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Sample records for cooperia curticei railliet

  1. Species-specific PCR for the identification of Cooperia curticei (Nematoda: Trichostrongylidae) in sheep.

    PubMed

    Amarante, M R V; Bassetto, C C; Neves, J H; Amarante, A F T

    2014-12-01

    Agricultural ruminants usually harbour mixed infections of gastrointestinal nematodes. A specific diagnosis is important because distinct species can differ significantly in their fecundity and pathogenicity. Haemonchus spp. and Cooperia spp. are the most important gastrointestinal nematodes infecting ruminants in subtropical/tropical environments. In Brazil, C. punctata is more adapted to cattle than sheep. Additionally, C. spatulata appears to be more adapted to cattle, whereas C. curticei is more adapted to sheep. However, infection of sheep with C. punctata is common when cattle and sheep share the same pasture. Although morphological analyses have been widely used to identify nematodes, molecular methods can overcome technical limitations and help improve species-specific diagnoses. Genetic markers in the first and second internal transcribed spacers (ITS-1 and ITS-2, respectively) of nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) have been used successfully to detect helminths. In the present study, the ITS-1 region was analysed and used to design a species-specific oligonucleotide primer pair to identify C. curticei. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product was sequenced and showed 97% similarity to C. oncophora partial ITS-1 clones and 99% similarity to the C. curticei sequence JF680982. The specificity of this primer pair was corroborated by the analysis of 17 species of helminths, including C. curticei, C. punctata and C. spatulata. Species-specific diagnosis, which has implications for rapid and reliable identification, can support studies on the biology, ecology and epidemiology of trichostrongylid nematodes in a particular geographical location.

  2. Cooperia punctata: effect on cattle productivity?

    PubMed

    Stromberg, Bert E; Gasbarre, Louis C; Waite, Audie; Bechtol, David T; Brown, Michael S; Robinson, Nicholas A; Olson, Erik J; Newcomb, Harold

    2012-02-10

    Cooperia spp. have become the most prevalent parasites in United States cow/calf operations as observed in the USDA NAHMS (National Animal Health Monitoring System) Beef Cow/Calf survey in 2008. This is at least in part due to the widespread use of macrocyclic lactones that have recently been shown to have a reduced activity against these parasites. The effects of Cooperia spp. on cattle productivity are largely unknown. This study was conducted to assess their effect upon cattle housed under conditions found in American feedlots. Two hundred yearling calves (average weight 460 lb/209 kg) were acquired from northwestern Arkansas and northeastern Oklahoma and were vaccinated and dewormed upon arrival at the feedlot. Animals were comingled and preconditioned for approximately one month, and were fed a standard growing ration throughout the study. Calves were randomly divided into two groups (n=80, infected and control) and each group was further divided into two replicate pens (n=40). Calves from the two infected pens were orally inoculated with a gavage of 1 × 10(5) and 0.825 × 10(5) infective larvae of a recent isolate of Cooperia punctata on day 0 and 14, respectively, with the two control pens receiving a similar volume of tap water. Data collected included biweekly fecal egg counts, daily individual feed consumption and weight gain over the 60-day test period. The presence of C. punctata (>99% of recovered worms) was confirmed by necropsy and recovery from the small intestine on days 35 and 60 post infection (PI) in a subset of animals. Egg counts were positive by day 14 PI and remained at numbers similar to values seen in field studies. The control group gained weight 7.5% more rapidly (p=0.02) than infected animals (3.24 lb/1.47 kg per day vs. 3.0 lb/1.36 kg per day, respectively). The Cooperia-infected calves also consumed 1.5 lb (0.68 kg) less dry feed per day than the control animals (p=0.02). These data suggest that C. punctata has a deleterious effect

  3. Use of cloned excretory/secretory low-molecular-weight proteins of Cooperia oncophora in a serological assay.

    PubMed Central

    Poot, J; Kooyman, F N; Dop, P Y; Schallig, H D; Eysker, M; Cornelissen, A W

    1997-01-01

    The potential of Cooperia oncophora excretory/secretory (ES) proteins as antigens in a serological assay which aims to establish exposure levels in cattle was assessed. ES proteins were analyzed by one- and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. The N-terminal domains of two ES proteins were sequenced, and the corresponding cDNAs were cloned. Two cDNAs, designated CoES14.0 and CoES14.2, were expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant proteins were tested in an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in which crude worm antigen (CWA) was used as a reference standard. In total, 67 reference serum samples were used: 27 negative serum samples, 29 C. oncophora-specific serum samples, 7 Dictyocaulus viviparus-specific serum samples, and 4 Ostertagia ostertagi-specific serum samples. This showed respective sensitivities and specificities of 17 and 84%, 0 and 100%, and 100 and 100% by the ELISAs with the three different types of proteins (CWA, CoES14.0, and CoES14.2, respectively). Since the CoES14.2 ELISA had the best sensitivity and specificity with reference sera, its specificity was further validated in an antigen inhibition ELISA. In this assay CoES14.2 and CWA preparations of C. oncophora, Cooperia curticei, O. ostertagi, Nematodirus helvetianus, Fasciola hepatica, D. viviparus, Haemonchus placei, and Trichostrongylus colubriformus were used as competitor antigens. This experiment showed that only the homologous antigens C. oncophora CWA and CoEs14.2 resulted in 100% inhibition. The CWA preparations of all other nematodes did not affect the ELISA, even if concentrations of 250 times the 50% inhibitory concentration of C. oncophora CWA were used. These results indicate that CoES14.2 does not share cross-reactive epitopes with heterologous CWAs. Finally, we tested the CoES14.2 ELISA with sequential serum samples from naturally infected groups of animals. The optical density values that were obtained correlated well with

  4. Regulatory networks and pathways in the bovine small intestine during Cooperia oncophora infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cooperia oncophora is an important parasitic nematode of cattle with a wide distribution in temperate areas. Twenty Holstein nematode-naïve bull calves were experimentally infected with approximately 100,000 infective L3s and infection was allowed to progress for 7, 14, 28, 42 days, respectively. Th...

  5. Modelling Cooperia oncophora: Quantification of key parameters in the parasitic phase.

    PubMed

    Verschave, Sien H; Rose, Hannah; Morgan, Eric R; Claerebout, Edwin; Vercruysse, Jozef; Charlier, Johannes

    2016-06-15

    Cooperia oncophora is one of the most common intestinal nematodes in cattle. It is also the dose-limiting species for the most frequently used anthelmintics, and consequently, the species usually involved in reports of anthelmintic resistance. However, little information is available on its population dynamics, hindering the parameterisation of transmission models to support understanding of the impact of anthelmintic resistance, climate change and alternative control strategies on nematode epidemiology. This systematic review and meta-analysis provides estimates for key life history traits of the parasitic phase of C. oncophora and investigates potential influences of acquired immunity on these traits. PMID:27198786

  6. Analysis of the protective immune response following intramuscular vaccination of calves against the intestinal parasite Cooperia oncophora

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anthelmintic resistance in the bovine parasite Cooperia oncophora is developing and spreading rapidly worldwide. Vaccination is therefore often put forward as a cost-effective alternative for chemical drugs. Recently we reported the successful evaluation of a double domain activation-associated secr...

  7. Elucidation of Leucaena leucocephala anthelmintic-like phytochemicals and the ultrastructural damage generated to eggs of Cooperia spp.

    PubMed

    von Son-de Fernex, Elke; Alonso-Díaz, Miguel Ángel; Mendoza-de Gives, Pedro; Valles-de la Mora, Braulio; González-Cortazar, Manases; Zamilpa, Alejandro; Castillo Gallegos, Epigmenio

    2015-11-30

    Leucaena leucocephala is a tropical forage legume suggested as an alternative method to control gastrointestinal parasitism in ruminants. This study: (1) performed a bio-guided fractionation of an aqueous extract of L. leucocephala using the egg hatch assay (EHA) to identify the anthelmintic (AH)-like phytochemicals present in fresh leaves, and (2) assessed the ultrastructural damage to eggs of Cooperia spp. after incubation with the final fraction. Phytochemicals were isolated using silica gel columns and identified using high performance liquid chromatography and standards for comparison. The final fraction was evaluated using EHA at 0.06, 0.125, 0.250, 0.500 and 1.1 mg ml(-1). The lethal concentration to inhibit 50% of Cooperia spp. egg hatching (LC50) was calculated using a Probit analysis. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed the ultrastructural changes present in Cooperia spp. eggs. Bio-guided isolation procedures led to the recognition of an active fraction (LlC1F3) mainly composed of quercetin (82.21%) and caffeic acid (13.42%) which inhibited 90.49 ± 2.8% of Cooperia spp. egg hatching (P<0.05), and an LC50 of 0.06 ± 0.14 mg ml(-1). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed eggs exposed to the active fraction had an irregular external layer with small projections and ruptures of lateral eggshell walls. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed changes to Cooperia spp. eggs in electro-density, including the thickness of the eggshell layers and fractures after incubation with the final fraction (LlC1F3). Changes in bioactivity after purification suggest synergistic interactions between quercetin and caffeic acid. PMID:26477279

  8. Elucidation of Leucaena leucocephala anthelmintic-like phytochemicals and the ultrastructural damage generated to eggs of Cooperia spp.

    PubMed

    von Son-de Fernex, Elke; Alonso-Díaz, Miguel Ángel; Mendoza-de Gives, Pedro; Valles-de la Mora, Braulio; González-Cortazar, Manases; Zamilpa, Alejandro; Castillo Gallegos, Epigmenio

    2015-11-30

    Leucaena leucocephala is a tropical forage legume suggested as an alternative method to control gastrointestinal parasitism in ruminants. This study: (1) performed a bio-guided fractionation of an aqueous extract of L. leucocephala using the egg hatch assay (EHA) to identify the anthelmintic (AH)-like phytochemicals present in fresh leaves, and (2) assessed the ultrastructural damage to eggs of Cooperia spp. after incubation with the final fraction. Phytochemicals were isolated using silica gel columns and identified using high performance liquid chromatography and standards for comparison. The final fraction was evaluated using EHA at 0.06, 0.125, 0.250, 0.500 and 1.1 mg ml(-1). The lethal concentration to inhibit 50% of Cooperia spp. egg hatching (LC50) was calculated using a Probit analysis. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed the ultrastructural changes present in Cooperia spp. eggs. Bio-guided isolation procedures led to the recognition of an active fraction (LlC1F3) mainly composed of quercetin (82.21%) and caffeic acid (13.42%) which inhibited 90.49 ± 2.8% of Cooperia spp. egg hatching (P<0.05), and an LC50 of 0.06 ± 0.14 mg ml(-1). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed eggs exposed to the active fraction had an irregular external layer with small projections and ruptures of lateral eggshell walls. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed changes to Cooperia spp. eggs in electro-density, including the thickness of the eggshell layers and fractures after incubation with the final fraction (LlC1F3). Changes in bioactivity after purification suggest synergistic interactions between quercetin and caffeic acid.

  9. Endoparasites of cats from the Tirana area and the first report on Aelurostrongylus abstrusus (Railliet, 1898) in Albania.

    PubMed

    Knaus, Martin; Kusi, Ilir; Rapti, Dhimitër; Xhaxhiu, Dashamir; Winter, Renate; Visser, Martin; Rehbein, Steffen

    2011-10-01

    Following the recovery of first-stage nematode larvae indicative of Aelurostrongylus abstrusus infection in the faeces of free-roaming cats from the greater Tirana area, examination of 18 cats at necropsy revealed nine of them harbouring adult A. abstrusus (Railliet, 1898) in the lungs (prevalence, 50%; range, 1-11). In addition to A. abstrusus, Eucoleus aerophilus (16.7%; 1-9) was isolated from the lungs, and Toxocara cati (83.3%; 2-33), Ancylostoma tubaeforme (44.4%; 1-20), Dipylidium caninum (83.3%; 1-164), Joyeuxiella pasqualei (11.1%; 1-3) and one specimen of an acanthocephalan (5.5%) were recovered from the gastrointestinal tract. Furthermore, oocysts of Cystoisospora felis and C. rivolta were found in the rectal faeces of 5.6% and 11.1% of the cats, respectively. In conclusion, the prevalence of endoparasite infection in free-roaming cats in Tirana can be considered to be high. The occurrence of A. abstrusus, which may cause respiratory distress in cats, is reported for the first time in Albania.

  10. Splice variants and regulatory networks associated with host resistance to the intestinal worm Cooperia oncophora in cattle.

    PubMed

    Li, Robert W; Wu, Sitao; Li, Cong-Jun; Li, Weizhong; Schroeder, Steven G

    2015-07-30

    To elucidate the molecular mechanism of host resistance, we characterized the jejunal transcriptome of Angus cattle selected for parasite resistance for over 20 years in response to infection caused by the intestinal worm Cooperia oncophora. The transcript abundance of 56 genes, such as that of mucin 12 (MUC12) and intestinal alkaline phosphatase (ALPI), was significantly higher in resistant cattle. Novel splicing variants, exon skipping events, and gene fusion events, were also detected. An algorithm for the reconstruction of accurate cellular networks (ARACNE) was used to infer de novo regulatory molecular networks in the interactome between the parasite and host. Under a combined cutoff of an error tolerance (ϵ = 0.10) and a stringent P-value threshold of mutual information (1.0 × 10(-5)), a total of 229,100 direct interactions controlled by 20,288 hub genes were identified. Among these hub genes, 7651 genes had ≥ 100 direct neighbors while the top 9778 hub genes controlled more than 50% of total direct interactions. Three lysozyme genes (LYZ1, LYZ2, and LYZ3), which are co-located in bovine chromosome 5 in tandem and are strongly upregulated in resistant cattle, shared a common regulatory network of 55 genes. These ancient antimicrobials were likely involved in regulating host-parasite interactions by affecting host gut microbiome. Notably, ALPI, known as a gut mucosal defense factor, controlled a molecular network consisting 410 genes, including 14 transcription factors (TF) and 10 genes that were significantly regulated in resistant cattle. Several large regulatory networks were controlled by TF, such as STAT6, SREBF1, and ELF4. Gene ontology (GO) processes significantly enriched in the regulatory network controlled by STAT6 included lipid metabolism. Our findings provide insights into the immune regulation of host-parasite interactions and the molecular mechanisms of host resistance in cattle.

  11. The effect of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on infection with the nematodes Ostertagia ostertagi and Cooperia oncophora in calves.

    PubMed

    Muturi, K N; Scaife, J R; Lomax, M A; Jackson, F; Huntley, J; Coop, R L

    2005-05-15

    Diet-induced changes in the polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) content of immune cells influences the immune phenotype that develops following infection. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of manipulating dietary PUFA supply on tissue fatty acids composition and immunity to a mixed infection with an abomasal and an intestinal nematode parasite in calves. Calves (n=24) were allocated into two treatment groups and fed 25 g/day of either fish oil (n-3 group) or a binary mixture of palm/rapeseed oil (normal group) as a supplement in milk replacer. Within each treatment group eight calves were infected with 2000 L3 Ostertagia ostertagi and Cooperia oncophora, three times per week for 8 weeks, the remaining calves were pair-fed uninfected controls. Faecal egg counts (FEC) were carried out twice weekly. At slaughter, the whole gut was removed intact for worm counts and tissue samples were taken for fatty acid analysis. Samples of abomasum, duodenum and mid-gut were also collected for immunohistological analysis. FEC were not significantly influenced by oil supplement but tended to remain higher in the palm/rapeseed oil-fed group (normal infected). The number of intestinal immature worms was significantly (p<0.05) higher in the n-3 group. Mucosal mast cell (MMC) and eosinophil numbers were significantly increased (p<0.05) by infection and were significantly lower (p<0.05) in the intestinal tissue of the fish oil supplemented and infected group (n-3 infected group). These results suggest that feeding an n-3 PUFA-rich supplement (fish oil) can influence cellular mediators of immunity to nematode infection. This is the first report of the establishment of patency and the subsequent development of immunity to a mixed infection with O. ostertagi and C. oncophora in calves undergoing early rumen development. The trend in the FEC, MMC and eosinophil numbers in the n-3 group suggests that decreasing the dietary n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio may be a worthwhile immunonutritional

  12. Two new species of Contracaecum Railliet & Henry, 1912 (Nematoda: Anisakidae), C. fagerholmi n. sp. and C. rudolphii F from the brown pelican Pelecanus occidentalis in the northern Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    D'Amelio, S; Cavallero, S; Dronen, N O; Barros, N B; Paggi, L

    2012-01-01

    DNA sequencing of the nuclear ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacers (ITS) and mitochondrial rrnS and cox2 genes, and analysis of polymorphisms in restriction profiles in the ITS and rrnS, were used to characterise anisakid nematodes belonging to Contracaecum Railliet & Henry, 1912 infecting the brown pelican Pelecanus occidentalis (L.) in Galveston Bay, Texas and Sarasota Bay, Florida. Molecular data led to the detection of two new species: Contracaecum fagerholmi n. sp., which was also supported by clear morphological evidence, and Contracaecum rudolphii F, a new cryptic species within the Contracaecum rudolphii Hartwich, 1964 complex. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that C. fagerholmi and C. rudolphii F form two well-separated clusters, with C. fagerholmi being closely related to Contracaecum bioccai Mattiucci et al., 2008 and C. rudolphii F being included in the C. rudolphii complex. C. fagerholmi can be readily differentiated morphologically from all of its congeners, other than C. microcephalum (Rudolphii 1809) and the five currently recognised members of the C. rudolphii complex (C. rudolphii A, B, C, D and E). C. fagerholmi differs from C. microcephalum in the length of the spicules and the shape of the distal tip of the spicules, and from C. rudolphii (sensu lato) in the shape and size of the ventro-lateral and dorsal lips and by having interlabia which are not distally bifurcate. Further studies are needed to determine which morphological characteristics can be used to distinguish the cryptic species of the C. rudolphii complex in order to assign them with formal names. The recovery of a third species, C. bioccai, from the brown pelican confirms its occurrence in this host and extends its known geographical distribution. PMID:22139006

  13. Lack of efficacy of monepantel against Trichostrongylus colubriformis in sheep in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cintra, M C R; Teixeira, V N; Nascimento, L V; Sotomaior, C S

    2016-01-30

    Multiple drug resistance of nematodes against anthelmintics has become one of the most important economic problems in sheep production worldwide. The aim of this experiment was to evaluate the efficacy of monepantel (2.5mg/kg) against gastrointestinal nematodes in fecal egg count reduction test (FECRT) and controlled efficacy test (CT) in naturally infected sheep. We used 30 sheep for the FECRT and 20 sheep for the CT, equally divided into control and treated groups. In the FECRT, the reduction was 98%. Larval identification of pre-treatment coprocultures revealed 100% Haemonchus spp. for both control and treated groups. Post-treatment culture of treated sheep was 100% Oesophagostomum spp., but only few larvae were recovered. In the control group, they were 99% Haemonchus spp and 1% Oesophagostomum spp. larvae. Based on the FECRT, Haemonchus spp. was considered susceptible to monepantel. The efficacy of monepantel in the CT against Haemonchus contortus and Trichostrongylus axei was 100% and against Cooperia curticei was 99.7%. For Trichostrongylus colubriformis, the efficacy was -21.5%. In both treated and untreated animals, Oesophagostomum columbianum was recovered from the large intestines. Based on FECRT and CT and in accordance with WAAVP standards, monepantel was ineffective against T. colubriformis and O. columbianum, but effective against H. contortus, T. axei and C. curticei in the studied flock.

  14. [CIRCULATION OF DIROFILARIA REPENS (RAILLIET ET HENRY, 1911) IN THE ARID ZONE OF SOUTHERN RUSSIA].

    PubMed

    Varlamova, A I; Arkhipov, I A

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of dirofilariasis was studied in dogs from the urban and rural areas in Southern Russia. The high prevalence of Dirofilaria repens infection were established among the dogs in the Republic of Kalmykia. The blood samples from 328 dogs were tested; D. repens infection was detected in 23.6 and 15.5% of the rural and urban dogs, respectively. The highest prevalence of D. repens infection was noted in of 4-6-year-old dogs. Dogs aged 0, 1-3, 4-6 7-9, and more 10 years were infected in 0, 26.3, 33.3, 29.4, and 28.5% of cases, respectively. PMID:27405212

  15. Ultrastructural study of Sarcocystis fusiformis (Railliet, 1897) infecting the Indian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) of Egypt.

    PubMed

    Ghaffar, F A; Hilali, M; Scholtyseck, E

    1978-09-01

    Sarcocysts from the muscular layer of the oesophagus of 20 Indian water buffaloes (about 7--10 years old) have been collected in Egypt and studied by means of electron microscopy in Bonn (West Germany). Large and small cysts have been observed. The large type ranged from 7--30 X 3--7 mm, and the small cysts measured 1.3--5.1 X 0.7--2.2 mm. The metrocytes of both types of cysts as well as the merozoites were very similar concerning their shape, size and ultrastructural characteristics. The metrocytes of the large and small cysts were mostly located at the peripheral region of the cysts and multiplied by endodyogeny. They were variable in shape and size. They ranged from 7.6 X 4.8 micrometer to 9.2 X 5.4 micrometer. Most of them exhibited deep invaginations of their pellicle. Their cytoplasm was electron pale and often extremely vacuolated. The merozoites of both types of cysts were elongated with a length ranging from 14.6--17.0 micrometer and showed all characteristic organelles of these cells (conoid, rhoptries, micronemes, subpellicular microtubules etc.) The wall of the large and small cysts showed no distinct morphological differences. The great similarities between the walls of the two types of cysts as well as between the micromorphology of the developmental stages (metrocytes and merozoites) lead to the conclusion that the two types of cysts examined may belong to one species of Sarcocystis.

  16. [CIRCULATION OF DIROFILARIA REPENS (RAILLIET ET HENRY, 1911) IN THE ARID ZONE OF SOUTHERN RUSSIA].

    PubMed

    Varlamova, A I; Arkhipov, I A

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of dirofilariasis was studied in dogs from the urban and rural areas in Southern Russia. The high prevalence of Dirofilaria repens infection were established among the dogs in the Republic of Kalmykia. The blood samples from 328 dogs were tested; D. repens infection was detected in 23.6 and 15.5% of the rural and urban dogs, respectively. The highest prevalence of D. repens infection was noted in of 4-6-year-old dogs. Dogs aged 0, 1-3, 4-6 7-9, and more 10 years were infected in 0, 26.3, 33.3, 29.4, and 28.5% of cases, respectively.

  17. Experimental infection of selected arthropods with spirurid nematodes Spirocerca lupi Railliet & Henry, 1911 and Gongylonema ingluvicola Molin, 1857.

