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Sample records for copper ore tailings

  1. Beneficiation of flotation tailing from Polish copper sulfide ores

    SciTech Connect

    Luszczkiewicz, A.; Sztaba, K.S.

    1995-12-31

    Flotation tailing of Polish copper sulfide ores represents more than 90% of the mass of run-of-mine ore. The tailing contains mainly quartz, dolomite, clay minerals, traces of sulfides, and some accessory minerals. Almost all minerals of the tailing are well liberated and, therefore, any further beneficiation process applied to the tailing is expected to be inexpensive. In this work, results of investigations on utilization of flotation tailing using classification and gravity concentration are presented. It is shown that due to classification of flotation tailing in hydrocyclones, the coarse fraction becomes suitable material for gravity separation providing backfill material for underground mines as well as heavy minerals, a source of valuable rare elements. It was also found that heavy minerals separated by gravity methods contain a significant amount of rare elements such as zirconium, titanium, silver, rare earth metals, and uranium. The light fraction of the gravity separation contains well deslimed quartz particles and meets strict requirements for hydraulic filling material used for structural support in underground mines. Evaluation of the cost of the proposed technology indicated that investment to implement the method would provide a return within 2--4 years.

  2. Isolation and characterization of lost copper and molybdenum particles in the flotation tailings of Kennecott copper porphyry ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tserendavga, Tsend-Ayush

    The importance of flotation separation has long been, and continues to be, an important technology for the mining industry, especially to metallurgical engineers. However, the flotation process is quite complex and expensive, in addition to being influenced by many variables. Understanding the variables affecting flotation efficiency and how valuable minerals are lost to the tailings gives metallurgists an advantage in their attempts to increase efficiency by designing operations to target the areas of greatest potential value. A successful, accurate evaluation of lost minerals in the tailings and appropriate solutions to improve flotation efficiency can save millions of dollars in the effective utilization of our mineral resources. In this dissertation research, an attempt has been made to understand the reasons for the loss of valuable mineral particles in the tailings from Kennecott Utah Copper ores. Possibilities include liberation, particle aggregation (slime coating) and surface chemistry issues associated with the flotation separation. This research generally consisted of three main aspects. The first part involved laboratory flotation experiments and factors, which affect the flotation efficiency. Results of flotation testing are reported that several factors such as mineral exposure/liberation and slime coating and surface oxidation strongly affect the flotation efficiency. The second part of this dissertation research was to develop a rapid scan dual energy (DE) methodology using 2D radiography to identify, isolate, and prepare lost sulfide mineral particles with the advantages of simple sample preparation, short analysis time, statistically reliable accuracy and confident identification. The third part of this dissertation research was concerned with detailed characterization of lost particles including such factors as liberation, slime coating, and surface chemistry characteristics using advanced analytical techniques and instruments. Based on the

  3. Pressure leaching las cruces copper ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezowsky, R. M.; Xue, T.; Collins, M. J.; Makwana, M.; Barton-Jones, I.; Southgate, M.; Maclean, J. K.

    1999-12-01

    A hydrometallurgical process was developed for treating the Las Cruces massive sulfide-ore deposit located near Seville, Spain. A two-stage countercurrent leach process, consisting of an atmospheric leach and a pressure leach, was developed to effectively leach copper from the copper-bearing minerals and to generate a solution suitable for the subsequent solvent-extraction and copper-electrowinning operations. The results of batch and continuous miniplant tests are presented.

  4. Estimated water requirements for the conventional flotation of copper ores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bleiwas, Donald I.

    2012-01-01

    This report provides a perspective on the amount of water used by a conventional copper flotation plant. Water is required for many activities at a mine-mill site, including ore production and beneficiation, dust and fire suppression, drinking and sanitation, and minesite reclamation. The water required to operate a flotation plant may outweigh all of the other uses of water at a mine site, [however,] and the need to maintain a water balance is critical for the plant to operate efficiently. Process water may be irretrievably lost or not immediately available for reuse in the beneficiation plant because it has been used in the production of backfill slurry from tailings to provide underground mine support; because it has been entrapped in the tailings stored in the TSF, evaporated from the TSF, or leaked from pipes and (or) the TSF; and because it has been retained as moisture in the concentrate. Water retained in the interstices of the tailings and the evaporation of water from the surface of the TSF are the two most significant contributors to water loss at a conventional flotation circuit facility.

  5. Electrodialytic remediation of copper mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Henrik K; Rojo, Adrián; Ottosen, Lisbeth M

    2005-01-31

    Mining activities in Chile have generated large amounts of solid waste, which have been deposited in mine tailing impoundments. These impoundments cause concern to the communities due to dam failures or natural leaching to groundwater and rivers. This work shows the laboratory results of nine electrodialytic remediation experiments on copper mine tailings. The results show that electric current could remove copper from watery tailing if the potential gradient was higher than 2 V/cm during 21 days. With addition of sulphuric acid, the process was enhanced because the pH decreased to around 4, and the copper by this reason was released in the solution. Furthermore, with acidic tailing the potential gradient was less than 2 V/cm. The maximum copper removal reached in the anode side was 53% with addition of sulphuric acid in 21 days experiment at 20 V using approximately 1.8 kg mine tailing on dry basis. In addition, experiments with acidic tailing show that the copper removal is proportional with time.

  6. Using tailings from the enrichment of zircon-ilmenite ores

    SciTech Connect

    Suleimenov, S.T.; Saibulatov, S.Zh.; Togzhanov, I.A.; Suleimenov, K.T.; Abdrakhimov, V.Z.; Vasil'chenko, N.A.

    1988-07-01

    X-ray methods, IR-spectroscopy, and microscopic techniques were used to investigate the phase inversions occurring during the firing of the clay part of the tailings from the gravitation enrichment of zircon-ilmenite ores from the Karotkel'sk deposit to evaluate the wastes as ceramic raw materials. Results showed the development of a liquid phase at a temperature below 950 C, intense crystallization of mullite at 1000-1050 C, the formation of a solid solution of the substitution type, replacing the mullite by oxides of iron and titanium, and the polymorphic inversion of beta-quartz to alpha-cristobalate. The properties of facing tiles from (%) 50 clay part of the KhGR ores, 30 light fraction ash and 20 wollastonite are shown and compared with the properties of tiles made from factory bodies of the Tselinogradsk ceramic combine.

  7. Leaching of Copper Ore by Thiobacillus Ferrooxidans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennox, John; Biaha, Thomas

    1991-01-01

    A quantitative laboratory exercise based upon the procedures copper manufacturers employ to increase copper production is described. The role of chemoautotrophic microorganisms in biogeologic process is emphasized. Safety considerations when working with bacteria are included. (KR)

  8. Sorption of copper by vegetated copper-mine tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Coninck, A.; Karam, A.; Jaouich, A.

    2009-04-01

    The lixiviation of copper (Cu) from vegetated mine tailings may present an environmental risk because of the potential adverse effects it may pose to ground and surface water around mines. However, bonding of Cu to mine tailings can limit transfer to surrounding water. The main objective of the present study is to assess Cu sorption by cultivated Cu-mine tailings containing calcite (pH 7.7) as influenced by commercial peat moss-shrimp waste compost (PSC) and chelating solution. Fresh tailing and tailing that had been used in pot experiments were tested and compared. Samples (0.50 g) of tailings were equilibrated with 20 cm3 of 0.01 M CaCl2 solution containing 100 mg Cu dm-3, as CuCl2, for 72 h at room temperature. After equilibration period, the samples were centrifuged and filtered. Concentration of Cu in the equilibrium solution was measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The sorption coefficient (Ks) was used to interpret the sorption data. The sorption experiment was replicated two times. Compost was the most effective organic amendment in enhancing Cu sorption. The Ks values were positively and significantly correlated with organic matter content and Cu associated with the organic fraction of tailing samples. The mineralogy and organic matter content can influence the sorption capacity of Cu-mine tailings. Calcite-containing mine tailings amended with PSC can be used to sorb Cu from chloride solutions.

  9. Plant and soil reactions to nickel ore processed tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Sheets, P.J.; Volk, V.V.; Gardner, E.H.

    1982-07-01

    Greenhouse and laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the effect that tailings, produced during the processing of nickeliferous laterite ores by a proposed U.S. Bureau of Mines Process, would have on plant growth and soil properties. The tailings contained soluble salts (7.6 mmhos/cm), NH/sub 4/-N (877 ..mu..g/g), Ni (0.28%), Mn (82 ..mu..g/g DTPA-extractable), Cr (0.44%), P (2 and 6 ..mu..g/g acid F- and NaHCO/sub 3/-extractable, respectively), and Ca and Mg (1.0 and 20.7 meq/100 g NH/sub 4/Ac-extractable, respectively). Water leaching decreased the NH/sub 4/-N concentration to 53 ..mu..g/g and the EC to 0.4 mmhos/cm by removal of (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and MgSO/sub 4/ salts. Tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) was grown on Eightlar clay soil (skeletal, serpentinitic, mesic Typic Xerochrept) amended with 0, 223, 446, and 669 g tailings/kg soil and pure, unleached tailings for 32 weeks in the greenhouse. Seedling establishment of plants grown on soil amended at the highest tailings rate and the pure tailings was initially slow, but plants grown on soil amended at lower rates established readily and grew well. Plant P was <0.24%, while plant Ca concentrations were <0.45% throughout the growth period even though Ca(H/sub 2/PO/sub 2/)/sub 2/ and gypsum had been added. Ammonium acetate-extractable Ca at the end of the growth period was <5.0 meq/100 g on all amended soils.The Mn, Ni, and Cr concentrations of plants grown on treated soils were within normal ranges, although soil-analysis values were higher than commonly found. It is recommended that the tailings be washed to reduce NH/sub 4/-N and soluble salts prior to revegetation, and that native soil be added to the surface to reduce crusting.

  10. Ore microscopy of the Paoli silver-copper deposit, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, C.A.; Hagni, R.D.; Berendsen, P.

    1991-01-01

    The Paoli silver-copper deposit is located in south-central Oklahoma, 56 km south-southeast from Norman, Oklahoma. It was mined for high-grade silver-copper near the beginning of this century, and intensive exploratory drilling during the early 1970's delineated unmined portions of the deposit. A collaborative study between the U.S.G.S., the Kansas Geological Survey, and the University of Missouri-Rolla was undertaken to provide new information on the character of red bed copper deposits of the Midcontinent region. The Paoli deposit has been interpreted to occur as a roll-front type of deposit. The silver and copper mineralization occurs within paleochannels in the Permian Wellington Formation. The silver-copper interfaces appear to be controlled by oxidation-reduction interfaces that are marked by grey to red color changes in the host sandstone. Ore microscopic examinations of polished thin sections show that unoxidized ore consists of chalcocite, digenite, chalcopyrite, covellite and pyrite; and oxidized ores are characterized by covellite, bornite, hematite and goethite. In sandstone-hosted ores, chalcocite and digenite replace dolomite and border clastic quartz grains. In siltstone-hosted ores, the copper sulfide grains have varied shapes; most are irregular in shape and 5-25 ??m across, others have euhedral shapes suggestive of pyrite crystal replacements, and some are crudely spherical and are 120-200 ??m across. Chalcopyrite is the predominant copper sulfide at depth. Covellite and malachite replace chalcocite and digenite near the surface. Silver only occurs as native silver; most as irregularly shaped grains 40-80 ??m across, but some as cruciform crystals that are up to 3.5 mm across. The native silver has been deposited after copper sulfides, and locally replaces chalcocite. Surficial nodules of pyrite, malachite and hematite locally are present in outcrops at the oxidation-reduction fronts. Polished sections of the nodules show that malachite forms a

  11. [Environmental hygiene and comprehensive processing of copper sulphate ore].

    PubMed

    Petrov, B A

    2004-01-01

    The modern comprehensive processing of copper-sulphate ores is based on using the fire, chemical and combined fire-and-hydrometallurgy processes. The existing schemes of comprehensive ore processing do not provide for a total utilization of the metallurgical cycles wastes due to the inherent technological and design shortcomings; besides, they are a source of environmental pollution. Contamination of the atmospheric air with discharge elements has unfavorable effects on the health condition of population; it worsens the natural body resistance and contributes (through the induction of chromosome aberrations) to a higher general morbidity and mortality due to malignant neoplasms. Health-improve measures are supported by modern achievements in the sphere of copper-sulphate ore processing technologies--they ensure the hygienic and ecological rational management and usage at all stages of the processing of raw materials and secondary products. Institutions of the territorial medical-and-ecological monitoring are the corner stones for ecological safety of persons residing in areas of comprehensive copper-and-sulphate ore processing.

  12. Insights Into Ore Deposit Genesis Using Copper Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, K. C.; Larson, P. B.; Ramos, F. C.; Gaspar, M.; Chang, Z.

    2002-12-01

    Advances in MC-ICPMS have renewed interest in the analysis of transition metal isotopes to better constrain the processes involved in ore deposition. At WSU we employ sample-standard bracketing to accurately and precisely measure copper isotope ratios of whole mineral dissolutions without normalizing to zinc. This approach bypasses the use of chromatography for samples without significant isobaric interferences avoiding potential fractionation resulting from chromatography. Comparisons of analyses of native copper and chalcopyrite samples with and without chromatographic purification are within error. Reproducibility measured using native copper and chalcopyrite is \\pm0.03\\permil (1\\sigma, relative to NIST 976) over 2 months. We have found the range of δ65Cu values in chalcopyrite from a variety of ore deposits to be -0.9\\permil to +3.1\\permil. δ65Cu values of native copper and bornite samples are more restricted (-0.8\\permil to 1.3\\permil, and -1.1\\permil to 1.0\\permil, respectively). Additional minerals, including chalcocite, mohawkite, azurite and cuprite, have been analyzed from a variety of ore depositional environments. Variations in δ65Cu values of individual mineral species within a single deposit or district have smaller ranges. For example, "hypogene" native copper samples from the Michigan Native Copper district show a restricted range of values (0.2\\permil to 0.4\\permil), over 100km strike of the district. In addition, different genetically related minerals in the same deposit show distinctive trends in δ65Cu values. For example, co-precipitated chalcopyrite-bornite pairs from three deposits (Resolution, AZ, Beaver-Harrison Mine, UT, and Ferrobamba, Peru) display consistently higher δ65Cu values in chalcopyrite relative to bornite. Results from the Tintaya district, Peru and Resolution, AZ suggest that variations in δ65Cu values may be systematic on the deposit scale. In both deposits, δ65Cu in chalcopyrite increases with distance from

  13. A Simulator for Copper Ore Leaching

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, B.

    1999-05-14

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Copper is a strategic metal and the nation needs a secure supply both for industrial use and military needs. However, demand is growing worldwide and is outstripping the ability of the mining industry to keep up. Improved recovery methods are critically needed to maintain the balance of supply and demand. The goal of any process design should be to increase the amount of copper recovered, control movement of acid and other environmentally harmful chemicals, and reduce energy requirements. To achieve these ends, several improvements in current technology are required, the most important of which is a better understanding of, and the ability to quantify, how fluids move through heterogeneous materials in a complex chemical environment. The goal of this project is create a new modeling capability that couples hydrology with copper leaching chemistry . once the model has been verified and validated, we can apply the model to specific problems associated with heap leaching (flow channeling due to non-uniformities in heap structure, precipitation/dissolution reactions, and bacterial action), to understand the causes of inefficiencies, and to design better recovery systems. We also intend to work with representatives of the copper mining industry to write a coordinated plan for further model development and application that will provide economic benefits to the industry and the nation.

  14. Modeling the formation of porphyry-copper ores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingebritsen, Steven E.

    2012-01-01

    Porphyry-copper ore systems, the source of much of the world's copper and molybdenum, form when metal-bearing fluids are expelled from shallow, degassing magmas. On page 1613 of this issue, Weis et al. (1) demonstrate that self-organizing processes focus metal deposition. Specifically, their simulation studies indicate that ores develop as consequences of dynamic variations in rock permeability driven by injection of volatile species from rising magmas. Scenarios with a static permeability structure could not reproduce key field observations, whereas dynamic permeability responses to magmatic-fluid injection localized a metal-precipitation front where enrichment by a factor of 103 could be achieved [for an overview of their numerical-simulation model CSMP++, see (2)].

  15. Leaching of molybdenum and arsenic from uranium ore and mill tailings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landa, E.R.

    1984-01-01

    A sequential, selective extraction procedure was used to assess the effects of sulfuric acid milling on the geochemical associations of molybdenum and arsenic in a uranium ore blend, and the tailings derived therefrom. The milling process removed about 21% of the molybdenum and 53% of the arsenic initially present in the ore. While about one-half of the molybdenum in the ore was water soluble, only about 14% existed in this form in the tailings. The major portion of the extractable molybdenum in the tailings appears to be associated with hydrous oxides of iron, and with alkaline earth sulfate precipitates. In contrast with the pattern seen for molybdenum, the partitioning of arsenic into the various extractable fractions differs little between the ore and the tailings. ?? 1984.

  16. Extracting copper from copper oxide ore by a zwitterionic reagent and dissolution kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jiu-shuai; Wen, Shu-ming; Deng, Jian-ying; Wu, Dan-dan

    2015-03-01

    Sulfamic acid (SA), which possesses a zwitterionic structure, was applied as a leaching reagent for the first time for extracting copper from copper oxide ore. The effects of reaction time, temperature, particle size, reagent concentration, and stirring speed on this leaching were studied. The dissolution kinetics of malachite was illustrated with a three-dimensional diffusion model. A novel leaching effect of SA on malachite was eventually demonstrated. The leaching rate increased with decreasing particle size and increasing concentration, reaction temperature and stirring speed. The activation energy for SA leaching malachite was 33.23 kJ/mol. Furthermore, the effectiveness of SA as a new reagent for extracting copper from copper oxide ore was confirmed by experiment. This approach may provide a solution suitable for subsequent electrowinning. In addition, results reported herein may provide basic data that enable the leaching of other carbonate minerals of copper, zinc, cobalt and so on in an SA system.

  17. Phytostabilisation potential of lemon grass (Cymbopogon flexuosus (Nees ex Stend) Wats) on iron ore tailings.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, M; Dhal, N K; Patra, P; Das, B; Reddy, P S R

    2012-01-01

    The present pot culture study was carried out for the potential phytostabilisation of iron ore tailings using lemon grass (Cymbopogon flexuosus) a drought tolerant, perennial, aromatic grass. Experiments have been conducted by varying the composition of garden soil (control) with iron ore tailings. The various parameters, viz. growth of plants, number of tillers, biomass and oil content of lemon grass are evaluated. The studies have indicated that growth parameters of lemon grass in 1:1 composition of garden soil and iron ore tailings are significantly more (-5% increase) compared to plants grown in control soil. However, the oil content of lemon grass in both the cases more or less remained same. The results also infer that at higher proportion of tailings the yield of biomass decreases. The studies indicate that lemongrass with its fibrous root system is proved to be an efficient soil binder by preventing soil erosion.

  18. 40 CFR 440.100 - Applicability; description of the copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum ores subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum ores subcategory. 440.100 Section 440.100 Protection of... DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Copper, Lead, Zinc, Gold, Silver, and Molybdenum Ores Subcategory § 440.100 Applicability; description of the copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum ores subcategory. (a)...

  19. 40 CFR 440.100 - Applicability; description of the copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum ores subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum ores subcategory. 440.100 Section 440.100 Protection of... DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Copper, Lead, Zinc, Gold, Silver, and Molybdenum Ores Subcategory § 440.100 Applicability; description of the copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum ores subcategory. (a)...

  20. Leaching of radionuclides from uranium ore and mill tailings ( Ra- 226, Tn-230).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landa, E.R.

    1982-01-01

    The major part of the extractable uranium is associated with a readily acid-soluble fraction in both ore and tailings. The major part of the extractable 226Ra was associated with an iron, manganese hydrous-oxide fraction in the ore and tailings. Thorium-230 was the least leachable of the radionuclides studied. The major portion of the extractable 230Th was associated with alkaline-earth sulphate precipitates, organic matter, or both. The specific effects of milling on each of the nuclides are discussed.-Author

  1. Extraction of copper from an oxidized (lateritic) ore using bacterially catalysed reductive dissolution.

    PubMed

    Nancucheo, Ivan; Grail, Barry M; Hilario, Felipe; du Plessis, Chris; Johnson, D Barrie

    2014-01-01

    An oxidized lateritic ore which contained 0.8 % (by weight) copper was bioleached in pH- and temperature-controlled stirred reactors under acidic reducing conditions using pure and mixed cultures of the acidophilic chemolithotrophic bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. Sulfur was provided as the electron donor for the bacteria, and ferric iron present in goethite (the major ferric iron mineral present in the ore) acted as electron acceptor. Significantly more copper was leached by bacterially catalysed reductive dissolution of the laterite than in aerobic cultures or in sterile anoxic reactors, with up to 78 % of the copper present in the ore being extracted. This included copper that was leached from acid-labile minerals (chiefly copper silicates) and that which was associated with ferric iron minerals in the lateritic ore. In the anaerobic bioreactors, soluble iron in the leach liquors was present as iron (II) and copper as copper (I), but both metals were rapidly oxidized (to iron (III) and copper (II)) when the reactors were aerated. The number of bacteria added to the reactors had a critical role in dictating the rate and yield of copper solubilised from the ore. This work has provided further evidence that reductive bioprocessing, a recently described approach for extracting base metals from oxidized deposits, has the potential to greatly extend the range of metal ores that can be biomined. PMID:24687752

  2. Extraction of copper from an oxidized (lateritic) ore using bacterially catalysed reductive dissolution.

    PubMed

    Nancucheo, Ivan; Grail, Barry M; Hilario, Felipe; du Plessis, Chris; Johnson, D Barrie

    2014-01-01

    An oxidized lateritic ore which contained 0.8 % (by weight) copper was bioleached in pH- and temperature-controlled stirred reactors under acidic reducing conditions using pure and mixed cultures of the acidophilic chemolithotrophic bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. Sulfur was provided as the electron donor for the bacteria, and ferric iron present in goethite (the major ferric iron mineral present in the ore) acted as electron acceptor. Significantly more copper was leached by bacterially catalysed reductive dissolution of the laterite than in aerobic cultures or in sterile anoxic reactors, with up to 78 % of the copper present in the ore being extracted. This included copper that was leached from acid-labile minerals (chiefly copper silicates) and that which was associated with ferric iron minerals in the lateritic ore. In the anaerobic bioreactors, soluble iron in the leach liquors was present as iron (II) and copper as copper (I), but both metals were rapidly oxidized (to iron (III) and copper (II)) when the reactors were aerated. The number of bacteria added to the reactors had a critical role in dictating the rate and yield of copper solubilised from the ore. This work has provided further evidence that reductive bioprocessing, a recently described approach for extracting base metals from oxidized deposits, has the potential to greatly extend the range of metal ores that can be biomined.

  3. Effect of rare earth Ce on the far infrared radiation property of iron ore tailings ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jie; Meng, Junping; Liang, Jinsheng; Duan, Xinhui; Huo, Xiaoli; Tang, Qingguo

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Detailed process proposed for preparation of iron ore tailings ceramics. • Replace natural minerals with iron ore tailings as raw materials for preparing functional ceramics. • Impact mechanism of Ce on far infrared ceramics, as well as its optimum addition amounts can be obtained. • Propose a new perspective on considering the mechanism of far infrared radiation. - Abstract: A kind of far infrared radiation ceramics was prepared by using iron ore tailings, CaCO{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} as main raw materials, and Ce as additive. The result of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that the sample exhibits excellent radiation value of 0.914 when doping 7 wt.% Ce. Ce{sup 4+} dissolved into iron diopside and formed interstitial solid solution with it sintered at 1150 °C. The oxidation of Fe{sup 2+} to Fe{sup 3+} caused by Ce{sup 4+} led to a decrease of crystallite sizes and enhancement of Mg–O and Fe–O vibration in iron diopside, which consequently improved the far infrared radiation properties of iron ore tailings ceramics.

  4. Bacterial consortium for copper extraction from sulphide ore consisting mainly of chalcopyrite

    PubMed Central

    Romo, E.; Weinacker, D.F.; Zepeda, A.B.; Figueroa, C.A.; Chavez-Crooker, P.; Farias, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    The mining industry is looking forward for bacterial consortia for economic extraction of copper from low-grade ores. The main objective was to determine an optimal bacterial consortium from several bacterial strains to obtain copper from the leach of chalcopyrite. The major native bacterial species involved in the bioleaching of sulphide ore (Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, Leptospirillum ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum ferriphilum) were isolated and the assays were performed with individual bacteria and in combination with At. thiooxidans. In conclusion, it was found that the consortium integrated by At. ferrooxidans and At. thiooxidans removed 70% of copper in 35 days from the selected ore, showing significant differences with the other consortia, which removed only 35% of copper in 35 days. To validate the assays was done an escalation in columns, where the bacterial consortium achieved a higher percentage of copper extraction regarding to control. PMID:24294251

  5. Extraction of Copper from Malanjkhand Low-Grade Ore by Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sradhanjali; Sukla, Lala Behari; Mishra, Baroda Kanta

    2011-10-01

    Thermophilic bacteria are actively prevalent in hot water springs. Their potential to grow and sustain at higher temperatures makes them exceptional compare to other microorganism. The present study was initiated to isolate, identify and determine the feasibility of extraction of copper using thermophilic heterotrophic bacterial strain. Bacillus stearothermophilus is a thermophilic heterotrophic bacterium isolated from hot water spring, Atri, Orissa, India. This bacterium was adapted to low-grade chalcopyrite ore and its efficiency to solubilize copper from Malanjkhand low-grade ore was determined. The low-grade copper ore contains 0.27% Cu, in which the major copper-bearing mineral is chalcopyrite associated with other minerals present as minor phase. Variation in parameters such as pulp-density and temperatures were studied. After 30 days of incubation, it was found that Bacillus stearothermophilus solubilize copper up to 81.25% at pH 6.8 at 60°C. PMID:23024410

  6. 40 CFR 440.100 - Applicability; description of the copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum ores subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum ores subcategory. 440.100 Section 440.100 Protection of... MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Copper, Lead, Zinc, Gold, Silver, and Molybdenum Ores Subcategory § 440.100 Applicability; description of the copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum...

  7. 40 CFR 440.100 - Applicability; description of the copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum ores subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum ores subcategory. 440.100 Section 440.100 Protection of... MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Copper, Lead, Zinc, Gold, Silver, and Molybdenum Ores Subcategory § 440.100 Applicability; description of the copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum...

  8. 40 CFR 440.100 - Applicability; description of the copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum ores subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum ores subcategory. 440.100 Section 440.100 Protection of... MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Copper, Lead, Zinc, Gold, Silver, and Molybdenum Ores Subcategory § 440.100 Applicability; description of the copper, lead, zinc, gold, silver, and molybdenum...

  9. Effect of Tourmaline-Doped on the Far Infrared Emission of Iron Ore Tailings Ceramics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Meng, Junping; Liang, Jinsheng; Zhang, Hongchen; Gu, Xiaoyang

    2016-04-01

    Iron ore tailings as secondary resources have been of great importance to many countries in the world. Their compositions are similar to that of infrared emission ceramics, but there are few reports about it. In addition, tourmaline has high infrared emission properties due to its unique structure. With the purpose of expanding functional utilization of iron ore tailings, as well as reducing the production cost of far infrared ceramics, a new kind of far infrared emission ceramics was prepared by using iron ore tailings, calcium carbonate, silica, and natural tourmaline. The ceramics powders were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscope, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The results show that after being sintered at 1065 °C, the percentage of pseudobrookite and lattice strain of samples increased with increasing the elbaite content. Furthermore, the added tourmaline was conducive to the densification sintering of ceramics. The appearance of Li-O vibration at 734.73 cm-1, as well as the strengthened Fe-O vibration at 987.68 cm-1 were attributed to the formation of Li0.375Fe1.23Ti1.4O5 solid solution, which led the average far infrared emissivity of ceramics increase from 0.861 to 0.906 within 8-14 µm.

  10. Effect of Tourmaline-Doped on the Far Infrared Emission of Iron Ore Tailings Ceramics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Meng, Junping; Liang, Jinsheng; Zhang, Hongchen; Gu, Xiaoyang

    2016-04-01

    Iron ore tailings as secondary resources have been of great importance to many countries in the world. Their compositions are similar to that of infrared emission ceramics, but there are few reports about it. In addition, tourmaline has high infrared emission properties due to its unique structure. With the purpose of expanding functional utilization of iron ore tailings, as well as reducing the production cost of far infrared ceramics, a new kind of far infrared emission ceramics was prepared by using iron ore tailings, calcium carbonate, silica, and natural tourmaline. The ceramics powders were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscope, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The results show that after being sintered at 1065 °C, the percentage of pseudobrookite and lattice strain of samples increased with increasing the elbaite content. Furthermore, the added tourmaline was conducive to the densification sintering of ceramics. The appearance of Li-O vibration at 734.73 cm-1, as well as the strengthened Fe-O vibration at 987.68 cm-1 were attributed to the formation of Li0.375Fe1.23Ti1.4O5 solid solution, which led the average far infrared emissivity of ceramics increase from 0.861 to 0.906 within 8-14 µm. PMID:27451708

  11. 63,65Cu NMR Method in a Local Field for Investigation of Copper Ore Concentrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilenko, A. N.; Starykh, R. V.; Khabibullin, I. Kh.; Matukhin, V. L.

    2015-01-01

    To choose the most efficient method and ore beneficiation flow diagram, it is important to know physical and chemical properties of ore concentrates. The feasibility of application of the 63,65Cu nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method in a local field aimed at studying the properties of copper ore concentrates in the copper-iron-sulfur system is demonstrated. 63,65Cu NMR spectrum is measured in a local field for a copper concentrate sample and relaxation parameters (times T1 and T2) are obtained. The spectrum obtained was used to identify a mineral (chalcopyrite) contained in the concentrate. Based on the experimental data, comparative characteristics of natural chalcopyrite and beneficiated copper concentrate are given. The feasibility of application of the NMR method in a local field to explore mineral deposits is analyzed.

  12. Determination of copper content in soils and ores by laser-induced breakdown spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labutin, T. A.; Popov, A. M.; Zaytsev, S. M.; Cal'ko, I. A.; Zorov, N. B.

    2016-09-01

    It is demonstrated that the method of laser-induced breakdown spectrometry can be applied for quantitative determination of the copper content at a level of 500-40000 g/t, typical for copper ores and soil in the outcrop areas. To avoid the self-absorption of the resonance copper lines, we studied the most intense nonresonant lines of copper atoms and ions. It is shown that the Cu I 521.82-nm line is rather intense and provides the linear calibration. The copper detection limit for this line of 280 g/t allows its use for rapid mapping of outcrop areas.

  13. Catalytic-Oxidative Leaching of Low-Grade Complex Zinc Ore by Cu (II) Ions Produced from Copper Ore in Ammonia-Ammonium Sulfate Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi Xiong; Yin, Zhou Lan; Hu, Hui Ping; Chen, Qi Yuan

    2012-10-01

    The catalytic-oxidative leaching of a mixed ore, which consists of low-grade oxide copper ore and oxide zinc ore containing ZnS, was investigated in ammonia-ammonium sulfate solution. The effect of the main parameters, such as mass ratio of copper ore to zinc ore, liquid-to-solid ratio, concentration of lixivant, leaching time, and temperature, was studied. The optimal leaching conditions with a maximum extraction of Cu 92.6 pct and Zn 85.5 pct were determined as follows: the mass ratio of copper ore to zinc ore 4/10 g/g, temperature 323.15 K (50 °C), leaching time 6 hours, stirring speed 500 r/min, liquid-to-solid ratio 3.6/1 cm3/g, concentration of lixivant including ammonia 2.0 mol/dm3, ammonium sulfate 1.0 mol/dm3, and ammonium persulfate 0.3 mol/dm3. It was found that ZnS in the oxide zinc ore could be extracted with Cu(II) ion, which was produced from copper ore and was used as the catalyst in the presence of ammonium persulfate.

  14. Native plant restoration of biosolids-amended copper mine tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, P.A.; Zabowski, D.; Everett, R.L.; Scherer, G.

    1998-12-31

    Copper mine tailings are difficult to revegetate due to nutrient deficiencies, high levels of acidity, and potential metal toxicities. An amendment of biosolids could ameliorate these harsh growing conditions through the addition of available nutrients, improvement of physical soil properties (e.g., increased water holding capacity), and possible lowering of toxic metal availability through complexation with organic matter. A study was conducted on mine tailings at Holden, WA to evaluate the effect of an amendment of biosolids on the survival and growth of five native plant species (Sitka alder, big leaf maple, fireweed, w. yarrow, and pearly everlasting). Plots were established in tailings, gravel over tailings (G/T), and biosolids plus gravel over tailings. Each of the native plant species, except maple, had their highest survival in the biosolids-amended plot with 3 species at 100% survival. The biosolids amendment was shown to improve the growth of all species except maple. Fireweed produced 62 times more biomass in the biosolids-amended plot compared to the unamended plot (G/T). Plant analysis revealed a dramatic increase in nutrient content with the amendment of biosolids. Biosolids improved the survival, growth, and nutritional status of native plant species on the copper mine tailings.

  15. Gold supported iron oxide-hydroxide derived from iron ore tailings for CO oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakthivel, R.; Das, B.; Satpati, B.; Mishra, B. K.

    2009-04-01

    Iron ore tailing, a waste material of iron ore industry, has been used to prepare iron oxide-hydroxide support for anchoring nano-gold particles. FeOOH was prepared from iron chloride solution obtained from acid digestion of iron ore tailing. Precipitation deposition method was used to prepare Au supported FeOOH. The samples were characterized by XRD, TEM, TG-DTA and FTIR. The XRD studies have confirmed the FeOOH phase and the TEM studies reveal the anchoring of gold particles on FeOOH whose size is about 5 nm. FTIR spectra showed the vibration mode of metal-oxygen bond and the presence of hydroxyl group in FeOOH and Au/FeOOH. TG-DTA results confirmed dehydration of FeOOH and the process is retarded by the presence of Au particles. The catalytic conversion of carbon monoxide by Au/FeOOH was around 55% but the catalyst became inactive after pretreatment at 300 °C in presence of oxygen which led to agglomeration of Au particles and removal of hydroxyl groups from the surface of FeOOH.

  16. Effect of anions on selective solubilization of zinc and copper in bacterial leaching of sulfide ores.

    PubMed

    Harahuc, L; Lizama, H M; Suzuki, I

    2000-07-20

    Bacterial leaching of sulfide ores using Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, Thiobacillus thiooxidans, or a combination of the two was studied at various concentrations of specific anions. Selective zinc and copper solubilization was obtained by inhibiting iron oxidation without affecting sulfur/sulfide oxidation. Phosphate reduced iron solubilization from a pyrite (FeS(2))-sphalerite (ZnS) mixture without significantly affecting zinc solubilization. Copper leaching from a chalcopyrite (CuFeS(2))-sphalerite mixture was stimulated by phosphate, whereas chloride accelerated zinc extraction. In a complex sulfide ore containing pyrite, chalcopyrite, and sphalerite, both phosphate and chloride reduced iron solubilization and increased copper extraction, whereas only chloride stimulated zinc extraction. Maximum leaching obtained was 100% zinc and 50% copper. Time-course studies of copper and zinc solubilization suggest the possibility of selective metal recovery following treatment with specific anions. PMID:10861398

  17. Quantitative mineralogical characterization of chrome ore beneficiation plant tailing and its beneficiated products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S. K.

    2015-04-01

    Mineralogical characterization and liberation of valuable minerals are primary concerns in mineral processing industries. The present investigation focuses on quantitative mineralogy, elemental deportment, and locking-liberation characteristics of the beneficiation of tailings from a chrome ore beneficiation plant in the Sukinda region, Odisha; methods used for the study of the beneficiated tailings are QEMSCAN®, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and mineral chemistry by a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy-dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS). The tailing sample was fine grained (69.48wt% below 45 μm size), containing 20.25wt% Cr2O3 and 39.19wt% Fe2O3, with a Cr:Fe mass ratio of 0.51. Mineralogical investigations using QEMSCAN studies revealed that chromite, goethite, and gibbsite are the dominant mineral phases with minor amounts of hematite, kaolinite, and quartz. The sample contained 34.22wt% chromite, and chromite liberation is more than 80% for grains smaller than 250 μm in size. Based on these results, it was predicted that liberated chromite and high-grade middling chromite particles could be separated from the gangue by various concentration techniques. The tailing sample was beneficiated by hydrocyclone, tabling, wet high-intensity magnetic separation (WHIMS), and flotation in order to recover the chromite. A chromite concentrate with 45.29wt% Cr2O3 and a Cr:Fe mass ratio of 1.85 can be produced from these low-grade chromite ore beneficiation plant rejects.

  18. Natural radiation and its hazard in copper ore mines in Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, Nguyen; Jodłowski, Paweł; Kalita, Stefan; Olko, Paweł; Chruściel, Edward; Maksymowicz, Adam; Waligórski, Michał; Bilski, Paweł; Budzanowski, Maciej

    2008-06-01

    The doses of gamma radiation, concentrations of radium isotopes in water and sediments, radon concentration and concentration of alpha potential energy of radon decay products in the copper ore mine and in the mining region in the vicinity of Lubin town in Poland are presented. These data served as a basis for the assessment of radiological hazard to the mine workers and general public. The results of this assessment indicate that radiological hazard in the region does not differ substantially from typical values associated with natural radiation background. The calculated average annual effective dose for copper miners is 1.48 mSv. In general, copper ore mines can be regarded as radiologically safe workplaces.

  19. Krasnotur'insk Skarn copper ore field, Northern Urals: The U-Pb age of ore-controlling diorites and their place in the regional metallogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabezhev, A. I.; Ronkin, Yu. L.; Puchkov, V. N.; Gerdes, A.; Rovnushkin, M. Yu.

    2014-06-01

    The Krasnotur'insk skarn copper ore field known from the theoretical works of Academician K.S. Korzhinskii is located in the western part of the Tagil volcanic zone (in the area of the town of Krasnotur'insk). The ore field is composed of layered Devonian (Emsian) volcanosedimentary rocks intruded by small plutons of quartz diorites, diorites, and gabbrodiorites. Widespread pre-ore and intra-ore dikes of similar composition control the abundance of the andradite skarns formed after limestones and the magnetitesulfide and sulfide ore bodies formed after skarns. The LA-ICP-MS U-Pb concordant age of zircon from the quartz diorite of the Vasil'evsko-Moskalevskii pluton calculated by 16 analyses (16 crystals) is 407.7 ± 1.6 Ma (MSWD = 1.5). Taking into account the geological and petrogeochemical similarity of diorites of small plutons and intra-ore dikes, it is assumed that this age corresponds to the period of formation of the ore-magmatic system of the Krasnotur'insk skarn copper ore field. It was probably formed somewhat earlier than the Auerbakh montzonitic pluton and the accompanying skarn magnetite deposits in the south.

  20. Speciation and Characterization of Arsenic in Gold Ores and Cyanidation Tailings Using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Paktunc, Dogan; Foster, Andrea; Heald, Steve M.; Laflamme, Gilles

    2004-03-25

    The knowledge of mineralogy and molecular structure of arsenic is needed to better understand the stability of As in wastes resulting from processing of gold ores. In this study, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron microprobe, X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAFS) techniques were employed to determine the mineralogical composition and local coordination environment of arsenic in gold ores and process tailings from a bench-scale testwork designed to mimic a common plant practice. Arsenic -bearing minerals identified in the ores and tailings include Fe oxyhydroxides, scorodite, ferric arsenates, arseniosiderite, Ca-Fe arsenates, pharmacosiderite, jarosite and arsenopyrite. Iron oxyhydroxides contain variable levels of As from trace to about 22 wt % and Ca to approximately 9 %.

  1. Investigation of Leaching Kinetics of Copper from Malachite Ore in Ammonium Nitrate Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekmekyapar, Ahmet; Aktaş, Evrim; Künkül, Asim; Demirkiran, Nizamettin

    2012-08-01

    The production of metallic copper from low-grade copper ores is generally carried out by hydrometallurgical methods. Leaching is the first prerequisite of any hydrometallurgical process. Solutions containing ammonia may allow for selective leaching of the copper from the ore. In this study, the leaching kinetics of malachite, which is an oxidized copper ore, in ammonium nitrate solutions was examined. The effects of some experimental parameters on the leaching process were investigated, and a kinetic model to represent the effects of these parameters on the leaching rate was developed. It was determined that the leaching rate increased with increasing solution concentration, temperature, and agitation speed, as well as decreasing particle size. It was found that the leaching reaction followed the mixed kinetic controlled model, which includes two different leaching processes including the surface chemical reaction (303 K to 323 K [30 °C to 50 °C]) and diffusion through a porous product layer (323 K to 343 K [50 °C to 70 °C]). The activation energies of these sequential steps were determined to be 95.10 and 29.50 kJ/mol, respectively.

  2. Manganese ore tailing: optimization of acid leaching conditions and recovery of soluble manganese.

    PubMed

    Santos, Olívia de Souza Heleno; Carvalho, Cornélio de Freitas; Silva, Gilmare Antônia da; Santos, Cláudio Gouvêa Dos

    2015-01-01

    Manganese recovery from industrial ore processing waste by means of leaching with sulfuric acid was the objective of this study. Experimental conditions were optimized by multivariate experimental design approaches. In order to study the factors affecting leaching, a screening step was used involving a full factorial design with central point for three variables in two levels (2(3)). The three variables studied were leaching time, concentration of sulfuric acid and sample amount. The three factors screened were shown to be relevant and therefore a Doehlert design was applied to determine the best working conditions for leaching and to build the response surface. By applying the best leaching conditions, the concentrations of 12.80 and 13.64 %w/w of manganese for the global sample and for the fraction -44 + 37 μm, respectively, were found. Microbeads of chitosan were tested for removal of leachate acidity and recovering of soluble manganese. Manganese recovery from the leachate was 95.4%. Upon drying the leachate, a solid containing mostly manganese sulfate was obtained, showing that the proposed optimized method is efficient for manganese recovery from ore tailings.

  3. Porphyry-copper ore shells form at stable pressure-temperature fronts within dynamic fluid plumes.

    PubMed

    Weis, P; Driesner, T; Heinrich, C A

    2012-12-21

    Porphyry-type ore deposits are major resources of copper and gold, precipitated from fluids expelled by crustal magma chambers. The metals are typically concentrated in confined ore shells within vertically extensive vein networks, formed through hydraulic fracturing of rock by ascending fluids. Numerical modeling shows that dynamic permeability responses to magmatic fluid expulsion can stabilize a front of metal precipitation at the boundary between lithostatically pressured up-flow of hot magmatic fluids and hydrostatically pressured convection of cooler meteoric fluids. The balance between focused heat advection and lateral cooling controls the most important economic characteristics, including size, shape, and ore grade. This self-sustaining process may extend to epithermal gold deposits, venting at active volcanoes, and regions with the potential for geothermal energy production.

  4. Porphyry-copper ore shells form at stable pressure-temperature fronts within dynamic fluid plumes.

    PubMed

    Weis, P; Driesner, T; Heinrich, C A

    2012-12-21

    Porphyry-type ore deposits are major resources of copper and gold, precipitated from fluids expelled by crustal magma chambers. The metals are typically concentrated in confined ore shells within vertically extensive vein networks, formed through hydraulic fracturing of rock by ascending fluids. Numerical modeling shows that dynamic permeability responses to magmatic fluid expulsion can stabilize a front of metal precipitation at the boundary between lithostatically pressured up-flow of hot magmatic fluids and hydrostatically pressured convection of cooler meteoric fluids. The balance between focused heat advection and lateral cooling controls the most important economic characteristics, including size, shape, and ore grade. This self-sustaining process may extend to epithermal gold deposits, venting at active volcanoes, and regions with the potential for geothermal energy production. PMID:23160957

  5. [Dust factor, its effect on the body and prevention of morbidity of workers during copper and nickel ore smelting].

    PubMed

    Lipatov, G Ia

    1990-01-01

    Basing on the results of complex studies, the author provides a comparative hygienic assessment of different copper and nickel ore melting processes, which revealed a considerable contamination of the working zone air with copper and nickel containing aerosols. The workers engaged therein displayed bronchopulmonary, stomach and hepatobiliary disorders. The hygienic advantages of the autogenous ore and concentrates melting technique are proposed, along with a complex of health improving measures with a particular emphasis on the expedience of the new technological processes. PMID:2262150

  6. [Dust factor, its effect on the body and prevention of morbidity of workers during copper and nickel ore smelting].

    PubMed

    Lipatov, G Ia

    1990-01-01

    Basing on the results of complex studies, the author provides a comparative hygienic assessment of different copper and nickel ore melting processes, which revealed a considerable contamination of the working zone air with copper and nickel containing aerosols. The workers engaged therein displayed bronchopulmonary, stomach and hepatobiliary disorders. The hygienic advantages of the autogenous ore and concentrates melting technique are proposed, along with a complex of health improving measures with a particular emphasis on the expedience of the new technological processes.

  7. Reclamation of acidic copper mine tailings using municipal biosolids

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, M.T.; Thompson, T.L.; Bengson, S.A.

    1998-12-31

    Reclamation of copper mine tailings in a cost effective, successful, and sustainable manner is an ongoing area of evaluation in the arid southwest. A study was initiated in September, 1996 near Hayden, Arizona to evaluate the use of municipal biosolids for reclaiming acidic copper mine tailings (pH of 2.5 to 4.0). The main objectives of the study were to (1) define an appropriate level of biosolids application for optimum plant growth, and (2) evaluate the effects of green waste and lime amendments. The experiment was a randomized complete block design with four biosolid rates of 20, 70, 100 and 135 dry tons/acre, three amendment treatments (none, green waste, and green waste plus lime); with three replications. Non-replicated controls (no treatment, green waste only and lime only) were included for comparison. Shortly after biosolids incorporation to a depth of 10--12 inches, composite soil samples (0--12 inches) of each plot were taken. Biosolids incorporation increased the pH of the tailings (>5.75) and additional increases in pH were noted with lime application. In January 1997, the plots were seeded and sprinkler irrigation was commenced. A total of 4.47 inches of rainfall and 3.8 inches of irrigation were applied until harvest in May 1997. Data from the first growing season indicates optimum growth (>66 lbs/acre) at biosolids rates of 70--100 dry tons/acre. There was a significant positive effect on growth of green waste and lime amendments. Surface NO{sub 3}-N concentrations in biosolids amended plots were greatly reduced (from 23 to 6 mg/kg) by addition of green waste. There was no evidence for NO{sub 3}N leaching below 12 inches.

  8. Characterization of energy critical elements in ore resources and associated waste tailings: Implications for recovery and remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClenaghan, Sean H.

    2015-04-01

    The occurrence of Energy Critical Elements (ECE) in primary ore minerals and their subsequent enrichment in waste tailings is of great metallurgical interest. Recovery of many ECEs, in particular In, Ge, and Ga have come chiefly as a by-product of base-metal production (smelting and refining); these elements are found only at very low levels in the Earth's crust and do not typically form economic deposits on their own. As the ECEs become more important for a growing number of technological applications, it is critical to map the distribution of these elements in ore and waste (gangue) minerals to optimize their recovery and remediation. The characterization and beneficiation of ECEs is best illustrated for Zn-rich ore systems, where a mineral such as sphalerite (ZnS) will concentrate a number of major (Fe, Mn) and important trace elements (Cd, Se, In, Ge, Te, Sn, Bi, Sb, Hg). Interestingly, the mineral chemistry of sphalerite will often differ between different styles of mineralization (i.e., granite-hosted veins versus volcanic-hosted massive sulfides) and can even exhibit considerable variability within a deposit in response to metal zonation across hydrothermal facies. This has significant metallurgical implications for the blending of ore resources, the efficient production of Zn concentrates, and their ultimate value during the smelting and refining stages. Gangue minerals transferred to waste tailings may also exhibit significant enrichment in ECEs and precious metals; including Au in pyrite-arsenopyrite, and rare earth elements in a range of carbonate and phosphate minerals. In situ micro-analytical techniques are ideal for the quantitative measurement of trace elements in ore minerals as well as associated gangue materials. Recent advances in ICP-MS and ICP-OES technology coupled with newer classes of UV Excimer lasers (native 193 nm light) have allowed for more discrete analyses, permitting micro-chemical mapping at small scales (<10 microns). Further

  9. Ore grade decrease as life cycle impact indicator for metal scarcity: the case of copper.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Marisa D M; Goedkoop, Mark J; Storm, Per; Huijbregts, Mark A J

    2012-12-01

    In the life cycle assessment (LCA) of products, the increasing scarcity of metal resources is currently addressed in a preliminary way. Here, we propose a new method on the basis of global ore grade information to assess the importance of the extraction of metal resources in the life cycle of products. It is shown how characterization factors, reflecting the decrease in ore grade due to an increase in metal extraction, can be derived from cumulative ore grade-tonnage relationships. CFs were derived for three different types of copper deposits (porphyry, sediment-hosted, and volcanogenic massive sulfide). We tested the influence of the CF model (marginal vs average), mathematical distribution (loglogistic vs loglinear), and reserve estimate (ultimate reserve vs reserve base). For the marginal CFs, the statistical distribution choice and the estimate of the copper reserves introduce a difference of a factor of 1.0-5.0 and a factor of 1.2-1.7, respectively. For the average CFs, the differences are larger for these two choices, i.e. respectively a factor of 5.7-43 and a factor of 2.1-3.8. Comparing the marginal CFs with the average CFs, the differences are higher (a factor 1.7-94). This paper demonstrates that cumulative grade-tonnage relationships for metal extraction can be used in LCA to assess the relative importance of metal extractions.

  10. Efficient degradation of Acid Orange 7 in aqueous solution by iron ore tailing Fenton-like process.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jianming; Gao, Zhanqi; He, Huan; Yang, Shaogui; Sun, Cheng

    2016-05-01

    An effective method based on iron ore tailing Fenton-like process was studied for removing an azo dye, Acid Orange 7 (AO7) in aqueous solution. Five tailings were characterized by X-ray fluorescence spectroscope (XFS), Brunner-Emmet-Teller (BET) measurement, and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The result of XFS showed that Fe, Si and Ca were the most abundant elements and some toxic heavy metals were also present in the studied tailings. The result of BET analysis indicated that the studied tailings had very low surface areas (0.64-5.68 m(2) g(-1)). The degradation efficiencies of AO7 were positively correlated with the content of iron oxide and cupric oxide, and not related with the BET surface area of the tailings. The co-existing metal elements, particularly Cu, might accelerate the heterogeneous Fenton-like reaction. The effects of other parameters on heterogeneous Fenton-like degradation of AO7 by a converter slag iron tailing (tailing E) which contains highest iron oxide were also investigated. The tailing could be reused 10 times without significant decrease of the catalytic capacity. Very low amount of iron species and almost undetectable toxic elements were leached in the catalytic degradation of AO7 by the tailing E. The reaction products were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and a possible pathway of AO7 degradation was proposed. This study not only provides an effective method for removing azo dyes in polluted water by employing waste tailings as Fenton-like catalysts, but also uses waste tailings as the secondary resource. PMID:26891355

  11. Apatite ore mine tailings as an amendment for remediation of a lead-contaminated shooting range soil.

    PubMed

    Venäläinen, Salla H

    2011-10-01

    This study investigated the use of tailings from apatite ore beneficiation in the remediation of a heavily contaminated shooting range soil. The tailings originating in Siilinjärvi carbonatite complex, Finland, consist of apatite residues accompanied by phlogopite and calcite. In a pot experiment, organic top layer of a boreal forest soil predisposed to pellet-derived lead (Pb) was amended with tailings of various particle-sizes (Ø>0.2mm, Ø<0.2mm and unsieved material) differing in their mineralogical composition. After 9-, 10-, 14- and 21-month incubation, the samples were monitored for tailings-induced changes in the different Pb pools by means of sequential fractionation. Following the incubation, the samples were extracted with water and the extracts were analyzed for Pb species distribution by means of a cation exchange resin. The results revealed that Pb was continuously released from the shotgun pellet fragments due to weathering. However, the apatite and calcite compartments in the tailings counteracted the mobility of the released Pb through the formation of sparingly soluble fluorpyromorphite and cerussite. Furthermore, the tailings efficiently reduced the bioavailability of Pb by transferring it from the water-soluble and exchangeable pools into the organic one. The material also increased the proportion of the less toxic non-cationic Pb to the total dissolved Pb from the initial level of 5% to 9-12%. The results suggest that the tailings-induced stabilization of Pb may be an environmentally sound remediation technique at polluted sites. PMID:21871651

  12. Apatite ore mine tailings as an amendment for remediation of a lead-contaminated shooting range soil.

    PubMed

    Venäläinen, Salla H

    2011-10-01

    This study investigated the use of tailings from apatite ore beneficiation in the remediation of a heavily contaminated shooting range soil. The tailings originating in Siilinjärvi carbonatite complex, Finland, consist of apatite residues accompanied by phlogopite and calcite. In a pot experiment, organic top layer of a boreal forest soil predisposed to pellet-derived lead (Pb) was amended with tailings of various particle-sizes (Ø>0.2mm, Ø<0.2mm and unsieved material) differing in their mineralogical composition. After 9-, 10-, 14- and 21-month incubation, the samples were monitored for tailings-induced changes in the different Pb pools by means of sequential fractionation. Following the incubation, the samples were extracted with water and the extracts were analyzed for Pb species distribution by means of a cation exchange resin. The results revealed that Pb was continuously released from the shotgun pellet fragments due to weathering. However, the apatite and calcite compartments in the tailings counteracted the mobility of the released Pb through the formation of sparingly soluble fluorpyromorphite and cerussite. Furthermore, the tailings efficiently reduced the bioavailability of Pb by transferring it from the water-soluble and exchangeable pools into the organic one. The material also increased the proportion of the less toxic non-cationic Pb to the total dissolved Pb from the initial level of 5% to 9-12%. The results suggest that the tailings-induced stabilization of Pb may be an environmentally sound remediation technique at polluted sites.

  13. Chelatometric determination of calcium and magnesium in iron ores, slags, anorthosite, limestone, copper-nickel-lead-zinc ores and divers materials.

    PubMed

    Hitchen, A; Zechanowitsch, G

    1980-03-01

    Chelatometric methods for the determination of calcium and magnesium in iron ores, slags, anorthosite, copper-nickel-lead-zinc ores and various other materials are described. Potential interfering elements are masked with triethanolamine and potassium cyanide. In one aliquot calcium is titrated at pH > 12, with calcein and thymolphthalein mixed indicator and in another aliquot calcium and magnesium are titrated in ammonia buffer, with o-cresolphthalein complexone screened with Naphthol Green B as indicator. The results compare favourably with certified values for reference materials of diverse nature. PMID:18962661

  14. Chelatometric determination of calcium and magnesium in iron ores, slags, anorthosite, limestone, copper-nickel-lead-zinc ores and divers materials.

    PubMed

    Hitchen, A; Zechanowitsch, G

    1980-03-01

    Chelatometric methods for the determination of calcium and magnesium in iron ores, slags, anorthosite, copper-nickel-lead-zinc ores and various other materials are described. Potential interfering elements are masked with triethanolamine and potassium cyanide. In one aliquot calcium is titrated at pH > 12, with calcein and thymolphthalein mixed indicator and in another aliquot calcium and magnesium are titrated in ammonia buffer, with o-cresolphthalein complexone screened with Naphthol Green B as indicator. The results compare favourably with certified values for reference materials of diverse nature.

  15. Bacterial populations within copper mine tailings: long-term effects of amendment with Class A biosolids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluates the effect of surface application of dried Class A biosolids on microbial populations within copper mine tailings. Methods and Results: Mine tailing sites were established at ASARCO Mission Mine close to Sahuarita, Arizona. Site 1 (Dec. 1998) was amended with 248 tons ha-1 of C...

  16. A greenhouse trial to investigate the ameliorative properties of biosolids and plants on physicochemical conditions of iron ore tailings: Implications for an iron ore mine site remediation.

    PubMed

    Cele, Emmanuel Nkosinathi; Maboeta, Mark

    2016-01-01

    An iron ore mine site in Swaziland is currently (2015) in a derelict state as a consequence of past (1964-1988) and present (2011 - current) iron ore mining operations. In order to control problems associated with mine wastes, the Swaziland Water Services Corporation (SWSC) recently (2013) proposed the application of biosolids in sites degraded by mining operations. It is thought that this practice could generally improve soil conditions and enhance plant reestablishment. More importantly, the SWSC foresees this as a potential solution to the biosolids disposal problems. In order to investigate the effects of biosolids and plants in soil physicochemical conditions of iron mine soils, we conducted two plant growth trials. Trial 1 consisted of tailings that received biosolids and topsoil (TUSB mix) while in trial 2, tailings received biosolids only (TB mix). In the two trials, the application rates of 0 (control), 10, 25, 50, 75 and 100 t ha(-1) were used. After 30 days of equilibration, 25 seeds of Cynodon dactylon were sown in each pot and thinned to 10 plants after 4 weeks. Plants were watered twice weekly and remained under greenhouse conditions for 12 weeks, subsequent to which soils were subjected to chemical analysis. According to the results obtained, there were significant improvements in soil parameters related to fertility such as organic matter (OM), water holding capacity (WHC), cation exchange capacity (CEC), ammonium [Formula: see text] , magnesium (Mg(2+)), calcium (Ca(2+)) and phosphorus ( [Formula: see text] ). With regard to heavy metals, biosolids led to significant increases in soil total concentrations of Cu, Zn, Cd, Hg and Pb. The higher concentrations of Zn and Cu in treated tailings compared to undisturbed adjacent soils are a cause for concern because in the field, this might work against the broader objectives of mine soil remediation, which include the recolonization of reclaimed sites by soil-dwelling organisms. Therefore, while

  17. A greenhouse trial to investigate the ameliorative properties of biosolids and plants on physicochemical conditions of iron ore tailings: Implications for an iron ore mine site remediation.

    PubMed

    Cele, Emmanuel Nkosinathi; Maboeta, Mark

    2016-01-01

    An iron ore mine site in Swaziland is currently (2015) in a derelict state as a consequence of past (1964-1988) and present (2011 - current) iron ore mining operations. In order to control problems associated with mine wastes, the Swaziland Water Services Corporation (SWSC) recently (2013) proposed the application of biosolids in sites degraded by mining operations. It is thought that this practice could generally improve soil conditions and enhance plant reestablishment. More importantly, the SWSC foresees this as a potential solution to the biosolids disposal problems. In order to investigate the effects of biosolids and plants in soil physicochemical conditions of iron mine soils, we conducted two plant growth trials. Trial 1 consisted of tailings that received biosolids and topsoil (TUSB mix) while in trial 2, tailings received biosolids only (TB mix). In the two trials, the application rates of 0 (control), 10, 25, 50, 75 and 100 t ha(-1) were used. After 30 days of equilibration, 25 seeds of Cynodon dactylon were sown in each pot and thinned to 10 plants after 4 weeks. Plants were watered twice weekly and remained under greenhouse conditions for 12 weeks, subsequent to which soils were subjected to chemical analysis. According to the results obtained, there were significant improvements in soil parameters related to fertility such as organic matter (OM), water holding capacity (WHC), cation exchange capacity (CEC), ammonium [Formula: see text] , magnesium (Mg(2+)), calcium (Ca(2+)) and phosphorus ( [Formula: see text] ). With regard to heavy metals, biosolids led to significant increases in soil total concentrations of Cu, Zn, Cd, Hg and Pb. The higher concentrations of Zn and Cu in treated tailings compared to undisturbed adjacent soils are a cause for concern because in the field, this might work against the broader objectives of mine soil remediation, which include the recolonization of reclaimed sites by soil-dwelling organisms. Therefore, while

  18. Speciation and characterization of arsenic in gold ores and cyanidation tailings using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paktunc, D.; Foster, A.; Heald, S.; Laflamme, G.

