchus placei and Oesophagostomum radiatum, the pour-on of ivermectin+abamectin showed better efficacy than the 0.5 per cent ivermectin and 0.5 per cent abamectin. As to Cooperia punctata, there was no difference regarding efficacy results obtained by the avermectins combination and abamectin. The pour-on combination of 1.5 per cent ivermectin +0.5 per cent abamectin obtained high efficacy against R. (B.) microplus, D. hominis and some species of cattle gastrointestinal helminths when compared with formulations of 0.5 per cent ivermectin and 0.5 per cent abamectin administered through the same route. PMID:26392893

  19. Comparative efficacy of ivermectin pour-on, albendazole, oxfendazole and fenbendazole against Ostertagia ostertagi inhibited larvae, other gastrointestinal nematodes and lungworm of cattle.

    PubMed

    Williams, J C; DeRosa, A; Nakamura, Y; Loyacano, A F

    1997-12-15

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the current efficacy of albendazole (ABZ), oxfendazole (OXF) and fenbendazole (FBZ) compared with ivermectin pour-on (IVM-PO) against inhibited early fourth-stage larvae (IEL4) of Ostertagia ostertagi, other gastrointestinal nematodes and lungworm of cattle during spring in Louisiana. Twenty-five crossbred beef heifer calves of 235 kg average weight and 10-12 months of age were acquired in late winter and grazed for 9 weeks on pasture contaminated with O. ostertagi and other nematodes until May 15. The cattle were weighed and randomly allotted into 5 groups of 5 calves on May 16 (day 0) and treatments were as follows: group 1, nontreated controls (CONT); group 2, IVM-PO on mid-backline at 500 micrograms/kg; group 3, ABZ suspension (oral) at 10 mg/kg; group 4, OXF suspension (oral) at 4.5 mg/kg; group 5, FBZ suspension (oral) at 5 mg/kg. After treatment and confinement in separate pens for each group, approximately equal numbers of cattle from each group were necropsied daily between days 29-31. Mean numbers of O. ostertagi developmental stages present in CONT were: adult, 5234; developing (DL4), 3130; IEL4, 44,077. The mean percentage of IEL4 was 84.1. Cooperia spp. were the second most prevalent in CONT (20,307) and smaller numbers of abomasal and intestinal species and Dictyocaulus viviparus were present in nearly all CONT. Percent reductions for the four compounds against O. ostertagi adult, DL4 and IEL4, respectively, were IVM-PO: 99.7, 98.3, 98.1; ABZ: 74.1, 76.5, 75.3; OXF: 78.5, 42.1, 32.0; FBZ: 63.6, 17.7, 39.7. Efficacy of IVM-PO was greater (P < 0.05) against all O. ostertagi stages than the benzimidazole (BZ) drugs, except for ABZ (DL4). There were no significant differences in group means (except for C. punctata adult males, P < 0.05 lower for IVM-PO) or wide variation in reduction percentages for other abomasal and intestinal species and D. viviparus between IVM-PO and BZ drugs. The low efficacy of all three BZ