    PubMed

    Mukaratirwa, S; Pillay, E; Munsammy, K

    2010-12-01

    Gongylonema ingluvicola and Spirocerca lupi are spirurid nematodes that require arthropod intermediate hosts in order to complete their life cycle. Beetles of the family Scarabaeidae are reported to serve as intermediate hosts for both these parasites. In this study selected species of beetles of the family Scarabaeidae as well as other groups of arthropods were screened for susceptibility to infection with S. lupi and G. ingluvicola. Arthropods were exposed to infective eggs of both parasites for a determined period of time and dissected/digested to determine the presence or absence of pre-infective and infective larvae. All the five species of dung beetles exposed to infection with S. lupi, namely, Pachylomerus femoralis, Scarabaeus rugosus, Gymnopleurus humanus, Kheper nigroaeneus and Anachalcos convexus were susceptible and, of the two species exposed to G. ingluvicola, only Gy. humanus was susceptible. Spirocerca lupi eggs developed in millipede species, Daratoagonus cristulatus, and remained as encysted larvae, while in Orthoporoides kyrhocephalus no development was observed. Spirocerca lupi larvae were not detected in the cricket species Gryllus assimilis, or the cockroach species Periplaneta americana, and, similarly, G. ingluvicola larvae were not detected in the millipede species O. kyrhocephalus. The difference in the susceptibility of the arthropods to the two parasite species may depend on their feeding biology.

  18. Dose confirmation studies for monepantel, an amino-acetonitrile derivative, against fourth stage gastro-intestinal nematode larvae infecting sheep.

    PubMed

    Hosking, B C; Dobson, D P; Stein, P A; Kaminsky, R; Bapst, B; Mosimann, D; Mason, P C; Seewald, W; Strehlau, G; Sager, H

    2009-03-23

    Monepantel is the first compound from the recently discovered amino-acetonitrile derivative (AAD) class of anthelmintics to be developed for use in sheep. Nine dose confirmation studies were conducted in Australia, New Zealand and Switzerland to confirm the minimum therapeutic oral dose of monepantel to control fourth stage (L4) gastro-intestinal nematode larvae in sheep (target species were Haemonchus contortus, Teladorsagia (Ostertagia) circumcincta, Teladorsagia trifurcata, Trichostrongylus axei, Trichostrongylus colubriformis, Trichostrongylus vitrinus, Cooperia curticei, Cooperia oncophora, Nematodirusbattus, Nematodirusfilicollis, Nematodirus spathiger, Chabertia ovina and Oesophagostomum venulosum). In each study, sheep infected with a defined selection of the target nematodes were treated with 2.5mg monepantel/kg liveweight. Following euthanasia and worm counting, efficacy was calculated against worm counts from untreated control groups. The results demonstrate high (95<100%) efficacy of monepantel when administered orally to sheep at 2.5mg/kg for most species tested. Efficacy levels against N. spathiger and O. venulosum were variable and failed to meet the required regulatory standard (> or =90%) in some studies. Efficacy was demonstrated against L4 stages of nematodes known to be resistant to either benzimidazole and/or levamisole anthelmintics (macrocyclic lactone resistant isolates were not available for testing). The broad-spectrum activity of monepantel against L4 larvae of common gastro-intestinal nematodes in sheep and its favorable safety profile represents a significant advance in the treatment of parasitic gastro-enteritis in this animal species. No adverse effects related to treatment with monepantel were observed. PMID:19135310

  19. Establishment rate of sheep gastrointestinal nematodes in farmed red deer (Cervus elaphus).

    PubMed

    Tapia-Escárate, D; Pomroy, W E; Scott, I; Wilson, P R; Lopez-Villalobos, N

    2015-04-15

    To investigate the establishment of sheep gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) in red deer, five red deer and five sheep aged 5-6 months were challenged with a mixed burden of sheep GIN at a rate of 327L3/kg bodyweight. The LSmean (SE) establishment rates (%) for Haemonchus contortus, Teladorsagia circumcincta, Cooperia curticei, Trichostrongylus spp. and Oesophagostomum+Chabertia spp. were 18.6 (0.03), 35.5 (0.04), 30.7 (0.04), 74.9 (0.05), 19.9 (0.06), respectively in sheep and 10.5 (0.03), 1.0 (0.04), 0.1 (0.04), 1.0 (0.05), 4.8 (0.06) respectively, in deer. Establishment rates were significantly different (p<0.05) between hosts for all genera. No Trichostrongylus colubriformis or Trichostrongylus vitrinus were seen in any deer but were present in all sheep. Trichostrongylus axei were seen in both hosts but there were relatively more which established in sheep than in deer (p<0.01). No Chabertia ovina were seen in any deer but were present in four of five sheep in low numbers. The only species of Oesophagostomum seen in either host was Oesophagostomum venulosum. These results suggest that the sheep GIN most likely to infect red deer grazing the same pastures are H. contortus, T. axei and O. venulosum.

  20. Haemonchus longistipes Railliet & Henry, 1909 (Nematoda, Trichostrongylidae) from the Egyptian dromedary, Camelus dromedarius (Artiodactyla: Camelidae), first identification on the basis of light and ultrastructural data.

    PubMed

    Morsy, Kareem; Bashtar, Abdel-Rahman; Fol, Mona; Yehia, Salma

    2014-12-01

    Haemonchus longistipes is a gastrointestinal abomasal nematode which is one of the most prevalent and pathogenic parasites infesting the stomach of ruminants. On the basis of light and ultrastructural data, the objective of the present study was to introduce a first identification of the cameline haemonchosis caused by H. longistipes. Abomasa of 42 Egyptian camels Camelus dromedarius (Artiodactyla: Camelidae) were collected monthly from September 2013 to April 2014 from the main slaughter house of Cairo, Egypt. Adult male and female nematode worms were recovered from 26 (62%) specimens of the examined abomasa. The parasites were of yellow color; the body was filiform (slender) tapered towards the anterior end in male and towards both ends in female. Buccal capsules absent, the buccal cavity was small with a conspicuous dorsal lancet extended from dorsal wall. The cervical papillae were prominent and spine-like. The body length of the female worm was 16.6-20.5 (18.5 ± 0.3) mm. The anterior end to the cervical papillae was 3.19-4.30 (4.12 ± 0.5) mm. The vulva of the female had a linguiform process or flap, the tail is without a spine, and the anal pore at the posterior end of the body had a simple dorsal rim. The body of male was 10.4-14.7 (13.9 ± 2.0) mm in length. The male bursa had elongated lobes supported by long, slender rays. The small dorsal lobe was asymmetrical with Y-shaped dorsal rays. The spicules were long with a length of 0.52-0.54 (0.53 ± 0.05) mm, each provided with a small barb and pore near its extremity. Synlophe was bilaterally and dorsoventrally symmetrical; it extended from cephalic expansion over anterior 50% of prebursal or prevulvar body and consisted of a maximum of 42 ridges. The described species herein was compared with the three morphologically similar species Haemonchus mitchelli, Haemonchus okapiae, and H. longistipes with their synlophes consist of 42 ridges distributed over the anterior half of the body. These species can be separated by unique structural characteristics of their synlophes, spicules, and copulatory bursa. The most morphologically similar species to the recovered worm was H. longistipes. Also, some of the parameters with regard to morphology and morphometry of this parasite were described for the first time. PMID:25273629

  1. Two species of Synhimantus (dispharynx) railliet, Henry and Sisoff, 1912 (Nematoda: Acuarioidea: Acuariidae), in passerine birds from the Area de Conservacion Guanacaste, Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luping; Brooks, Daniel R; Causey, Douglas

    2004-10-01

    Members of 2 species of Synhimantus (Dispharynx) live under the lining of the gizzard in passerine birds from the Area de Conservacion Guanacaste, Costa Rica. Synhimantus (Dispharynx) nasuta (Rudolphi, 1819) occurs in Thraupis episcopus, Turdus grayi, Caryothraustes poliogaster, Platyrinchus cancrominus, Ramphocaenus melanurus, Vermivora peregrina, and Geothlypis poliocephala. A single male, in Turdus grayi, apparently representing a new species, distinguishable from all other species of Synhimantus (Dispharynx) by having similar shaped left and right spicules, is described but not named.

  2. Effects of age, sex, lactation and social dominance on faecal egg count patterns of gastrointestinal nematodes in farmed eland (Taurotragus oryx).

    PubMed

    Vadlejch, J; Kotrba, R; Čadková, Z; Růžičková, A; Langrová, I

    2015-10-01

    The eland is a large African antelope that can be bred in a temperate climate, under similar conditions and production systems as cattle. However, knowledge of parasites in farmed elands outside the area of their native habitat is still limited, and information concerning factors that influence these parasites is lacking. Therefore, faecal samples from an entire herd of elands, including calves and adult females and males, were examined monthly over a one year period. Almost 84% of the animals were found to be positive for gastrointestinal nematodes. Strongyle-type eggs were most frequently detected (prevalence 75%), followed by Capillaria sp., Nematodirus sp. and Trichuris sp. eggs. Following culturing eggs to infective larvae, Teladorsagia sp., Trichostrongylus sp., Nematodirus sp., Cooperia sp. and Oesophagostomum sp. were identified. Following necropsy of two calves that died during the study one abomasal nematode (Teladorsagia circumcincta), five small intestinal nematode species (Nematodirus helvetianus, N. spathiger, Cooperia oncophora, C. curticei and Capillaria bovis) and two large intestinal nematodes (Oesophagostomum venulosum and Trichuris ovis) were recovered. From these findings, it is evident that the eland harbours nematodes that are typical for domestic cattle and small ruminants. Morphological and morphometric analyses of recovered nematodes revealed that these parasites do not require any special morphological adaptation to establish infection in elands. The faecal output of strongyle-type and Nematodirus sp. eggs was seasonal, with the highest egg production taking place during spring and summer. Calves had higher faecal egg counts (for all the monitored nematode species) than adults did. Lactation in females was significantly (P<0.0001) associated with higher strongyle nematode egg shedding. Social dominance also affected faecal egg count patterns. The lower the hierarchical position among adults (regardless of sex), the higher the risk of

  3. Effects of age, sex, lactation and social dominance on faecal egg count patterns of gastrointestinal nematodes in farmed eland (Taurotragus oryx).

    PubMed

    Vadlejch, J; Kotrba, R; Čadková, Z; Růžičková, A; Langrová, I

    2015-10-01

    The eland is a large African antelope that can be bred in a temperate climate, under similar conditions and production systems as cattle. However, knowledge of parasites in farmed elands outside the area of their native habitat is still limited, and information concerning factors that influence these parasites is lacking. Therefore, faecal samples from an entire herd of elands, including calves and adult females and males, were examined monthly over a one year period. Almost 84% of the animals were found to be positive for gastrointestinal nematodes. Strongyle-type eggs were most frequently detected (prevalence 75%), followed by Capillaria sp., Nematodirus sp. and Trichuris sp. eggs. Following culturing eggs to infective larvae, Teladorsagia sp., Trichostrongylus sp., Nematodirus sp., Cooperia sp. and Oesophagostomum sp. were identified. Following necropsy of two calves that died during the study one abomasal nematode (Teladorsagia circumcincta), five small intestinal nematode species (Nematodirus helvetianus, N. spathiger, Cooperia oncophora, C. curticei and Capillaria bovis) and two large intestinal nematodes (Oesophagostomum venulosum and Trichuris ovis) were recovered. From these findings, it is evident that the eland harbours nematodes that are typical for domestic cattle and small ruminants. Morphological and morphometric analyses of recovered nematodes revealed that these parasites do not require any special morphological adaptation to establish infection in elands. The faecal output of strongyle-type and Nematodirus sp. eggs was seasonal, with the highest egg production taking place during spring and summer. Calves had higher faecal egg counts (for all the monitored nematode species) than adults did. Lactation in females was significantly (P<0.0001) associated with higher strongyle nematode egg shedding. Social dominance also affected faecal egg count patterns. The lower the hierarchical position among adults (regardless of sex), the higher the risk of

  4. Pharmacokinetics and anthelmintic efficacy of topical eprinomectin in goats prevented from grooming.

    PubMed

    Rehbein, Steffen; Kellermann, Michael; Wehner, Teresa A

    2014-11-01

    Pharmacokinetics and anthelmintic activity of topical eprinomectin in goats prevented from physical contact to others and self-grooming were studied. Sixteen approximately 7 months old male castrated German White Noble goats harbouring induced infections of gastrointestinal nematode parasites were included in the study. They were blocked based on pre-treatment body weight (range 22.4 to 36.4 kg) and then randomly allocated to the untreated control group or the group treated with topical 0.5% w/v eprinomectin (EPRINEX Pour-on, Merial) at 1 mg/kg body weight. Plasma samples were collected prior to and at intervals up to 14 days following treatment and analyzed to determine the concentrations of eprinomectin (B1a component). Parasites were recovered, identified, and counted following necropsy 14 days after treatment. Goats treated with topical eprinomectin had significantly fewer (≥99% reduction, p < 0.01) adult Cooperia curticei, Haemonchus contortus, Nematodirus battus, Oesophagostomum venulosum, Ostertagia circumcincta, and Trichostrongylus colubriformis than the untreated controls. Basic pharmacokinetic parameters for eprinomectin B1a were AUCinfinity, 37.1 ± 15.2 day ng/mL; T½, 5.11 ± 2.83 days; and Cmax, 5.93 ± 1.87 ng/mL; individual maximal concentrations were observed 1 or 2 days after treatment. Results of this study indicate that oral ingestion is not required to achieve adequate exposure for excellent anthelmintic efficacy following topical administration of eprinomectin at 1 mg/kg body weight to goats.

  5. 21 CFR 520.905c - Fenbendazole paste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... lungworms (Dictyocaulus viviparus), stomach worms (Haemonchus contortus, Ostertagia ostertagi, Trichostrongylus axei), and intestinal worms (Bunostomum phlebotomum, Nematodirus helvetianus, Cooperia punctata,...

  6. 21 CFR 520.905c - Fenbendazole paste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... lungworms (Dictyocaulus viviparus), stomach worms (Haemonchus contortus, Ostertagia ostertagi, Trichostrongylus axei), and intestinal worms (Bunostomum phlebotomum, Nematodirus helvetianus, Cooperia punctata,...

  7. 21 CFR 520.905c - Fenbendazole paste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... lungworms (Dictyocaulus viviparus), stomach worms (Haemonchus contortus, Ostertagia ostertagi, Trichostrongylus axei), and intestinal worms (Bunostomum phlebotomum, Nematodirus helvetianus, Cooperia punctata,...

  8. 21 CFR 520.905c - Fenbendazole paste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... lungworms (Dictyocaulus viviparus), stomach worms (Haemonchus contortus, Ostertagia ostertagi, Trichostrongylus axei), and intestinal worms (Bunostomum phlebotomum, Nematodirus helvetianus, Cooperia punctata,...

  9. 21 CFR 520.905c - Fenbendazole paste.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... lungworms (Dictyocaulus viviparus), stomach worms (Haemonchus contortus, Ostertagia ostertagi, Trichostrongylus axei), and intestinal worms (Bunostomum phlebotomum, Nematodirus helvetianus, Cooperia punctata,...

  10. 21 CFR 558.360 - Morantel tartrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...., Ostertagia spp., Trichostrongylus spp.), worms of the small intestine (Cooperia spp., Trichostrongylus spp., Nematodirus spp.), and worms of the large intestine (Oesophagostomum radiatum). (ii) Goats. For removal...

  11. 21 CFR 558.360 - Morantel tartrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...., Ostertagia spp., Trichostrongylus spp.), worms of the small intestine (Cooperia spp., Trichostrongylus spp., Nematodirus spp.), and worms of the large intestine (Oesophagostomum radiatum). (ii) Goats. For removal...

  12. 21 CFR 558.360 - Morantel tartrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...., Ostertagia spp., Trichostrongylus spp.), worms of the small intestine (Cooperia spp., Trichostrongylus spp., Nematodirus spp.), and worms of the large intestine (Oesophagostomum radiatum). (ii) Goats. For removal...

  13. 21 CFR 520.1450a - Morantel tartrate bolus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...., Ostertagia spp., Trichostrongylus spp.), worms of the small intestine (Cooperia spp., Trichostrongylus spp., Nematodirus spp.), and worms of the large intestine (Oesophagostomum radiatum). (3) Limitations. Conditions...

  14. 21 CFR 520.1450a - Morantel tartrate bolus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...., Ostertagia spp., Trichostrongylus spp.), worms of the small intestine (Cooperia spp., Trichostrongylus spp., Nematodirus spp.), and worms of the large intestine (Oesophagostomum radiatum). (3) Limitations. Conditions...

  15. 21 CFR 520.1450a - Morantel tartrate bolus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...., Ostertagia spp., Trichostrongylus spp.), worms of the small intestine (Cooperia spp., Trichostrongylus spp., Nematodirus spp.), and worms of the large intestine (Oesophagostomum radiatum). (3) Limitations. Conditions...

  16. 21 CFR 520.1450a - Morantel tartrate bolus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...., Ostertagia spp., Trichostrongylus spp.), worms of the small intestine (Cooperia spp., Trichostrongylus spp., Nematodirus spp.), and worms of the large intestine (Oesophagostomum radiatum). (3) Limitations. Conditions...

  17. 21 CFR 520.1450a - Morantel tartrate bolus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...., Ostertagia spp., Trichostrongylus spp.), worms of the small intestine (Cooperia spp., Trichostrongylus spp., Nematodirus spp.), and worms of the large intestine (Oesophagostomum radiatum). (3) Limitations. Conditions...

  18. 21 CFR 558.360 - Morantel tartrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...., Ostertagia spp., Trichostrongylus spp.), worms of the small intestine (Cooperia spp., Trichostrongylus spp., Nematodirus spp.), and worms of the large intestine (Oesophagostomum radiatum). (ii) Goats. For removal...

  19. 21 CFR 520.1242b - Levamisole hydrochloride tablet or oblet (bolus).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... against the following nematode infections: Stomach worms (Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia), intestinal worms (Trichostrongylus, Cooperia, Nematodirus, Bunostomum, Oesophagostomum), and lungworms... infections: Stomach worms (Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia), intestinal worms...

  20. 21 CFR 520.1242b - Levamisole hydrochloride tablet or oblet (bolus).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... against the following nematode infections: Stomach worms (Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia), intestinal worms (Trichostrongylus, Cooperia, Nematodirus, Bunostomum, Oesophagostomum), and lungworms... infections: Stomach worms (Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia), intestinal worms...

  1. 21 CFR 520.1242b - Levamisole hydrochloride tablet or oblet (bolus).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... against the following nematode infections: Stomach worms (Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia), intestinal worms (Trichostrongylus, Cooperia, Nematodirus, Bunostomum, Oesophagostomum), and lungworms... infections: Stomach worms (Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia), intestinal worms...

  2. 21 CFR 520.1242b - Levamisole hydrochloride tablet or oblet (bolus).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... against the following nematode infections: Stomach worms (Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia), intestinal worms (Trichostrongylus, Cooperia, Nematodirus, Bunostomum, Oesophagostomum), and lungworms... infections: Stomach worms (Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia), intestinal worms...

  3. 21 CFR 520.1242b - Levamisole hydrochloride tablet or oblet (bolus).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... against the following nematode infections: Stomach worms (Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia), intestinal worms (Trichostrongylus, Cooperia, Nematodirus, Bunostomum, Oesophagostomum), and lungworms... infections: Stomach worms (Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia), intestinal worms...

  4. Comparative analyses of transcriptomic profiles of the bovine small intestine in response to both a primary infection and a drug-attenuated reinfection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cooperia oncophora is an economically important gastrointestinal nematode in ruminants. Acquired resistance to Cooperia oncophora infection in cattle develops rapidly as a result of prior infections. Naïve cattle, when given a primary infection of high-dose infective L3 larvae, develop a strong immu...

  5. 21 CFR 520.1120b - Haloxon boluses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., Trichostrongylus and Cooperia. (2) It is administered by giving one bolus per approximately 500 pounds body weight (35 to 50 milligrams per kilogram of body weight). (3) For most effective results, re-treat animals...

  6. 21 CFR 524.770 - Doramectin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Indications for use. For treatment and control of gastrointestinal roundworms: Ostertagia ostertagi (adults... (adults), Haemonchus placei (adults and fourth-stage larvae), Trichostrongylus axei (adults and fourth-stage larvae), Trichostrongylus colubriformis (adults and fourth-stage larvae), Cooperia...

  7. 21 CFR 520.2380c - Thiabendazole bolus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... weight. (a) Indications for use. Control of infections of gastrointestinal roundworms (general.... Control of severe infections of gastrointestinal roundworms (genera Trichostrongylus spp., Haemonchus spp., Nematodirus spp., Ostertagia spp., and Oesophagostomum radiatum). Control of infections with Cooperia spp....

  8. 21 CFR 520.1242a - Levamisole powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... infections: Stomach worms (Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia); intestinal worms (Trichostrongylus... the following adult nematode infections: Stomach worms (Haemonchus placei, Ostertagia ostertagi, Trichostrongylus axei); intestinal worms (T. longispicularis, Cooperia oncophora, C. punctata,...

  9. 21 CFR 520.1242f - Levamisole hydrochloride gel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... effective against the following nematode infections: Stomach worms (Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia), intestinal worms (Trichostrongylus, Cooperia, Nematodirus, Bunostomum, Oesophagostomum), and lungworms... with the following nematodes: Large roundworms (Ascaris suum), nodular worms (Oesophagostomum...

  10. 21 CFR 520.1242a - Levamisole powder for oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Indications for use—(A) Effective against the following nematode infections: Stomach worms (Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia); intestinal worms (Trichostrongylus, Cooperia, Nematodirus, Bunostomum...: Stomach worms (Haemonchus placei, Ostertagia ostertagi, Trichostrongylus axei); intestinal worms...

  11. 21 CFR 522.1242 - Levamisole.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... is used as an anthelmintic in cattle for treatment of the following parasites: stomach worms (Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia), intestinal worms (Trichostrongylus, Cooperia, Nematodirus... used as an anthelmintic in cattle for treatment of the following parasites: stomach worms...

  12. 21 CFR 520.1242f - Levamisole hydrochloride gel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... effective against the following nematode infections: Stomach worms (Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia), intestinal worms (Trichostrongylus, Cooperia, Nematodirus, Bunostomum, Oesophagostomum), and lungworms... with the following nematodes: Large roundworms (Ascaris suum), nodular worms (Oesophagostomum...

  13. 21 CFR 520.1242a - Levamisole powder for oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Indications for use—(A) Effective against the following nematode infections: Stomach worms (Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia); intestinal worms (Trichostrongylus, Cooperia, Nematodirus, Bunostomum...: Stomach worms (Haemonchus placei, Ostertagia ostertagi, Trichostrongylus axei); intestinal worms...

  14. 21 CFR 520.1242a - Levamisole powder for oral solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Indications for use—(A) Effective against the following nematode infections: Stomach worms (Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia); intestinal worms (Trichostrongylus, Cooperia, Nematodirus, Bunostomum...: Stomach worms (Haemonchus placei, Ostertagia ostertagi, Trichostrongylus axei); intestinal worms...

  15. 21 CFR 520.1242a - Levamisole powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... infections: Stomach worms (Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia); intestinal worms (Trichostrongylus... the following adult nematode infections: Stomach worms (Haemonchus placei, Ostertagia ostertagi, Trichostrongylus axei); intestinal worms (T. longispicularis, Cooperia oncophora, C. punctata,...