    2004-01-01

    The knowledge of mineralogy and molecular structure of As is needed to better understand the stability of As in wastes resulting from processing of gold ores. In this study, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron microprobe, X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy (including both XANES and EXAFS regimes) were employed to determine the mineralogical composition and local coordination environment of As in gold ores and process tailings from bench-scale tests designed to mimic a common plant practice. Arsenic-bearing minerals identified in the ores and tailings include iron (III) oxyhydroxides, scorodite (FeAsO4??2H2O), ferric arsenates, arseniosiderite (Ca2Fe3 (AsO4)3O2??3H2O), Ca-Fe arsenates, pharmacosiderite (KFe4 (AsO4)3(OH)4??6-7H2O), jarosite (K2Fe6(SO4)4 (OH)12) and arsenopyrite (FeAsS). Iron (III) oxyhydroxides contain variable levels of As from trace to about 22 wt% and Ca up to approximately 9 wt%. Finely ground ore and tailings samples were examined by bulk XAFS and selected mineral grains were analyzed by microfocused XAFS (micro-EXAFS) spectroscopy to reconcile the ambiguities of multiple As sources in the complex bulk EXAFS spectra. XANES spectra indicated that As occurs as As5+in all the samples. Micro-EXAFS spectra of individual iron (III) oxyhydroxide grains with varying As concentrations point to inner-sphere bidentate-binuclear arsenate complexes as the predominant form of As. There are indications for the presence of a second Fe shell corresponding to bidentate-mononuclear arrangement. Iron (III) oxyhydroxides with high As concentrations corresponding to maximum adsorption densities probably occur as nanoparticles. The discovery of Ca atoms around As in iron (III) oxyhydroxides at interatomic distances of 4.14-4.17 A?? and the coordination numbers suggest the formation of arseniosiderite-like nanoclusters by coprecipitation rather than simple adsorption of Ca onto iron (III) oxyhydroxides

  19. Feasibility Studies on Pipeline Disposal of Concentrated Copper Tailings Slurry for Waste Minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senapati, Pradipta Kumar; Mishra, Barada Kanta

    2016-06-01

    The conventional lean phase copper tailings slurry disposal systems create pollution all around the disposal area through seepage and flooding of waste slurry water. In order to reduce water consumption and minimize pollution, the pipeline disposal of these waste slurries at high solids concentrations may be considered as a viable option. The paper presents the rheological and pipeline flow characteristics of copper tailings samples in the solids concentration range of 65-72 % by weight. The tailings slurry indicated non-Newtonian behaviour at these solids concentrations and the rheological data were best fitted by Bingham plastic model. The influence of solids concentration on yield stress and plastic viscosity for the copper tailings samples were discussed. Using a high concentration test loop, pipeline experiments were conducted in a 50 mm nominal bore (NB) pipe by varying the pipe flow velocity from 1.5 to 3.5 m/s. A non-Newtonian Bingham plastic pressure drop model predicted the experimental data reasonably well for the concentrated tailings slurry. The pressure drop model was used for higher size pipes and the operating conditions for pipeline disposal of concentrated copper tailings slurry in a 200 mm NB pipe with respect to specific power consumption were discussed.

  20. The effect of copper on iron reduction and its application to the determination of total iron content in iron and copper ores by potassium dichromate titration.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hanjun; Tang, Yang; Ying, Haisong; Wang, Minghai; Wan, Pingyu; Jin Yang, X

    2014-07-01

    The International Standard Organization (ISO) specifies two titrimetric methods for the determination of total iron content in iron ores using potassium dichromate as titrant after reduction of the iron(III) by tin(II) chloride and/or titanium(III) chloride. These two ISO methods (ISO2597-1 and ISO2597-2) require nearly boiling-point temperature for iron(III) reduction and suffer from copper interference and/or mercury pollution. In this study, potassium borohydride was used for reduction of iron(III) catalyzed by copper ions at ambient temperatures. In the absence of copper, iron(III) reduction by potassium borohydride was sluggish while a trace amount of copper significantly accelerated the reduction and reduced potassium borohydride consumption. The catalytic mechanism of iron(III) reduction in sulfuric acid and hydrochloric acid was investigated. Potassium borohydride in sodium hydroxide solution was stable without a significant degradation within 24h at ambient conditions and the use of potassium borohydride prepared in sodium hydroxide solution was safe and convenient in routine applications. The applicability of potassium borohydride reduction for the determination of total iron content by potassium dichromate titration was demonstrated by comparing with the ISO standard method using iron and copper ore reference materials and iron ore samples. PMID:24840467

  1. The effect of copper on iron reduction and its application to the determination of total iron content in iron and copper ores by potassium dichromate titration.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hanjun; Tang, Yang; Ying, Haisong; Wang, Minghai; Wan, Pingyu; Jin Yang, X

    2014-07-01

    The International Standard Organization (ISO) specifies two titrimetric methods for the determination of total iron content in iron ores using potassium dichromate as titrant after reduction of the iron(III) by tin(II) chloride and/or titanium(III) chloride. These two ISO methods (ISO2597-1 and ISO2597-2) require nearly boiling-point temperature for iron(III) reduction and suffer from copper interference and/or mercury pollution. In this study, potassium borohydride was used for reduction of iron(III) catalyzed by copper ions at ambient temperatures. In the absence of copper, iron(III) reduction by potassium borohydride was sluggish while a trace amount of copper significantly accelerated the reduction and reduced potassium borohydride consumption. The catalytic mechanism of iron(III) reduction in sulfuric acid and hydrochloric acid was investigated. Potassium borohydride in sodium hydroxide solution was stable without a significant degradation within 24h at ambient conditions and the use of potassium borohydride prepared in sodium hydroxide solution was safe and convenient in routine applications. The applicability of potassium borohydride reduction for the determination of total iron content by potassium dichromate titration was demonstrated by comparing with the ISO standard method using iron and copper ore reference materials and iron ore samples.

  2. Recovery of Copper from Cyanidation Tailing by Flotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Tingsheng; Huang, Xiong; Yang, Xiuli

    2016-02-01

    In this work, sodium hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide, sodium metabisulfite and copper sulfate as activators were investigated to lessen the depression effect of cyanide for deep-depressing chalcopyrite. The experimental results indicate that the copper recovery exceeded 94%, 84% and 97% at the dosage: sodium hypochlorite 3 mL/L, hydrogen peroxide 2 mL/L, sodium metabisulfite 2 × 10-3 mol/L and copper sulfate 1.67 × 10-4 mol/L, respectively. According to the results of zeta potential and Fourier transform infrared spectrum, it is suggested that chalcopyrite was depressed because of the chemical adsorption of cyanide on the chalcopyrite surfaces. Sodium hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide and sodium metabisulfite can destroy Cu-C bond on the deep-depressing chalcopyrite surface by chemical reaction. Copper sulfate can activate deep-depressing chalcopyrite by copper ion adsorption.

  3. Geochemistry and S, Pb isotope of the Yangla copper deposit, western Yunnan, China: Implication for ore genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xi-An; Liu, Jia-Jun; Cao, Ye; Han, Si-Yu; Gao, Bing-yu; Wang, Huan; Liu, Yue-Dong

    2012-07-01

    The Yangla copper deposit, situated in the middle section of Jinshajiang tectonic belt between Zhongza-Zhongdian block and Changdu-Simao block, is a representative and giant copper deposit that has been discovered in Jinshajiang-Lancangjiang-Nujiang region in recent years. There are coupled relationships between Yangla granodiorite and copper mineralization in the Yangla copper deposit. Five molybdenite samples yielded a well-constrained 187Re-187Os isochron age of 233.3 ± 3 Ma, the metallogenesis is therefore slightly younger than the crystallization age of the granodiorite. S, Pb isotopic compositions of the Yangla copper deposit indicate that the ore-forming materials were derived from the mixture of upper crust and mantle, also with the magmatic contributions. In the late Early Permian, the Jinshajiang Oceanic plate was subducted to the west, resulting in the formation of a series of gently dipping thrust faults in the Jinshajiang tectonic belt, meanwhile, accompanied magmatic activities. In the early Late Triassic, which was a time of transition from collision-related compression to extension in the Jinshajiang tectonic belt, the thrust faults were tensional; it would have been a favorable environment for forming ore fluids. The ascending magma provided a channel for the ore-forming fluid from the mantle wedge. After the magma arrived at the base of the early-stage Yangla granodiorite, the platy granodiorite at the base of the body would have shielded the late-stage magma from the fluid. The magma would have cooled slowly, and some of the ore-forming fluid in the magma would have entered the gently dipping thrust faults near the Yangla granodiorite, resulting in mineralization.

  4. Treatment of copper ores and concentrates with industrial nitrogen species catalyzed pressure leaching and non-cyanide precious metals recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Corby G.

    2003-04-01

    Today, with a stringent economic and environmental climate prevailing in the copper business, there is increased interest in evaluating new processing alternatives for production. Hydrometallurgical pressure oxidation of copper concentrates is one of the more viable approaches, and several technological candidates have emerged. Of these, an overlooked but, ironically, the first industrially proven methodology utilized nitrogen species catalyzation in the oxidizing pressure-leach system to produce copper via solvent extraction/electrowinning. Given its advantages, this may prove to be a feasible process alternative for the future. In this article, the history of the system and its application to copper concentrates and ores will be outlined. In particular, a non-cyanide methodology for effective recovery of precious metals from chalcopyrite concentrates will be discussed.

  5. Biogeochemical evolution of sulfide ore mine tailings profiles under semi-arid climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorover, J.

    2014-12-01

    Mining represents a principal form of earth surface disturbance in the anthropocene. Weathering reactions that ensue following tailings deposition are strongly affected by climatic forcing and tailings composition, and these also affect the weathering-induced transformations of the associated mineral assemblages and metal(loid) contaminants. The presence or absence of plants and associated microbiota can have a profound influence on these weathering trajectories. We employed field, laboratory and modeling approaches to resolve the impact of (bio)geochemical weathering reactions on the transformation of mine tailings parent materials into soil over the time following mining cessation. Using controlled experiments, we have evaluated the impacts of plants and associated rhizosphere microbiota on these reactions, hydrologic fluxes, and the molecular speciation of mining derived contaminants. Plant establishment is shown to alter site ecohydrology and biogeochemical weathering processes leading to distinctly different weathering products and patterns.

  6. Effects of plant growth-promoting bacteria isolated from copper tailings on plants in sterilized and non-sterilized tailings.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weiqiu; Yang, Chao; Shi, Si; Shu, Wensheng

    2014-02-01

    Ten strains of Cu-tolerant bacteria with potential plant growth-promoting ability were isolated by selecting strains with the ability to use 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate as a sole nitrogen source (designated ACC-B) or fix nitrogen (designated FLN-B) originating from the rhizosphere of plants growing on copper tailings. All 10 strains proved to have intrinsic ability to produce indole acetic acid and siderophores, and most of them could mobilize insoluble phosphate. In addition, a greenhouse study showed that ACC-B, FLN-B and a mixture of both had similar, potent ability to stimulate growth of Pennisetum purpureum, Medicago sativa and Oenothera erythrosepala plants grown on sterilized tailings. For instance, above-ground biomass of P. purpureum was 278-357% greater after 60d growth on sterilized tailings in their presence. They could also significantly promote the growth of the plants grown on non-sterilized tailings, though the growth-promoting effects were much weaker. So, strategies for using of the plant growth-promoting bacteria in the practice of phytoremediation deserve further studies to get higher growth-promoting efficiency.

  7. Evaluation of metal mobility from copper mine tailings in northern Chile.

    PubMed

    Lam, Elizabeth J; Gálvez, M E; Cánovas, M; Montofré, I L; Rivero, D; Faz, A

    2016-06-01

    This work shows the results obtained on a copper mine tailing in the Antofagasta Region, Chile. The tailing was classified as saline-sodic with high concentrations of metals, especially Cu and Fe, with pH 8.4. Our objectives were to (1) compare the physicochemical properties of the tailing with surrounding soils of the mine under study, and (2) evaluate the effect of two amendments (CaCO3 and compost) and their mixtures on Cu(2+), Mn, Fe, Zn, Mg(2+), and K(+) and Ca(2+), SO4 (2-), NO3 (-), and PO4 (3-) leaching. The data obtained were submitted to variance and covariance analysis. The results from the comparison between both substrates showed that in general, the tailing presented greater content of metals. Regarding tailing leaching, pH, electrical conductivity (EC), and concentration of the elements of interest were measured. The statistical analysis showed that Cu(2+) leaching and immobilization of Fe occurred to the greatest extent with compost. The EC decreased throughout the experiment with irrigation and increased upon treatment with compost. The major interactions found among the chemical parameters were (1) tailings without treatment, Cu(2+)/Fe and NO3 (-)/SO4 (2-); (2) tailings treated with CaCO3, Cu(2+)/K(+); (3) tailings treated with compost, NO3 (-)/SO4 (-2) and EC/Cu(2+); and (4) tailings treated with both amendments, EC/Fe and Cu(2+)/Fe. The ANOVA showed that the number of irrigations and the amendments statistically significantly affected the copper mobility and the organic amendment significantly influenced the iron mobility. PMID:26957432

  8. Biomining: metal recovery from ores with microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Schippers, Axel; Hedrich, Sabrina; Vasters, Jürgen; Drobe, Malte; Sand, Wolfgang; Willscher, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Biomining is an increasingly applied biotechnological procedure for processing of ores in the mining industry (biohydrometallurgy). Nowadays the production of copper from low-grade ores is the most important industrial application and a significant part of world copper production already originates from heap or dump/stockpile bioleaching. Conceptual differences exist between the industrial processes of bioleaching and biooxidation. Bioleaching is a conversion of an insoluble valuable metal into a soluble form by means of microorganisms. In biooxidation, on the other hand, gold is predominantly unlocked from refractory ores in large-scale stirred-tank biooxidation arrangements for further processing steps. In addition to copper and gold production, biomining is also used to produce cobalt, nickel, zinc, and uranium. Up to now, biomining has merely been used as a procedure in the processing of sulfide ores and uranium ore, but laboratory and pilot procedures already exist for the processing of silicate and oxide ores (e.g., laterites), for leaching of processing residues or mine waste dumps (mine tailings), as well as for the extraction of metals from industrial residues and waste (recycling). This chapter estimates the world production of copper, gold, and other metals by means of biomining and chemical leaching (bio-/hydrometallurgy) compared with metal production by pyrometallurgical procedures, and describes new developments in biomining. In addition, an overview is given about metal sulfide oxidizing microorganisms, fundamentals of biomining including bioleaching mechanisms and interface processes, as well as anaerobic bioleaching and bioleaching with heterotrophic microorganisms.

  9. Biomining: metal recovery from ores with microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Schippers, Axel; Hedrich, Sabrina; Vasters, Jürgen; Drobe, Malte; Sand, Wolfgang; Willscher, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Biomining is an increasingly applied biotechnological procedure for processing of ores in the mining industry (biohydrometallurgy). Nowadays the production of copper from low-grade ores is the most important industrial application and a significant part of world copper production already originates from heap or dump/stockpile bioleaching. Conceptual differences exist between the industrial processes of bioleaching and biooxidation. Bioleaching is a conversion of an insoluble valuable metal into a soluble form by means of microorganisms. In biooxidation, on the other hand, gold is predominantly unlocked from refractory ores in large-scale stirred-tank biooxidation arrangements for further processing steps. In addition to copper and gold production, biomining is also used to produce cobalt, nickel, zinc, and uranium. Up to now, biomining has merely been used as a procedure in the processing of sulfide ores and uranium ore, but laboratory and pilot procedures already exist for the processing of silicate and oxide ores (e.g., laterites), for leaching of processing residues or mine waste dumps (mine tailings), as well as for the extraction of metals from industrial residues and waste (recycling). This chapter estimates the world production of copper, gold, and other metals by means of biomining and chemical leaching (bio-/hydrometallurgy) compared with metal production by pyrometallurgical procedures, and describes new developments in biomining. In addition, an overview is given about metal sulfide oxidizing microorganisms, fundamentals of biomining including bioleaching mechanisms and interface processes, as well as anaerobic bioleaching and bioleaching with heterotrophic microorganisms. PMID:23793914

  10. Geophysical model of the Cu-Mo porphyry ore deposit at Copper Flat Mine, Hillsboro, Sierra County, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, Adrian Emmanuel Gutierrez

    A 3D gravity model of the Copper Flat Mine was performed as part of the exploration of new resources in at the mine. The project is located in the Las Animas Mining District in Sierra County, New Mexico. The mine has been producing ore since 1877 and is currently owned by the New Mexico Copper Corporation, which plans o bringing the closed copper mine back into production with innovation and a sustainable approach to mining development. The Project is located on the Eastern side of the Arizona-Sonora-New Mexico porphyry copper Belt of Cretaceous age. Copper Flat is predominantly a Cretaceous age stratovolcano composed mostly of quartz monzonite. The quartz monzonite was intruded by a block of andesite alter which a series of latite dikes creating veining along the topography where the majority of the deposit. The Copper Flat deposit is mineralized along a breccia pipe where the breccia is the result of auto-brecciation due to the pore pressure. There have been a number of geophysical studies conducted at the site. The most recent survey was a gravity profile on the area. The purpose of the new study is the reinterpretation of the IP Survey and emphasizes the practical use of the gravity geophysical method in evaluating the validity of the previous survey results. The primary method used to identify the deposit is gravity in which four Talwani models were created in order to created a 3D model of the ore body. The Talwani models have numerical integration approaches that were used to divide every model into polygons. The profiles were sectioned into polygons; each polygon was assigning a specific density depending on the body being drawn. Three different gridding techniques with three different filtering methods were used producing ten maps prior to the modeling, these maps were created to establish the best map to fit the models. The calculation of the polygons used an exact formula instead of the numerical integration of the profile made with a Talwani approach. A

  11. Effects of catholyte conditioning on electrokinetic extraction of copper from mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dong-Mei; Deng, Chang-Fen; Alshawabkeh, Akram N; Cang, Long

    2005-08-01

    Effect of electrokinetic treatment on copper partitioning and distribution in mine tailings were studied. In particular the effects of catholyte enhancement by HAc-NaAc, HCl, HAc-NaAc+EDTA and lactic acid+NaOH were evaluated. The results show that conditioning the catholyte plays a very important role in improving Cu removal. When HAc-NaAc is used in the catholyte, the removal percentage of total Cu from the mine tailings sample reached 12.3% under 40 V in 15 days of treatment. The removal percentage of Cu increased to 31.2% when EDTA was used together with HAc-NaAc in the catholyte. At the same time, increasing the applied voltage and treatment time result in an increase in the Cu removal from the mine tailings. Compared with HAc-NaAc (pH=3.52), the use of lactic acid+NaOH (pH=3.15) in the catholyte resulted in better performance in Cu removal from the mine tailings. HCl treatment resulted in removal of about 17.5% of Cu from the mine tailings; however, it resulted in production of significant amounts of toxic chlorine gas. Copper partitioning in the mine tailings was analyzed before and after the electrokinetic treatments. The analysis was conducted using 0.25 mol/l MgCl2 and 0.5 mol/l HCl as extractants, consequently, to assess the mobility of Cu after treatment. The results showed that lowering the pH of the mine tailings increased the exchangeable Cu fraction (or the portion extracted by MgCl2). Accordingly, further acidification results in an increased mobility of Cu and increase in the environmental risk of mine tailings.

  12. Impact of commercial garden growth substratum and NPK-fertilizer on copper fractionation in a copper-mine tailing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, A.; Karam, A.; Jaouich, A.

    2009-04-01

    Organic amendment and NPK-fertilizer could affect the distribution of copper (Cu) among Cu-mine tailing compounds and hence the availability or phytotoxicity of Cu to plants. A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted to investigate the forms of Cu in a Cu-mine tailing (pH 7.70) amended with a commercial garden growth substratum (GGS) containing peat moss and natural mycorrhizae (Glomus intraradices) in combination with a commercial NPK-fertilizer (20-20-20), by a sequential extraction method. There were eight treatments after the combination of four rates of GGS (0, 12.4, 50 and 100 g/kg tailing) and two rates of fertilizer (0 and 20 g/kg tailing). At the end of a 52-week incubation period, tailing Cu was sequentially extracted to fractionate Cu into five operationally defined geochemical forms, namely ‘water-soluble' (Cu-sol), ‘exchangeable' (Cu-exc), ‘specifically adsorbed on carbonates or carbonate-bound' (Cu-car), ‘organic-bound' (Cu-org) and ‘residual' (Cu-res) fractions. After treatments, the most labile Cu pool (Cu-sol + Cu-exc) represented about 0.94 % of the total Cu, the Cu-car and Cu-org accounted for 22.7 and 5.0% of total Cu, and the residual Cu accounted for nearly 71.3% of total Cu. Compared with the control, the application of GGS decreased Cu-car and increased CuORG whereas the addition of fertilizer increased Cu-sol + Cu-exc and decreased Cu-carb. Fertilizer-treated tailings had the highest amount of Cu-sol + Cu-exc. High rates of GGS resulted in Cu-org levels in GGS-treated tailings which were more than 2.0-2.8 times those obtained in the untreated tailing (control). The partition of Cu in GGS-treated tailings followed the order: Cu-sol + Cu-exc < Cu-car < Cu-org < Cu-res. This study suggests that NPK-fertilizer promotes the formation of labile Cu forms in the calcite-containing Cu-mine tailing. GGS in the tailing matrix acts as effective sorbent for Cu.

  13. The shift of microbial communities and their roles in sulfur and iron cycling in a copper ore bioleaching system

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Jiaojiao; Deng, Jie; Xiao, Yunhua; He, Zhili; Zhang, Xian; Van Nostrand, J. D.; Liang, Yili; Deng, Ye; Liu, Xueduan; Yin, Huaqun

    2016-01-01

    Bioleaching has been employed commercially to recover metals from low grade ores, but the production efficiency remains to be improved due to limited understanding of the system. This study examined the shift of microbial communities and S&Fe cycling in three subsystems within a copper ore bioleaching system: leaching heap (LH), leaching solution (LS) and sediment under LS. Results showed that both LH and LS had higher relative abundance of S and Fe oxidizing bacteria, while S and Fe reducing bacteria were more abundant in the Sediment. GeoChip analysis showed a stronger functional potential for S0 oxidation in LH microbial communities. These findings were consistent with measured oxidation activities to S0 and Fe2+, which were highest by microbial communities from LH, lower by those from LS and lowest form Sediment. Moreover, phylogenetic molecular ecological network analysis indicated that these differences might be related to interactions among microbial taxa. Last but not the least, a conceptual model was proposed, linking the S&Fe cycling with responsible microbial populations in the bioleaching systems. Collectively, this study revealed the microbial community and functional structures in all three subsystems of the copper ore, and advanced a holistic understanding of the whole bioleaching system. PMID:27698381

  14. Copper binding triggers compaction in N-terminal tail of human copper pump ATP7B.

    PubMed

    Mondol, Tanumoy; Åden, Jörgen; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2016-02-12

    Protein conformational changes are fundamental to biological reactions. For copper ion transport, the multi-domain protein ATP7B in the Golgi network receives copper from the cytoplasmic copper chaperone Atox1 and, with energy from ATP hydrolysis, moves the metal to the lumen for loading of copper-dependent enzymes. Although anticipated, conformational changes involved in ATP7B's functional cycle remain elusive. Using spectroscopic methods we here demonstrate that the four most N-terminal metal-binding domains in ATP7B, upon stoichiometric copper addition, adopt a more compact arrangement which has a higher thermal stability than in the absence of copper. In contrast to previous reports, no stable complex was found in solution between the metal-binding domains and the nucleotide-binding domain of ATP7B. Metal-dependent movement of the first four metal-binding domains in ATP7B may be a trigger that initiates the overall catalytic cycle.

  15. Preparation and characterization of novel glass-ceramic tile with microwave absorption properties from iron ore tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Rui; Liao, SongYi; Dai, ChangLu; Liu, YuChen; Chen, XiaoYu; Zheng, Feng

    2015-03-01

    A novel glass-ceramic tile consisting of one glass-ceramic layer (GC) attaining microwave absorption properties atop ceramic substrate was prepared through quench-heat treatment route derived from iron ore tailings (IOTs) and commercial raw materials (purity range 73-99%). X-ray diffraction (XRD), SEM, Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Physical property measurement system (PPMS) and Vector network analyzer (VNA) measurements were carried out to investigate phase, microstructure, magnetic and microwave absorption aspects of the glass-ceramic layer. Roughly 80.6±1.7 wt% borosilicate glass and 19.4±1.7 wt% spinel ferrite with chemical formula of (Zn2+0.17Fe3+0.83)[Fe3+1.17Fe2+0.06Ni2+0.77]O4 were found among the tested samples. Absorption of Electromagnetic wave by 3 mm thick glass-ceramic layer at frequency of 2-18 GHz reached peak reflection loss (RL) of -17.61 dB (98.27% microwave absorption) at 10.31 GHz. Altering the thickness of the glass-ceramic layer can meet the requirements of different level of microwave absorption.

  16. Production of lightweight ceramisite from iron ore tailings and its performance investigation in a biological aerated filter (BAF) reactor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangsheng; Du, Fang; Yuan, Li; Zeng, Hui; Kong, Sifang

    2010-06-15

    The few reuse and large stockpile of iron ore tailings (IOT) led to a series of social and environmental problems. This study investigated the possibility of using the IOT as one of starting materials to prepare lightweight ceramisite (LWC) by a high temperature sintering process. Coal fly ash (CFA) and municipal sewage sludge (SS) were introduced as additives. The LWC was used to serve as a biomedium in a biological aerated filter (BAF) reactor for municipal wastewater treatment, and its purification performance was examined. The effects of sintering parameters on physical properties of the LWC, and leaching concentrations of heavy metals from the LWC were also determined. The microstructure and the phase composition of the LWC were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Results revealed that: (1) IOT could be used to produce the LWC under the optimal sintering parameters; (2) the leaching concentrations of heavy metals from the LWC were well below their respective regulatory levels in the China Environmental Quality Standards for Surface Water (CEQS); and (3) the BAF reactor with the LWC serving as the biomedium achieved high removal efficiencies for COD(Cr) (>92%), NH(4)(+)-N (>62%) and total phosphate (T-P) (>63%). Therefore, the LWC produced from the IOT was suitable to serve as the biomedium in the municipal wastewater treatment.

  17. Construction and preliminary evaluation of copper tailings reclamation test plots at Cyprus Miami Mining Corporation

    SciTech Connect

    Chammas, G.A.; McCaulou, D.R.; Jones, G.L.

    1999-07-01

    Twenty pilot-scale test plots were constructed in mid-1998 at the Cyprus Miami mine to investigate the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of various reclamation strategies for establishment of self-sustaining native vegetation on acidic copper tailings. Four reclamation strategies are being tested: (1) directly covering acidic tailings with varying thicknesses f cover soil; (2) removing and/or neutralizing particularly acidic surgical tailings before soil cover placement, (3) chemically and/or physically inhibiting upward water and solute movement using neutralizing and neutral capillary barriers, and (4) constructing a subgrade of neutral tailings beneath cover soil. Preliminary results suggest that thicker soil covers and capillary barrier test plots initially support vegetation to a greater extent than other test plots, probably because of their increased moisture storage capacity. Results also suggest that salts are beginning to migrate upward from underlying tailings into cover soil. Data collected from ongoing vegetation surveys and soil testing will be used to evaluate the effect of various reclamation strategies on vegetation establishment and the potential impact of upward salt migration.

  18. Water leaching of titanium from ore flotation residue

    SciTech Connect

    Jaworska, Malgorzata M.; Guibal, Eric

    2003-07-01

    Copper ore tailings were tested for the stability of titanium submitted to water leaching in three different reactor systems (agitated vessel, bioreactor and percolated fixed-bed column). For each of these systems, titanium extraction did not exceed 1% of the available metal. Biomass removed from ore residue adsorbed a small part of the titanium with sorption capacities below 20-30 mg g{sup -1}, but most of this biomass was sequestered in the ore residue. Oxygen and carbon dioxide concentrations were monitored and changes in concentration correlated with bacteria development at the initial stage of the process and to fungal development in the latter stages.

  19. Banded sulfide-magnetite ores of Mauk copper massive sulfide deposit, Central Urals: Composition and genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safina, N. P.; Maslennikov, V. V.; Maslennikova, S. P.; Kotlyarov, V. A.; Danyushevsky, L. V.; Large, R. R.; Blinov, I. A.

    2015-05-01

    The results of investigation of metamorphosed sulfide-magnetite ores from the Mauk deposit located within the Main Ural Fault at the junction of Tagil and Magnitogorsk massive sulfide zones are discussed. The ore-hosting sequence comprises metamorphic rocks formed from basalt, carbonaceous and carbonaceous-cherty siltstone, and lenticular serpentinized ultramafic bodies. The ores of the deposit are represented by banded varieties and less frequent breccia. The clastic origin of the banded ore is indicated by load casts at the bottom of sulfide beds, alternation of sulfide and barren beds, and the truncation of the growth zones of pyrite crystals. Pyrite, pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite, and magnetite are the major minerals of the banded ores. The internal structure of the listed minerals testifies to the deep metamorphic recrystallization of primary hydrothermal-sedimentary ores accompanied with deformation. Cubanite, pyrrhotite, mackinawite, greigite, and gold are enclosed in metacrysts of pyrite, magnetite, and chalcopyrite. The accessory minerals of the Pb-Bi-Te, Bi-Te, and Ag-Te systems as well as uraninite have been found at the Mauk deposit for the first time. Magnetite predominantly replaces pyrite and less frequently chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite, and gangue minerals. It was established that the major carriers of As and Co are crystals of metamorphic pyrite. Chalcopyrite is the major carrier of Zn, Sn, Te, Pb, Bi, and Ag. Admixture of Fe and Cu is typical of sphalerite, and Se and Ni are characteristic of pyrrhotite. Ti, V, Mn, Sb, As, Ba, and U are concentrated in magnetite. The banded ores of the Mauk deposit are suggested as having been transformed in several stages: diagenesis, anadiagenesis, epidiagenesis ( t < 300°C), and amphibolite facies metamorphism ( t > 500°C).

  20. Agricultural soils spiked with copper mine wastes and copper concentrate: implications for copper bioavailability and bioaccumulation.

    PubMed

    Ginocchio, Rosanna; Sánchez, Pablo; de la Fuente, Luz María; Camus, Isabel; Bustamante, Elena; Silva, Yasna; Urrestarazu, Paola; Torres, Juan C; Rodríguez, Patricio H

    2006-03-01

    A better understanding of exposure to and effects of copper-rich pollutants in soils is required for accurate environmental risk assessment of copper. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to study copper bioavailability and bioaccumulation in agricultural soils spiked with different types of copper-rich mine solid wastes (copper ore, tailing sand, smelter dust, and smelter slag) and copper concentrate. A copper salt (copper sulfate, CuSO4) that frequently is used to assess soil copper bioavailability and phytotoxicity also was included for comparison. Results showed that smelter dust, tailing sand, and CuSO4 are more likely to be bioavailable and, thus, toxic to plants compared with smelter slag, concentrate, and ore at equivalent total copper concentrations. Differences may be explained by intrinsic differences in copper solubilization from the source materials, but also by their capability to decrease soil pH (confounding effect). The copper toxicity and bioaccumulation in plants also varied according to soil physicochemical characteristics (e.g., pH and total organic carbon) and the available levels of plant nutrients, such as nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium. Chemistry/mineralogy of mine materials, soil/pore-water chemistry, and plant physiological status thus should be integrated for building adequate models to predict phytotoxicity and environmental risk of copper. PMID:16566155

  1. Using soil island plantings as dispersal vectors in large area copper tailings reforestation

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, G.; Everett, R.

    1998-12-31

    The Wenatchee National Forest undertook the reforestation of the 80 acre (35 ha) Holden copper mine tailings of Washington State in 1989 by using 20, one-fourth acre, triangular shaped soil islands as a source of plant propagules targeted for gravel-covered tailings surfaces. The islands were constructed of soil and surface litter transported from a nearby gravel pit, and planted with four species of conifer seedlings, the shrub Sitka alder (Alnus sinuata) and eight species of grasses. Conifer and alder seedlings were also planted in graveled covered tailings with amendments. Since reproductive status of the conifers would not occur for several years, this propagule vector hypothesis was tested by measuring the distances traveled onto the tailings surface by grass seeds. The number of grass shoots established in four treatment blocks in target plots downwind from the soil island source plantings was also determined. After 36 months, grass seed had migrated to a distance of 32 feet (11 m) from the soil island source. Grass shoots were present within 10 feet (3 m) downwind of the soil island, the most frequent being Mountain brome (Bromus marginatus). Among the tree species, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) and Sitka alder grew an average of 6 inches (15--16 cm) after 40 months on the soil islands but somewhat less on the tailing surface. By the third growing season, the only tree species in reproductive condition on the tailings was alder. The soil-island technique is successful for grass dispersal and may have potential for conifer and alder migration.

  2. Molybdenum and copper levels in white-tailed deer near uranium mines in Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, K.A.; LeLeux, J.; Mulhern, B.M.

    1984-01-01

    Molybdenum toxicity, molybdenosis, in ruminant animals has been identified in at least 15 states and in Canada, England, Australia, and New Zealand. In most western states, molybdenosis has been associated with strip-mine spoil deposits. Molybdenum toxicity has been diagnosed in cattle pastured near uranium strip-mine spoils in several Texas counties. Recent reports from hunters and the authors' observations indicated that white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus ) that fed near uranium-mine spoil deposits may also have been exposed to high levels of molybdenum. The objectives of this study were to determine if white-tailed deer from a South Texas uranium mining district were accumulating harmful levels of molybdenum and to compare molybdenum and copper levels with antler development in deer from the mined area vs. an unmined control area.

  3. Effects of copper mine tailings disposal on littoral meiofaunal assemblages in the Atacama region of northern Chile.

    PubMed

    Lee, Matthew R; Correa, Juan A

    2005-02-01

    The effects of the disposal of copper mine tailings on the littoral meiofaunal assemblages of the Chañaral area of northern Chile were studied. Of the metals data collected, only in the case of copper was there a clear association with the tailings distribution in both the seawater and porewater samples, and it is assumed that the tailings on the beaches was the source of copper in the adjacent seawater. When compared to the reference sites, the meiofaunal assemblages at the impacted sites had significantly lower densities and taxa diversities; at the northern sites only the densities were lower. Otoplanid turbellarians were identified as characteristic of those beaches impacted by tailings. The combination of porewater copper and the amount of tailings present were identified as mostly responsible for the observed structure of the meiofaunal assemblages. It was also established that the variation in natural sediment grain size from beach to beach was not a significant factor in the observed differences in the meiofaunal assemblages. The two groups of meiofauna that proved to be most sensitive to the effects of tailings dumping were the foraminiferans and the harpacticoid copepods.

  4. Temporal Evolution of Volcanic and Plutonic Magmas Related to Porphyry Copper Ores Based on Zircon Geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilles, J. H.; Lee, R. G.; Wooden, J. L.; Koleszar, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Porphyry Cu (Mo-Au) and epithermal Au-Ag ores are globally associated with shallow hydrous, strongly oxidized, and sulfur-rich arc intrusions. In many localities, long-lived magmatism includes evolution from early andesitic volcanic (v) and plutonic (p) rocks to later dacitic or rhyolitic compositions dominated by plutons. We compare zircon compositions from three igneous suites with different time spans: Yerington, USA (1 m.y., p>v), El Salvador, Chile (4 m.y., p>v), and Yanacocha, Peru (6 m.y., v>p). At Yerington granite dikes and ores formed in one event, at ES in 2 to 3 events spanning 3 m.y., and at Yanacocha in 6 events spanning 5 m.y. At both ES and Yanacocha, high-Al amphiboles likely crystallized at high temperature in the mid-crust and attest to deep magmas that periodically recharged the shallow chambers. At Yanacocha, these amphiboles contain anhydrite inclusions that require magmas were sulfur-rich and strongly oxidized (~NNO+2). The Ti-in-zircon geothermometer provides estimates of 920º to 620º C for zircon crystallization, and records both core to rim cooling and locally high temperature rim overgrowths. Ore-related silicic porphyries yield near-solidus crystallization temperatures of 750-650°C consistent with low zircon saturation temperatures. The latter zircons have large positive Ce/Ce* and small negative Eu/Eu*≥0.4 anomalies attesting to strongly oxidized conditions (Ballard et al., 2001), which we propose result from crystallization and SO2 loss to the magmatic-hydrothermal ore fluid (Dilles et al., 2015). The Hf, REE, Y, U, and Th contents of zircons are diverse in the magma suites, and Th/U vs Yb/Gd plots suggest a dominant role of crystal fractionation with lesser roles for both crustal contamination and mixing with high temperature deep-sourced mafic magma. Ce/Sm vs Yb/Gd plots suggest that magma REE contents at <900°C are dominated by early crystallization of hornblende and apatite, and late crystallization (~<780°C) of titanite

  5. Multiple Sulfate Isotopic Evidence on the Formation of Oxide Copper Ore at Spence, Atacama Desert, Northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, T.; Bao, H.; Reich, M.; Palacios, C.

    2007-12-01

    In the Atacama Desert of northern Chile, one of the world's richest metallogenic provinces, porphyry copper deposits are characterized by the unique occurrence of atacamite in their oxidized zones. The origin and formation of the oxide zone of these copper deposits is, however, controversial. It was proposed that Cl-rich deep formation water pumping-up events along faults by earthquakes, after onset of the hyperaridity, were required (Cameron et al., 2007). Their model would imply that supplies of saline deep formation water from fractures to the surface should have left behind a homogeneous or fracture-controlled salt profile from surface down to the oxide zone. While no excluding the deep formation water model in other deposit, here we propose that, in our sampling region, the alternative saline source, which is critical for atacamite formation, could be locally evaporated groundwater, Cl-rich salts leached from arid surface by meteoric water, or brines from eastern salar basins at a time when the climate in northern Chile was changing from arid to hyperarid. At this climate transition, arid- requiring minerals such as atacamite in the oxide zone were formed and, more importantly, preserved upon evaporation beneath the surface alluvial deposits. Since salt accumulation at the surface remain active during hyperarid condition, our model would predict that water-soluble salt profile from surface to the oxide zone should have a characteristic pattern: salts with an atmospheric component on the surface gradually transitioning to salts of the oxide ore zone on the bottom and a mixing zone in between. To test these two alternative models, we focus on sulfate salts, one of the common water-soluble salts in arid environments. An added advantage is that sulfate accumulated on desert surface has a secondary atmospheric component that bears a unique triple oxygen isotope signature, easily distinguishable from sulfate formed by the oxidation of sulfide minerals at the oxide

  6. Assessment of Vegetation Establishment on Tailings Dam at an Iron Ore Mining Site of Suburban Beijing, China, 7 Years After Reclamation with Contrasting Site Treatment Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Demin; Zhao, Fangying; Sun, Osbert Jianxin

    2013-09-01

    Strip-mining operations greatly disturb soil, vegetation and landscape elements, causing many ecological and environmental problems. Establishment of vegetation is a critical step in achieving the goal of ecosystem restoration in mining areas. At the Shouyun Iron Ore Mine in suburban Beijing, China, we investigated selective vegetation and soil traits on a tailings dam 7 years after site treatments with three contrasting approaches: (1) soil covering (designated as SC), (2) application of a straw mat, known as "vegetation carpet", which contains prescribed plant seed mix and water retaining agent (designated as VC), on top of sand piles, and (3) combination of soil covering and application of vegetation carpet (designated as SC+VC). We found that after 7 years of reclamation, the SC+VC site had twice the number of plant species and greater biomass than the SC and VC sites, and that the VC site had a comparable plant abundance with the SC+VC site but much less biodiversity and plant coverage. The VC site did not differ with the SC site in the vegetation traits, albeit low soil fertility. It is suggested that application of vegetation carpet can be an alternative to introduction of topsoil for treatment of tailings dam with fine-structured substrate of ore sands. However, combination of topsoil treatment and application of vegetation carpet greatly increases vegetation coverage and plant biodiversity, and is therefore a much better approach for assisting vegetation establishment on the tailings dam of strip-mining operations. While application of vegetation carpet helps to stabilize the loose surface of fine-structured mine wastes and to introduce seed bank, introduction of fertile soil is necessary for supplying nutrients to plant growth in the efforts of ecosystem restoration of mining areas.

  7. Leaching of metals from ores. (Latest citations from the US Patent bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning the extraction of metals from ores by leaching. Topics include leaching of metals from ore heaps, mine tailings, smelter wastes, and sea nodules. Metals covered include gold, uranium, copper, nickel, silver, manganese, and cobalt. Bacterio-electric, biological-acid, and hydrogen peroxide leaching are included. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  8. Material flows generated by pyromet copper smelting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goonan, T.G.

    2005-01-01

    Copper production through smelting generates large volumes of material flows. As copper contained in ore becomes copper contained in concentrate to be fed into the smelting process, it leaves behind an altered landscape, sometimes mine waste, and always mill tailings. Copper concentrate, fluxing materials, fuels, oxygen, recyclables, scrap and water are inputs to the process. Dust (recycled), gases - containing carbon dioxide (CO2) (dissipated) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) (mostly collected, transformed and sold) and slag (discarded or sold) - are among the significant process outputs. This article reports estimates of the flows of these input/output materials for a particular set of smelters studied in some countries.

  9. Phytoremediation potential of transplanted bare-root seedlings of trees for lead/zinc and copper mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiang; Chen, Yi-Tai; Wang, Shu-Feng; Pan, Hong-Wei; Sun, Hai-Jing; Liu, Cai-Xia; Liu, Jian-Feng; Jiang, Ze-Ping

    2016-11-01

    Selecting plant species that can overcome unfavorable conditions and increase the recovery of degraded mined lands remains a challenge. A pot experiment was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using transplanted tree seedlings for the phytoremediation of lead/zinc and copper mine tailings. One-year-old bare-root of woody species (Rhus chinensis Mill, Quercus acutissima Carruth, Liquidambar formosana Hance, Vitex trifolia Linn. var. simplicifolia Cham, Lespedeza cuneata and Amorpha fruticosa Linn) were transplanted into pots with mine tailings and tested as potential metal-tolerant plants. Seedling survival, plant growth, root trait, nutrient uptake, and metal accumulation and translocation were assessed. The six species grew in both tailings and showed different tolerance level. A. fruticosa was highly tolerant of Zn, Pb and Cu, and grew normally in both tailings. Metal concentrations were higher in the roots than in the shoots of the six species. All of the species had low bioconcentration and translocation factor values. However, R. chinensis and L. formosana had significantly higher translocation factor values for Pb (0.88) and Zn (1.78) than the other species. The nitrogen-fixing species, A. fruticosa, had the highest tolerance and biomass production, implying that it has great potential in the phytoremediation of tailing areas in southern China. PMID:27216539

  10. Temporal variability of radon in a remediated tailing of uranium ore processing--the case of Urgeiriça (central Portugal).

    PubMed

    Barbosa, S M; Lopes, F; Correia, A D; Barbosa, S; Pereira, A C; Neves, L F

    2015-04-01

    Radon monitoring at different levels of the cover of the Urgeiriça tailings shows that the sealing is effective and performing as desired in terms of containing the strongly radioactive waste resulting from uranium ore processing. However, the analysis of the time series of radon concentration shows a very complex temporal structure, particularly at depth, including very large and fast variations from a few tens of kBq m(-3) to more than a million kBq m(-3) in less than one day. The diurnal variability is strongly asymmetric, peaking at 18 h/19 h and decreasing very fast around 21 h/22 h. The analysis is performed for summer and for a period with no rain in order to avoid the potential influence of precipitation and related environmental conditions on the radon variability. Analysis of ancillary measurements of temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and wind direction, as well as atmospheric pressure reanalysis data shows that the daily averaged radon concentration in the taillings material is anti-correlated with the atmospheric pressure and that the diurnal amplitude is associated with the magnitude of atmospheric pressure daily oscillations.

  11. Statistical source identification of major and trace elements in groundwater downward the tailings dam of Miduk Copper Complex, Kerman, Iran.

    PubMed

    Kargar, Maryam; Khorasani, Neamatolah; Karami, Mahmoud; Rafiee, Gholamreza; Naseh, Reza

    2012-10-01

    Identifying the possible sources of potential harmful metals in groundwater systems plays a crucial role in evaluating the potential risks to residents and local plant cover. An attempt was made to define the origin of Al, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mo, Ni, and Pb in groundwater using multivariate statistic approaches [principal component analysis (PCA), hierarchical cluster analysis], and tailings sequential extraction by the method of Tessier et al. The concentrations of studied elements were measured in 42 samples collected from 15 stations surrounding and downward the tailings dam of Miduk Copper Complex, central province of Kerman, Iran. According to the PCA results, confirmed by cluster dendrogram and metal content measurement of tailings sequential extracts, two components accounting for nearly 73% of the total variance, controlled the heavy metal variability and classified the possible source of groundwater contamination into two categories: (1) upper seepage which controls the variability of Cd, Cu, Fe, Ni, and Pb and (2) toe seepage of tailings dump affecting on Mo and Al concentration in downstream groundwater.

  12. ELEMENTAL MERCURY IN COPPER, SILVER, AND GOLD ORES: AN UNEXPECTED CONTRIBUTION TO LAKE SUPERIOR SEDIMENTS WITH GLOBAL IMPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mercury and copper inventories are low in central Lake Superior and increase markedly towards the Keweenaw Peninsula...where copper, mercury, and silver inventories are elevated and highly correlated. High copper, silver, and mercury inventories can be traced back to shoreline st...

  13. Inhibition of acid mine drainage and immobilization of heavy metals from copper flotation tailings using a marble cutting waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozsin, Gulsen

    2016-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) with high concentrations of sulfates and metals is generated by the oxidation of sulfide bearing wastes. CaCO3-rich marble cutting waste is a residual material produced by the cutting and polishing of marble stone. In this study, the feasibility of using the marble cutting waste as an acid-neutralizing agent to inhibit AMD and immobilize heavy metals from copper flotation tailings (sulfide- bearing wastes) was investigated. Continuous-stirring shake-flask tests were conducted for 40 d, and the pH value, sulfate content, and dissolved metal content of the leachate were analyzed every 10 d to determine the effectiveness of the marble cutting waste as an acid neutralizer. For comparison, CaCO3 was also used as a neutralizing agent. The average pH value of the leachate was 2.1 at the beginning of the experiment ( t = 0). In the experiment employing the marble cutting waste, the pH value of the leachate changed from 6.5 to 7.8, and the sulfate and iron concentrations decreased from 4558 to 838 mg/L and from 536 to 0.01 mg/L, respectively, after 40 d. The marble cutting waste also removed more than 80wt% of heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) from AMD generated by copper flotation tailings.

  14. Selenium and its redox speciation in rainwater from sites of Valparaiso region in Chile, impacted by mining activities of copper ores.

    PubMed

    De, Gregori Ida; Lobos, Maria G; Pinochet, Hugo

    2002-01-01

    The determination of the total concentration of selenium does not provide sufficient information about its toxicity and its bioavailability. The determination of its chemical forms is the basis for understanding the biogeochemical cycle in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and for detecting the species which might be toxic to biota. In this work we describe an analytical procedure to carry out the redox speciation of selenium present at ultratrace levels in rainwater from sites of Valparaiso region in Chile, impacted by mining activities of copper ores. A simple preconcentration step of the rainwater sample on a rotavapor system, in vacuum at low temperature permits the concentration of the different redox selenium species until levels quantifiable by sensitive techniques such as differential pulse cathodic stripping voltammetry or by spectrometric techniques, based on the hydride generation and detection by atomic absorption or atomic fluorescence spectrometry. These techniques coupled to redox chemical reactions allow the redox speciation of selenium. The results show that the open evaporation system can be used to concentrate water samples when the aim of the analysis is the determination of the total selenium concentration. On the contrary, to carry out its redox speciation only the preconcentration performed on rotavapor system, in vacuum can be used. When synthetic solutions containing different redox species of selenium, at ultratrace levels, were slowly evaporated on open system, Se(II) and Se(IV) were oxidized. The optimized procedure was then applied to the selenium determination and its redox speciation in rainwater samples collected in sites impacted by mining activities of copper ores. It was found that the amounts of total selenium in rainwater, as copper, from Puchuncavi valley decrease exponentially with the distance from the source, indicating that these elements in this region arise from the industrial complex Las Ventanas. In the redox

  15. Soil management of copper mine tailing soils--sludge amendment and tree vegetation could improve biological soil quality.

    PubMed

    Asensio, Verónica; Covelo, Emma F; Kandeler, Ellen

    2013-07-01

    Mine soils at the depleted copper mine in Touro (Northwest Spain) are physico-chemically degraded and polluted by chromium and copper. To increase the quality of these soils, some areas at this mine have been vegetated with eucalyptus or pines, amended with sludges, or received both treatments. Four sites were selected at the Touro mine tailing in order to evaluate the effect of these different reclamation treatments on the biological soil quality: (1) Control (untreated), (2) Forest (vegetated), (3) Sludge (amended with sludges) and (4) Forest+Sludge (vegetated and amended). The new approach of the present work is that we evaluated the effect of planting trees or/and amending with sludges on the biological soil quality of mine sites polluted by metals under field conditions. The addition of sludges to mine sites recovered the biological quality of the soil, while vegetating with trees did not increase microbial biomass and function to the level of unpolluted sites. Moreover, amending with sludges increased the efficiency of the soil's microbial community to metabolize C and N, which was indicated by the decrease of the specific enzyme activities and the increase in the ratio Cmic:Nmic (shift towards predominance of fungi instead of bacteria). However, the high Cu and Cr concentrations still have negative influence on the microorganisms in all the treated soils. For the future remediation of mine soils, we recommend periodically adding sludge and planting native legume species.

  16. Study of Munella Ores. (puka Region, Albania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liçaj, Engjell; Mandili, Jorgo; Tabaku, Boran; Thomo, Niko

    2010-01-01

    The study of Munella ores is based on four analysis (A, B, Cand cores). They represent different types of minerals in the Munella area. Cores were taken by the geologist of Puka Geological Enterprise. A Core: It represents an ore with pyrite and chalcopyrite where copper and sulfur contents are 0.77 and 8.2% respectively. B Core: This core represents an ore with spharelites and pyrite where zinc content is 1.5% and 2.9% sulfur one. C Core: It is a chalcopyrite ore, massive in nature, where copper content is 2.01% and 36% sulfur one. D Core: It also represents copper- zinc—sulfur ore where their content is 0.66, 1.00 and 4.28% respectively. Each core is studied individually by selective schema to have copper, zinc and pyrite concentrates. Copper and pyrite concentrates will be the first material for pyro- metallurgical industry.

  17. Temporal variation in the diversity and cover of sessile species in rocky intertidal communities affected by copper mine tailings in northern Chile.

    PubMed

    Fariña, J M; Castilla, J C

    2001-07-01

    Several coastal rocky shores in the northern Chile have been affected by the discharges of copper mine tailings. In spite of this, the temporal and spatial variation on the diversity and composition of their intertidal benthic communities has scarcely been studied. The objectives of the present study were to analyse and to compare quantitatively the temporal variation on the diversity, cover and composition of sessile species in rocky intertidal benthic communities of the northern Chilean coast, in relation to the presence of copper mine tailings. The results show that the drastic reduction on the sessile species diversity and the monopolization of the substrate exerted by the green algae Enteromorpha compressa, are common and permanent features of the intertidal rocky shores affected by copper mine tailings. Such spatial (between sites) and temporal (seasonal) variation of these changes has been associated with the relative concentrations of trace metals and inorganic particles of the mining wastes. Our results suggest that the mechanical effects of resuspended and settling tailings are a more likely cause.

  18. Germination and Early Growth of Brassica juncea in Copper Mine Tailings Amended with Technosol and Compost

    PubMed Central

    González, Luís

    2014-01-01

    Mine tailings represent a serious threat to the environment and human health; thus their restoration has become a major concern. In this study, the interactions between Brassica juncea and different mine soil treatments were evaluated in order to understand their effect on germination and early growth. Three soil treatments containing 25% and 50% of technosol and 30% of compost were prepared. Germination and early growth were assessed in soil and pore water extracts from the treatments. Unlike the untreated mine soil, the three treatments allowed germination and growth, achieving levels comparable to those of seedlings from the same species developed in normal conditions. The seedlings grown in 50% of technosol and 30% of compost exhibited greater germination percentages, higher growth, and more efficient mechanisms against oxidative stress, ascribed to the organic matter and nutrients content of these treatments. Considering the unequivocal ability of B. juncea for phytoremediation, the results suggest that technosol and compost may be an auspicious solution to allow the germination and early growth of this species in mine tailings. PMID:25386602

  19. Selective copper diffusion into quartz-hosted vapor inclusions: Evidence from other host minerals, driving forces, and consequences for Cu-Au ore formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jung Hun; Heinrich, Christoph A.

    2013-07-01

    larger ion analyzed in vapor inclusions probably represent true gold concentrations in magmatic-hydrothermal vapor. These findings imply that brine-vapor separation in porphyry deposits does not cause selective Cu transfer to the vapor, but is more likely to destabilize Cu complexes and promote copper ore deposition during decompression and unmixing of the two fluid phases. By contrast, Au may be selectively transferred into the vapor phase, allowing its transport through the deeper porphyry copper deposits to form epithermal gold deposits closer to the earth's surface.

  20. Zircon U-Pb geochronology, geochemistry, and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopes of granitoids in the Yulekenhalasu copper ore district, northern Junggar, China: Petrogenesis and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fuquan; Chai, Fengmei; Zhang, Zhixin; Geng, Xinxia; Li, Qiang

    2014-03-01

    The Yulekenhalasu porphyry copper deposit is located in the Kalaxiange'er metallogenic belt in northern Junggar, China. We present the results from zircon U-Pb geochronology, and geochemical and Sr-Nd-Hf isotope analyses of the granitoids associated with the ore deposits with a view to constrain their petrogenesis and tectonic setting. The granitoids consist of quartz diorite, diorite porphyry, porphyritic monzonite, and quartz porphyry, emplaced at 382, 379, 375-374, and 348 Ma, respectively, which span Late Devonian to early Carboniferous ages. The ore-bearing intrusion is mainly diorite porphyry, with subordinate porphyritic monzonite. The Late Devonian intrusions are characterized by SiO2 contents of 54.5-64.79 wt.%, Na2O contents of 3.82-8.24 wt.%, enrichment in Na, light rare-earth elements (LREEs), and large ion lithophile elements. They also display relative depletion in Y, Ba, P, Nb, Ta, and Ti, and weak negative Eu anomalies (δEu = 0.6-0.87). The early Carboniferous quartz porphyry is characterized by high SiO2 content (72.26-73.35 wt.%), enrichment in LREEs, K, and Sr, and relative depletion in Y (10.82-12.52 ppm) and Yb (1.06-1.15 ppm). The Late Devonian and early Carboniferous granitoids are characterized by positive ɛNd(t) values (5.2-10.1, one sample at - 1.9), positive ɛHf(t) values (7.46-18.45), low (87Sr/86Sr)i values (0.70363-0.70476), and young crustal residence ages. These data indicate that the sources of the granitoids were mainly mantle-derived juvenile rocks. Geochemical and Nd-Sr-Hf isotopic data demonstrate that the Late Devonian granitoids formed in an oceanic island arc, and they were formed from different sources, among which the mineralized diorite porphyry might have originated from a mixed slab-derived and mantle wedge melt source. The early Carboniferous quartz porphyry was likely emplaced in a mature island arc environment, and was probably derived from juvenile crust.

  1. 44. PHOTOCOPY OF DRAWING OF THE MINE ORE BIN AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. PHOTOCOPY OF DRAWING OF THE MINE ORE BIN AND LOADING TERMINAL, CROSS SECTION AND SIDE ELEVATION - Kennecott Copper Corporation, On Copper River & Northwestern Railroad, Kennicott, Valdez-Cordova Census Area, AK

  2. 43. PHOTOCOPY OF DRAWING OF THE MINE ORE BIN AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. PHOTOCOPY OF DRAWING OF THE MINE ORE BIN AND LOADING TERMINAL, CROSS SECTION AND SIDE ELEVATION - Kennecott Copper Corporation, On Copper River & Northwestern Railroad, Kennicott, Valdez-Cordova Census Area, AK

  3. 37. VIEW NORTH FROM EAST CRUDE ORE BIN TO CRUSHER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. VIEW NORTH FROM EAST CRUDE ORE BIN TO CRUSHER ADDITION AND CRUSHED OXIDIZED ORE BIN. VISIBLE ARE DINGS MAGNETIC PULLEY (CENTER), THE 100-TON STEEL CRUSHED UNOXIDIZED ORE BIN, AND UPPER PORTION OF THE STEPHENS-ADAMSON 25 TON/HR BUCKET ELEVATOR. THE UPPER TAILINGS POND LIES BEYOND THE MILL WITH THE UPPER TAILINGS DAM UNDER THE GRAVEL ROAD IN THE UPPER RIGHT CORNER. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  4. Lead-isotopic, sulphur-isotopic, and trace-element studies of galena from the Silesian-Cracow Zn-Pb ores, polymetallic veins from the Gory Swietokrzyskie MTS, and the Myszkow porphyry copper deposit, Poland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, S.E.; Vaughn, R.B.; Gent, C.A.; Hopkins, R.T.

    1996-01-01

    Lead-isotopic data on galena samples collected from a paragenetically constrained suite of samples from the Silesian-Cracow ore district show no regional or paragenetically controlled lead-isotopic trends within the analytical reproducibility of the measurements. Furthermore, the new lead-isotopic data agree with previously reported lead-isotopic results (R. E. Zartman et al., 1979). Sulfur-isotopic analyses of ores from the Silesian-Cracow district as well as from vein ore from the Gory Swietokrzyskie Mts. and the Myszkow porphyry copper deposit, when coupled with trace-element data from the galena samples, clearly discriminate different hydrothermal ore-forming events. Lead-isotopic data from the Permian and Miocene evaporite deposits in Poland indicate that neither of these evaporite deposits were a source of metals for the Silesian-Cracow district ores. Furthermore, lead-isotopic data from these evaporite deposits and the shale residues from the Miocene halite samples indicate that the crustal evolution of lead in the central and western European platform in southern Poland followed normal crustal lead-isotopic growth, and that the isotopic composition of crustal lead had progressed beyond the lead-isotopic composition of lead in the Silesian-Cracow ores by Permian time. Thus, Mesozoic and Tertiary sedimentary flysch rocks can be eliminated as viable source rocks for the metals in the Silesian-Cracow Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) deposits. The uniformity of the isotopic composition of lead in the Silesian-Cracow ores, when coupled with the geologic evidence that mineralization must post-date Late Jurassic faulting (E. Gorecka, 1991), constrains the geochemical nature of the source region. The source of the metals is probably a well-mixed, multi-cycle molasse sequence of sedimentary rocks that contains little if any Precambrian metamorphic or granitic clasts (S. E. Church, R. B. Vaughn, 1992). If ore deposition was post Late Jurassic (about 150 m. y.) or later

  5. Copper

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Copper ; CASRN 7440 - 50 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects )

  6. Ore distribution in the Herminia mine (Julcani, Peru): ore bands and role ore shoots

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, U.; Murdock, G.

    1985-01-01

    Julcani has been one of the major silver and bismuth producing districts of Peru during the past 30 years. The veins are related to a late Miocene volcanic complex and the ore minerals are mainly enargite, tetrahedrite, various silver sulfosalts and galena; gangue minerals are mostly pyrite and barite. Extensive mining, good accessibility and excellent record keeping provide a good opportunity to study ore distribution patterns and zoning in the Herminia mine. Six veins were selected because of their abundant information and coverage of the zoning sequence. The inner copper, intermediate silver and outer lead grade maxima are shown to form parallel ore bands that are generally concordant with the previously reported metal ratio contours, despite the different ages of the ore minerals. These systematic relations are corroborated by logarithmic covariation diagrams. Ore bands join at vein junctions, demonstrating that the vein network constituted a connected hydrothermal system. Oreshoots form at ore band lobes that are related to greater vein widths. Grade and ratio contours indicate that solution flow was generally horizontal to the SW within a favorable volcanic horizon in the 420-580 level range. Several exploration and development applications are illustrated.

  7. Temporal evolution of bacterial communities associated with the in situ wetland-based remediation of a marine shore porphyry copper tailings deposit.

    PubMed

    Diaby, N; Dold, B; Rohrbach, E; Holliger, C; Rossi, P

    2015-11-15

    Mine tailings are a serious threat to the environment and public health. Remediation of these residues can be carried out effectively by the activation of specific microbial processes. This article presents detailed information about temporal changes in bacterial community composition during the remediation of a section of porphyry copper tailings deposited on the Bahía de Ite shoreline (Peru). An experimental remediation cell was flooded and transformed into a wetland in order to prevent oxidation processes, immobilizing metals. Initially, the top oxidation zone of the tailings deposit displayed a low pH (3.1) and high concentrations of metals, sulfate, and chloride, in a sandy grain size geological matrix. This habitat was dominated by sulfur- and iron-oxidizing bacteria, such as Leptospirillum spp., Acidithiobacillus spp., and Sulfobacillus spp., in a microbial community which structure resembled acid mine drainage environments. After wetland implementation, the cell was water-saturated, the acidity was consumed and metals dropped to a fraction of their initial respective concentrations. Bacterial communities analyzed by massive sequencing showed time-dependent changes both in composition and cell numbers. The final remediation stage was characterized by the highest bacterial diversity and evenness. Aside from classical sulfate reducers from the phyla δ-Proteobacteria and Firmicutes, community structure comprised taxa derived from very diverse habitats. The community was also characterized by an elevated proportion of rare phyla and unaffiliated sequences. Numerical ecology analysis confirmed that the temporal population evolution was driven by pH, redox, and K. Results of this study demonstrated the usefulness of a detailed follow-up of the remediation process, not only for the elucidation of the communities gradually switching from autotrophic, oxidizing to heterotrophic and reducing living conditions, but also for the long term management of the remediation

  8. Temporal evolution of bacterial communities associated with the in situ wetland-based remediation of a marine shore porphyry copper tailings deposit.