  16. Nematodes of the small intestine of African buffaloes, Syncerus caffer, in the Kruger National Park, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Taylor, William A; Skinner, John D; Boomker, Joop

    2013-05-16

    The abundance and distribution of parasitic helminths in populations of African buffaloes, Syncerus caffer, have not been well documented. A total of 28 buffaloes of different ages and sexeswere sampled in the Kruger National Park, South Africa, for nematodes of the small intestine. Three nematode species were identified, namely Cooperia fuelleborni, Cooperia hungi and Trichostrongylus deflexus, with C. hungi being a new country record for African buffalo in South Africa. The overall prevalence was 71%and the average number of worms was 2346 (range: 0-15 980). This is a small burden for such a large mammal. Sex, age and body condition of the buffaloes had no significant effect on worm occurrence.

  17. Evaluation of three formulations of fenbendazole (10% suspension, 0.5% pellets, and 20% premix) against nematode infections in cattle.

    PubMed

    Blagburn, B L; Hanrahan, L A; Hendrix, C M; Lindsay, D S

    1986-03-01

    Anthelmintic efficacies of 3 formulations of fenbendazole were evaluated in cattle naturally parasitized with nematodes: a 10% oral suspension, 0.5% pellets as a top dressing on feed, and a 20% premix. All formulations of fenbendazole were greater than 99% effective in removing adults of Haemonchus contortus, Ostertagia spp, Cooperia spp, and Oesophagostomum radiatum. Fenbendazole was greater than 96% effective in removing adults of Strongyloides papillosus and greater than 85% effective in the removal of Trichuris sp. Fenbendazole was greater than 96% effective against immature nematodes, which were thought to be primarily Cooperia spp. Adverse reactions were not observed in calves treated with the 3 formulations of fenbendazole.

  18. 21 CFR 524.770 - Doramectin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., AND RELATED PRODUCTS OPHTHALMIC AND TOPICAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.770 Doramectin. (a...) Indications for use. For treatment and control of gastrointestinal roundworms: Ostertagia ostertagi (adults...; and with Cooperia punctata and Haemonchus placei for 35 days after treatment; and to...

  19. Anthelmintic efficiency of doramectin, fenbendazole, and nitroxynil, in combination or individually, in sheep worm control.

    PubMed

    Holsback, Luciane; Luppi, Pedro Alex Ramsey; Silva, Camile Sanches; Negrão, Gustavo Kremer; Conde, Gabriel; Gabriel, Hugo Vinícius; Balestrieri, João Vitor; Tomazella, Lucas

    2016-01-01

    The anthelmintic efficiency of doramectin, fenbendazole, and nitroxynil, used individually or in combination, was determined by the Fecal Egg Count Reduction (FECR) test and cultivation of larvae of anthelminthic-treated sheep grouped as follows: G1 (doramectin), G2 (fenbendazole), G3 (nitroxynil), G4 (doramectin + fenbendazole), G5 (doramectin + nitroxynil), G6 (fenbendazole + nitroxynil), G7 (doramectin + nitroxynil + fenbendazole), G8 (untreated). In addition to individually used doramectin and fenbendazole, the helminths were also resistant to the combination of doramectin + fenbendazole; nitroxynil + fenbendazole; and doramectin + nitroxynil + fenbendazole, with their FECR rates ranging from 62-83%. The helminths showed possible nitroxynil-resistance, but had low resistance when the drug was administered in combination with doramectin. The evaluation of individual helminth species revealed that fenbendazole was fully effective against Cooperia; doramectin (G1), moderately effective against Haemonchus and insufficiently active against Cooperia; nitroxynil, effective against Haemonchus and insufficiently active against Cooperia. It was concluded from the results that herd nematodes are resistant to doramectin, fenbendazole, and nitroxynil, and that the combined use of the drugs not only fails to significantly improve the anthelmintic efficiency against Haemonchus and Cooperia, but is also cost-ineffective.

  20. 21 CFR 520.2380a - Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein... § 520.2380a Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block. (a) Chemical name. 2-(4-Thiazolyl..., Ostertagia and Cooperia). (iv) Limitations. Administer to cattle on pasture or range accustomed to...

  1. 21 CFR 520.2380a - Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein... § 520.2380a Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block. (a) Chemical name. 2-(4-Thiazolyl..., Ostertagia and Cooperia). (iv) Limitations. Administer to cattle on pasture or range accustomed to...

  2. 21 CFR 520.2380a - Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein... § 520.2380a Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block. (a) Chemical name. 2-(4-Thiazolyl..., Ostertagia and Cooperia). (iv) Limitations. Administer to cattle on pasture or range accustomed to...

  3. 21 CFR 520.2380a - Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein... § 520.2380a Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block. (a) Chemical name. 2-(4-Thiazolyl..., Ostertagia and Cooperia). (iv) Limitations. Administer to cattle on pasture or range accustomed to...

  4. 21 CFR 520.2380a - Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein... § 520.2380a Thiabendazole top dressing and mineral protein block. (a) Chemical name. 2-(4-Thiazolyl..., Ostertagia and Cooperia). (iv) Limitations. Administer to cattle on pasture or range accustomed to...

  5. On a new species of the genus Cobboldina (Nematoda: Atractidae) from Hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius Linnaeus, 1758) captivated at the Alipore Zoological Garden, Kolkata, West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Sagata; Manna, Buddhadeb

    2012-10-01

    The specimens of the genus Cobboldina Leiper, 1911 and family Atractidae (Railliet, 1917) Travassos, 1919 recovered from the faecal matter of Hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius Linnaeus, 1758) from the Alipore Zoological Garden, Kolkata, India recognized as a new species after careful observation. The collected nematode differs from the only valid species Cobboldina vivipara Leiper, 1911, in the presence of gubernaculum (13.2-29.7 μm in length) and the number of caudal papillae (10 pairs) and named as Cobboldina gubernacularia sp. n., This is the second species of the genus Cobboldina recorded from the host Hippopotamus amphibius Linnaeus, 1758 remaining captive in the Alipore Zoological Garden, Kolkata, India.

  6. On a new species of the genus Cobboldina (Nematoda: Atractidae) from Hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius Linnaeus, 1758) captivated at the Alipore Zoological Garden, Kolkata, West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Sagata; Manna, Buddhadeb

    2012-10-01

    The specimens of the genus Cobboldina Leiper, 1911 and family Atractidae (Railliet, 1917) Travassos, 1919 recovered from the faecal matter of Hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius Linnaeus, 1758) from the Alipore Zoological Garden, Kolkata, India recognized as a new species after careful observation. The collected nematode differs from the only valid species Cobboldina vivipara Leiper, 1911, in the presence of gubernaculum (13.2-29.7 μm in length) and the number of caudal papillae (10 pairs) and named as Cobboldina gubernacularia sp. n., This is the second species of the genus Cobboldina recorded from the host Hippopotamus amphibius Linnaeus, 1758 remaining captive in the Alipore Zoological Garden, Kolkata, India. PMID:24082537

  7. The genera Paranoplocephala Lühe 1910 and Anoplocephaloides Baer, 1923 (Cestoda: Anoplocephalidae), with particular reference to species in rodents.

    PubMed

    Rausch, R L

    1976-01-01

    The present study redefines the systematic arrangement and taxonomic status of some anoplocephaline cestodes previously allocated among the genera Andrya Railliet, 1893. Paranoplacephala Lühe, 1910, and Aprostatandrya Kirshenblat, 1938. Comparisons indicated that Paranoplocephala omphalodes (Hermann, 1783), type species of Paranoplocephala, differs morphologically from its congeners, all of which conform to the diagnosis of the genus Anoplocephaloides Baer, 1923, hitherto considered a synonym of Paranoplocephala, and that it cannot be distinguished at the generic level from Aprostatandrya macrocephala (Douthitt, 1915), type of the genus Aprostatandrya. The distinction between Andrya and Aprostatandrya based on the presence or absence of a "prostate gland" does not exist, for neither the type species of Andrya, A; rhopalocephala (Riehm, 1881), nor A. cuniculi (Blanchard, 1891) possesses such an organ; rather, the structure of the external seminal vesicle in these cestodes does not differ fundamentally from that in P. omphalodes or in species of Aprostatandrya. Based on these findings, Aprostatandrya Kirshenbalt, 1938 is placed in synonymy with Paranoplocephala Lühe, 1910, and Anoplocephaloides Baer, 1923 is restored to contain all species other than P. omphalodes formerly allocated to the genus. Paranoplocephala. If the pattern of development of the uterus in A. rhopalocephala is found to be like that in P. omphalodes, Paranoplocephala Lühe, 1910 will in turn also become a synonym of Andrya Railliet, 1893. Three additional species of Anoplocephaloides are described, and the zoogeography of Anoplocephaloides spp. and their mammalian hosts is briefly discussed.

  8. Importance of gastro-intestinal helminths in calves in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Owen, I L; Talbot, N T

    1983-05-01

    Gastro-intestinal nematodes caused poor growth rates and high mortality in undrenched calves when weaning preceded the wet season. Cooperia punctata and Haemonchus placei were the dominant species throughout the year with worm burdens and pasture contamination being highest during the wet season and lowest in the dry season. Histotropic stages occurred throughout the year in weaner calves but with a clear peak during the wet season. The development of host resistance against the most important worm species generally followed the pattern described by others but a breakdown in resistance against Cooperia occurred amongst some calves during the wet season. The number of H. placei, together with Bunostomum phlebotomum, was sufficiently large in some calves to cause death. It is likely that the even larger burdens of C. punctata observed would have contributed to if not caused death.

  9. The Effects of Anthelmintic Treatments on the Development of Gastrointestinal Parasitism in Calves

    PubMed Central

    Smith, H. J.

    1974-01-01

    Fortnightly treatment of susceptible calves with 1-tetramisole during the first two months of continuous exposure to pastures residually heavily-infected with Ostertagia ostertagi, Cooperia oncophora and Nematodirus helvetianus did not prevent the development of clinical parasitic gastroenteritis, although the infections were not as severe as in nontreated calves. Development of resistance in treated calves was manifested by significantly smaller numbers of Cooperia eggs in utero (which were reflected by reduced fecal egg counts) and by significantly smaller Nematodirus worm burdens than in susceptible calves that commenced grazing coincident with cessation of treatment. The findings also indicated that resistance to Nematodirus helvetianus was slower in developing in treated than in nontreated infected calves. PMID:4274819

  10. Seasonal variations in the numbers of trichostrongylid nematode eggs and their larvae in the faeces of farmed goats in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Rahman, W A

    1992-04-01

    Faecal worm egg counts of goats from two farms in Penang Island, West Malaysia, were monitored over a period of 14 months. The faecal egg count pattern followed that of total rainfall. The humid tropical environment was favourable for the development of various species of trichostrongylid nematodes, namely Haemonchus contortus, Trichostrongylus spp., Oesophagostomum spp. and Cooperia spp. Generally, H. contortus was observed to be the predominant species, more so in the monsoon months of the year. PMID:1615628

  11. Parasitic infection of Camelus dromedarius from Iran.

    PubMed

    Mirzayans, A; Halim, R

    1980-01-01

    25 intestinal tract, 30 oesophagus and respiratory organs and 47 liver of arabian camel were examined. 35 species of Nematodes two species of Cestodes one immature Trematode one cestodes larvae, one Diptera larvae, one Microfilaria of lung worm and two external parasites were found. This is a first report of helminths in camel from Iran. The Nematodes: Physocephalus sexalatus, Ascarops strongylina, Haemonchus contortus, Cooperia punctata, Nematodirus oratianus, Nematodirella longissimespiculata, Trichostrongylus axei and Gongylonema pulchrum are reported for the first time from Camel.

  12. Gastro-intestinal helminths in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) of Illinois.

    PubMed

    Cook, T W; Ridgeway, B T; Andrews, R; Hodge, J

    1979-07-01

    Two deer populations, one in northern Illinois the other in southern Illinois, were examined by necropsy (n = 44 and 40 respectively) for helminth parasites of the gastro-intestinal tract and abdominal cavity. Both herds were parasitized by Apteragia odocoilei, Haemonchus contortus, Gongylonema pulchrum, Setaria yehi, Trichuris ovis, and Moniezia benedeni. Nematodirus sp. was found only in deer of northern Illinois. Ostertagia mossi, Capillaria sp., Cooperia sp., and Oesophagostomum sp. were found only in deer of southern Illinois.

  13. New records of Porrocaecum sp. and Hysterothylacium sp. (Nematoda: Anisakidae) from fishes of Bay of Bengal.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, I R; Rao, K H; Shyamasundary, K

    1990-01-01

    The present paper deals with new records of nematoda of the family Anisakidae Railliet et Henry, 1912. During a study of the parasites of marine fishes (shark, ray and marine teleosts) of Bay of Bengal, females of interesting nematode parasites were found in stomach and body cavity of Chiloscyllium indicum (Gmelin), Torpedo panthera (Olfers), Pomadasys masculatus Bloch and Sphyraena obtusata Cuvier from Visakhapatnam, Bheemunipatnam and Yarada (Andhra Pradesh). Most of the characters tally with Porrocaecum galeocerdonis and Hysterothylacium engraulisi, except for minor variations. Because of the non-availability of the male, it is not possible to assign the present specimens to any of the known species of the genera Porrocaecum and Hysterothylacium. Hence these are referred as Porrocaecum sp. and Hysterothylacium sp. Chiloscyllium indicum and Torpedo panthera are new host records. Visakhapatnam, Bheemunipatnam and Yarada are the new locality records. PMID:2152367

  14. Larvae of Contracaecum sp. (Nematoda: Anisakidae) in the threatened freshwater fish Sandelia capensis (Anabantidae) in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Moravec, Franti Ek; van Rensburg, Candice Jansen; Van As, Liesl L

    2016-08-01

    Third-stage larvae of the nematode genus Contracaecum Railliet et Henry, 1912 (Contracaecum sp.) were, for the first time, recorded from the abdominal cavity of the threatened endemic freshwater fish Sandelia capensis (Cuvier) in South Africa. The larval morphology indicated that they belong to a species of which the adults are parasitic in fish-eating birds. Although the nematode seems to be a common parasite of S. capensis in the locality under study (prevalence 23%), the low intensity of infection recorded (1 to 4) and the generally known low pathogenicity of Contracaecum larvae in fish indicate that this parasite probably does not represent a danger to the local population of this threatened fish species. PMID:27503922

  15. Further description of Aspidodera raillieti (Nematoda: Aspidoderidae) from Didelphis marsupialis (Mammalia: Didelphidae) by light and scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chagas-Moutinho, V A; Oliveira-Menezes, A; Cárdenas, M Q; Lanfredi, R M

    2007-10-01

    Nematodes of the family Aspidoderidae (Nematoda: Heterakoidea) Freitas 1956 are widely distributed from Americas. The species of the genus Aspidodera Railliet and Henry 1912 are parasites of mammals of the orders Edentata, Marsupialia, and Rodentia. In the present work, Aspidodera raillieti (L. Travassos, Mem Inst Oswaldo Cruz 5(3):271-318, 1913), collected from the large intestine of Didelphis marsupialis (Mammalia: Didelphidae) from Valle del Cauca, Colombia, is redescribed. The association of light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) allowed a detailed analysis of the morphology and ultrastructure of this nematode. Some taxonomic features, such as cephalic region, topography of the cuticle, sucker, spicules, posterior end of males, localization of vulva, the anus, and posterior end of females were observed. Important structures such as amphid, details of cephalic region, phasmid, and number and localization of caudal papillae are documented by SEM, for the first time adding characters to identify this species. Colombia is a new geographical record for A. raillieti.

  16. Redescription, generic allocation and synonymy of Decorataria magnilabiata (Molin, 1860) n. comb. (Nematoda: Spirurida: Acuariidae), a parasite of the roseate spoonbill Platalea ajaja L. (Aves: Threskiornithidae) in South America.

    PubMed

    Mutafchiev, Yasen; Georgiev, Boyko B

    2011-09-01

    Decorataria magnilabiata (Molin, 1860) n. comb. is proposed for Dispharagus magnilabiatus Molin, 1860 [= Acuaria (Cheilospirura) magnilabiata (Molin, 1860) Railliet, Henry & Sisoff, 1912; Cheilospirura magnilabiata (Molin, 1860) Stiles & Hassall, 1920; Dispharynx magnilabiata (Molin, 1860) Gendre, 1920] (Nematoda, Spirurida, Acuariidae), a parasite of the roseate spoonbill Platalea ajaja L. (Ciconiiformes, Threskiornithidae) known from Brazil, France (bird in captivity), Argentina and Cuba. The species is redescribed and illustrated on the basis of the type-series (from Brazil) in the Helminthological Collection of the Naturhistorisches Museum, Vienna. Syncuaria diacantha Petter, 1961 [= Decorataria diacantha (P.) Skryabin, Sobolev & Ivashkin, 1965], originally described from Platalea ajaja in France (bird in captivity), is recognised as a junior synonym of Decorataria magnilabiata (new synonymy). PMID:21805387

  17. Aspidoderidae from North America, with the description of a new species of Aspidodera (Nematoda: Heterakoidea).

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Ruiz, F Agustín; Gardner, Scott L; Varela-Stokes, Andrea S

    2006-08-01

    Aspidodera sogandaresi n. sp. (Heterakoidea: Aspidoderidae) from Dasypus novemcinctus Linnaeus, 1758 is herein described. This nematode occurs in armadillos from as far south as the canal zone of Panama, north through central Mexico, and into the southern United States. Previously identified as Aspidodera fasciata (Schneider, 1866), this new species has blunt projections on the lips and lateral expansions at the distal tips of the spicules, whereas A. fasciata has conspicuous digitiform projections on the lips, and a terminal round expansion at the tips of the spicules. Other species of the family present in North America include Aspidodera binansata Railliet and Henry, 1913; Aspidodera vazi Proença, 1937; and Lauroia trinidadensis Cameron, 1939. PMID:16995403

  18. Studies on Sarcocystis in Malaysia. I. Sarcocystis levinei n. sp. from the water buffalo Bubalus bubalis.

    PubMed

    Dissanaike, A S; Kan, S P

    1978-04-20

    Light and electron microscopic studies and feeding experiments have confirmed the presence of two species of Sarcocystis in the water buffalo Bubalus bubalis. One is the already known species with large macroscopic sarcocysts, Sarcocystis fusiformia (Railliet, 1897) Bernard and Bauche, 1912 and the other is S. levinei n. sp. which is being described in detail. The sarcocysts of S. levinei are 0.9 x 0.1 mm and the zoites in them 17.8 x 4.2 micrometer. Ultrastructurally, the primary cyst wall shows sloping villi with irregular wavy outlines. Within the villi are coarse granules and annulated fibrils. Trabeculae are present. The sexual stages of S. levinei occur in the subepithelial tissue of the small intestine of the dog and sporocysts shed by this definitive host are 15-16 by 10 micrometer.

  19. Phenotypic and genotypic characterisation of Haemonchus spp. and other gastrointestinal nematodes resistant to benzimidazole in infected calves from the tropical regions of Campeche State, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Encalada-Mena, Lisandro; Tuyub-Solis, Henry; Ramirez-Vargas, Gabriel; Mendoza-de-Gives, Pedro; Aguilar-Marcelino, Liliana; López-Arellano, Ma Eugenia

    2014-09-15

    The aim of this study was to identify the presence of anthelmintic resistance to benzimidazole (BZ) in gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) from naturally infected calves in the tropical regions of Campeche State of Mexico. The faecal egg count reduction test (FECRT) was conducted at 10 livestock farms localised in the Carmen, Candelaria, Champotón, Escárcega and Palizada municipalities of Campeche. The assessed anthelmintic was albendazole. The trial period was between August and November 2012. Infected calves were allocated into two groups, control and treated, on each farm. The number of eggs excreted per g of faeces was estimated by the McMaster technique at 0 and 14 days pre- and post- treatment, respectively. Recovered infective larvae (L3) (pre- and post-treatment) were identified using taxonomic keys and a genomic DNA (gDNA) template from a pool of L3 species prior to BZ treatment. Additionally, BZ-resistance polymorphisms in Haemonchus were determined by Allele Specific PCR (AS-PCR) at codon 200 and by end-point PCR at codons 200, 198 and 167 from isotype 1 of the β-tubulin gene. Morphological identification revealed Haemonchus, Cooperia, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia and Oesophagostumum L3 species before BZ treatment, and Haemonchus and Cooperia L3 species after treatment. Additionally, of the GIN populations, three exhibited BZ resistance, and seven were BZ-susceptible by FECRT. Molecular analysis identified mutations in Haemonchus populations on nine farms at codon 200 (TTC to TAC) by AS-PCR, while no changes were observed at 167 (TTC to TAC) or 198 (GAA to GCA) codons in any population. In conclusion, resistance to BZ was determined in Haemonchus and Cooperia nematodes in infected cattle in five tropical regions of Campeche State.

  20. Gastrointestinal nematode infections in roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) from the NW of the Iberian Peninsula: assessment of some risk factors.

    PubMed

    Pato, F J; Vázquez, L; Díez-Baños, N; López, C; Sánchez-Andrade, R; Fernández, G; Díez-Baños, P; Panadero, R; Díaz, P; Morrondo, P

    2013-09-01

    Intestinal contents of 218 roe deer hunted in the northwest (NW) of the Iberian Peninsula during the 2008-2009 hunting seasons were examined in order to provide information on the gastrointestinal (GI) nematode prevalence and intensity of infection and the possible influence of some environmental and intrinsic factors such as climatic conditions, age and sex. All the animals studied harboured GI nematodes, and a total of 20 different species belonging to ten genera were identified. Spiculopteragia spiculoptera/Spiculopteragia mathevossiani, Ostertagia leptospicularis/Ostertagia kolchida and Nematodirus filicollis were the most common. This is the first citation for Chabertia ovina, Cooperia pectinata, Cooperia punctata, Cooperia oncophora, Haemonchus contortus, Nematodirus spathiger, Oesophagostomum venulosum, Teladorsagia trifurcata, Trichostrongylus capricola, Trichostrongylus colubriformis, Trichostrongylus vitrinus and Trichuris capreoli in roe deer from the Iberian Peninsula. Prevalence and intensity were significantly higher in the abomasum, where infections with more than one GI nematode species were the most common; in the other intestinal segments infections with only one GI nematode species were the most prevalent. When considering the influence of the different risk factors on the prevalence of GI nematodes, the highest prevalence for most of the genera were observed in roe deer from coastal areas, where climatic conditions are more favourable for the development and survival of third stage larvae in the environment. Regarding the sex of the animals, the prevalence was, in general, higher in males than in females, probably due to behavioural and physiological sex-related differences. On the contrary, no differences were found in relation to the age of the animals. This study reveals that roe deer from the NW of the Iberian Peninsula are widely and intensely infected with gastrointestinal nematodes, which probably affect the health status of these

  1. Gastrointestinal nematode infection and performance of weaned stocker calves in response to anthelmintic control strategies.

    PubMed

    Walker, R S; Miller, J E; Monlezun, C J; LaMay, D; Navarre, C; Ensley, D

    2013-10-18

    Gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) parasite control recommendations are in a state of flux because of the increase in anthelmintic resistant cattle parasites, such as Cooperia spp. In addition, Cooperia spp. infection is typically high in warm-season grass pastures and can affect growth performance of grazing stocker calves in the Gulf Coast Region. This study evaluated the effects of moxidectin pour-on, oxfendazole oral suspension, or a combination of the two given at separate times on infection and performance of weaned beef calves grazing summer forages. Steers (n=42) and heifers (n=31) were stratified by sex, d-11 fecal egg count (FEC), and d-1 shrunk body weight (BW) to one of 10 pastures with four anthelmintic treatments and one control. Treatments included: (1) oxfendazole given on d 0 and moxidectin on d 73 (O+M), (2) moxidectin given on d 0 and oxfendazole on d 73 (M+O), (3) moxidectin given on d 0 (M), (4) oxfendazole given on d 0 (O) and (5) no anthelmintic given (CON). Calves grazed for d-110 beginning May 27th. Response variables were FEC (collected on d-11, 14, 31, 45, 59, 73, 87 and 108), coprocultures (evaluated for d 87 and 108), final shrunk BW, shrunk BW gain, average daily gain (ADG), and full BW gain (collected on d 31, 59, 73, 87, and 108). Calves treated with either oxfendazole (O+M and O) or moxidectin (M+O and M) on d 0 had significantly lower (P<0.001) FEC than the CON calves on d 14, 31 and 45. However, the M+O treated calves had significantly higher (P<0.001) FEC than both oxfendazole treated groups. In addition, calves treated with a second dewormer on d 73 (O+M and M+O) had significantly lower (P<0.001) FEC by d 87 than the CON or M treated calves. Shrunk BW gain and ADG were significantly greater (P=0.005) for the O+M compared to the M treated and CON calves, but comparable with the M+O and O treated calves, respectively. Coprocultures sampled on d 87 and 108 for calves not receiving a second dewormer were predominantly Cooperia spp. and

  2. [Effectiveness of fenbendazole (Panacur) in cattle invaded by gastrointestinal and pulmonary nematodes].

    PubMed

    Corba, J; Reisz, T; Krupicer, I; Pacenovský, J; Breza, M

    1977-04-01

    The effectiveness of the new anthelmintic fenbendazole (Panacur) produced by Hoechst, W. Germany, was tested in cattle naturally invaded by gastro-intestinal and pulmonary nematodes. The single dose of 5.7 mg per kg or 7.5 mg per kg body weight administered either in the form of a 10% suspension or in pellets containing 1.5% of the active substance gave 100% intenseffectiveness and 100% extenseffectiveness in the control of Dictyocaulus viviparus, Haemonchus contortus, Trichostrongylus spp., Ostertagia spp., Oesophagostomum spp. and Cooperia spp. The animals tolerated the administration of both drug forms without showing any undesirable symptoms.

  3. The efficacy and plasma profiles of abamectin plus levamisole combination anthelmintics administered as oral and pour-on formulations to cattle.

    PubMed

    Leathwick, D M; Miller, C M; Sauermann, C W; Candy, P M; Ganesh, S; Fraser, K; Waghorn, T S

    2016-08-30

    In phase I, faecal egg count reduction tests (FECRT) were conducted on six commercial cattle farms to compare the performance of two pour-on and one oral combination anthelmintic. Groups of 12-15 calves were sampled for faecal nematode egg count (FEC) before treatment with either abamectin oral, levamisole oral, an abamectin+levamisole oral combination or one of two abamectin+levamisole combination pour-ons. Samples were collected again 14days after treatment to calculate the percentage reduction in FEC. The proportions of infective stage larvae (L3) in faecal cultures were used to apportion egg counts to, and calculate efficacy against, the main parasite genera. Abamectin oral was effective against Ostertagia except on one farm where resistance was indicated, but had reduced efficacy against Cooperia on four farms. Levamisole oral was effective against Cooperia on all farms, but had variable efficacy against Ostertagia. The abamectin+levamisole oral was effective against both species on all farms. The abamectin+levamisole pour-ons were effective on some farms but not on others. In particular, pour-on 2 failed to achieve 95% efficacy in 45% of evaluations, 4/6 against Cooperia and 1/5 against Ostertagia. On some farms the combination pour-ons were less effective than their constituent actives administered alone as orals. In phase II, 8 groups of 6 calves, grazing parasite-free pasture, were infected with putatively ML-resistant isolates of Cooperia oncophora and Ostertagia ostertagi. Once infections were patent groups were treated with oral or pour-on formulations of abamectin alone, levamisole alone, abamectin+levamisole (two pour-ons) or remained untreated. Blood samples were collected for analysis and after 8days all calves were euthanized and abomasa and intestines recovered for worm counts. All treatments were effective against O. ostertagi and all treatments containing levamisole were effective against C. oncophora. Animals treated with the oral combination

  4. Helminth parasites of gemsbok (Oryx gazella) in the Klein Karoo.

    PubMed

    Ellis, M B; Boomker, J

    2006-12-01

    The number and species of helminth parasites from three gemsbok (Oryx gazella) were recorded, and their faecal nematode egg counts and the level of pasture contamination determined. Six nematode genera were recovered and four species identified, of which Trichostrongylus rugatus was the most prevalent. Other nematode species recovered were Cooperia sp., Agriostomum sp., Haemonchus contortus, Nematodirus spathiger and Ostertagia ostertagi. None of the worms were present in all animals studied, and no new host associations were found. Cysticerci were recovered from the mesenteries of one gemsbok and a further two unidentifiable helminths were recovered from the abomasum and the kidney fat layer of another antelope. PMID:17283732

  5. [Knowledge of the endoparasitic fauna of Lama guanicoe Muller, 1776, from the Mitre Peninsula, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina].

    PubMed

    Navone, G T; Merino, M L

    1989-01-01

    Parasitological fauna of Lama guanicoe in the Peninsula Mitre, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, is analyzed in this paper. Coproparasitological tests of 58 samples were performed, and on this basis, the presence of the following genera was determined: Haemonchus, Marshallagia, Cooperia, Nematodirus, Ostertagia, Trichostrongylus, Oesophagostomun and Chavertia. Marshallagia and Chabertia are reported for the first time for this host. The dung piles are not considered as parasitic barriers. Infections occur in two seasons: at the beginning of the spring and at the beginning of summer, as a survival strategy of parasitic nematodes. Parasites of L. guanicoe would be secondarily acquired form cattle.

  6. Parasitism among white-tailed deer and domestic sheep on common range.

    PubMed

    Prestwood, A K; Pursglove, S R; Hayes, F A

    1976-07-01

    Parasitism was studied in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and domestic sheep (Ovis aries) which shared a common range in eastern West Virginia. Of 30 species of internal parasites, 11 were found in deer and 22 in sheep. Five parasites, Sarcocystis sp., Cysticercus tenuicollis, Oesophagostomum venulosum, Cooperia punctata, and Gongylonema pulchrum, occurred in both deer and sheep. An index of similarity of 17.2 suggests that the parasite faunas of these hosts are distinct, and that it is unlikely that white-tailed deer are reservoirs of common parasites of domestic sheep in the southern Appalachian region.

  7. The anthelmintic efficacy of albendazole against gastrointestinal roundworms, tapeworms, lungworms and liverflukes in sheep.

    PubMed

    van Schalkwyk, P C; Geyser, T L; Récio, M; Erasmus, F P

    1979-03-01

    Anthelmintic trials were carried out to evaluate the efficacy of albendazole against helmi of 2,5 to 3,8 mg/kg administered orally, resulted in a 98,8 to 100% reduction of adult parasites of the genera Haemonchus, Ostertagia, Trichostrongylus, Nematodirus, Gaigeria, Oesophagostomum, Chabertia, Marshallagia and Cooperia. Against the immature stages of these genera, except for Marshallagia and Cooperia, which were not tested, a dose level of 2,5 to 3,8 mg/kg was 83,9-100% effective. Albendazole at 2,5 mg/kg was 99,0% effective against adult stages of Dictyocaulus; its activity at a dose of 3,8 mg/kg against the immature stages of D. filaria was 89,3%. In sheep naturally infested with Moniezia, 100% elimination was obtained at a dose level of 2,5 mg/kg. Dose levels of 3,8 mg/kg and higher were more than 76% effective against adult Fasciola hepatica, while a dose of 4,8 mg/kg was 63% effective against adult Fasciola gigantica.

  8. The anthelmintic efficacy of albendazole against gastrointestinal roundworms, tapeworms, lungworms and liverflukes in sheep.

    PubMed

    van Schalkwyk, P C; Geyser, T L; Récio, M; Erasmus, F P

    1979-03-01

    Anthelmintic trials were carried out to evaluate the efficacy of albendazole against helmi of 2,5 to 3,8 mg/kg administered orally, resulted in a 98,8 to 100% reduction of adult parasites of the genera Haemonchus, Ostertagia, Trichostrongylus, Nematodirus, Gaigeria, Oesophagostomum, Chabertia, Marshallagia and Cooperia. Against the immature stages of these genera, except for Marshallagia and Cooperia, which were not tested, a dose level of 2,5 to 3,8 mg/kg was 83,9-100% effective. Albendazole at 2,5 mg/kg was 99,0% effective against adult stages of Dictyocaulus; its activity at a dose of 3,8 mg/kg against the immature stages of D. filaria was 89,3%. In sheep naturally infested with Moniezia, 100% elimination was obtained at a dose level of 2,5 mg/kg. Dose levels of 3,8 mg/kg and higher were more than 76% effective against adult Fasciola hepatica, while a dose of 4,8 mg/kg was 63% effective against adult Fasciola gigantica. PMID:551183

  9. Overwintering of Bovine Gastrointestinal Nematodes in Southwestern Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Slocombe, J. O. D.

    1974-01-01

    Several steers, reared in isolation until approximately six months of age, were placed on a small isolated enclosed pasture from late spring to late fall of 1970, 1971 and 1972. The pasture was left vacant and unused during the winters and early springs. The pasture had been used in previous years by cattle, and in the late spring of 1970 was grazed by cattle know to be passing gastrointestinal nematode eggs in their feces. The steers were slaughtered periodically, and the prevalence of nematode species in the abomasum, small intestine, and large intestine, was determined from random samples of up to 100 adult male worms from each segment. The following nematodes were found in the steers in 1971 and 1972 and survived winters on pasture: Ostertagia ostertagi, O. lyrata, Cooperia oncophora, C. mcmasteri, Nematodirus helvetianus and Trichuris discolor. Two nematodes Cooperia punctata and Bunostomum phlebotomum known to be present on pasture in 1970, since they were recovered from the steers in that year, were not found in the steers in 1971 and 1972. PMID:4272963

  10. Prevalence of internal parasites in beef cows in the United States: Results of the National Animal Health Monitoring System's (NAHMS) beef study, 2007-2008.

    PubMed

    Stromberg, Bert E; Gasbarre, Louis C; Ballweber, Lora R; Dargatz, David A; Rodriguez, Judith M; Kopral, Christine A; Zarlenga, Dante S

    2015-10-01

    During the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Animal Health Monitoring System's (NAHMS) 2007-2008 beef study, 567 producers from 24 US States were offered the opportunity to collect fecal samples from weaned beef calves and have them evaluated for the presence of parasite eggs (Phase 1). Participating producers were provided with instructions and materials for sample collection. Up to 20 fresh fecal samples were collected from each of the 99 participating operations. Fresh fecal samples were submitted to one of 3 randomly assigned laboratories for evaluation. Upon arrival at the laboratories, all samples were processed for the enumeration of strongyle, Nematodirus, and Trichuris eggs using the modified Wisconsin technique. The presence or absence of coccidian oocysts and tapeworm eggs was also noted. In submissions where the strongyle eggs per gram exceeded 30, aliquots from 2 to 6 animals were pooled for DNA extraction. Extracted DNA was subjected to genus level polymerase chain reaction (PCR) identification for the presence of Ostertagia, Cooperia, Haemonchus, Oesophagostomum, and Trichostrongylus. In this study, 85.6% of the samples had strongyle type, Nematodirus, and Trichuris eggs. Among the samples evaluated, 91% had Cooperia, 79% Ostertagia, 53% Haemonchus, 38% Oesophagostomum, 18% Nematodirus, 7% Trichuris, and 3% Trichostrongylus. The prevalence of coccidia and tapeworm eggs was 59.9% and 13.7%, respectively.

  11. Anisakid nematodes (Nematoda: Anisakidae) from the marine fishes Plectropomus laevis Lacépède (Serranidae) and Sphyraena qenie Klunzinger (Sphyraenidae) off New Caledonia, including two new species of Hysterothylacium Ward & Magath, 1917.

    PubMed

    Moravec, František; Justine, Jean-Lou

    2015-11-01

    Based on light and scanning electron microscopical studies, two new species of Hysterothylacium Ward & Magath, 1917 (Nematoda: Anisakidae) are described from the digestive tract of perciform fishes off New Caledonia: H. alatum n. sp. from Plectropomus laevis (Lacépède) (Serranidae) and H. sphyraenae n. sp. from Sphyraena qenie Klunzinger (Sphyraenidae). The former species (H. alatum) is mainly characterised by its large body (male 42.05 mm, gravid females 51.18-87.38 mm long), the shape of the dorsal lip, conspicuously broad cervical alae, a short caecum and a long ventricular appendix, the length of the spicules (925 µm), the number (25 pairs) and distribution of the genital papillae and the tail tip bearing numerous minute cuticular protuberances. The other species (H. sphyraenae) is mainly characterised by the presence of narrow lateral alae, a short caecum and a long ventricular appendix, the length (762-830 µm) and shape of the spicules, the number (37-38 pairs) and arrangement of the genital papillae, and by the tail tip which lacks any distinct cuticular projections visible under the light microscope. In addition, and unidentifiable at the species level, conspicuously large (45.71-66.10 mm long) larvae of Contracaecum Railliet & Henry, 1912, were found in the body cavity of P. laevis, which serves as a paratenic host for this parasite.

  12. Rhabdochona spp. (Nematoda: Rhabdochonidae) from fishes in the Central African Republic, including three new species.

    PubMed

    Moravec, Frantisek; Jirků, Miloslav

    2014-04-01

    Based on light and scanning electron microscopical studies, three new, one already known and one not identified species of the nematode genus Rhabdochona Railliet, 1916 are reported from the intestine of freshwater fishes in Dzanga-Sangha Protected Areas (Congo River basin), the Central African Republic: Rhabdochona (Rhabdochona) centroafricana sp. n. from Barbus miolepis Boulenger, R. (R.) marcusenii sp. n. from Marcusenius greshoffii (Schilthuis), R. (Globochona) paski Baylis, 1928 from Phenacogrammus aurantiacus (Pellegrin) (new host record), R. (G.) tricuspidata sp. n. from Raiamas christvi (Boulenger) and Rhabdochona (G.) sp. (only females) from Epiplatys multifasciatus (Boulenger). Rhabdochona centroafricana is mainly characterised by the length of the left spicule (333 microm) and the presence of the operculum bearing a conspicuous gelatinous formation on one of egg poles, R. marcusenii by the length of the left spicule (453-486 microm) and the presence of a single broad filament on one egg pole only and R. tricuspidata by the body with marked cuticular ornamentations and deirids branching into three prongs. A key to valid species of Rhabdochona parasitic in fishes of Africa is provided.

  13. Raphidascaris (Raphidascaris) macrouri n. sp. (Nematoda: Anisakidae) from two deep-sea macrourid fishes in the Western Mediterranean: Morphological and molecular characterisations.

    PubMed

    Pérez-i-García, David; Constenla, María; Carrassón, Maite; Montero, Francisco E; Soler-Membrives, Anna; González-Solís, David

    2015-10-01

    A new nematode species, Raphidascaris (Raphidascaris) macrouri n. sp. (Anisakidae), is described from male and female specimens found in the intestine, and occasionally in stomach and pyloric caeca, of two deep-water macrourid fishes (Gadiformes) off Barcelona, Mediterranean Sea: Nezumia aequalis (Günther) (type-host) and Trachyrincus scabrus (Rafinesque). Based on light and scanning electron microscopy examination, the new species shows similar morphological features as the other four valid species of the subgenus Raphidascaris Railliet & Henry, 1915, but it differs from Raphidascaris (Raphidascaris) acus (Bloch, 1779), Raphidascaris (Raphidascaris) lutjani Olsen, 1952 and Raphidascaris (Raphidascaris) mediterraneus Lèbre & Petter, 1983 in the high number of precloacal papillae (23-32) and from Raphidascaris (Raphidascaris) gigi Fujita, 1928 in the length of the spicules. Moreover, Raphidascaris (Raphidascaris) macrouri n. sp. exhibits a high variability on the number and distribution of caudal papillae, which was not recorded in the other four mentioned species. This is the first species of this subgenus reported from the family Macrouridae. Sequences of ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region are analysed and compared with closely related nematode species. Molecular analysis confirmed the uniformity of the R. (R.) macrouri n. sp. between hosts.

  14. A new species of Atriotaenia (Cestoda: Anoplocephalidae) from the hog-nosed skunk Conepatus chinga (Carnivora: Mephitidae) in Peru.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Puerta, Luis A; Ticona, Daniel S; Lopez-Urbina, Maria T; Gonzalez, Armando E

    2012-08-01

    Atriotaenia sanmarci n. sp. (Cestoda: Anoplocephalidae) is described as a parasite of the Andean hog-nosed skunk, Conepatus chinga (Carnivora: Mephitidae), from Cusco, Perú. The new species is primarily distinguished from related species by the distribution, and greater number, of testes, i.e., 194-223 versus 40-60 in Atriotaenia sandgroundi (Sandground, 1926) Baer, 1935, 47-73 in Atriotaenia procyonis (Chandler, 1942) Spasskii, 1951, and 21-84 in Atriotaenia incisa Railliet, 1899. Also, there are differences with respect to the larger dimensions of suckers (300-371 µm vs. 140 in A. sandgroundi, 83-134 in A. procyonis, 70-140 in A. incisa, and 155-192 in Atriotaenia hastati Vaucher, 1982) and in the cirrus pouch length (204-732 µm vs. 90 in A. sandgroundi, 200-220 in A. procyonis, 100-180 in A. incisa, and 150-205 in A. hastati). The new species differs from A. sandgroundi and A. hastati in having a larger body size (122-133 mm vs. 10.6 and 10, respectively). This cestode is the fifth species of Atriotaenia Sandground, 1926.

  15. Anisakid nematodes (Nematoda: Anisakidae) from the marine fishes Plectropomus laevis Lacépède (Serranidae) and Sphyraena qenie Klunzinger (Sphyraenidae) off New Caledonia, including two new species of Hysterothylacium Ward & Magath, 1917.

    PubMed

    Moravec, František; Justine, Jean-Lou

    2015-11-01

    Based on light and scanning electron microscopical studies, two new species of Hysterothylacium Ward & Magath, 1917 (Nematoda: Anisakidae) are described from the digestive tract of perciform fishes off New Caledonia: H. alatum n. sp. from Plectropomus laevis (Lacépède) (Serranidae) and H. sphyraenae n. sp. from Sphyraena qenie Klunzinger (Sphyraenidae). The former species (H. alatum) is mainly characterised by its large body (male 42.05 mm, gravid females 51.18-87.38 mm long), the shape of the dorsal lip, conspicuously broad cervical alae, a short caecum and a long ventricular appendix, the length of the spicules (925 µm), the number (25 pairs) and distribution of the genital papillae and the tail tip bearing numerous minute cuticular protuberances. The other species (H. sphyraenae) is mainly characterised by the presence of narrow lateral alae, a short caecum and a long ventricular appendix, the length (762-830 µm) and shape of the spicules, the number (37-38 pairs) and arrangement of the genital papillae, and by the tail tip which lacks any distinct cuticular projections visible under the light microscope. In addition, and unidentifiable at the species level, conspicuously large (45.71-66.10 mm long) larvae of Contracaecum Railliet & Henry, 1912, were found in the body cavity of P. laevis, which serves as a paratenic host for this parasite. PMID:26446541

  16. Frequency of cattle farms with ivermectin resistant gastrointestinal nematodes in Veracruz, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Díaz, M A; Arnaud-Ochoa, R A; Becerra-Nava, R; Torres-Acosta, J F J; Rodriguez-Vivas, R I; Quiroz-Romero, R H

    2015-09-15

    This study reports the percentage of cattle farms with ivermectin (IVM) resistant gastrointestinal nematodes (GINs) in Veracruz, Mexico, and identifies the GIN genera involved in the resistances. It also describes management practices of anthelmintic (AH) use on the surveyed farms. Twenty-one farms were assessed by means of the faecal egg count reduction test using the McMaster technique. Only two farms had GIN populations susceptible to IVM (9.5%). The proportion of farms with IVM resistant GIN was 71.4% (15/21). Seven of these farms had less than 80% egg count reductions. Haemonchus and Cooperia were the genera most commonly found in the resistant populations, followed by Oesophagostomum. Inappropriate AH treatment practices were identified from the completed questionnaires. Further management practices such as selective treatment and quarantine treatments are proposed to further reduce the spread of IVM resistance between farms.

  17. Multispecies resistance of cattle gastrointestinal nematodes to long-acting avermectin formulations in Mato Grosso do Sul.

    PubMed

    Borges, Fernando de Almeida; Borges, Dyego Gonçalves Lino; Heckler, Rafael Pereira; Neves, Juliana Paniago Lordello; Lopes, Fernando Gonçalves; Onizuka, Marcel Kenzo Vilalba

    2015-09-15

    The use of long-acting avermectins (AVMs) in cattle to treat infections with gastrointestinal nematodes was common in Brazil until its prohibition by state authorities. The prohibition; however, was rescinded in 2015, but a scientific discussion of the pros and cons of the use of these formulations is necessary. We evaluated the levels of resistance to 1.0 and 3.5% doramectin and to 3.15% ivermectin in cattle. The worms in animals treated with 3.5% doramectin were characterized by the suppression of oviposition and by a higher proportion of adult females carrying no eggs. Haemonchus placei, Cooperia punctata, C. pectinata, C. spatulata, and Oesophagostomum radiatum were resistant to the above compositions. The administration of long-acting AVM formulations did not result in a higher efficacy against these helminth populations.

  18. [Effect of bolus administration of albendazole into the rumen on gastrointestinal nematodes and the Dicrocoelium dendriticum trematode in sheep].

    PubMed

    Corba, J; Krupicer, I; Várady, M; Pet'ko, B

    1994-01-01

    The efficacy of intraruminal albendazole (ABZ) capsules (Proftril-Captec) and the effect of treatment on productivity parameters were studied in two experiments totally on 466 ewes naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes and trematodes D. dendriticum. Ovoscopical tests revealed that treated animals remained negative during 10-12 weeks after the administration of capsules and that pasture contamination with helminths was significantly reduced. Necropsy revealed 96.9-99.2% efficacy against nematodes Nematodirus spp., Oesophagostomum spp., Cooperia spp., Trichostrongylus spp. and Trichuris ovis. Priority finding is the efficacy of ABZ capsules against trematodes D. dendriticum which was in the first experiment 88.5% and in the second experiment 91.8%. During the 6-month pasture season treated ewes produced on average 2.56 kg cheese and 0.6 kg wool per ewe more than untreated controls.