    PubMed

    Diaby, N; Dold, B; Rohrbach, E; Holliger, C; Rossi, P

    2015-11-15

    Mine tailings are a serious threat to the environment and public health. Remediation of these residues can be carried out effectively by the activation of specific microbial processes. This article presents detailed information about temporal changes in bacterial community composition during the remediation of a section of porphyry copper tailings deposited on the Bahía de Ite shoreline (Peru). An experimental remediation cell was flooded and transformed into a wetland in order to prevent oxidation processes, immobilizing metals. Initially, the top oxidation zone of the tailings deposit displayed a low pH (3.1) and high concentrations of metals, sulfate, and chloride, in a sandy grain size geological matrix. This habitat was dominated by sulfur- and iron-oxidizing bacteria, such as Leptospirillum spp., Acidithiobacillus spp., and Sulfobacillus spp., in a microbial community which structure resembled acid mine drainage environments. After wetland implementation, the cell was water-saturated, the acidity was consumed and metals dropped to a fraction of their initial respective concentrations. Bacterial communities analyzed by massive sequencing showed time-dependent changes both in composition and cell numbers. The final remediation stage was characterized by the highest bacterial diversity and evenness. Aside from classical sulfate reducers from the phyla δ-Proteobacteria and Firmicutes, community structure comprised taxa derived from very diverse habitats. The community was also characterized by an elevated proportion of rare phyla and unaffiliated sequences. Numerical ecology analysis confirmed that the temporal population evolution was driven by pH, redox, and K. Results of this study demonstrated the usefulness of a detailed follow-up of the remediation process, not only for the elucidation of the communities gradually switching from autotrophic, oxidizing to heterotrophic and reducing living conditions, but also for the long term management of the remediation

  9. Evolution of ore deposits on terrestrial planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, R. G.

    1991-01-01

    Ore deposits on terrestrial planets materialized after core formation, mantle evolution, crustal development, interactions of surface rocks with the hydrosphere and atmosphere, and, where life exists on a planet, the involvement of biological activity. Core formation removed most of the siderophilic and chalcophilic elements, leaving mantles depleted in many of the strategic and noble metals relative to their chondritic abundances. Basaltic magma derived from partial melting of the mantle transported to the surface several metals contained in immiscible silicate and sulfide melts. Magmatic ore deposits were formed during cooling, fractional crystallization and density stratification from the basaltic melts. Such ore deposits found in earth's Archean rocks were probably generated during early histories of all terrestrial planets and may be the only types of igneous ores on Mars. Where plate tectonic activity was prevalent on a terrestrial planet, temporal evolution of ore deposits took place. Repetitive episodes of subduction modified the chemical compositions of the crust and upper mantles, leading to porphyry copper and molybdenum ores in calc-alkaline igneous rocks and granite-hosted tin and tungsten deposits. Such plate tectonic-induced mineralization in relatively young igneous rocks on earth may also have produced hydrothermal ore deposits on Venus in addition to the massive sulfide and cumulate chromite ores associated with Venusian mafic igneous rock. Sedimentary ore deposits resulting from mechanical and chemical weathering in reducing atmospheres in Archean earth included placer deposits (e.g., uraninite, gold, pyrite ores). Chromite, ilmenite, and other dense unreactive minerals could also be present on channel floors and in valley networks on Mars, while banded iron formations might underlie the Martian northern plains regions. As oxygen evolved in earth's atmosphere, so too did oxide ores. By analogy, gossans above sulfide ores probably occur on Mars

  10. 19 CFR 10.98 - Copper-bearing fluxing material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Copper-bearing fluxing material. 10.98 Section 10... Material § 10.98 Copper-bearing fluxing material. (a) For the purpose of this section, ores usable as a... copper. (b) (c) There shall be filed in connection with the entry of such copper-bearing ores, either...

  11. 19 CFR 10.98 - Copper-bearing fluxing material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Copper-bearing fluxing material. 10.98 Section 10... Material § 10.98 Copper-bearing fluxing material. (a) For the purpose of this section, ores usable as a... copper. (b) (c) There shall be filed in connection with the entry of such copper-bearing ores, either...

  12. 19 CFR 10.98 - Copper-bearing fluxing material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Copper-bearing fluxing material. 10.98 Section 10... Material § 10.98 Copper-bearing fluxing material. (a) For the purpose of this section, ores usable as a... copper. (b) (c) There shall be filed in connection with the entry of such copper-bearing ores, either...

  13. 19 CFR 10.98 - Copper-bearing fluxing material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Copper-bearing fluxing material. 10.98 Section 10... Material § 10.98 Copper-bearing fluxing material. (a) For the purpose of this section, ores usable as a... copper. (b) (c) There shall be filed in connection with the entry of such copper-bearing ores, either...

  14. 19 CFR 10.98 - Copper-bearing fluxing material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Copper-bearing fluxing material. 10.98 Section 10... Material § 10.98 Copper-bearing fluxing material. (a) For the purpose of this section, ores usable as a... copper. (b) (c) There shall be filed in connection with the entry of such copper-bearing ores, either...

  15. Hydrothermal alteration, fluid inclusions and stable isotope systematics of the Alvo 118 iron oxide-copper-gold deposit, Carajás Mineral Province (Brazil): Implications for ore genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torresi, Ignacio; Xavier, Roberto Perez; Bortholoto, Diego F. A.; Monteiro, Lena V. S.

    2012-03-01

    The Alvo 118 iron oxide-copper-gold (IOCG) deposit (170 Mt at 1.0 wt.% Cu, 0.3 g/t Au) lies in the southern sector of the Itacaúnas Shear Belt, Carajás Mineral Province, along a WNW-ESE-striking, 60-km-long shear zone, close to the contact of the ~2.76-Ga metavolcano-sedimentary Itacaiúnas Supergroup and the basement (~3.0 Ga Xingu Complex). The Alvo 118 deposit is hosted by mafic and felsic metavolcanic rocks and crosscutting granitoid and gabbro intrusions that have been subjected to the following hydrothermal alteration sequence towards the ore zones: (1) poorly developed sodic alteration (albite and scapolite); (2) potassic alteration (biotite or K-feldspar) accompanied by magnetite formation and silicification; (3) widespread, pervasive chlorite alteration spatially associated with quartz-carbonate-sulphide infill ore breccia and vein stockworks; and (4) local post-ore quartz-sericite alteration. The ore assemblage is dominated by chalcopyrite (~60%), bornite (~10%), hematite (~20%), magnetite (10%) and subordinate chalcocite, native gold, Au-Ag tellurides, galena, cassiterite, F-rich apatite, xenotime, monazite, britholite-(Y) and a gadolinite-group mineral. Fluid inclusion studies in quartz point to a fluid regime composed of two distinct fluid types that may have probably coexisted within the timeframe of the Cu-Au mineralizing episode: a hot (>200°C) saline (32.8‰ to 40.6 wt.% NaCl eq.) solution, represented by salt-bearing aqueous inclusions, and a lower temperature (<200°C), low to intermediate salinity (<15 wt.% NaCl eq.) aqueous fluid defined by two-phase (LH2O + VH2O) fluid inclusions. This trend is very similar to those defined for other IOCG systems of the Carajás Mineral Province. δ 18OH2O values in equilibrium with calcite (-1.0‰ to 7.5‰ at 277°C to 344°C) overlap the lower range for primary magmatic waters, but the more 18O-depleted values also point to the involvement of externally derived fluids, possibly of meteoric origin

  16. Long-term effects of different type and rates of organic amendments on reclamation of copper mine tailing in Central Chile.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arellano, Eduardo; Garreton, Bruna; Ginocchio, Rosanna

    2016-04-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the long-term effects of a single application of organic amendments on a copper mine tailings. Seven years after seeding of a mix of herbaceous plant and planting of ten native trees, and the application of organic amendment, plant community and soil fertility was measured in replicated plots that received six different treatments of waste water treatment plant biosolids (100 ton/ha, and 200 ton/ha), olive oil waste (100 ton/ha, and 200 ton/ha) and pisco grapes waste (90 ton/ha, and 200 ton/ha). A control treatment that received no organic amendment was also measured after seven years. Field measurements demonstrated that application of biosolids and pisco grapes waste, at both rates significantly improved vegetation coverage in comparison to the control treatment (80 and 100% vs control, 25%). The high rates of pisco waste had the highest vegetation diversity and survival in comparison to the other treatments. The high rate of olive oil waste had a negative effect on vegetation development in comparison to the control treatment. The application of organic amendment improved soil fertility in the long-term. All the treatments had a significant higher nitrogen concentration in comparison to the control treatment. The high rates of biosolids and pisco grape waste had a significantly effect of soil carbon concentration. Soil macro-aggregate in the high rate of pisco grape waste were also higher than the control, showing a positive relation between soil recover and vegetation development. We can conclude assisted phytostabilization of mine tailings is likely a technically effective solution for the valorisation of organic residues.

  17. View looking northwest toward HIghGrade Ore Bin and Concentrate Bin ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View looking northwest toward HIgh-Grade Ore Bin and Concentrate Bin - Kennecott Copper Corporation, Concentration Mill, On Copper River & Northwestern Railroad, Kennicott, Valdez-Cordova Census Area, AK

  18. Metal concentrations in the soils and native plants surrounding the old flotation tailings pond of the copper mining and smelting complex Bor (Serbia).

    PubMed

    Antonijević, M M; Dimitrijević, M D; Milić, S M; Nujkić, M M

    2012-03-01

    In this study concentrations of metals in the native plants and soils surrounding the old flotation tailings pond of the copper mine were determined. It has been established that the soil is heavily contaminated with copper, iron and arsenic, the mean concentrations being 1585.6, 29,462.5 and 171.7 mg kg(-1) respectively. All the plants, except manganese, accumulated metallic elements in concentrations which were either in the range of critical and phytotoxic values (Pb and As) or higher (Zn), and even much higher (Cu and Fe) than these values. Otherwise, the accumulation of Mn, Pb and As was considerably lower than that of Cu, Fe and Zn. In most plants the accumulation of target metals was highest in the root. Several plant species showed high bioaccumulation and translocation factor values, which classify them into species for potential use in phytoextraction. The BCF and TF values determined in Prunus persica were 1.20 and 3.95 for Cu, 1.5 and 6.0 for Zn and 1.96 and 5.44 for Pb. In Saponaria officinalis these values were 2.53 and 1.27 for Zn, and in Juglans regia L. they were 8.76 and 17.75 for Zn. The translocation factor in most plants, for most metals, was higher than one, whereas the highest value was determined in Populus nigra for Zn, amounting to 17.8. Among several tolerant species, the most suitable ones for phytostabilization proved to be Robinia pseudoacacia L. for Zn and Verbascum phlomoides L., Saponaria officinalis and Centaurea jacea L. for Mn, Pb and As.

  19. 40 CFR 421.40 - Applicability: Description of the primary copper smelting subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... primary copper smelting subcategory. 421.40 Section 421.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Copper Smelting Subcategory § 421.40 Applicability: Description of the primary copper... the primary smelting of copper from ore or ore concentrates. Primary copper smelting includes, but...

  20. 40 CFR 421.40 - Applicability: Description of the primary copper smelting subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... primary copper smelting subcategory. 421.40 Section 421.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Copper Smelting Subcategory § 421.40 Applicability: Description of the primary copper... the primary smelting of copper from ore or ore concentrates. Primary copper smelting includes, but...

  1. 40 CFR 421.40 - Applicability: Description of the primary copper smelting subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... primary copper smelting subcategory. 421.40 Section 421.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Copper Smelting Subcategory § 421.40 Applicability: Description of the primary copper... the primary smelting of copper from ore or ore concentrates. Primary copper smelting includes, but...

  2. 40 CFR 421.40 - Applicability: Description of the primary copper smelting subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... primary copper smelting subcategory. 421.40 Section 421.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Copper Smelting Subcategory § 421.40 Applicability: Description of the primary copper... the primary smelting of copper from ore or ore concentrates. Primary copper smelting includes, but...

  3. 40 CFR 421.40 - Applicability: Description of the primary copper smelting subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... primary copper smelting subcategory. 421.40 Section 421.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Primary Copper Smelting Subcategory § 421.40 Applicability: Description of the primary copper... the primary smelting of copper from ore or ore concentrates. Primary copper smelting includes, but...

  4. Structural controls and evolution of gold-, silver-, and REE-bearing copper-cobalt ore deposits, Blackbird district, east-central Idaho: Epigenetic origins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lund, K.; Tysdal, R.G.; Evans, K.V.; Kunk, M.J.; Pillers, R.M.

    2011-01-01

    Textural data at all scales indicate that the host sites for veins and the tectonic evolution of both host rocks and mineral deposits were kinematically linked to Late Cretaceous regional thrust faulting. Heat, fluids, and conduits for generation and circulation of fluids were part of the regional crustal thickening. The faulting also juxtaposed metaevaporite layers in the Mesoproterozoic Yellowjacket Formation over Blackbird district host rocks. We conclude that this facilitated chemical exchange between juxtaposed units resulting in leaching of critical elements (Cl, K, B, Na) from metaevaporites to produce brines, scavenging of metals (Co, Cu, etc) from rocks in the region, and, finally, concentrating metals in the lower-plate ramp structures. Although the ultimate source of the metals remains undetermined, the present Cu-Co ± Au (± Ag ± Ni ± REE) Blackbird ore deposits formed during Late Cretaceous compressional deformation.

  5. A critical review of the effects of gold cyanide-bearing tailings solutions on wildlife.

    PubMed

    Donato, D B; Nichols, O; Possingham, H; Moore, M; Ricci, P F; Noller, B N

    2007-10-01

    industry. Cyanide concentrations below 50 mg/L weak-acid-dissociable (WAD) are deemed safe to wildlife but are considered an interim benchmark for discharge into tailings storage facilities (TSFs). Cyanide is a fast acting poison, and its toxicity is related to the types of cyanide complexes that are present. Cyanide in biota binds to iron, copper and sulfur-containing enzymes and proteins required for oxygen transportation to cells. The accurate determination of cyanide concentrations in the field is difficult to achieve due to sampling techniques and analytical error associated with loss and interferences following collection. The main WAD cyanide complexes in gold mine tailings are stable in the TSF environment but can release cyanide ions under varying environmental conditions including ingestion and absorption by wildlife. Therefore distinction between free, WAD and total cyanide forms in tailings water for regulatory purposes is justified. From an environmental perspective, there is a distinction between ore bodies on the basis of their copper content. For example, wildlife deaths are more likely to occur at mines possessing copper-gold ores due to the formation of copper-cyanide complexes which is toxic to birds and bats. The formation of copper-cyanide complex occurs preferentially to gold cyanide complex indicating the relative importance of economic vs. environmental considerations in the tailings water. Management of cyanide to a perceived threshold has inherent risks since cyanide has a steep toxicity response curve; is difficult to accurately measure in the field; and is likely to vary due to variable copper content of ore bodies and ore blending. Consequently, wildlife interaction needs to be limited to further reduce the risks. A gap in knowledge exists to design or manage cyanide-bearing mine waste solutions to render such facilities unattractive to at-risk wildlife species. This gap may be overcome by understanding the wildlife behaviour and habitat usage

  6. A critical review of the effects of gold cyanide-bearing tailings solutions on wildlife.

    PubMed

    Donato, D B; Nichols, O; Possingham, H; Moore, M; Ricci, P F; Noller, B N

    2007-10-01

    industry. Cyanide concentrations below 50 mg/L weak-acid-dissociable (WAD) are deemed safe to wildlife but are considered an interim benchmark for discharge into tailings storage facilities (TSFs). Cyanide is a fast acting poison, and its toxicity is related to the types of cyanide complexes that are present. Cyanide in biota binds to iron, copper and sulfur-containing enzymes and proteins required for oxygen transportation to cells. The accurate determination of cyanide concentrations in the field is difficult to achieve due to sampling techniques and analytical error associated with loss and interferences following collection. The main WAD cyanide complexes in gold mine tailings are stable in the TSF environment but can release cyanide ions under varying environmental conditions including ingestion and absorption by wildlife. Therefore distinction between free, WAD and total cyanide forms in tailings water for regulatory purposes is justified. From an environmental perspective, there is a distinction between ore bodies on the basis of their copper content. For example, wildlife deaths are more likely to occur at mines possessing copper-gold ores due to the formation of copper-cyanide complexes which is toxic to birds and bats. The formation of copper-cyanide complex occurs preferentially to gold cyanide complex indicating the relative importance of economic vs. environmental considerations in the tailings water. Management of cyanide to a perceived threshold has inherent risks since cyanide has a steep toxicity response curve; is difficult to accurately measure in the field; and is likely to vary due to variable copper content of ore bodies and ore blending. Consequently, wildlife interaction needs to be limited to further reduce the risks. A gap in knowledge exists to design or manage cyanide-bearing mine waste solutions to render such facilities unattractive to at-risk wildlife species. This gap may be overcome by understanding the wildlife behaviour and habitat usage

  7. Genomic insights into a new acidophilic, copper-resistant Desulfosporosinus isolate from the oxidized tailings area of an abandoned gold mine.

    PubMed

    Mardanov, Andrey V; Panova, Inna A; Beletsky, Alexey V; Avakyan, Marat R; Kadnikov, Vitaly V; Antsiferov, Dmitry V; Banks, David; Frank, Yulia A; Pimenov, Nikolay V; Ravin, Nikolai V; Karnachuk, Olga V

    2016-08-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction in acid mine drainage is still considered to be confined to anoxic conditions, although several reports have shown that sulfate-reducing bacteria occur under microaerophilic or aerobic conditions. We have measured sulfate reduction rates of up to 60 nmol S cm(-3) day(-1) in oxidized layers of gold mine tailings in Kuzbass (SW Siberia). A novel, acidophilic, copper-tolerant Desulfosporosinus sp. I2 was isolated from the same sample and its genome was sequenced. The genomic analysis and physiological data indicate the involvement of transporters and additional mechanisms to tolerate metals, such as sequestration by polyphosphates. Desulfosporinus sp. I2 encodes systems for a metabolically versatile life style. The genome possessed a complete Embden-Meyerhof pathway for glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. Complete oxidation of organic substrates could be enabled by the complete TCA cycle. Genomic analysis found all major components of the electron transfer chain necessary for energy generation via oxidative phosphorylation. Autotrophic CO2 fixation could be performed through the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. Multiple oxygen detoxification systems were identified in the genome. Taking into account the metabolic activity and genomic analysis, the traits of the novel isolate broaden our understanding of active sulfate reduction and associated metabolism beyond strictly anaerobic niches.

  8. Genomic insights into a new acidophilic, copper-resistant Desulfosporosinus isolate from the oxidized tailings area of an abandoned gold mine.

    PubMed

    Mardanov, Andrey V; Panova, Inna A; Beletsky, Alexey V; Avakyan, Marat R; Kadnikov, Vitaly V; Antsiferov, Dmitry V; Banks, David; Frank, Yulia A; Pimenov, Nikolay V; Ravin, Nikolai V; Karnachuk, Olga V

    2016-08-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction in acid mine drainage is still considered to be confined to anoxic conditions, although several reports have shown that sulfate-reducing bacteria occur under microaerophilic or aerobic conditions. We have measured sulfate reduction rates of up to 60 nmol S cm(-3) day(-1) in oxidized layers of gold mine tailings in Kuzbass (SW Siberia). A novel, acidophilic, copper-tolerant Desulfosporosinus sp. I2 was isolated from the same sample and its genome was sequenced. The genomic analysis and physiological data indicate the involvement of transporters and additional mechanisms to tolerate metals, such as sequestration by polyphosphates. Desulfosporinus sp. I2 encodes systems for a metabolically versatile life style. The genome possessed a complete Embden-Meyerhof pathway for glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. Complete oxidation of organic substrates could be enabled by the complete TCA cycle. Genomic analysis found all major components of the electron transfer chain necessary for energy generation via oxidative phosphorylation. Autotrophic CO2 fixation could be performed through the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. Multiple oxygen detoxification systems were identified in the genome. Taking into account the metabolic activity and genomic analysis, the traits of the novel isolate broaden our understanding of active sulfate reduction and associated metabolism beyond strictly anaerobic niches. PMID:27222219

  9. Differential effect of metals/metalloids on the growth and element uptake of mesquite plants obtained from plants grown at a copper mine tailing and commercial seeds.

    PubMed

    Haque, N; Peralta-Videa, J R; Duarte-Gardea, M; Gardea-Torresdey, J L

    2009-12-01

    The selection of appropriate seeds is essential for the success of phytoremediation/restoration projects. In this research, the growth and elements uptake by the offspring of mesquite plants (Prosopis sp.) grown in a copper mine tailing (site seeds, SS) and plants derived from vendor seeds (VS) was investigated. Plants were grown in a modified Hoagland solution containing a mixture of Cu, Mo, Zn, As(III) and Cr(VI) at 0, 1, 5 and 10 mg L(-1) each. After one week, plants were harvested and the concentration of elements was determined by using ICP-OES. At 1 mg L(-1), plants originated from SS grew faster and longer than control plants (0 mg L(-1)); whereas plants grown from VS had opposite response. At 5 mg L(-1), 50% of the plants grown from VS did not survive, while plants grown from SS had no toxicity effects on growth. Finally, plants grown from VS did not survive at 10 mg L(-1) treatment, whilst 50% of the plants grown from SS survived. The ICP-OES data demonstrated that at 1 mg L(-1) the concentration of all elements in SS plants was significantly higher compared to control plants and VS plants. While at 5 mg L(-1), the shoots of SS plants had significantly more Cu, Mo, As, and Cr. The results suggest that SS could be a better source of plants intended to be used for phytoremediation of soil impacted with Cu, Mo, Zn, As and Cr.

  10. Monzonitoid magmatism of the copper-porphyritic Lazurnoe deposit (South Primor'e): U-Pb and K-Ar geochronology and peculiarities of ore-bearing magma genesis by the data of isotopic-geochemical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhno, V. G.; Kovalenko, S. V.; Alenicheva, A. A.

    2011-05-01

    Magmatic rocks from the copper-porphyritic Lazurnoe deposit (Central Primor'e) have been studied. It has been found that rocks from the Lazurnyi massif are referred to gabbro-monzodiorites, monzodiorites, and monzo-granodiorites formed during two magmatic phases of different ages. The earlier phase is represented by gabbro-monzodiorites and diorites of the North Stock, and the later one, by gabbro-monzodiorites and monzo-grano-diorites of the South Stock. On the basis of isotopic dating by the U-Pb (SHRIMP) method for zircon and by the K-Ar method for hornblendes and biotites, the age of magmatic rocks is determined at 110 ± 4 for the earlier phase and at 103.5 ± 1.5 for the later one. Examination of the isotopic composition for Nd, Sr, Pb, Hf, δ18O, and REE spectra has shown that melts of the first phase are contaminated with crustal rocks and they are typical for a high degree of secondary alterations. Potassiumfeldspar, biotite, propylitic alterations, and sulfidization are manifested in these rocks. The rocks of the later stage of magmatism are characteristic for a primitive composition of isotopes and the absence of secondary alterations. They carry the features of adakite specifics that allows us to consider them derivatives of mantle generation under high fluid pressure. The intrusion of fluid-saturated melts of the second phase into the magmatic source of the first phase caused both an alteration pattern of rocks and copper-porphyritic mineralization. Isotopes of sulfur and oxygen allow us to consider the ore component to be of magmatic origin.

  11. Energy and materials flows in the copper industry

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, L.L.

    1980-12-01

    The copper industry comprises both the primary copper industry, which produces 99.9%-pure copper from copper ore, and the secondary copper industry, which salvages and recycles copper-containing scrap metal to extract pure copper or copper alloys. The United States uses about 2 million tons of copper annually, 60% of it for electrical applications. Demand is expected to increase less than 4% annually for the next 20 years. The primary copper industry is concentrated in the Southwest; Arizona produced 66% of the 1979 total ore output. Primary production uses about 170 x 10/sup 12/ Btu total energy annually (about 100 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton pure copper produced from ore). Mining and milling use about 60% of the total consumption, because low-grade ore (0.6% copper) is now being mined. Most copper is extracted by smelting sulfide ores, with concomitant production of sulfur dioxide. Clean air regulations will require smelters to reduce sulfur emissions, necessitating smelting process modifications that could also save 20 x 10/sup 12/ Btu (10 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton of copper) in smelting energy. Energy use in secondary copper production averages 20 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton of copper. If all copper products were recycled, instead of the 30% now salvaged, the energy conservation potential would be about one-half the total energy consumption of the primary copper industry.

  12. The extent of arsenic and of metal uptake by aboveground tissues of Pteris vittata and Cyperus involucratus growing in copper- and cobalt-rich tailings of the Zambian copperbelt.

    PubMed

    Kříbek, Bohdan; Mihaljevič, Martin; Sracek, Ondra; Knésl, Ilja; Ettler, Vojtěch; Nyambe, Imasiku

    2011-08-01

    The extent of arsenic (As) and metal accumulation in fronds of the As hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata (Chinese brake fern) and in leaves of Cyperus involucratus, which grow on the surface of an old flotation tailings pond in the Zambian Copperbelt province, was studied. The tailings consist of two types of material with distinct chemical composition: (1) reddish-brown tailings rich in As, iron (Fe), and other metals, and (2) grey-green tailings with a lower content of As, Fe, and other metals, apart from manganese (Mn). P. vittata accumulates from 2350 to 5018 μg g(-1) As (total dry weight [dw]) in its fronds regardless of different total and plant-available As concentrations in both types of tailings. Concentrations of As in C. involucratus leaves are much lower (0.24-30.3 μg g(-1) dw). Contents of copper (Cu) and cobalt (Co) in fronds of P. vittata (151-237 and 18-38 μg g(-1) dw, respectively) and in leaves of C. involucratus (96-151 and 9-14 μg g(-1) dw, respectively) are high, whereas concentrations of other metals (Fe, Mn, and zinc [Zn]) are low and comparable with contents of the given metals in common plants. Despite great differences in metal concentrations in the two types of deposited materials, concentrations of most metals in plant tissues are very similar. This indicates an exclusion or avoidance mechanism operating when concentrations of the metals in substrate are particularly high. The results of the investigation show that Chinese brake fern is not only a hyperaccumulator of As but has adapted itself to high concentrations of Cu and Co in flotation tailings of the Zambian Copperbelt.

  13. Ores and Climate Change - Primary Shareholders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Holly J.; Hannah, Judith L.

    2015-04-01

    Many in the economic geology community concern themselves with details of ore formation at the deposit scale, whether tallying fluid inclusion data to get at changes in ore-forming fluids or defining structures that aid and abet mineralization. These compilations are generally aimed at interpretation of events at the site of ore formation, with the goal being assignment of the deposit to a sanctioned ore deposit model. While providing useful data, this approach is incomplete and does not, by itself, serve present-day requirements for true interdisciplinary science. The ore-forming environment is one of chaos and disequilibrium at nearly all scales (Stein, 2014). Chaos and complexity are documented by variably altered rocks, veins or disseminated mineralization with multi-generational fluid histories, erratic and unusual textures in host rocks, and the bitumen or other hydrocarbon products entwined within many ore deposits. This should give pause to our drive for more data as a means to find "the answer". The answer lies in the kind of data collected and more importantly, in the way we interpret those data. Rather than constructing an ever-increasing catalog of descriptive mutations on sanctioned ore deposit models (e.g., IOGC or Iron-Oxide Copper Gold deposits), the way forward is to link source and transport of metals, sulfur, and organic material with regional and ultimately whole Earth chemical evolution. Important experimental work provides chemical constraints in controlled and behaved environments. To these data, we add imagination and interpretation, always tying back to field observations. In this paper, several key points are made by way of ore deposit examples: (1) many IOCG deposits are outcomes of profound changes in the chemistry of the Earth's surface, in the interplay of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and lithosphere; (2) the redox history of Fe in deep earth may be ultimately expressed in the ore-forming sequence; and (3) the formation of

  14. A preliminary combined geochemical and rock-magnetic study of tailings of non-magnetic ores from Tlalpujahua-El Oro mining districts, Michoacán and Estado de México States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, J.; Hernández-Bernal, M.; Corona-Chávez, P.

    2013-05-01

    Mining activities in Mexico have been continuously developed since 1550. Since then several thousands of million tons of waste produced as a result of the mining activity have been accumulated and scattered throughout the territory. These wastes can contain minerals with potentially toxic elements (PTEs) such as Cr, As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn, which show a distribution and mobility in the environment according to the chemical species in which are hosted. The Tlalpujahua - El Oro mining district (TOMD) concentrates an impressive number of mines and historical tailings. Due to their in-slope hydrographic position, the mining activities increase the risk of generating anthropogenic effluent that could contribute with a certain amount of mine-water with high contents of PTEs. Although magnetic methods have been widely applied to pollution studies of regions with high anthropogenic impact, its application to tailings is scarce in spite of the several studies that document the environmental effects as a result of the mining waste. We present the results obtained by combined geochemical and rock-magnetic studies in these tailings. Similarly to the traditional EPTs vs SiO2 diagrams, EPTs vs Fe show good linear (inverse) correlation with most of these health-risk elements. Fe concentrations determined magnetically from room-temperature susceptibility measurements agrees with those obtained by traditionally geochemical methods.

  15. Summary of the mineralogy of the Colorado Plateau uranium ores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weeks, Alice D.; Coleman, Robert Griffin; Thompson, Mary E.

    1956-01-01

    In the Colorado Plateau uranium has been produced chiefly from very shallow mines in carnotite ores (oxidized vanadiferous uranium ores) until recent deeper mining penetrated black unoxidized ores in water-saturated rocks and extensive exploration has discovered many deposits of low to nonvanadiferous ores. The uranium ores include a wide range from highly vanadiferous and from as much as one percent to a trace of copper, and contain a small amount of iron and traces of lead, zinc, molybdenum, cobalt, nickel, silver, manganese, and other metals. Recent investigation indicates that the carnotite ores have been derived by progressive oxidation of primary (unoxidized) black ores that contain low-valent uranium and vanadium oxides and silicates. The uranium minerals, uraninite and coffinite, are associated with coalified wood or other carbonaceous material. The vanadium minerals, chiefly montroseite, roscoelite, and other vanadium silicates, occur in the interstices of the sandstone and in siltstone and clay pellets as well as associated with fossil wood. Calcite, dolomite, barite and minor amounts of sulfides, arsenides, and selenides occur in the unoxidized ore. Partially oxidized vanadiferous ore is blue black, purplish brown, or greenish black in contrast to the black or dark gray unoxidized ore. Vanadium combines with uranium to form rauvite. The excess vanadium is present in corvusite, fernandinite, melanovanadite and many other quadrivalent and quinquevalent vanadium minerals as well as in vanadium silicates. Pyrite and part or all of the calcite are replaced by iron oxides and gypsum. In oxidized vanadiferous uranium ores the uranium is fixed in the relatively insoluble minerals carnotite and tyuyamunite, and the excess vanadium commonly combines with one or more of the following: calcium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, aluminum, iron, copper, manganese, or barium, or rarely it forms the hydrated pentoxide. The relatively stable vanadium silicates are little

  16. 3. VIEW OF EMPIRE STATE MINE WITH TAILING PILE IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF EMPIRE STATE MINE WITH TAILING PILE IN BOTTOM LEFT AND COLLAPSED ADIT LOCATED BELOW DARK SHADOWS IN FAR RIGHT/LOWER THIRD. COLLAPSED BUILDING AND PARTIAL VIEW OF ORE CHUTE/BIN IS VISIBLE ON HILLSIDE ABOVE TAILINGS. CAMERA POINTED NORTH/NORTHWEST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Empire State Mine, West side of Florida Mountain, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  17. A Copper-Sulfate-Based Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory for First-Year University Students That Teaches Basic Operations and Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Emilio; Vicente, Miguel Angel

    2002-01-01

    Presents a 10-hour chemistry experiment using copper sulfate that has three steps: (1) purification of an ore containing copper sulfate and insoluble basic copper sulfates; (2) determination of the number of water molecules in hydrated copper sulfate; and (3) recovery of metallic copper from copper sulfate. (Author/YDS)

  18. Osmium isotope constraints on ore metal recycling in subduction zones

    PubMed

    McInnes; McBride; Evans; Lambert; Andrew

    1999-10-15

    Veined peridotite xenoliths from the mantle beneath the giant Ladolam gold deposit on Lihir Island, Papua New Guinea, are 2 to 800 times more enriched in copper, gold, platinum, and palladium than surrounding depleted arc mantle. Gold ores have osmium isotope compositions similar to those of the underlying subduction-modified mantle peridotite source region, indicating that the primary origin of the metals was the mantle. Because the mantle is relatively depleted in gold, copper, and palladium, tectonic processes that enhance the advective transport and concentration of these fluid soluble metals may be a prerequisite for generating porphyry-epithermal copper-gold deposits. PMID:10521343

  19. Osmium isotope constraints on ore metal recycling in subduction zones

    PubMed

    McInnes; McBride; Evans; Lambert; Andrew

    1999-10-15

    Veined peridotite xenoliths from the mantle beneath the giant Ladolam gold deposit on Lihir Island, Papua New Guinea, are 2 to 800 times more enriched in copper, gold, platinum, and palladium than surrounding depleted arc mantle. Gold ores have osmium isotope compositions similar to those of the underlying subduction-modified mantle peridotite source region, indicating that the primary origin of the metals was the mantle. Because the mantle is relatively depleted in gold, copper, and palladium, tectonic processes that enhance the advective transport and concentration of these fluid soluble metals may be a prerequisite for generating porphyry-epithermal copper-gold deposits.

  20. Velocity field measurements in tailings dam failure experiments using a combined PIV-PTV approach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tailings dams are built to impound mining waste, also called tailings, which consists of a mixture of fine-sized sediments and water contaminated with some hazardous chemicals used for extracting the ore by leaching. Non-Newtonian flow of sediment-water mixture resulting from a failure of tailings d...

  1. 26. NORTHERN VIEW OF ORE YARD WITH ORE BRIDGES IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. NORTHERN VIEW OF ORE YARD WITH ORE BRIDGES IN THE BACKGROUND. BLAST FURNACES ALONG THE RIGHT SIDE. (Martin Stupich) - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  2. Bioprocessing of ores: Application to space resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansson, Karl R.

    1992-01-01

    The role of microorganisms in the oxidation and leaching of various ores (especially those of copper, iron, and uranium) is well known. This role is increasingly being applied by the mining, metallurgy, and sewage industries in the bioconcentration of metal ions from natural receiving waters and from waste waters. It is concluded that bioprocessing using bacteria in closed reactors may be a variable option for the recovery of metals from the lunar regolith. Obviously, considerable research must be done to define the process, specify the appropriate bacteria, determine the necessary conditions and limitations, and evaluate the overall feasibility.

  3. Introduction to ore geology

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    This textbook on ore geology is for second and third year undergraduates and closely parallels the undergraduate course given in this subject at England's University of Leicester. The volume covers three major areas: (1) principles of ore geology, (2) examples of the most important types of ore deposits, and (3) mineralization in space and time. Many chapters have been thoroughly revised for this edition and a chapter on diamonds has been added. Chapters on greisen and pegmatite have also been added, the former in response to the changing situation in tin mining following the recent tin crisis, and the latter in response to suggestions from geologists in a number of overseas countries. Some chapters have been considerably expanded and new sections added, including disseminated gold deposits and unconformity-associated uranium deposits. The author also expands on the importance of viewing mineral deposits from an economic standpoint.

  4. 14. HULETT ORE UNLOADERS IN MOTION; UNLOADING CANADIAN RED ORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. HULETT ORE UNLOADERS IN MOTION; UNLOADING CANADIAN RED ORE FROM THE 'GEORGE M. CAR.' VIEW LOOKING EAST. (Also see OH-18-38, OH-18-39, and OH-18-40.) - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  5. 38. HULETT ORE UNLOADERS IN MOTION; UNLOADING CANADIAN RED ORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. HULETT ORE UNLOADERS IN MOTION; UNLOADING CANADIAN RED ORE FROM THE GEORGE M. CARL.' VIEW LOOKING EAST. (Also see OH-18-14, OH-18-39, and OH-18-40) - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  6. 11. VIEW OF THE MILL LOOKING SOUTHWEST SHOWING THE ORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. VIEW OF THE MILL LOOKING SOUTHWEST SHOWING THE ORE RECEIVING STATION AND ORE BIN ON THE LEFT SIDE OF THE IMAGE, THE TRESTLE ON THE NORTH SIDE OF THE MILL LEADING FROM THE GROUND TO THE DELIVERY LEVEL. NOTE THE A FRAME STRUCTURE PROJECTING UP FROM THE INCLINED TRESTLE, THIS IS THE ONLY REMAINING PIECE OF A TRESTLE THAT CARRIED TAILING FROM THE MILL TO A CYANIDE PLANT THAT WAS LOCATED NORTH OF THE MILL. - Standard Gold Mill, East of Bodie Creek, Northeast of Bodie, Bodie, Mono County, CA

  7. NOVEL BINDERS AND METHODS FOR AGGLOMERATION OF ORE

    SciTech Connect

    S.K. Kawatra; T.C. Eisele; J.A. Gurtler; C.A. Hardison; K. Lewandowski

    2004-04-01

    Many metal extraction operations, such as leaching of copper, leaching of precious metals, and reduction of metal oxides to metal in high-temperature furnaces, require agglomeration of ore to ensure that reactive liquids or gases are evenly distributed throughout the ore being processed. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses achieves this even distribution of fluids by preventing fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Binders are critically necessary to produce agglomerates that will not break down during processing. However, for many important metal extraction processes there are no binders known that will work satisfactorily. Primary examples of this are copper heap leaching, where there are no binders that will work in the acidic environment encountered in this process, and advanced ironmaking processes, where binders must function satisfactorily over an extraordinarily large range of temperatures (from room temperature up to over 1200 C). As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. The large quantities of ore that must be handled in metal extraction processes also means that the binder must be inexpensive and useful at low dosages to be economical. The acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures developed in this project will also be adapted for use in improving the energy efficiency and performance of a broad range of mineral agglomeration applications, particularly heap leaching and advanced primary ironmaking.

  8. Novel Binders and Methods for Agglomeration of Ore

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Kawatra; T. C. Eisele; J. A. Gurtler; K. Lewandowski

    2005-09-30

    Many metal extraction operations, such as leaching of copper, leaching of precious metals, and reduction of metal oxides to metal in high-temperature furnaces, require agglomeration of ore to ensure that reactive liquids or gases are evenly distributed throughout the ore being processed. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses achieves this even distribution of fluids by preventing fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Binders are critically necessary to produce agglomerates that will not break down during processing. However, for many important metal extraction processes there are no binders known that will work satisfactorily at a reasonable cost. A primary example of this is copper heap leaching, where there are no binders currently encountered in this acidic environment process. As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. The large quantities of ore that must be handled in metal extraction processes also means that the binder must be inexpensive and useful at low dosages to be economical. The acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures developed in this project will also be adapted for use in improving the energy efficiency and performance of a broad range of mineral agglomeration applications, particularly heap leaching. The active involvement of our industrial partners will help to ensure rapid commercialization of any agglomeration technologies developed by this project.

  9. Novel Binders and Methods for Agglomeration of Ore

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Kawatra; T. C. Eisele; J. A. Gurtler

    2004-03-31

    Many metal extraction operations, such as leaching of copper, leaching of precious metals, and reduction of metal oxides to metal in high-temperature furnaces, require agglomeration of ore to ensure that reactive liquids or gases are evenly distributed throughout the ore being processed. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses achieves this even distribution of fluids by preventing fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Binders are critically necessary to produce agglomerates that will not break down during processing. However, for many important metal extraction processes there are no binders known that will work satisfactorily. A primary example of this is copper heap leaching, where there are no binders that will work in the acidic environment encountered in this process. As a result, operators of acidic heap-leach facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. The large quantities of ore that must be handled in metal extraction processes also means that the binder must be inexpensive and useful at low dosages to be economical. The acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures developed in this project will also be adapted for use in improving the energy efficiency and performance of other agglomeration applications, particularly advanced primary ironmaking.

  10. Novel Binders and Methods for Agglomeration of Ore

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Kawatra; T. C. Eisele; K. A. Lewandowski; J. A. Gurtler

    2006-03-31

    Many metal extraction operations, such as leaching of copper, leaching of precious metals, and reduction of metal oxides to metal in high-temperature furnaces, require agglomeration of ore to ensure that reactive liquids or gases are evenly distributed throughout the ore being processed. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses achieves this even distribution of fluids by preventing fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Binders are critically necessary to produce agglomerates that will not break down during processing. However, for many important metal extraction processes there are no binders known that will work satisfactorily at a reasonable cost. A primary example of this is copper heap leaching, where there are no binders currently encountered in this acidic environment process. As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. The large quantities of ore that must be handled in metal extraction processes also means that the binder must be inexpensive and useful at low dosages to be economical. The acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures developed in this project will also be adapted for use in improving the energy efficiency and performance of a broad range of mineral agglomeration applications, particularly heap leaching. The active involvement of our industrial partners will help to ensure rapid commercialization of any agglomeration technologies developed by this project.

  11. Tail Buffeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdrashitov, G.

    1943-01-01

    An approximate theory of buffeting is here presented, based on the assumption of harmonic disturbing forces. Two cases of buffeting are considered: namely, for a tail angle of attack greater and less than the stalling angle, respectively. On the basis of the tests conducted and the results of foreign investigators, a general analysis is given of the nature of the forced vibrations the possible load limits on the tail, and the methods of elimination of buffeting.

  12. Bronze age copper sources in the mediterranean: a new approach.

    PubMed

    Gale, N H; Stos-Gale, Z A

    1982-04-01

    Efforts by scientists to locate the sources of copper used in ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern cultures through comparative chemical analyses of copper ores and archeological artifacts have largely failed for various mineralogical and metallurgical reasons. The isotopic composition of lead, an element present in a minor amount in many copper ores and bronze objects, is unchanged through metallurgical processes and may in principle be used to determine the sources of the copper used in Bronze Age artifacts. Results suggest that for Late Bronze Age Crete the Laurion region in Attica, Greece, may have been a more important copper source than Cyprus.

  13. Biotransformation of organic-rich copper-bearing black shale by indigenous microorganisms isolated from lubin copper mine (Poland).

    PubMed

    Matlakowska, Renata; Narkiewicz, Wanda; Sklodowska, Aleksandra

    2010-04-01

    The role of indigenous microorganisms in the biotransformation of refractory organic-rich copper-bearing black shale ore (Kupferschiefer) was confirmed in laboratory experiments. The persistent shale's organic matter was utilized by a mixture of bacterial strains as the sole carbon and energy source, and bacterial growth was accompanied by chemical and structural changes of black shale. The release of metallic elements and organic compounds into the aqueous phase was shown. Chemical analysis revealed the presence of long-chain aliphatic hydrocarbons and further biodegradation of these compounds by bacterial action. In this study, the release of metals from metalloorganic compounds present in organic-rich copper-bearing black shale was shown for the first time. The results have also confirmed the biotransformation of metalloporphyrins naturally occurring in black shale by indigenous microorganisms. Moreover, changes in the surface area and quantitative mineral composition of black shale were detected following bacterial treatment. This biotransformation activity is of potential use in biotechnological procedures for the recovery of copper and other valuable metals from tailings that contain up to 16% black shale. On the other hand, the release of organic carbon and heavy metals from black shale by biodegradation may significantly add to anthropogenic pollution.

  14. 165. VIEW OF MILL FROM UPPER TAILINGS POND (NORTH). ROASTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    165. VIEW OF MILL FROM UPPER TAILINGS POND (NORTH). ROASTER ON LEFT WITH ELEVATOR/CRUSHED ORE BIN TOWER TO RIGHT. MAIN MILL BUILDING IN CENTER WITH THICKENER ADDITION TO RIGHT. MACHINE SHOP ON CRUDE ORE BIN TERRACE ABOVE ROASTER. THE LOCATION OF THE 100,000 GALLON MILL WATER TANK CAN BE SEEN AT THE CENTER RIGHT NEAR THE TOP OF THE MOUNTAIN - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  15. 24. VIEW OF MILL FROM UPPER TAILINGS POND (NORTH). ROASTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. VIEW OF MILL FROM UPPER TAILINGS POND (NORTH). ROASTER ON LEFT WITH ELEVATOR/CRUSHED ORE BIN TOWER TO RIGHT. MAIN MILL BUILDING IN CENTER WITH THICKENER ADDITION TO RIGHT. MACHINE SHOP ON CRUDE ORE BIN TERRACE ABOVE ROASTER. THE LOCATION OF THE 100,000 GALLON MILL WATER TANK CAN BE SEEN AT THE CENTER RIGHT NEAR THE TOP OF THE MOUNTAIN. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  16. The genesis of ores

    SciTech Connect

    Brimhall, G. )

    1991-05-01

    Human history and technology have been shaped by metals. How did they become concentrated in minable deposits located so conveniently near the earth's surface The author explains the mechanisms of fluid transport-by magma, water and even air and wind-responsible for the chemical and physical interactions that created bodies of metallic ores throughout geologic history. From their formation to their modification at the surface of the earth, ore deposits are geologically transitory and reflect dynamic processes within the earth as well as atmospheric and climatic influences on hydrologic systems. As highly reactive supracrustal systems, they then serve as geochemical sensors providing a powerful record and set of tracer elements for deducing the history, transport paths and forces operative in the crust.

  17. Possible lunar ores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillett, Stephen L.

    1991-01-01

    Despite the conventional wisdom that there are no lunar ores, geochemical considerations suggest that local concentrations of useful rare elements exist on the Moon in spite of its extreme dryness. The Moon underwent protracted igneous activity in its history, and certain magmatic processes can concentrate incompatible elements even if anhydrous. Such processes include: (1) separation of a magma into immiscible liquid phases (depending on composition, these could be silicate-silicate, silicate-oxide, silicate-sulfide, or silicate-salt); (2) cumulate deposits in layered igneous intrusions; and (3) concentrations of rare, refractory, lithophile elements (e.g., Be, Li, Zr) in highly differentiated, silica-rich magmas, as in the lunar granites. Terrestrial mining experience indicates that the single most important characteristic of a potential ore is its concentration of the desire element. The utility of a planet as a resource base is that the welter of interacting processes over geologic time can concentrate rare element automatically. This advantage is squandered if adequate exploration for ores is not first carried out.

  18. ORE CONVEYANCE SYSTEM AND ADIT. LOOKING WEST. ORE FROM THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ORE CONVEYANCE SYSTEM AND ADIT. LOOKING WEST. ORE FROM THE MINES ABOVE AT THE RIDGELINE AND TO THE RIGHT WAS CONVEYED TO THIS AREA AND DUMPED INTO THE SHAFT AT CENTER. THIS SHAFT OPENS INTO THE ADIT AT BOTTOM CENTER. THERE IS ANOTHER SHAFT OPENING INTO THE ADIT JUST ABOVE THE ADIT BEHIND THE STONE WALL. THE ORE WAS LOADED INTO TRAM CARS INSIDE THE ADIT AND CONVEYED ON TRACKS TO THE TRESTLE LEADING TO THE PRIMARY ORE BIN AT THE TRAM TERMINAL. TRACKS CAN BE SEEN LEADING FROM THE ADIT AND TO THE LEFT. THE ORE WAS THEN DUMPED INTO A CHUTE AT THE END OF THE TRESTLE CARRYING IT INTO THE ORE BIN AT THE TRAM TERMINAL(SEE CHUTE ON CA-291-30). - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  19. Lead isotope studies of the Guerrero composite terrane, west-central Mexico: implications for ore genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potra, Adriana; Macfarlane, Andrew W.

    2014-01-01

    New thermal ionization mass spectrometry and multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry Pb isotope analyses of three Cenozoic ores from the La Verde porphyry copper deposit located in the Zihuatanejo-Huetamo subterrane of the Guerrero composite terrane are presented and the metal sources are evaluated. Lead isotope ratios of 3 Cenozoic ores from the El Malacate and La Esmeralda porphyry copper deposits located in the Zihuatanejo-Huetamo subterrane and of 14 ores from the Zimapan and La Negra skarn deposits from the adjoining Sierra Madre terrane are also presented to look for systematic differences in the lead isotope trends and ore metal sources among the proposed exotic tectonostratigraphic terranes of southern Mexico. Comparison among the isotopic signatures of ores from the Sierra Madre terrane and distinct subterranes of the Guerrero terrane supports the idea that there is no direct correlation between the distinct suspect terranes of Mexico and the isotopic signatures of the associated Cenozoic ores. Rather, these Pb isotope patterns are interpreted to reflect increasing crustal contribution to mantle-derived magmas as the arc advanced eastward onto a progressively thicker continental crust. The lead isotope trend observed in Cenozoic ores is not recognized in the ores from Mesozoic volcanogenic massive sulfide and sedimentary exhalative deposits. The Mesozoic ores formed prior to the amalgamation of the Guerrero composite terrane to the continental margin, which took place during the Late Cretaceous, in intraoceanic island arc and intracontinental marginal basin settings, while the Tertiary deposits formed after this event in a continental arc setting. Lead isotope ratios of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic ores appear to reflect these differences in tectonic setting of ore formation. Most Pb isotope values of ores from the La Verde deposit (206Pb/204Pb = 18.674-18.719) are less radiogenic than those of the host igneous rocks, but plot within the

  20. Novel Binders and Methods for Agglomeration of Ore

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Kawatra; T. C. Eisele; K. A. Lewandowski; J. A. Gurtler

    2006-12-31

    Many metal extraction operations, such as leaching of copper, leaching of precious metals, and reduction of metal oxides to metal in high-temperature furnaces, require agglomeration of ore to ensure that reactive liquids or gases are evenly distributed throughout the ore being processed. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses achieves this even distribution of fluids by preventing fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Binders are critically necessary to produce agglomerates that will not break down during processing. However, for many important metal extraction processes there are no binders known that will work satisfactorily. Primary examples of this are copper heap leaching, where there are no binders that will work in the acidic environment encountered in this process, and advanced ironmaking processes, where binders must function satisfactorily over an extraordinarily large range of temperatures (from room temperature up to over 1200 C). As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. The large quantities of ore that must be handled in metal extraction processes also means that the binder must be inexpensive and useful at low dosages to be economical. The acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures developed in this project will also be adapted for use in improving the energy efficiency and performance of a broad range of mineral agglomeration applications, particularly heap leaching and advanced primary ironmaking. This project has identified several acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures that can be used for improving the energy efficiency of heap leaching, by preventing the ''ponding'' and ''channeling'' effects that currently cause reduced recovery and extended leaching cycle times. Methods have also been developed for iron ore processing which are intended to improve the

  1. Contamination of water and soil by the Erdenet copper-molybdenum mine in Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battogtokh, B.; Lee, J.; Woo, N. C.; Nyamjav, A.

    2013-12-01

    As one of the largest copper-molybdenum (Cu-Mo) mines in the world, the Erdenet Mine in Mongolia has been active since 1978, and is expected to continue operations for at least another 30 years. In this study, the potential impacts of mining activities on the soil and water environments have been evaluated. Water samples showed high concentrations of sulfate, calcium, magnesium, Mo, and arsenic, and high pH values in the order of high to low as follows: tailing water > Khangal River > groundwater. Statistical analysis and the δ2H and δ18O values of water samples indicate that the tailing water directly affects the stream water and indirectly affects groundwater through recharge processes. Soil and stream sediments are highly contaminated with Cu and Mo, which are major elements of ore minerals. Based on the contamination factor (CF), the pollution load index (PLI), and the degree of contamination (Cd), soil appears to be less contaminated than stream sediments. The soil particle size is similar to that of tailing materials, but stream sediments have much coarser particles, implying that the materials have different origins. Contamination levels in stream sediments display a tendency to decrease with distance from the mine, but no such changes are found in soil. Consequently, soil contamination by metals is attributable to wind-blown dusts from the tailing materials, and stream sediment contamination is caused by discharges from uncontained subgrade ore stock materials. Considering the evident impact on the soil and water environment, and the human health risk from the Erdenet Mine, measures to mitigate its environmental impact should be taken immediately including source control, the establishment of a systematic and continuous monitoring system, and a comprehensive risk assessment. Sampling locations around the Erdenet Mine

  2. Leaching of Calcareous Bornite Ore in Ammoniacal Solution Containing Ammonium Persulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi-xiong; Yin, Zhou-lan; Chen, Yi-guang; Xiong, Li-zhi

    2014-12-01

    The leaching process of copper from calcareous bornite ore using ammonium persulfate as an oxidant in ammoniacal solution was investigated. The effects of stirring speed, temperature, initial concentration of ammonia and ammonium persulfate, and liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratio on the extraction percentage of copper from bornite ore were studied. The results show that the optimum leaching conditions for bornite ore with a maximum extraction of copper 88.9 pct are temperature 313.15 K (40 °C), reaction time 4 hours, stirring speed 600 r /min, L/S ratio 7/1 cm3/g, initial concentration of ammonia 2.0 mol/dm3, and ammonium persulfate 3.0 mol/dm3.

  3. Mortality among sulfide ore miners

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlman, K.; Koskela, R.S.; Kuikka, P.; Koponen, M.; Annanmaeki, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Lung cancer mortality was studied during 1965-1985 in Outokumpu township in North Karelia, where an old copper mine was located. Age-specific lung cancer death rates (1968-1985) were higher among the male population of Outokumpu than among the North Karelian male population of the same age excluding the Outokumpu district (p less than .01). Of all 106 persons who died from lung cancer during 1965-1985 in Outokumpu township, 47 were miners of the old mine, 39 of whom had worked there for at least three years and been heavily exposed to radon daughters and silica dust. The study cohort consisted of 597 miners first employed between 1954 and 1973 by a new copper mine and a zinc mine, and employed there for at least 3 years. The period of follow-up was 1954-1986. The number of person-years was 14,782. The total number of deaths was 102; the expected number was 72.8 based on the general male population and 97.8 based on the mortality of the male population of North Karelia. The excess mortality among miners was due mainly to ischemic heart disease (IHD); 44 were observed, the expected number was 22.1, based on the general male population, and the North Karelian expected number was 31.2 (p less than .05). Of the 44 miners who died from IHD, 20 were drillers or chargers exposed to nitroglycerin in dynamite charges, but also to several simultaneous stress factors including PAHs, noise, vibration, heavy work, accident risk, and working alone. Altogether 16 tumors were observed in the cohort. Ten of these were lung cancers, the expected number being 4.3. Miners who had died from lung cancer were 35-64 years old, and had entered mining work between 1954 and 1960. Five of the ten lung cancer cases came from the zinc mine (1.7 expected). Three of them were conductors of diesel-powered ore trains.

  4. Metal-residence sites in mine tailings in the Magdalena District, New Mexico, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Larocque, A.C.L.; Chapin, C.E.; Laughlin, A.W.; Hickmott, D.

    1996-05-01

    Mineralization in the Kelly Mining Camp is hosted by the Mississippian Kelly Limestone and comprises Zn-Pb skarn, replacement, and vein deposits related to Tertiary intrusive activity. The ore consists of primary (hypogene) sulfide mineralization which has been oxidized near surface to form secondary (supergene) mineralization. A zone of secondary sulfide-enrichment separates the sulfide and oxide ores. Mine tailings in the camp contain primary sulfide, oxide and gangue minerals, secondary (supergene) minerals formed during weathering of the primary ore, and tertiary minerals formed by alteration of hypogene and supergene assemblages after deposition in the tailings impoundment.

  5. Can I Trust ORE Reports?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feedback, 1984

    1984-01-01

    This issue of FEEDBACK, a newsletter produced by the the Austin Independent School District Office of Research and Evaluation (ORE), illustrates the accuracy, validity, and fairness of ORE reports. The independence of the reports is explained. Internal and external quality controls are used to ensure reliability and accuracy of the reports.…

  6. Novel Binders and Methods for Agglomeration of Ore

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Kawatra; T. C. Eisele; K. A. Lewandowski; J. A. Gurtler

    2006-09-30

    Heap leaching is one of the methods being used to recover metal from low grade ore deposits. The main problem faced during heap leaching is the migration of fine grained particles through the heap, forming impermeable beds which result in poor solution flow. The poor solution flow leads to less contact between the leach solution and the ore, resulting in low recovery rates. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses prevents fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Currently, there is one facility in the United States which uses agglomeration. This operation agglomerates their ore using leach solution (raffinate), but is still experiencing undesirable metal recovery from the heaps due to agglomerate breakdown. The use of a binder, in addition to the leach solution, during agglomeration would help to produce stronger agglomerates that did not break down during processing. However, there are no known binders that will work satisfactorily in the acidic environment of a heap, at a reasonable cost. As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. Increasing copper recovery in heap leaching by the use of binders and agglomeration would result in a significant decrease in the amount of energy consumed. Assuming that 70% of all the leaching heaps would convert to using agglomeration technology, as much as 1.64*10{sup 12} BTU per year would be able to be saved if a 25% increase in copper recovery was experienced, which is equivalent to saving approximately 18% of the energy currently being used in leaching heaps. For every week a leach cycle was decreased, a savings of as much as 1.23*10{sup 11} BTU per week would result. This project has identified several acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures. These binders and experimental procedures will be able to be used for use in improving the energy efficiency of

  7. 2. VIEW OF EAST TAILING DAM (FOREGROUND), LOOKING EAST SOUTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF EAST TAILING DAM (FOREGROUND), LOOKING EAST SOUTHEAST UP WASH TOWARD ORE BIN, OVERBURDEN, ADITS, AND ROAD SHOWN IN CA-290-1. MILL SITE IS UP AND TO THE RIGHT OF THIS VIEW. STANDARD FIFTY-GALLON DRUM IN FOREGROUND GIVES SCALE OF WALL. - Skidoo Mine, Park Route 38 (Skidoo Road), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  8. Physical, chemical and antimicrobial characterization of copper-bearing material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bowen; Hwang, Jiann-Yang; Drelich, Jaroslaw; Popko, Domenic; Bagley, Susan

    2010-12-01

    Arsenic, cadmium, copper, mercury, silver, and zinc are elements with strong antimicrobial properties. Among them, copper is more environmentally friendly and has both good antibacterial and antifungal properties. It has been shown that copper can even be effective against new viruses such as avian influenza (H5N1). Development of copper-bearing materials for various applications, therefore, is receiving increased attention. The Keweenaw Peninsula of Michigan was the largest native copper mining regions of North America at the turn of the 20th century. Copper was extracted by mining the copper-rich basaltic rock, and steamdriven stamp mills were used to process a great volume of low-grade ores, resulting in huge amounts of crushed waste ore called stamp sands. Approximately 500 million tons of stamp sand were discarded. This material is investigated in this study as an example for the development of antimicrobial materials.

  9. 54. VIEW OF ROASTER ADDITION FROM SOUTHEAST. SHOWS ELEVATOR/ORE BIN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. VIEW OF ROASTER ADDITION FROM SOUTHEAST. SHOWS ELEVATOR/ORE BIN ADDITION ON LEFT WITH BASE OF EXHAUST STACK, PORTION OF TOPPLED STACK ON LOWER RIGHT IN VIEW, AND UPPER TAILINGS POND BEYOND. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  10. SUBAQUEOUS DISPOSAL OF MILL TAILINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Neeraj K. Mendiratta; Roe-Hoan Yoon; Paul Richardson

    1999-09-03

    A study of mill tailings and sulfide minerals was carried out in order to understand their behavior under subaqueous conditions. A series of electrochemical experiments, namely, cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and galvanic coupling tests were carried out in artificial seawater and in pH 6.8 buffer solutions with chloride and ferric salts. Two mill tailings samples, one from the Kensington Mine, Alaska, and the other from the Holden Mine, Washington, were studied along with pyrite, galena, chalcopyrite and copper-activated sphalerite. SEM analysis of mill tailings revealed absence of sulfide minerals from the Kensington Mine mill tailings, whereas the Holden Mine mill tailings contained approximately 8% pyrite and 1% sphalerite. In order to conduct electrochemical tests, carbon matrix composite (CMC) electrodes of mill tailings, pyrite and galena were prepared and their feasibility was established by conducting a series of cyclic voltammetry tests. The cyclic voltammetry experiments carried out in artificial seawater and pH 6.8 buffer with chloride salts showed that chloride ions play an important role in the redox processes of sulfide minerals. For pyrite and galena, peaks were observed for the formation of chloride complexes, whereas pitting behavior was observed for the CMC electrodes of the Kensington Mine mill tailings. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy conducted in artificial seawater provided with the Nyquist plots of pyrite and galena. The Nyquist plots of pyrite and galena exhibited an inert range of potential indicating a slower rate of leaching of sulfide minerals in marine environments. The galvanic coupling experiments were carried out to study the oxidation of sulfide minerals in the absence of oxygen. It was shown that in the absence of oxygen, ferric (Fe3+) ions might oxidize the sulfide minerals, thereby releasing undesirable oxidation products in the marine environment. The source of Fe{sup 3{minus}} ions may be

  11. Reinforcement core facilitates O-ring installation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Reinforcement core holds O-ring in place within a structure while adjacent parts are being assembled. The core in the O-ring adds circumferential rigidity to the O-ring material. This inner core does not appreciably affect the sectional elasticity or gland-sealing characteristics of the O-ring.

  12. Microbial reduction of iron ore

    DOEpatents

    Hoffmann, M.R.; Arnold, R.G.; Stephanopoulos, G.

    1989-11-14

    A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry. 11 figs.

  13. Microbial reduction of iron ore

    DOEpatents

    Hoffmann, Michael R.; Arnold, Robert G.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    1989-01-01

    A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry.