  19. Effect of a controlled-release albendazole capsule on parasitism and productivity of sheep.

    PubMed

    Corba, J; Krupicer, I; Legény, J; Juris, P; Veselý, L

    1991-11-01

    The efficacy of intraruminal albendazole (ABZ) capsules (Profitril-Captec) and the effect of treatment on productivity were studied in 300 ewes infected with gastrointestinal nematodes and the trematode Dicrocoelium dendriticum. Coprological tests revealed that treated animals remained negative for 10 weeks after the administration of capsules. Contamination of pasture with nematode larvae was significantly reduced during the whole experiment. Necropsy of 14 animals (seven treated and seven untreated) showed 96.9-99.2% efficacy against the nematodes Nematodirus spp., Oesophagostomum spp., Cooperia spp., Trichostrongylus spp. and Trichuris ovis, while efficacy was 88.5% against D. dendriticum. During the 6 month pasture season (May-October 1989), treated ewes produced on average 2.56 kg cheese and 0.6 kg wool per ewe more than untreated controls. Our study confirms the reliability of the ABZ slow-release capsules over 90 days and the positive effect of treatment on nematode contamination of pasture and ewe productivity.

  20. Combination anthelmintics effectively control ML-resistant parasites; a real-world case history.

    PubMed

    Smith, L L

    2014-07-30

    Routine investigation into an ill-thrift situation with grazing cattle led to the discovery of the first reported case of macrocyclic lactone (ML) resistance in cattle in the USA. Research revealed that resistant parasites were originating on pastures in southeastern USA and were not an anomalous resident population on Wisconsin pastures. Prior to using anthelmintics in combination, ML-resistant Cooperia and Haemonchus spp. were shown to survive treatment with single-active MLs and were being transported in shipped cattle and seeding summer grazing pastures. Treatment and management strategies implemented in 2011 and 2012 suggested that ML-surviving parasites were introduced into the conditioning facility and surviving treatment with ML. Data also demonstrated the use of combination ML+oral levamisole was highly effective in minimizing the transport of ML-surviving parasites from southeastern USA to Wisconsin pastures. The value of fecal egg count monitoring and PCR evaluation of nematode species under production conditions are confirmed.

  1. Helminth parasitisms among intermingling insular populations of white-tailed deer, feral cattle, and feral swine.

    PubMed

    Prestwood, A K; Kellogg, F E; Pursglove, S R; Hayes, F A

    1975-04-15

    Helminth infections among free-ranging, intermingling populations of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), cattle (Bos taurus), and swine (Sus scrofa) on an island off the Georgia coast were studied. Of 39 species of helminths collected, 19 were found in deer, 17 in cattle, and 13 in swine. Of 28 species of helminths recovered from ruminants, 8, viz, Capillaria bovis, Cooperia punctata, Dictyocaulus viviparus, Gongylonema pulchrum, G verrucosum, Haemonchus contortus, Moniezia benedeni, and Trichostrongylus axei, occurred in both deer and cattle. Common liver flukes (Fasciola hepatica) infected cattle and swine but not deer. Only 1 helminth, G pulchrum, infected deer, cattle, and swine. The findings suggested that helminths harbored by the host species are distinct, with little exchange occurring.

  2. Parasites of domestic and wild animals in South Africa. X. Helminths in impala.

    PubMed

    Horak, I G

    1978-12-01

    Two to four impala in the Nylsvley Nature Reserve were culled each month from February 1975-February 1976. Two trematode species, 1 cestode species and 13 species of nematodes were recovered from these antelope. Of these, Fasciola gigantica, Gongylonema pulchrum, Haemonchus placei and Trichostrongylus falculatus are new records for impala. In general, H. placei, Longistrongylus sabie and Impalaia tuberculata exhibited a similar pattern of seasonal occurrence. Adult worms were present during November-February, while marked inhibition in the development of large numbers of 4th stage larvae occurred from April-September or October. Cooperia hungi, Cooperioides hamiltoni and Cooperloides hepaticae followed a similar pattern, but inhibition in the 4th larval stage was not as marked and lasted from June-September. No seasonal pattern of prevalence could be determined for Trichostrongylus spp. The worm burdens of young impala increased with the age of the animals and reached a peak when the impala were 1 year old.

  3. Effects of season and physical condition on the gastrointestinal helminth community of white-tailed deer from the Texas Edwards Plateau.

    PubMed

    Waid, D D; Pence, D B; Warren, R J

    1985-07-01

    Eighty-six adult female white-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginianus (Zimmermann), collected over a 12-mo period in the Texas Edwards Plateau, harbored six species of nematodes (Haemonchus contortus, Gongylonema pulchrum, Oesophagostomum venulosum, Ostertagia ostertagi, Cooperia sp., and Apteragia odocoilei), and two cestodes (Moniezia sp. and Taenia hydatigena). The patterns of distribution of the three common species of gastrointestinal helminths (H. contortus, O. venulosum, and G. pulchrum) were overdispersed. When analyzed for the main and interactive effects of the extrinsic and intrinsic variables of season and physical condition, respectively, aggregated abundances in H. contortus and O. venulosum appeared to result from the main effect of seasonal changes operating over the collective populations of these two species rather than from the intrinsic factor of physical condition operating within selected subpopulations. Abomasal parasite counts do not appear to be a useful index for monitoring herd condition of white-tailed deer from this geographic region.

  4. Helminth parasites of intermingling axis deer, wild swine and domestic cattle from the island of Molokai, Hawaii.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, M E; Davidson, W R

    1989-04-01

    Helminth infections of axis deer (Cervus axis), wild swine (Sus scrofa) and domestic cattle (Bos taurus) were studied among intermingling herds on the Puu-O-Hoku Ranch, Molokai, Hawaii. Twenty-four species of helminths were collected from the 10 deer, 10 swine and 10 cattle. Capillaria bovis, Cooperia punctata, Haemonchus contortus and Trichostrongylus axei infected both axis deer and cattle, whereas Gongylonema pulchrum infected both axis deer and wild swine. None of the species of helminths occurred in both wild swine and cattle nor was any species found in all three hosts. Wild swine and domestic cattle supported separate and distinct helminth communities. In contrast, the helminth community of axis deer appeared to be derived from the helminth communities of cattle and wild swine and consisted only of those species capable of parasitizing either a broad range of ruminants or many mammalian taxa.

  5. Effectiveness of current anthelmintic treatment programs on reducing fecal egg counts in United States cow-calf operations

    PubMed Central

    Gasbarre, Louis C.; Ballweber, Lora R.; Stromberg, Bert E.; Dargatz, David A.; Rodriguez, Judy M.; Kopral, Christine A.; Zarlenga, Dante S.

    2015-01-01

    During the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Animal Health Monitoring System’s (NAHMS) 2007–2008 beef study, producers from 24 states were offered the opportunity to evaluate their animals for internal parasites and for overall responses to treatment with anthelmintics. A lapse of 45 d was required between initial sampling and any previous treatments. Choice of anthelmintic (oral benzimidazoles, and both injectable and pour-on endectocides) was at the discretion of the producer so as not to alter the local control programs. Fresh fecal samples were collected from 20 animals, or from the entire group if less than 20, then randomly assigned to 1 of 3 participating laboratories for examination. Analyses consisted of double centrifugation flotation followed by enumeration of strongyle, Nematodirus, and Trichuris eggs (the presence of coccidian oocysts and tapeworm eggs was also noted). Where strongyle eggs per gram (epg) exceeded 30, aliquots from 2 to 6 animals were pooled for egg isolation and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis for the presence of Ostertagia, Cooperia, Haemonchus, Oesophagostomum, and Trichostrongylus. Results from 72 producers (19 States) indicated that fecal egg count reductions were < 90% in 1/3 of the operations. All operations exhibiting less than a 90% reduction had used pour-on macrocyclic lactones as the anthelmintic treatment. While some of these less than expected reductions could have been the result of improper drug application, PCR analyses of the parasite populations surviving treatment, coupled with follow-up studies at a limited number of sites, indicated that less than expected reductions were most likely due to anthelmintic resistance in Cooperia spp. and possibly Haemonchus spp. PMID:26424910

  6. Molecular survey of trichostrongyle nematodes in a Bison bison herd experiencing clinical parasitism, and effects of avermectin treatment.

    PubMed

    Eljaki, A A; Al Kappany, Y M; Grosz, D D; Smart, A J; Hildreth, M B

    2016-08-30

    North American bison (Bison bison) producers face many challenges, including the potential clinical and economics problems caused by trichostrongyle nematodes within their herds. Little is known about the prevalence, intensity, geographical distribution and clinical significance of these parasites in commercial bison herds, even from regions where bison production has become popular. This study involved a large herd of bison from eastern South Dakota that was experiencing clinical parasitism due to a temporary over-stocking problem. After documenting fecal egg counts (FECs) and trichostrongyle genera present among the 3 main age-categories (i.e. adults, yearlings, calves) of bison during this heavily infected grazing season, the effects of doramectin treatment on the different age groups was also evaluated. This is the first bison study using PCR to identify genera of trichostrongyles in fecal samples. Virtually all 103 bison fecal samples from all 3 age classes were shedding trichostrongyle eggs by the end of the season, and the mean FECs were 34 eggs/g (EPG) among the cows, 125 EPG in the yearlings, and 186 EGP among calves. Based upon this heavily-infected herd, there is evidence that the susceptibility of bison to trichostrongyles is more similar to beef cattle than to sheep. Other parasites such as Moniezia, Nematodirus, Trichuris, and coccidians were also identified in these samples. All but 3 of the 51 samples analyzed with PCR shown at least 1 trichostrongyle genera. Ostertagia was detected in 68.6% of the samples, Cooperia in 80.39%, Haemonchus in at least 73% and Trichostrongylus in 16% of the herd. Most commonly, bison were infected with combinations of Haemonchus/Ostertagia/Cooperia. After treatment with doramectin, the mean FECs dropped by 99.9% for all of the bison age classes. PMID:27523937

  7. Phylogenetic Characterization of β-Tubulins and Development of Pyrosequencing Assays for Benzimidazole Resistance in Cattle Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Demeler, Janina; Krüger, Nina; Krücken, Jürgen; von der Heyden, Vera C.; Ramünke, Sabrina; Küttler, Ursula; Miltsch, Sandra; López Cepeda, Michael; Knox, Malcolm; Vercruysse, Jozef; Geldhof, Peter; Harder, Achim; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg

    2013-01-01

    Control of helminth infections is a major task in livestock production to prevent health constraints and economic losses. However, resistance to established anthelmintic substances already impedes effective anthelmintic treatment in many regions worldwide. Thus, there is an obvious need for sensitive and reliable methods to assess the resistance status of at least the most important nematode populations. Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the β-tubulin isotype 1 gene of various nematodes correlate with resistance to benzimidazoles (BZ), a major anthelmintic class. Here we describe the full-length β-tubulin isotype 1 and 2 and α-tubulin coding sequences of the cattle nematode Ostertagia ostertagi. Additionally, the Cooperia oncophora α-tubulin coding sequence was identified. Phylogenetic maximum-likelihood analysis revealed that both isotype 1 and 2 are orthologs to the Caenorhabditis elegans ben-1 gene which is also associated with BZ resistance upon mutation. In contrast, a Trichuris trichiura cDNA, postulated to be β-tubulin isotype 1 involved in BZ resistance in this human parasite, turned out to be closely related to C. elegans β-tubulins tbb-4 and mec-7 and would therefore represent the first non-ben-1-like β-tubulin to be under selection through treatment with BZs. A pyrosequencing assay was established to detect BZ resistance associated SNPs in β-tubulin isotype 1 codons 167, 198 and 200 of C. oncophora and O. ostertagi. PCR-fragments representing either of the two alleles were combined in defined ratios to evaluate the pyrosequencing assay. The correlation between the given and the measured allele frequencies of the respective SNPs was very high. Subsequently laboratory isolates and field populations with known resistance status were analyzed. With the exception of codon 167 in Cooperia, increases of resistance associated alleles were detected for all codons in at least one of the phenotypically resistant population. Pyrosequencing

  8. Effectiveness of current anthelmintic treatment programs on reducing fecal egg counts in United States cow-calf operations.

    PubMed

    Gasbarre, Louis C; Ballweber, Lora R; Stromberg, Bert E; Dargatz, David A; Rodriguez, Judy M; Kopral, Christine A; Zarlenga, Dante S

    2015-10-01

    During the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Animal Health Monitoring System's (NAHMS) 2007-2008 beef study, producers from 24 states were offered the opportunity to evaluate their animals for internal parasites and for overall responses to treatment with anthelmintics. A lapse of 45 d was required between initial sampling and any previous treatments. Choice of anthelmintic (oral benzimidazoles, and both injectable and pour-on endectocides) was at the discretion of the producer so as not to alter the local control programs. Fresh fecal samples were collected from 20 animals, or from the entire group if less than 20, then randomly assigned to 1 of 3 participating laboratories for examination. Analyses consisted of double centrifugation flotation followed by enumeration of strongyle, Nematodirus, and Trichuris eggs (the presence of coccidian oocysts and tapeworm eggs was also noted). Where strongyle eggs per gram (epg) exceeded 30, aliquots from 2 to 6 animals were pooled for egg isolation and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis for the presence of Ostertagia, Cooperia, Haemonchus, Oesophagostomum, and Trichostrongylus. Results from 72 producers (19 States) indicated that fecal egg count reductions were < 90% in 1/3 of the operations. All operations exhibiting less than a 90% reduction had used pour-on macrocyclic lactones as the anthelmintic treatment. While some of these less than expected reductions could have been the result of improper drug application, PCR analyses of the parasite populations surviving treatment, coupled with follow-up studies at a limited number of sites, indicated that less than expected reductions were most likely due to anthelmintic resistance in Cooperia spp. and possibly Haemonchus spp.

  9. Gastrointestinal nematode infection in beef cattle of different genetic groups in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, M C S; Alencar, M M; Chagas, A C S; Giglioti, R; Oliveira, H N

    2009-12-23

    Resistance to natural infection by gastrointestinal nematodes was compared in 67 female calves of the following genetic groups: Nelore (NX); 1/2 Senepol+1/2 Nelore (SN); and 1/2 Aberdeen Angus+1/2 Nelore (AN). The NX (n=26), SN (n=23) and AN (n=18) animals were monitored for 14 months, during which they remained without treatment, allowed to graze in a tropical environment. Eggs per gram of feces (EPG), coprocultures and packed cell volume (PCV) were carried out monthly. No significant effects of the interaction between the genetic groups and month/year of collection and the genetic group on the EPG were found, but there was a significant influence of the month of collection (P<0.01). The monthly PCV measurements did not differ for the animals of the three genetic groups and there was no association found between the EPG and PCV. The animals of the SN and NX groups showed similar numbers of EPG with results zero, while for the AN group these numbers were significantly lower (P<0.05). Although the NX group had a large number of EPG with results zero, it also contained many animals with high counts, meaning this group had higher averages during the entire study period. The following nematode genera were found in the coprocultures: Haemonchus, Cooperia, Oesophagostomum and Trichostrongylus, the latter in smallest proportion. There was no significant difference between the genetic groups for averages of all parasites identified, except Cooperia, which were present in higher numbers in the animals of the NX group (P<0.05). The results obtained in this experiment suggest that the use of Bos taurus x Bos indicus crossbreeds can be a good strategy to reduce the use of chemical control in Brazil. PMID:19828253

  10. Biodiversity of trematodes in their intermediate mollusc and fish hosts in the freshwater ecosystems of Europe.

    PubMed

    Faltýnková, Anna; Sures, Bernd; Kostadinova, Aneta

    2016-03-01

    We analysed two novel databases containing 2,380 and 8,202 host-parasite-locality records for trematode parasites of molluscs and fishes, respectively, to assess the biodiversity of trematodes in their intermediate mollusc and fish hosts in the freshwater environment in Europe. The "mollusc" dataset covers large numbers of pulmonate (29 spp.), "prosobranch" (15 spp.) and bivalve (11 spp.) molluscs acting as first intermediate hosts for 171 trematode species of 89 genera and 35 families. Of these, 23 and 40 species utilise freshwater fishes as definitive and second intermediate hosts, respectively. The most frequently recorded families are the Echinostomatidae Looss, 1899, Diplostomidae Poirier, 1886 and Schistosomatidae Stilles & Hassal, 1898, and the most frequently recorded species are Diplostomum spathaceum (Rudolphi, 1819), D. pseudospathaceum Niewiadomska, 1984 and Echinoparyphium recurvatum (von Linstow, 1873). Four snail species harbour extremely rich trematode faunas: Lymnaea stagnalis (L.) (41 spp.); Planorbis planorbis (L.) (39 spp.); Radix peregra (O.F. Müller) (33 spp.); and R. ovata (Draparnaud) (31 spp.). The "fish" dataset covers 99 fish species of 63 genera and 19 families acting as second intermediate hosts for 66 species of 33 genera and nine families. The most frequently recorded families are the Diplostomidae Poirier, 1886, Strigeidae Railliet, 1919 and Bucephalidae Poche, 1907, and the most frequently recorded species are Diplostomum spathaceum (Rudolphi, 1819), Tylodelphys clavata (von Nordmann, 1832) and Posthodiplostomum cuticola (von Nordmann, 1832). Four cyprinid fishes exhibit the highest species richness of larval trematodes: Rutilus rutilus (L.) (41 spp.); Abramis brama (L.) (34 spp.); Blicca bjoerkna (L.) (33 spp.); and Scardinius erythrophthalmus (L.) (33 spp.). Larval stages of 50 species reported in fish are also reported in freshwater molluscs, thus indicating a relatively good knowledge of the life-cycles of fish trematodes in

  11. Laoxyuris laonasti n. gen., n. sp. (Nematoda: Syphaciinae) parasite of Laonastes aenigmamus (Rodentia: Diatomyidae): morphology, biology, taxonomy, phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Hugot, Jean Pierre; Feliu, Carlos; Douangboupha, Bounneuang; Ribas, Alexis

    2013-06-01

    A new Oxyurid genus and species are described in a rodent recently discovered in Lao PDR: Laonastes aenigmamus which happens to be the single survivor of the Diatomyidae, a family considered to be extinct since the Miocene. The morphological characters of the new parasite species allow classifying it within the Syphaciinae Railliet, 1916, a subfamily whose members are exclusively parasites of Lagomorpha and Rodents. Male Syphaciinae have developed several types of ventral cuticular ornamentation used to firmly grip the female during mating. The ornamental characters observed in the new species include a finger like appendix, which, until now, has not been described in the subfamily. The originality of this apparatus justifies the creation of a new genus and a new species for the pinworm parasite of Laonastes. Using morphological characters, the new species is analyzed phylogenetically to describe its affinities with representatives of the main groups distinguished within the Syphaciinae. The phylogenetic study produces a cladogram similar to the phylogeny recently proposed for the hosts of the subfamily and in agreement with a close association of the Diatomyidae with the Ctenodactylidae. Such a phenomenon of cophylogeny is interpreted as the result of the existence of a strict specificity between the Syphaciinae and their respective hosts, due to the very close adaptation of their life cycle with the behaviors of their hosts. In Lagomorpha and Rodents, caecotrophy and grooming activities allow a direct transmission of the parasite eggs and favor successive self-infestations, increasing the chances for the parasite to maintain itself in the same host species but decreasing the probability of host switching. The resulting high host specificity allowed the Syphaciinae to out-compete other pinworms and maintain themselves in their specific host over millions of years. PMID:23357582

  12. The zoophilic fruitfly Phortica variegata: morphology, ecology and biological niche.

    PubMed

    Otranto, D; Brianti, E; Cantacessi, C; Lia, R P; Máca, J

    2006-12-01

    Flies belonging to the subfamily Steganinae (Drosophilidae) display unusual zoophilic feeding habits at the adult and/or larval stage. Phortica variegata (Fallén) feeds on tears or eye liquid around the eyes of humans and carnivores. When feeding it is a potential vector of Thelazia callipaeda (Railliet and Henry) eyeworms. Adult and larval stages of this fly may be easily confused with other species belonging to the same genus, and little is known on the biology and ecology of P. variegata. In April-November 2005, a total of 969 P. variegata were collected in an area with a high prevalence of canine thelaziosis. The number of flies collected weekly was then related to climatic and environmental parameters (e.g. temperature, relative humidity and total rainfall) recorded daily at the collection site. The highest number of Phortica were collected during July-August. The sex ratio (number of males : females) rose from approximately 0.5 during May-July, to approximately 3.0 in August and 181 during September-October. Distributional data, representing 242 sites at which P. variegata has been collected in Europe, were analysed using a desktop implementation of the genetic algorithm for rule-set prediction (GARP) to model ecological requirements across Europe, as well as in Italy. P. variegata is shown to be mainly active at 20-25 degrees C and 50-75% RH. The ecological niche model suggests with a high degree of confidence that large areas of Europe are likely to represent suitable habitat for this species, mostly concentrated in central Europe. The results reported here contribute basic knowledge on the ecology and geographical distribution of P. variegata flies, which will be fundamental to gaining a better understanding of their role as vectors of human and animal pathogens. PMID:17199746

  13. Resistance of beef cattle of two genetic groups to ectoparasites and gastrointestinal nematodes in the state of São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, M C S; Alencar, M M; Giglioti, R; Beraldo, M C D; Aníbal, F F; Correia, R O; Boschini, L; Chagas, A C S; Bilhassi, T B; Oliveira, H N

    2013-10-18

    . The average EPG values were only influenced by CO (P<0.01). The coprocultures revealed the presence of the following endoparasites: Haemonchus spp., Cooperia spp., Oesophagostomum spp. and Trichostrongylus spp., the last in smaller proportion. There were no significant differences between the genetic groups for the endoparasite loads, except for Cooperia spp., which were present in greater number (P<0.05) in the NI group. The results obtained in this experiment confirm previous findings of greater susceptibility of the Nelore breed to Cooperia spp. and high resistance to ectoparasites. PMID:23916059

  14. Biological control of gastrointestinal parasitic nematodes using Duddingtonia flagrans in sheep under natural conditions in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-De Gives, Pedro; Zapata Nieto, Claudia; Hernández, Enrique Liébano; Arellano, María Eugenia López; Rodríguez, David Herrera; Garduño, Roberto González

    2006-10-01

    This investigation was aimed to evaluate the use of an oral bio-preparation containing Duddingtonia flagrans chlamydospores for the control of sheep gastrointestinal parasitic nematodes under the Mexican cold high plateau conditions. Two groups of gastrointestinal parasitic nematode naturally infected sheep, were randomly selected and located into two free-gastrointestinal nematode larvae paddocks. Group 1 received once a week a supplement containing D. flagrans chlamydospores mixed with oats and molasses. Group 2 received a similar supplement without any fungal material. After 5 months grazing animals were discarded from the experiment and two groups of free-nematode "tracer" sheep were located into the same paddocks to collect larvae from the contaminated pastures. Animals were slaughtered and necropsied and the nematodes were obtained and counted. A screening of the number of gastrointestinal nematode larvae present on the grass was performed and compared between the two grazing areas. The results showed 56% reduction in the Ostertagia (Teladorsagia) circumcincta and 94% reduction in the Nematodirus sp. population of the "tracer" sheep who grazed on the D. flagrans-treated sheep area, compared to the nematode population in animals grazed on the non-treated area. The results of the number of larvae on the grazing pastures showed a 51.1% reduction for H. contortus, and 100% for Cooperia sp. in the area with fungi. In the case of Trichostrongylus sp. no reduction was observed, when compared to the control group.

  15. Activity of luxabendazole against liver flukes, gastrointestinal roundworms, and lungworms in naturally infected sheep.

    PubMed

    Kassai, T; Takáts, C; Fok, E; Redl, P

    1988-01-01

    The anthelmintic potential of luxabendazole was investigated in sheep harboring mixed naturally acquired helminth infections. Results were assessed by comparing worm counts of the treated groups (seven animals each) on days 7-8 posttreatment with those of the nontreated control group, except for protostrongylid lungworms, for which the changes in pre- and posttreatment group mean larval counts/g feces were assessed for intensity effect. A single oral treatment at doses of 10.0 or 12.5 mg/kg body wt removed 97.6% of the adult Fasciola hepatica and 63.2%-83.8% of the Dicrocoelium dendriticum. Luxabendazole at 7.5, 10.0, and 12.5 mg/kg proved 100% effective in removing adult worms of the genera Haemonchus, Ostertagia, Trichostrongylus, Cooperia and Nematodirus as well as tissue-associated larval stages of gastrointestinal nematodes of the abomasal mucosa. The drug showed an intensity effect of 79.7%-87.6% against Strongyloides papillosus. Luxabendazole removed all Dictyocaulus filaria and reduced the fecal excretion of larvae of protostrongylid species (Protostrongylus rufescens, Neostrongylus linearis, Cystocaulus ocreatus, Muellerius capillaris) by 97.8%-99.6%. The efficacy of luxabendazole compared favorably with that of Diplin Kombi (oxyclozanide and levamisole), which was used as a reference drug.

  16. Gastrointestinal nematode infection in small ruminants in Ethiopia: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Asmare, Kassahun; Sheferaw, Desie; Aragaw, Kassaye; Abera, Mesele; Sibhat, Berhanu; Haile, Aynalem; Kiara, Henry; Szonyi, Barbara; Skjerve, Eystein; Wieland, Barbara

    2016-08-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) nematode infections are a major health challenge affecting productive and reproductive performance of sheep and goats in Ethiopia. However, there is no comprehensive summary on the occurrence and distribution of the infection at national level. This systematic review provides pooled prevalence estimates and assesses potential predictors of the nematode infections in small ruminants, i.e. helpful in planning interventions or control strategies. The review used 50 animal level datasets retrieved from 24 manuscripts. The studies used data collected from 9407 sheep and 3478 goats. A meta-analytical approach was employed to analyze Effect size (ES). The reported GI nematodes represented eleven genera affecting sheep and goats including: Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Teladorsagia/Ostertagia, Strongyloides, Bunostomum, Nematodirus, Chabertia, Trichuris, Cooperia, Skrjabinema and Oesophagostomum. The GI nematodes pooled prevalence estimate in the random effect model was 75.8% (95% CI: 69.6, 80.8). The subgroup analysis revealed significant (p<0.05) differences in the prevalence between different regions and type of diagnostic methods used. 'Postmortem technique' and 'eastern part of the country' were associated with higher GI nematode prevalence and accounted for 68.1% of the between studies heterogeneity. In light of the high parasitic prevalence in all agro-ecologies, the need for strategic intervention is recommended. Meanwhile, data need to be generated for some of the regions where dependable survey reports are lacking.

  17. Biological control of gastrointestinal parasitic nematodes using Duddingtonia flagrans in sheep under natural conditions in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-De Gives, Pedro; Zapata Nieto, Claudia; Hernández, Enrique Liébano; Arellano, María Eugenia López; Rodríguez, David Herrera; Garduño, Roberto González

    2006-10-01

    This investigation was aimed to evaluate the use of an oral bio-preparation containing Duddingtonia flagrans chlamydospores for the control of sheep gastrointestinal parasitic nematodes under the Mexican cold high plateau conditions. Two groups of gastrointestinal parasitic nematode naturally infected sheep, were randomly selected and located into two free-gastrointestinal nematode larvae paddocks. Group 1 received once a week a supplement containing D. flagrans chlamydospores mixed with oats and molasses. Group 2 received a similar supplement without any fungal material. After 5 months grazing animals were discarded from the experiment and two groups of free-nematode "tracer" sheep were located into the same paddocks to collect larvae from the contaminated pastures. Animals were slaughtered and necropsied and the nematodes were obtained and counted. A screening of the number of gastrointestinal nematode larvae present on the grass was performed and compared between the two grazing areas. The results showed 56% reduction in the Ostertagia (Teladorsagia) circumcincta and 94% reduction in the Nematodirus sp. population of the "tracer" sheep who grazed on the D. flagrans-treated sheep area, compared to the nematode population in animals grazed on the non-treated area. The results of the number of larvae on the grazing pastures showed a 51.1% reduction for H. contortus, and 100% for Cooperia sp. in the area with fungi. In the case of Trichostrongylus sp. no reduction was observed, when compared to the control group. PMID:17135538

  18. Assessment of the impact of plant species composition and drought stress on survival of strongylid third-stage larvae in a greenhouse experiment.

    PubMed

    Knapp-Lawitzke, Friederike; Küchenmeister, Frank; Küchenmeister, Kai; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Demeler, Janina

    2014-11-01

    Grazing livestock is always exposed to infective parasite stages. Depending on the general health status of the animal, the farm management, environmental conditions and pasture exposure, the impact ranges from non-affected to almost moribund animals. The greenhouse experiment was performed to investigate how climatic changes and plant composition influence the occurrence/survival of strongylid third-stage larvae (L3) on pasture. Ten different types of plant species compositions (eight replicates for each) were inoculated with approximately 10,000 Cooperia oncophora L3. The different plant compositions can be assorted to two groups: without legume content and with legume content (52-62% legume content). Half of the replicates were watered adequately, while the other half was hold under drought stress (DS), mimicking longer dry periods. During the DS cycles, the respective containers were not watered until they reached the wilting point. Grass samples were taken 1, 4 and 6 weeks after inoculation, soil samples were taken only once after 6 weeks and all samples were examined for occurrence of L3. After the second DS cycle, the number of L3 present on herbage samples was reduced significantly. The higher the legume content of the pasture composition, the higher is the L3 occurrence on pasture. Independent of the watering scheme, the soil served as the most important reservoir with consistently higher numbers of L3 in the soil compared to herbage.

  19. Effect of fenbendazole and ivermectin on development of strongylate nematode eggs and larvae in calf feces.

    PubMed

    Miller, J E; Morrison, D G

    1992-07-01

    Thirty-nine weaned steer calves (mean weight 284 kg) were maintained under dry-lot conditions and assigned (based on fecal nematode egg count) to one of three treatment groups of 13 animals each as follows: control (no treatment), fenbendazole (5 mg kg-1), and ivermectin (0.2 mg kg-1). Fecal samples were collected 12 h before treatment, at treatment, and 12, 24, 48 and 72 h after treatment for determination of nematode eggs per gram, and (after culture) infective larvae per gram and population distribution. The effect of treatment on egg development was observed in feces collected 12 and 24 h after treatment. There was essentially no difference in efficacy, based on egg counts, of fenbendazole and ivermectin. Egg count was reduced 100% by both anthelmintics at 72 h after treatment. Viability, based on percent of eggs reaching the infective larval stage, of developing stages at 12, 24, and 48 h after fenbendazole treatment was 0.1%, 1.1%, and 0%; after ivermectin treatment the corresponding values were 23.7%, 30.1%, and 28.6%, respectively. Fenbendazole treatment resulted in little or no development of eggs and/or larvae in feces deposited 12 and 24 h after treatment, whereas development proceeded normally (compared with the control group) in ivermectin treated feces. Population distribution of infective larvae was predominantly Haemonchus and Cooperia with some Ostertagia and Oesophagostomum.

  20. Helminth parasites of the Kafue lechwe antelope ( Kobus leche kafuensis): a potential source of infection to domestic animals in the Kafue wetlands of Zambia.

    PubMed

    Phiri, A M; Chota, A; Muma, J B; Munyeme, M; Sikasunge, C S

    2011-03-01

    The Kafue lechwe antelope (Kobus leche kafuensis), a medium-sized, semi-aquatic antelope, grazes extensively on pastures accessed by livestock in and around Lochinvar and Blue Lagoon national parks in the Kafue wetlands of Zambia. This interaction has a potential for bi-modal transmission of a wide range of parasitic helminths between lechwe and domestic ruminants. A survey was conducted to investigate the status of helminths in the Kafue lechwe during the 2008 (July-December) hunting season, involving 65 animals hunted under special research licences. Worm identification was based on morphological features using standard identification keys. Eleven different types of helminths were identified in the animals studied; namely, Oesophagostomum, Bunostomum, Cooperia, Dictyocaulus, Marshallagia, Stilesia, Setaria, Trichuris, Fasciola, amphistomes and Schistosoma. Amphistomes (100%) and Oesophagostomum (60.9%) were the most common while Fasciola (7.8%) and Stilesia (1.6%) were the least of the identified helminths. There was no evidence that helminths, at intensities observed, adversely affected the health of the lechwe. The degree of worm infection was observed to vary between the two study areas, with Blue Lagoon recording higher infection levels compared to Lochinvar. The host range of many of the helminths found in the Kafue lechwe is broad and could serve as a potentially stable source of infection to domestic animals such as goats and cattle. Therefore, issues concerning livestock management and conservation may arise.

  1. Differences in susceptibility to gastrointestinal nematode infection between Angus and Brangus cattle in south Louisiana.

    PubMed

    Peña, M T; Miller, J E; Wyatt, W; Kearney, M T

    2000-03-28

    Breed susceptibility to nematode infection was evaluated in Angus (Bos taurus) and Brangus (B. indicus crossbreed) cattle. A cow-calf herd and a yearling replacement heifer herd were monitored during one grazing season. Calves were born in March and were weaned in October. Individual rectal fecal samples were collected monthly from the two herds and processed for fecal egg counts (FEC) and coprocultures. Cow and calf FEC increased from April, reaching maximum values during the summer. Angus cows and calves had significantly (p<0.05) greater FEC than Brangus cows and calves, and Haemonchus and Cooperia were the predominant genera. Replacement heifer FEC showed a similar pattern with maximum levels during late summer/fall, and Haemonchus was the predominant genus. No significant differences were seen between breeds, however, infection levels were consistently lower in Brangus heifers. Ostertagia was present in cows and heifers only in fall/winter, which is consistent with summer inhibition. The data suggested that cows were an important source of pasture contamination for their susceptible calves and that the Brangus breed was relatively more resistant to infection. The use of B. indicus crossbreeds may help in alleviating reliance on chemical control by reducing the rate of pasture contamination and subsequent infection losses. PMID:10729645

  2. The parasitic fauna of the European bison (Bison bonasus) (Linnaeus, 1758) and their impact on the conservation. Part 1. The summarising list of parasites noted.

    PubMed

    Karbowiak, Grzegorz; Demiaszkiewicz, Aleksander W; Pyziel, Anna M; Wita, Irena; Moskwa, Bożena; Werszko, Joanna; Bień, Justyna; Goździk, Katarzyna; Lachowicz, Jacek; Cabaj, Władysław

    2014-09-01

    During the current century, 88 species of parasites have been recorded in Bison bonasus. These are 22 species of protozoa (Trypanosoma wrublewskii, T. theileri, Giardia sp., Sarcocystis cruzi, S. hirsuta, S. hominis, S. fusiformis, Neospora caninum, Toxoplasma gondii, Cryptosporidium sp., Eimeria cylindrica, E. subspherica, E. bovis, E. zuernii, E. canadensis, E. ellipsoidalis, E. alabamensis, E. bukidnonensis, E. auburnensis, E. pellita, E. brasiliensis, Babesia divergens), 4 trematodes species (Dicrocoelium dendriticum, Fasciola hepatica, Parafasciolopsis fasciolaemorpha, Paramphistomum cervi), 4 cestodes species (Taenia hydatigena larvae, Moniezia benedeni, M. expansa, Moniezia sp.), 43 nematodes species (Bunostomum trigonocephalum, B. phlebotomum, Chabertia ovina, Oesophagostomum radiatum, O. venulosum, Dictyocaulus filaria, D.viviparus, Nematodirella alcidis, Nematodirus europaeus, N. helvetianus, N. roscidus, N. filicollis, N. spathiger, Cooperia oncophora, C. pectinata, C. punctata, C. surnabada, Haemonchus contortus, Mazamastrongylus dagestanicus, Ostertagia lyrata, O. ostertagi, O. antipini, O. leptospicularis, O. kolchida, O. circumcincta, O. trifurcata, Spiculopteragia boehmi, S. mathevossiani, S. asymmetrica, Trichostrongylus axei, T. askivali, T. capricola, T. vitrinus, Ashworthius sidemi, Onchocerca lienalis, O. gutturosa, Setaria labiatopapillosa, Gongylonema pulchrum, Thelazia gulosa, T. skrjabini, T. rhodesi, Aonchotheca bilobata, Trichuris ovis), 7 mites (Demodex bisonianus, D. bovis, Demodex sp., Chorioptes bovis, Psoroptes equi, P. ovis, Sarcoptes scabiei), 4 Ixodidae ticks (Ixodes ricinus, I. persulcatus, I. hexagonus, Dermacentor reticulatus), 1 Mallophaga species (Bisonicola sedecimdecembrii), 1 Anoplura (Haematopinus eurysternus), and 2 Hippoboscidae flies (Lipoptena cervi, Melophagus ovinus). There are few monoxenous parasites, many typical for cattle and many newly acquired from Cervidae.

  3. [Ecology of Thelazia spp. in cattle and their vectors in Italy].

    PubMed

    Giangaspero, A; Traversa, D; Otranto, D

    2004-06-01

    The genus Thelazia (Spirurida, Thelaziidae) includes a cosmopolitan group of eyeworm spirurids responsible for ocular infections in domestic and wild animals and transmitted by different species of muscids. Bovine thelaziosis is caused by Thelazia rhodesi Desmarest 1828, Thelazia gulosa Railliet & Henry 1910, and Thelazia skrjabini Erschow 1928, which occur in many countries; T. gulosa and T. skrjabini have been reported mainly in the New World, while T. rhodesi is particularly common in the Old World. In Italy, T. rhodesi was reported in southern regions a long time ago and, recently, T. gulosa and T. skrjabini have been identified in autochthonous cattle first in Apulia and then in Sardinia. Thirteen species of Musca are listed as intermediate hosts of eyeworms, but only Musca autumnalis and Musca larvipara have been demonstrated to act as vectors of Thelazia in the ex-URSS, North America, ex-Czechoslovakia and more recently in Sweden. In Italy, after the reports of T. gulosa and T. skrjabini in southern regions, the intermediate hosts of bovine eyeworms were initially only suspected as the predominant secretophagous Muscidae collected from the periocular region of cattle with thelaziosis were the face flies, M. autumnalis and M. larvipara, followed by Musca osiris, Musca tempestiva and Musca domestica. The well-known constraints in the identification of immature eyeworms to species by fly dissection and also the time-consuming techniques used constitute important obstacles to epidemiological field studies (i.e. vector identification and/or role, prevalence and pattern of infection in flies, etc.). Molecular studies have recently permitted to further investigations into this area. A PCR-RFLP analysis of the ribosomal ITS-1 sequence was developed to differentiate the 3 species of Thelazia (i.e. T. gulosa, T. rhodesi and T. skrjabini) found in Italy, then a molecular epidemiological survey has recently been carried out in field conditions throughout five seasons of

  4. Morphological variability and molecular identification of Uncinaria spp. (Nematoda: Ancylostomatidae) from grizzly and black bears: new species or phenotypic plasticity?

    PubMed

    Catalano, Stefano; Lejeune, Manigandan; van Paridon, Bradley; Pagan, Christopher A; Wasmuth, James D; Tizzani, Paolo; Duignan, Pádraig J; Nadler, Steven A

    2015-04-01

    The hookworms Uncinaria rauschi Olsen, 1968 and Uncinaria yukonensis ( Wolfgang, 1956 ) were formally described from grizzly ( Ursus arctos horribilis) and black bears ( Ursus americanus ) of North America. We analyzed the intestinal tracts of 4 grizzly and 9 black bears from Alberta and British Columbia, Canada and isolated Uncinaria specimens with anatomical traits never previously documented. We applied morphological and molecular techniques to investigate the taxonomy and phylogeny of these Uncinaria parasites. The morphological analysis supported polymorphism at the vulvar region for females of both U. rauschi and U. yukonensis. The hypothesis of morphological plasticity for U. rauschi and U. yukonensis was confirmed by genetic analysis of the internal transcribed spacers (ITS-1 and ITS-2) of the nuclear ribosomal DNA. Two distinct genotypes were identified, differing at 5 fixed sites for ITS-1 (432 base pairs [bp]) and 7 for ITS-2 (274 bp). Morphometric data for U. rauschi revealed host-related size differences: adult U. rauschi were significantly larger in black bears than in grizzly bears. Interpretation of these results, considering the historical biogeography of North American bears, suggests a relatively recent host-switching event of U. rauschi from black bears to grizzly bears which likely occurred after the end of the Wisconsin glaciation. Phylogenetic maximum parsimony (MP) and maximum likelihood (ML) analyses of the concatenated ITS-1 and ITS-2 datasets strongly supported monophyly of U. rauschi and U. yukonensis and their close relationship with Uncinaria stenocephala (Railliet, 1884), the latter a parasite primarily of canids and felids. Relationships among species within this group, although resolved by ML, were unsupported by MP and bootstrap resampling. The clade of U. rauschi, U. yukonensis, and U. stenocephala was recovered as sister to the clade represented by Uncinaria spp. from otariid pinnipeds. These results support the absence of strict

  5. Morphological variability and molecular identification of Uncinaria spp. (Nematoda: Ancylostomatidae) from grizzly and black bears: new species or phenotypic plasticity?

    PubMed

    Catalano, Stefano; Lejeune, Manigandan; van Paridon, Bradley; Pagan, Christopher A; Wasmuth, James D; Tizzani, Paolo; Duignan, Pádraig J; Nadler, Steven A

    2015-04-01

    The hookworms Uncinaria rauschi Olsen, 1968 and Uncinaria yukonensis ( Wolfgang, 1956 ) were formally described from grizzly ( Ursus arctos horribilis) and black bears ( Ursus americanus ) of North America. We analyzed the intestinal tracts of 4 grizzly and 9 black bears from Alberta and British Columbia, Canada and isolated Uncinaria specimens with anatomical traits never previously documented. We applied morphological and molecular techniques to investigate the taxonomy and phylogeny of these Uncinaria parasites. The morphological analysis supported polymorphism at the vulvar region for females of both U. rauschi and U. yukonensis. The hypothesis of morphological plasticity for U. rauschi and U. yukonensis was confirmed by genetic analysis of the internal transcribed spacers (ITS-1 and ITS-2) of the nuclear ribosomal DNA. Two distinct genotypes were identified, differing at 5 fixed sites for ITS-1 (432 base pairs [bp]) and 7 for ITS-2 (274 bp). Morphometric data for U. rauschi revealed host-related size differences: adult U. rauschi were significantly larger in black bears than in grizzly bears. Interpretation of these results, considering the historical biogeography of North American bears, suggests a relatively recent host-switching event of U. rauschi from black bears to grizzly bears which likely occurred after the end of the Wisconsin glaciation. Phylogenetic maximum parsimony (MP) and maximum likelihood (ML) analyses of the concatenated ITS-1 and ITS-2 datasets strongly supported monophyly of U. rauschi and U. yukonensis and their close relationship with Uncinaria stenocephala (Railliet, 1884), the latter a parasite primarily of canids and felids. Relationships among species within this group, although resolved by ML, were unsupported by MP and bootstrap resampling. The clade of U. rauschi, U. yukonensis, and U. stenocephala was recovered as sister to the clade represented by Uncinaria spp. from otariid pinnipeds. These results support the absence of strict

  6. Anthelmintic resistance to ivermectin and moxidectin in gastrointestinal nematodes of cattle in Europe.

    PubMed

    Geurden, Thomas; Chartier, Christophe; Fanke, Jane; di Regalbono, Antonio Frangipane; Traversa, Donato; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Demeler, Janina; Vanimisetti, Hima Bindu; Bartram, David J; Denwood, Matthew J

    2015-12-01

    Anthelmintic resistance has been increasingly reported in cattle worldwide over the last decade, although reports from Europe are more limited. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of injectable formulations of ivermectin and moxidectin at 0.2 mg per kg bodyweight against naturally acquired gastro-intestinal nematodes in cattle. A total of 753 animals on 40 farms were enrolled in Germany (12 farms), the UK (10 farms), Italy (10 farms), and France (8 farms). Animals were selected based on pre-treatment faecal egg counts and were allocated to one of the two treatment groups. Each treatment group consisted of between 7 and 10 animals. A post-treatment faecal egg count was performed 14 days (±2 days) after treatment. The observed percentage reduction was calculated for each treatment group based on the arithmetic mean faecal egg count before and after treatment. The resistance status was evaluated based on the reduction in arithmetic mean faecal egg count and both the lower and upper 95% confidence limits. A decreased efficacy was observed in half or more of the farms in Germany, France and the UK. For moxidectin, resistance was confirmed on 3 farms in France, and on 1 farm in Germany and the UK. For ivermectin, resistance was confirmed on 3 farms in the UK, and on 1 farm in Germany and France. The remaining farms with decreased efficacy were classified as having an inconclusive resistance status based on the available data. After treatment Cooperia spp. larvae were most frequently identified, though Ostertagia ostertagi was also found, in particular within the UK and Germany. The present study reports lower than expected efficacy for ivermectin and moxidectin (based on the reduction in egg excretion after treatment) on European cattle farms, with confirmed anthelmintic resistance on 12.5% of the farms.

  7. Efficacy of oxfendazole against inhibited larvae of Ostertagia ostertagi in naturally infected calves in the southern USA.

    PubMed

    Couvillion, C E; Herschler, R C; Boyle, C R; Hawkins, J A

    1989-04-29

    Forty yearling calves were assigned to four equal groups; three of the groups were treated with oxfendazole at dose rates of 6.75 mg/kg, 4.50 mg/kg, or 2.25 mg/kg bodyweight while the fourth group served as an untreated control. The calves were native to north-east Mississippi, USA, and harboured natural infections of gastrointestinal nematodes. The study was conducted during July when inhibited early fourth-stage larvae may be found in large numbers after their acquisition in the spring. The calves were maintained in separate groups on concrete-floored pens for 17 days before the intraruminal administration of oxfendazole. Seven days after treatment, the calves were slaughtered and the gastrointestinal parasites counted. At all the dose rates examined oxfendazole exhibited an efficacy of at least 99.4 per cent against adults of Haemonchus placei, Trichostrongylus axei, Bunostomum phlebotomum, Cooperia species, T colubriformis, Oesophagostomum radiatum, and Trichuris ovis. The efficacy against adult Ostertagia ostertagi was at least 99.4 per cent at dose rates of 6.75 and 4.50 mg/kg bodyweight, but decreased to 93.7 per cent at 2.25 mg/kg. The efficacy of oxfendazole against inhibited larvae of O ostertagi decreased with dose rate from 78.8 per cent at 6.75 mg/kg, to 58.9 per cent at 4.50 mg/kg and 20.3 per cent at 2.25 mg/kg bodyweight.