  14. The Application of Modern Techniques and Measurement Devices for Identification of Copper Ore Types and Their Properties / Wykorzystanie nowoczesnych technik i urządzeń pomiarowych do identyfikacji typów rud miedzi i ich właściwości

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczykowska, Aldona; Trybalski, Kazimierz; Krawczykowski, Damian

    2013-06-01

    The paper concerns the application of modern methods and research techniques for investigations of copper ore properties. It presents the procedure and tools which, when put together, can constitute a source of information on properties of different products of processing and, simultaneously, can be used in the process control and optimization. The copper ore of one of the branches of the KHGM Polska Miedz plc was investigated. The ore samples represented each of the three lithological types occurring in the Polish deposits, i.e. carbonate, shale and sandstone ores. The paper presents the results of microscopic analyses, image analysis of scanning photographs and application procedures of the obtained information for the identification of ore types (application of neuron networks to the recognition of lithological compositions). The present publication will present sample results of modelling of classification identifying two types of ores, i.e. carbonate-shale and sandstone. Summing up the predictions of ore type fractions in respective mixtures for the considered problem of classification it can be stated that the prediction results are good and confirm the lithological predominance of certain ore types in the investigated mixtures. The experimental part comprised the determination of mineralogical and lithological composition of ores (optical microscope) and also elemental composition in the microareas of analysed samples (scanning microscope). Next, the image analysis was performed and subsequently the models classifying the ore types were made. W rudzie miedzi przerabianej w zakładach wzbogacania O/ZWR KGHM Polska Miedź S.A. można wyróżnić trzy typy litologiczne: rudę węglanową, łupkową i piaskowcową. Typy te różnią się właściwościami między innymi takimi jak: rodzaj i zawartość minerałów miedzi, rodzaj minerałów nieużytecznych, zawartość miedzi, twardość i podatność na rozdrabnianie, ale także wielkością i kształtem ziaren

  15. Natural Ores as Oxygen Carriers in Chemical Looping Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Hanjing; Siriwardane, Ranjani; Simonyi, Thomas; Poston, James

    2013-08-01

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a combustion technology that utilizes oxygen from oxygen carriers (OC), such as metal oxides, instead of air to combust fuels. The use of natural minerals as oxygen carriers has advantages, such as lower cost and availability. Eight materials, based on copper or iron oxides, were selected for screening tests of CLC processes using coal and methane as fuels. Thermogravimetric experiments and bench-scale fixed-bed reactor tests were conducted to investigate the oxygen transfer capacity, reaction kinetics, and stability during cyclic reduction/oxidation reaction. Most natural minerals showed lower combustion capacity than pure CuO/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} due to low-concentrations of active oxide species in minerals. In coal CLC, chryscolla (Cu-based), magnetite, and limonite (Fe-based) demonstrated better reaction performances than other materials. The addition of steam improved the coal CLC performance when using natural ores because of the steam gasification of coal and the subsequent reaction of gaseous fuels with active oxide species in the natural ores. In methane CLC, chryscolla, hematite, and limonite demonstrated excellent reactivity and stability in 50-cycle thermogravimetric analysis tests. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-based ores possess greater oxygen utilization but require an activation period before achieving full performance in methane CLC. Particle agglomeration issues associated with the application of natural ores in CLC processes were also studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  16. Iron versus Copper II. Principles and Applications in Bioinorganic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ochiai, Ei-Ichiro

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the differences between iron and copper. Describes various aspects of the behaviors of these two elements, including those of biological and environmental significance. Addresses the evolution of the atmosphere and sedimentary ore formation, the phylogeny of iron and copper, and some anthropological notes regarding the use of the metals.…

  17. Relationship between soil copper content and copper content of selected crop plants in central Chile.

    PubMed

    Badilla-Ohlbaum, R; Ginocchio, R; Rodríguez, P H; Céspedes, A; González, S; Allen, H E; Lagos, G E

    2001-12-01

    A survey of copper levels in agricultural soils of central Chile revealed two soil clusters-one with a mean copper level of 162 mg/kg and one with a mean copper level of 751 mg/kg of soil. Samples of soils from both soil clusters were characterized on the basis of physicochemical characteristics, and copper extractability was compared by saturation and CaCl2 extraction as well as an acid-leaching procedure (TCLP). We also measured the copper content of various tissues of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) and onion (Allium cepa) crops growing on these soils. Other than copper levels, soils from the two clusters were quite similar, with slightly greater levels of molybdenum and cadmium in the high-copper soils. Within each cluster, extracted copper levels and total soil copper levels were not correlated. However, the three extraction procedures solubilized significantly more copper from the high-Cu soils. Mineralogical characterization of the soil particles and depth profiles of soil metal levels in a subsample of sites suggested that highly insoluble copper ore and mining wastes might account for the high copper levels. Neither total nor extractable copper levels allowed statistical prediction of the levels of copper in plant tissue. The edible tissues of both crops had the same mean copper content, regardless of the copper soil level. However, copper contents of stems and leaves were significantly higher for plants growing on the high-Cu soils. These results show that in these soils, high copper levels are associated with very insoluble copper species and thus low bioavailability of copper to crop plants. PMID:11764158

  18. Microbial metabolism alters pore water chemistry and increases consolidation of oil sands tailings.

    PubMed

    Arkell, Nicholas; Kuznetsov, Petr; Kuznetsova, Alsu; Foght, Julia M; Siddique, Tariq

    2015-01-01

    Tailings produced during bitumen extraction from surface-mined oil sands ores (tar sands) comprise an aqueous suspension of clay particles that remain dispersed for decades in tailings ponds. Slow consolidation of the clays hinders water recovery for reuse and retards volume reduction, thereby increasing the environmental footprint of tailings ponds. We investigated mechanisms of tailings consolidation and revealed that indigenous anaerobic microorganisms altered porewater chemistry by producing CO and CH during metabolism of acetate added as a labile carbon amendment. Entrapped biogenic CO decreased tailings pH, thereby increasing calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) cations and bicarbonate (HCO) concentrations in the porewater through dissolution of carbonate minerals. Soluble ions increased the porewater ionic strength, which, with higher exchangeable Ca and Mg, decreased the diffuse double layer of clays and increased consolidation of tailings compared with unamended tailings in which little microbial activity was observed. These results are relevant to effective tailings pond management strategies. PMID:25602329

  19. Uranium mill ore dust characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Knuth, R.H.; George, A.C.

    1980-11-01

    Cascade impactor and general air ore dust measurements were taken in a uranium processing mill in order to characterize the airborne activity, the degree of equilibrium, the particle size distribution and the respirable fraction for the /sup 238/U chain nuclides. The sampling locations were selected to limit the possibility of cross contamination by airborne dusts originating in different process areas of the mill. The reliability of the modified impactor and measurement techniques was ascertained by duplicate sampling. The results reveal no significant deviation from secular equilibrium in both airborne and bulk ore samples for the /sup 234/U and /sup 230/Th nuclides. In total airborne dust measurements, the /sup 226/Ra and /sup 210/Pb nuclides were found to be depleted by 20 and 25%, respectively. Bulk ore samples showed depletions of 10% for the /sup 226/Ra and /sup 210/Pb nuclides. Impactor samples show disequilibrium of /sup 226/Ra as high as +-50% for different size fractions. In these samples the /sup 226/Ra ratio was generally found to increase as particle size decreased. Activity median aerodynamic diameters of the airborne dusts ranged from 5 to 30 ..mu..m with a median diameter of 11 ..mu..m. The maximum respirable fraction for the ore dusts, based on the proposed International Commission on Radiological Protection's (ICRP) definition of pulmonary deposition, was < 15% of the total airborne concentration. Ore dust parameters calculated for impactor duplicate samples were found to be in excellent agreement.

  20. Grouting of uranium mill tailings piles

    SciTech Connect

    Boegly, W.J. Jr.; Tamura, T.; Williams, J.D.

    1984-03-01

    A program of remedial action was initiated for a number of inactive uranium mill tailings piles. These piles result from mining and processing of uranium ores to meet the nation's defense and nuclear power needs and represent a potential hazard to health and the environment. Possible remedial actions include the application of covers to reduce radon emissions and airborne transport of the tailings, liners to prevent groundwater contamination by leachates from the piles, physical or chemical stabilization of the tailings, or moving the piles to remote locations. Conventional installation of liners would require excavation of the piles to emplace the liner; however, utilization of grouting techniques, such as those used in civil engineering to stabilize soils, might be a potential method of producing a liner without excavation. Laboratory studies on groutability of uranium mill tailings were conducted using samples from three abandoned piles and employing a number of particulate and chemical grouts. These studies indicate that it is possible to alter the permeability of the tailings from ambient values of 10/sup -3/ cm/s to values approaching 10/sup -7/ cm/s using silicate grouts and to 10/sup -8/ cm/s using acrylamide and acrylate grouts. An evaluation of grouting techniques, equipment required, and costs associated with grouting were also conducted and are presented. 10 references, 1 table.

  1. Tail gut cyst.

    PubMed

    Rao, G Mallikarjuna; Haricharan, P; Ramanujacharyulu, S; Reddy, K Lakshmi

    2002-01-01

    The tail gut is a blind extension of the hindgut into the tail fold just distal to the cloacal membrane. Remnants of this structure may form tail gut cyst. We report a 14-year-old girl with tail gut cyst that presented as acute abdomen. The patient recovered after cyst excision.

  2. Tail biting in pigs.

    PubMed

    Schrøder-Petersen, D L; Simonsen, H B

    2001-11-01

    One of the costly and welfare-reducing problems in modern pig production is tail biting. Tail biting is an abnormal behaviour, characterized by one pig's dental manipulation of another pig's tail. Tail biting can be classified into two groups: the pre-injury stage, before any wound on the tail is present, and the injury stage, where the tail is wounded and bleeding. Tail biting in the injury stage will reduce welfare of the bitten pig and the possible spread of infection is a health as well as welfare problem. The pigs that become tail biters may also suffer, because they are frustrated due to living in a stressful environment. This frustration may result in an excessive motivation for biting the tails of pen mates. This review aims to summarize recent research and theories in relation to tail biting. PMID:11681870

  3. Evaluation of feasibility of static tests applied to Küre VMS ore deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirel, Cansu; Çelik Balci, Nurgül; Şeref Sönmez, M.

    2015-04-01

    Küre volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) ore deposits have been mined for its copper content for over centuries. However, there is no published data on AMD around Küre VMS ore deposits. This study investigates the sources of acid producing mechanisms in Küre, using field and laboratorial approaches. Geochemical static tests to predict AMD generation are widely applied to mining sites for assessing potential environmental consequences. However, there are well known limitations of these methods particularly resulting from assumptions used for calculations. To test the feasibility of the methods to predict potential of AMD generation of Küre (VMS) copper deposits, for the first time, acid production and neutralization potential of various mine wastes of Küre (VMS) copper deposits were determined. To test our static test results, in situ and laboratory geochemical data were also obtained from the groundwater discharges from Bakibaba underground mining tunnels. Feasibility study showed that, despite a few inconsistencies, static tests were suitable for predicting generation of AMD around Küre copper mining site and reflected well the site conditions. The current study revealed that pulp density, defined as solid/liquid ratio and used for static tests, is an important limiting factor to predict reliable data for AMD generation. In this study, we also determined surface waters affected by AMD are predicted to have a pH value between 3 and 5, with an average of pH 4. Excessive concentrations of manganese, copper, cobalt and sulfate are also noted with considerable amounts of iron and zinc, which can reach to toxic levels. Moreover, iron and zinc were found to be the controlling the fate of metals by precipitation and co-precipitation, due to their relatively depleted concentrations at redox shifting zones. Key words: Küre pyritic copper ore, Bakibaba mining tunnels, volcanogenic massive sulfide ore deposits, acid production potential, neutralization potential

  4. Remobilisation features and structural control on ore grade distribution at the Konkola stratiform Cu-Co ore deposit, Zambia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torremans, K.; Gauquie, J.; Boyce, A. J.; Barrie, C. D.; Dewaele, S.; Sikazwe, O.; Muchez, Ph.

    2013-03-01

    The Konkola deposit is a high grade stratiform Cu-Co ore deposit in the Central African Copperbelt in Zambia. Economic mineralisation is confined to the Ore Shale formation, part of the Neoproterozoic metasedimentary rocks of the Katanga Supergroup. Petrographic study reveals that the copper-cobalt ore minerals are disseminated within the host rock, sometimes concentrated along bedding planes, often associated with dolomitic bands or clustered in cemented lenses and in layer-parallel and irregular veins. The hypogene sulphide mineralogy consists predominantly of chalcopyrite, bornite and chalcocite. Based upon relationships with metamorphic biotite, vein sulphides and most of the sulphides in cemented lenses were precipitated during or after biotite zone greenschist facies metamorphism. New δ34S values of sulphides from the Konkola deposit are presented. The sulphur isotope values range from -8.7‰ to +1.4‰ V-CDT for chalcopyrite from all mineralising phases and from -4.4‰ to +2.0‰ V-CDT for secondary chalcocite. Similarities in δ34S for sulphides from different vein generations, earlier sulphides and secondary chalcocite can be explained by (re)mobilisation of S from earlier formed sulphide phases, an interpretation strongly supported by the petrographic evidence. Deep supergene enrichment and leaching occurs up to a km in depth, predominantly in the form of secondary chalcocite, goethite and malachite and is often associated with zones of high permeability. Detailed distribution maps of total copper and total cobalt contents of the Ore Shale formation show a close relationship between structural features and higher copper and lower cobalt contents, relative to other areas of the mine. Structural features include the Kirilabombwe anticline and fault zones along the axial plane and two fault zones in the southern limb of the anticline. Cobalt and copper behave differently in relation to these structural features. These structures are interpreted to have

  5. SRB O-ring free response analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Carleton J.

    1986-01-01

    The free response of viton O-rings were investigated. Two different response mechanisms of viton O-rings are identified and a theoretical representation of the two mechanisms is compared with experimental results for various temperatures.

  6. Phase analytical studies of industrial copper smelting slags. Part I: Silicate slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüffler, R.; Dávalos, J.

    1998-12-01

    The pyrometallurgical extraction of copper from sulfide ore concentrates is determined by the behaviour of the associated iron during smelting. Hence, 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy is an attractive tool for studying the phases in silicate slags from German and Chilean smelting plants. Other methods used were ore microscopy, electron microprobe analysis, and X-ray powder diffraction.

  7. Measuring Gaps In O-Ring Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Scott E.

    1990-01-01

    Technique enables measurement of leakage areas created by small obstructions in O-ring seals. With simple fixture, gaps measured directly. Compresses piece of O-ring by amount determined by spacers. Camera aimed through clear plastic top plate records depression made in O-ring by obstruction. Faster, easier, more accurate than conventional estimation.

  8. O-ring gasket test fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, James Eric (Inventor); Mccluney, Donald Scott (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus is presented for testing O-ring gaskets under a variety of temperature, pressure, and dynamic loading conditions. Specifically, this apparatus has the ability to simulate a dynamic loading condition where the sealing surface in contact with the O-ring moves both away from and axially along the face of the O-ring.

  9. Conical O-ring seal

    DOEpatents

    Chalfant, Jr., Gordon G.

    1984-01-01

    A shipping container for radioactive or other hazardous materials which has a conical-shaped closure containing grooves in the conical surface thereof and an O-ring seal incorporated in each of such grooves. The closure and seal provide a much stronger, tighter and compact containment than with a conventional flanged joint.

  10. Conical O-ring seal

    DOEpatents

    Chalfant, G.G. Jr.

    A shipping container for radioactive or other hazardous materials has a conical-shaped closure containing grooves in the conical surface thereof and an O-ring seal incorporated in each of such grooves. The closure and seal provide a much stronger, tighter and compact containment than with a conventional flanged joint.

  11. Gaseous reduction of laterite ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utigard, T.; Bergman, R. A.

    1993-04-01

    Lateritic nickel ores have been reduced under laboratory conditions. The reduction experiments were carried out at temperatures from 500 °C to 1100 °C in a horizontal tube furnace using various mixtures of H2 and CO2. The hydrogen evolution method was used to measure the degree of metallization of the reduced ore. It was found that the rate of reduction was very low at 500 °C but then increased rapidly upon heating the ore to 600 °C. The percent metallics increased with increasing H2 to CO2 ratios in the reducing gas. At temperatures between 600 °C and 1100 °C, a H2 to CO2 ratio of 3 leads to the formation of 5 to 6 pct metallics in the reduced calcine was shown. Heating the ore in air or nitrogen prior to reduction does not affect the degree of metallization. A H2 to CO2 ratio of at least 4 is required to obtain a ferronickel product analyzing 36 pct nickel if no further reduction is carried out during the subsequent smelting operation.

  12. Geology and ore deposits of the Casto quadrangle, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, Clyde P.

    1934-01-01

    The study of the Casto quadrangle was undertaken as the first item in a project to obtain more thorough knowledge of the general geology of southcentral Idaho on which to base study of the ore deposits of t he region. The quadrangle conta ins fragmentary exposures of Algonkian and Paleozoic sedimentary rocks, extensive deposits of old volcanic strata, presumably Permian, not heretofore recognized in this part of Idaho, and a thick succession of Oligocene(?) lava and pyroclastic rocks. The Idaho batholith and its satellites extend into the quadrangle, and in addition there a re large masses of Tertiary granitic rock, not previously distinguished in Idaho, and many Tertiary dikes, some of which are genetically associated with contact-metamorphic deposits. The area contains injection gneiss of complex origin, largely related to the Idaho batholith but in part resulting from injection by ~he Tertiary granitic rocks under relatively light load. Orogenic movement took place in Algonkian, Paleozoic, and Tertiary time. There is a summit peneplain or par tial peneplain of Tertiary, perhaps Pliocene age, and the erosional history since its elevation has been complex. The ore deposits include lodes and placers. The lodes are related to both the Idaho batholith and the Tert iary intrusive rocks and have yielded gold and copper ore of a total value of about 1,000,000. Placers, largely formed in an interglacial inter val, have yielded about an equal amount. There has been some prospecting but almost no production since 1916.

  13. Copper Deposits in Sedimentary and Volcanogenic Rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tourtelot, Elizabeth B.; Vine, James David

    1976-01-01

    Copper deposits occur in sedimentary and volcanogenic rocks within a wide variety of geologic environments where there may be little or no evidence of hydrothermal alteration. Some deposits may be hypogene and have a deep-seated source for the ore fluids, but because of rapid cooling and dilution during syngenetic deposition on the ocean floor, the resulting deposits are not associated with hydrothermal alteration. Many of these deposits are formed at or near major tectonic features on the Earth's crust, including plate boundaries, rift valleys, and island arcs. The resulting ore bodies may be stratabound and either massive or disseminated. Other deposits form in rocks deposited in shallow-marine, deltaic, and nonmarine environments by the movement and reaction of interstratal brines whose metal content is derived from buried sedimentary and volcanic rocks. Some of the world's largest copper deposits were probably formed in this manner. This process we regard as diagenetic, but some would regard it as syngenetic, if the ore metals are derived from disseminated metal in the host-rock sequence, and others would regard the process as epigenetic, if there is demonstrable evidence of ore cutting across bedding. Because the oxidation associated with diagenetic red beds releases copper to ground-water solutions, red rocks and copper deposits are commonly associated. However, the ultimate size, shape, and mineral zoning of a deposit result from local conditions at the site of deposition - a logjam in fluvial channel sandstone may result in an irregular tabular body of limited size; a petroleum-water interface in an oil pool may result in a copper deposit limited by the size and shape of the petroleum reservoir; a persistent thin bed of black shale may result in a copper deposit the size and shape of that single bed. The process of supergene enrichment has been largely overlooked in descriptions of copper deposits in sedimentary rocks. However, supergene processes may be

  14. In-place leaching of uranium, copper, and evaporites

    SciTech Connect

    Carnahan, T.G.

    1982-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to discuss in-place leaching technology in the United States. Application of in-place leaching to uranium ores has been particularly successful. The sandstone ores are contained above and below by impermeable shales and the uranium ore minerals are easily leached with oxidizing acid or base solutions. Copper is recovered from subgrade rock by dump or in-place leaching acidified ferric sulfate solutions. The leaching solution migrates down through the rock and dissolves copper. The solution is collected from the base of the dumps and copper is recovered by solvent extraction, electrowinning, or by cementation on detinned steel cans. Solution mining of evaporites is being conducted commercially for the extraction of sodium chloride and potassium chloride.

  15. Uranium ore treatment. (Latest citations from the Compendex database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the treatment of uranium ores. Emphasis is place upon the primary step within the process, acid leaching. Tailing disposal and proper handling of radioactive materials is also emphasized. Primary treatment procedures include ion-exchange, sulfuric acid leaching, solvent extraction, and sedimentation. Environmental aspects of uranium milling and mining are examined in a related bibliography. (Contains a minimum of 112 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  16. Uranium ore treatment. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the treatment of uranium ores. Emphasis is place upon the primary step within the process, acid leaching. Tailing disposal and proper handling of radioactive materials is also emphasized. Primary treatment procedures include ion-exchange, sulfuric acid leaching, solvent extraction, and sedimentation. Environmental aspects of uranium milling and mining are examined in a related bibliography. (Contains a minimum of 115 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  17. Biomining-biotechnologies for extracting and recovering metals from ores and waste materials.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D Barrie

    2014-12-01

    The abilities of acidophilic chemolithotrophic bacteria and archaea to accelerate the oxidative dissolution of sulfide minerals have been harnessed in the development and application of a biotechnology for extracting metals from sulfidic ores and concentrates. Biomining is currently used primarily to leach copper sulfides and as an oxidative pretreatment for refractory gold ores, though it is also used to recover other base metals, such as cobalt, nickel and zinc. Recent developments have included using acidophiles to process electronic wastes, to extract metals from oxidized ores, and to selectively recover metals from process waters and waste streams. This review describes the microorganisms and mechanisms involved in commercial biomining operations, how the technology has developed over the past 50 years, and discusses the challenges and opportunities for mineral biotechnologies in the 21st century.

  18. Biomining-biotechnologies for extracting and recovering metals from ores and waste materials.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D Barrie

    2014-12-01

    The abilities of acidophilic chemolithotrophic bacteria and archaea to accelerate the oxidative dissolution of sulfide minerals have been harnessed in the development and application of a biotechnology for extracting metals from sulfidic ores and concentrates. Biomining is currently used primarily to leach copper sulfides and as an oxidative pretreatment for refractory gold ores, though it is also used to recover other base metals, such as cobalt, nickel and zinc. Recent developments have included using acidophiles to process electronic wastes, to extract metals from oxidized ores, and to selectively recover metals from process waters and waste streams. This review describes the microorganisms and mechanisms involved in commercial biomining operations, how the technology has developed over the past 50 years, and discusses the challenges and opportunities for mineral biotechnologies in the 21st century. PMID:24794631

  19. Geothermal brine well: Mile-deep drill hole may tap ore-bearing magmatic water and rocks Undergoing Metamorphism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, D.E.; Anderson, E.T.; Grubbs, D.K.

    1963-01-01

    A deep geothermal well in California has tapped a very saline brine extraordinarily high in heavy metals and other rare elements; copper and silver are precipitated during brine production. Preliminary evidence suggests that the brine may be pure magmatic water and an active ore-forming solution. Metamorphism of relatively young rocks may also be occurring within accessible depths.

  20. Geothermal Brine Well: Mile-Deep Drill Hole May Tap Ore-Bearing Magmatic Water and Rocks Undergoing Metamorphism.

    PubMed

    White, D E; Anderson, E T; Grubbs, D K

    1963-03-01

    A deep geothermal well in California has tapped a very saline brine extraordinarily high in heavy metals and other rare elements; copper and silver are precipitated during brine production. Preliminary evidence suggests that the brine may be pure magmatic water and an active ore-forming solution. Metamorphism of relatively young rocks may also be occurring within accessible depths.

  1. Copper transport.

    PubMed

    Linder, M C; Wooten, L; Cerveza, P; Cotton, S; Shulze, R; Lomeli, N

    1998-05-01

    In adult humans, the net absorption of dietary copper is approximately 1 mg/d. Dietary copper joins some 4-5 mg of endogenous copper flowing into the gastrointestinal tract through various digestive juices. Most of this copper returns to the circulation and to the tissues (including liver) that formed them. Much lower amounts of copper flow into and out of other major parts of the body (including heart, skeletal muscle, and brain). Newly absorbed copper is transported to body tissues in two phases, borne primarily by plasma protein carriers (albumin, transcuprein, and ceruloplasmin). In the first phase, copper goes from the intestine to the liver and kidney; in the second phase, copper usually goes from the liver (and perhaps also the kidney) to other organs. Ceruloplasmin plays a role in this second phase. Alternatively, liver copper can also exit via the bile, and in a form that is less easily reabsorbed. Copper is also present in and transported by other body fluids, including those bathing the brain and central nervous system and surrounding the fetus in the amniotic sac. Ceruloplasmin is present in these fluids and may also be involved in copper transport there. The concentrations of copper and ceruloplasmin in milk vary with lactational stage. Parallel changes occur in ceruloplasmin messenger RNA expression in the mammary gland (as determined in pigs). Copper in milk ceruloplasmin appears to be particularly available for absorption, at least in rats. PMID:9587137

  2. Copper transport.

    PubMed

    Linder, M C; Wooten, L; Cerveza, P; Cotton, S; Shulze, R; Lomeli, N

    1998-05-01

    In adult humans, the net absorption of dietary copper is approximately 1 mg/d. Dietary copper joins some 4-5 mg of endogenous copper flowing into the gastrointestinal tract through various digestive juices. Most of this copper returns to the circulation and to the tissues (including liver) that formed them. Much lower amounts of copper flow into and out of other major parts of the body (including heart, skeletal muscle, and brain). Newly absorbed copper is transported to body tissues in two phases, borne primarily by plasma protein carriers (albumin, transcuprein, and ceruloplasmin). In the first phase, copper goes from the intestine to the liver and kidney; in the second phase, copper usually goes from the liver (and perhaps also the kidney) to other organs. Ceruloplasmin plays a role in this second phase. Alternatively, liver copper can also exit via the bile, and in a form that is less easily reabsorbed. Copper is also present in and transported by other body fluids, including those bathing the brain and central nervous system and surrounding the fetus in the amniotic sac. Ceruloplasmin is present in these fluids and may also be involved in copper transport there. The concentrations of copper and ceruloplasmin in milk vary with lactational stage. Parallel changes occur in ceruloplasmin messenger RNA expression in the mammary gland (as determined in pigs). Copper in milk ceruloplasmin appears to be particularly available for absorption, at least in rats.

  3. Advantages and challenges of increased antimicrobial copper use and copper mining.

    PubMed

    Elguindi, Jutta; Hao, Xiuli; Lin, Yanbing; Alwathnani, Hend A; Wei, Gehong; Rensing, Christopher

    2011-07-01

    Copper is a highly utilized metal for electrical, automotive, household objects, and more recently as an effective antimicrobial surface. Copper-containing solutions applied to fruits and vegetables can prevent bacterial and fungal infections. Bacteria, such as Salmonellae and Cronobacter sakazakii, often found in food contamination, are rapidly killed on contact with copper alloys. The antimicrobial effectiveness of copper alloys in the healthcare environment against bacteria causing hospital-acquired infections such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Clostridium difficile has been described recently. The use of copper and copper-containing materials will continue to expand and may lead to an increase in copper mining and production. However, the copper mining and manufacturing industry and the consumer do not necessarily enjoy a favorable relationship. Open pit mining, copper mine tailings, leaching products, and deposits of toxic metals in the environment often raises concerns and sometimes public outrage. In addition, consumers may fear that copper alloys utilized as antimicrobial surfaces in food production will lead to copper toxicity in humans. Therefore, there is a need to mitigate some of the negative effects of increased copper use and copper mining. More thermo-tolerant, copper ion-resistant microorganisms could improve copper leaching and lessen copper groundwater contamination. Copper ion-resistant bacteria associated with plants might be useful in biostabilization and phytoremediation of copper-contaminated environments. In this review, recent progress in microbiological and biotechnological aspects of microorganisms in contact with copper will be presented and discussed, exploring their role in the improvement for the industries involved as well as providing better environmental outcomes.

  4. Geochemistry of Mine Waste and Mill Tailings, Meadow Deposits, Streambed Sediment, and General Hydrology and Water Quality for the Frohner Meadows Area, Upper Lump Gulch, Jefferson County, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klein, Terry L.; Cannon, Michael R.; Fey, David L.

    2004-01-01

    Frohner Meadows, an area of low-topographic gradient subalpine ponds and wetlands in glaciated terrane near the headwaters of Lump Gulch (a tributary of Prickly Pear Creek), is located about 15 miles west of the town of Clancy, Montana, in the Helena National Forest. Mining and ore treatment of lead-zinc-silver veins in granitic rocks of the Boulder batholith over the last 120 years from two sites (Frohner mine and the Nellie Grant mine) has resulted in accumulations of mine waste and mill tailings that have been distributed downslope and downstream by anthropogenic and natural processes. This report presents the results of an investigation of the geochemistry of the wetlands, streams, and unconsolidated-sediment deposits and the hydrology, hydrogeology, and water quality of the area affected by these sources of ore-related metals. Ground water sampled from most shallow wells in the meadow system contained high concentrations of arsenic, exceeding the Montana numeric water-quality standard for human health. Transport of cadmium and zinc in ground water is indicated at one site near Nellie Grant Creek based on water-quality data from one well near the creek. Mill tailings deposited in upper Frohner Meadow contribute large arsenic loads to Frohner Meadows Creek; Nellie Grant Creek contributes large arsenic, cadmium, and zinc loads to upper Frohner Meadows. Concentrations of total-recoverable cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc in most surface-water sites downstream from the Nellie Grant mine area exceeded Montana aquatic-life standards. Nearly all samples of surface water and ground water had neutral to slightly alkaline pH values. Concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, lead, and zinc in streambed sediment in the entire meadow below the mine waste and mill tailings accumulations are highly enriched relative to regional watershed-background concentrations and exceed consensus-based, probable-effects concentrations for streambed sediment at most sites. Cadmium, copper, and

  5. Use of cemented paste backfill in arsenic-rich tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamberg, Roger; Maurice, Christian; Alakangas, Lena

    2015-04-01

    Gold is extracted by cyanide leaching from inclusions in arsenopyrite from a mine in the north of Sweden. The major ore mineral assemblage consists of pyrrhotite and arsenopyrite-loellingite. Effluents from the gold extraction were treated with Fe2(SO4)3, with the aim to form stable As-bearing Fe-precipitates (FEP). The use of the method called cemented paste backfill (CPB) is sometimes suggested for the management of tailings. In CPB, tailings are commonly mixed with low proportions (3 - 7 %) of cement and backfilled into underground excavated area. To reduce costs, amendments such as granulated blast furnace slag (GBFS), biofuel fly ash (BFA) and cement kiln dust (CKD) are used for partial replacement of cement in CPB due to their pozzolanic and alkaline properties. The objective for this study was to evaluate the leaching behaviour of As in CPB-mixtures with low proportions (1 - 3 %) of BFA and ordinary cement and unmodified tailings. The selection of CPB-recipies was made based on technical and economical criterias to adress the demands deriving from the mining operations. Speciation of the As in ore and tailings samples revealed that mining processes have dissolved the majority of the arsenopyrite in the ore, causing secondary As phases to co-precipitate with newly formed FEP:s. Tank leaching tests (TLT) and weathering cells (WCT) were used to compare leaching behaviour in a monolithic mass contra a crushed material. Quantification of the presumed benefit of CPB was made by calculation of the cumulative leaching of As. Results from the leaching tests (TLT and WCT) showed that the inclusion of As-rich tailings into a cementitious matrix increased leaching of As. This behaviour could partially be explained by an increase of pH. The addition of alkaline binder materials to tailings increased As leaching due to the relocation of desorbed As from FEPs into less acid-tolerant species such as Ca-arsenates and cementitious As-phases. Unmodified tailings generated an

  6. Contrasting hydrological processes of meteoric water incursion during magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposition: An oxygen isotope study by ion microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fekete, Szandra; Weis, Philipp; Driesner, Thomas; Bouvier, Anne-Sophie; Baumgartner, Lukas; Heinrich, Christoph A.

    2016-10-01

    Meteoric water convection has long been recognized as an efficient means to cool magmatic intrusions in the Earth's upper crust. This interplay between magmatic and hydrothermal activity thus exerts a primary control on the structure and evolution of volcanic, geothermal and ore-forming systems. Incursion of meteoric water into magmatic-hydrothermal systems has been linked to tin ore deposition in granitic plutons. In contrast, evidence from porphyry copper ore deposits suggests that crystallizing subvolcanic magma bodies are only affected by meteoric water incursion in peripheral zones and during late post-ore stages. We apply high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to analyze oxygen isotope ratios of individual growth zones in vein quartz crystals, imaged by cathodo-luminescence microscopy (SEM-CL). Existing microthermometric information from fluid inclusions enables calculation of the oxygen isotope composition of the fluid from which the quartz precipitated, constraining the relative timing of meteoric water input into these two different settings. Our results confirm that incursion of meteoric water directly contributes to cooling of shallow granitic plutons and plays a key role in concurrent tin mineralization. By contrast, data from two porphyry copper deposits suggest that downward circulating meteoric water is counteracted by up-flowing hot magmatic fluids. Our data show that porphyry copper ore deposition occurs close to a magmatic-meteoric water interface, rather than in a purely magmatic fluid plume, confirming recent hydrological modeling. On a larger scale, the expulsion of magmatic fluids against the meteoric water interface can shield plutons from rapid convective cooling, which may aid the build-up of large magma chambers required for porphyry copper ore formation.

  7. Getting rid of the unwanted: highlights of developments and challenges of biobeneficiation of iron ore minerals-a review.

    PubMed

    Adeleke, Rasheed A

    2014-12-01

    The quest for quality mineral resources has led to the development of many technologies that can be used to refine minerals. Biohydrometallurgy is becoming an increasingly acceptable technology worldwide because it is cheap and environmentally friendly. This technology has been successfully developed for some sulphidic minerals such as gold and copper. In spite of wide acceptability of this technology, there are limitations to its applications especially in the treatment of non-sulphidic minerals such as iron ore minerals. High levels of elements such as potassium (K) and phosphorus (P) in iron ore minerals are known to reduce the quality and price of these minerals. Hydrometallurgical methods that are non-biological involving the use of chemicals are usually used to deal with this problem. However, recent advances in mining technologies favour green technologies, known as biohydrometallurgy, with minimal impact on the environment. This technology can be divided into two, namely bioleaching and biobeneficiation. This review focuses on Biobeneficiation of iron ore minerals. Biobeneficiation of iron ore is very challenging due to the low price and chemical constitution of the ore. There are substantial interests in the exploration of this technology for improving the quality of iron ore minerals. In this review, current developments in the biobeneficiation of iron ore minerals are considered, and potential solutions to challenges faced in the wider adoption of this technology are proposed.

  8. Softened-Stainless-Steel O-Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marquis, G. A.; Waters, William I.

    1993-01-01

    In fabrication of O-ring of new type, tube of 304 stainless steel bent around mandril into circle and welded closed into ring. Ring annealed in furnace to make it soft and highly ductile. In this condition, used as crushable, deformable O-ring seal. O-ring replacements used in variety of atmospheres and temperatures, relatively inexpensive, fabricated with minimum amount of work, amenable to one-of-a-kind production, reusable, and environmentally benign.

  9. Metallization of siderite ore in reducing roasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vusikhis, A. S.; Leont'ev, L. I.; Kudinov, D. Z.; Gulyakov, V. S.

    2016-05-01

    The behavior of the initial ore and the concentrate of magnetoroasting beneficiation during metallization under the conditions that are close to those for reducing roasting of iron ores in a rotary furnace is studied in terms of works on extending the field of application of Bakal siderites. A difference in the mechanisms of the metallization of crude ore and the roasted concentrate is observed. The metallization of roasted concentrate lumps is more efficient than that of crude siderite ore. In this case, the process ends earlier and can be carried out at higher temperatures (1250-1300°C) without danger of skull formation.

  10. Application of the Geo-Anomaly Unit Concept in Quantitative Delineation and Assessment of Gold Ore Targets in Western Shandong Uplift Terrain, Eastern China

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yongqing Zhao Pengda; Chen Jianguo; Liu Jiping

    2001-03-15

    A number of large and giant ore deposits have been discovered within the relatively small areas of lithospheric structure anomalies, including various boundary zones of tectonic plates. The regions have become the well-known intercontinental ore-forming belts, such as the circum-Pacific gold-copper, copper-molybdenum, and tungsten-tin metallogenic belts. These belts are typical geological anomalous areas. An investigation into the hydrothermal ore deposits in different regions in the former Soviet Union illustrated that the geologic structures of ore fields of almost all major commercial deposits have distinct features compared with the neighboring areas. These areas with distinct features are defined as geo-anomalies. A geo-anomaly refers to such a geologic body or a combination of bodies that their composition, texture-structure, and genesis are significantly different from those of their surroundings. A geo-anomaly unit (GU) is an area containing distinct features that can be delineated with integrated ore-forming information using computer techniques on the basis of the geo-anomaly concept. Herein, the GU concept is illustrated by a case study of delineating the gold ore targets in the western Shandong uplift terrain, eastern China. It includes: (1) analyses of gold ore-forming factors; (2) compilation of normalized regional geochemical map and extraction of geochemical anomalies; (3) compilation of gravitational and aeromagnetic tectonic skeleton map and extraction of gravitational and aeromagnetic anomalies; (4) extraction of circular and linear anomalies from remote-sensing Landsat TM images; (5) establishment of a geo-anomaly conceptual model associated with known gold mineralization; (6) establishment of gold ore-forming favorability by computing techniques; and (7) delineation and assessment of ore-forming units. The units with high favorability are suggested as ore targets.

  11. [Studies of radioactivity in the ores and mineral products].

    PubMed

    Brovtsyn, A K

    2004-01-01

    Mineral ores and products made of them were studied by gamma-spectrophotometry. Regularities of radionuclide content in ores and products were found. A possibility of deactivation of ores and mineral products by the technology of aerohydrodynamic concentration was shown.

  12. Estimating gold-ore mineralization potential within Topolninsk ore field (Gorny Altai)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timkin, T.; Voroshilov, V.; Askanakova, O.; Cherkasova, T.; Chernyshov, A.; Korotchenko, T.

    2015-11-01

    Based on the results of ore and near-ore metasomatite composition analysis, the factors and indicators of gold-ore mineralization potential were proposed. Integration of the obtained data made it possible to outline magmatic, structural, and lithological factors, as well as direct and indirect indicators of gold-ore mineralization. Applying multidimensional analysis inherent to geochemical data, the spatial structure was investigated, as well as the potential mineralization was identified. Based on the developed and newly-identified mineralization, small (up to medium-sized) mineable gold-ore deposits in skarns characterized by complex geological setting was identified.

  13. Iron ore: energy, labor, and capital changes with technology.

    PubMed

    Kakela, P J

    1978-12-15

    Resource gathering is depending on leaner crude ores. Iron ore mining typifies this trend. To make lean taconite iron ores useful required a technologic breakthrough-pelletization. The shift to iron ore pellets has the advantage that they require less energy and labor per ton of molten iron than high-grade naturally concentrated ores. Increased reliance on pellets causes a geographic shift of some jobs and environmental effects from blast furnaces to iron ore mines. PMID:17735387

  14. Iron ore: energy, labor, and capital changes with technology.

    PubMed

    Kakela, P J

    1978-12-15

    Resource gathering is depending on leaner crude ores. Iron ore mining typifies this trend. To make lean taconite iron ores useful required a technologic breakthrough-pelletization. The shift to iron ore pellets has the advantage that they require less energy and labor per ton of molten iron than high-grade naturally concentrated ores. Increased reliance on pellets causes a geographic shift of some jobs and environmental effects from blast furnaces to iron ore mines.

  15. 43 CFR 9239.5-1 - Ores.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ores. 9239.5-1 Section 9239.5-1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TECHNICAL SERVICES (9000) TRESPASS Kinds of Trespass § 9239.5-1 Ores. (a) For...

  16. 43 CFR 9239.5-1 - Ores.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ores. 9239.5-1 Section 9239.5-1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TECHNICAL SERVICES (9000) TRESPASS Kinds of Trespass § 9239.5-1 Ores. (a) For...

  17. 43 CFR 9239.5-1 - Ores.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ores. 9239.5-1 Section 9239.5-1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TECHNICAL SERVICES (9000) TRESPASS Kinds of Trespass § 9239.5-1 Ores. (a) For...

  18. 43 CFR 9239.5-1 - Ores.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ores. 9239.5-1 Section 9239.5-1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TECHNICAL SERVICES (9000) TRESPASS Kinds of Trespass § 9239.5-1 Ores. (a) For...

  19. The copper-cobalt deposits of the Quartzburg district, Grant County, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vhay, John Stewart

    1960-01-01

    The copper- and cobalt-bearing veins of part of the Quartzburg district are in fracture zones trending about N. 70 degrees E. in folded Permian (?) metavolcanic rocks on the southwest side of a quartz diorite stock. Along many of the veins fine-grained tourmaline and quartz have replaced the country rock. The primary ore minerals are chalcopyrite, glaucodot, safflorite, and cobaltite. The copper- and cobalt-rich parts of the deposits appear to be in separate ore shoots. Gold content is generally higher in the cobalt-bearing parts of the veins than in the copper-rich parts. The Standard mine has developed part of one vein zone. Several other vein zones that crop out may contain as much copper as the Standard vein zone. Further bulldozing and diamond drilling on the surface, and more geologic mapping, sampling, and diamond drilling underground are suggested as means to explore for more ore deposits.

  20. Application of high resolution 2D/3D spectral induced polarization (SIP) in metalliferous ore exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R.; Zhao, X.; Yao, H.; He, X.; Zeng, P.; Chang, F.; Yang, Y.; Zhang, X.; Xi, X.; He, L.

    2015-12-01

    Induced polarization (IP) is a powerful tool in metalliferous ore exploration. However, there are many sources, such as clay and graphite, which can generate IP anomaly. Spectral induced polarization (SIP) measures IP response on a wide frequency range. This method provides a way to discriminate IP response generated by metalliferous ore or other objects. The best way to explore metalliferous ore is 3D SIP exploration. However, if we consider the exploration cost and efficiency, we can use SIP profiling to find an anomaly, and then use 2D/3D SIP sounding to characterize the anomaly. Based on above idea, we used a large-scale distributed SIP measurement system which can realize 800 sounding sites in one direction at the same time. This system can be used for SIP profiling, 2D/3D SIP sounding with high efficiency, high resolution, and large depth of investigation (> 1000 m). Qiushuwan copper - molybdenum deposit is located in Nanyang city, Henan province, China. It is only a middle-size deposit although over 100 holes were drilled and over 40 years of exploration were spent because of very complex geological setting. We made SIP measurement over 100 rock and ore samples to discriminate IP responses of ore and rock containing graphite. Then we carried out 7 lines of 2D SIP exploration with the depth of investigation great than 1000 m. The minimum electode spacing for potential difference is only 20 m. And we increase the spacing of current electodes at linear scale. This acquisition setting ensures high density data acquired and high quality data acquisition. Modeling and inversion result proves that we can get underground information with high resolution by our method. Our result shows that there exists a strong SIP response related to ore body in depth > 300 m. Pseudo-3D inversion of five 2D SIP sounding lines shows the location and size of IP anomaly. The new drillings based our result found a big copper-molybdenum ore body in new position with depth > 300 m and

  1. Cross-Comparison of Leaching Strains Isolated from Two Different Regions: Chambishi and Dexing Copper Mines

    PubMed Central

    Ngom, Baba; Liang, Yili; Liu, Xueduan

    2014-01-01

    A cross-comparison of six strains isolated from two different regions, Chambishi copper mine (Zambia, Africa) and Dexing copper mine (China, Asia), was conducted to study the leaching efficiency of low grade copper ores. The strains belong to the three major species often encountered in bioleaching of copper sulfide ores under mesophilic conditions: Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, and Leptospirillum ferriphilum. Prior to their study in bioleaching, the different strains were characterized and compared at physiological level. The results revealed that, except for copper tolerance, strains within species presented almost similar physiological traits with slight advantages of Chambishi strains. However, in terms of leaching efficiency, native strains always achieved higher cell density and greater iron and copper extraction rates than the foreign microorganisms. In addition, microbial community analysis revealed that the different mixed cultures shared almost the same profile, and At. ferrooxidans strains always outcompeted the other strains. PMID:25478575

  2. Cross-comparison of leaching strains isolated from two different regions: Chambishi and Dexing copper mines.

    PubMed

    Ngom, Baba; Liang, Yili; Liu, Xueduan

    2014-01-01

    A cross-comparison of six strains isolated from two different regions, Chambishi copper mine (Zambia, Africa) and Dexing copper mine (China, Asia), was conducted to study the leaching efficiency of low grade copper ores. The strains belong to the three major species often encountered in bioleaching of copper sulfide ores under mesophilic conditions: Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, and Leptospirillum ferriphilum. Prior to their study in bioleaching, the different strains were characterized and compared at physiological level. The results revealed that, except for copper tolerance, strains within species presented almost similar physiological traits with slight advantages of Chambishi strains. However, in terms of leaching efficiency, native strains always achieved higher cell density and greater iron and copper extraction rates than the foreign microorganisms. In addition, microbial community analysis revealed that the different mixed cultures shared almost the same profile, and At. ferrooxidans strains always outcompeted the other strains.

  3. MERCURY IN METAL ORE DEPOSITS: AN UNRECOGNIZED, WIDESPREAD SOURCE TO LAKE SUPERIOR SEDIMENTS, CONTRIBUTION #1072

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mining operations have worked the rich mineral resources of the Lake Superior Basin for over 150 years, leaving industrially impacted regions with tailing piles and smelters. In Lake Superior sediments, mercury and copper inventories increase towards shorelines and are highly cor...

  4. Geology, geochemistry, and geophysics of the Fry Canyon uranium/copper project site, southeastern Utah - Indications of contaminant migration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Otton, James K.; Zielinski, Robert A.; Horton, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    The Fry Canyon uranium/copper project site in San Juan County, southeastern Utah, was affected by the historical (1957-68) processing of uranium and copper-uranium ores. Relict uranium tailings and related ponds, and a large copper heap-leach pile at the site represent point sources of uranium and copper to local soils, surface water, and groundwater. This study was designed to establish the nature, extent, and pathways of contaminant dispersion. The methods used in this study are applicable at other sites of uranium mining, milling, or processing. The uranium tailings and associated ponds sit on a bench that is as much as 4.25 meters above the level of the adjacent modern channel of Fry Creek. The copper heap leach pile sits on bedrock just south of this bench. Contaminated groundwater from the ponds and other nearby sites moves downvalley and enters the modern alluvium of adjacent Fry Creek, its surface water, and also a broader, deeper paleochannel that underlies the modern creek channel and adjacent benches and stream terraces. The northern extent of contaminated groundwater is uncertain from geochemical data beyond an area of monitoring wells about 300 meters north of the site. Contaminated surface water extends to the State highway bridge. Some uranium-contaminated groundwater may also enter underlying bedrock of the Permian Cedar Mesa Sandstone along fracture zones. Four dc-resistivity surveys perpendicular to the valley trend were run across the channel and its adjacent stream terraces north of the heap-leach pile and ponds. Two surveys were done in a small field of monitoring wells and two in areas untested by borings to the north of the well field. Bedrock intercepts, salt distribution, and lithologic information from the wells and surface observations in the well field aided interpretation of the geophysical profiles there and allowed interpretation of the two profiles not tested by wells. The geophysical data for the two profiles to the north of the

  5. Rare-earth occurrences in the Pea Ridge tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Vierrether, C.W.; Cornell, W.I.

    1993-01-01

    Tailings from the Pea Ridge iron mine contain significant amounts of apatite, which has rare-earth element values associated with it. In association with the recovery of rare-earth minerals as a secondary resource, the US Bureau of Mines conducted an investigation on the recoverability of the rare-earth minerals from the tailings. The mill tailings were subjected to a phosphate flotation to separate the apatite from other constituents. More than 70-pct recovery of the rare-earth values was achieved. Based on mineralogical characterization and prior analysis of rare-earth-bearing breccia pipe material at Pea Ridge, it is proposed that processing this phosphate concentrate on a vanner table would yield up to a 95-pct recovery of the rare earths in the concentrate, with the apatite reporting to the tailings. Intensive ore microscopy studies of the original tailings to the flotation products led to the identification of monazite, xenotime, and rare-earth-enriched apatite as the major rare-earth-bearing minerals in the tailings.

  6. Geology and ore deposits of the Klondike Ridge area, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vogel, John David

    1960-01-01

    The region described in this report is in the northeastern part of the Colorado Plateau and is transitional between two major structural elements. The western part is typical of the salt anticline region of the Plateau, but the eastern part has features which reflect movements in the nearby San Juan Mountains. There are five major structural elements in the report area: the Gypsum Valley anticline, Dry Creek Basin, the Horse Park fault block, Disappointment Valley, and the Dolores anticline. Three periods of major uplift are recognized In the southeastern end of the Gypsum Valley anticline. Each was followed by collapse of the overlying strata. Erosion after the first two periods removed nearly all topographic relief over the anticline; erosion after the last uplift has not yet had a profound effect on the topography except where evaporite beds are exposed at the surface. The first and greatest period of salt flow and anticlinal uplift began in the late Pennsylvanian and continued intermittently and on an ever decreasing scale into the Early Cretaceous. Most movement was in the Permian and Triassic periods. The second period of uplift and collapse was essentially contemporaneous with widespread tectonic activity on. the northwestern side of the San Juan Mountains and may have Occurred in the Oligocene and Miocene epochs. Granogabbro sills and dikes were intruded during the middle or upper Tertiary in Disappointment Valley and adjoining parts of the Gypsum Valley and Dolores anticlines. The third and mildest period of uplift occurred in the Pleistocene and was essentially contemporaneous with the post-Hinsdale uplift of the San Juan Mountains. This uplift began near the end of the earliest, or Cerro, stage of glaciation. Uranium-vanadium, manganese, and copper ore as well as gravel have been mined in the Klondike district. All deposits are small, and few have yielded more than 100 tons of ore. Most of the latter are carnotite deposits. Carnotite occurs in the lower

  7. Process for desulfurization of coal and ores

    SciTech Connect

    Starbuck, A.

    1980-07-22

    A process for desulfurizing ores containing sulfur comprises the steps of: (A) crushing ore containing sulfur to a particle consistency; (B) feeding the crushed ore to a heated continuous-flow processor; (C) introducing pre-heated sulfur dissolving solvent into said processor with the crushed ore; (D) concurrently mixing and force conveying the crushed ore and solvent by augering in the continuous flow processor at an elevated temperature in which sulfur is dissolvable and is dissolved in a heated sulfur-solvent solution with suspended particles and a remaining ore, the processor being oriented for about horizontal augering; (E) separating the sulfur-solvent solution with suspended particles from the remaining ore at an elevated temperature; (F) drying the separated, remaining ore by evaporating remaining solvent from the ore; (G) recovering solvent from the ore drying step by condensing the evaporated solvent; (H) concurrently crystallizing sulfur dissolved in the sulfur-solvent solution and force conveying the sulfur-solvent solution and crystallizing sulfur by augering a continuous flow chilled processor wherein the sulfur-solvent solution and crystallizing sulfur are conveyed together in a concurrent manner as a mixture in a continuous forward direction at controlled reduced temperatures as substantially the entire mixture progresses to a separate separating step, said crystallizing sulfur existing in part as a suspension and in part as a precipitate; (I) separating both crystallized suspension sulfur and crystallized precipitate sulfur from the solvent solution; (J) drying the separated crystallized sulfur by evaporating the solvent from the crystallized sulfur, wherein a fine crystal sulfur product is obtained; and (K) recovering solvent from the crystallized sulfur drying step by condensing the veaporated solvent.

  8. A "Tail" Of Two Mines: Determining The Sources Of Lead In Mine Waters Using Pb Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousens, B. L.; Allen, D. M.; Lepitre, M. E.; Mortensen, J. K.; Gabites, J. E.; Nugent, M.; Fortin, D.

    2004-12-01

    Acid mine drainage can be a significant environmental problem in regions where mine tailings are exposed to surface water and shallow groundwater flow. Whereas high metal concentrations in surface waters and groundwaters indicate that metals are being mobilized, these data do not uniquely identify the source of the contamination. The isotopic composition of Pb in mine waters is a superb tracer of Pb sources, because the isotopic composition of ore Pb is usually significantly different from that of host rocks, other surficial deposits, and aerosols. We have investigated metal mobility at two abandoned Pb-Zn mines in different geological settings: the sediment-hosted Sullivan Mine in southeastern British Columbia, and the New Calumet Mine of western Quebec that is hosted in metamorphic rocks of the Grenville Province. Ores from both mines have homogeneous Pb isotopic compositions that are much less radiogenic than surrounding host rocks. At Sullivan, the Pb isotopic compositions of water samples define a mixing line between Sullivan ore and at least one other more radiogenic end-member. Water samples with high Pb concentrations (0.002 to 0.3 mg/L) generally are acidic and have Pb isotope ratios equal to Sullivan ore, whereas waters with low Pb contents have near-neutral pH and have variably more radiogenic Pb isotope ratios. Thus not all the waters collected in the study area originate from Sullivan ore or mining operations, as previously thought. The dominant source of ore Pb in mine waters are the waste rock dumps. Based on their isotopic compositions, host shales or aerosols from the local Pb smelter are potential sources of non-Sullivan ore Pb; local glacial tills are an unlikely source due to their heterogeneous Pb isotopic composition. Similarly, at the New Calumet mine, water samples collected in direct contact with either ore at the surface or tailings have high Pb concentrations (up to 0.02 mg/L) and Pb isotope ratios equal to New Calumet Pb-Zn ore. However

  9. Method for extracting copper, silver and related metals

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, Bruce A.; McDowell, W. J.

    1990-01-01

    A process for selectively extracting precious metals such as silver and gold concurrent with copper extraction from aqueous solutions containing the same. The process utilizes tetrathiamacrocycles and high molecular weight organic acids that exhibit a synergistic relationship when complexing with certain metal ions thereby removing them from ore leach solutions.

  10. Method for extracting copper, silver and related metals

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, B.A.; McDowell, W.J.

    1987-10-23

    A process for selectively extracting precious metals such as silver and gold concurrent with copper extraction from aqueous solutions containing the same. The process utilizes tetrathiamacrocycles and high molecular weight organic acids that exhibit a synergistic relationship when complexing with certain metal ions thereby removing them from ore leach solutions.

  11. Copper artifacts from prehistoric archeological sites in the dakotas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, W.E., Jr.; Neuman, R.W.

    1966-01-01

    Abstract. Thirteen archeological specimens were analyzed spectrographically, and within defined limits they were determined to be native copper. Twelve of the specimens show close elemental homogeneity and are believed to be of Lake Superior ore; the origin of the other specimen is devious.

  12. Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at the Spook site, Converse County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Haywood, F.F.; Christian, D.J.; Chou, K.D.; Ellis, B.S.; Lorenzo, D.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

    1980-05-01

    Results of a radiological survey performed at the Spook site in Converse County, Wyoming, in June 1976, are presented. The mill at this site was located a short distance from the open-pit mine where the ore was obtained and where part of the tailings was dumped into the mine. Several piles of overburden or low-grade ore in the vicinity were included in the measurements of above-ground gamma exposure rate. The average exposure rate over these piles varied from 14 ..mu..R/hr, the average background exposure rate for the area, to 140 ..mu..R/hr. The average exposure rate for the tailings and former mill area was 220 ..mu..R/hr. Movement of tailings particles down dry washes was evident. The calculated concentration of /sup 226/Ra in ten holes as a function of depth is presented graphically.

  13. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1990-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  14. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1989-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  15. The Tail of BPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruba, Steve; Meyer, Jim

    Business process management suites (BPMS's) represent one of the fastest growing segments in the software industry as organizations automate their key business processes. As this market matures, it is interesting to compare it to Chris Anderson's 'Long Tail.' Although the 2004 "Long Tail" article in Wired magazine was primarily about the media and entertainment industries, it has since been applied (and perhaps misapplied) to other markets. Analysts describe a "Tail of BPM" market that is, perhaps, several times larger than the traditional BPMS product market. This paper will draw comparisons between the concepts in Anderson's article (and subsequent book) and the BPM solutions market.

  16. Jupiter's magnetic tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.; Acuna, M. H.; Lepping, R. P.; Behannon, K. W.; Burlaga, L. F.; Neubauer, F. M.

    1979-01-01

    Voyager 1 observations of the Jovian magnetosphere are discussed which are most naturally interpreted in terms of a well-developed magnetic tail on the nightside of the planet. It is shown that this tail, with a 'neutral sheet' separating the upper and lower lobes of opposite field polarity, is formed and controlled by external forces associated with the solar wind. The inner magnetosphere's current tail is found to merge with the magnetotail's neutral sheet. It is concluded that this configuration leads to a strong local-time control of the outer Jovian magnetosphere rather than planetary control.

  17. Copper Metallochaperones

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Nigel J.; Winge, Dennis R.

    2014-01-01

    The current state of knowledge on how copper metallochaperones support the maturation of cuproproteins is reviewed. Copper is needed within mitochondria to supply the CuA and intramembrane CuB sites of cytochrome oxidase, within the trans-Golgi network to supply secreted cuproproteins and within the cytosol to supply superoxide dismutase 1 (Sod1). Subpopulations of copper-zinc superoxide dismutase also localize to mitochondria, the secretory system, the nucleus and, in plants, the chloroplast, which also requires copper for plastocyanin. Prokaryotic cuproproteins are found in the cell membrane and in the periplasm of gram-negative bacteria. Cu(I) and Cu(II) form tight complexes with organic molecules and drive redox chemistry, which unrestrained would be destructive. Copper metallochaperones assist copper in reaching vital destinations without inflicting damage or becoming trapped in adventitious binding sites. Copper ions are specifically released from copper metallochaperones upon contact with their cognate cuproproteins and metal transfer is thought to proceed by ligand substitution. PMID:20205585

  18. Modeling of crushed ore agglomeration for heap leach operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhawan, Nikhil

    The focus of this dissertation is modeling of the evolution of size distribution in batch agglomeration drum. There has been no successful work on modeling of crushed ore agglomeration although the framework for population balance modeling of pelletization and granulation is readily available. In this study three different batch agglomeration drums were used to study the agglomeration kinetics of copper, gold and nickel ores. The agglomerate size distribution is inherently subject to random fluctuation due the very nature of the process. Yet, with careful experimentation and size analysis the evolution of size distribution can be followed. The population balance model employing the random coalesce model with a constant rate kernel was shown to work well in a micro and lab scale agglomerator experiments. In small drums agglomerates begin to break in a short time, whereas the growth is uniform in the lab scale drum. The experimental agglomerate size distributions exhibit self-preserving size spectra which confirms the applicability of coalescence rate based model. The same spectra became a useful fact for predicting the size distribution with an empirical model. Since moisture is a principal variable, the absolute deviation from optimum moisture was used as the primary variable in the empirical model. Having established a model for the size distribution, the next step was to delve into the internal constituents of each agglomerate size class. To this end, an experimental scheme known as dip test was devised. The outcome of the test was the size distribution of progeny particles which make up a given size class of agglomerate. The progeny size distribution was analyzed with a model that partitions the particles into a host and guest category. The ensuing partition coefficient is a valuable in determining how a particle in a size class participates in larger agglomerates. This dissertation lays out the fundamentals for applying the population balance concept to batch

  19. Speciation And Colloid Transport of Arsenic From Mine Tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Slowey, A.J.; Johnson, S.B.; Newville, M.; Brown, G.E., Jr.

    2007-07-13

    In addition to affecting biogeochemical transformations, the speciation of As also influences its transport from tailings at inoperative mines. The speciation of As in tailings from the Sulfur Bank Mercury Mine site in Clear Lake, California (USA) (a hot-spring Hg deposit) and particles mobilized from these tailings have been examined during laboratory-column experiments. Solutions containing two common, plant-derived organic acids (oxalic and citric acid) were pumped at 13 pore volumes d{sup -1} through 25 by 500 mm columns of calcined Hg ore, analogous to the pedogenesis of tailings. Chemical analysis of column effluent indicated that all of the As mobilized was particulate (1.5 mg, or 6% of the total As in the column through 255 pore volumes of leaching). Arsenic speciation was evaluated using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), indicating the dominance of arsenate [As(V)] sorbed to poorly crystalline Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides and coprecipitated with jarosite [KFe{sub 3}(SO{sub 4}, AsO{sub 4}){sub 2}(OH){sub 6}] with no detectable primary or secondary minerals in the tailings and mobilized particles. Sequential chemical extractions (SCE) of <45 {micro}m mine tailings fractions also suggest that As occurs adsorbed to Fe (hydr)oxides (35%) and coprecipitated within poorly crystalline phases (45%). In addition, SCEs suggest that As is associated with 1 N acid-soluble phases such as carbonate minerals (20%) and within crystalline Fe-(hydr)oxides (10%). The finding that As is transported from these mine tailings dominantly as As(V) adsorbed to Fe (hydr)oxides or coprecipitated within hydroxysulfates such as jarosite suggests that As release from soils and sediments contaminated with tailings will be controlled by either organic acid-promoted dissolution or reductive dissolution of host phases.

  20. Biogeometallurgical pre-mining characterization of ore deposits: an approach to increase sustainability in the mining process.

    PubMed

    Dold, Bernhard; Weibel, Leyla

    2013-11-01

    Based on the knowledge obtained from acid mine drainage formation in mine waste environments (tailings impoundments and waste rock dumps), a new methodology is applied to characterize new ore deposits before exploitation starts. This gives the opportunity to design optimized processes for metal recovery of the different mineral assemblages in an ore deposit and at the same time to minimize the environmental impact and costs downstream for mine waste management. Additionally, the whole economic potential is evaluated including strategic elements. The methodology integrates high-resolution geochemistry by sequential extractions and quantitative mineralogy in combination with kinetic bioleach tests. The produced data set allows to define biogeometallurgical units in the ore deposit and to predict the behavior of each element, economically or environmentally relevant, along the mining process.