  8. Prevalence and risk factors associated with gastrointestinal nematode infection in goats raised in Baybay city, Leyte, Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Rupa, Ariel Paul M.; Portugaliza, Harvie P.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Gastrointestinal parasitism is a serious constraint affecting goat production in the Philippines. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and associated risk factors of gastrointestinal nematode infection in goat-populated barangays of Baybay City, Leyte. Materials and Methods: A total of 81 households or farms were interviewed, and 450 goats were sampled for fecalysis. Fecal egg count along with egg morphological identification and coproculture for third stage larvae identification were conducted. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analyses were carried out to determine the farm- and animal-level prevalence and risk factors. Results: Fecalysis revealed the presence of strongyle and Trichuris spp. with a farm-level prevalence of 100% and 4.94%, respectively; and animal-level prevalence of 96.22% and 4.44%, respectively. The identified strongyle genera per barangay were Haemonchus spp. (34.79%), Trichostrongylus spp. (33.29%), Oesophagostomum spp. (24.21%), Cooperia spp. (6.93%), and Chabertia spp. (0.79%). Goats older than 12 months were four times more likely to present high strongyle burden when compared to goats <6 months. With each month increase in goat’s age, the odds of acquiring strongyle infection also increased by 1.07 times. Animals kept in goat house with cemented flooring have lower odds of acquiring strongyle (odds ratio=0.12). Goats raised for leisure purposes and fed with carabao grass (Paspalum conjugatum) were 8.12 and 5.52 times more likely to acquire Trichuris, respectively. Conclusion: Most of the backyard goat raisers in Baybay City, Leyte, do not practice sound helminth control measures as shown by the high prevalence of gastrointestinal nematodes. The most relevant risk factors for gastrointestinal nematode infection were the age of the goat, type of goat house’s flooring, purpose of raising goats, and feeding practices. PMID:27536034

  9. Evaluation of the effectiveness of Duddingtonia flagrans and Monacrosporium thaumasium in the biological control of gastrointestinal nematodes in female bovines bred in the semiarid region.

    PubMed

    Silva, Manoel Eduardo da; Braga, Fabio Ribeiro; Borges, Luana Alcântara; Oliveira, Jair Mendes de; Lima, Walter dos Santos; Guimarães, Marcos Pezzi; Araújo, Jackson Victor de

    2014-06-01

    Brazil has a herd of 212 million cattle and 171 million hectares of pastures that produce approximately 96 % of Brazilian beef. The Brazilian production system enables animal infection by endoparasites, which are considered one of the main obstacles for the development of this industry and are responsible for considerable economic losses. The control of parasitic diseases is performed via the administration of antiparasitic drugs, but they leave residues of the products in the treated animal, affect non-target organisms and select resistant strains of the parasites. The species D. flagrans and M. thaumasium are promising and sustainable alternatives for controlling gastrointestinal helminths of ruminants and other herbivores. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of isolates of these species, formulated in a sodium alginate matrix and administered twice a week, to reduce the number of environmental infective larvae of gastrointestinal nematodes that affect prepubescent zebu females. The treated animals presented fewer eggs and a lower number of infective larvae per gram of faeces (p < 0.05). The pastures occupied by treated animals showed a statistically significant reduction (p < 0.05) of the number of L3 and, furthermore, the genera Cooperia sp., Haemonchus sp., and Oesophagostomum sp. were the most prevalent. The average weight of the animals did not differ statistically (p > 0.05) among the treated and control groups. The use of sodium alginate pellets as vehicle for delivery of the fungus mycelia D. flagrans (isolate AC001) and M. thaumasium (isolate NF34A) proved effective in controlling trichostrongylids in prepubescent cows bred in the semi-arid region, with an effective reduction in the number of infective larvae in the pastures.

  10. Utilization of computer processed high definition video imaging for measuring motility of microscopic nematode stages on a quantitative scale: "The Worminator".

    PubMed

    Storey, Bob; Marcellino, Chris; Miller, Melissa; Maclean, Mary; Mostafa, Eman; Howell, Sue; Sakanari, Judy; Wolstenholme, Adrian; Kaplan, Ray

    2014-12-01

    A major hindrance to evaluating nematode populations for anthelmintic resistance, as well as for screening existing drugs, new compounds, or bioactive plant extracts for anthelmintic properties, is the lack of an efficient, objective, and reproducible in vitro assay that is adaptable to multiple life stages and parasite genera. To address this need we have developed the "Worminator" system, which objectively and quantitatively measures the motility of microscopic stages of parasitic nematodes. The system is built around the computer application "WormAssay", developed at the Center for Discovery and Innovation in Parasitic Diseases at the University of California, San Francisco. WormAssay was designed to assess motility of macroscopic parasites for the purpose of high throughput screening of potential anthelmintic compounds, utilizing high definition video as an input to assess motion of adult stage (macroscopic) parasites (e.g. Brugia malayi). We adapted this assay for use with microscopic parasites by modifying the software to support a full frame analysis mode that applies the motion algorithm to the entire video frame. Thus, the motility of all parasites in a given well are recorded and measured simultaneously. Assays performed on third-stage larvae (L3) of the bovine intestinal nematode Cooperia spp., as well as microfilariae (mf) of the filarioid nematodes B. malayi and Dirofilaria immitis, yielded reproducible dose responses using the macrocyclic lactones ivermectin, doramectin, and moxidectin, as well as the nicotinic agonists, pyrantel, oxantel, morantel, and tribendimidine. This new computer based-assay is simple to use, requires minimal new investment in equipment, is robust across nematode genera and developmental stage, and does not require subjective scoring of motility by an observer. Thus, the "Worminator" provides a relatively low-cost platform for developing genera- and stage-specific assays with high efficiency and reproducibility, low labor input

  11. Use of Ivermectin as Endoparasiticide in Tropical Cattle Herds Generates Resistance in Gastrointestinal Nematodes and the Tick Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Alegría-López, M A; Rodríguez-Vivas, R I; Torres-Acosta, J F J; Ojeda-Chi, M M; Rosado-Aguilar, J A

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine simultaneously the status of resistance against ivermectin (IVM) in gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) and Rhipicephalus microplus (Canestrini, 1888) ticks in 12 cattle farms where IVM was used for the control of GIN in the Mexican tropics. Six farms had frequent use of IVM (≥ 4 times per year) and six farms had low frequency of IVM use (1-2 times per year). The fecal egg count reduction test and the larval immersion test were used to determine the resistant status of GIN and R. microplus against IVM, respectively. The results indicated that 100% of the surveyed farms had IVM-resistant GIN (reduction % from 0 to 67%). The genera involved were Haemonchus, Cooperia, Ostertagia, Trichostrongylus, and Oesophagostomum. Although the IVM was never used for the control of ticks, 50% of the surveyed farms presented GIN and R. microplus simultaneously resistant to IVM. Furthermore, two R. microplus populations showed high resistance ratio (RR) to IVM (farm TAT: RR50% = 7 and RR99% = 40.1; and farm SLS: RR50% = 2.4; RR99% = 11.0). A high frequency of IVM use (≥ 4 times per year) seemed to promote IVM resistance amongst R. microplus ticks compared with the farms with low frequency of IVM use (1-2 times per year; 66.6 vs. 25.0%, respectively). However, the number of surveyed farms was insufficient to show clear statistical inferences (odds ratio = 6.00; 95% CI = 0.341-105.5). The use of IVM for the control of GIN promoted simultaneously the development of IVM resistance in the GIN and R. microplus populations of the cattle herds surveyed. PMID:26336306

  12. Anthelmintic resistance in gastrointestinal nematodes of beef cattle in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Fernanda; Portella, Luiza Pires; Rodrigues, Fernando de Souza; Reginato, Caroline Zamperete; Pötter, Luciana; Cezar, Alfredo Skrebsky; Sangioni, Luís Antônio; Vogel, Fernanda Silveira Flores

    2016-04-01

    Gastrointestinal nematodes resistant to anthelmintics have been reported in several regions of Brazil, and they may be associated with economic losses for the cattle industry. This study aimed to evaluate the resistance status of gastrointestinal nematodes from naturally infected beef cattle to several commercially available anthelmintics, as well as to test the efficacy of combinations of anthelmintics against multi-resistant gastrointestinal nematodes. Ten farms located in Rio Grande do Sul state were selected by: farmers' consent; extensive raising system; availability of calves aged from 7 to 9 months naturally infected by gastrointestinal nematodes; absence of anthelmintic treatment for 60 days before the study; and presence of 70-100 calves or more of both genders with ≥ 200 eggs per gram of feces (EPG) (sensitivity of 50 EPG). These calves were distributed into 10 groups (of 7-10 animals) per farm and treated with ivermectin, doramectin, eprinomectin, fenbendazole, closantel, nitroxynil, disophenol, levamisole, albendazole, or moxidectin. Feces were collected 2 days before treatment and 14 days after treatment. Additional groups of 7-10 calves were used to test six different two-drug combinations at four of the studied farms. In general terms, fenbendazole was the most effective drug, followed by levamisole, disophenol, and moxidectin. However, parasite resistance to multiple drugs was found in all herds, especially in the genera Cooperia spp., Trichostrongylus spp., and Haemonchus spp.. Some of the two-drug combinations were effective against nematode populations identified as resistant to the same compounds when used as single drugs. The most effective combinations were moxidectin + levamisole, doramectin + fenbendazole, and levamisole + closantel. In this study, parasites resistant to the main commercially available anthelmintics were found in all herds, and some combinations of two active components belonging to different chemical groups were effective

  13. Anthelmintic effects of forage chicory (Cichorium intybus) against gastrointestinal nematode parasites in experimentally infected cattle.

    PubMed

    Peña-Espinoza, Miguel; Thamsborg, Stig M; Desrues, Olivier; Hansen, Tina V A; Enemark, Heidi L

    2016-09-01

    Two experiments studied the effects of dietary chicory against gastrointestinal nematodes in cattle. In Experiment (Exp.) 1, stabled calves were fed chicory silage (CHI1; n = 9) or ryegrass/clover hay (CTL1; n = 6) with balanced protein/energy intakes between groups. After 16 days, all calves received 10 000 Ostertagia ostertagi and 66 000 Cooperia oncophora third-stage larvae (L3) [day (D) 0 post-infection (p.i.)]. In Exp. 2, calves were assigned to pure chicory (CHI2; n=10) or ryegrass/clover (CTL2; n = 10) pastures. After 7 days, animals received 20 000 O. ostertagi L3/calf (D0 p.i.) and were moved regularly preventing pasture-borne infections. Due to poor regrowth of the chicory pasture, CHI2 was supplemented with chicory silage. At D40 p.i. (Exp. 1) and D35 p.i. (Exp. 2) calves were slaughtered for worm recovery. In Exp.1, fecal egg counts (FEC) were similar between groups. However, O. ostertagi counts were significantly reduced in CHI1 by 60% (geometric mean; P < 0·01), whereas C. oncophora burdens were unaffected (P = 0·12). In Exp. 2, FEC were markedly lowered in CHI2 from D22 p.i onwards (P < 0·01). Ostertagia ostertagi adult burdens were significantly reduced in CHI2 by 66% (P < 0·001). Sesquiterpene lactones were identified only in chicory (fresh/silage). Chicory shows promise as an anti-Ostertagia feed for cattle and further studies should investigate its on-farm use. PMID:27173405

  14. Anthelmintic resistance to ivermectin and moxidectin in gastrointestinal nematodes of cattle in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Geurden, Thomas; Chartier, Christophe; Fanke, Jane; di Regalbono, Antonio Frangipane; Traversa, Donato; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Demeler, Janina; Vanimisetti, Hima Bindu; Bartram, David J.; Denwood, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Anthelmintic resistance has been increasingly reported in cattle worldwide over the last decade, although reports from Europe are more limited. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of injectable formulations of ivermectin and moxidectin at 0.2 mg per kg bodyweight against naturally acquired gastro-intestinal nematodes in cattle. A total of 753 animals on 40 farms were enrolled in Germany (12 farms), the UK (10 farms), Italy (10 farms), and France (8 farms). Animals were selected based on pre-treatment faecal egg counts and were allocated to one of the two treatment groups. Each treatment group consisted of between 7 and 10 animals. A post-treatment faecal egg count was performed 14 days (±2 days) after treatment. The observed percentage reduction was calculated for each treatment group based on the arithmetic mean faecal egg count before and after treatment. The resistance status was evaluated based on the reduction in arithmetic mean faecal egg count and both the lower and upper 95% confidence limits. A decreased efficacy was observed in half or more of the farms in Germany, France and the UK. For moxidectin, resistance was confirmed on 3 farms in France, and on 1 farm in Germany and the UK. For ivermectin, resistance was confirmed on 3 farms in the UK, and on 1 farm in Germany and France. The remaining farms with decreased efficacy were classified as having an inconclusive resistance status based on the available data. After treatment Cooperia spp. larvae were most frequently identified, though Ostertagia ostertagi was also found, in particular within the UK and Germany. The present study reports lower than expected efficacy for ivermectin and moxidectin (based on the reduction in egg excretion after treatment) on European cattle farms, with confirmed anthelmintic resistance on 12.5% of the farms. PMID:26448902

  15. Anthelmintic resistance in gastrointestinal nematodes of beef cattle in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Fernanda; Portella, Luiza Pires; Rodrigues, Fernando de Souza; Reginato, Caroline Zamperete; Pötter, Luciana; Cezar, Alfredo Skrebsky; Sangioni, Luís Antônio; Vogel, Fernanda Silveira Flores

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal nematodes resistant to anthelmintics have been reported in several regions of Brazil, and they may be associated with economic losses for the cattle industry. This study aimed to evaluate the resistance status of gastrointestinal nematodes from naturally infected beef cattle to several commercially available anthelmintics, as well as to test the efficacy of combinations of anthelmintics against multi-resistant gastrointestinal nematodes. Ten farms located in Rio Grande do Sul state were selected by: farmers' consent; extensive raising system; availability of calves aged from 7 to 9 months naturally infected by gastrointestinal nematodes; absence of anthelmintic treatment for 60 days before the study; and presence of 70–100 calves or more of both genders with ≥200 eggs per gram of feces (EPG) (sensitivity of 50 EPG). These calves were distributed into 10 groups (of 7–10 animals) per farm and treated with ivermectin, doramectin, eprinomectin, fenbendazole, closantel, nitroxynil, disophenol, levamisole, albendazole, or moxidectin. Feces were collected 2 days before treatment and 14 days after treatment. Additional groups of 7–10 calves were used to test six different two-drug combinations at four of the studied farms. In general terms, fenbendazole was the most effective drug, followed by levamisole, disophenol, and moxidectin. However, parasite resistance to multiple drugs was found in all herds, especially in the genera Cooperia spp., Trichostrongylus spp., and Haemonchus spp.. Some of the two-drug combinations were effective against nematode populations identified as resistant to the same compounds when used as single drugs. The most effective combinations were moxidectin + levamisole, doramectin + fenbendazole, and levamisole + closantel. In this study, parasites resistant to the main commercially available anthelmintics were found in all herds, and some combinations of two active components belonging to different chemical groups

  16. Parasitic infections in dairy cattle around Hanoi, northern Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Geurden, T; Somers, R; Thanh, N T G; Vien, L V; Nga, V T; Giang, H H; Dorny, P; Giao, H K; Vercruysse, J

    2008-05-31

    In northern Vietnam, dairy cattle are mainly managed in small-scale farms, where animals are kept confined and feeding occurs by cut and carry methods. In the present study the occurrence of parasitic infections was examined in five provinces around Hanoi. A total of 201 farms were visited, and 334 stool and 239 blood samples were collected from calves younger than 3 months, animals between 3 and 24 months and adult cows. Furthermore, 254 milk samples were collected from lactating animals. Coproscopical examination indicated a high prevalence of nematode eggs (Cooperia spp., Haemonchus and Oesophagostomum spp.) in animals (n=176) between 3 and 24 months (66%) and in adult cows (n=90; 54%). In these age groups the prevalence of Fasciola was 28% and 39%, respectively, and for Paramphistomum the prevalence was 78% and 82%, respectively. Fifty percent of the calves younger than 3 months (n=68) were positive for Giardia, and none for Cryptosporidium. Most Giardia isolates were identified as the non-zoonotic G. duodenalis assemblage E on the beta-giardin gene. The blood samples were examined with commercially available Svanovir((R))Elisa's for the presence of Anaplasma marginale and Babesia bigemina specific antibodies, and a prevalence of 28% and 54% was found, respectively. In the milk samples Neospora caninum specific antibodies (Svanovir((R))Elisa) were detected in 30% of the lactating animals. The present study demonstrates that parasitic infections occur frequently in dairy cattle around Hanoi although animals are mainly kept confined, and indicates that further research on the economic impact of these infections is needed. PMID:18328629

  17. Sensitivity and efficiency of selected coproscopical methods-sedimentation, combined zinc sulfate sedimentation-flotation, and McMaster method.

    PubMed

    Becker, Ann-Christin; Kraemer, Amelie; Epe, Christian; Strube, Christina

    2016-07-01

    Coproscopical methods used in veterinary-parasitological diagnostics were validated according to their sensitivity (Se) and egg recovery rate [efficiency (Ef)]. Validation of the combined sedimentation-flotation method and the modified McMaster method was performed by using feces spiked with eggs of Ancylostoma caninum, Uncinaria stenocephala, Cooperia oncophora, cyathostomins, Ascaris suum, Toxascaris leonina, Toxocara canis, Trichuris vulpis, Moniezia expansa, and Anoplocephala perfoliata. For validation of the sedimentation method, Fasciola hepatica eggs were used. With the combined sedimentation-flotation method using ZnSO4 as flotation medium [specific gravity (SG) 1.30], 5 g fecal samples of all tested parasite species (concentration levels 1, 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, and 80 epg) were reproducibly detected "positive" (100 % Se) as of 80 epg. The Ef of the combined sedimentation-flotation method, defined as percentage of rediscovered eggs, revealed clear differences between parasites and showed the highest value for cyathostomins and the lowest for U. stenocephala and T. leonina eggs. The average Ef for all parasite species at 80 epg was 1.50 %. With the McMaster method (concentration levels 1, 30, 50, 80, 100, 500, and 1000 epg), all tested parasite species were detected reliably positive as of 500 epg with a mean Ef of 46.4 %. When evaluating the sedimentation method (concentration levels 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 epg), F. hepatica eggs were reproducibly found in 5 g fecal samples as of 20 epg with 20.0 % Ef. The result that the combined zinc sulfate sedimentation-flotation method (SG 1.30) as flotation medium provides diagnostic certainty only as of 80 epg has to be considered at preventing zoonoses. If pet owners wish to prevent any zoonotic infection ("zero tolerance"), a monthly anthelminthic treatment should be advised instead of monthly fecal examinations. PMID:26997342

  18. Elevated temperatures and long drought periods have a negative impact on survival and fitness of strongylid third stage larvae.

    PubMed

    Knapp-Lawitzke, Friederike; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Demeler, Janina

    2016-04-01

    In grazing cattle, infections with gastrointestinal nematodes pose some of the most important health threats and subclinical infections result in considerable production losses. While there is little doubt that climate change will affect grazing ruminants directly, mean temperature increases of ∼ 3°C and longer drought stress periods in summer may also influence the free-living stages of parasitic nematodes. Hostile climatic conditions reduce the number of L3s on pasture and therefore the refugium, which is expected to result in a higher selection pressure, accelerating development of resistance against anthelmintic drugs. The aim of the current experiments was to investigate the effects of drought stress and different temperature/humidity ranges over time on the survival and fitness of Cooperia oncophora L3s and their distribution in grass and soil under controlled conditions using a climate chamber. Grass containers inoculated with L3s were analysed after 1-6weeks using descriptive statistics as well as linear models. A large proportion of L3s was recovered from soil where fitness was also better preserved than on grass. Numbers and fitness of recovered L3s declined with duration in the climate chamber under both temperature profiles. However, the results of the linear models confirmed that higher temperatures (20-33°C versus 17-22.6°C) significantly impaired survival, distribution and fitness of L3s. Application of drought stress, known as another important factor, had a surprisingly smaller impact than its duration or higher temperatures. The climate chamber enabled exclusion of confounding factors and therefore accurate interpretation of the investigated climatic aspects. The obtained results highlight the relative importance of those factors, and will help to design better models for the population dynamics of L3s on pasture in the future. Additionally, the outcomes of these investigations may offer explanations regarding interdependencies of development

  19. Pharmacological effects of ivermectin, an antiparasitic agent for intestinal strongyloidiasis: its mode of action and clinical efficacy.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Takanori

    2003-12-01

    Ivermectin is an oral semi-synthetic lactone anthelmintic agent derived from avermectins isolated from fermentation products of Streptomyces avermitilis. Ivermectin showed a concentration-dependent inhibitory effect on motility of a free-living nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). There exist specific binding sites having a high affinity for ivermectin in the membrane fraction of C. elegans, and a strong positive correlation was detected between the affinity for these binding sites and the suppressive effect on motility of C. elegans in several ivermectin-related substances. These results suggested that the binding to these binding sites is important for the nematocidal activity of ivermectin. In oocytes of Xenopus laevis injected with the Poly (A)(+) RNA of C. elegans, expression of a chloride channel, which is irreversibly activated by ivermectin, was recognized. The pharmacological properties of this channel suggest that the ivermectin-sensitive channel is a glutamate-activated chloride channel. As to the glutamate-activated chloride channel, two subtypes (GluCl-alpha and GluCl-beta) were cloned, suggesting these subtypes constitute the glutamate-activated chloride channel. These findings suggest that ivermectin binds to glutamate-activated chloride channels existing in nerve or muscle cells of nematode with a specific and high affinity, causing hyperpolarization of nerve or muscle cells by increasing permeability of chloride ion through the cell membrane, and as a result, the parasites are paralyzed to death. In experimental infections in sheep and cattle, ivermectin exhibited potent dose-dependent anthelmintic effects on Haemonchus, Ostertagia, Trichostrongylus, Cooperia, Oesphagostomum, and Dictyocaulus. Anthelmintic effects were reported also in dogs, horses, and humans infected with Strongyloides. In the clinical Phase III trial in Japan, 50 patients infected with Strongyloides stercoralis were administered approx. 200 microg/kg of ivermectin to

  20. Efficacy of an energy block containing Duddingtonia flagrans in the control of gastrointestinal nematodes of sheep.

    PubMed

    Sagüés, María F; Fusé, Luis A; Fernández, Alicia S; Iglesias, Lucía E; Moreno, Fabiana C; Saumell, Carlos A

    2011-09-01

    The efficacy of the nematode-trapping fungus Duddingtonia flagrans incorporated into an energy block was evaluated for the control of gastrointestinal nematodes in sheep. Four naturally parasitised sheep with average nematode egg counts of 2,470 eggs per gram grazed by pairs on two similar parasite-free paddocks for 30 days. During that period, one pair of sheep (treated animals, T1) received an energy block containing chlamydospores of D. flagrans at a dose of 200,000 chlamydopores/kg bw/day, while the second pair (control animals, C1) received a fungus-free energy block. The animals in both groups were taken off the paddocks after contaminating the pastures for a month with either nematode eggs plus fungal chlamydospores (T1) or nematode eggs alone (C1). Twelve parasite-free sheep were divided into two groups of six animals each, the treated group (T2) was placed on the paddock previously contaminated with parasites and fungus, while the control group (C2) was placed on the parasite-only paddock. These two groups grazed on their respective paddocks during 30 days and were then housed for 15 days, after which period they were slaughtered in order to determine the parasite burden present in each animal. Results showed that animals in group T2 harboured significantly less nematodes than their counterpart in group C2. The efficacy of D. flagrans was 92% against the total parasite burden, 100% against Haemonchus contortus and Teladorsagia circumcincta, 89.9% against Trichostrongylus colubriformis, 87.5% against Cooperia onchopora, and 90% against Trichostrongylus axei. No efficacy was detected against Nematodirus spathiger, Trichuris ovis and T. skrjabini.

  1. Sensitivity and efficiency of selected coproscopical methods-sedimentation, combined zinc sulfate sedimentation-flotation, and McMaster method.

    PubMed

    Becker, Ann-Christin; Kraemer, Amelie; Epe, Christian; Strube, Christina

    2016-07-01

    Coproscopical methods used in veterinary-parasitological diagnostics were validated according to their sensitivity (Se) and egg recovery rate [efficiency (Ef)]. Validation of the combined sedimentation-flotation method and the modified McMaster method was performed by using feces spiked with eggs of Ancylostoma caninum, Uncinaria stenocephala, Cooperia oncophora, cyathostomins, Ascaris suum, Toxascaris leonina, Toxocara canis, Trichuris vulpis, Moniezia expansa, and Anoplocephala perfoliata. For validation of the sedimentation method, Fasciola hepatica eggs were used. With the combined sedimentation-flotation method using ZnSO4 as flotation medium [specific gravity (SG) 1.30], 5 g fecal samples of all tested parasite species (concentration levels 1, 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, and 80 epg) were reproducibly detected "positive" (100 % Se) as of 80 epg. The Ef of the combined sedimentation-flotation method, defined as percentage of rediscovered eggs, revealed clear differences between parasites and showed the highest value for cyathostomins and the lowest for U. stenocephala and T. leonina eggs. The average Ef for all parasite species at 80 epg was 1.50 %. With the McMaster method (concentration levels 1, 30, 50, 80, 100, 500, and 1000 epg), all tested parasite species were detected reliably positive as of 500 epg with a mean Ef of 46.4 %. When evaluating the sedimentation method (concentration levels 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 epg), F. hepatica eggs were reproducibly found in 5 g fecal samples as of 20 epg with 20.0 % Ef. The result that the combined zinc sulfate sedimentation-flotation method (SG 1.30) as flotation medium provides diagnostic certainty only as of 80 epg has to be considered at preventing zoonoses. If pet owners wish to prevent any zoonotic infection ("zero tolerance"), a monthly anthelminthic treatment should be advised instead of monthly fecal examinations.

  2. Gastrointestinal helminthiasis: prevalence and associated determinants in domestic ruminants of district Toba Tek Singh, Punjab, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Nisar; Sajid, Muhammad Sohail; Khan, Muhammad Kasib; Iqbal, Zafar; Hussain, Altaf

    2010-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the prevalence and associated determinants (e.g., sex, age, on-farm management and husbandry) of gastrointestinal (GI) helminths in the domestic animals of district Toba Tek Singh, Punjab, Pakistan. For this purpose, 1,140 cattle, 1,140 buffaloes, 660 goats, 840 sheep, and 156 camels were randomly selected and their fecal samples were screened every other week for a year using a modified floatation technique. The samples positive for strongyle-type eggs had the parasite species identified using coproculture. It was found that the prevalence of GI helminths was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in sheep (44.17%; 371/840) than in other livestock. Sheep were followed in order by goats (40.15%; 265/660), buffaloes (39.82%; 454/1,140), and cattle (33.68%; 384/1,140). The important helminth species identified were Fasciola (F.) gigantica, Fasciola hepatica, Haemonchus contortus, Toxocara vitulorum, Trichostrongylus spp., Oesophagostomum spp., Ostertagia spp., Cooperia spp., Strongyloides spp., Moniezia spp., and Trichuris spp. The prevalence of GI helminths except F. hepatica and F. gigantica was significantly higher in grazing animals, females (P < 0.05) and young (P < 0.05) of all the host species when compared with stall-fed animals, males and adults, respectively. Using ponds and rivers/canals as drinking water were found to have significant influence (P < 0.05) on the prevalence of GI helminths. The results provide a baseline data for planning future research and control strategies against GI helminthes.

  3. Anthelmintic resistance in gastrointestinal nematodes of beef cattle in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Fernanda; Portella, Luiza Pires; Rodrigues, Fernando de Souza; Reginato, Caroline Zamperete; Pötter, Luciana; Cezar, Alfredo Skrebsky; Sangioni, Luís Antônio; Vogel, Fernanda Silveira Flores

    2016-04-01

    Gastrointestinal nematodes resistant to anthelmintics have been reported in several regions of Brazil, and they may be associated with economic losses for the cattle industry. This study aimed to evaluate the resistance status of gastrointestinal nematodes from naturally infected beef cattle to several commercially available anthelmintics, as well as to test the efficacy of combinations of anthelmintics against multi-resistant gastrointestinal nematodes. Ten farms located in Rio Grande do Sul state were selected by: farmers' consent; extensive raising system; availability of calves aged from 7 to 9 months naturally infected by gastrointestinal nematodes; absence of anthelmintic treatment for 60 days before the study; and presence of 70-100 calves or more of both genders with ≥ 200 eggs per gram of feces (EPG) (sensitivity of 50 EPG). These calves were distributed into 10 groups (of 7-10 animals) per farm and treated with ivermectin, doramectin, eprinomectin, fenbendazole, closantel, nitroxynil, disophenol, levamisole, albendazole, or moxidectin. Feces were collected 2 days before treatment and 14 days after treatment. Additional groups of 7-10 calves were used to test six different two-drug combinations at four of the studied farms. In general terms, fenbendazole was the most effective drug, followed by levamisole, disophenol, and moxidectin. However, parasite resistance to multiple drugs was found in all herds, especially in the genera Cooperia spp., Trichostrongylus spp., and Haemonchus spp.. Some of the two-drug combinations were effective against nematode populations identified as resistant to the same compounds when used as single drugs. The most effective combinations were moxidectin + levamisole, doramectin + fenbendazole, and levamisole + closantel. In this study, parasites resistant to the main commercially available anthelmintics were found in all herds, and some combinations of two active components belonging to different chemical groups were effective

  4. Utilization of computer processed high definition video imaging for measuring motility of microscopic nematode stages on a quantitative scale: “The Worminator”

    PubMed Central

    Storey, Bob; Marcellino, Chris; Miller, Melissa; Maclean, Mary; Mostafa, Eman; Howell, Sue; Sakanari, Judy; Wolstenholme, Adrian; Kaplan, Ray

    2014-01-01

    A major hindrance to evaluating nematode populations for anthelmintic resistance, as well as for screening existing drugs, new compounds, or bioactive plant extracts for anthelmintic properties, is the lack of an efficient, objective, and reproducible in vitro assay that is adaptable to multiple life stages and parasite genera. To address this need we have developed the “Worminator” system, which objectively and quantitatively measures the motility of microscopic stages of parasitic nematodes. The system is built around the computer application “WormAssay”, developed at the Center for Discovery and Innovation in Parasitic Diseases at the University of California, San Francisco. WormAssay was designed to assess motility of macroscopic parasites for the purpose of high throughput screening of potential anthelmintic compounds, utilizing high definition video as an input to assess motion of adult stage (macroscopic) parasites (e.g. Brugia malayi). We adapted this assay for use with microscopic parasites by modifying the software to support a full frame analysis mode that applies the motion algorithm to the entire video frame. Thus, the motility of all parasites in a given well are recorded and measured simultaneously. Assays performed on third-stage larvae (L3) of the bovine intestinal nematode Cooperia spp., as well as microfilariae (mf) of the filarioid nematodes B. malayi and Dirofilaria immitis, yielded reproducible dose responses using the macrocyclic lactones ivermectin, doramectin, and moxidectin, as well as the nicotinic agonists, pyrantel, oxantel, morantel, and tribendimidine. This new computer based-assay is simple to use, requires minimal new investment in equipment, is robust across nematode genera and developmental stage, and does not require subjective scoring of motility by an observer. Thus, the “Worminator” provides a relatively low-cost platform for developing genera- and stage-specific assays with high efficiency and reproducibility, low

  5. Anthelmintic resistance in cattle nematodes in the US.

    PubMed

    Gasbarre, Louis C

    2014-07-30

    The first documented case of macrocyclic lactone resistance in gastrointestinal (GI) nematodes of cattle was seen in the US approximately 10 years ago. Since that time the increase incidence of anthelmintic resistance has continued at an alarming rate. Currently parasites of the genera Cooperia and/or Haemonchus resistant to generic or brand-name macrocyclic lactones have be demonstrated in more than half of all operations examined. Both of these parasite genera are capable of causing economic losses by decreasing food intake and subsequently animal productivity. Currently, there are no easy and quick means to detect anthelmintic resistant GI nematodes. Definitive identification requires killing of cattle. The most commonly used field detection method is the fecal egg count reduction test (FECRT). This method can be adapted for use as a screening agent for Veterinarians and producers to identify less than desired clearance of the parasites after anthelmintic treatment. Further studies can then define the reasons for persistence of the egg counts. The appearance of anthelmintic resistance is largely due to the development of very effective nematode control programs that have significantly improved the productivity of the US cattle industry, but at the same time has placed a high level of selective pressure on the parasite genome. The challenges ahead include the development of programs that control the anthelmintic resistant nematodes but at the same time result in more sustainable parasite control. The goal is to maintain high levels of productivity but to exert less selective pressures on the parasites. One of the most effective means to slow the development of drug resistance is through the simultaneous use of multiple classes of anthelmintics, each of which has a different mode of action. Reduction of the selective pressure on the parasites can be attained through a more targeted approach to drug treatments where the producer's needs are met by selective

  6. A controlled study on gastrointestinal nematodes from two Swedish cattle farms showing field evidence of ivermectin resistance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Anthelmintic resistance (AR) is an increasing problem for the ruminant livestock sector worldwide. However, the extent of the problem is still relatively unknown, especially for parasitic nematodes of cattle. The effect of ivermectin (IVM) (Ivomec inj.®, Merial) was investigated in Swedish isolates of gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) populations showing signs of AR in the field to further characterise the AR status by a range of in vivo and in vitro methods. Methods Three groups, each of 11 calves, were infected with an equal mixture of third stage larvae (L3) of Cooperia oncophora and Ostertagia ostertagi. Group A was inoculated with an IVM-susceptible laboratory isolate and groups B and C with isolates originating from ‘resistant’ cattle farms. Faecal egg counts (FEC) were monitored from 0 to 45 days post infection (d.p.i.), and L3 were harvested continuously for larval migration inhibition testing (LMIT) and species-specific PCR (ITS2). At 31 d.p.i., one calf from each group was necropsied and adult worms were recovered pre-treatment. At 35 d.p.i., calves from all groups were injected with IVM at the recommended dose (0.2 mg/kg bodyweight). At 45 d.p.i., another two animals from each group were sacrificed and established gastrointestinal worms were collected and counted. Results A few animals in all three groups were still excreting eggs (50-150 per g faeces) 10 days post IVM injection. However, there was no significant difference in the FEC reductions in groups A (95%; 95% CI 81-99), B (98%; 92-100) and C (99%; 97-100) between 35 and 44 d.p.i. Furthermore, LMIT showed no significant difference between the three groups. Approximately 100 adult O. ostertagi were found in the abomasum of one calf (group B), whereas low to moderate numbers (400-12 200) of C. oncophora remained in the small intestine of the calves in all three groups at 45 d.p.i. PCR on L3 harvested from faecal samples up to 10 days post treatment showed a ratio of 100% C. oncophora

  7. Effect of vacuum packing and temperature on survival and hatching of strongyle eggs in faecal samples.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Mita E; Thapa, Sundar; Thamsborg, Stig M; Mejer, Helena

    2016-02-15

    Strongyle eggs of helminths of livestock usually hatch within a few hours or days after deposition with faeces. This poses a problem when faecal sampling is performed in the field. As oxygen is needed for embryonic development, it is recommended to reduce air supply during transport and refrigerate. The present study therefore investigated the combined effect of vacuum packing and temperature on survival of strongyle eggs and their subsequent ability to hatch and develop into L3. Fresh faecal samples were collected from calves infected with Cooperia oncophora, pigs infected with Oesophagostomum dentatum, and horses infected with Strongylus vulgaris and cyathostomins. The samples were allocated into four treatments: vacuum packing and storage at 5 °C or 20 °C (5 V and 20 V); normal packing in plastic gloves closed with a loose knot and storage at 5 °C or 20 °C (5 N and 20 N). The number of eggs per gram faeces (EPG) was estimated every fourth day until day 28 post set up (p.s.) by a concentration McMaster-method. Larval cultures were prepared on day 0, 12 and 28 p.s. and the larval yield determined. For C. oncophora, the EPG was significantly higher in vacuum packed samples after 28 days as compared to normal storage, regardless of temperature. However, O. dentatum EPG was significantly higher in samples kept at 5 °C as compared to 20 °C, irrespective of packing. For the horse strongyles, vacuum packed samples at 5 °C had a significantly higher EPG compared to the other treatments after 28 days. The highest larval yield of O. dentatum and horse strongyles were obtained from fresh faecal samples, however, if storage is necessary prior to setting up larval cultures O. dentatum should be kept at room temperature (aerobic or anaerobic). However, horse strongyle coprocultures should ideally be set up on the day of collection to ensure maximum yield. Eggs of C. oncophora should be kept vacuum packed at room temperature for the highest larval yield.

  8. Physiological and parasitological responses to nematode infections of fattening cattle in the Western Pampas of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Suarez, V H; Lorenzo, R M; Busetti, M R; Santucho, G M

    1999-02-25

    The epidemiology of nematode infection was studied in fattening grazing cattle from weaning (April 1994) to market at the end of their second autumn (July 1995). Sixty Aberdeen Angus calves of seven months of age were randomly allocated by weight to two groups: GT, treated every three weeks with doramectin (200 mcg/kg); and GI, an infected group, only treated with fenbendazole (7.5 mg/kg) at weaning and on the 1st of October. The two groups were grazed together on contaminated lucerne pastures until July, on 'clean' oat pastures until October and again on contaminated lucerne until the end of the trial. Fecal egg counts (epg), herbage larvae (L3), serum pepsinogen (Pep) and blood eosinophils (Eo) were evaluated monthly. Eight steers were slaughtered for worm recovery, three in July 1994, three in December 1994 and two in July 1995. Grazing feed intake was estimated by fecal output (chromic oxide method)/l-diet digestibility and to measure non-specific response, Brucella antibodies were detected at 11 and 40 days post-vaccination in early winter. Fecal egg counts, Pep and Eo of GI increased (P<0.01) from April to July when there was a moderate-to-high level of infection. Ostertagia, Trichostrongylus and Cooperia were the predominant genera. By late winter, all parameters decreased on oat 'clean' pastures and increased again when cattle returned to moderately infected lucerne. During summer, the parameters measured reflected the negligible numbers of L3 on pastures until early autumn. At this time, increased numbers of L3 were followed by a moderate rise (P<0.01) of epg, Pep and Eo values. During winter, GT showed higher (P<0.04) Brucella antibody IgG titers while feed intake of GI was 24.9% depressed (P<0.02). There were total cumulative weight-gain (WG) differences (P<0.001) between groups (GT=263.1 kg; GI=214.3 kg). During the second autumn, the mean WG of GT steers was 16.6 kg greater (P<0.04) than that of GI. Vaccination titres against Brucella suggested non

  9. Endectocide activity of a pour-on formulation containing 1.5 per cent ivermectin +0.5 per cent abamectin in cattle

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Heloisa Cristina; Prette, Nancy; Lopes, Welber Daniel Zanetti; Sakamoto, Cláudio Alessandro M; Buzzulini, Carolina; dos Santos, Thais Rabelo; Cruz, Breno Cayeiro; Teixeira, Weslen F Pires; Felippelli, Gustavo; Carvalho, Rafael Silveira; Maciel, Willian Giquelin; Soares, Vando Edésio; da Costa, Alvimar José

    2015-01-01

    The present work aimed to evaluate, through ten different studies, the therapeutic efficacy of a new pour-on formulation, containing 1.5 per cent ivermectin +0.5 per cent abamectin, against parasites of cattle. Results obtained on trials against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus showed that the pour-on combination of 1.5 per cent ivermectin +0.5 per cent abamectin obtained superior efficacy indexes against this ectoparasite, when compared with formulations containing 0.5 per cent ivermectin, 1 per cent ivermectin and the combination of 1 per cent abamectin +20 per cent levamisole. The results of efficacy of the ivermectin+abamectin and the 0.5 per cent ivermectin against Haematobia irritans were similar. Against Cochliomyia hominivorax larvae, all pour-on formulations tested (1.5 per cent ivermectin +0.5 per cent abamectin, 0.5 per cent ivermectin and 0.5 per cent abamectin), as well as 1 per cent doramectin administered subcutaneously, were considered ineffective. Cattle medicated with 1.5 per cent ivermectin +0.5 per cent abamectin, pour-on, remained free from parasitism by Dermatobia hominis larvae during 42 days (96 per cent efficacy), while values superior to 90 per cent were obtained by 0.5 per cent ivermectin (92 per cent) and 0.5 per cent abamectin (93 per cent) until the 42nd and 35th days post treatment, respectively. Against Haemonchus placei and Oesophagostomum radiatum, the pour-on of ivermectin+abamectin showed better efficacy than the 0.5 per cent ivermectin and 0.5 per cent abamectin. As to Cooperia punctata, there was no difference regarding efficacy results obtained by the avermectins combination and abamectin. The pour-on combination of 1.5 per cent ivermectin +0.5 per cent abamectin obtained high efficacy against R. (B.) microplus, D. hominis and some species of cattle gastrointestinal helminths when compared with formulations of 0.5 per cent ivermectin and 0.5 per cent abamectin administered through the same route. PMID:26392893

  10. New approach for the strategic control of gastrointestinal nematodes in grazed beef cattle during the growing phase in central Brazil.

    PubMed

    Heckler, R P; Borges, D G L; Vieira, M C; Conde, M H; Green, M; Amorim, M L; Echeverria, J T; Oliveira, T L; Moro, E; Van Onselen, V J; Borges, F A

    2016-05-15

    ), October (T5) and November (T5 and T6). Haemonchus, Cooperia, Trichostrongylus and Oesophagostomum were identified. Treatments in May and November, the most common practice in Brazil, did not increase the final weight gain, so an additional and intermediate treatment during the dry season (August) is recommended. PMID:27084483

  11. Comparative efficacy of ivermectin pour-on, albendazole, oxfendazole and fenbendazole against Ostertagia ostertagi inhibited larvae, other gastrointestinal nematodes and lungworm of cattle.

    PubMed

    Williams, J C; DeRosa, A; Nakamura, Y; Loyacano, A F

    1997-12-15

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the current efficacy of albendazole (ABZ), oxfendazole (OXF) and fenbendazole (FBZ) compared with ivermectin pour-on (IVM-PO) against inhibited early fourth-stage larvae (IEL4) of Ostertagia ostertagi, other gastrointestinal nematodes and lungworm of cattle during spring in Louisiana. Twenty-five crossbred beef heifer calves of 235 kg average weight and 10-12 months of age were acquired in late winter and grazed for 9 weeks on pasture contaminated with O. ostertagi and other nematodes until May 15. The cattle were weighed and randomly allotted into 5 groups of 5 calves on May 16 (day 0) and treatments were as follows: group 1, nontreated controls (CONT); group 2, IVM-PO on mid-backline at 500 micrograms/kg; group 3, ABZ suspension (oral) at 10 mg/kg; group 4, OXF suspension (oral) at 4.5 mg/kg; group 5, FBZ suspension (oral) at 5 mg/kg. After treatment and confinement in separate pens for each group, approximately equal numbers of cattle from each group were necropsied daily between days 29-31. Mean numbers of O. ostertagi developmental stages present in CONT were: adult, 5234; developing (DL4), 3130; IEL4, 44,077. The mean percentage of IEL4 was 84.1. Cooperia spp. were the second most prevalent in CONT (20,307) and smaller numbers of abomasal and intestinal species and Dictyocaulus viviparus were present in nearly all CONT. Percent reductions for the four compounds against O. ostertagi adult, DL4 and IEL4, respectively, were IVM-PO: 99.7, 98.3, 98.1; ABZ: 74.1, 76.5, 75.3; OXF: 78.5, 42.1, 32.0; FBZ: 63.6, 17.7, 39.7. Efficacy of IVM-PO was greater (P < 0.05) against all O. ostertagi stages than the benzimidazole (BZ) drugs, except for ABZ (DL4). There were no significant differences in group means (except for C. punctata adult males, P < 0.05 lower for IVM-PO) or wide variation in reduction percentages for other abomasal and intestinal species and D. viviparus between IVM-PO and BZ drugs. The low efficacy of all three BZ

  12. Methods to determine resistance to anthelmintics when continuing larval development occurs.

    PubMed

    Lyndal-Murphy, M; Swain, A J; Pepper, P M

    2014-01-31

    The in vivo faecal egg count reduction test (FECRT) is the most commonly used test to detect anthelmintic resistance (AR) in gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) of ruminants in pasture based systems. However, there are several variations on the method, some more appropriate than others in specific circumstances. While in some cases labour and time can be saved by just collecting post-drench faecal worm egg counts (FEC) of treatment groups with controls, or pre- and post-drench FEC of a treatment group with no controls, there are circumstances when pre- and post-drench FEC of an untreated control group as well as from the treatment groups are necessary. Computer simulation techniques were used to determine the most appropriate of several methods for calculating AR when there is continuing larval development during the testing period, as often occurs when anthelmintic treatments against genera of GIN with high biotic potential or high re-infection rates, such as Haemonchus contortus of sheep and Cooperia punctata of cattle, are less than 100% efficacious. Three field FECRT experimental designs were investigated: (I) post-drench FEC of treatment and controls groups, (II) pre- and post-drench FEC of a treatment group only and (III) pre- and post-drench FEC of treatment and control groups. To investigate the performance of methods of indicating AR for each of these designs, simulated animal FEC were generated from negative binominal distributions with subsequent sampling from the binomial distributions to account for drench effect, with varying parameters for worm burden, larval development and drench resistance. Calculations of percent reductions and confidence limits were based on those of the Standing Committee for Agriculture (SCA) guidelines. For the two field methods with pre-drench FEC, confidence limits were also determined from cumulative inverse Beta distributions of FEC, for eggs per gram (epg) and the number of eggs counted at detection levels of 50 and 25. Two