  1. 25. FRONT END LOADERS MOMENTARILY IN REPOSE IN THE ORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. FRONT END LOADERS MOMENTARILY IN REPOSE IN THE ORE STORAGE YARD. AN ORE BRIDGE THAT FORMERLY TRANSFERRED ORE WITHIN THE STORAGE YARD WAS DESTROYED BY A BLIZZARD IN 1978. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  2. 36. ORE DOCK, LOOKING WEST. HULETT UNLOADERS AWAIT THE NEXT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. ORE DOCK, LOOKING WEST. HULETT UNLOADERS AWAIT THE NEXT ORE BOAT. BY LATE WINTER, THE ORE STORAGE YARD SEEN AT LEFT WILL BE DEPLETED. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  3. Main types of gold ore forming systems and their relationship with the paleogeodynamic settings on the Taimyr Peninsula and the Severnaya Zemlya Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proskurnin, Vasiliy; Anatoly, Gavrish; Aleksandra, Bagaeva; Petrushkov, Boris; Shneider, Alexey; Saltanov, Vasily; Stepunina, Maria; Proskurnina, Alina

    2014-05-01

    Within the Taimyr - Severnaya Zemlya mineragenic province, the Late Paleozoic - Early Mesozoic Kara rare-metal - gold and Byrrangsky coal-bearing - polymetallic mineragenic areas are distinguished. Main geological commercial types of the Kara mineragenic area include manifestations of gold-quartz, gold sulphide-quartz (proper gold ore), and gold-rare metal, gold-bearing copper-molybdenum-porphyry formations. The Riphean - Vendian subduction - collisional and Late Paleozoic - Early Mesozoic repeated collisional (deuterogenic) ore-forming systems play a leading role in their formation. Regardless of the age and formation features, manifestations of proper gold ore formations are controlled by a common factor, the degree of metamorphism of host rocks - not above the sericite-biotite subfacies of the greenschist facies, and belong to the group of hydrothermal-metasomatic ore forming systems conditioned by alkali-acid differentiation of matter in temperature gradient field with ore concentration in mesozone. Depending on the host Precambrian formations, Kara Late Paleozoic - Early Mesozoic mineragenic area is subdivided into Mininsky-Bolshevistsky flysch-terrigenous carbonaceous zone with manifestation of zonal regional metamorphism of the andalusite-sillimanite type (Arctida passive margin) and Shrenk-Faddey volcanogenic-carbonate-terrigenous carbonaceous zone with ophiolites (accretion prism of Siberia). For the Riphean - Early Vendian endogenous manifestations, the following main types of gold ore forming systems are distinguished: in the passive marginal Mininsky-Bolshevistsky zone - early collisional metamorphic-hydrothermal in terrigenous carbonaceous complexes (Valterovsky, Voskresensky, Litkensky ore zones) and late collisional plutonic-hydrothermal in allochthonous granitoids of S-type (Martovsky-Nikitinsky ore cluster); in the accretionary Shrenck-Faddey zone - subduction-collisional plutonic-metamorphic-hydrothermal (Zhilninsky, Leningradsky ore zones) in

  4. MR imaging of ore for heap bioleaching studies using pure phase encode acquisition methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagan, Marijke A.; Sederman, Andrew J.; Johns, Michael L.

    2012-03-01

    Various MRI techniques were considered with respect to imaging of aqueous flow fields in low grade copper ore. Spin echo frequency encoded techniques were shown to produce unacceptable image distortions which led to pure phase encoded techniques being considered. Single point imaging multiple point acquisition (SPI-MPA) and spin echo single point imaging (SESPI) techniques were applied. By direct comparison with X-ray tomographic images, both techniques were found to be able to produce distortion-free images of the ore packings at 2 T. The signal to noise ratios (SNRs) of the SESPI images were found to be superior to SPI-MPA for equal total acquisition times; this was explained based on NMR relaxation measurements. SESPI was also found to produce suitable images for a range of particles sizes, whereas SPI-MPA SNR deteriorated markedly as particles size was reduced. Comparisons on a 4.7 T magnet showed significant signal loss from the SPI-MPA images, the effect of which was accentuated in the case of unsaturated flowing systems. Hence it was concluded that SESPI was the most robust imaging method for the study of copper ore heap leaching hydrology.

  5. Characterisation and Processing of Some Iron Ores of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, S. J. G.; Patil, M. R.; Rudrappa, C.; Kumar, S. P.; Ravi, B. P.

    2013-10-01

    Lack of process characterization data of the ores based on the granulometry, texture, mineralogy, physical, chemical, properties, merits and limitations of process, market and local conditions may mislead the mineral processing entrepreneur. The proper implementation of process characterization and geotechnical map data will result in optimized sustainable utilization of resource by processing. A few case studies of process characterization of some Indian iron ores are dealt with. The tentative ascending order of process refractoriness of iron ores is massive hematite/magnetite < marine black iron oxide sands < laminated soft friable siliceous ore fines < massive banded magnetite quartzite < laminated soft friable clayey aluminous ore fines < massive banded hematite quartzite/jasper < massive clayey hydrated iron oxide ore < manganese bearing iron ores massive < Ti-V bearing magnetite magmatic ore < ferruginous cherty quartzite. Based on diagnostic process characterization, the ores have been classified and generic process have been adopted for some Indian iron ores.

  6. The sources of our iron ores. II

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burchard, E.F.

    1933-01-01

    In this instalment** the iron ore deposits of the Lake Superior States, which normally furnish about 80 per cent, of the annual output of the United States, are described together with historical notes on discovery and transportation of ore. Deposits in the Mississippi Valley and Western States are likewise outlined and the sources of imported ore are given. Reviewing the whole field, it is indicated that the great producing deposits of the Lake Superior and southern Appalachian regions are of hematite in basin areas of sedimentary rocks, that hydrated iron oxides and iron carbonates are generally found in undisturbed comparatively recent sediments, and that magnetite occurs in metamorphic and igneous rocks; also that numerical abundance of deposits is not a criterion as to their real importance as a source of supply. Statistics of production of iron ore and estimates of reserves of present grade conclude the paper.

  7. Research of Geochemical Associations of Nephelin Ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vulf, M.; Simonov, K.; Sazonov, A.

    The instant paper concerns research of distribution petrogenic chemical members in urtit ore body of Kia-Shaltyrsk deposit. Rocks of the deposit are ore for producing alum earth. Actuality of the subject based on outlooks of detection noble metal ore-bearing (Au, Pt, Pd, Rh, Ru) in alkaline rocks of Siberia, including rocks of Kia-Shaltyrsk deposit (Kuznetsk Alatau). The main purpose of analysis of distribution of members is directed to detection of a non-uniformity of distribution of substance and segments enriched with alum earth and noble members. The basic solved problems are following: o Creation regression models of ore body; o Definition of cumulative distribution functions of members in a contour of ore body; o The analysis of the obtained outcomes in geologic terms. For construction regression models the full-scale data was used, which was presented by the results of the spectral and silicate analyses of gold and petrogenic members containing 130 assays arranged in ore body. A non-linear multiparameter model of the ore body based on components of nephelin ore using neural net approach was constructed. For each member the corresponding distribution function is produced. The model is constructed on the following members: Au, Al2O3, SiO2, Fe2O3, CaO, MgO, SO3, R2O ((Na2O+K2O) -1) and losses of burning. The error of model forecasting membersS concentrations was from 0.02 up to 20%. Large errors basically connected with assays located near contact of ore body and ad- jacent strata or with very high concentrations of members; also they can be connected with different genesis of rocks or superposition of other processes. The analysis of concentrations of members and normalised absolute errors of the fore- cast has shown, that all members can be sectioned into two groups: first: Al2O3, SiO2, R2O, Fe2O3 and second: Au, losses of burning, CaO, MgO, SO3. The distribution of 1 gold is tightly connected with calcium and losses of burning and spatially linked with zones

  8. Selenium content in sulfide ores from the Chalkidiki peninsula, Greece.

    PubMed

    Nicolaidou, A E

    1998-01-01

    Selenium (Se) was assessed in galena, sphalerite, and pyrite samples. These are components of mixed sulfide ores from the Olympias and Madem Lakkos-Mavres Petres deposits and the Skouries porphyry-copper deposit. We used atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) with a hydride generator system. The highest concentration of Se (516 ppm) was found in the fine-grained galena at the -135 level of the Olympias deposits. In the Madem Lakkos-Mavres Petres deposit, the highest concentration of Se (33 ppm) was found in the pyrites of the level 30. The concentration of Se in the arsenopyrites and chalcopyrites is lower than the detection limit of the analytical method (< 100 ppb). The concentrated chalcopyrite from the porphyry copper deposit at Skouries exhibits a significant Se content (average 200 ppm) in contrast to the chalcopyrite from the Olympias and the Madem Lakkos-Mavres Petres. Variations in the Se content of the sulfide minerals studied could be caused by redox-pH and/or temperature conditions, as well as by the difference in crystal structure. The Se found in the areas studied may positively affect the environment. Sulfide minerals are oxidized by microorganisms, infiltrate in the soil-water in the form of selenate or selenite ion, and directly or indirectly influence the human organism. PMID:9726790

  9. Selenium content in sulfide ores from the Chalkidiki peninsula, Greece.

    PubMed

    Nicolaidou, A E

    1998-01-01

    Selenium (Se) was assessed in galena, sphalerite, and pyrite samples. These are components of mixed sulfide ores from the Olympias and Madem Lakkos-Mavres Petres deposits and the Skouries porphyry-copper deposit. We used atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) with a hydride generator system. The highest concentration of Se (516 ppm) was found in the fine-grained galena at the -135 level of the Olympias deposits. In the Madem Lakkos-Mavres Petres deposit, the highest concentration of Se (33 ppm) was found in the pyrites of the level 30. The concentration of Se in the arsenopyrites and chalcopyrites is lower than the detection limit of the analytical method (< 100 ppb). The concentrated chalcopyrite from the porphyry copper deposit at Skouries exhibits a significant Se content (average 200 ppm) in contrast to the chalcopyrite from the Olympias and the Madem Lakkos-Mavres Petres. Variations in the Se content of the sulfide minerals studied could be caused by redox-pH and/or temperature conditions, as well as by the difference in crystal structure. The Se found in the areas studied may positively affect the environment. Sulfide minerals are oxidized by microorganisms, infiltrate in the soil-water in the form of selenate or selenite ion, and directly or indirectly influence the human organism.

  10. The Tail Suspension Test

    PubMed Central

    Terrillion, Chantelle E.; Piantadosi, Sean C.; Bhat, Shambhu; Gould, Todd D.

    2012-01-01

    The tail-suspension test is a mouse behavioral test useful in the screening of potential antidepressant drugs, and assessing of other manipulations that are expected to affect depression related behaviors. Mice are suspended by their tails with tape, in such a position that it cannot escape or hold on to nearby surfaces. During this test, typically six minutes in duration, the resulting escape oriented behaviors are quantified. The tail-suspension test is a valuable tool in drug discovery for high-throughput screening of prospective antidepressant compounds. Here, we describe the details required for implementation of this test with additional emphasis on potential problems that may occur and how to avoid them. We also offer a solution to the tail climbing behavior, a common problem that renders this test useless in some mouse strains, such as the widely used C57BL/6. Specifically, we prevent tail climbing behaviors by passing mouse tails through a small plastic cylinder prior to suspension. Finally, we detail how to manually score the behaviors that are manifested in this test. PMID:22315011

  11. Examination of Lipopolysaccharide (O-Antigen) Populations of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans from Two Mine Tailings

    PubMed Central

    Southam, G.; Beveridge, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    Net acid-generating capacities of 39.74 kg of H2SO4 per ton (ca. 0.05 kg/kg) (pH 2.68) for the Lemoine copper mine tailings (closed ca. 8 years ago; located 40 km west of Chibougamau, Quebec, Canada) and 16.07 kg of H2SO4 per ton (ca. 0.02 kg/kg) (pH 3.01) for the Copper Rand tailings (in current use and 50 km distant [east] from those of Lemoine) demonstrate that these sulfide tailings can support populations of acidophilic thiobacilli. Oxidized regions in both tailings environments were readily visible, were extremely acidic (Lemoine, pH 2.36; Copper Rand, pH 3.07), and provided natural isolates for our study. A 10% (wt/vol) oxalic acid treatment, which solubilizes both ferric sulfate and ferric hydroxide precipitates (B. Ramsay, J. Ramsay, M. deTremblay, and C. Chavarie, Geomicrobiol. J. 6:171-177, 1988), enabled the recovery of intact bacterial cells from the tailings material and from liquid synthetic medium for lipopolysaccharide analysis. No viable cells could be cultured after this oxalic acid treatment. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electro-phoretic profiles of lipopolysaccharides extracted from the Lemoine tailings were complex, indicating a heterogeneous population of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. Six T. ferrooxidans subspecies as identified by lipopolysaccharide analysis (i.e., lipopolysaccharide chemotypes) were eventually isolated from a total of 112 cultures from the Lemoine tailings. Using the same isolate and lipopolysaccharide typing techniques, we identified only a single lipopolysaccharide chemotype from 20 cultures of T. ferrooxidans isolated from the Copper Rand tailings. This homogeneity of lipopolysaccharide chemotype was much different from what was found for the older Lemoine tailings and may reflect a progressive lipopolysaccharide heterogeneity of Thiobacillus isolates as tailings leach and age. Images PMID:16348925

  12. Environmental impact of uranium mining and ore processing in the Lagoa Real District, Bahia, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ilson G; Cidu, Rosa; Fanfani, Luca; Pitsch, Helmut; Beaucaire, Catherine; Zuddas, Pierpaolo

    2005-11-15

    Uranium mining and processing at Lagoa Real (Bahia, Brazil) started in 2000. Hydrogeochemical monitoring carried out from 1999 to 2001 revealed generally good quality of the water resources outside and inside the mineralized area. No chemical contamination in waters for domestic uses was observed. Hydrochemical characteristics did not vary significantly after 1 year of U exploitation, as compared to premining conditions. Due to the short time of mining, the results cannot exclude future variations in water quality. Leaching experiments helped to describe processes of ore and waste degradation. Sulfate was identified as an indicator for different types of contamination. Potential hazards related to local climate (hot rainy season) were identified. They indicate that tailings derived from the ore processing, destabilized by sulfuric acid attack, may induce acidification and salinization in the surrounding environment. Another potential source of environmental impact could be linked to local radium-rich mineralization, originating radon emission.

  13. The Role of Groundwater Flow and Faulting on Hydrothermal Ore Formation in Sedimentary Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garven, G.

    2006-05-01

    Sediment-hosted ore formation is thought to occur as a normal outcome of basin evolution, due to deep groundwater flow, heat transport, and reactive mass transport ---all of which are intimately coupled. This paper reviews recent attempts to understand the hydrologic and geochemical processes forming some of the world's largest sediment-hosted ores. Several questions still dominate the literature (driving forces for flows, source and controls on metal acquisition, concentrations of ore-forming components, timing and duration, role of faults, effects of transient flows). This paper touches upon all of these questions. Coupled reactive transport models have been applied for understanding the genesis of sandstone-hosted uranium ores of North America and Australia, red-bed copper ores of North America and northern Europe, carbonate-hosted MVT lead-zinc ores of the U.S. Midcontinent and northwestern Canada, and the carbonate- hosted lead-zinc ores of Ireland and southeast France. Good progress has been made in using these computational methods for comparing and contrasting both carbonate hosted (MVT and Irish types) and shale- hosted (SEDEX type) Pb-Zn deposits. The former are mostly associated with undeformed carbonate platforms associated with distal orogenic belts and the later are mostly associated with extensional basins and failed rifts that are heavily faulted. Two giant ore provinces in extensional basins provide good examples of structural control on reactive mass transport: shale-hosted Pb-Zn ores of the Proterozoic McArthur basin, Australia, and shale-hosted Pb-Zn-Ba ores of the Paleozoic Kuna basin, Alaska. For the McArthur basin, hydrogeologic simulations of thermally-driven free convection suggest a strong structural control on fluid flow created by the north-trending fault systems that dominate this Proterozoic extensional basin. Brines appear to have descended to depths of a few kilometers along the western side of the basin, migrated laterally to the

  14. Analytical fingerprint for tantalum ores from African deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melcher, F.; Graupner, T.; Sitnikova, M.; Oberthür, T.; Henjes-Kunst, F.; Gäbler, E.; Rantitsch, G.

    2009-04-01

    Illegal mining of gold, diamonds, copper, cobalt and, in the last decade, "coltan" has fuelled ongoing armed conflicts and civil war in a number of African countries. Following the United Nations initiative to fingerprint the origin of conflict materials and to develop a traceability system, our working group is investigating "coltan" (i.e. columbite-tantalite) mineralization especially in Africa, also within the wider framework of establishing certified trading chains (CTC). Special attention is directed towards samples from the main Ta-Nb-Sn provinces in Africa: DR Congo, Rwanda, Mozambique, Ethiopia, Egypt and Namibia. The following factors are taken into consideration in a methodological approach capable of distinguishing the origin of tantalum ores and concentrates with the utmost probability: (1) Quality and composition of coltan concentrates vary considerably. (2) Mineralogical and chemical compositions of Ta-Nb ores are extremely complex due to the wide range of the columbite-tantalite solid solution series and its ability to incorporate many additional elements. (3) Coltan concentrates may contain a number of other tantalum-bearing minerals besides columbite-tantalite. In our approach, coltan concentrates are analyzed in a step-by-step mode. State-of-the-art analytical tools employed are automated scanning electron microscopy (Mineral Liberation Analysis; MLA), electron microprobe analysis (major and trace elements), laser ablation-ICP-MS (trace elements, isotopes), and TIMS (U-Pb dating). Mineral assemblages in the ore concentrates, major and trace element concentration patterns, and zoning characteristics in the different pegmatites from Africa distinctly differ from each other. Chondrite-normalized REE distribution patterns vary significantly between columbite, tantalite, and microlite, and also relative to major element compositions of columbites. Some locations are characterized by low REE concentrations, others are highly enriched. Samples with

  15. Geology and ore deposits of the Whitepine area, Tomichi mining district, Gunnison County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Charles Sherwood

    1956-01-01

    The Tomichi mining district is on the western slope of the Continental Divide near the southern end of the Sawatch Range in southeastern Gunnison County, Colorado. The most productive part of the Tomichi district was the Whitepine area. It is estimated that since the discovery of ore in 1879 the area has produced approximately $7,000,000, principally in lead and zinc, with lesser amounts of silver, copper, and gold. Geologically, the Whitepine area is a faulted syncline of Paleozoic rocks that was intruded by Tertiary igneous rocks. The oldest rock of the area is the Silver Plume granite of pre-Cambrian age. Deposited upon this successively were the Sawatch quartzite (Late Cambrian), Manitou dolomite (Early Ordovician), Harding quartzite (Middle Ordovician), Fremont dolomite (Lade Ordovician), Chaffee formation (Late Devonian), Leadville limestone (Late Mississippian), and Beldon shale (Late Pennsylvanian); a total thickness of about 1,450 feet. During the Laramide Revolution, the sedimentary rocks were folded into a broad northward-plunging syncline, faulted, and intruded by a series of igneous rocks. The igneous rocks, in order of relative age from oldest to youngest, are: a rhyolite stock, the Princeton quartz monzonite batholith, quartz monzonite or quartz latite porphyry dikes, and rhyolite or pitchstone porphyry dikes. The ore deposits of the Whitepine area may be classified into replacement deposits, vein deposits, and contact metamorphic deposits. The replacement deposits may be further subdivided into deposits along faults and bedded deposits. Of the types of deposits, the most productive have been the replacement deposits along faults. The major replacement deposits along faults are those of the Akron, Morning Star, and Victor mines. The ore deposits of these mines are in the foot wall of the Star faults in the Akron mine in the Manitou dolomite and in the Morning Star and Victor mines in the Leadville limestone. The chief bedded replacement deposits are

  16. 8. EAST ELEVATION OF SKIDOO MILL AND UPPER ORE BIN, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. EAST ELEVATION OF SKIDOO MILL AND UPPER ORE BIN, LOOKING WEST FROM ACCESS ROAD. THE ROADWAY ON THIS LEVEL (CENTER) WAS USED FOR UNLOADING ORE BROUGHT ON BURROWS INTO THE ORE BIN AT THE TOP LEVEL OF THE MILL. THE ORE BIN IN THE UPPER LEFT WAS ADDED LATER WHEN ORE WAS BROUGHT TO THE MILL BY TRUCKS. - Skidoo Mine, Park Route 38 (Skidoo Road), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  17. Tree-Substrate Water Relations and Root Development in Tree Plantations Used for Mine Tailings Reclamation.

    PubMed

    Guittonny-Larchevêque, Marie; Bussière, Bruno; Pednault, Carl

    2016-05-01

    Tree water uptake relies on well-developed root systems. However, mine wastes can restrict root growth, in particular metalliferous mill tailings, which consist of the finely crushed ore that remains after valuable metals are removed. Thus, water stress could limit plantation success in reclaimed mine lands. This study evaluates the effect of substrates varying in quality (topsoil, overburden, compost and tailings mixture, and tailings alone) and quantity (50- or 20-cm-thick topsoil layer vs. 1-m plantation holes) on root development and water stress exposure of trees planted in low-sulfide mine tailings under boreal conditions. A field experiment was conducted over 2 yr with two tree species: basket willow ( L.) and hybrid poplar ( Moench × A. Henry). Trees developed roots in the tailings underlying the soil treatments despite tailings' low macroporosity. However, almost no root development occurred in tailings underlying a compost and tailings mixture. Because root development and associated water uptake was not limited to the soil, soil volume influenced neither short-term (water potential and instantaneous transpiration) nor long-term (δC) water stress exposure in trees. However, trees were larger and had greater total leaf area when grown in thicker topsoil. Despite a volumetric water content that always remained above permanent wilting point in the tailings colonized by tree roots, measured foliar water potentials at midday were lower than drought thresholds reported for both tested tree species.

  18. Tree-Substrate Water Relations and Root Development in Tree Plantations Used for Mine Tailings Reclamation.

    PubMed

    Guittonny-Larchevêque, Marie; Bussière, Bruno; Pednault, Carl

    2016-05-01

    Tree water uptake relies on well-developed root systems. However, mine wastes can restrict root growth, in particular metalliferous mill tailings, which consist of the finely crushed ore that remains after valuable metals are removed. Thus, water stress could limit plantation success in reclaimed mine lands. This study evaluates the effect of substrates varying in quality (topsoil, overburden, compost and tailings mixture, and tailings alone) and quantity (50- or 20-cm-thick topsoil layer vs. 1-m plantation holes) on root development and water stress exposure of trees planted in low-sulfide mine tailings under boreal conditions. A field experiment was conducted over 2 yr with two tree species: basket willow ( L.) and hybrid poplar ( Moench × A. Henry). Trees developed roots in the tailings underlying the soil treatments despite tailings' low macroporosity. However, almost no root development occurred in tailings underlying a compost and tailings mixture. Because root development and associated water uptake was not limited to the soil, soil volume influenced neither short-term (water potential and instantaneous transpiration) nor long-term (δC) water stress exposure in trees. However, trees were larger and had greater total leaf area when grown in thicker topsoil. Despite a volumetric water content that always remained above permanent wilting point in the tailings colonized by tree roots, measured foliar water potentials at midday were lower than drought thresholds reported for both tested tree species. PMID:27136172

  19. Geothermal energy for copper dump leaching

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

    1982-08-01

    This report evaluates the possibility of using geothermal energy to heat a sulfuric acid leaching solution for the purpose of faster and more efficient copper recovery from copper-containing minerals. Experimental studies reported in the literature have shown that this technique can be economically feasible for the extraction of copper from low-grade dump ores. Its main advantage appears to be the considerable reduction in long-term leaching periods; it could also be less expensive than other conventional processing operations if an economical geothermal resource were provided. However, this process has some pitfalls which might restrict the extent of geothermal energy use. Nevertheless, the process is still technologically sound, especially if groundwaters are used directly in the leaching operation.

  20. Geochemical hosts of solubilized radionuclides in uranium mill tailings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landa, E.R.; Bush, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    The solubilization and subsequent resorption of radionuclides by ore components or by reaction products during the milling of uranium ores may have both economic and environmental consequences. Particle-size redistribution of radium during milling has been demonstrated by previous investigators; however, the identification of sorbing components in the tailings has received little experimental attention. In this study, uranium-bearing sandstone ore was milled, on a laboratory scale, with sulfuric acid. At regular intervals, filtrate from this suspension was placed in contact with mixtures of quartz sand and various potential sorbents which occur as gangue in uranium ores; the potential sorbents included clay minerals, iron and aluminum oxides, feldspar, fluorspar, barite, jarosite, coal, and volcanic glass. After equilibration, the quartz sand-sorbent mixtures were separated from the filtrate and radioassayed by gamma-spectrometry to determine the quantities of 238U, 230Th, 226Ra, and 210Pb sorbed, and the radon emanation coefficients. Sorption of 238U was low in all cases, with maximal sorptions of 1-2% by the bentonite- and coal-bearing samples. 230Th sorption also was generally less than 1%; maximal sorption here was observed in the fluorspar-bearing sample and appears to be associated with the formation of gypsum during milling. 226Ra and 210 Pb generally showed higher sorption than the other nuclides - more than 60% of the 26Ra solubilized from the ore was sorbed on the barite-bearing sample. The mechanism (s) for this sorption by a wide variety of substrates is not yet understood. Radon emanation coefficients of the samples ranged from about 5 to 30%, with the coal-bearing samples clearly demonstrating an emanating power higher than any of the other materials. ?? 1990.

  1. Oil shales, evaporites and ore deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugster, Hans P.

    1985-03-01

    The relationships between oil shales, evaporites and sedimentary ore deposits can be classified in terms of stratigraphic and geochemical coherence. Oil shale and black shale deposition commonly follows continental red beds and is in turn followed by evaporite deposition. This transgressive-regressive sequence represents an orderly succession of depositional environments in space and time and results in stratigraphic coherence. The amount of organic carbon of a sediment depends on productivity and preservation, both of which are enhanced by saline environments. Work on Great Salt Lake. Utah, allows us to estimate that only 5% of TOC originally deposited is preserved. Inorganic carbonate production is similar to TOC production, but preservation is much higher. Oil shales and black shales commonly are enriched in heavy metals through scavenging by biogenic particles and complexation by organic matter. Ore deposits are formed from such rocks through secondary enrichment processes, establishing a geochemical coherence between oil shales and ore deposits. The Permian Kupferschiefer of N. Europe is used as an example to define a Kupferschiefer type (KST) deposit. Here oxygenated brines in contact with red beds become acidified through mineral precipitation and acquire metals by dissolving oxide coatings. Oxidation of the black shale leads to further acid production and metal acquisition and eventually to sulfide deposition along a reducing front. In order to form ore bodies, the stratigraphic coherence of the red bed-black shale-evaporite succession must be joined by the geochemical coherence of the ore body-evaporite-black shale association. The Cretaceous Cu-Zn deposits of Angola, the Zambian Copperbelt as well as the Creta, Oklahoma, deposits are other KST examples. In the Zambian Copperbelt, evaporites are indicated by the carbonate lenticles thought to be pseudomorphs after gypsum-anhydrite nodules. MVT deposits are also deposited by acid brines, but at more

  2. Is rhizosphere remediation sufficient for sustainable revegetation of mine tailings?

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Longbin; Baumgartl, Thomas; Mulligan, David

    2012-01-01

    Background Revegetation of mine tailings (fine-grained waste material) starts with the reconstruction of root zones, consisting of a rhizosphere horizon (mostly topsoil and/or amended tailings) and the support horizon beneath (i.e. equivalent to subsoil – mostly tailings), which must be physically and hydro-geochemically stable. This review aims to discuss key processes involved in the development of functional root zones within the context of direct revegetation of tailings and introduces a conceptual process of rehabilitating structure and function in the root zones based on a state transition model. Scope Field studies on the revegetation of tailings (from processing base metal ore and bauxite residues) are reviewed. Particular focus is given to tailings' properties that limit remediation effectiveness. Aspects of root zone reconstruction and vegetation responses are also discussed. Conclusions When reconstructing a root zone system, it is critical to restore physical structure and hydraulic functions across the whole root zone system. Only effective and holistically restored systems can control hydro-geochemical mobility of acutely and chronically toxic factors from the underlying horizon and maintain hydro-geochemical stability in the rhizosphere. Thereafter, soil biological capacity and ecological linkages (i.e. carbon and nutrient cycling) may be rehabilitated to integrate the root zones with revegetated plant communities into sustainable plant ecosystems. A conceptual framework of system transitions between the critical states of root zone development has been proposed. This will illustrate the rehabilitation process in root zone reconstruction and development for direct revegetation with sustainable plant communities. Sustainable phytostabilization of tailings requires the systematic consideration of hydro-geochemical interactions between the rhizosphere and the underlying supporting horizon. It further requires effective remediation strategies to

  3. Dynamin at actin tails.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunkyung; De Camilli, Pietro

    2002-01-01

    Dynamin, the product of the shibire gene of Drosophila, is a GTPase critically required for endocytosis. Some studies have suggested a functional link between dynamin and the actin cytoskeleton. This link is of special interest, because there is evidence implicating actin dynamics in endocytosis. Here we show that endogenous dynamin 2, as well as green fluorescence protein fusion proteins of both dynamin 1 and 2, is present in actin comets generated by Listeria or by type I PIP kinase (PIPK) overexpression. In PIPK-induced tails, dynamin is further enriched at the interface between the tails and the moving organelles. Dynamin mutants harboring mutations in the GTPase domain inhibited nucleation of actin tails induced by PIPK and moderately reduced their speed. Although dynamin localization to the tails required its proline-rich domain, expression of a dynamin mutant lacking this domain also diminished tail formation. In addition, this mutant disrupted a membrane-associated actin scaffold (podosome rosette) previously shown to include dynamin. These findings suggest that dynamin is part of a protein network that controls nucleation of actin from membranes. At endocytic sites, dynamin may couple the fission reaction to the polymerization of an actin pool that functions in the separation of the endocytic vesicles from the plasma membrane. PMID:11782545

  4. Geology and ore deposits of the Pioche district, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westgate, L.G.; Knopf, Adolph

    1932-01-01

    which was discovered accidentally during the prospecting of the fissure veins. The ore deposits of the district comprise three groups (1) silver-bearing fissure veins in quartzite; (2) silver-bearing mineralized granite porphyry; (3) replacement deposits in limestone and dolomite. All of them appear to have been formed at about the same time, in the epoch of mineralization that occurred shortly after the intrusion of the granitic rocks and their allied dikes of granite porphyry and lamprophyre. The entire present output of the district is coming from the replacement deposits in limestone and dolomite, but exploratory work is still in progress on the fissure veins and mineralized porphyry. The replacement deposits include both replacement fissure veins and stratiform ("bedded") replacement deposits. The replacement fissure veins dip steeply and cut across the bedding of the carbonate rocks in which they are inclosed. They are thoroughly oxidized, as deep at least as 1,100 feet, for on none of them have the mine workings penetrated to water level, and they are highly manganiferous and limonitic and low in silica. At-certain horizons stratiform replacement deposits extend out as lateral branches from the fissure veins. Deposits of this kind occur mainly in the Mendha limestone, Highland Peak limestone, and Lyndon limestone. The stratigraphic range is therefore at least 5,500 feet, and as some of the fissure veins extend down through the underlying Pioche shale the indicated range may exceed 6,500 feet. The most notable representatives of the replacement fissure veins are at the Bristol mine, where they yield silver-bearing copper-leadzinc ores. So far unique among the ore bodies of the district is the pipe of wad and pyrolusite ore at the Jackrabbit mine, the periphery of the pipe consisting of a girdle of extraordinarily coarse white calcite spar produced by the recrystallization of the surrounding limestones. The stratiform replacement deposits that are attracting most

  5. Antimony ore in the Fairbanks district, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Killeen, Pemberton Lewis; Mertie, John B.

    1951-01-01

    Antimony-bearing ores in the Fairbanks district, Alaska, are found principally in two areas, the extremities of which are at points 10 miles west and 23 miles northeast of Fairbanks; and one of two minor areas lies along this same trend 30 miles farther to the northeast. These areas are probably only local manifestations of mineralization that affected a much broader area and formed antimony-bearing deposits in neighboring districts, the closest of which is 50 miles away. The ores were exposed largely as a result of lode gold mining, but at two periods in the past, high prices for antimony ore warranted an independent production and about 2500 tons of stibnite ore was shipped. The sulfide deposits occupy the same fractures along which a gold-quartz mineralization of greater economic importance occurred; and both are probably genetically related to igneous rocks which intrude the schistose country rock. The sulfide is in part contemporaneous with some late-stage quartz in which it occurs as disseminated crystals; and in part the latest filling in the mineralized zones where it forms kidney-shaped masses of essentially solid sulfide. One extremely long mass must have contained nearly 100 tons of ore, but the average of the larger kidneys is closer to several tons. Much of the ore is stibnite, with quartz as a minor impurity, and assays show the tenor to vary from 40 to 65 percent antimony. Sulphantimonites are less abundant but likewise occur as disseminated crystals and as kidney-shaped bodies. Antimony oxides appear on the weathered surface and along fractures within the sulfide ore. Deposits containing either stibnite or sulphantimonite are known at more than 50 localities, but only eighteen have produced ore and the bulk of this came from the mines. The geology of the deposit, and the nature, extent, and period of the workings are covered in the detailed descriptions of individual occurrences. Several geologic and economic factors, which greatly affect

  6. Platinum metals magmatic sulfide ores.

    PubMed

    Naldrett, A J; Duke, J M

    1980-06-27

    Platinum-group elements (PGE) are mined predominantly from deposits that have formed by the segregation of molten iron-nickel-copper sulfides from silicate magmas. The absolute concentrations of PGE in sulfides from different deposits vary over a range of five orders of magnitude, whereas those of other chalcophile elements vary by factors of only 2 to 100. However, the relative proportions of the different PGE in a given deposit are systematically related to the nature of the parent magma. The absolute and relative concentrations of PGE in magmatic sulfides are explained in terms of the degree of partial melting of mantle peridotite required to produce the parent magma and the processes of batch equilibration and fractional segregation of sulfides. The Republic of South Africa and the U.S.S.R. together possess more than 97 percent of the world PGE reserves, but significant undeveloped resources occur in North America. The Stillwater complex in Montana is perhaps the most important example.

  7. Genetic and biochemical effects induced by iron ore, Fe and Mn exposure in tadpoles of the bullfrog Lithobates catesbeianus.

    PubMed

    Veronez, Alexandra Caroline da Silva; Salla, Rômulo Victor; Baroni, Vinícius Dadalto; Barcarolli, Indianara Fernanda; Bianchini, Adalto; Dos Reis Martinez, Claudia Bueno; Chippari-Gomes, Adriana Regina

    2016-05-01

    For decades, the extraction of minerals has intensified in order to meet the demand of industry. Iron ore deposits are important sources of metals, such as iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn). The particulate ores can be dispersed during extraction, transport and storage, with potential to induce biological impacts. Amphibians are very sensitive to environmental stressors. Therefore, the present study aimed to assess the effects of iron ore, Fe and Mn exposure during the metamorphosis of Lithobates catesbeianus. Endpoints analyzed included morphological (biometrical and developmental analyses), whole body Fe and Mn concentration in, plasma ferritin concentration, erythrocyte DNA damage (measured through comet assay and micronucleus test) and liver activity of enzymes involved in oxidative status [glutathione S-transferase (GST) and catalase (CAT)]. Tadpoles were kept under control condition (no contaminant addition) or exposed to iron ore (3.79mg/L as fine particulate matter); Fe (nominal concentration: 0.51mg/L Fe as C10H12FeN2NaO8; Fe-EDTA); and Mn (nominal concentration: 5.23mg/L Mn as 4H2O.MnCl2) for 30 days. Virtually, no mortality was observed, except for one tadpole found dead in the iron ore treatment. However, tadpoles exposed to iron ore had longer tail than those kept under control conditions while tadpoles exposed to manganese chloride showed higher body length than control ones. Exposure to Fe and Mn induced a delay in tadpole metamorphosis, especially when these metals are presented not as a mixture (iron ore). Tadpoles exposed to iron ore had increased whole body Fe and Mn while those exposed to Fe and Mn accumulated each metal individually. Tadpoles exposed to any of the contaminants tested showed a significant increase in erythrocyte DNA damage and frequency of micronuclei. In addition, they showed higher liver GST activity respect with those kept under control conditions. Plasma ferritin concentration and liver CAT activity were higher only in tadpoles

  8. Genetic and biochemical effects induced by iron ore, Fe and Mn exposure in tadpoles of the bullfrog Lithobates catesbeianus.

    PubMed

    Veronez, Alexandra Caroline da Silva; Salla, Rômulo Victor; Baroni, Vinícius Dadalto; Barcarolli, Indianara Fernanda; Bianchini, Adalto; Dos Reis Martinez, Claudia Bueno; Chippari-Gomes, Adriana Regina

    2016-05-01

    For decades, the extraction of minerals has intensified in order to meet the demand of industry. Iron ore deposits are important sources of metals, such as iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn). The particulate ores can be dispersed during extraction, transport and storage, with potential to induce biological impacts. Amphibians are very sensitive to environmental stressors. Therefore, the present study aimed to assess the effects of iron ore, Fe and Mn exposure during the metamorphosis of Lithobates catesbeianus. Endpoints analyzed included morphological (biometrical and developmental analyses), whole body Fe and Mn concentration in, plasma ferritin concentration, erythrocyte DNA damage (measured through comet assay and micronucleus test) and liver activity of enzymes involved in oxidative status [glutathione S-transferase (GST) and catalase (CAT)]. Tadpoles were kept under control condition (no contaminant addition) or exposed to iron ore (3.79mg/L as fine particulate matter); Fe (nominal concentration: 0.51mg/L Fe as C10H12FeN2NaO8; Fe-EDTA); and Mn (nominal concentration: 5.23mg/L Mn as 4H2O.MnCl2) for 30 days. Virtually, no mortality was observed, except for one tadpole found dead in the iron ore treatment. However, tadpoles exposed to iron ore had longer tail than those kept under control conditions while tadpoles exposed to manganese chloride showed higher body length than control ones. Exposure to Fe and Mn induced a delay in tadpole metamorphosis, especially when these metals are presented not as a mixture (iron ore). Tadpoles exposed to iron ore had increased whole body Fe and Mn while those exposed to Fe and Mn accumulated each metal individually. Tadpoles exposed to any of the contaminants tested showed a significant increase in erythrocyte DNA damage and frequency of micronuclei. In addition, they showed higher liver GST activity respect with those kept under control conditions. Plasma ferritin concentration and liver CAT activity were higher only in tadpoles

  9. Current Energy Requirements in the Copper Producing Industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitt, Charles H.; Wadsworth, Milton E.

    1981-06-01

    An analysis of energy usage in the production of refined cathode copper was made from mining ore to cathode copper. In mining copper ore the greatest energy consumers are ore hauling and blasting. Another important factor is the "recovery efficiency" of the metallurgical processes used to extract the copper. The mining and mineral concentrating energies are directly proportional to the "recovery efficiency," with a typical mining operation requiring about 20 million Btu/ton of cathode copper produced. Mineral concentrating was also found to be a large energy consumer, requiring about 43 million Btu/ton of cathode copper. Some possibilities for energy savings in the mineral processing area include use of autogenous grinding and computer control for optimizing grinding operations, improved classifier efficiency, and optimizing the entire concentrator plant performance by interrelating all plant operations. In acid plants, optimization of input SO2 concentration can make the plant a net producer rather than a net user of energy. The conventional smelting process utilizes very little of the energy from the combustion of sulfides in the charge. Several of the newer copper pyrometallurgical processes which utilize more of the combustion energy of the sulfides as heat show a significant improvement over conventional smelting. Generally, increased use of oxygen decreases Level 1 energies but proportionately increases Level 2 energies. Hydrometallurgical processes are, in general, more energy intensive than smelting processes, mainly because of the inability to utilize the heat of reaction of the sulfides. Electrowinning used in most hydrometallurgy processes is also energy intensive, and research in these areas could produce significant energy savings. Combination pyrometallurgical processes are generally less energy intensive than entirely hydrometallurgical processes. Significant improvements may be made in energy use in hydrometallurgical processes by more effective

  10. Scientific basis for risk assessment and management of uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    A National Research Council study panel, convened by the Board on Radioactive Waste Management, has examined the scientific basis for risk assessment and management of uranium mill tailings and issued this final report containing a number of recommendations. Chapter 1 provides a brief introduction to the problem. Chapter 2 examines the processes of uranium extraction and the mechanisms by which radionuclides and toxic chemicals contained in the ore can enter the environment. Chapter 3 is devoted to a review of the evidence on health risks associated with radon and its decay products. Chapter 4 provides a consideration of conventional and possible new technical alternatives for tailings management. Chapter 5 explores a number of issues of comparative risk, provides a brief history of uranium mill tailings regulation, and concludes with a discussion of choices that must be made in mill tailing risk management. 211 refs., 30 figs., 27 tabs.

  11. Biotechnical applications to ore mining and processing. (Latest citations from the COMPENDEX database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning applications of biotechnology to mining processes, excluding coal mining. Topics discussed include bacterial extraction, bacterial leaching, biodesulfurization, biodegradation, biocatalysis, microbial oxidation and reduction, and biological beneficiation techniques. Applications are considered for the mining of manganese, uranium, zinc, pyrites, copper, gold, and other metallic ores, and for treatment of their waste products. Both in situ and post excavation processes are considered, as well as biological cleanup of process effluents. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  12. The indirect electrochemical refining of lunar ores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semkow, Krystyna W.; Sammells, Anthony F.

    1987-01-01

    Recent work performed on an electrolytic cell is reported which addresses the implicit limitations in various approaches to refining lunar ores. The cell uses an oxygen vacancy conducting stabilized zirconia solid electrolyte to effect separation between a molten salt catholyte compartment where alkali metals are deposited, and an oxygen-evolving anode of composition La(0.89)Sr(0.1)MnO3. The cell configuration is shown and discussed along with a polarization curve and a steady-state current-voltage curve. In a practical cell, cathodically deposited liquid lithium would be continuously removed from the electrolytic cell and used as a valuable reducing agent for ore refining under lunar conditions. Oxygen would be indirectly electrochemically extracted from lunar ores for breathing purposes.

  13. REAR PROFILE OF TAIL FROM SECOND LEVEL OF TAIL DOCK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    REAR PROFILE OF TAIL FROM SECOND LEVEL OF TAIL DOCK STAND, SHOWING AIRCRAFT NUMBER (319), HORIZONTAL STABILIZER, TAIL CONE AND COOLING CTS FOR THE AUXILIARY POWER UNIT (APU), MECHANIC PAUL RIDEOUT IS LOWERING THE BALANCE PANELS ON THE STABILIZERS FOR LUBRICATION AND INSPECTION. - Greater Buffalo International Airport, Maintenance Hangar, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  14. The physical hydrogeology of ore deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Appold, M.S.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrothermal ore deposits represent a convergence of fluid flow, thermal energy, and solute flux that is hydrogeologically unusual. From the hydrogeologic perspective, hydrothermal ore deposition represents a complex coupled-flow problem—sufficiently complex that physically rigorous description of the coupled thermal (T), hydraulic (H), mechanical (M), and chemical (C) processes (THMC modeling) continues to challenge our computational ability. Though research into these coupled behaviors has found only a limited subset to be quantitatively tractable, it has yielded valuable insights into the workings of hydrothermal systems in a wide range of geologic environments including sedimentary, metamorphic, and magmatic. Examples of these insights include the quantification of likely driving mechanisms, rates and paths of fluid flow, ore-mineral precipitation mechanisms, longevity of hydrothermal systems, mechanisms by which hydrothermal fluids acquire their temperature and composition, and the controlling influence of permeability and other rock properties on hydrothermal fluid behavior. In this communication we review some of the fundamental theory needed to characterize the physical hydrogeology of hydrothermal systems and discuss how this theory has been applied in studies of Mississippi Valley-type, tabular uranium, porphyry, epithermal, and mid-ocean ridge ore-forming systems. A key limitation in the computational state-of-the-art is the inability to describe fluid flow and transport fully in the many ore systems that show evidence of repeated shear or tensional failure with associated dynamic variations in permeability. However, we discuss global-scale compilations that suggest some numerical constraints on both mean and dynamically enhanced crustal permeability. Principles of physical hydrogeology can be powerful tools for investigating hydrothermal ore formation and are becoming increasingly accessible with ongoing advances in modeling software.

  15. Gold, nickel and copper mining and processing.

    PubMed

    Lightfoot, Nancy E; Pacey, Michael A; Darling, Shelley

    2010-01-01

    Ore mining occurs in all Canadian provinces and territories except Prince Edward Island. Ores include bauxite, copper, gold, iron, lead and zinc. Workers in metal mining and processing are exposed, not only to the metal of interest, but also to various other substances prevalent in the industry, such as diesel emissions, oil mists, blasting agents, silica, radon, and arsenic. This chapter examines cancer risk related to the mining of gold, nickel and copper. The human carcinogenicity of nickel depends upon the species of nickel, its concentration and the route of exposure. Exposure to nickel or nickel compounds via routes other than inhalation has not been shown to increase cancer risk in humans. As such, cancer sites of concern include the lung, and the nasal sinus. Evidence comes from studies of nickel refinery and leaching, calcining, and sintering workers in the early half of the 20th century. There appears to be little or no detectable risk in most sectors of the nickel industry at current exposure levels. The general population risk from the extremely small concentrations detectable in ambient air are negligible. Nevertheless, animal carcinogenesis studies, studies of nickel carcinogenesis mechanisms, and epidemiological studies with quantitative exposure assessment of various nickel species would enhance our understanding of human health risks associated with nickel. Definitive conclusions linking cancer to exposures in gold and copper mining and processing are not possible at this time. The available results appear to demand additional study of a variety of potential occupational and non-occupational risk factors. PMID:21199602

  16. Isolation of uranium mill tailings and their component radionuclides from the biosphere; some earth science perspectives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landa, Edward

    1980-01-01

    Uranium mining and milling is an expanding activity in the. Western United States. Although the milling process yields a uranium concentrate, the large volume of tailings remaining contains about 85 percent of the radioactivity originally associated with the ore. By virtue of the physical and chemical processing of the ore and the redistribution of the contained radionuclides at the Earth's surface, these tailings constitute a technologically enhanced source of natural radiation exposure. Sources of potential human radiation exposure from uranium mill tailings include the emanation of radon gas, the transport of particles by wind and water, and the transport of soluble radionuclides, seeping from disposal areas, by ground water. Due to the 77,000 year half-life of thorium-230, the parent of radium-226, the environmental effects associated with radionuclides contained in these railings must be conceived of within the framework of geologic processes operating over geologic time. The magnitude of erosion of cover materials and tailings and the extent of geochemical mobilization of the contained radionuclides to the atmosphere and hydrosphere should be considered in the evaluation of the potential, long-term consequences of all proposed uranium mill tailings management plans.

  17. Platinum metals magmatic sulfide ores.

    PubMed

    Naldrett, A J; Duke, J M

    1980-06-27

    Platinum-group elements (PGE) are mined predominantly from deposits that have formed by the segregation of molten iron-nickel-copper sulfides from silicate magmas. The absolute concentrations of PGE in sulfides from different deposits vary over a range of five orders of magnitude, whereas those of other chalcophile elements vary by factors of only 2 to 100. However, the relative proportions of the different PGE in a given deposit are systematically related to the nature of the parent magma. The absolute and relative concentrations of PGE in magmatic sulfides are explained in terms of the degree of partial melting of mantle peridotite required to produce the parent magma and the processes of batch equilibration and fractional segregation of sulfides. The Republic of South Africa and the U.S.S.R. together possess more than 97 percent of the world PGE reserves, but significant undeveloped resources occur in North America. The Stillwater complex in Montana is perhaps the most important example. PMID:17796685

  18. 40 CFR 440.20 - Applicability; description of the aluminum ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... aluminum ore subcategory. 440.20 Section 440.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Aluminum Ore Subcategory § 440.20 Applicability; description of the aluminum ore subcategory. The... an aluminum ore....

  19. 40 CFR 440.20 - Applicability; description of the aluminum ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... aluminum ore subcategory. 440.20 Section 440.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Aluminum Ore Subcategory § 440.20 Applicability; description of the aluminum ore subcategory. The... an aluminum ore....

  20. 40 CFR 440.20 - Applicability; description of the aluminum ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... aluminum ore subcategory. 440.20 Section 440.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Aluminum Ore Subcategory § 440.20 Applicability; description of the aluminum ore subcategory. The... an aluminum ore....

  1. CONTEXT VIEW ALONG EXISTING PERIMETER TRACKS LOOKING OVER IRON ORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTEXT VIEW ALONG EXISTING PERIMETER TRACKS LOOKING OVER IRON ORE CARS TOWARDS CLEVELAND BULK TERMINAL BUILDINGS. LOOKING SOUTH. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  2. CONTEXT VIEW SHOWING MODERN TRACKS PASSING UNDER HULETTS AND ORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTEXT VIEW SHOWING MODERN TRACKS PASSING UNDER HULETTS AND ORE YARD. LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  3. AERIAL OVERVIEW, LOOKING NORTH, WITH FORMER TCIUS STEEL ORE MINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AERIAL OVERVIEW, LOOKING NORTH, WITH FORMER TCI-US STEEL ORE MINE HEADQUARTERS (BOTTOM) AND SUPERINTENDENT'S AND FOREMAN HOUSING ALONG MINNESOTA AVENUE AT CREST OF RED MOUNTAIN (TOP LEFT). - Muscoda Red Ore Mining Community, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  4. CONTEXT VIEW ACROSS ORE YARD AT MODERN SELFUNLOADING SHIP UNLOADING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTEXT VIEW ACROSS ORE YARD AT MODERN SELF-UNLOADING SHIP UNLOADING IN FRONT OF HULETTS. LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  5. CONTEXT VIEW ACROSS ORE YARD AT MODERN SELFUNLOADING BOOM IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTEXT VIEW ACROSS ORE YARD AT MODERN SELF-UNLOADING BOOM IN FRONT OF HULETTS. LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  6. 3. DETAIL OF ORE RECEIVING PLATFORM AND GRIZZLY, VIEW TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. DETAIL OF ORE RECEIVING PLATFORM AND GRIZZLY, VIEW TO WEST. - Vanadium Corporation of America (VCA) Naturita Mill, Sampling Building & Ore Receiving Platform, 3 miles Northwest of Naturita, between Highway 141 & San Miguel River, Naturita, Montrose County, CO

  7. 1. VIEW TO SOUTH (RETAINING WALL OF ORE RECEIVING PLATFORM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW TO SOUTH (RETAINING WALL OF ORE RECEIVING PLATFORM TO LEFT). - Vanadium Corporation of America (VCA) Naturita Mill, Sampling Building & Ore Receiving Platform, 3 miles Northwest of Naturita, between Highway 141 & San Miguel River, Naturita, Montrose County, CO

  8. 2. VIEW TO NORTHEAST (ORE RECEIVING PLATFORM OUT OF VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW TO NORTHEAST (ORE RECEIVING PLATFORM OUT OF VIEW TO RIGHT). - Vanadium Corporation of America (VCA) Naturita Mill, Sampling Building & Ore Receiving Platform, 3 miles Northwest of Naturita, between Highway 141 & San Miguel River, Naturita, Montrose County, CO

  9. 4. DETAIL OF ORE RECEIVING PLATFORM AND GRIZZLY, VIEW TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL OF ORE RECEIVING PLATFORM AND GRIZZLY, VIEW TO EAST. - Vanadium Corporation of America (VCA) Naturita Mill, Sampling Building & Ore Receiving Platform, 3 miles Northwest of Naturita, between Highway 141 & San Miguel River, Naturita, Montrose County, CO

  10. 7. VIEW OF CARRIE No. 3 AND No. 4 ORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF CARRIE No. 3 AND No. 4 ORE BRIDGE, ORE YARD AND FURNACES FROM THE HOT METAL BRIDGE. - U.S. Steel Homestead Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Homestead, Allegheny County, PA

  11. Ore-bearing hydrothermal metasomatic processes in the Elbrus volcanic center, the northern Caucasus, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurbanov, A. G.; Bogatikov, O. A.; Dokuchaev, A. Ya.; Gazeev, V. M.; Abramov, S. S.; Groznova, E. O.; Shevchenko, A. V.

    2008-06-01

    Precaldera, caldera, and postcaldera cycles are recognized in the geological evolution of the Pleistocene-Holocene Elbrus volcanic center (EVC). During the caldera cycle, the magmatic activity was not intense, whereas hydrothermal metasomatic alteration of rocks was vigorous and extensive. The Kyukyurtli and Irik ore-magmatic systems have been revealed in the EVC, with the former being regarded as the more promising one. The ore mineralization in rocks of the caldera cycle comprises occurrences of magnetite, ilmenite, pyrite and pyrrhotite (including Ni-Co varieties), arsenopyrite, chalcopyrite, millerite, galena, and finely dispersed particles of native copper. Pyrite and pyrrhotite from volcanics of the caldera cycle and dacite of the Kyukyurtli extrusion are similar in composition and differ from these minerals of the postcaldera cycle, where pyrite and pyrrhotite are often enriched in Cu, Co, and Ni and millerite is noted as well. The composition of ore minerals indicates that the hydrothermal metasomatic alteration related to the evolution of the Kyukyurtli hydrothermal system was superimposed on rocks of the caldera cycle, whereas the late mineralization in rocks of the postcaldera cycle developed autonomously. The homogenization temperature of fluid inclusions in quartz and carbonate from crosscutting veinlets in the apical portion of the Kyukyurtli extrusion is 140-170°C and in quartz from geyserite, 120-150°C. The temperature of formation of the chalcopyrite-pyrite-pyrrhotite assemblage calculated using mineral geothermometers is 156 and 275°C in dacite from the middle and lower portions of the Malka lava flow and 190°C in dacite of the Kyukyurtli extrusion. The hydrothermal solutions that participated in metasomatic alteration of rocks pertaining to the Kyukyurtli ore-magmatic system (KOMS) and formed both secondary quartzite and geyserite were enriched in fluorine, as evidenced from the occurrence of F-bearing minerals-zharchikhite, ralstonite,

  12. Concentrations and forms of heavy metals around two ore processing sites in Katanga, Democratic Republic of Congo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mees, F.; Masalehdani, M. N. N.; De Putter, T.; D'Hollander, C.; Van Biezen, E.; Mujinya, B. B.; Potdevin, J. L.; Van Ranst, E.

    2013-01-01

    The concentration of heavy metals and the forms in which they occur were determined for tailings and derived deposits of two major processing sites of Cu-Co and Cu-Zn-(Pb) ores in the Katanga Copperbelt (Kipushi, Likasi). They were studied by a combination of methods, focussed on the nature of water- and EDTA-extractable compounds, the mineralogical composition of tailings and associated secondary minerals, and textural features of metal-bearing efflorescences. For the Kipushi area, sulfide minerals in tailings of decantation basins are identified as the source of extractable metals they contain, but input from an external source rather than local oxidation of substrate components is responsible for high levels of contamination in the Likasi area. Contaminated areas around Likasi are characterized by an abundance of Mg-sulfate efflorescences with high concentrations of cobalt and other metals, acting as an important vector for further dispersion of contaminants by wind and water.

  13. 32. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING NORTH ON THE ORE BREAKER LEVEL. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING NORTH ON THE ORE BREAKER LEVEL. THE ORE BREAKER, A BLAKE JAW CRUSHER, IS IN THE BOX IN THE LEFT OF THE PHOTOGRAPH, THE ORE TO BE BROKEN IS FED INTO THE OPENING ON THE FLOOR AND NEXT TO ORE BREAKER BOX. THE GRIZZLY BARS ARE ON THE RIGHT AND THE PULLEYS FROM THE POWER SYSTEM ARE OVERHEAD. - Standard Gold Mill, East of Bodie Creek, Northeast of Bodie, Bodie, Mono County, CA

  14. Placement Of O-Rings In Solid Rocket Booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Charles

    1991-01-01

    Brief report proposes to modify placement of O-ring seals in joints of Solid Rocket Booster of Space Shuttle. Modified joint and seal essentially "inside-out" version of old joint and seal. O-rings placed between outer side of tang and clevis. Joint rotation pushes tang harder against O-rings, thereby making even tighter seal. Proposal derived from analysis of Space Shuttle Challenger disaster, attributed to failure of these O-ring seals.

  15. Thermal Barrier For Vented O-Ring Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schick, H.; Shadlesky, Philip S.; Perry, Mark C.; Ketner, Donald M.; Salita, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Barrier allows gases to seat seal without damaging it. Ring of tungsten-wire mesh forms protective barrier between hot, pressurized combustion gases and O-rings. Mesh cools and depressurizes gases so they safely push on and thereby help to seat primary O-ring or secondary O-ring if primary O-ring fails to form seals. Barrier devised for use in rocket motor. Potential terrestrial applications includes aircraft engines, furnaces, and ducts carrying hot gases.

  16. Photochemical changes in cyanide speciation in drainage from a precious metal ore heap

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.A.; Leinz, R.W.; Grimes, D.J.; Rye, R.O.

    2002-01-01

    In drainage from an inactive ore heap at a former gold mine, the speciation of cyanide and the concentrations of several metals were found to follow diurnal cycles. Concentrations of the hexacyanoferrate complex, iron, manganese, and ammonium were higher at night than during the day, whereas weak-acid-dissociable cyanide, silver, gold, copper, nitrite, and pH displayed the reverse behavior. The changes in cyanide speciation, iron, and trace metals can be explained by photodissociation of iron and cobalt cyanocomplexes as the solutions emerged from the heap into sunlight-exposed channels. At midday, environmentally significant concentrations of free cyanide were produced in a matter of minutes, causing trace copper, silver, and gold to be mobilized as cyanocomplexes from solids. Whether rapid photodissociation is a general phenomenon common to other sites will be important to determine in reaching a general understanding of the environmental risks posed by routine or accidental water discharges from precious metal mining facilities.

  17. Copper cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Copper cyanide ; CASRN 544 - 92 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  18. 17. ORE DOCK, LOOKING EAST FROM HULETT NO. 1. WHEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. ORE DOCK, LOOKING EAST FROM HULETT NO. 1. WHEN BUILT IN 1911-1912, THIS WAS THE LARGEST ORE-UNLOADING DOCK ON THE GREAT LAKES. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  19. 29. ORE DOCK, LOOKING WEST; AT WORK UNLOADING THE 'GEORGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. ORE DOCK, LOOKING WEST; AT WORK UNLOADING THE 'GEORGE M. HUMPHREY'S' CARGO OF 25,000. TONS OF ORE. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  20. CONTEXT VIEW ALONG EXISTING PERIMETER TRACKS LOOKING OVER IRON ORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTEXT VIEW ALONG EXISTING PERIMETER TRACKS LOOKING OVER IRON ORE CARS TOWARDS WESTERN SIDE OF CLEVELAND BULK TERMINAL BUILDINGS AND A SELF-UNLOADING IRON ORE SHIP AT DOCK. LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  1. 18. VIEW OF CRUDE ORE BINS FROM WEST. WEST CRUDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. VIEW OF CRUDE ORE BINS FROM WEST. WEST CRUDE ORE BIN AND TRESTLE FROM TWO JOHNS TRAMLINE TO SOUTH, CRUDE ORE BIN IN FOREGROUND. MACHINE SHOP IN BACKGROUND. THE TRAM TO PORTLAND PASSED TO NORTH OF MACHINE SHOP. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  2. 3. EAGLE MILL, DETAIL OF CRUDE ORE BIN FROM NORTH, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. EAGLE MILL, DETAIL OF CRUDE ORE BIN FROM NORTH, c. 1908-10. SHOWS EXPOSED CRUSHER HOUSE IN FRONT OF (SOUTH) CRUDE ORE BIN AND SNOW SHED ADDED OVER TRAM TRACKS. NOTE LACK OF EAST OR WEST CRUDE ORE BINS. CREDIT JW. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  3. 6. Looking west showing top of dock: steaming frozen ore ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Looking west showing top of dock: steaming frozen ore which had been put in pockets in December 1959, May 6, 1990. Photographer: unknown - Marquette Ore Dock No. 6, Ore Dock, On pilings in Marquette City Lower Harbor, Marquette, Marquette County, MI

  4. Rebound Of Previously Compressed O-Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Carleton J.

    1988-01-01

    Report presents theoretical and experimental analysis of relaxation characteristics of O-ring of vinylidene fluoride/hexafluoropropylene copolymer of same composition used in solid rocket boosters on Space Shuttle flight 51-L. Study covers range of temperatures from 10 to 120 degree F. Presents one-dimensional mathematical model of response provided for both elastic response and creep.

  5. Ore Melting and Reduction in Silicomanganese Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringdalen, Eli; Gaal, Sean; Tangstad, Merete; Ostrovski, Oleg

    2010-12-01

    The charge for silicomangansese production consists of manganese ore (often mixed with ferromanganese slag) dolomite or calcite, quartz, and in some cases, other additions. These materials have different melting properties, which have a strong effect on reduction and smelting reactions in the production of a silicomanganese alloy. This article discusses properties of Assman, Gabonese, and Companhia Vale do Rio Doce (CVRD) ores, CVRD sinter and high-carbon ferromanganese (HC FeMn) slag, and their change during silicomanganese production. The melting and reduction temperatures of these manganese sources were measured in a carbon monoxide atmosphere, using the sessile drop method and a differential thermal analysis/thermogravimetric analysis. Equilibrium phases were analyzed using FACTSage (CRCT, Montreal, Canada and GTT, Aachen, Germany) software. Experimental investigations and an analysis of equilibrium phases revealed significant differences in the melting behavior and reduction of different manganese sources. The difference in smelting of CVRD ore and CVRD sinter was attributed to a faster reduction of sinter by the graphite substrate and carbon monoxide. The calculation of equilibrium phases in the reduction process of manganese ores using FACTSage correctly reflects the trends in the production of manganese alloys. The temperature at which the manganese oxide concentration in the slag was reduced below 10 wt pct can be assigned to the top of the coke bed in the silicomanganese furnace. This temperature was in the range 1823 K to 1883 K (1550 °C to 1610 °C).

  6. Sources of ores of the ferroalloy metals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burchard, E.F.

    1933-01-01

    Since all steel is made with the addition of alloying elements, the record of the metallic raw materials contributory to the steel industry would be far from complete without reference to the ferroalloy metals. This paper, therefore, supplements two preceding arvicles on the sources of our iron ores. The photographs, with the exception of those relating to molybdenum and vanadium, are by the author.

  7. Energy conservation during the smelting of ores

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, J. C.

    1985-07-16

    The invention discloses processes for preparing matched sizes of electric furnace feed materials. With the matched sizes, components of the feed mixture do not separate inside the furnace and this decreases the electric energy for smelting. Preparation of matched sizes of materials is made possible by low-temperature agglomeration followed by drying to indurate the agglomerates. Fuel requirements for induration are substantially reduced, and environmental problems associated with high-temperature agglomeration are eliminated. Phosphate ores can be agglomerated and simultaneously the ores are upgraded by increasing the P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ content. Unbeneficiated phosphate ores heretofore considered unsuited for smelting can be used as phosphate sources for the production of phosphorus. A combustible gas consisting mainly of carbon monoxide and hydrogen is generated when ores are smelted. Processes are disclosed for cleaning the gas to permit it to be burned in a facility for the cogeneration of electric energy. At phosphorus furnaces the potential energy in the gas is equal to about 65 percent of the electric energy used in smelting; consequently, the net electric energy consumption can be substantially reduced by operation of a cogeneration facility.

  8. PROCESS OF RECOVERING URANIUM FROM ITS ORES

    DOEpatents

    Galvanek, P. Jr.

    1959-02-24

    A process is presented for recovering uranium from its ores. The crushed ore is mixed with 5 to 10% of sulfuric acid and added water to about 5 to 30% of the weight of the ore. This pugged material is cured for 2 to 3 hours at 100 to 110 deg C and then cooled. The cooled mass is nitrate-conditioned by mixing with a solution equivalent to 35 pounds of ammunium nitrate and 300 pounds of water per ton of ore. The resulting pulp containing 70% or more solids is treated by upflow percolation with a 5% solution of tributyl phosphate in kerosene at a rate equivalent to a residence time of about one hour to extract the solubilized uranium. The uranium is recovered from the pregnant organic liquid by counter-current washing with water. The organic extractant may be recycled. The uranium is removed from the water solution by treating with ammonia to precipitate ammonium diuranate. The filtrate from the last step may be recycled for the nitrate-conditioning treatment.

  9. Modelling Cometary Sodium Tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkett, K. S.; Jones, G. H.; Coates, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    Neutral sodium is readily observed in cometary spectra and can be seen to form its own distinct tail at high activity comets. Solar radiation pressure accelerates the sodium atoms antisunward and, as strong sodium absorption lines are present in the solar spectrum, the magnitude of this force is dependent upon the Doppler shift of the incident solar radiation. Therefore the heliocentric velocity of the sodium atom directly determines its acceleration. This can produce unique effects, such as a stagnation region. Sodium is relatively easy to detect and so can potentially be used to trace mechanisms in the coma that are otherwise difficult to observe. The source of neutral sodium in the tail currently remains unknown. We have therefore developed a new, three dimensional Monte-Carlo model of neutral cometary sodium in order to facilitate testing of different source production functions. It includes weightings due to neutral sodium lifetime, variation of cometary sodium emission due to Fraunhofer absorption lines and solar flux variation with heliocentric distance. The Swings and Greenstein effects, which can have particularly dramatic effects in near-Sun comets, are also considered comprehensively. Preliminary results from this model are presented, focusing on a comparison of predictions of the neutral sodium tail of Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) with initial observations.

  10. An econometric model of the U.S. secondary copper industry: Recycling versus disposal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slade, M.E.

    1980-01-01

    In this paper, a theoretical model of secondary recovery is developed that integrates microeconomic theories of production and cost with a dynamic model of scrap generation and accumulation. The model equations are estimated for the U.S. secondary copper industry and used to assess the impacts that various policies and future events have on copper recycling rates. The alternatives considered are: subsidies for secondary production, differing energy costs, and varying ore quality in primary production. ?? 1990.

  11. The Myszkow porphyry copper-molybdenum deposit, Poland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chaffee, M.A.; Eppinger, R.G.; Lason, K.; Slosarz, J.; Podemski, M.

    1994-01-01

    The porphyry copper-molybdenum deposit at Myszkow, south-central Poland, lies in the Cracow-Silesian orogenic belt, in the vicinity of a Paleozoic boundary between two tectonic plates. The deposit is hosted in a complex that includes early Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks intruded in the late Paleozoic by a predominantly granodioritic pluton. This deposit exhibits many features that are typical of porphyry copper deposits associated with calc-alkaline intrusive rocks, including ore- and alteration-mineral suites, zoning of ore and alteration minerals, fluid-inclusion chemistry, tectonic setting, and structural style of veining. Unusual features of the Myszkow deposit include high concentrations of tungsten and the late Paleozoic (Variscan) age. -Authors

  12. Global emission and production of mercury during the pyrometallurgical extraction of nonferrous sulfide ores.

    PubMed

    Hylander, Lars D; Herbert, Roger B

    2008-08-15

    The contribution of the milling, smelting, and refining of sulfide ores to Hg emissions and to Hg byproduction is not adequately quantified in a global context. In this study, we estimate Hg emissions from the pyrometallurgical treatment of Cu, Pb, and Zn sulfide ores. We base our calculations on quantities processed and Hg content in Cu, Pb, and Zn concentrates, derived from unique global databases on smelter feed and production. In 2005, about 275 tons of Hg were emitted globally to the atmosphere from Cu, Pb, and Zn smelters. Nearly one-half was emitted from Zn smelters and the other half equally divided between Cu and Pb smelters. Most Hg was emitted in China, followed by the Russian Federation, India, and South Korea. Global emission factors were 5.81, 15.71, and 12.09 g of Hg ton(-1) of metal for Cu, Pb, and Zn smelters, respectively. Calculations indicate that Hg abatementtechnologies applied to flue gases may have recovered 8.8 tons and 228 tons Hg from Pb and Zn smelters, respectively, most of which was probably sold as a byproduct. In conclusion, Hg emitted from processing copper, lead, and zinc ores has been largely underestimated in Hg emission inventories. Reducing these emissions may be one of the most economical measures to reduce global Hg emissions. PMID:18767653

  13. 13. ORE DOCK, LOOKING EAST FROM HULETT NO. 1. WHEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. ORE DOCK, LOOKING EAST FROM HULETT NO. 1. WHEN BUILT IN 1911-1912, THIS WAS THE LARGEST ORE-UNLOADING DOCK ON THE GREAT LAKES. THE DOCK FEATURED FOUR HULETT UNLOADERS, EACH WITH A BUCKET CAPACITY OF 17 TONS; A 15-TON CAPACITY ORE STOCKING AND REHANDLING BRIDGE; AND A ONE-MILLION-TON CAPACITY ORE STORAGE YARD. THE WILLIAM-SEAVER-MORGAN COMPANY OF CLEVELAND BUILT THE DOCK EQUIPMENT. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  14. Fractal and Chaos Analysis for Dynamics of Radon Exhalation from Uranium Mill Tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongmei; Tan, Wanyu; Tan, Kaixuan; Liu, Zehua; Xie, Yanshi

    2016-08-01

    Tailings from mining and milling of uranium ores potentially are large volumes of low-level radioactive materials. A typical environmental problem associated with uranium tailings is radon exhalation, which can significantly pose risks to environment and human health. In order to reduce these risks, it is essential to study the dynamical nature and underlying mechanism of radon exhalation from uranium mill tailings. This motivates the conduction of this study, which is based on the fractal and chaotic methods (e.g. calculating the Hurst exponent, Lyapunov exponent and correlation dimension) and laboratory experiments of the radon exhalation rates. The experimental results show that the radon exhalation rate from uranium mill tailings is highly oscillated. In addition, the nonlinear analyses of the time series of radon exhalation rate demonstrate the following points: (1) the value of Hurst exponent much larger than 0.5 indicates non-random behavior of the radon time series; (2) the positive Lyapunov exponent and non-integer correlation dimension of the time series imply that the radon exhalation from uranium tailings is a chaotic dynamical process; (3) the required minimum number of variables should be five to describe the time evolution of radon exhalation. Therefore, it can be concluded that the internal factors, including heterogeneous distribution of radium, and randomness of radium decay, as well as the fractal characteristics of the tailings, can result in the chaotic evolution of radon exhalation from the tailings.

  15. Modeling fossil energy demands of primary nonferrous metal production: the case of copper.

    PubMed

    Swart, Pilar; Dewulf, Jo

    2013-12-17

    The methodologies for life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) of metal resources are rather diverse. Some LCIA methods are based on ore grade changes, but they typically do not consider the impact of changes in primary metal extraction technology. To characterize the impact of technology changes for copper, we modeled and analyzed energy demand, expressed in fossil energy equivalents (FEE) per kilogram of primary copper, taking into account the applied mining method and processing technology. The model was able to capture variations in reported energy demands of selected mining sites (FEE: 0.07 to 0.84 MJ-eq/kg ore) with deviations of 1 to 30%. Applying the model to a database containing global mine production data resulted in energy demand median values of around 50 MJ/kg Cu irrespective of the processing route, even though median values of ore demands varied between processing routes from ca. 35 (underground, conventional processing) to 200 kg ore/kg Cu (open pit, solvent-extraction, and electrowinning), as high specific ore demands are typically associated with less energy intensive extraction technologies and vice versa. Thus, only considering ore grade in LCIA methods without making any differentiation with regard to employed technology can produce misleading results. PMID:24266773

  16. Modeling fossil energy demands of primary nonferrous metal production: the case of copper.

    PubMed

    Swart, Pilar; Dewulf, Jo

    2013-12-17

    The methodologies for life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) of metal resources are rather diverse. Some LCIA methods are based on ore grade changes, but they typically do not consider the impact of changes in primary metal extraction technology. To characterize the impact of technology changes for copper, we modeled and analyzed energy demand, expressed in fossil energy equivalents (FEE) per kilogram of primary copper, taking into account the applied mining method and processing technology. The model was able to capture variations in reported energy demands of selected mining sites (FEE: 0.07 to 0.84 MJ-eq/kg ore) with deviations of 1 to 30%. Applying the model to a database containing global mine production data resulted in energy demand median values of around 50 MJ/kg Cu irrespective of the processing route, even though median values of ore demands varied between processing routes from ca. 35 (underground, conventional processing) to 200 kg ore/kg Cu (open pit, solvent-extraction, and electrowinning), as high specific ore demands are typically associated with less energy intensive extraction technologies and vice versa. Thus, only considering ore grade in LCIA methods without making any differentiation with regard to employed technology can produce misleading results.

  17. Reducing acid leaching of manganiferous ore: effect of the iron removal operation on solid waste disposal.

    PubMed

    De Michelis, Ida; Ferella, Francesco; Beolchini, Francesca; Vegliò, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    The process of reducing acid leaching of manganiferous ore is aimed at the extraction of manganese from low grade manganese ores. This work is focused on the iron removal operation. The following items have been considered in order to investigate the effect of the main operating conditions on solid waste disposal and on the process costs: (i) type and quantity of the base agent used for iron precipitation, (ii) effective need of leaching waste separation prior to the iron removal operation, (iii) presence of a second leaching stage with the roasted ore, which might also act as a preliminary iron removal step, and (iv) effect of tailings washing on the solid waste classification. Different base compounds have been tested, including CaO, CaCO3, NaOH, and Na2CO3. The latter gave the best results concerning both the precipitation process kinetics and the reagent consumption. The filtration of the liquor leach prior to iron removal was not necessary, implying significant savings in capital costs. A reduction of chemical consumption and an increase of manganese concentration in the solution were obtained by introducing secondary leaching tests with the previously roasted ore; this additional step was introduced without a significant decrease of global manganese extraction yield. Finally, toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) tests carried out on the leaching solid waste showed: (i) a reduction of arsenic mobility in the presence of iron precipitates, and (ii) the need for a washing step in order to produce a waste that is classifiable as not dangerous, taking into consideration the existing Environmental National Laws. PMID:18556190

  18. Reducing acid leaching of manganiferous ore: Effect of the iron removal operation on solid waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    De Michelis, Ida; Ferella, Francesco; Beolchini, Francesca Veglio, Francesco

    2009-01-15

    The process of reducing acid leaching of manganiferous ore is aimed at the extraction of manganese from low grade manganese ores. This work is focused on the iron removal operation. The following items have been considered in order to investigate the effect of the main operating conditions on solid waste disposal and on the process costs: (i) type and quantity of the base agent used for iron precipitation, (ii) effective need of leaching waste separation prior to the iron removal operation, (iii) presence of a second leaching stage with the roasted ore, which might also act as a preliminary iron removal step, and (iv) effect of tailings washing on the solid waste classification. Different base compounds have been tested, including CaO, CaCO{sub 3}, NaOH, and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. The latter gave the best results concerning both the precipitation process kinetics and the reagent consumption. The filtration of the liquor leach prior to iron removal was not necessary, implying significant savings in capital costs. A reduction of chemical consumption and an increase of manganese concentration in the solution were obtained by introducing secondary leaching tests with the previously roasted ore; this additional step was introduced without a significant decrease of global manganese extraction yield. Finally, toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) tests carried out on the leaching solid waste showed: (i) a reduction of arsenic mobility in the presence of iron precipitates, and (ii) the need for a washing step in order to produce a waste that is classifiable as not dangerous, taking into consideration the existing Environmental National Laws.

  19. Degradation Characteristics of O-rings on Highly Aged GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minagawa, Tadao; Nagao, Eiichi; Tsuchie, Ei; Yonezawa, Hiroshi; Takayama, Daisuke; Yamakawa, Yutaka

    Owing to increasing number of highly aged GIS, the investigation of the remaining lifetimes of those systems are becoming more important. Because a lot of O-rings are used in GIS, the study of degradation mechanism and lifetime estimation method of O-ring is essential. In this paper, the information about O-ring degradation mechanism is described, and the statistical method for estimating the remaining lifetime of O-ring is proposed. The degradation of O-ring is mainly subject to chemical reactions triggered by oxygen. Because there are many factors influencing those chemical reactions, the dispersion of degradation rates of O-rings in GIS is very large. Consequently the statistical analysis is one of the effective techniques for lifetime estimation of O-rings in GIS.

  20. High-rate behaviour of iron ore pellet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, Gustaf; Häggblad, Hans-Åke; Jonsén, Pär; Nishida, Masahiro

    2015-09-01

    Iron ore pellets are sintered, centimetre-sized spheres of ore with high iron content. Together with carbonized coal, iron ore pellets are used in the production of steel. In the transportation from the pelletizing plants to the customers, the iron ore pellets are exposed to different loading situations, resulting in degradation of strength and in some cases fragmentation. For future reliable numerical simulations of the handling and transportation of iron ore pellets, knowledge about their mechanical properties is needed. This paper describes the experimental work to investigate the dynamic mechanical properties of blast furnace iron ore pellets. To study the dynamic fracture of iron ore pellets a number of split Hopkinson pressure bar tests are carried out and analysed.

  1. DETAIL VIEW OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL, SECONDARY ORE BIN, CRUSHER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF LOWER TRAM TERMINAL, SECONDARY ORE BIN, CRUSHER FOUNDATION, AND BALL MILL FOUNDATIONS, LOOKING NORTH NORTHWEST. ORE FROM THE MINES WAS DUMPED FROM THE TRAM BUCKETS INTO THE PRIMARY ORE BIN UNDER THE TRAM TERMINAL. A SLIDING CONTROL DOOR INTRODUCED THE INTO THE JAW CRUSHER (FOUNDATIONS,CENTER). THE CRUSHED ORE WAS THEN CONVEYED INTO THE SECONDARY ORE BIN AT CENTER LEFT. A HOLE IN THE FLOOR OF THE ORE BIN PASSED ORE ONTO ANOTHER CONVEYOR THAT BROUGHT IT OUT TO THE BALL MILL(FOUNDATIONS,CENTER BOTTOM). THIS SYSTEM IS MOST LIKELY NOT THE ORIGINAL SET UP, PROBABLY INSTALLED IN THE MINE'S LAST OCCUPATION IN THE EARLY 1940s. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  2. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, H.; Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1990-01-09

    A composition of matter is described which is comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide. A method for making this composition of matter is also described. This invention relates to the art of powder metallurgy and, more particularly, it relates to dispersion strengthened metals.

  3. Floods from tailings dam failures.

    PubMed

    Rico, M; Benito, G; Díez-Herrero, A

    2008-06-15

    This paper compiles the available information on historic tailings dam failures with the purpose to establish simple correlations between tailings ponds geometric parameters (e.g., dam height, tailings volume) and the hydraulic characteristics of floods resulting from released tailings. Following the collapse of a mining waste dam, only a part of tailings and polluted water stored at the dam is released, and this outflow volume is difficult to estimate prior the incident. In this study, tailings' volume stored at the time of failure was shown to have a good correlation (r2=0.86) with the tailings outflow volume, and the volume of spilled tailings was correlated with its run-out distance (r2=0.57). An envelope curve was drawn encompassing the majority of data points indicating the potential maximum downstream distance affected by a tailings' spill. The application of the described regression equations for prediction purposes needs to be treated with caution and with support of on-site measurement and observations. However, they may provide a universal baseline approximation on tailing outflow characteristics (even if detailed dam information is unavailable), which is of a great importance for risk analysis purposes.

  4. ASTER, ALI and Hyperion sensors data for lithological mapping and ore minerals exploration.

    PubMed

    Beiranvand Pour, Amin; Hashim, Mazlan

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides a review of the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), Advanced Land Imager (ALI), and Hyperion data and applications of the data as a tool for ore minerals exploration, lithological and structural mapping. Spectral information extraction from ASTER, ALI, and Hyperion data has great ability to assist geologists in all disciplines to map the distribution and detect the rock units exposed at the earth's surface. The near coincidence of Earth Observing System (EOS)/Terra and Earth Observing One (EO-1) platforms allows acquiring ASTER, ALI, and Hyperion imagery of the same ground areas, resulting accurate information for geological mapping applications especially in the reconnaissance stages of hydrothermal copper and gold exploration, chromite, magnetite, massive sulfide and uranium ore deposits, mineral components of soils and structural interpretation at both regional and district scales. Shortwave length infrared and thermal infrared bands of ASTER have sufficient spectral resolution to map fundamental absorptions of hydroxyl mineral groups and silica and carbonate minerals for regional mapping purposes. Ferric-iron bearing minerals can be discriminated using six unique wavelength bands of ALI spanning the visible and near infrared. Hyperion visible and near infrared bands (0.4 to 1.0 μm) and shortwave infrared bands (0.9 to 2.5 μm) allowed to produce image maps of iron oxide minerals, hydroxyl-bearing minerals, sulfates and carbonates in association with hydrothermal alteration assemblages, respectively. The techniques and achievements reviewed in the present paper can further introduce the efficacy of ASTER, ALI, and Hyperion data for future mineral and lithological mapping and exploration of the porphyry copper, epithermal gold, chromite, magnetite, massive sulfide and uranium ore deposits especially in arid and semi-arid territory. PMID:25674434

  5. Neutron activation analysis of fluid inclusions for copper, manganese, and zinc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czamanske, G.K.; Roedder, E.; Burns, F.C.

    1963-01-01

    Microgram quantities of copper, manganese, and zinc, corresponding to concentrations greater than 100 parts per million, were found in milligram quantities of primary inclusion fluid extracted from samples of quartz and fluorite from two types of ore deposits. The results indicate that neutron activation is a useful analytical method for studying the content of heavy metal in fluid inclusions.

  6. Tailings dam-break flow - Analysis of sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleixo, Rui; Altinakar, Mustafa

    2015-04-01

    A common solution to store mining debris is to build tailings dams near the mining site. These dams are usually built with local materials such as mining debris and are more vulnerable than concrete dams (Rico et al. 2008). of The tailings and the pond water generally contain heavy metals and various toxic chemicals used in ore extraction. Thus, the release of tailings due to a dam-break can have severe ecological consequences in the environment. A tailings dam-break has many similarities with a common dam-break flow. It is highly transient and can be severely descructive. However, a significant difference is that the released sediment-water mixture will behave as a non-Newtonian flow. Existing numerical models used to simulate dam-break flows do not represent correctly the non-Newtonian behavior of tailings under a dam-break flow and may lead to unrealistic and incorrect results. The need for experiments to extract both qualitative and quantitative information regarding these flows is therefore real and actual. The present paper explores an existing experimental data base presented in Aleixo et al. (2014a,b) to further characterize the sediment transport under conditions of a severe transient flow and to extract quantitative information regarding sediment flow rate, sediment velocity, sediment-sediment interactions a among others. Different features of the flow are also described and analyzed in detail. The analysis is made by means of imaging techniques such as Particle Image Velocimetry and Particle Tracking Velocimetry that allow extracting not only the velocity field but the Lagrangian description of the sediments as well. An analysis of the results is presented and the limitations of the presented experimental approach are discussed. References Rico, M., Benito, G., Salgueiro, AR, Diez-Herrero, A. and Pereira, H.G. (2008) Reported tailings dam failures: A review of the European incidents in the worldwide context , Journal of Hazardous Materials, 152, 846

  7. The geomagnetic tail

    SciTech Connect

    Birn, J. )

    1991-01-01

    A review is presented of the plasma sheet and lobe regions of the magnetotail, focusing principally on large-scale processes or microprocesses with some large-scale effects. Consideration is given to quiet and average structures, not necessarily related to activity phases, with quasi-steady convection aspects, and with the characteristics of dynamic phases including acceleration mechanisms and single particle aspects. Attention is given to various activity models, average and quiet time properties, properties and effects of magnetospheric convection, dynamics of the magnetotail, and the near tail, substorm current wedge.

  8. Preliminary reduction of oxidized nickel ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakhomov, R. A.; Starykh, R. V.

    2014-11-01

    The laws of gas reduction of oxidized nickel ores (ONOs) are studied. The theoretical prerequisites of the selective reduction of ONO nickel, which are based on the difference between the oxygen partial pressures over the NiO-Ni and FeO-Fe systems, are discussed. The effect of the oxygen partial pressure during reducing roasting of ONOs of ferruginous and magnesia types on the reduction parameters and the quality of the ferronickel formed upon subsequent melting of cinders is experimentally investigated. The optimum conditions of preliminary gas reduction of ONOs are determined. Melting of the cinder of reducing roasting leads to the formation of nickel-rich ferronickel (20-50 wt % Ni for various types of ores) upon the extraction of nickel into ferronickel of >95%, which substantially exceeds the parameters of the existing commercial processes.

  9. Copper urine test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The copper urine test is performed by collecting urine at specific times for a 24-hour period. The urine is tested for the amount of copper present. The copper urine test is used to determine the presence of Wilson ...

  10. Proterozoic geology and ore deposits of Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karlstrom, Karl E.

    1991-01-01

    Proterozoic rocks in Arizona have been the focus of interest for geologists since the late 1800's. Early investigations, led by the U.S. Geological Survey, focused on the extensive ore deposits hosted by Proterozoic rocks. By the 1960's, these studies, combined with theses from academic institutions and the efforts of the Arizona Geological Survey, had produced a rich data base of geologic maps, primarily of the central part of the Transition Zone. The chronological significance of these maps became much better known with the application of U-Pb geochronology by L.Y. Silver and his students starting in the 1960's. The 1970's and early 1980's were marked by numerous contributions from Masters and Ph.D students at a variety of academic institutions, and continued work by the U.S. Geological Survey. Interest in ore deposits persisted and there was an increasing interest in interpretation of the tectonic history of Proterozoic rocks in terms of plate tectonic models, as summarized in papers by Phillip Anderson, Ed DeWitt, Clay Conway, Paul Lindberg, and J.L Anderson in the 1989 Arizona Geological Society Digest 17: "Geologic Evolution of Arizona". The present volume: "Proterozoic Geology and Ore deposits of Arizona" builds upon A.G.S. Digest 17, and presents the results of geologic investigations from the latter part of the 1980's. A number of the papers are condensed versions of MS theses done by students at Northern Arizona University. These papers are based upon 1:10,000 mapping and structural analysis of several areas in Arizona. The geologic maps from each of these studies are available separately as part of the Arizona Geological Survey Contributed Map Series. These detailed maps, plus the continuing mapping efforts of the U.S.G.S. and students at other academic institutions, form an ever improving data base for continuing attempts to understand the Proterozoic geology and ore deposits of Arizona

  11. Kinetics of Uranium Extraction from Uranium Tailings by Oxidative Leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Biao; Li, Mi; Zhang, Xiaowen; Huang, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Extraction of uranium from uranium tailings by oxidative leaching with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was studied. The effects of various extraction factors were investigated to optimize the dissolution conditions, as well as to determine the leaching kinetic parameters. The behavior of H2O2 in the leaching process was determined through scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) and x-ray diffraction analysis of leaching residues. Results suggest that H2O2 can significantly improve uranium extraction by decomposing the complex gangue structures in uranium tailings and by enhancing the reaction rate between uranium phases and the leaching agent. The extraction kinetics expression was changed from 1 - 3(1 - α)2/3 + 2(1 - α) = K 0(H2SO4)-0.14903(S/L)-1.80435( R o)0.20023 e -1670.93/T t ( t ≥ 5) to 1 - 3(1 - α)2/3 + 2(1 - α) = K 0(H2SO4)0.01382(S/L)-1.83275( R o)0.25763 e -1654.59/T t ( t ≥ 5) by the addition of H2O2 in the leaching process. The use of H2O2 in uranium leaching may help in extracting uranium more efficiently and rapidly from low-uranium-containing ores or tailings.

  12. Long tail kinetics in biophysics?

    PubMed Central

    Nagle, J F

    1992-01-01

    Long tail kinetics describe a variety of data from complex, disordered materials that cannot be described by conventional kinetics. It is suggested that the kinetics of diffusive motion in complex biological media, such as cytoplasm or biomembranes, might also have long tails. The effects of long tail kinetics are investigated for two standard biophysical measurements, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). It is shown that long tail kinetic data would yield significantly distorted and misleading results when analyzed assuming conventional kinetics. PMID:1420883

  13. Iron ore weathering potentials of ectomycorrhizal plants.

    PubMed

    Adeleke, R A; Cloete, T E; Bertrand, A; Khasa, D P

    2012-10-01

    Plants in association with soil microorganisms play an important role in mineral weathering. Studies have shown that plants in symbiosis with ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi have the potential to increase the uptake of mineral-derived nutrients. However, it is usually difficult to study many of the different factors that influence ectomycorrhizal weathering in a single experiment. In the present study, we carried out a pot experiment where Pinus patula seedlings were grown with or without ECM fungi in the presence of iron ore minerals. The ECM fungi used included Pisolithus tinctorius, Paxillus involutus, Laccaria bicolor and Suillus tomentosus. After 24 weeks, harvesting of the plants was carried out. The concentration of organic acids released into the soil, as well as potassium and phosphorus released from the iron ore were measured. The results suggest that different roles of ectomycorrhizal fungi in mineral weathering such as nutrient absorption and transfer, improving the health of plants and ensuring nutrient circulation in the ecosystem, are species specific, and both mycorrhizal roots and non-mycorrhizal roots can participate in the weathering process of iron ore minerals.

  14. 3. VIEW OF WEST TAILING DAM, LARGE TANK, AND TAILING, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF WEST TAILING DAM, LARGE TANK, AND TAILING, LOOKING NORTHEAST. A SIX-FOOT SCALE IS LOCATED AGAINST WALL ON LEFT. PURPOSE OF TANK IS UNKNOWN, BUT APPEARS TO HAVE FALLEN FROM ITS ORIGINAL LOCATION AT THE MILL SITE, UP AND TO THE RIGHT OF THIS VIEW. - Skidoo Mine, Park Route 38 (Skidoo Road), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  15. Physical-chemical conditions of ore deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barton, P.B.

    1981-01-01

    Ore deposits form under a wide range of physical and chemical conditions, but those precipitating from hot, aqueous fluids-i.e. the hydrothermal deposits-form generally below 700??C and at pressures of only 1 or 2 kbar or less. Natural aqueous fluids in rocks may extract metal and sulfur from a variety of rock types or may acquire them as a residual heritage from a crystallizing silicate magma. Ore-forming hydrothermal fluids never appear as hot springs (except in deep, submarine situations) because they boil, mix with surface waters, and cool, thereby losing their ore-bearing ability before reaching the surface. Mineral systems function as chemical buffers and indicators just as buffers and indicators function in a chemical laboratory. By reading the record written in the buffer/indicator assemblages of minerals one can reconstruct many aspects of the former chemical environment. By studying the record of changing conditions one may deduce information regarding the processes functioning to create the succession of chemical environments and the ore deposits they represent. The example of the OH vein at Creede, Colorado, shows a pH buffered by the K-feldspar + muscovite + quartz assemblage and the covariation of S2 and O2 buffered by the assemblage chlorite + pyrite + quartz. Boiling of the ore fluid led to its oxidation to hematite-bearing assemblages and simultaneously produced an intensely altered, sericitic capping over the vein in response to the condensation of vapors bearing acidic components. The solubility of metals as calculated from experimental and theoretical studies of mineral solubility appears too low by at least one or two powers of ten to explain the mineralization at Creede. In contrast to Creede where the mineral stabilities all point to a relatively consistent chemistry, the Mississippi Valley type deposits present a puzzle of conflicting chemical clues that are impossible to reconcile with any single equilibrium situation. Thus we must

  16. Physical-chemical conditions of ore deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Paul B.

    Ore deposits form under a wide range of physical and chemical conditions, but those precipitating from hot, aqueous fluids-i.e. the hydrothermal deposits-form generally below 700°C and at pressures of only 1 or 2 kbar or less. Natural aqueous fluids in rocks may extract metal and sulfur from a variety of rock types or may acquire them as a residual heritage from a crystallizing silicate magma. Ore-forming hydrothermal fluids never appear as hot springs (except in deep, submarine situations) because they boil, mix with surface waters, and cool, thereby losing their ore-bearing ability before reaching the surface. Mineral systems function as chemical buffers and indicators just as buffers and indicators function in a chemical laboratory. By reading the record written in the buffer/indicator assemblages of minerals one can reconstruct many aspects of the former chemical environment. By studying the record of changing conditions one may deduce information regarding the processes functioning to create the succession of chemical environments and the ore deposits they represent. The example of the OH vein at Creede, Colorado, shows a pH buffered by the K-feldspar + muscovite + quartz assemblage and the covariation of S 2 and O 2 buffered by the assemblage chlorite + pyrite + quartz. Boiling of the ore fluid led to its oxidation to hematite-bearing assemblages and simultaneously produced an intensely altered, sericitic capping over the vein in response to the condensation of vapors bearing acidic components. The solubility of metals as calculated from experimental and theoretical studies of mineral solubility appears too low by at least one or two powers of ten to explain the mineralization at Creede. In contrast to Creede where the mineral stabilities all point to a relatively consistent chemistry, the Mississippi Valley type deposits present a puzzle of conflicting chemical clues that are impossible to reconcile with any single equilibrium situation. Thus we must

  17. A hydrogeologic model of stratiform copper mineralization in the Midcontinent Rift System, Northern Michigan, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swenson, J.B.; Person, M.; Raffensperger, J.P.; Cannon, W.F.; Woodruff, L.G.; Berndt, M.E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a suite of two-dimensional mathematical models of basin-scale groundwater flow and heat transfer for the middle Proterozoic Midcontinent Rift System. The models were used to assess the hydrodynamic driving mechanisms responsible for main-stage stratiform copper mineralization of the basal Nonesuch Formation during the post-volcanic/pre-compressional phase of basin evolution. Results suggest that compaction of the basal aquifer (Copper Harbor Formation), in response to mechanical loading during deposition of the overlying Freda Sandstone, generated a pulse of marginward-directed, compaction-driven discharge of cupriferous brines from within the basal aquifer. The timing of this pulse is consistent with the radiometric dates for the timing of mineralization. Thinning of the basal aquifer near White Pine, Michigan, enhanced stratiform copper mineralization. Focused upward leakage of copper-laden brines into the lowermost facies of the pyrite-rich Nonesuch Formation resulted in copper sulfide mineralization in response to a change in oxidation state. Economic-grade mineralization within the White Pine ore district is a consequence of intense focusing of compaction-driven discharge, and corresponding amplification of leakage into the basal Nonesuch Formation, where the basal aquifer thins dramatically atop the Porcupine Mountains volcanic structure. Equilibrium geochemical modeling and mass-balance calculations support this conclusion. We also assessed whether topography and density-driven flow systems could have caused ore genesis at White Pine. Topography-driven flow associated with the Ottawan orogeny was discounted because it post-dates main-stage ore genesis and because recent seismic interpretations of basin inversion indicates that basin geometry would not be conductive to ore genesis. Density-driven flow systems did not produce focused discharge in the vicinity of the White Pine ore district.

  18. Acid pre-treatment method for in situ ore leaching

    DOEpatents

    Mallon, R.G.; Braun, R.L.

    1975-10-28

    An acid leaching method is described for the recovery of a desired element from a subterranean rubblized body of primary ore containing the element and also having associated therewith a carbonate mineral wherein the rubblized ore body is flooded with an aqueous acidic solution in order to release carbon dioxide from the associated carbonate mineral. After a substantial portion of the available carbon dioxide is released and removed from the ore body, as by venting to the atmosphere, an oxidizing gas is introduced into the flooded, rubblized ore to oxidize the ore and form an acid leach solution effective in the presence of the dissolved oxidizing gas to dissolve the ore and cause the desired element to go into solution. The leach solution is then circulated to the surface where the metal values are recovered therefrom.

  19. Rate and regulation of copper transport by human copper transporter 1 (hCTR1).

    PubMed

    Maryon, Edward B; Molloy, Shannon A; Ivy, Kristin; Yu, Huijun; Kaplan, Jack H

    2013-06-21

    Human copper transporter 1 (hCTR1) is a homotrimer of a 190-amino acid monomer having three transmembrane domains believed to form a pore for copper permeation through the plasma membrane. The hCTR1-mediated copper transport mechanism is not well understood, nor has any measurement been made of the rate at which copper ions are transported by hCTR1. In this study, we estimated the rate of copper transport by the hCTR1 trimer in cultured cells using (64)Cu uptake assays and quantification of plasma membrane hCTR1. For endogenous hCTR1, we estimated a turnover number of about 10 ions/trimer/s. When overexpressed in HEK293 cells, a second transmembrane domain mutant of hCTR1 (H139R) had a 3-fold higher Km value and a 4-fold higher turnover number than WT. Truncations of the intracellular C-terminal tail and an AAA substitution of the putative metal-binding HCH C-terminal tripeptide (thought to be required for transport) also exhibited elevated transport rates and Km values when compared with WT hCTR1. Unlike WT hCTR1, H139R and the C-terminal mutants did not undergo regulatory endocytosis in elevated copper. hCTR1 mutants combining methionine substitutions that block transport (M150L,M154L) on the extracellular side of the pore and the high transport H139R or AAA intracellular side mutations exhibited the blocked transport of M150L,M154L, confirming that Cu(+) first interacts with the methionines during permeation. Our results show that hCTR1 elements on the intracellular side of the hCTR1 pore, including the carboxyl tail, are not essential for permeation, but serve to regulate the rate of copper entry.

  20. High resolution X-ray computed tomography studies of Grasberg porphyry Cu-Au ores, Papua, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyle, J. Richard; Mote, Alison S.; Ketcham, Richard A.

    2008-07-01

    High-resolution X-ray computed tomography (HRXCT) provides unique information of the geological and metallurgical significance for gold and related ore minerals in the supergiant Grasberg porphyry Cu-Au deposit. Digital radiographs have proved to be an effective means of screening samples for the presence of gold for HRXCT studies. Digital radiograph effectiveness is limited by the thickness of samples (typically to ≤2 cm), as well as the associated minerals. Thus, preselecting samples for gold studies using HRXCT is most effective using digital radiographs combined with assay information. Differentiating between metallic mineral grains with relatively small differences in density, e.g., bornite (5.1 g/cm3) from chalcopyrite (4.2 g/cm3), is relatively straightforward for isolated monominerallic grains or composites in a similar lower-density matrix, but difficulties are encountered with the interpretation of typical intergrown ore minerals. X-ray beam-hardening artifacts lead to inconsistency in attenuation determination, both within and among slice images, complicating quantitative processing. However, differentiation of chalcopyrite and bornite has been successful in smaller-diameter (≤22-mm) cores of Grasberg ores. Small-diameter (≤10 mm) cores of the Grasberg stockwork Cu-Au ore were analyzed using HRXCT methods scanned at the minimum spacing currently available (7.5 μm), and data reduction protocols using the Blob3D program were modified to improve the quantification of grain sizes and shapes. Grains as small as 6.5 μm have been identified. All of these grains are in direct contact with chalcopyrite, providing support for gold distribution in porphyry copper systems being a result of exsolution from copper sulfides. HRXCT scanning (±digital radiography) precisely defines the in situ location of mineral grains of interest within a sample, which then can be studied in conventional petrographic sections, and other types of analytical studies conducted, e

  1. Geological and geochemical studies of the Shujiadian porphyry Cu deposit, Anhui Province, Eastern China: Implications for ore genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiwei; Zhou, Taofa; Yuan, Feng; Fan, Yu; White, Noel C.; Lin, Fengjie

    2015-05-01

    Most porphyry deposits in the world occur in magmatic arc settings and are related to subduction of oceanic plates. A small proportion of porphyry deposits occur in intracontinental settings, however they are still poorly understood. Shujiadian, a newly-discovered porphyry Cu deposit, is located in the Middle-Lower Yangtze River Valley metallogenic belt and belongs to the intracontinental class. The deposit has classic alteration zones defined by a core of potassic alteration and local Ca-silicate alteration, which is overprinted by a feldspar-destructive alteration zone and cut by veins containing epidote and chlorite. Wallrocks of the deposit are unreactive quartz-rich sedimentary rocks. Three main paragenetic stages have been recognized based on petrographic observations; silicate stage, quartz-sulfide stage, and sulfide-carbonate stage. Quartz + pyrite + chalcopyrite ± molybdenite veins, and quartz + chalcopyrite + pyrite veins of the quartz-sulfide stage contribute most of the copper, and chalcopyrite + chlorite ± pyrite ± pyrrhotite ± quartz ± illite veins of the sulfide-carbonate stage also contribute part of the copper; all the mineralized veins are associated with feldspar-destructive alteration. Investigations on the fluid inclusions in Shujiadian indicate that the ore-forming fluids had four evolutionary episodes: immiscibility and overpressure in the silicate stage, boiling in the quartz-sulfide stage and mixing with meteoric water in the sulfide-carbonate stage. Sulfur and strontium isotope studies suggest that ore metals were mainly derived from magmatic-hydrothermal fluids, and combined with our study of fluid inclusions, we infer that decompression, changes in oxygen fugacity and sulfur content were the main factors that caused Cu precipitation. Compared with porphyry deposits in magmatic arc settings, there are some differences in the ore-bearing rock, alteration, and the composition of ore-forming fluids.

  2. Device For Testing Compatibility Of An O-Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Dennis D.

    1995-01-01

    Fixture designed for use in exposing compressed elastomeric O-ring or other ring seal to test fluid. Made of metal or plastic, with threaded recess into which O-ring placed. Opposite threaded end is opening through which test fluid introduced and placed in contact with O-ring. After exposure, compression set and swell or shrinkage of ring measured. Fixture set to compress ring by selected amount, providing for reproducible compression.

  3. OVERVIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, TRAM TRESTLE, AND PRIMARY ORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, TRAM TRESTLE, AND PRIMARY ORE BIN, LOOKING NORTHEAST. REMAINS OF A BLACKSMITH'S FORGE AND WORK CAN BE SEEN JUST BELOW THE ORE BIN (SEE CA-291-32 FOR DETAIL). ROCK FOUNDATIONS LOCATED JUST ABOVE THE ORE BIN AND ALONG THE FIRST RIDGELINE ARE TENT PADS. SEE CA-291-49 (CT) FOR IDENTICAL COLOR TRANSPARENCY. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  4. OVERVIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, TRAM TRESTLE, AND PRIMARY ORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF UPPER TRAM TERMINAL, TRAM TRESTLE, AND PRIMARY ORE BIN, LOOKING NORTHEAST. REMAINS OF A BLACKSMITH'S FORGE AND WORK CAN BE SEEN JUST BELOW THE ORE BIN (SEE CA-291-32 FOR DETAIL). ROCK FOUNDATIONS LOCATED JUST ABOVE THE ORE BIN AND ALONG THE FIRST RIDGELINE ARE TENT PADS. SEE CA-291-24 FOR IDENTICAL B&W NEGATIVE. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  5. 40 CFR 440.40 - Applicability; description of the mercury ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... mercury ore subcategory. 440.40 Section 440.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Mercury Ore Subcategory § 440.40 Applicability; description of the mercury ore subcategory. The provisions... produce mercury ores; and (b) mills beneficiating mercury ores by gravity separation methods or by...

  6. 40 CFR 440.40 - Applicability; description of the mercury ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... mercury ore subcategory. 440.40 Section 440.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Mercury Ore Subcategory § 440.40 Applicability; description of the mercury ore subcategory. The provisions... produce mercury ores; and (b) mills beneficiating mercury ores by gravity separation methods or by...

  7. 40 CFR 440.40 - Applicability; description of the mercury ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... mercury ore subcategory. 440.40 Section 440.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Mercury Ore Subcategory § 440.40 Applicability; description of the mercury ore subcategory. The provisions... produce mercury ores; and (b) mills beneficiating mercury ores by gravity separation methods or by...

  8. Understanding Cu release into environment from Kure massive sulfide ore deposits, Kastamonu, NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirel, Cansu; Sonmez, Seref; Balci, Nurgul

    2014-05-01

    Covering a wide range on the earth's crust, oxidation of metal sulfide minerals have vital environmental impacts on the aquatic environment, causing one of the major environmental problems known as acid mine drainage (AMD). Located in the Kastamonu province of the Western Black Sea region, Kure district is one of the major copper mining sites in Turkey. Mining activities in the area heads back to ancient times, such that operation is thought to be started with the Roman Empire. Currently, only the underground mining tunnels of Bakibaba and Asikoy are being operated. Thus, mining heaps and ores of those pyritic deposits have been exposed to the oxidative conditions for so long. As a result of weathering processes of past and recent heaps of the Kure volcanic massive sulfide deposits in addition to the main ore mineral (chalcopyrite), significant amount of metals, especially Cu, are being released into the environment creating undesirable environmental conditions. In order to elucidate Cu release mechanisms from Kure pyritic ore deposits and mining wastes, field and laboratory approaches were used. Surface water and sediment samples from the streams around the mining and waste sites were collected. Groundwater samples from the active underground mining site were also collected. Physical parameters (pH, Eh, T°C, and EC) of water samples were determined in situ and in the laboratory using probes (WTW pH 3110, WTW Multi 9310 and CRISON CM 35). Metal and ion concentrations of the water samples were analysed using ICP-MS and DR 2800 spectrophotometer, respectively. High Cu, Co, Zn and Fe concentrations were determined in the water samples with pH values ranging from 2.9- 4. Cu concentrions ranges from 345 ppm to 36 ppm in the water samples. Consistent with the water samples, high Cu, Fe, Zn and Co were also determined in the sediment samples. Laboratory chalcopyrite oxidation experiments under the conditions representing the field site were set up as biological and

  9. Sealing Out-Of-Round Tubes With O-Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, Paul J.

    1991-01-01

    Glass or ceramic tubes out-of-round sealed effectively by ordinary O-rings in caps of modified hydraulic fittings. In typical connection, O-ring squeezed between two surfaces having inward-opening slants of 5 degrees or 10 degrees. Slanted surfaces force ring inward, compressing it around tube. Connector metal fitting, tightened by hand around O-ring, seals O-ring against tube as much as 1/16 in. out of round. Modified connectors seal glass or ceramic tubes against gas or vacuum leakage in furnaces, vacuum systems, and tubes for glassblowing equipment.

  10. 34. VIEW OF VIVIANNA WORKS ORE SORTING AND CRUSHING PLATFORM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. VIEW OF VIVIANNA WORKS ORE SORTING AND CRUSHING PLATFORM LOOKING EAST, NORTHEAST. NOTICE RAIL TIES EMBEDDED IN CONCRETE. - Mariscal Quicksilver Mine & Reduction Works, Terlingua, Brewster County, TX

  11. 4. TROJAN MILL, DETAIL OF CRUDE ORE BINS FROM NORTH, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. TROJAN MILL, DETAIL OF CRUDE ORE BINS FROM NORTH, c. 1912. SHOWS TIMBER FRAMING UNDER CONSTRUCTION FOR EAST AND WEST CRUDE ORE BINS AT PREVIOUS LOCATION OF CRUSHER HOUSE, AND SNOW SHED PRESENT OVER SOUTH CRUDE ORE BIN WITH PHASE CHANGE IN SNOW SHED CONSTRUCTION INDICATED AT EAST END OF EAST CRUDE ORE BIN. THIS PHOTOGRAPH IS THE FIRST IMAGE OF THE MACHINE SHOP, UPPER LEFT CORNER. CREDIT JW. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  12. Experimenting With Ore: Creating the Taconite Process; flow chart of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Experimenting With Ore: Creating the Taconite Process; flow chart of process - Mines Experiment Station, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities Campus, 56 East River Road, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN

  13. [Copper and copper alloys. Technology updates].

    PubMed

    Loconsolo, V; Crespi, M

    2012-01-01

    The correlations between copper and copper alloys and human health have been the subject of some recent and extensive scientific researches. The voluntary risks evaluation, which anticipated the EU REACH Directive application, has shown that copper is a "safe" product for human health and for environment. In addition, it could be of great help thanks to its antibacterial properties. Copper tube can contribute in a relevant way to the prevention of water systems pollution by Legionella. Also the spreading of nosocomial infections is significantly contrasted by the use of copper and copper alloys for the production of articles intended for being frequently touched by people. The Environmental Protection Agency of the United States has in fact "registered" as antibacterial over 350 of copper alloys. PMID:23213799

  14. Mixing from below in hydrothermal ore deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bons, Paul D.; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Markl, Gregor; Walter, Bejamin

    2014-05-01

    Unconformity-related hydrothermal ore deposits typically show indications of mixing of two end-member fluids: (a) hot, deep, rock-buffered basement brines and (b) colder fluids derived from the surface or overlying sediments. The hydromechanics of bringing these fluids together from above and below remain unclear. Classical percolative Darcy-flow models are inconsistent with (1) fluid overpressure indicated by fracturing and brecciation, (2) fast fluid flow indicated by thermal disequilibrium, and (3) strong fluid composition variations on the mm-scale, indicated by fluid inclusion analyses (Bons et al. 2012; Fusswinkel et al. 2013). We propose that fluids first descend, sucked down by desiccation reactions in exhumed basement. Oldest fluids reach greatest depths, where long residence times and elevated temperatures allow them the extensively equilibrate with their host rock, reach high salinity and scavenge metals, if present. Youngest fluids can only penetrate to shallower depths and can (partially) retain signatures from their origin, for example high Cl/Br ratios from the dissolution of evaporitic halite horizons. When fluids are released from all levels of the crustal column, these fluids mix during rapid ascent to form hydrothermal ore deposits. Mixing from below provides a viable hydromechanical mechanism to explain the common phenomenon of mixed shallow and deep fluids in hydrothermal ore deposits. Bons, P.D., Elburg, M.A., Gomez-Rivas, E. 2012. A review of the formation of tectonic veins and their microstructures. J. Struct. Geol. doi:10.1016/j.jsg.2012.07.005 Fusswinkel, T., Wagner, T., Wälle, M., Wenzel, T., Heinrich, C.A., Markl, M. 2013. Fluid mixing forms basement-hosted Pb-Zn deposits: Insight from metal and halogen geochemistry of individual fluid inclusions. Geology. doi:10.1130/G34092.1

  15. Optimization of staged bioleaching of low-grade chalcopyrite ore in the presence and absence of chloride in the irrigating lixiviant: ANFIS simulation.

    PubMed

    Vakylabad, Ali Behrad; Schaffie, Mahin; Naseri, Ali; Ranjbar, Mohammad; Manafi, Zahra

    2016-07-01

    In this investigation, copper was bioleached from a low-grade chalcopyrite ore using a chloride-containing lixiviant. In this regard, firstly, the composition of the bacterial culture media was designed to control the cost in commercial application. The bacterial culture used in this process was acclimated to the presence of chloride in the lixiviant. Practically speaking, the modified culture helped the bio-heap-leaching system operate in the chloridic media. Compared to the copper recovery from the low-grade chalcopyrite by bioleaching in the absence of chloride, bioleaching in the presence of chloride resulted in improved copper recovery. The composition of the lixiviant used in this study was a modification with respect to the basal salts in 9 K medium to optimize the leaching process. When leaching the ore in columns, 76.81 % Cu (based on solid residues of bioleaching operation) was recovered by staged leaching with lixiviant containing 34.22 mM NaCl. The quantitative findings were supported by SEM/EDS observations, X-ray elemental mapping, and mineralogical analysis of the ore before and after leaching. Finally, Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) was used to simulate the operational parameters affecting the bioleaching operation in chloride-sulfate system. PMID:27000968

  16. Neotethyan rifting-related ore occurrences: study of an accretionary mélange complex (Darnó Unit, NE Hungary)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Gabriella B.; Oláh, Erika; Zaccarini, Federica; Szakáll, Sándor

    2016-02-01

    The geology of the NE Hungarian Darnó Unit is rather complicated, as it is composed mostly of a Jurassic accretionary mélange complex, according to the most recent investigations. The magmatic and sedimentary rock blocks of the mélange represent products of different evolutionary stages of the Neotethys; including Permian and Triassic sedimentary rocks of marine rifting related origin, Triassic pillow basalt of advanced rifting related origin and Jurassic pillow basalt originated in back-arc-basin environment. This small unit contains a copper-gold occurrence in the Permian marly-clayey limestone, an iron enrichment in the Triassic sedimentary succession, a copper-silver ore occurrence in Triassic pillow basalts and a copper ore indication, occurring both in the Triassic and Jurassic pillow basalts. The present study deals with the Cu(-Ag) occurrence in the Triassic basalt and the Fe occurrence in the Triassic sedimentary succession. The former shows significant similarities with the Michigan-type mineralizations, while the latter has typical characteristics of the Fe-SEDEX deposits. All the above localities fit well into the new geological model of the investigated area. The mineralizations represent the different evolutionary stages of the Neotethyan rifting and an epigenetic, Alpine metamorphism-related process and their recent, spatially close position is the result of the accretionary mélange formation. Thus, the Darnó Unit represents a perfect natural laboratory for studying and understanding the characteristic features of several different rifting related ore forming processes.

  17. The coupled geochemistry of Au and As in pyrite from hydrothermal ore deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deditius, Artur P.; Reich, Martin; Kesler, Stephen E.; Utsunomiya, Satoshi; Chryssoulis, Stephen L.; Walshe, John; Ewing, Rodney C.

    2014-09-01

    The ubiquity of Au-bearing arsenian pyrite in hydrothermal ore deposits suggests that the coupled geochemical behaviour of Au and As in this sulfide occurs under a wide range of physico-chemical conditions. Despite significant advances in the last 20 years, fundamental factors controlling Au and As ratios in pyrite from ore deposits remain poorly known. Here we explore these constraints using new and previously published EMPA, LA-ICP-MS, SIMS, and μ-PIXE analyses of As and Au in pyrite from Carlin-type Au, epithermal Au, porphyry Cu, Cu-Au, and orogenic Au deposits, volcanogenic massive sulfide (VHMS), Witwatersrand Au, iron oxide copper gold (IOCG), and coal deposits. Pyrite included in the data compilation formed under temperatures from ∼30 to ∼600 °C and in a wide variety of geological environments. The pyrite Au-As data form a wedge-shaped zone in compositional space, and the fact that most data points plot below the solid solubility limit defined by Reich et al. (2005) indicate that Au1+ is the dominant form of Au in arsenian pyrite and that Au-bearing ore fluids that deposit this sulfide are mostly undersaturated with respect to native Au. The analytical data also show that the solid solubility limit of Au in arsenian pyrite defined by an Au/As ratio of 0.02 is independent of the geochemical environment of pyrite formation and rather depends on the crystal-chemical properties of pyrite and post-depositional alteration. Compilation of Au-As concentrations and formation temperatures for pyrite indicates that Au and As solubility in pyrite is retrograde; Au and As contents decrease as a function of increasing temperature from ∼200 to ∼500 °C. Based on these results, two major Au-As trends for Au-bearing arsenian pyrite from ore deposits are defined. One trend is formed by pyrites from Carlin-type and orogenic Au deposits where compositions are largely controlled by fluid-rock interactions and/or can be highly perturbed by changes in temperature and

  18. Lead Isotope Constraints on the Sources of Ore Metals in SW Mexican Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potra, A.; Macfarlane, A. W.

    2007-12-01

    Lead isotope ratios from mineral deposits in southern Mexico increase with distance from the trench from 206Pb/204Pb values between 18.597 and 18.650 in the coastal area to values between 18.712 and 19.069 approximately 800 km east from the trench. This variation has been attributed to increasing assimilation of radiogenic lead from the crust with increasing distance from the trench. New sampling was undertaken in this area to provide a clearer picture of the potential sources of ore metals in this arc system, and also, if possible, to examine whether ore metal sources differ among the proposed tectonostratigraphic exotic terranes of southern Mexico. New TIMS lead isotope analyses are presented for samples from the metamorphic basement rocks of the Guerrero Terrane, the Late Cretaceous clastic sedimentary rocks from the Upper Mesozoic Assemblage, and for mid-Cretaceous igneous rocks, as well as for samples from the Oligocene La Verde, Esmeralda, and El Malacate copper prospects. Whole rock samples of schist from the Jurassic-Cretaceous Arteaga Complex and phyllite and slate from the Tierra Caliente Complex contain radiogenic lead relative to bulk earth models, with 206Pb/204Pb ranging from 18.981-19.256. These values are substantially more radiogenic than published values of analyses of metagabbro and charnockite from the Grenvillian-age Oaxaca Terrane. Sedimentary rocks (sandstones, siltstones, and marls) belonging to the Huetamo Sequence have 206Pb/204Pb values ranging between 18.630 to 18.998, close to the published data for the sediments from IPOD-DSDP Sites 487 and 488, Cocos Plate. Whole rock analyses of igneous rocks (granodiorite) collected from La Verde and El Malacate have 206Pb/204Pb ranging from 18.764 to 18.989, clustering between the fields represented by the sedimentary and the metamorphic rocks, suggesting assimilation of lead from these components. Ore samples from La Verde and Esmeralda have 206Pb/204Pb between 18.685 and 18.731 and plot within

  19. [Infrared Spectra Characteristics of the Silicate Nickel Ores: A Comparison Study on Different Ore Samples from Indonesia and China].

    PubMed

    Yang, Meng-li; Fu, Wei; Wang, Bao-hua; Zhang, Ya-qian; Huang, Xiao-rong; Niu, Hu-jie

    2015-03-01

    The silicate nickel ores developed in the lateritic nickel deposit, from Kolonodale, Sulawesi Island, Indonesia, and Yuanjiang, Yunnan province, China, were selected for the present study. The X-ray diffraction and Fourier infrared spectra were used to analyze the mineralogical attribute of laterite nickel ores from two different places. The results show that these two different silicate nickel ores have unique infrared spectra characteristics individually, which contributes to the ore classification. The silicate nickel ores from Kolonodale deposit, Indonesia, can be classified as the serpentine type, the montmorillonite + serpentine type, and the garnierite type. While, the silicate nickel ores from Yuanjiang deposit, China, can be classified as the serpentine type and the talc + serpentine type. Moreover, the mineral crystallinity of Yuanjiang nickel ores is generally better than Kolonodale nickel ores. According to the advantage of infrared absorption spectra in distinguishing mineral polytypes, it can be determined that lizardite is the main mineral type in the silicate nickel ores of the two deposits, and there is no obvious evidence of chrysotile and antigorite's existence. The characteristic of infrared absorption spectra also shows that frequency change of OH libration indicates Ni (Fe) replacing Mg in the serpentine type nickel-bearing mineral, that is, OH libration of serpentine moves to higher frequency, with the proportion of Ni (Fe) replacing Mg increasing. PMID:26117869

  20. [Infrared Spectra Characteristics of the Silicate Nickel Ores: A Comparison Study on Different Ore Samples from Indonesia and China].

    PubMed

    Yang, Meng-li; Fu, Wei; Wang, Bao-hua; Zhang, Ya-qian; Huang, Xiao-rong; Niu, Hu-jie

    2015-03-01

    The silicate nickel ores developed in the lateritic nickel deposit, from Kolonodale, Sulawesi Island, Indonesia, and Yuanjiang, Yunnan province, China, were selected for the present study. The X-ray diffraction and Fourier infrared spectra were used to analyze the mineralogical attribute of laterite nickel ores from two different places. The results show that these two different silicate nickel ores have unique infrared spectra characteristics individually, which contributes to the ore classification. The silicate nickel ores from Kolonodale deposit, Indonesia, can be classified as the serpentine type, the montmorillonite + serpentine type, and the garnierite type. While, the silicate nickel ores from Yuanjiang deposit, China, can be classified as the serpentine type and the talc + serpentine type. Moreover, the mineral crystallinity of Yuanjiang nickel ores is generally better than Kolonodale nickel ores. According to the advantage of infrared absorption spectra in distinguishing mineral polytypes, it can be determined that lizardite is the main mineral type in the silicate nickel ores of the two deposits, and there is no obvious evidence of chrysotile and antigorite's existence. The characteristic of infrared absorption spectra also shows that frequency change of OH libration indicates Ni (Fe) replacing Mg in the serpentine type nickel-bearing mineral, that is, OH libration of serpentine moves to higher frequency, with the proportion of Ni (Fe) replacing Mg increasing.

  1. [Tail Plane Icing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Aviation Safety Program initiated by NASA in 1997 has put greater emphasis in safety related research activities. Ice-contaminated-tailplane stall (ICTS) has been identified by the NASA Lewis Icing Technology Branch as an important activity for aircraft safety related research. The ICTS phenomenon is characterized as a sudden, often uncontrollable aircraft nose- down pitching moment, which occurs due to increased angle-of-attack of the horizontal tailplane resulting in tailplane stall. Typically, this phenomenon occurs when lowering the flaps during final approach while operating in or recently departing from icing conditions. Ice formation on the tailplane leading edge can reduce tailplane angle-of-attack range and cause flow separation resulting in a significant reduction or complete loss of aircraft pitch control. In 1993, the Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) and NASA embarked upon a four-year research program to address the problem of tailplane stall and to quantify the effect of tailplane ice accretion on aircraft performance and handling characteristics. The goals of this program, which was completed in March 1998, were to collect aerodynamic data for an aircraft tail with and without ice contamination and to develop analytical methods for predicting the effects of tailplane ice contamination. Extensive dry air and icing tunnel tests which resulted in a database of the aerodynamic effects associated with tailplane ice contamination. Although the FAA/NASA tailplane icing program generated some answers regarding ice-contaminated-tailplane stall (ICTS) phenomena, NASA researchers have found many open questions that warrant further investigation into ICTS. In addition, several aircraft manufacturers have expressed interest in a second research program to expand the database to other tail configurations and to develop experimental and computational methodologies for evaluating the ICTS phenomenon. In 1998, the icing branch at NASA Lewis initiated a second

  2. The role of the Antofagasta-Calama Lineament in ore deposit deformation in the Andes of northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, Carlos; Ramírez, Luis E.; Townley, Brian; Solari, Marcelo; Guerra, Nelson

    2007-02-01

    During the Late Jurassic-Early Oligocene interval, widespread hydrothermal copper mineralization events occurred in association with the geological evolution of the southern segment of the central Andes, giving rise to four NS-trending metallogenic belts of eastward-decreasing age: Late Jurassic, Early Cretaceous, Late Paleocene-Early Eocene, and Late Eocene-Early Oligocene. The Antofagasta-Calama Lineament (ACL) consists of an important dextral strike-slip NE-trending fault system. Deformation along the ACL system is evidenced by a right-lateral displacement of the Late Paleocene-Early Eocene metallogenic belts. Furthermore, clockwise rotation of the Early Cretaceous Mantos Blancos copper deposit and the Late Paleocene Lomas Bayas porphyry copper occurred. In the Late Eocene-Early Oligocene metallogenic belt, a sigmoidal deflection and a clockwise rotation is observed in the ACL. The ACL is thought to have controlled the emplacement of Early Oligocene porphyry copper deposits (34-37 Ma; Toki, Genoveva, Quetena, and Opache), whereas it deflected the Late Eocene porphyry copper belt (41-44 Ma; Esperanza, Telégrafo, Centinela, and Polo Sur ore deposits). These observations suggest that right-lateral displacement of the ACL was active during the Early Oligocene. We propose that the described structural features need to be considered in future exploration programs within this extensively gravel-covered region of northern Chile.

  3. Sedimentary exhalative nickel-molybdenum ores in south China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lott, D.A.; Coveney, R.M.; Murowchick, J.B.; Grauch, R.I.

    1999-01-01

    Unique bedded Ni-Mo ores hosted by black shales were discovered in localized paleobasins along the Yangzte platform of southern China in 1971. Textural evidence and radiometric dates imply ore formation during sedimentation of black shales that grade into readily combustible beds, termed stone coals, which contain 10 to 15 percent organic carbon. Studies of 427 fluid inclusions indicate extreme variation in hydrothermal brine salinities that were contained by Proterozoic dolostones underlying the ore zone in Hunan and Guizhou. Variations of fluid inclusion salinities, which range from 0.1 to 21.6 wt percent NaCl equiv, are attributed to differences in the compositions of brines in strata underlying the ore bed, complicated by the presence of seawater and dilute fluids that represent condensates of vapors generated by boiling of mineralizing fluids or Cambrian meteoric water. The complex processes of ore deposition led to scattered homogenization temperatures ranging from 100??to 187??C within the Hunan ore zone and from 65??to 183??C within the Guizhou ore zone. While living organisms probably did not directly accumulate metals in situ in sufficient amounts to explain the unusually high grades of the deposits, sulfur isotope ratios indicate that bacteria, now preserved as abundant microfossils, provided sufficient sulfide for the ores by reduction of seawater sulfate. Such microbiota may have depended on vent fluids and transported organic matter for key nutrients and are consistent with a sedex origin for the ores. Vent fluids interacted with organic remains, including rounded fragments of microbial mats that were likely transported to the site of ore deposition by the action of waves and bottom currents prior to replacement by ore minerals.

  4. Formation of a magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposit: insights with LA-ICP-MS analysis of fluid inclusions

    PubMed

    Audetat; Gunther; Heinrich

    1998-03-27

    The physical and chemical mechanism of ore precipitation in the Yankee Lode tin deposit (Mole Granite, Australia) was quantified by direct trace-element microanalysis of fluid inclusions. Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used to measure element concentrations in a series of fluid inclusions representing the fluid before, during, and after the deposition of cassiterite (SnO2). Tin precipitation was driven by mixing of hot magmatic brine with cooler meteoric water. At the same time, a separate magmatic vapor phase selectively transported copper and boron into the liquid mixture.

  5. Formation of a magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposit: insights with LA-ICP-MS analysis of fluid inclusions

    PubMed

    Audetat; Gunther; Heinrich

    1998-03-27

    The physical and chemical mechanism of ore precipitation in the Yankee Lode tin deposit (Mole Granite, Australia) was quantified by direct trace-element microanalysis of fluid inclusions. Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used to measure element concentrations in a series of fluid inclusions representing the fluid before, during, and after the deposition of cassiterite (SnO2). Tin precipitation was driven by mixing of hot magmatic brine with cooler meteoric water. At the same time, a separate magmatic vapor phase selectively transported copper and boron into the liquid mixture. PMID:9516106

  6. Mercury's Dynamic Magnetic Tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.

    2010-01-01

    The Mariner 10 and MESSENGER flybys of Mercury have revealed a magnetosphere that is likely the most responsive to upstream interplanetary conditions of any in the solar system. The source of the great dynamic variability observed during these brief passages is due to Mercury's proximity to the Sun and the inverse proportionality between reconnection rate and solar wind Alfven Mach number. However, this planet's lack of an ionosphere and its small physical dimensions also contribute to Mercury's very brief Dungey cycle, approx. 2 min, which governs the time scale for internal plasma circulation. Current observations and understanding of the structure and dynamics of Mercury's magnetotail are summarized and discussed. Special emphasis will be placed upon such questions as: 1) How much access does the solar wind have to this small magnetosphere as a function of upstream conditions? 2) What roles do heavy planetary ions play? 3) Do Earth-like substorms take place at Mercury? 4) How does Mercury's tail respond to extreme solar wind events such coronal mass ejections? Prospects for progress due to advances in the global magnetohydrodynamic and hybrid simulation modeling and the measurements to be taken by MESSENGER after it enters Mercury orbit on March 18, 2011 will be discussed.

  7. 76 FR 34211 - Intent To Prepare a Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Kennecott Utah Copper...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-13

    ... Proposed Kennecott Utah Copper LLC Tailings Expansion Project, Near Magna, Salt Lake County, UT, Permit... expansion of an active commercial mining operation near Magna, Salt Lake County, UT. Kennecott Utah Copper... infrastructure on a 1992-acre parcel approximately ten miles west of Salt Lake City near the community of...

  8. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Maybell, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, contaminated soil, building foundations, and materials associated with the former processing of uranium ore at UMTRA Project sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further contamination of ground water. One UMTRA Project site is near Maybell, Colorado. Surface cleanup at this site began in 1995 and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The tailings are being stabilized in place at this site. The disposal area has been withdrawn from public use by the DOE and is referred to as the permanent withdrawal area. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from past uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project at this site is in its beginning stages. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future potential impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results presented in this document and other evaluations will determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  9. 27. HULETT ORE UNLOADERS TEMPORARILY IN REPOSE, AS A NEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. HULETT ORE UNLOADERS TEMPORARILY IN REPOSE, AS A NEW SKIP TIES UP AT DOCK. THE UNLOADERS OPERATE ALMOST CONTINUOUSLY DURING THE SHIPPING SEASON, WHICH USUALLY RUNS FROM APRIL UNTIL LATE DECEMBER OR EARLY JANUARY. VIEW HERE IS LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  10. TRAM HOUSE INTERIOR, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. NOTE DEPARTING ORE BUCKET "12" ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TRAM HOUSE INTERIOR, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. NOTE DEPARTING ORE BUCKET "12" AND SUSPENSION CABLE ANGLING DOWN THROUGH FLOOR AT LOWER LEFT. LARGE LEVER ON SIDE OF BUCKET ALLOWS IT TO BE ROTATED FOR DUMPING ORE. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  11. 24. REAR ELEVATION, HULETT ORE UNLOADERS. TRACKS CARRYING THE FRONT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. REAR ELEVATION, HULETT ORE UNLOADERS. TRACKS CARRYING THE FRONT END AND REAR LEGS OF THE HULETT UNLOADERS ARE LAID ON THE DOCK AND REAR WALLS, RESPECTIVELY; BOTH WALLS ARE MADE OF REINFORCED CONCRETE SUPPORTED ON CONCRETE PILES. - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  12. Upgrading Titanium Ore Through Selective Chlorination Using Calcium Chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jungshin; Okabe, Toru H.

    2013-06-01

    To develop a simple and effective process for upgrading low-grade titanium ore (ilmenite, mainly FeTiO3), a new selective chlorination process based on the use of calcium chloride (CaCl2) as the chlorine source was investigated in this study. Titanium ore and a titanium ore/CaCl2 mixture were placed in two separate crucibles inside a gas-tight quartz tube that was then positioned in a horizontal furnace. In the experiments, the titanium ore in the two crucibles reacted with either HCl produced from CaCl2 or CaCl2 itself at 1100 K (827 °C), leading to the selective removal of the iron present in the titanium ore as iron chlorides [FeCl x (l,g) ( x = 2, 3)]. Various kinds of titanium ores produced in different countries were used as feedstock, and the influence of the particle size and atmosphere on the selective chlorination was investigated. Under certain conditions, titanium dioxide (TiO2) with purity of about 97 pct was directly obtained in a single step from titanium ore containing 51 pct TiO2. Thus, selective chlorination is a feasible method for producing high purity titanium dioxide from low-grade titanium ore.

  13. 25. View looking southwest from furnaces shows the ore end ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. View looking southwest from furnaces shows the ore end limestone storage bins. Ore and limestone were carried by conveyor, seen at far left, to the tripper car, which in turn distributed them into the trestle bins. - Central Furnaces, 2650 Broadway, east bank of Cuyahoga River, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  14. PROCESS FOR THE CONCENTRATION OF ORES CONTAINING GOLD AND URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Gaudin, A.M.; Dasher, J.

    1958-06-10

    ABS>A process is described for concentrating certain low grade uranium and gold bearing ores, in which the gangue is mainly quartz. The production of the concentrate is accomplished by subjecting the crushed ore to a froth floatation process using a fatty acid as a collector in conjunction with a potassium amyl xanthate collector. Pine oil is used as the frothing agent.

  15. 19. VIEW OF CRUDE ORE BINS FROM EAST. EAST CRUDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. VIEW OF CRUDE ORE BINS FROM EAST. EAST CRUDE ORE BIN IN FOREGROUND WITH DISCHARGE TO GRIZZLY AT BOTTOM OF VIEW. CONCRETE RETAINING WALL TO LEFT (SOUTH) AND BOTTOM (EAST EDGE OF EAST BIN). - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  16. 64. NORTH WALL OF CRUSHED OXIDIZED ORE BIN. THE PRIMARY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    64. NORTH WALL OF CRUSHED OXIDIZED ORE BIN. THE PRIMARY MILL FEEDS AT BOTTOM. MILL SOLUTION TANKS WERE TO THE LEFT (EAST) AND BARREN SOLUTION TANK TO THE RIGHT (WEST) OR THE CRUSHED ORE BIN. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  17. DETAIL OVERHEAD VIEW OF SECONDARY ORE BIN, CONVEYOR PLATFORM TRAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OVERHEAD VIEW OF SECONDARY ORE BIN, CONVEYOR PLATFORM TRAM TRESTLE, AND LOADING PLATFORM, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. THE HOLE IN THE ORE BIN FLOOR CAN BE SEEN, AND BALL MILL FOUNDATION AT LOWER LEFT CORNER. SEE CA-291-13 FOR IDENTICAL B&W NEGATIVE. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  18. 15. NORTH ELEVATION OF UPPER ORE BIN, CHUTE, AND JAW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. NORTH ELEVATION OF UPPER ORE BIN, CHUTE, AND JAW CRUSHER, LOOKING SOUTH FROM END OF CONVEYOR PLATFORM. NOTICE THE THREE ORE BIN CONTROL DOORS, CORRESPONDING TO SEPARATE COMPARTMENTS OF THE BIN. - Skidoo Mine, Park Route 38 (Skidoo Road), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  19. 25. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING SOUTH IN THE ORE RECEIVING LEVEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING SOUTH IN THE ORE RECEIVING LEVEL SHOWING THE TRAMWAY TRACKS IN THE FLOOR, ORE CHUTES IN THE FLOOR, NEWER TRACKS COMING IN FROM THE TRESTLE ON THE EAST SIDE OF THE MILL., AND THE WINDING DRUM THE TRAMWAY IN THE BACKGROUND. - Standard Gold Mill, East of Bodie Creek, Northeast of Bodie, Bodie, Mono County, CA

  20. LOOKING WEST ALONG PASSAGE BETWEEN CRUSHING ROOM AND FINE ORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LOOKING WEST ALONG PASSAGE BETWEEN CRUSHING ROOM AND FINE ORE BIN AREA. NOTE STEEL CUSTOM ORE CHUTES IN BACKGROUND. THE FARTHEST BINS WERE LAST USED FOR STORAGE OF BALL MILL BALLS. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  1. 13. OBLIQUE VIEW OF UPPER ORE BIN, LOOKING WEST NORTHWEST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. OBLIQUE VIEW OF UPPER ORE BIN, LOOKING WEST NORTHWEST. THIS ORE BIN WAS ADDED IN THE LATE 1930'S. IT IS TRAPAZOIDAL IN SHAPE, WIDER AT THE REAR THAN THE FRONT, AND DIVIDED INTO THREE BINS, EACH WITH ITS OWN CONTROL DOOR (SEE CA-290-15). - Skidoo Mine, Park Route 38 (Skidoo Road), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  2. 25. DETAIL OF STRUCTURAL TIMBERS, ORE BIN, AND STAIRWAY TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. DETAIL OF STRUCTURAL TIMBERS, ORE BIN, AND STAIRWAY TO TOP FLOOR OF MILL, LOOKING SOUTH FROM SECOND FLOOR OF MILL. PORTION OF ORE BIN ON RIGHT, STAIRS ON LEFT. - Skidoo Mine, Park Route 38 (Skidoo Road), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  3. 14. OBLIQUE VIEW OF UPPER ORE BIN AND LOADING DECK, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. OBLIQUE VIEW OF UPPER ORE BIN AND LOADING DECK, LOOKING WEST. DETAIL OF SUPPORTING TIMBERS. THE LOCATION OF THIS ORE BIN IN RELATION TO THE MILL CAN BE SEEN IN MANY OF THE MILL OVERVIEWS. (CA-290-4 THROUGH CA-290-8). - Skidoo Mine, Park Route 38 (Skidoo Road), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  4. Hydrogen peroxide in sulfuric acid extraction of uranium ores

    SciTech Connect

    DeVries, F.W.

    1984-01-10

    Uranium can be extracted from its ores at a pH of 2.5 to 5.5 using sulfuric acid, hydrogen peroxide, trace of iron and a sulfate. The extraction process is applicable to both tank leaching of conventionally mined ores and in situ leaching.

  5. 39. HULETT ORE UNLOADER IN MOTION. VIEW LOOKING EAST. (Also ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. HULETT ORE UNLOADER IN MOTION. VIEW LOOKING EAST. (Also see OH-18-14, OH-18-38, and OH-18-40) - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  6. 40. HULETT ORE UNLOADER IN MOTION. VIEW LOOKING EAST. (Also ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. HULETT ORE UNLOADER IN MOTION. VIEW LOOKING EAST. (Also see OH-18-14, OH-18-38, and OH-18-39) - Pennsylvania Railway Ore Dock, Lake Erie at Whiskey Island, approximately 1.5 miles west of Public Square, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  7. Protective in vivo effect of curcumin on copper genotoxicity evaluated by comet and micronucleus assays.

    PubMed

    Corona-Rivera, Alfredo; Urbina-Cano, Patricia; Bobadilla-Morales, Lucina; Vargas-Lares, José de Jesus; Ramirez-Herrera, Mario Alberto; Mendoza-Magaua, Maria Luisa; Troyo-Sanroman, Rogelio; Diaz-Esquivel, Pedro; Corona-Rivera, Jorge Roman

    2007-01-01

    Curcumin is a phytochemical with antiinflammatory, antioxidant and anticarcinogenic activities. Apparently, curcumin is not genotoxic in vivo, but in vitro copper and curcumin interactions induce genetic damage. The aim of this study was to test if in vivo copper excess induces DNA damage measured by comet and micronucleus assays in the presence of curcumin. We tested 0.2% curcumin in Balb-C mice at normal (13 ppm) and high (65, 130 and 390 ppm) copper ion concentrations. The comet and micronucleus assays were performed 48 hr after chemical application. Comet tail length in animals treated with 0.2% curcumin was not significantly different from the control. Animals exposed to copper cations (up to 390 ppm) exhibited higher oxidative DNA damage. Curcumin reduced the DNA damage induced by 390 ppm copper. We observed statistically significant increase in damage in individuals exposed to 390 ppm copper versus the control or curcumin groups, which was lowered by the presence of curcumin. Qualitative data on comets evidenced that cells from individuals exposed to 390 ppm copper had longer tails (categories 3 and 4) than in 390 ppm copper + curcumin. A statistically significant increase in frequency of micronucleated erythrocytes (MNE/10000TE) was observed only in 390 ppm copper versus the control and curcumin alone. Also cytotoxicity measured as the frequency of polychromatic erythrocytes (PE/1000TE) was attributable to 390 ppm copper. The lowest cytotoxic effect observed was attributed to curcumin. In vivo exposure to 0.2% curcumin for 48 hr did not cause genomic damage, while 390 ppm copper was genotoxic, but DNA damage induced by 390 ppm copper was diminished by curcumin. Curcumin seems to exert a genoprotective effect against DNA damage induced by high concentrations of copper cations. The comet and micronucleus assays prove to be suitable tools to detect DNA damage by copper in the presence of curcumin. PMID:17998598

  8. [Copper transport and metabolism].

    PubMed

    Kurasaki, Masaaki; Saito, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    In this review, copper metabolism and transport in mammalian tissues are introduced and discussed. Firstly, the copper required amounts and LD50 levels are shown to explain the difficult balances of copper in the cells between necessity and toxicity. Furthermore, on the basis of literatures published, relationship between copper-binding metallothioneins and mechanisms for the absorption and excretion of copper or hereditary copper metabolic disorders metabolism abnormality symptom are explained. Finally it has been indicated that apoptosis induced by heavy metals, especially copper was initiated by production of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress in the cells. To understand precise mechanism for copper homeostasis in mammalian cells, further investigation will be needed to clarify the copper behaviors in normal and abnormal situations. PMID:27455798

  9. Room Temperature Aging Study of Butyl O-rings

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Wilson

    2009-08-07

    During testing under the Enhanced Surveillance Campaign in 2001, preliminary data detected a previously unknown and potentially serious concern with recently procured butyl o-rings. All butyl o-rings molded from a proprietary formulation throughout the period circa 1999 through 2001 had less than a full cure. Tests showed that sealing force values for these suspect o-rings were much lower than expected and their physical properties were very sensitive to further post curing at elevated temperatures. Further testing confirmed that these o-rings were approximately 50% cured versus the typical industry standard of > 90% cured. Despite this condition, all suspect o-rings fully conformed to their QC acceptance requirements, including their individual product drawing requirements.

  10. The structure of comet tails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, J. C.; Niedner, M. B., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Present models of the plasma tails of comets are described. The interaction of the solar wind with ions from the cometary atmosphere is discussed, and the phenomenon of magnetic reconnection observed in plasma tails is explained. The accomplishments of the ICE mission to the Comet Giacobini-Zinner are summarized, and the tasks and expected contributions from upcoming Soviet, European, and Japanese missions to Comet Halley are addressed.

  11. Tail phenomena. [of Halley's comet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, J. C.; Niedner, M. B., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    An overview of tail phenomena is presented based on worldwide submissions to the Large-Scale Phenomena Discipline Specialist Team of the International Halley Watch. Examples of tail phenomena and science are presented along with estimates of total expected yield from the Network. The archive of this material will clearly be very valuable for studying the solar-wind/comet interaction during the 1985-1986 apparition of Halley's Comet.

  12. Theseus Tail Being Unloaded

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The tail of the Theseus prototype research aircraft is seen here being unloaded at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in May of 1996. The Theseus aircraft, built and operated by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia, was a unique aircraft flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Aurora. Dryden hosted the Theseus program, providing hangar space and range safety for flight testing. Aurora Flight Sciences was responsible for the actual flight testing, vehicle flight safety, and operation of the aircraft. The Theseus remotely piloted aircraft flew its maiden flight on May 24, 1996, at Dryden. During its sixth flight on November 12, 1996, Theseus experienced an in-flight structural failure that resulted in the loss of the aircraft. As of the beginning of the year 2000, Aurora had not rebuilt the aircraft. Theseus was built for NASA under an innovative, $4.9 million fixed-price contract by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and its partners, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Fairmont State College, Fairmont, West Virginia. The twin-engine, unpiloted vehicle had a 140-foot wingspan, and was constructed largely of composite materials. Powered by two 80-horsepower, turbocharged piston engines that drove twin 9-foot-diameter propellers, Theseus was designed to fly autonomously at high altitudes, with takeoff and landing under the active control of a ground-based pilot in a ground control station 'cockpit.' With the potential ability to carry 700 pounds of science instruments to altitudes above 60,000 feet for durations of greater than 24 hours, Theseus was intended to support research in areas such as stratospheric ozone depletion and the atmospheric effects of future high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Instruments carried aboard Theseus also would be able to validate satellite-based global environmental change measurements

  13. Beneficiation of rare earth minerals from Bokan Mountain - Dotson Ridge ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narantsetseg, Purevbaatar

    The purpose of this research work was to study the beneficiation of rare earth ore of the Bokan Mountain - Dotson Ridge deposit, located near Ketchikan, Alaska. Rare earth element (REE) composite ore samples from the Bokan Mountain - Dotson Ridge deposit were tested using gravity concentration, magnetic separation, flotation, and leaching techniques to separate the REE. The composite ore sample was a product of a preliminary x-ray sorting process. Qualitative electron microprobe analysis of the ore showed that most of the REE minerals in the ore were silicate minerals. Since the electron microprobe analysis samples were coated with carbon during sample preparation, the carbon element was inactivated for analysis. Because of this, carbonate compounds of minerals' particles could not be detected. 95% of the REE mineral particles appear to be smaller than about 10 microm in size (about 100 microm2 in area). For the gravity concentration, light rare earth elements (LREE) and heavy rare earth elements' (HREE) individual elemental recovery values were in the ranges of 49.6-52.8% and 46.3-48.8%, respectively, at 25% of mass yield. In order to separate a larger amount of the REE, a wet high intensity magnetic separation (WHIMS) test was carried out on tailings of the gravity concentration tests. The HREE individual elemental recovery values ranged from 56.3-63.1% at 37% mass yield, while LREE individual elemental recovery values were in the 57.9% - 59.1% range. For the combined gravity and magnetic separation processes, the net individual elemental recovery values of the LREE and the HREE were in the range of 79.6-80.5% and 76.5-80.9%, respectively. The combined mass yield of the gravity and magnetic separation processes was 53%. Direct leaching tests conducted on the composite ground ore feed yielded high individual elemental recovery values of 90-92% of the LREE. The HREE individual elemental recovery values ranged from 56.5-87.3%. In the leaching, 20% HCl was used in

  14. Timing of ore-related magmatism in the western Alaska Range, southwestern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Ryan D.; Graham, Garth E.; Anderson, Eric D.; Selby, David

    2014-01-01

    This report presents isotopic age data from mineralized granitic plutons in an area of the Alaska Range located approximately 200 kilometers to the west-northwest of Anchorage in southwestern Alaska. Uranium-lead isotopic data and trace element concentrations of zircons were determined for 12 samples encompassing eight plutonic bodies ranging in age from approximately 76 to 57.4 millions of years ago (Ma). Additionally, a rhenium-osmium age of molybdenite from the Miss Molly molybdenum occurrence is reported (approx. 59 Ma). All of the granitic plutons in this study host gold-, copper-, and (or) molybdenum-rich prospects. These new ages modify previous interpretations regarding the age of magmatic activity and mineralization within the study area. The new ages show that the majority of the gold-quartz vein-hosting plutons examined in this study formed in the Late Cretaceous. Further work is necessary to establish the ages of ore-mineral deposition in these deposits.

  15. Kestel: an early bronze age source of tin ore in the taurus mountains, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Yener, K A; Ozbal, H; Kaptan, E; Pehlidotvan, A N; Goodway, M

    1989-04-14

    An ancient mine located at Kestel on the outskirts of Nigde, in the Taurus Mountains of south central Turkey, has been dated by radiocarbon and pottery type to the third millennium B.C. Archeological soundings in the mine located cassiterite (tin oxide) in the detritus of ancient mining activity. Cassiterite is also present in veins and, as placer deposits, in streams nearby. Since tin is used with copper in order to form bronze but is thinly distributed in the earth's crust, the presence of tin ore at Kestel offers a source for the much sought after tin of the Bronze Age. The discovery of an ancient mine containing cassiterite sheds light on this question, but also greatly complicates the accepted picture of regional economic patterns in the highland resource areas of Anatolia and of interregional metal exchange in the formative periods of urbanization and metal use in the eastern Mediterranean.

  16. Late Cretaceous porphyry copper mineralization in Sonora, Mexico: Implications for the evolution of the Southwest North America porphyry copper province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barra, Fernando; Valencia, Victor A.

    2014-10-01

    Two porphyry Cu-Mo prospects in northern Sonora, Mexico (Fortuna del Cobre and Los Humos) located within the southwestern North American porphyry province have been dated in order to constrain the timing of crystallization and mineralization of these ore deposits. In Fortuna del Cobre, the pre-mineralization granodiorite porphyry yielded an U-Pb zircon age of 76.5 ± 2.3 Ma, whereas two samples from the ore-bearing quartz feldespathic porphyry were dated at 74.6 ± 1.3 and 75.0 ± 1.4 Ma. Four molybdenite samples from Los Humos porphyry Cu prospect yielded a weighted average Re-Os age of 73.5 ± 0.2 Ma, whereas two samples from the ore-bearing quartz monzonite porphyry gave U-Pb zircon ages of 74.4 ± 1.1 and 74.5 ± 1.3 Ma, showing a Late Cretaceous age for the emplacement of this ore deposit. The results indicate that Laramide porphyry Cu mineralization of Late Cretaceous age is not restricted to northern Arizona as previously thought and provide evidence for the definition of NS trending metallogenic belts that are parallel to the paleo-trench. Porphyry copper mineralization follows the inland migration trend of the magmatic arc as a result of the Farallon slab flattening during the Laramide orogeny.

  17. Sphalerite geobarometry of deformed sulphide ores from the C. S. A. Mine, Cobar, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangameshwar, S. R.; Marshall, B.

    1980-12-01

    The C. S. A. Mine is located near Cobar, central New South Wales. The copper-zinc-lead ores occur in Early Devonian rocks of the Cobar Super-Group. Lower greenschist (“slate-grade”) metamorphism has developed elongate lenticular ore systems parallel to the extension (down-dip) lineation in cleavage. FeS contents of sphalerites coexisting with pyrite and pyrrhotite outside and inside pressure shadows indicate much higher pressures (7.7 to 9.0 kbar) than those inferred from stratigraphic reasoning and the low metamorphic grade. The homogeneous distribution of Fe in sphalerites suggests equilibration with pyrite-pyrrhotite; and concentrations of Co and Ni in iron sulphides, and Mn, Cd and Cu in sphalerite are too low to have influenced phase relations in the FeS-ZnS pseudobinary system. The anomalously high pressures are therefore ascribed to reequilibration of sphalerite compositions with a monoclinic pyrrhotite-pyrite buffer. The FeS contents of the reequilibrated sphalerites apparently reflect the differing mean stress domains that exist outside and inside pressure shadows. This suggests that reequilibration occurred under the same stress distribution as produced the original pressure shadows, and implies FeS dissolution during the decay of the cleavage-producing structuro-metamorphic event. The commonly observed scatter of sphalerite compositions in low grade assemblages appears to record micro-scale mean stress domains, and thereby testifies to the pressure sensitivity of the mole percent FeS contents.

  18. High REE and Y concentrations in Co-Cu-Au ores of the Blackbird district, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, J.F.

    2006-01-01

    Analysis of 11 samples of strata-bound Co-Cu-Au ore from the Blackbird district in Idaho shows previously unknown high concentrations of rare earth elements (REE) and Y, averaging 0.53 wt percent ???REE + Y oxides. Scanning electron microscopy indicates REE and Y residence in monazite, xenotime, and allanite that form complex intergrowths with cobaltite, suggesting coeval Co and REE + Y mineralization during the Mesoproterozoic. Occurrence of high REE and Y concentrations in the Blackbird ores, together with previously documented saline-rich fluid inclusions and Cl-rich biotite, suggest that these are not volcanogenic massive sulfide or sedimentary exhalative deposits but instead are iron oxide-copper-gold (IOCG) deposits. Other strata-bound Co deposits of Proterozoic age in the North American Cordillera and elsewhere in the world may have potential for REE and Y resources. IOCG deposits with abundant light REE should also be evaluated for possible unrecognized heavy REE and Y mineralization. ?? 2006 by Economic Geology.

  19. Morphogenesis of the T4 tail and tail fibers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Remarkable progress has been made during the past ten years in elucidating the structure of the bacteriophage T4 tail by a combination of three-dimensional image reconstruction from electron micrographs and X-ray crystallography of the components. Partial and complete structures of nine out of twenty tail structural proteins have been determined by X-ray crystallography and have been fitted into the 3D-reconstituted structure of the "extended" tail. The 3D structure of the "contracted" tail was also determined and interpreted in terms of component proteins. Given the pseudo-atomic tail structures both before and after contraction, it is now possible to understand the gross conformational change of the baseplate in terms of the change in the relative positions of the subunit proteins. These studies have explained how the conformational change of the baseplate and contraction of the tail are related to the tail's host cell recognition and membrane penetration function. On the other hand, the baseplate assembly process has been recently reexamined in detail in a precise system involving recombinant proteins (unlike the earlier studies with phage mutants). These experiments showed that the sequential association of the subunits of the baseplate wedge is based on the induced-fit upon association of each subunit. It was also found that, upon association of gp53 (gene product 53), the penultimate subunit of the wedge, six of the wedge intermediates spontaneously associate to form a baseplate-like structure in the absence of the central hub. Structure determination of the rest of the subunits and intermediate complexes and the assembly of the hub still require further study. PMID:21129200

  20. Radiological survey of the inactive uranium-mill tailings at Green River, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Haywood, F.F.; Christian, D.J.; Ellis, B.S.; Hubbard, H.M. Jr.; Lorenzo, D.; Shinpaugh, W.H.

    1980-03-01

    The uranium-mill tailings at Green River, Utah, are relatively low in /sup 226/Ra content and concentration (20 Ci and 140 pCi/g, respectively) because the mill was used to upgrade the uranium ore by separating the sand and slime fractions; most of the radium was transported along with the slimes to another mill site. Spread of tailings was observed in all directions, but near-background gamma exposure rates were reached at distances of 40 to 90 m from the edge of the pile. Water erosion of the tailings is evident and, since a significant fraction of the tailings pile lies in Brown's Wash, the potential exists for repetition of the loss of a large quantity of tailings such as occurred during a flood in 1959. In general, the level of surface contamination was low at this site, but some areas in the mill site, which were being used for nonuranium work, have gamma-ray exposure rates up to 143 ..mu..R/hr.

  1. Evolution of uranium distribution and speciation in mill tailings, COMINAK Mine, Niger.

    PubMed

    Déjeant, Adrien; Galoisy, Laurence; Roy, Régis; Calas, Georges; Boekhout, Flora; Phrommavanh, Vannapha; Descostes, Michael

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated the evolution of uranium distribution and speciation in mill tailings from the COMINAK mine (Niger), in production since 1978. A multi-scale approach was used, which combined high resolution remote sensing imagery, ICP-MS bulk rock analyses, powder X-ray diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Focused Ion Beam--Transmission Electron Microscopy and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy. Mineralogical analyses showed that some ore minerals, including residual uraninite and coffinite, undergo alteration and dissolution during tailings storage. The migration of uranium and other contaminants depends on (i) the chemical stability of secondary phases and sorbed species (dissolution and desorption processes), and (ii) the mechanical transport of fine particles bearing these elements. Uranium is stabilized after formation of secondary uranyl sulfates and phosphates, and adsorbed complexes on mineral surfaces (e.g. clay minerals). In particular, the stock of insoluble uranyl phosphates increases with time, thus contributing to the long-term stabilization of uranium. At the surface, a sulfate-cemented duricrust is formed after evaporation of pore water. This duricrust limits water infiltration and dust aerial dispersion, though it is enriched in uranium and many other elements, because of pore water rising from underlying levels by capillary action. Satellite images provided a detailed description of the tailings pile over time and allow monitoring of the chronology of successive tailings deposits. Satellite images suggest that uranium anomalies that occur at deep levels in the pile are most likely former surface duricrusts that have been buried under more recent tailings.

  2. A Copper-Sulfate-Based Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory for First-Year University Students That Teaches Basic Operations and Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Emilio; Vicente, Miguel Angel

    2002-04-01

    An integrated inorganic chemistry laboratory experiment for first-year students in Chemistry and Chemical Engineering is presented. It is based on copper sulfate and structured for a duration of about 10 hours, and has three steps: purification of a natural ore containing copper sulfate and insoluble basic copper sulfates, determination of the number of water molecules in hydrated copper sulfate, and recovery of metallic copper from copper sulfate. Many basic operations and concepts related to this experiment are studied: weighing; heating; filtration (simple and vacuum-assisted); purification; crystallization; pure compounds and mixtures; hydrated and anhydrous salts; solubility; unsaturated (dilute and concentrated), saturated, and supersaturated solutions; adsorbed and crystallization water; reversible dehydration; redox reaction; electrode potential; free energy; spontaneity; and catalysis.

  3. Preliminaries on pollution risk factors related to mining and ore processing in the Cu-rich pollymetallic belt of Eastern Carpathians, Romania.

    PubMed

    Stumbea, Dan

    2013-11-01

    The present study focuses on the mineralogical and geochemical patterns of mining and ore-processing wastes from some occurrences in the Eastern Carpathians; its aim is to identify the main factors and processes that could lead to the pollution of the environment. In this respect, the following types of solid waste were investigated: efflorescent salts developed on the surface of rock blocks from a quarry, ore-processing waste from two tailings ponds, and salt crusts developed at the surface of a tailings pond. The potential risks emphasized by these preliminary investigations are the following: (1) the risk of wind-driven removal and transport of the waste from the surface of tailings ponds, given that fine grains prevail (up to 80%); (2) the risk of tailings removal through mechanical transport by water, during heavy rainfall; (3) the appearance of hydrated sulfates on the rock fragments from the mining waste, sulfates which are highly susceptible to the generation of acid mine drainage (pH<4); (4) the high amount of toxic elements (Pb, Cd, Cu, Zn, As, etc.) that acid mine drainage leachates contain; and (5) the development of a salt crust on the flat, horizontal surfaces of the waste deposit, due to this very shape. Statistical data regarding the amount of both major and minor elements in the tailings have revealed two statistical populations for nearly all the toxic metals. This suggests that, beyond the effect that the tailings have upon the environment through their mere presence in a given area, there are alleged additional factors and processes which intensify the pollution: the location of the waste deposit relative to the topography of the area; the shape of the waste deposit; the development of low areas on the surface of the deposit, areas which favor the appearance of salt crusts; and the mineralogy of efflorescent aggregates.

  4. Preliminaries on pollution risk factors related to mining and ore processing in the Cu-rich pollymetallic belt of Eastern Carpathians, Romania.

    PubMed

    Stumbea, Dan

    2013-11-01

    The present study focuses on the mineralogical and geochemical patterns of mining and ore-processing wastes from some occurrences in the Eastern Carpathians; its aim is to identify the main factors and processes that could lead to the pollution of the environment. In this respect, the following types of solid waste were investigated: efflorescent salts developed on the surface of rock blocks from a quarry, ore-processing waste from two tailings ponds, and salt crusts developed at the surface of a tailings pond. The potential risks emphasized by these preliminary investigations are the following: (1) the risk of wind-driven removal and transport of the waste from the surface of tailings ponds, given that fine grains prevail (up to 80%); (2) the risk of tailings removal through mechanical transport by water, during heavy rainfall; (3) the appearance of hydrated sulfates on the rock fragments from the mining waste, sulfates which are highly susceptible to the generation of acid mine drainage (pH<4); (4) the high amount of toxic elements (Pb, Cd, Cu, Zn, As, etc.) that acid mine drainage leachates contain; and (5) the development of a salt crust on the flat, horizontal surfaces of the waste deposit, due to this very shape. Statistical data regarding the amount of both major and minor elements in the tailings have revealed two statistical populations for nearly all the toxic metals. This suggests that, beyond the effect that the tailings have upon the environment through their mere presence in a given area, there are alleged additional factors and processes which intensify the pollution: the location of the waste deposit relative to the topography of the area; the shape of the waste deposit; the development of low areas on the surface of the deposit, areas which favor the appearance of salt crusts; and the mineralogy of efflorescent aggregates. PMID:23625118

  5. GIS-based Mine Tailings Yield Mapping using RUSLE and Sediment Delivery Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Choi, Y.; Park, H.; Kwon, H.; Yoon, S.; Go, W.

    2010-12-01

    Erosion of mine tailings heaped up on the side of abandoned mine is an environmental problem because they contain harmful heavy metals. These harmful heavy metals such as copper, lead, arsenic in mine tailings cause contamination of surrounding streams and soil. To prevent and reduce the damage of surrounding streams caused by harmful heavy metals leaking from mine tailings, evaluating the pollution loading amount of mine tailings is required. However, it is difficult to assess its environmental impacts accurately because of its complex processes associated with it (Lal 1994). To estimate soil erosion and develop soil erosion management plans, there are some soil erosion estimation methods. Among these methods, the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) is the most widely used method. The six factors affecting soil loss such as rainfall-runoff erosivity, soil erodibility, slope length and steepness, cover management, and support practice were extracted from the spatial data and measurement data to evaluate average annual soil loss. Applying this model to mine tailings is possible, because mine tailings are regarded as soil. All the sediment generated may not be delivered at the watershed outlet because some of it may be deposited at various locations in the watershed. RUSLE does not consider the sediment delivery ratio to estimate the mine tailings delivered to the downstream point of interest. In this study, three methods are provided to compute the spatially distributed sediment delivery ratios and the results are compared with each other. Geographical Information System (GIS)-based erosion model and sediment delivery model were used to estimate the potential sediment yield from mine tailings in this study. The results achieved in this study can be used as basis data to assist mine tailings management and tailings dam installation plan. This work was supported by the Mine Reclamation Corporation funded by the Ministry of Knowledge Economy, Republic of Korea

  6. Metallogenic events and tectonic setting of the Duobaoshan ore field in Heilongjiang Province, NE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yu-Jie; Ren, Yun-Sheng; Duan, Ming-Xin; Tong, Kuang-Yin; Chen, Cong; Yang, Qun; Li, Chao

    2015-01-01

    The Duobaoshan ore field, a major center of metal production in Northeast China, is located in the northeast of the Xing'an-Mongolia Orogenic Belt (the eastern part of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt) and within the northern Greater Xing'an Mountains. Several types of ore deposits are mined in the Duobaoshan region, including the Duobaoshan and Tongshan porphyry copper-molybdenum deposits, the Sankuanggou skarn iron-copper deposit, and the Zhengguang epithermal gold deposit. Zircon grains from the Tongshan granodiorite and porphyritic granite yield laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) U-Pb weighted mean ages of 475.9 ± 0.8 Ma and 230.9 ± 0.9 Ma to 240.7 ± 0.8 Ma, respectively. The Re-Os isochron age of molybdenites from the Tongshan deposit is 473 ± 4 Ma. Because both field observations and petrographic analysis identified disseminated chalcopyrite, pyrite, and malachite in the porphyritic granite, the isotope dating indicates that the Tongshan deposit underwent at least two magmatic-mineralization events, during the Ordovician and the Triassic. Zircon grains from the metallogenic granodiorite of the Sankuanggou skarn deposit yield an age of 176.1 ± 0.3 Ma, and Re-Os dating of molybdenite gives an age of 173 ± 6 Ma, indicating a Jurassic event. Based on previous research and the new geochemical analysis presented in this study, it is inferred that the magmatism and mineralization of the Sankuanggou deposit were associated with the subduction of the Paleo-Pacific Plate. The Duobaoshan region has therefore experienced at least three major magmatic and mineralization events, during the Ordovician (470-480 Ma), the Triassic (230-240 Ma), and the Early Jurassic (170-180 Ma).

  7. High-temperature performance prediction of iron ore fines and the ore-blending programming problem in sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Bing-ji; Zhang, Jian-liang; Guo, Hong-wei; Chen, Ling-kun; Li, Wei

    2014-08-01

    The high-temperature performance of iron ore fines is an important factor in optimizing ore blending in sintering. However, the application of linear regression analysis and the linear combination method in most other studies always leads to a large deviation from the desired results. In this study, the fuzzy membership functions of the assimilation ability temperature and the liquid fluidity were proposed based on the fuzzy mathematics theory to construct a model for predicting the high-temperature performance of mixed iron ore. Comparisons of the prediction model and experimental results were presented. The results illustrate that the prediction model is more accurate and effective than previously developed models. In addition, fuzzy constraints for the high-temperature performance of iron ore in this research make the results of ore blending more comparable. A solution for the quantitative calculation as well as the programming of fuzzy constraints is also introduced.

  8. Ceramic colorant from untreated iron ore residue.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Oscar Costa; Bernardin, Adriano Michael

    2012-09-30

    This work deals with the development of a ceramic colorant for glazes from an untreated iron ore residue. 6 mass% of the residue was added in suspensions (1.80 g/cm(3) density and 30s viscosity) of white, transparent and matte glazes, which were applied as thin layers (0.5mm) on engobeb and not fired ceramic tiles. The tiles were fired in laboratory roller kiln in a cycle of 35 min and maximum temperatures between 1050 and 1180°C. The residue and glazes were characterized by chemical (XRF) and thermal (DTA and optical dilatometry) analyses, and the glazed tiles by colorimetric and XRD analyses. The results showed that the colorant embedded in the transparent glaze results in a reddish glaze (like pine nut) suitable for the ceramic roof tile industry. For the matte and white glazes, the residue has changed the color of the tiles with temperature. PMID:22795839

  9. Geology of the pitchblende ores of Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bastin, Edson S.

    1915-01-01

    The large amount of public interest that has recently been manifested in radium because of the apparent cures of cancer effected by certain of its emanations makes it desirable to place before the public as promptly as possible all available information in regard to the occurrence of the minerals from which radium may be derived. The following account of the mode of occurrence of pitchblende at Quartz Hill, in Gilpin County, Colo., is therefore published in advance of a much larger report on the same region in which many other types of ore deposits will be considered. The field studies were made.in the fall of 1912. As the geologic relations at Quartz Hill differ in important particulars from those at foreign localities, a summary of the genetically important features of the principal European occurrences is included for purposes of comparison.

  10. Ceramic colorant from untreated iron ore residue.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Oscar Costa; Bernardin, Adriano Michael

    2012-09-30

    This work deals with the development of a ceramic colorant for glazes from an untreated iron ore residue. 6 mass% of the residue was added in suspensions (1.80 g/cm(3) density and 30s viscosity) of white, transparent and matte glazes, which were applied as thin layers (0.5mm) on engobeb and not fired ceramic tiles. The tiles were fired in laboratory roller kiln in a cycle of 35 min and maximum temperatures between 1050 and 1180°C. The residue and glazes were characterized by chemical (XRF) and thermal (DTA and optical dilatometry) analyses, and the glazed tiles by colorimetric and XRD analyses. The results showed that the colorant embedded in the transparent glaze results in a reddish glaze (like pine nut) suitable for the ceramic roof tile industry. For the matte and white glazes, the residue has changed the color of the tiles with temperature.

  11. Direct Biohydrometallurgical Extraction of Iron from Ore

    SciTech Connect

    T.C. Eisele

    2005-10-01

    A completely novel approach to iron extraction was investigated, based on reductive leaching of iron by anaerobic bacteria. Microorganisms were collected from an anaerobic bog where natural seepage of dissolved iron was observed. This mixed culture was used to reduce insoluble iron in a magnetite ore to the soluble ferrous (Fe{sup +2}) state. While dissolution rates were slow, concentrations of dissolved iron as high as 3487 mg/l could be reached if sufficient time was allowed. A factorial study of the effects of trace nutrients and different forms of organic matter indicated that the best dissolution rates and highest dissolved iron concentrations were achieved using soluble carbohydrate (sucrose) as the bacterial food source, and that nutrients other than nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, sodium, and acetate were not necessary. A key factor in reaching high levels of dissolved iron was maintaining a high level of carbon dioxide in solution, since the solubility of iron carbonates increases markedly as the quantity of dissolved carbon dioxide increases. Once the iron is dissolved, it has been demonstrated that the ferrous iron can then be electroplated from solution, provided that the concentration of iron is sufficiently high and the hydrogen ion concentration is sufficiently low. However, if the leaching solution is electrolyzed directly, organic matter precipitates at the cathode along with the metallic iron. To prevent this problem, the ferrous iron should be separated from the bulk solution in a more concentrated, purified form. One route to accomplishing this is to take advantage of the change in solubility of ferrous iron as a function of carbon dioxide concentration. By cycling the concentration of carbon dioxide in solution, it is possible to produce an iron-rich concentrate that should be suitable for electrolysis. This represents the first viable hydrometallurgical method for leaching iron directly from ore and producing metallic iron.

  12. Comparison of the mineralogy of the Boss-Bixby, Missouri copper-iron deposit, and the Olympic Dam copper-uranium-gold deposit, South Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Brandom, R.T.; Hagni, R.D.; Allen, C.R.

    1985-01-01

    An ore microscopic examination of 80 polished sections prepared from selected drill core specimens from the Boss-Bixby, Missouri copper-iron deposit has shown that its mineral assemblage is similar to that of the Olympic Dam (Roxby Downs) copper-uranium-gold deposit in South Australia. A comparison with the mineralogy reported for Olympic Dam shows that both deposits contain: 1) the principal minerals, magnetite, hematite, chalcopyrite, and bornite, 2) the cobalt-bearing phases, carrollite and cobaltian pyrite, 3) the titanium oxides, rutile and anatase, 4) smaller amounts of martite, covellite, and electrum, 5) fluorite and carbonates, and 6) some alteration minerals. The deposits also are similar with regard to the sequence of mineral deposition: 1) early oxides, 2) then sulfide minerals, and 3) a final oxide generation. The deposits, however, are dissimilar with regard to their host rock lithologies and structural settings. The Boss-Bixby ores occupy breccia zones within a hydrothermally altered basic intrusive and intruded silicic volcanics, whereas the Olympic Dam ores are contained in sedimentary breccias in a graben or trough. Also, some minerals have been found thus far to occur at only one of the deposits. The similarity of mineralogy in these deposits suggests that they were formed from ore fluids that had some similarities in character and that the St. Francois terrane of Missouri is an important region for further exploration for deposits with this mineral assemblage.

  13. Does climate have heavy tails?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermejo, Miguel; Mudelsee, Manfred

    2013-04-01

    When we speak about a distribution with heavy tails, we are referring to the probability of the existence of extreme values will be relatively large. Several heavy-tail models are constructed from Poisson processes, which are the most tractable models. Among such processes, one of the most important are the Lévy processes, which are those process with independent, stationary increments and stochastic continuity. If the random component of a climate process that generates the data exhibits a heavy-tail distribution, and if that fact is ignored by assuming a finite-variance distribution, then there would be serious consequences (in the form, e.g., of bias) for the analysis of extreme values. Yet, it appears that it is an open question to what extent and degree climate data exhibit heavy-tail phenomena. We present a study about the statistical inference in the presence of heavy-tail distribution. In particular, we explore (1) the estimation of tail index of the marginal distribution using several estimation techniques (e.g., Hill estimator, Pickands estimator) and (2) the power of hypothesis tests. The performance of the different methods are compared using artificial time-series by means of Monte Carlo experiments. We systematically apply the heavy tail inference to observed climate data, in particular we focus on time series data. We study several proxy and directly observed climate variables from the instrumental period, the Holocene and the Pleistocene. This work receives financial support from the European Commission (Marie Curie Initial Training Network LINC, No. 289447, within the 7th Framework Programme).

  14. Near-Surface Sensing of Vegetative Heavy Metal Stress: Method Development for an Accelerated Assessment of Mine Tailing Waste and Remediation Efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. T.; Gottfried, M.; Berglund, E.; Rodriguez, G.; Ceckanowicz, D. J.; Cutter, N.; Badgeley, J.

    2014-12-01

    The boom and bust history of mineral extraction in the American southwest is visible today in tens of thousands of abandoned and slowly decaying mine installations that scar the landscape. Mine tailing piles, mounds of crushed mineral ore, often contain significant quantities of heavy metal elements which may leach into surrounding soils, surface water and ground water. Chemical analysis of contaminated soils is a tedious and time-consuming process. Regional assessment of heavy metal contamination for treatment prioritization would be greatly accelerated by the development of near-surface imaging indices of heavy-metal vegetative stress in western grasslands. Further, the method would assist in measuring the ongoing effectiveness of phytoremedatian and phytostabilization efforts. To test feasibility we ground truthed nine phytoremediated and two control sites sites along the mine-impacted Kerber Creek watershed in Saguache County, Colorado. Total metal concentration was determined by XRF for both plant and soil samples. Leachable metals were extracted from soil samples following US EPA method 1312. Plants were identified, sorted into roots, shoots and leaves, and digested via microwave acid extraction. Metal concentrations were determined with high accuracy by ICP-OES analysis. Plants were found to contain significantly higher concentrations of heavy metals than surrounding soils, particularly for manganese (Mn), iron (Fe), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), barium (Ba), and lead (Pb). Plant species accumulated and distributed metals differently, yet most showed translocation of metals from roots to above ground structures. Ground analysis was followed by near surface imaging using an unmanned aerial vehicle equipped with visible/near and shortwave infrared (0.7 to 1.5 μm) cameras. Images were assessed for spectral shifts indicative of plant stress and attempts made to correlate results with measured soil and plant metal concentrations.

  15. Bog Manganese Ore: A Resource for High Manganese Steel Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Swatirupa; Singh, Saroj K.; Mohapatra, Birendra K.

    2016-06-01

    Bog manganese ore, associated with the banded iron formation of the Iron Ore Group (IOG), occurs in large volume in northern Odisha, India. The ore is powdery, fine-grained and soft in nature with varying specific gravity (2.8-3.9 g/cm3) and high thermo-gravimetric loss, It consists of manganese (δ-MnO2, manganite, cryptomelane/romanechite with minor pyrolusite) and iron (goethite/limonite and hematite) minerals with sub-ordinate kaolinite and quartz. It shows oolitic/pisolitic to globular morphology nucleating small detritus of quartz, pyrolusite/romanechite and hematite. The ore contains around 23% Mn and 28% Fe with around 7% of combined alumina and silica. Such Mn ore has not found any use because of its sub-grade nature and high iron content, and is hence considered as waste. The ore does not respond to any physical beneficiation techniques because of the combined state of the manganese and iron phases. Attempts have been made to recover manganese and iron value from such ore through smelting. A sample along with an appropriate charge mix when processed through a plasma reactor, produced high-manganese steel alloy having 25% Mn within a very short time (<10 min). Minor Mn content from the slag was recovered through acid leaching. The aim of this study has been to recover a value-added product from the waste.

  16. Sulfur isotope geochemistry of ore and gangue minerals from the Silesian-Cracow Mississippi Valley-type ore district, Poland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leach, D.L.; Vets, J.G.; Gent, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    Studies of the sulfur isotopic composition of ore and gangue minerals from the Silesian-Cracow Zn-Pb district were conducted to gain insights into processes that controlled the location and distribution of the ore deposits. Results of this study show that minerals from the Silesian-Cracow ore district have the largest range of sulfur isotope compositions in sulfides observed from any Mississippi Valley-type ore district in the world. The ??34S values for sulfide minerals range from +38 to -32 per mil for the entire paragenetic sequence but individual stages exhibit smaller ranges. There is a well developed correlation between the sulfur isotope composition and paragenetic stage of ore deposition. The first important ore stage contains mostly positive ??34S values, around 5 per mil. The second stage of ore formation are lower, with a median value of around -5 to -15 per mil, and with some values as low as -32 per mil. Late stage barite contains isotopically heavy sulfur around +32 per mil. The range in sulfur isotope compositions can be explained by contributions of sulfur from a variety of source rocks together with sulfur isotope fractionations produced by the reaction paths for sulfate reduction. Much of the variation in sulfur isotope compositions can be explained by bacterial reduction of sedimentary sulfate and disequilibrium reactions by intermediate-valency sulfur species, especially in the late-stage pyrite and sphalerite. Organic reduction of sulfate and thermal release of sulfur from coals in the Upper Silesian Coal Basin may have been important contributors to sulfur in the ore minerals. The sulfur isotopic data, ore mineral textures, and fluid inclusion data, are consistent with the hypothesis that fluid mixing was the dominant ore forming mechanism. The rather distinct lowering of ?? 34S values in sulfides from stage 2 to stage 3 is believed to reflect some fundamental change in the source of reduced sulfur and/or hydrology of the ore

  17. Copper-tantalum alloy

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.

    1986-07-15

    A tantalum-copper alloy can be made by preparing a consumable electrode consisting of an elongated copper billet containing at least two spaced apart tantalum rods extending longitudinally the length of the billet. The electrode is placed in a dc arc furnace and melted under conditions which co-melt the copper and tantalum to form the alloy.

  18. On copper peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, L.

    1988-01-01

    The action of hydrogen superoxide on copper salts in alcoholic solutions is studied. The action of hydrogen peroxide on copper hydroxide in alcoholic suspensions, and the action of ethereal hydrogen peroxide on copper hydroxide are discussed. It is concluded that using the procedure proposed excludes almost entirely the harmful effect of hydrolysis.

  19. Demystifying Controlling Copper Corrosion

    EPA Science Inventory

    The LCR systematically misses the highest health and corrosion risk sites for copper. Additionally, there are growing concerns for WWTP copper in sludges and discharge levels. There are many corrosion control differences between copper and lead. This talk explains the sometimes c...

  20. [Copper pathology (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Mallet, B; Romette, J; Di Costanzo, J D

    1982-01-30

    Copper is an essential dietary component, being the coenzyme of many enzymes with oxidase activity, e.g. ceruloplasmin, superoxide dismutase, monoamine oxidase, etc. The metabolism of copper is complex and imperfectly known. Active transport of copper through the intestinal epithelial cells involves metallothionein, a protein rich in sulfhydryl groups which also binds the copper in excess and probably prevents absorption in toxic amounts. In hepatocytes a metallothionein facilitates absorption by a similar mechanism and regulates copper distribution in the liver: incorporation in an apoceruloplasmin, storage and synthesis of copper-dependent enzymes. Metallothioneins and ceruloplasmin are essential to adequate copper homeostasis. Apart from genetic disorders, diseases involving copper usually result from hypercupraemia of varied origin. Wilson's disease and Menkes' disease, although clinically and pathogenetically different, are both marked by low ceruloplasmin and copper serum levels. The excessive liver retention of copper in Wilson's disease might be due to increased avidity of hepatic metallothioneins for copper and decreased biliary excretion through lysosomal dysfunction. Menkes' disease might be due to low avidity of intestinal and hepatic metallothioneins for copper. The basic biochemical defect responsible for these two hereditary conditions has not yet been fully elucidated.

  1. Mira's Tail There All Along

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer discovered an exceptionally long comet-like tail of material trailing behind Mira -- a star that has been studied thoroughly for about 400 years. So, why had this tail gone unnoticed for so long? The answer is that nobody had scanned the extended region around Mira in ultraviolet light until now.

    As this composite demonstrates, the tail is only visible in ultraviolet light (top), and does not show up in visible light (bottom). Incidentally, Mira is much brighter in visible than ultraviolet light due to its low surface temperature of about 3,000 kelvin (about 5,000 degrees Fahrenheit).

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer, one of NASA's Small Explorer class missions, is the first all-sky survey in ultraviolet light. It found Mira's tail by chance during a routine scan. Since the mission's launch more than four years ago, it has surveyed millions of galaxies and stars. Such vast collections of data often bring welcome surprises, such as Mira's unusual tail.

    The visible-light image is from the United Kingdom Schmidt Telescope in Australia, via the Digitized Sky Survey, a program affiliated with the Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Md.

  2. Porphyry copper assessment of British Columbia and Yukon Territory, Canada: Chapter C in Global mineral resource assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mihalasky, Mark J.; Bookstrom, Arthur A.; Frost, Thomas P.; Ludington, Steve

    2011-01-01

    In permissive tract 003pCu2002, alkaline igneous rocks of Middle Triassic to Late Jurassic age within the Intermontane accreted island-arc terranes are assessed for alkaline porphyry Cu-Au deposits. The area of this tract is 109,290 km2. In 12 known deposits the total reported tonnage of ore is 6,440 Mt, containing 20.9 Mt copper. An estimated 7 undiscovered deposits contain a calculated mean of 22 Mt copper and a median of 13 Mt copper. The spatial density for the 19 known plus estimated

  3. 36. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING WEST FROM UNDERNEATH THE ORE BINS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. INTERIOR VIEW LOOKING WEST FROM UNDERNEATH THE ORE BINS LOOKING AT THE BACK SIDE OF THE HENDY CHALLENGE CONTINUOUS ORE FEEDERS, #1 IS ON THE LEFT, #2 IS CENTER, AND #3 IS ON THE RIGHT. THESE ARE USED TO KEEP A CONTINUOUS FLOW OF ORE INTO THE STAMP MILLS. NOTE THE SPARE FEEDER DISKS ON THE FLOOR BOTTOM CENTER AND SPARE STAMP HEADS AND SHOES ON THE FLOOR BOTTOM LEFT OF THE IMAGE. - Standard Gold Mill, East of Bodie Creek, Northeast of Bodie, Bodie, Mono County, CA

  4. Tourmaline as a recorder of ore-forming processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, J.F.; Trumbull, R.B.

    2011-01-01

    Tourmaline occurs in diverse types of hydrothermal mineral deposits and can be used to constrain the nature and evolution of ore-forming fl uids. Because of its broad range in composition and retention of chemical and isotopic signatures, tourmaline may be the only robust recorder of original mineralizing processes in some deposits. Microtextures and in situ analysis of compositional and isotopic variations in ore-related tourmaline provide valuable insights into hydrothermal systems in seafl oor, sedimentary, magmatic, and metamorphic environments. Deciphering the hydrothermal record in tourmaline also holds promise for aiding exploration programs in the search for new ore deposits.

  5. Geology of the Copper King Mine area, Prairie Divide, Larimer County, Colorado (Part 1)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sims, Paul Kibler; Phair, George

    1952-01-01

    The Copper King mine, in Larimer County, Colo., in the northern part of the Front Range of Colorado, was operated for a short time prior to World War II for copper and zino, but since 1949, when pitchblende was discovered on the mine dump, it has been worked for uranium. The bedrock in the mine area consists predominantly of pre-Cambrian (Silver Plums) granite with minor migmatite and metasediments--biotite-quartz-plagioclase gneiss, biotite schist, quartzite, amphibolite, amphibole skarn, and biotite skols. The metasediments occur as inclusions that trend northeast in the granite. This trend is essentially parallel to the prevailing foliation in the granite. At places the metasediments are crosscut sharply by the granite to form angular, partly discordant, steep-walled bodies in the granite. Faults, confined to a narrow zone that extends through the mine, cut both the pre-Cambrian rocks and the contained sulfide deposits. The Copper King fault, a breccia zone, contains a deposit of pitchblende; the other faults are believed to be later than the ore. The two types of mineral deposits--massive sulfide and pitchblende deposits--in the mine area, are of widely different mineralogy, age, and origin. The massive sulfide deposits are small and consist of pyrite, sphalerite, chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite, and in places magnetite in amphibole skarn, mice skols, and quartzite. The deposit at the Copper King mine has yielded small quantities of high-grade sphalerite ore. The massive sulfides are pyrometasomatic deposits of pre-Cambrian age. The pitchblende at the Copper King mine is principally in the Copper King vein, a tight, hard breccia zone that cuts through both granite and the massive sulfide deposit. A small part of the pitchblende is in small fractures near the vein and in boxwork pyrite adjacent to the vein; the post-ore faults, close to their intersection with the Copper King vein, contain some radioactive material, but elsewhere, so far as is known, they are barren

  6. Remediation of uranium mill tailings by an integrated biological and chemical process

    SciTech Connect

    Torma, A.E.

    1992-01-01

    Dilute calcium chloride brine solution was found to be effective in the solubilization of toxic heavy metals and long half-life radionuclides (Th-230, Ra-226 and Pb-210) from uranium ores and mill tailings. The recovery of heavy metals and radionuclides from uranium mill tailing effluents was studied with calcium alginate beads. The maximum cadmium and zinc uptakes by calcium alginate beads were determined to be 2.8 [times] 10[sup [minus]3] and 2.3 [times] 10[sup [minus]3] mol/dry weight of alginate. The kinetic values, V[sub m] and K, were calculated for uranium uptake by calcium alginate to be 96.2 mg/l/s and 0.125 g/l, respectively.

  7. Remediation of uranium mill tailings by an integrated biological and chemical process

    SciTech Connect

    Torma, A.E.

    1992-12-31

    Dilute calcium chloride brine solution was found to be effective in the solubilization of toxic heavy metals and long half-life radionuclides (Th-230, Ra-226 and Pb-210) from uranium ores and mill tailings. The recovery of heavy metals and radionuclides from uranium mill tailing effluents was studied with calcium alginate beads. The maximum cadmium and zinc uptakes by calcium alginate beads were determined to be 2.8 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} and 2.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} mol/dry weight of alginate. The kinetic values, V{sub m} and K, were calculated for uranium uptake by calcium alginate to be 96.2 mg/l/s and 0.125 g/l, respectively.

  8. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site Salt Lake City, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Salt Lake City, Utah, evaluates potential public health or environmental impacts resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium ore processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell located at Clive, Utah, in 1987 by the US Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate residual ground water contamination at the former uranium processing site, known as the Vitro processing site. This risk assessment is the first site-specific document under the Ground Water Project. It will help determine the appropriate remedial action for contaminated ground water at the site.

  9. 40 CFR 440.40 - Applicability; description of the mercury ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... mercury ore subcategory. 440.40 Section 440.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Mercury Ore Subcategory § 440.40 Applicability; description of the mercury ore subcategory. The provisions of subpart...

  10. 40 CFR 440.70 - Applicability; description of the nickel ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... nickel ore subcategory. 440.70 Section 440.70 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Nickel Ore Subcategory § 440.70 Applicability; description of the nickel ore subcategory. The provisions of this subpart G are applicable to discharges from (a) mines that produce nickel ore and (b)...

  11. 40 CFR 440.70 - Applicability; description of the nickel ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... nickel ore subcategory. 440.70 Section 440.70 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Nickel Ore Subcategory § 440.70 Applicability; description of the nickel ore subcategory. The provisions of this subpart G are applicable to discharges from (a) mines that produce nickel ore and (b)...

  12. 40 CFR 440.70 - Applicability; description of the nickel ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... nickel ore subcategory. 440.70 Section 440.70 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Nickel Ore Subcategory § 440.70 Applicability; description of the nickel ore subcategory. The provisions of this...

  13. 40 CFR 440.70 - Applicability; description of the nickel ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... nickel ore subcategory. 440.70 Section 440.70 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Nickel Ore Subcategory § 440.70 Applicability; description of the nickel ore subcategory. The provisions of this...

  14. 40 CFR 440.70 - Applicability; description of the nickel ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... nickel ore subcategory. 440.70 Section 440.70 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Nickel Ore Subcategory § 440.70 Applicability; description of the nickel ore subcategory. The provisions of this subpart G are applicable to discharges from (a) mines that produce nickel ore and (b)...

  15. 40 CFR 440.20 - Applicability; description of the aluminum ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... aluminum ore subcategory. 440.20 Section 440.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Aluminum Ore Subcategory § 440.20 Applicability; description of the aluminum ore subcategory. The provisions of...

  16. 40 CFR 440.20 - Applicability; description of the aluminum ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... aluminum ore subcategory. 440.20 Section 440.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Aluminum Ore Subcategory § 440.20 Applicability; description of the aluminum ore subcategory. The provisions of...

  17. 40 CFR 440.90 - Applicability; description of the antimony ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... antimony ore subcategory. 440.90 Section 440.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Antimony Ore Subcategory § 440.90 Applicability; description of the antimony ore subcategory. The provisions of this subpart I are applicable to discharges from (a) mines that produce antimony ore and...

  18. 40 CFR 440.90 - Applicability; description of the antimony ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... antimony ore subcategory. 440.90 Section 440.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Antimony Ore Subcategory § 440.90 Applicability; description of the antimony ore subcategory. The provisions of this subpart I are applicable to discharges from (a) mines that produce antimony ore and...

  19. 40 CFR 440.90 - Applicability; description of the antimony ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... antimony ore subcategory. 440.90 Section 440.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Antimony Ore Subcategory § 440.90 Applicability; description of the antimony ore subcategory. The provisions of...

  20. 40 CFR 440.90 - Applicability; description of the antimony ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... antimony ore subcategory. 440.90 Section 440.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Antimony Ore Subcategory § 440.90 Applicability; description of the antimony ore subcategory. The provisions of...

  1. 40 CFR 440.90 - Applicability; description of the antimony ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... antimony ore subcategory. 440.90 Section 440.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Antimony Ore Subcategory § 440.90 Applicability; description of the antimony ore subcategory. The provisions of this subpart I are applicable to discharges from (a) mines that produce antimony ore and...

  2. 40 CFR 440.50 - Applicability; description of the titanium ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... titanium ore subcategory. 440.50 Section 440.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Titanium Ore Subcategory § 440.50 Applicability; description of the titanium ore subcategory. The provisions of...

  3. 40 CFR 440.50 - Applicability; description of the titanium ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... titanium ore subcategory. 440.50 Section 440.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Titanium Ore Subcategory § 440.50 Applicability; description of the titanium ore subcategory. The provisions of this subpart E are applicable to discharges from (a) mines obtaining titanium ores from...

  4. 40 CFR 440.50 - Applicability; description of the titanium ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... titanium ore subcategory. 440.50 Section 440.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Titanium Ore Subcategory § 440.50 Applicability; description of the titanium ore subcategory. The provisions of this subpart E are applicable to discharges from (a) mines obtaining titanium ores from...

  5. 40 CFR 440.50 - Applicability; description of the titanium ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... titanium ore subcategory. 440.50 Section 440.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Titanium Ore Subcategory § 440.50 Applicability; description of the titanium ore subcategory. The provisions of this subpart E are applicable to discharges from (a) mines obtaining titanium ores from...

  6. 40 CFR 440.50 - Applicability; description of the titanium ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... titanium ore subcategory. 440.50 Section 440.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Titanium Ore Subcategory § 440.50 Applicability; description of the titanium ore subcategory. The provisions of...

  7. 40 CFR 440.110 - Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... platinum ore subcategory. 440.110 Section 440.110 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Platinum Ores Subcategory § 440.110 Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory. The provisions of this subpart K are applicable to discharges from (a) mines that produce platinum ore and...

  8. 40 CFR 440.110 - Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... platinum ore subcategory. 440.110 Section 440.110 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Platinum Ores Subcategory § 440.110 Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory. The provisions of this subpart K are applicable to discharges from (a) mines that produce platinum ore and...

  9. 40 CFR 440.110 - Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... platinum ore subcategory. 440.110 Section 440.110 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Platinum Ores Subcategory § 440.110 Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory. The provisions of...

  10. 40 CFR 440.110 - Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... platinum ore subcategory. 440.110 Section 440.110 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Platinum Ores Subcategory § 440.110 Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory. The provisions of this subpart K are applicable to discharges from (a) mines that produce platinum ore and...

  11. 40 CFR 440.110 - Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... platinum ore subcategory. 440.110 Section 440.110 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Platinum Ores Subcategory § 440.110 Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory. The provisions of...

  12. 40 CFR 440.60 - Applicability; description of the tungsten ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... tungsten ore subcategory. 440.60 Section 440.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Tungsten Ore Subcategory § 440.60 Applicability; description of the tungsten ore subcategory. The provisions of...

  13. 40 CFR 440.60 - Applicability; description of the tungsten ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... tungsten ore subcategory. 440.60 Section 440.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Tungsten Ore Subcategory § 440.60 Applicability; description of the tungsten ore subcategory. The provisions of this subpart F are applicable to discharges from (a) mines that produce tungsten ore and...

  14. 40 CFR 440.60 - Applicability; description of the tungsten ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... tungsten ore subcategory. 440.60 Section 440.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Tungsten Ore Subcategory § 440.60 Applicability; description of the tungsten ore subcategory. The provisions of...

  15. 40 CFR 440.60 - Applicability; description of the tungsten ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... tungsten ore subcategory. 440.60 Section 440.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Tungsten Ore Subcategory § 440.60 Applicability; description of the tungsten ore subcategory. The provisions of this subpart F are applicable to discharges from (a) mines that produce tungsten ore and...

  16. 40 CFR 440.60 - Applicability; description of the tungsten ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... tungsten ore subcategory. 440.60 Section 440.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Tungsten Ore Subcategory § 440.60 Applicability; description of the tungsten ore subcategory. The provisions of this subpart F are applicable to discharges from (a) mines that produce tungsten ore and...

  17. 46 CFR 97.12-1 - Bulk ores and similar cargoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bulk ores and similar cargoes. 97.12-1 Section 97.12-1... OPERATIONS Cargo Stowage § 97.12-1 Bulk ores and similar cargoes. (a) The owners or operators of general cargo vessels which carry bulk cargoes such as ore, ore concentrates, and similar cargoes shall...

  18. 40 CFR 440.40 - Applicability; description of the mercury ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... mercury ore subcategory. 440.40 Section 440.40 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Mercury Ore Subcategory § 440.40 Applicability; description of the mercury ore subcategory. The provisions of subpart...

  19. Metal-sulfide mineral ores, Fenton chemistry and disease. Particle induced inflammatory stress response in lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, Andrea D.; Smirnov, Alexander; Tsirka, Stella E.; Schoonen, Martin A. A.

    2014-07-10

    The inhalation of mineral particulates and other earth materials, such as coal, can initiate or enhance disease in humans. Workers in occupations with high particulate exposure, such as mining, are particularly at risk. The ability of a material to generate an inflammatory stress response (ISR), a measure of particle toxicity, is a useful tool in evaluating said exposure risk. ISR is defined as the upregulation of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) normalized to cell viability. This study compares the ISR of A549 human lung epithelial cells after exposure to well-characterized common metal-sulfide ore mineral separates. The evaluation of the deleterious nature of ore minerals is based on a range of particle loadings (serial dilutions of 0.002 m2/mL stock) and exposure periods (beginning at 30 min and measured systematically for up to 24 h). There is a wide range in ISR values generated by the ore minerals. The ISR values produced by the sphalerite samples are within the range of inert materials. Arsenopyrite generated a small ISR that was largely driven by cell death. Galena showed a similar, but more pronounced response. Copper-bearing ore minerals generated the greatest ISR, both by upregulating cellular ROS and generating substantial and sustained cell death. Chalcopyrite and bornite, both containing ferrous iron, generated the greatest ISR overall. Particles containing Fenton metals as major constituents produce the highest ISR, while other heavy metals mainly generate cell death. Furthermore, this study highlights the importance of evaluating the chemistry, oxidation states and structure of a material when assessing risk management.

  20. Metal-sulfide mineral ores, Fenton chemistry and disease. Particle induced inflammatory stress response in lung cells

    DOE PAGES

    Harrington, Andrea D.; Smirnov, Alexander; Tsirka, Stella E.; Schoonen, Martin A. A.

    2014-07-10

    The inhalation of mineral particulates and other earth materials, such as coal, can initiate or enhance disease in humans. Workers in occupations with high particulate exposure, such as mining, are particularly at risk. The ability of a material to generate an inflammatory stress response (ISR), a measure of particle toxicity, is a useful tool in evaluating said exposure risk. ISR is defined as the upregulation of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) normalized to cell viability. This study compares the ISR of A549 human lung epithelial cells after exposure to well-characterized common metal-sulfide ore mineral separates. The evaluation of the deleteriousmore » nature of ore minerals is based on a range of particle loadings (serial dilutions of 0.002 m2/mL stock) and exposure periods (beginning at 30 min and measured systematically for up to 24 h). There is a wide range in ISR values generated by the ore minerals. The ISR values produced by the sphalerite samples are within the range of inert materials. Arsenopyrite generated a small ISR that was largely driven by cell death. Galena showed a similar, but more pronounced response. Copper-bearing ore minerals generated the greatest ISR, both by upregulating cellular ROS and generating substantial and sustained cell death. Chalcopyrite and bornite, both containing ferrous iron, generated the greatest ISR overall. Particles containing Fenton metals as major constituents produce the highest ISR, while other heavy metals mainly generate cell death. Furthermore, this study highlights the importance of evaluating the chemistry, oxidation states and structure of a material when assessing risk management.« less

  1. Metal-sulfide mineral ores, Fenton chemistry and disease--particle induced inflammatory stress response in lung cells.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Andrea D; Smirnov, Alexander; Tsirka, Stella E; Schoonen, Martin A A

    2015-01-01

    The inhalation of mineral particulates and other earth materials, such as coal, can initiate or enhance disease in humans. Workers in occupations with high particulate exposure, such as mining, are particularly at risk. The ability of a material to generate an inflammatory stress response (ISR), a measure of particle toxicity, is a useful tool in evaluating said exposure risk. ISR is defined as the upregulation of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) normalized to cell viability. This study compares the ISR of A549 human lung epithelial cells after exposure to well-characterized common metal-sulfide ore mineral separates. The evaluation of the deleterious nature of ore minerals is based on a range of particle loadings (serial dilutions of 0.002m(2)/mL stock) and exposure periods (beginning at 30min and measured systematically for up to 24h). There is a wide range in ISR values generated by the ore minerals. The ISR values produced by the sphalerite samples are within the range of inert materials. Arsenopyrite generated a small ISR that was largely driven by cell death. Galena showed a similar, but more pronounced response. Copper-bearing ore minerals generated the greatest ISR, both by upregulating cellular ROS and generating substantial and sustained cell death. Chalcopyrite and bornite, both containing ferrous iron, generated the greatest ISR overall. Particles containing Fenton metals as major constituents produce the highest ISR, while other heavy metals mainly generate cell death. This study highlights the importance of evaluating the chemistry, oxidation states and structure of a material when assessing risk management.

  2. Metal-sulfide mineral ores, Fenton chemistry and disease--particle induced inflammatory stress response in lung cells.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Andrea D; Smirnov, Alexander; Tsirka, Stella E; Schoonen, Martin A A

    2015-01-01

    The inhalation of mineral particulates and other earth materials, such as coal, can initiate or enhance disease in humans. Workers in occupations with high particulate exposure, such as mining, are particularly at risk. The ability of a material to generate an inflammatory stress response (ISR), a measure of particle toxicity, is a useful tool in evaluating said exposure risk. ISR is defined as the upregulation of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) normalized to cell viability. This study compares the ISR of A549 human lung epithelial cells after exposure to well-characterized common metal-sulfide ore mineral separates. The evaluation of the deleterious nature of ore minerals is based on a range of particle loadings (serial dilutions of 0.002m(2)/mL stock) and exposure periods (beginning at 30min and measured systematically for up to 24h). There is a wide range in ISR values generated by the ore minerals. The ISR values produced by the sphalerite samples are within the range of inert materials. Arsenopyrite generated a small ISR that was largely driven by cell death. Galena showed a similar, but more pronounced response. Copper-bearing ore minerals generated the greatest ISR, both by upregulating cellular ROS and generating substantial and sustained cell death. Chalcopyrite and bornite, both containing ferrous iron, generated the greatest ISR overall. Particles containing Fenton metals as major constituents produce the highest ISR, while other heavy metals mainly generate cell death. This study highlights the importance of evaluating the chemistry, oxidation states and structure of a material when assessing risk management. PMID:25107347

  3. The Skellefte Ore District as seen with magnetotellurics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de los Ángeles García Juanatey, María; Hübert, Juliane; Tryggvason, Ari; Juhlin, Christopher; Pedersen, Laust B.; Bauer, Tobias E.; Dehghannejad, Mahdieh; Weihed, Pär

    2013-04-01

    The Skellefte District is one of the richest metallogenic mining areas in Sweden. The main deposits consist of volcanic-hosted massive sulphides (VHMS) rich in zinc, copper, lead, gold and silver, that have been explored and mined for more than a century. Considering that technological advancements allow deeper mining, and that today new discoveries occur less often, new efforts have been directed at locating targets at greater depths. Thus, current exploration strategies need to be adjusted, and a better understanding of regional scale structures is necessary. Following this approach the project "VINNOVA 4D modeling of the Skellefte District" was launched. Its main purpose was to unravel the regional structures and tectonic setting of the Skellefte District and construct a 3D geological model of two key localities within the district. To help accomplish this, magnetotelluric (MT) data were acquired throughout the district together with seismic reflection, geoelectric (ERT and IP) and potential field data. The MT data set consists of 120 stations that were mainly acquired along existing seismic lines. Time series processing yielded MT transfer functions in the frequency range between 700 Hz and 200 s. These data were inverted into 2D resistivity depth sections and subsequently analyzed to identify robust features. Additionally, 3D inversions were computed and compared with the standard 2D results to assess their reliability and better locate conductive bodies. The resistivity features deemed trustworthy were then interpreted in geological terms. For this task, results from the other geophysical methods were considered. The achieved penetration depth varied between 10 and 20 km. The main findings include: (1) conductive hydrothermally altered zones are present within the otherwise resistive rocks of the ore-bearing volcanic units, (2) the depth extension of early and post-orogenic intrusions are depicted as high resistivity features, (3) several prominent conductive

  4. VIEW FACING EAST. ORE TRESTLE WINDS AROUND THE INGOT MOLD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FACING EAST. ORE TRESTLE WINDS AROUND THE INGOT MOLD CONDITIONING BUILDING IN FOREGROUND. PITTSBURGH & LAKE ERIE TRACKS WIND THROUGH TOWN TOWARDS PITTSBURGH AT RIGHT. - Pittsburgh Steel Company, Monessen Works, Donner Avenue, Monessen, Westmoreland County, PA

  5. RUSTING ORE TRAIN, ONCE PART OF NEW YORK ELEVATED LINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    RUSTING ORE TRAIN, ONCE PART OF NEW YORK ELEVATED LINE (TWO LOCOMOTIVES, SHOWING RAILROAD TRUCKS IN FOREGROUND) - Council City & Solomon River Railroad, Locomotives, Nome Vicinity, Nome, Nome Census Area, AK

  6. 53. VIEW OF CRUSHED OXIDIZED ORE BIN FROM EAST. SHOWS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. VIEW OF CRUSHED OXIDIZED ORE BIN FROM EAST. SHOWS ACCESS STAIR TO FEED LEVEL; DUST COLLECTOR ON LEFT. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  7. Microstructure of bentonite in iron ore green pellets.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, Iftekhar U; Mouzon, Johanne; Schröppel, Birgit; Kaech, Andres; Dobryden, Illia; Forsmo, Seija P E; Hedlund, Jonas

    2014-02-01

    Sodium-activated calcium bentonite is used as a binder in iron ore pellets and is known to increase strength of both wet and dry iron ore green pellets. In this article, the microstructure of bentonite in magnetite pellets is revealed for the first time using scanning electron microscopy. The microstructure of bentonite in wet and dry iron ore pellets, as well as in distilled water, was imaged by various imaging techniques (e.g., imaging at low voltage with monochromatic and decelerated beam or low loss backscattered electrons) and cryogenic methods (i.e., high pressure freezing and plunge freezing in liquid ethane). In wet iron ore green pellets, clay tactoids (stacks of parallel primary clay platelets) were very well dispersed and formed a voluminous network occupying the space available between mineral particles. When the pellet was dried, bentonite was drawn to the contact points between the particles and formed solid bridges, which impart strength to the solid compact. PMID:24397939

  8. Effect of shelf aging on O-ring materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, T. E.; Stone, W. P.

    1978-01-01

    Commercial O-rings made from 13 different rubber compounds were tested for physical properties after 7 and 12 years of shelf aging. No gross changes were observed in tensile strength, elongation, or compression deflection characteristics.

  9. Jasperoid float and stream cobbles as tools in geochemical exploration for hydrothermal ore deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovering, T.G.

    1981-01-01

    Fragments of silicified rocks that are associated with deposits of base and precious metals may be transported as cobbles and pebbles in alluvium far downstream from the source outcrop. These rocks commonly exhibit certain characteristics which distinguish them from other detrital siliceous material, and may thus serve as a useful tool in reconnaissance geochemical exploration. The predominant characteristics of jasperoid samples, classified according to genesis, type of host rock, and proximity to base and precious metal deposits have been tabulated from a large master file containing descriptive and analytical information on jasperoid samples representing more than a hundred areas in the United States. Jasperoid that is genetically and spatially associated with ore deposits is generally dark gray or brown in color, brecciated, phaneritic, and vuggy. Jasperoids associated with lead and zinc deposits exhibit extensive halos of lead and silver anomalies, and more restricted zinc and gold anomalies. Those related to copper deposits show extensive copper, silver, and gold anomalies, and more restricted bismuth and molybdenum anomalies. Jasperoid related to gold deposits tends to exhibit extensive gold and silver anomalies and more restricted titanium, barium, vanadium, molybdenum, and rare-earth element anomalies. ?? 1981.

  10. Geology and Ore Deposits of the Uncompahgre (Ouray) Mining District, Southwestern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burbank, Wilbur Swett; Luedke, Robert G.

    2008-01-01

    The Uncompahgre mining district, part of the Ouray mining district, includes an area of about 15 square miles (mi2) on the northwestern flank of the San Juan Mountains in southwestern Colorado from which ores of gold, silver, copper, lead, and zinc have had a gross value of $14 to 15 million. Bedrock within the district ranges in age from Proterozoic to Cenozoic. The oldest or basement rocks, the Uncompahgre Formation of Proterozoic age, consist of metamorphic quartzite and slate and are exposed in a small erosional window in the southern part of the district. Overlying those rocks with a profound angular unconformity are Paleozoic marine sedimentary rocks consisting mostly of limestones and dolomites and some shale and sandstone that are assigned to the Elbert Formation and Ouray Limestone, both of Devonian age, and the Leadville Limestone of Mississippian age. These units are, in turn, overlain by rocks of marine transitional to continental origin that are assigned to the Molas and Hermosa Formations of Pennsylvanian age and the Cutler Formation of Permian age; these three formations are composed predominantly of conglomerates, sandstones, and shales that contain interbedded fossiliferous limestones within the lower two-thirds of the sequence. The overlying Mesozoic strata rest also on a pronounced angular unconformity upon the Paleozoic section. This thick Mesozoic section, of which much of the upper part was eroded before the region was covered by rocks of Tertiary age, consists of the Dolores Formation of Triassic age, the Entrada Sandstone, Wanakah Formation, and Morrison Formation all of Jurassic age, and the Dakota Sandstone and Mancos Shale of Cretaceous age. These strata dominantly consist of shales, mudstones, and sandstones and minor limestones, breccias, and conglomerates. In early Tertiary time the region was beveled by erosion and then covered by a thick deposit of volcanic rocks of mid-Tertiary age. These volcanic rocks, assigned to the San Juan

  11. Making Reliable Large-Diameter O-Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, Glade L.; Harvey, Albert R.

    1989-01-01

    Vacuum curing yields joint-free, voidless elastomer seals. Method for manufacturing large-diameter O-rings produces them in single pieces, without bonded joints. Reduces probability trapped gases form flaws. O-rings produced, having diameters as much as 144 in. (3.66m), reliable and of high quality. Nesting upper and lower halves of mold hold elastomer rings for curing. Oil flowing through upper and lower cavities heats elastomer to cure it.

  12. A geochemical assessment of possible lunar ore formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskin, Larry A.; Colson, Russell O.; Vaniman, David

    1991-01-01

    The Moon apparently formed without appreciable water or other relatively volatile materials. Interior concentrations of water or other volatile substances appear to be extremely low. On Earth, water is important to the genesis of nearly all types of ores. Thus, some have reasoned that only abundant elements would occur in ore concentrations. The definition and recognition of ores on the Moon challenge the imaginations and the terrestrial perceptions of ore bodies. Lunar ores included solar-wind soaked soils, which contain abundant but dilute H, C, N, and noble gases (including He-3). Oxygen must be mined; soils contain approximately 45 percent (wt). Mainstream processes of rock formation concentrated Si, Mg, Al, Fe, and Ca, and possibly Ti and Cr. The highland surface contains approximately 70 percent (wt) feldspar (mainly CaAl2Si2O8), which can be separated from some highland soils. Small fragments of dunite were collected; dunite may occur in walls and central peaks of some craters. Theoretical extensions of observations of lunar samples suggest that the Moon may have produced ores of trace elements. Some small fragments have trace-element concentrations 10(exp 4) times higher than the lunar average, indicating that effective geochemical separations occurred; processes included fractional crystallization, silicate immiscibility, vaporization and condensation, and sulfide metamorphism. Operations of these processes acting on indigenous materials and on meteoritic material in the regolith could have produced ores. Infalling carbonaceous meteorites and comets have added water and hydrocarbons that may have been cold-trapped. Vesicles in basalts, pyroclastic beads, and reported transient events suggest gag emission from the lunar interior; such gas might concentrate and transport rare elements. Large impacts may disperse ores or produce them through deposition of heat at depth and by vaporization and subsequent condensation. The main problem in assessing lunar

  13. Timing of multiple hydrothermal events in the iron oxide-copper-gold deposits of the Southern Copper Belt, Carajás Province, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreto, Carolina P. N.; Monteiro, Lena V. S.; Xavier, Roberto P.; Creaser, Robert A.; DuFrane, S. Andrew; Melo, Gustavo H. C.; Delinardo da Silva, Marco A.; Tassinari, Colombo C. G.; Sato, Kei

    2015-06-01

    The Southern Copper Belt, Carajás Province, Brazil, hosts several iron oxide-copper-gold (IOCG) deposits, including Sossego, Cristalino, Alvo 118, Bacuri, Bacaba, Castanha, and Visconde. Mapping and U-Pb sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) IIe zircon geochronology allowed the characterization of the host rocks, situated within regional WNW-ESE shear zones. They encompass Mesoarchean (3.08-2.85 Ga) TTG orthogneiss, granites, and remains of greenstone belts, Neoarchean (ca. 2.74 Ga) granite, shallow-emplaced porphyries, and granophyric granite coeval with gabbro, and Paleoproterozoic (1.88 Ga) porphyry dykes. Extensive hydrothermal zones include albite-scapolite, biotite-scapolite-tourmaline-magnetite alteration, and proximal potassium feldspar, chlorite-epidote and chalcopyrite formation. U-Pb laser ablation multicollector inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS) analysis of ore-related monazite and Re-Os NTIMS analysis of molybdenite suggest multiple Neoarchean (2.76 and 2.72-2.68 Ga) and Paleoproterozoic (2.06 Ga) hydrothermal events at the Bacaba and Bacuri deposits. These results, combined with available geochronological data from the literature, indicate recurrence of hydrothermal systems in the Southern Copper Belt, including 1.90-1.88-Ga ore formation in the Sossego-Curral ore bodies and the Alvo 118 deposit. Although early hydrothermal evolution at 2.76 Ga points to fluid migration coeval with the Carajás Basin formation, the main episode of IOCG genesis (2.72-2.68 Ga) is related to basin inversion coupled with Neoarchean (ca. 2.7 Ga) felsic magmatism. The data suggest that the IOCG deposits in the Southern Copper Belt and those in the Northern Copper Belt (2.57-Ga Salobo and Igarapé Bahia-Alemão deposits) do not share a common metallogenic evolution. Therefore, the association of all IOCG deposits of the Carajás Province with a single extensive hydrothermal system is precluded.

  14. Breakaway frictions of dynamic O-rings in mechanical seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Tom; Kay, Peter

    1993-05-01

    Breakaway friction of a dynamic O-ring affects the mechanical seal's response to large axial shaft movement and face wear. However, little data exist to help designers. Therefore, a test rig was developed to measure breakaway friction. The research quantitatively shows the effects of lubrication with silicone grease and a change of surface finish. By using the Taguchi statistical experimental design method, the significance of test parameters was evaluated with a minimum number of tests. It was found that fluid pressure, dwell time, and O-ring percentage squeeze affect O-ring breakaway friction more than the O-ring cross sectional diameter and axial sliding speed within the range of values tested. The authors showed that breakaway friction increased linearly with pressure. However, O-rings made of different materials had significantly different increase rates, even if they had nominally the same durometer hardness. Breakaway friction also increased with logarithm of dwell time. Again, the increase rate depended strongly on the specific O-ring material tested. These observations led the authors to believe that the typical approach of generalizing data based on generic polymer type and durometer was inappropriate.

  15. Mercury exposure aboard an ore boat.

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Richard R; Busch, Stephanie

    2004-01-01

    Two maritime academy interns (X and Y) were exposed to mercury vapor after spilling a bottle of mercury on the floor in an enclosed storeroom while doing inventory aboard an ore boat. During a 3-day period, intern Y suffered transient clinical intoxication that resolved after he was removed from the environment and he showered and discarded all clothing. His initial serum mercury level dropped from 4 ng/mL to < 0.05 ng/mL. Intern X had an initial level of 11 ng/mL, which continued to rise to a maximum of 188.8 ng/mL. He complained of tremulousness, insomnia, and mild agitation and was hospitalized. He had showered and discarded all clothing except his footwear earlier than intern Y. Intern X's continued exposure due to mercury in the contaminated boots during the 2 weeks before hospitalization was presumed to be the cause. Removing his footwear led to resolution of his toxic symptoms and correlated with subsequent lowered serum mercury levels. Chelation was initiated as recommended, despite its uncertain benefit for neurologic intoxication. Mercury is used in the merchant marine industry in ballast monitors called king gauges. New engineering is recommended for ballast monitoring to eliminate this hazard. PMID:15175181

  16. Mercury exposure aboard an ore boat.

    PubMed

    Roach, Richard R; Busch, Stephanie

    2004-06-01

    Two maritime academy interns (X and Y) were exposed to mercury vapor after spilling a bottle of mercury on the floor in an enclosed storeroom while doing inventory aboard an ore boat. During a 3-day period, intern Y suffered transient clinical intoxication that resolved after he was removed from the environment and he showered and discarded all clothing. His initial serum mercury level dropped from 4 ng/mL to < 0.05 ng/mL. Intern X had an initial level of 11 ng/mL, which continued to rise to a maximum of 188.8 ng/mL. He complained of tremulousness, insomnia, and mild agitation and was hospitalized. He had showered and discarded all clothing except his footwear earlier than intern Y. Intern X's continued exposure due to mercury in the contaminated boots during the 2 weeks before hospitalization was presumed to be the cause. Removing his footwear led to resolution of his toxic symptoms and correlated with subsequent lowered serum mercury levels. Chelation was initiated as recommended, despite its uncertain benefit for neurologic intoxication. Mercury is used in the merchant marine industry in ballast monitors called king gauges. New engineering is recommended for ballast monitoring to eliminate this hazard. PMID:15175181

  17. IN-SITU MINING OF PHOSPHATE ORES

    SciTech Connect

    H. El-Shall; R. Stana; A. El-Midany; S. Malekzadah

    2004-12-17

    Presently the mining of Florida phosphate requires the movement of over a 100-ton of materials (overburden, sand, clay) for every ton of phosphate concentrate recovered. Not only is this energy intensive, but it also causes significant stress on the environment. In 2003, the Department of Energy solicited ideas for innovative mining ideas that could significantly improve the efficiency of mining. An award was made to the University of Florida Engineering Research Center to evaluate the in situ mining of phosphates using an aqueous CO{sub 2} solution. Tests were carried out in a 15.2 cm (6-inch) diameter column, 1.83 meter (6 feet) long at pressures up to 117.2 kg/cm{sup 2} (40 psi). Results to date demonstrate that initially the MgO is leached from the ore and then the phosphate. While the tests are continuing, so far they have not demonstrated P{sub 2}O{sub 5} concentrations that are economically attractive.

  18. Cu-Mo-Au Partitioning and Ore Mineral Solubility: Constraints on the Role of Temperature, Pressure, and Volatile Fugacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tattitch, Brian; Blundy, Jon

    2014-05-01

    The complex conditions under which volatile phases are exsolved from arc magmas play a key role in the formation of Porphyry Copper Deposits (PCD). Specifically, the efficiency by which ore metals are removed from melts by these 'proto-ore fluids', metal ratios in the fluid(s), the mass of metals available for transport, and ultimately deposit grades are affected by several key intensive variables and volatile fugacitites. Previous experiments have shown that fluid salinity [1] as well as sulfur content [2] can strongly affect the ore metal partitioning. In addition, more subtle parameters such as cation ratios (e.g Na/K/H - [3]) along with melt ASI and fH2S/fSO2, may influence both Cu and Au. We present experiments designed to constrain the role of key variables (T, P, fO2, fH2S, fSO2, δΣ Clv) in influencing metal partitioning on a suite of ore metals in equilibrium. In order to simulate complex, natural proto-ore fluids, we have performed CuFeS2-MoS2 saturated, Cu-Au-Mo-Re partitioning experiments using pumice from the Cardones Ignimbrite in northern Chile. These experiments examine fluid-melt-crystal partitioning and ore mineral solubility for a magmatic system similar to those found in major PCD. Experiments were performed at 100 & 200 MPa and super-solidus conditions (810 oC) in oxidized (NNO + 2) and reduced (NNO + 0.75) environments with respect to sulphur, as well as at near-solidus conditions (740 oC and NNO + 0.75). Observed Cu concentrations are consistent with Cl-dependent partitioning, modified by the presence of sulfur. The vapour/melt partitioning of Cu is enhanced by increased fH2S at reduced conditions at 810 oC, but returns to Cl-dependence for high fSO2 at oxidized conditions (DCuv/m decreases from 40 ± 20 to 10 ± 5). In contrast, molybdenum partitioning remains constant with changing fO2 (DMov/m = 3 ± 1 and 4 ± 2 respectively). This corresponds to a change in the vapour Cu/Mo ratio from ~40:1 down to ~1:1. The decrease in DCuv/m is likely

  19. Metals uptake and health risks associated with cattle grazing on mine tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuji, J.S.

    1994-12-31

    Cattle are used at a site in Arizona to revegetate mine tailings dams by dispersing seeds and adding fertilizer with their manure. Although this program has been successful in revegetating the slopes, the residual metals in the tailings may potentially be accumulated by the cattle. Using US EPA guidelines on indirect exposure pathways and data on metals in tailings and in grasses, exposure and tissue levels of metals were calculated to assess health threats to the cattle or to those consuming the beef. Lead in the tailings and cadmium in tailings and grasses were selected for detailed exposure analysis via ingestion of tailings and grasses by grazing cattle. Predicted exposures to cattle were below levels resulting in toxic effects to livestock. Estimated human exposures were below the EPA reference dose for cadmium even for a 15 kg child consuming beef or beef liver. Similarly, estimated tissue levels of lead were within reported background dietary levels of lead in beef and kidney. Necropsies of four newborn calves found no evidence of metal toxicity, but possible copper and selenium deficiencies combined with viral infection. Similarly, blood samples from pregnant cattle had non-detectable levels of lead, arsenic, and cadmium.

  20. Application of three tailing-based composites in treating comprehensive electroplating wastewater.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongbo; Zhu, Mengling; Gao, Saisai

    2014-01-01

    Heavy metals and chemical oxygen demand (COD) are major challenging pollutants for most electroplating wastewater treatment plants. A novel composite material, prepared with a mixture of calcium and sodium compounds and tailings, was simply mixed by ratios and used to treat a comprehensive electroplating wastewater with influent COD, total copper (T-Cu), and total nickel (T-Ni) respectively as 690, 4.01, and 20.60 mg/L on average. Operational parameters, i.e. the contact time, pH, mass ratio of calcium and sodium compounds and tailings, were optimized as 30 min, 10.0, and 4:2:1. Removal rates for COD, T-Cu, and T-Ni could reach 71.8, 90.5, and 98.1%, respectively. No significant effect of initial concentrations on removal of T-Cu and T-Ni was observed for the composite material. The adsorption of Cu(II) and Ni(II) on the material fitted Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms respectively. Weight of waste sludge from the calcium/sodium-tailing system after reaction was 10% less than that from the calcium-tailing system. The tailing-based composite is cost-effective in combating comprehensive electroplating pollution, which shows a possibility of applying the tailings in treating electroplating wastewater.

  1. Recovery of Nickel and Cobalt from Laterite Tailings by Reductive Dissolution under Aerobic Conditions Using Acidithiobacillus Species.

    PubMed

    Marrero, J; Coto, O; Goldmann, S; Graupner, T; Schippers, A

    2015-06-01

    Biomining of sulfidic ores has been applied for almost five decades. However, the bioprocessing of oxide ores such as laterites lags commercially behind. Recently, the Ferredox process was proposed to treat limonitic laterite ores by means of anaerobic reductive dissolution (AnRD), which was found to be more effective than aerobic bioleaching by fungi and other bacteria. We show here that the ferric iron reduction mediated by Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans can be applied to an aerobic reductive dissolution (AeRD) of nickel laterite tailings. AeRD using a consortium of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans extracted similar amounts of nickel (53-57%) and cobalt (55-60%) in only 7 days as AnRD using Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. The economic and environmental advantages of AeRD for processing of laterite tailings comprise no requirement for an anoxic atmosphere, 1.8-fold less acid consumption than for AnRD, as well as nickel and cobalt recovered in a ferrous-based pregnant leach solution (PLS), facilitating the subsequent metal recovery. In addition, an aerobic acid regeneration stage is proposed. Therefore, AeRD process development can be considered as environmentally friendly for treating laterites with low operational costs and as an attractive alternative to AnRD. PMID:25923144

  2. Recovery of Nickel and Cobalt from Laterite Tailings by Reductive Dissolution under Aerobic Conditions Using Acidithiobacillus Species.

    PubMed

    Marrero, J; Coto, O; Goldmann, S; Graupner, T; Schippers, A

    2015-06-01

    Biomining of sulfidic ores has been applied for almost five decades. However, the bioprocessing of oxide ores such as laterites lags commercially behind. Recently, the Ferredox process was proposed to treat limonitic laterite ores by means of anaerobic reductive dissolution (AnRD), which was found to be more effective than aerobic bioleaching by fungi and other bacteria. We show here that the ferric iron reduction mediated by Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans can be applied to an aerobic reductive dissolution (AeRD) of nickel laterite tailings. AeRD using a consortium of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans extracted similar amounts of nickel (53-57%) and cobalt (55-60%) in only 7 days as AnRD using Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. The economic and environmental advantages of AeRD for processing of laterite tailings comprise no requirement for an anoxic atmosphere, 1.8-fold less acid consumption than for AnRD, as well as nickel and cobalt recovered in a ferrous-based pregnant leach solution (PLS), facilitating the subsequent metal recovery. In addition, an aerobic acid regeneration stage is proposed. Therefore, AeRD process development can be considered as environmentally friendly for treating laterites with low operational costs and as an attractive alternative to AnRD.

  3. Arsenic exposure levels in relation to different working departments in a copper mining and smelting plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qingshan; Song, Yingli; Liu, Shengnan; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Lin; Xi, Shuhua; Sun, Guifan

    2015-10-01

    The investigation was carried out to evaluate arsenic exposure and the urine metabolite profiles of workers with different working departments, including administration (Group1), copper ore mining (Group2), copper ore grinding (Group3), electrolytic procession (Group4) and copper smelting (Group5) in a Copper mining and processing plant in China. Information about characteristics of each subject was obtained by questionnaire and inorganic arsenic (iAs), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) in urine were determined. The highest urinary levels of iAs, MMA and DMA all were found in the Group 5. Group 4 workers had a higher iAs% and a lower PMI compared to Group 3. The urinary total As (TAs) levels of 54.7% subjects exceeded 50 μg/g Cr, and the highest percentage (93.3%) was found in Group 5, smelters. The results of the present study indicate that workers in copper production plant indeed exposed to As, especially for smelters and workers of electrolytic process.

  4. The long-term environmental impacts of the Mount Polley mine tailings spill, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Patrick; Hudson-Edwards, Karen; Macklin, Mark; Brewer, Paul; Bird, Graham; Williams, Richard

    2015-04-01

    On the 4th August 2014 a tailings impoundment failure at the Mount Polley gold and copper mine in British Columbia, Canada, released approximately 25 million m3 of solid and liquid waste into Hazeltine Creek, Quesnel Lake and Polley Lake. The sheer volume of the tailings released caused Haseltine Creek channel to expand from 2m to over 25m in width and Polley Lake water level to rise by 1.7m. The spill also removed trees in a 900 km2 corridor either side of Hazeltine Creek. Local residents and government officials have expressed serious concerns regarding the potential long-term effects on regional biodiversity, water security and to the livelihoods of First Nation communities. Among impoundment failures, the Mount Polley disaster is unique in that the solid tailings contain an unusual mixture of metal contaminants (arsenic, copper, gold, manganese, nickel, lead, vanadium). As particulate matter is the principal carrier of metal contaminants, the spilled tailings may reside in the regional soils and sediments for 1000s of years serving as a secondary source of pollution. The environmental risk posed by the spilled tailings is compounded by the location of the spill in a mountainous forested catchment, affected by severe winters with prominent spring snow melts that have the potential to remobilise very large quantities of spilled tailings. No data currently exist on the short- to long-term behaviour of these tailings in soils and sediments and the effects of the clean-up operations on their behaviour in this type of river environment. In this study, we adopt a multidisciplinary approach to determine the environmental and geomorphological impacts of the tailings spill. We have two specific objectives. (1) The physicochemical speciation and geochemical stability of spilled tailings will be characterised in surface and hyporheic sediments using bulk chemistry, mineralogical (XRD and SEM) and speciation methods (sequential extractions, electron microprobe analysis, XAS

  5. The ionospheres and plasma tails of comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendis, D. A.; Ip, W.-H.

    1977-01-01

    The paper reviews the current state of knowledge about cometary plasma (type I) tails and ionospheres. Observational statistics for type I tails are examined along with spectroscopic observations of plasma tails, identified ion species in such tails, and the morphology of cometary plasma tails and ionospheres. Evidence for a strong interaction between comets and the solar wind is evaluated on the basis of observations of plasma-tail orientations, large accelerations of tail structures, and correlations between disturbances in type I tails and solar-wind or geomagnetic disturbances. The use of comets as solar-wind probes is discussed, the nature of comet-solar-wind interactions is investigated, and ionization sources for cometary gases are considered. Hydrodynamic models of comet-solar-wind interaction are summarized, and the structure and ion chemistry of cometary ionospheres are studied. Observations suggesting that significant magnetic fields are associated with comets are briefly reviewed and interpreted.

  6. Lobster Tail Ice Formation on Aerosurface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Glace Ice formation commonly refered to as 'Lobster Tail' by scientists and engineers, is caused to form on the leading edge of a aircraft tail section in the icing research tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio.

  7. Geochemical constraints on adakites of different origins and copper mineralization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sun, W.-D.; Ling, M.-X.; Chung, S.-L.; Ding, X.; Yang, X.-Y.; Liang, H.-Y.; Fan, W.-M.; Goldfarb, R.; Yin, Q.-Z.

    2012-01-01

    The petrogenesis of adakites holds important clues to the formation of the continental crust and copper ?? gold porphyry mineralization. However, it remains highly debated as to whether adakites form by slab melting, by partial melting of the lower continental crust, or by fractional crystallization of normal arc magmas. Here, we show that to form adakitic signature, partial melting of a subducting oceanic slab would require high pressure at depths of >50 km, whereas partial melting of the lower continental crust would require the presence of plagioclase and thus shallower depths and additional water. These two types of adakites can be discriminated using geochemical indexes. Compiled data show that adakites from circum-Pacific regions, which have close affinity to subduction of young hot oceanic plate, can be clearly discriminated from adakites from the Dabie Mountains and the Tibetan Plateau, which have been attributed to partial melting of continental crust, in Sr/Y-versus-La/Yb diagram. Given that oceanic crust has copper concentrations about two times higher than those in the continental crust, whereas the high oxygen fugacity in the subduction environment promotes the release of copper during partial melting, slab melting provides the most efficient mechanism to concentrate copper and gold; slab melts would be more than two times greater in copper (and also gold) concentrations than lower continental crust melts and normal arc magmas. Thus, identification of slab melt adakites is important for predicting exploration targets for copper- and gold-porphyry ore deposits. This explains the close association of ridge subduction with large porphyry copper deposits because ridge subduction is the most favorable place for slab melting. ?? 2012 by The University of Chicago.

  8. The copper deposits of the Encampment District, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spencer, A.C.

    1904-01-01

    During the last few years prospecting in the Medicine Bow and Park ranges in northern Colorado and southern Wyoming has proved that copper-bearing minerals occur frequently and are very generally distributed over a wide region in this portion of the Rocky Mountains. This has gradually become known through the discovery of several more or less promising copper deposits and also through the exploitation of a few properties which have produced ore on a commercial scale. The increase in the number of prospectors has kept pace with the increasing interest in the region, until now every part of it has been at least cursorily examined. In spite of this activity and of a considerable amount of development work at several localities, the productive mines in actual operation are few, but the search for valuable deposits continues, and it is to be expected that other mines will eventually be discovered. 

  9. Infiltration behavior of sintering liquid on nuclei ores during low-titanium ore sintering process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong-hui; Zhang, Jian-liang; Xue, Xun; Wang, Guang-wei; Li, Ke-jiang; Liu, Zheng-jian

    2016-06-01

    Sinter strength is dependent not only on the self-intensity of the residual rude and bonding phase but also on the bonding degree between them. The infiltration behavior of sintering liquid on nuclei ores influences the bonding degree, which ultimately determines the sinter strength. Infiltration tests were conducted using micro-sinter equipment. The infiltration area index of original liquid (IAO), infiltration volume index of secondary liquid (IVS), and sinter body bonding strength (SBS) were proposed to study the melt infiltration behavior. The results show that the IVS first increases and then decreases with increasing TiO2 content in adhering fines, whereas the IAO exhibits the opposite behavior. Compared with the original liquid, the secondary liquid shows lower porosity, smaller pores, and more uniform distribution. The SBS increases first and then decreases with increasing IAO and TiO2 content, and reaches a maximum when the IAO and TiO2 contents are approximately 0.5 and 2.0wt%, respectively. The SBS first increases and then tends to be stable with increasing IVS. The TiO2 content is suggested to be controlled to approximately 2.0wt% in low-titanium ore sintering.

  10. Hydrochemistry of the Falls City uranium mine tailings remedial action project, Karnes County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, T.J.; Kreitler, C.W.

    1994-12-31

    Acidic tailings and tailings solutions, created by sulfuric acid processing of uranium ores, were disposed of on the outcrop of the Whitsett Formation (Eocene). These solutions have recharged the sandstones of the Whitsett since the 1960`s. Previous workers found a larger, complex, and unexplained pattern of contamination. Our study determined the extent and nature of contamination by (1) characterizing the geology and hydrology of the two shallow aquifers at the site, (2) determining the chemistry of the contaminant source (tailings solutions), and (3) identifying geochemical reactions that have altered the composition of contaminant plumes within each aquifer. The tailings solutions are composed of sodium chloride and neutral sulfate salts of aluminum and ammonium, with lesser amounts of iron, calcium, magnesium, potassium, and sodium sulfate. Hydrolysis of aluminum sulfate produces an acid pH (3 to 4). Also, aluminum sulfate is a pH buffer, and it controls acidity of the tailings solutions. Cation exchange and neutralization by calcite modify the tailings solutions as they migrate through the aquifers. These reactions explain chemical patterns, which delineate five separate contaminant plumes in the aquifers. In the Deweesville sandstone, cation exchange has removed ammonium from acidic contaminant plumes. However, neutralization is incomplete because of the paucity of calcite in the Deweesville. In contrast, in the calcite-rich Conquista fossilferous sandstone, cation exchange and complete neutralization by calcite have removed most contaminant ions. Those contaminant plumes are delineated by elevated concentrations of calcium and carbon dioxide. The amount of contamination in both aquifers is much smaller than that estimated previously.

  11. Key parameters for low-grade fine-grained iron ore valorization: lower environmental impact through reduced waste.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Christiane; Orberger, Beate; Tudryn, Alina; Baptiste, Benoît; Wirth, Richard; Morgan, Rachel; Miska, Serge

    2016-04-01

    In low-grade banded iron formations (BIFs), a large part of the iron is related to micro- and nano- metric iron-bearing inclusions within quartz and/or carbonates, mainly dolomite (~ 20 to 50 μm). Low-grade fine grained iron ore present two types of environmental risks: a) they are often stocked as tailings. For example, the recent disaster (5th of November 2015) in the Minas Gerais district, Brazil, was caused by the collapse of the Fundão tailings dam at an open cast mine; b) during beneficiation significant amounts of dust are generated also leading to metal loss. A laminated BIF studied from a drill core at Àguas Claras Mine, Quadrilátero Ferrífero, Brazil, contains 26.71 wt. % total iron, 0.2 wt. % SiO2, 0.32 wt.% MnO, 15.46 wt. % MgO, 22.32 wt.% CaO, 0.09 wt. % P2O5, < 0.05 wt. % Al2O3, 0.15 wt. % H2O and 34.08 wt. % CO2. Environmental hazardous elements are present as traces (As: 3-20 ppm, Cd: 0-0.7 ppm; Cr: 0.05-60 ppm, Pb: up to 55 ppm; U: up to 8 ppm). Dolomite and quartz bands alternate with hematite bands. Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and FIB-TEM analyses reveal that the micro- and nano- metric inclusions in dolomite are hematite and minor goethite, partly occurring as clusters in voids. Curie Balance analyses were carried out at different heating steps and temperatures on whole rock samples and a synthetic mix of decarbonated sample and pure dolomite. X-ray diffraction on the products of the heating experiments shows that that hematite is stable and new phases: magnesioferrite (MgFe2O4), lime (CaO), periclase (MgO), portlandite (Ca(OH)2) and srebrodoskite (Ca2Fe2O5) were formed between 680 °C and 920 °C. These findings promote the economic use of low grade ores rather than their stockpiling as tailings. The presence of OH-bearing goethite reduces the sintering temperature. After having separated coarse hematite from barren dolomite and quartz, a low temperature sintering of the inclusion-bearing dolomite/quartz leads to transformations

  12. Fluorosilicone and silicone o-ring aging study.

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, Robert; Gillen, Kenneth T.

    2007-10-01

    Fluorosilicone o-ring aging studies were performed. These studies examined the compressive force loss of fluorosilicone o-rings at accelerated (elevated) temperatures and were then used to make predictions about force loss at room temperature. The results were non-Arrhenius with evidence for a lowering in Arrhenius activation energies as the aging temperature was reduced. The compression set of these fluorosilicone o-rings was found to have a reasonably linear correlation with the force loss. The aging predictions based on using the observed curvature of the Arrhenius aging plots were validated by field aged o-rings that yielded degradation values reasonably close to the predictions. Compression set studies of silicone o-rings from a previous study resulted in good correlation to the force loss predictions for the fluorosilicone o-rings from this study. This resulted in a preliminary conclusion that an approximately linear correlation exists between compression set and force decay values for typical fluorosilicone and silicone materials, and that the two materials age at similar rates at low temperatures. Interestingly, because of the observed curvature of the Arrhenius plots available from longer-term, lower temperature accelerated exposures, both materials had faster force decay curves (and correspondingly faster buildup of compression set) at room temperature than anticipated from typical high-temperature exposures. A brief study on heavily filled conducting silicone o-rings resulted in data that deviated from the linear relationship, implying that a degree of caution must be exercised about any general statement relating force decay and compression set.

  13. Supergene processes on ore deposits - a source of heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Martycak, K.; Zeman, J.; Vacek-Vesely, M.

    1994-03-01

    The study of supergene processes (i.e., secondary processes running in ore deposits and driven by thermodynamic nonequilibrium between ore- and rock-forming minerals and natural waters, gasses, etc.) is important in order to understand the migration of heavy metals from ore into their adjacent surroundings. The contamination of the local environment can be characterized by the composition of pore waters. The Pb-Zn-Cu ore deposits of Zlate Hory (Czech Republic) have been chosen for a detailed study of pore solutions. A simple model has been created to describe the evolution of supergene processes in the ore deposits. This model is based on the determination of chemical composition of pore solutions. The dilution of pore solutions of such mineral deposits results in acid mine drainage. Pore solutions can have, during specific stages of their evolution, relatively high concentrations of Cu (0.09 mol/kg), Zn (0.1 mol/kg), SO{sub 4} (0.8 mol/kg) and an extremely low pH (1.38). The supergene alteration of pyrite is the most important process determining the character of pore water. This reaction causes significant acidification and is a leading source of acid mine drainage. The leached zone originates from the interaction of pyrite and limonite. Increased concentrations of heavy metals and sulfates occur in pore waters. The dynamic composition of pore waters within ore deposits undergoing the supergene process can be used to distinguish: (1) three main zones - limonite, transition, and primary zone and (2) two areas - an area with the highest intensity of weathering processes and an area of weathering initiation. In these areas the rate of sulfide oxidation is higher as a result of low pH. From the study of these zones and areas we can further our knowledge of ore body, pore solution, acid mine drainage, and contamination of the local environment. 32 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. [RESULTS OF DUST FACTOR IN COPPER PYROMETALLURGY].

    PubMed

    Adrianovskiy, V I; Lipatov, G Ya; Zebzeeva, N V; Kuzmina, E A

    2016-01-01

    The dust entering the air of the working zone of metallurgical shops was shown to be presented by a disintegration aerosols originating in crushing and transporting ore materials and condensation occurring in the course of smelting, converting and fire-refining copper. The overwhelming majority of the grains have a size of 2.1-5.0 mm, which determines a fixed condition of the presence of given dust in the working area, its long presence in the deeper parts of the respiratory system. At the preparatory stages in the composition of the dust there are presented significant amounts of crystalline silicon dioxide possessing of the fibrogenic impact on the body. In the dust the presence of the crystalline silicon dioxide, arsenic, nickel, cadmium determines its carcinogenic hazard. The elevated dustiness of the air is noted with the reflective and especially mine melting, due to the imperfection of the technological equipment and sanitary technical devices. Autogenous smelting processes have demonstrated their hygienic advantage over outdated methods of producing blister copper mining and smelting reflectivity. PMID:27430065

  15. [RESULTS OF DUST FACTOR IN COPPER PYROMETALLURGY].

    PubMed

    Adrianovskiy, V I; Lipatov, G Ya; Zebzeeva, N V; Kuzmina, E A

    2016-01-01

    The dust entering the air of the working zone of metallurgical shops was shown to be presented by a disintegration aerosols originating in crushing and transporting ore materials and condensation occurring in the course of smelting, converting and fire-refining copper. The overwhelming majority of the grains have a size of 2.1-5.0 mm, which determines a fixed condition of the presence of given dust in the working area, its long presence in the deeper parts of the respiratory system. At the preparatory stages in the composition of the dust there are presented significant amounts of crystalline silicon dioxide possessing of the fibrogenic impact on the body. In the dust the presence of the crystalline silicon dioxide, arsenic, nickel, cadmium determines its carcinogenic hazard. The elevated dustiness of the air is noted with the reflective and especially mine melting, due to the imperfection of the technological equipment and sanitary technical devices. Autogenous smelting processes have demonstrated their hygienic advantage over outdated methods of producing blister copper mining and smelting reflectivity.

  16. Nature, origin and evolution of the granitoid-hosted early Proterozoic copper-molybdenum mineralization at Malanjkhand, Central India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, S. C.; Kabiraj, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Pal, A. B.

    1996-07-01

    At Malanjkhand, Central India, lode-type copper (-molybdenum) mineralization occurs within calcalkaline tonalite-granodiorite plutonic rocks of early Proterozoic age. The bulk of the mineralization occurs in sheeted quartz-sulfide veins, and K-silicate alteration assemblages, defined by alkali feldspar (K-feldspar≫albite)+dusty hematite in feldspar±biotite±muscovite, are prominent within the ore zone and the adjacent host rock. Weak propylitic alteration, defined by albite+biotite+epidote/zoisite, surrounds the K-silicate alteration zone. The mineralized zone is approximately 2 km in strike length, has a maximum thickness of 200 m and dips 65° 75°, along which low-grade mineralization has been traced up to a depth of about 1 km. The ore reserve has been conservatively estimated to be 92 million tonnes with an average Cu-content of 1.30%. Supergene oxidation, accompanied by limited copper enrichment, is observed down to a depth of 100 m or more from the surface. Primary ores consist essentially of chalcopyrite and pyrite with minor magnetite and molybdenite. δ34S (‰) values in pyrite and chalcopyrite (-0.38 to +2.90) fall within the range characteristic of granitoid-hosted copper deposits. δ18O (‰) values for vein quartz (+6.99 to +8.80) suggest exclusive involvement of juvenile water. Annealed fabrics are common in the ore. The sequence of events that led to the present state of hypogene mineralization is suggested to be as follows: fracturing of the host rock, emplacement of barren vein quartz, pronounced wall-rock alteration accompanied by disseminated mineralization and the ultimate stage of intense silicification accompanied by copper mineralization. Fragments of vein quartz and altered wall rocks and striae in the ore suggest post-mineralization deformation. The recrystallization fabric, particularly in chalcopyrite and sphalerite, is a product of dynamic recrystallization associated with the post-mineralization shearing. The petrology of the host

  17. Uranium mill tailings quarterly report, January-March 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Latkovich, J.M.

    1982-05-01

    Progress is reported on: radon barrier systems for uranium mill tailings; liner evaluation for uranium mill tailings; revegetation/rock cover for stabilization of inactive U-tailings sites; and application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings.

  18. Surficial weathering of iron sulfide mine tailings under semi-arid climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Sarah M.; Root, Robert A.; Perdrial, Nicolas; Maier, Raina M.; Chorover, Jon

    2014-09-01

    Mine wastes introduce anthropogenic weathering profiles to the critical zone that often remain unvegetated for decades after mining cessation. As such, they are vulnerable to wind and water dispersion of particulate matter to adjacent ecosystems and residential communities. In sulfide-rich ore tailings, propagation to depth of the oxidative weathering front controls the depth-variation in speciation of major and trace elements. Despite the prevalence of surficial mine waste deposits in arid regions of the globe, few prior studies have been conducted to resolve the near-surface profile of sulfide ore tailings weathered under semi-arid climate. We investigated relations between gossan oxidative reaction-front propagation and the molecular speciation of iron and sulfur in tailings subjected to weathering in a semi-arid climate at an EPA Superfund Site in central Arizona (USA). Here we report a multi-method data set combining wet chemical and synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) methods to resolve the tight coupling of iron (Fe) and sulfur (S) geochemical changes in the top 2 m of tailings. Despite nearly invariant Fe and S concentration with depth (130-140 and 100-120 g kg-1, respectively), a sharp redox gradient and distinct morphological change was observed within the top 0.5 m, associated with a progressive oxidative alteration of ferrous sulfides to (oxyhydr)oxides and (hydroxy)sulfates. Transformation is nearly complete in surficial samples. Trends in molecular-scale alteration were co-located with a decrease in pH from 7.3 to 2.3, and shifts in Fe and S lability as measured via chemical extraction. Initial weathering products, ferrihydrite and gypsum, transform to schwertmannite, then jarosite-group minerals with an accompanying decrease in pH. Interestingly, thermodynamically stable phases such as goethite and hematite were not detected in any samples, but ferrihydrite was observed even in samples with

  19. Surficial weathering of iron sulfide mine tailings under semi-arid climate.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Sarah M; Root, Robert A; Perdrial, Nicolas; Maier, Raina; Chorover, Jon

    2014-09-15

    Mine wastes introduce anthropogenic weathering profiles to the critical zone that often remain unvegetated for decades after mining cessation. As such, they are vulnerable to wind and water dispersion of particulate matter to adjacent ecosystems and residential communities. In sulfide-rich ore tailings, propagation to depth of the oxidative weathering front controls the depth-variation in speciation of major and trace elements. Despite the prevalence of surficial mine waste deposits in arid regions of the globe, few prior studies have been conducted to resolve the near-surface profile of sulfide ore tailings weathered under semi-arid climate. We investigated relations between gossan oxidative reaction-front propagation and the molecular speciation of iron and sulfur in tailings subjected to weathering under semi-arid climate at an EPA Superfund Site in semi-arid central Arizona (USA). Here we report a multi-method data set combining wet chemical and synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) methods to resolve the tight coupling of iron (Fe) and sulfur (S) geochemical changes in the top 2 m of tailings. Despite nearly invariant Fe and S concentration with depth (130-140 and 100-120 g kg(-1), respectively), a sharp redox gradient and distinct morphological change was observed within the top 0.5 m, associated with a progressive oxidative alteration of ferrous sulfides to (oxyhydr)oxides and (hydroxy)sulfates. Transformation is nearly complete in surficial samples. Trends in molecular-scale alteration were co-located with a decrease in pH from 7.3 to 2.3, and shifts in Fe and S lability as measured via chemical extraction. Initial weathering products, ferrihydrite and gypsum, transform to schwertmannite, then jarosite-group minerals with an accompanying decrease in pH. Interestingly, thermodynamically stable phases such as goethite and hematite were not detected in any samples, but ferrihydrite was observed even in

  20. Surficial weathering of iron sulfide mine tailings under semi-arid climate

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Sarah M.; Root, Robert A.; Perdrial, Nicolas; Maier, Raina; Chorover, Jon

    2014-01-01

    Mine wastes introduce anthropogenic weathering profiles to the critical zone that often remain unvegetated for decades after mining cessation. As such, they are vulnerable to wind and water dispersion of particulate matter to adjacent ecosystems and residential communities. In sulfide-rich ore tailings, propagation to depth of the oxidative weathering front controls the depth-variation in speciation of major and trace elements. Despite the prevalence of surficial mine waste deposits in arid regions of the globe, few prior studies have been conducted to resolve the near-surface profile of sulfide ore tailings weathered under semi-arid climate. We investigated relations between gossan oxidative reaction-front propagation and the molecular speciation of iron and sulfur in tailings subjected to weathering under semi-arid climate at an EPA Superfund Site in semi-arid central Arizona (USA). Here we report a multi-method data set combining wet chemical and synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) methods to resolve the tight coupling of iron (Fe) and sulfur (S) geochemical changes in the top 2 m of tailings. Despite nearly invariant Fe and S concentration with depth (130–140 and 100–120 g kg−1, respectively), a sharp redox gradient and distinct morphological change was observed within the top 0.5 m, associated with a progressive oxidative alteration of ferrous sulfides to (oxyhydr)oxides and (hydroxy)sulfates. Transformation is nearly complete in surficial samples. Trends in molecular-scale alteration were co-located with a decrease in pH from 7.3 to 2.3, and shifts in Fe and S lability as measured via chemical extraction. Initial weathering products, ferrihydrite and gypsum, transform to schwertmannite, then jarosite-group minerals with an accompanying decrease in pH. Interestingly, thermodynamically stable phases such as goethite and hematite were not detected in any samples, but ferrihydrite was observed even