Science.gov

Sample records for copper perchlorates

  1. Crystal structures of copper(II) nitrate, copper(II) chloride, and copper(II) perchlorate complexes with 2-formylpyridine semicarbazone

    SciTech Connect

    Chumakov, Yu. M.; Tsapkov, V. I.; Antosyak, B. Ya.; Bairac, N. N.; Simonov, Yu. A.; Bocelli, G.; Pahontu, E.; Gulea, A. P.

    2009-05-15

    Compounds dinitrato(2-formylpyridinesemicarbazone)copper (I), dichloro(2-formylpyridinesemicarbazone) copper hemihydrate (II), and bis(2-formylpyridinesemicarbazone)copper(2+) perchlorate hydrate (III) are synthesized and their crystal structures are determined. In compounds I-III, the neutral 2-formylpyridine semicarbazone molecule (L) is tridentately attached to the copper atom via the N,N,O set of donor atoms. In compounds I and II, the Cu: L ratio is equal to 1: 1, whereas, in III, it is 1: 2. In complex I, the coordination sphere of the copper atom includes two nitrate ions with different structural functions in addition to the L ligand. The structure is built as a one-dimensional polymer in which the NO{sub 3} bidentate group fulfills a bridging function. The coordination polyhedron of the copper(2+) atom can be considered a distorted tetragonal bipyramid (4 + 1 + 1). Compound II has an ionic structure in which the main element is the [CuLCl{sub 2} . Cu(H{sub 2}O)LCl]{sup +} dimer. In the dimer, the copper atoms are linked via one of the {mu}{sub 2}-bridging chlorine atoms. The coordination polyhedra of the central atoms of the Cu(H{sub 2})LCl and CuLCl{sub 2} complex fragments are tetragonal bipyramid and tetragonal pyramid, respectively. In compound III, the copper atom is octahedrally surrounded by two L ligands in the mer configuration.

  2. Crystal structures of copper(II) nitrate, copper(II) chloride, and copper(II) perchlorate complexes with 2-formylpyridine semicarbazone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumakov, Yu. M.; Tsapkov, V. I.; Antosyak, B. Ya.; Bairac, N. N.; Simonov, Yu. A.; Bocelli, G.; Pahontu, E.; Gulea, A. P.

    2009-05-01

    Compounds dinitrato(2-formylpyridinesemicarbazone)copper ( I), dichloro(2-formylpyridinesemicarbazone) copper hemihydrate ( II), and bis(2-formylpyridinesemicarbazone)copper(2+) perchlorate hydrate ( III) are synthesized and their crystal structures are determined. In compounds I- III, the neutral 2-formylpyridine semicarbazone molecule ( L) is tridentately attached to the copper atom via the N,N,O set of donor atoms. In compounds I and II, the Cu: L ratio is equal to 1: 1, whereas, in III, it is 1: 2. In complex I, the coordination sphere of the copper atom includes two nitrate ions with different structural functions in addition to the L ligand. The structure is built as a one-dimensional polymer in which the NO3 bidentate group fulfills a bridging function. The coordination polyhedron of the copper(2+) atom can be considered a distorted tetragonal bipyramid (4 + 1 + 1). Compound II has an ionic structure in which the main element is the [Cu LCl2 · Cu(H2O) LCl]+ dimer. In the dimer, the copper atoms are linked via one of the μ2-bridging chlorine atoms. The coordination polyhedra of the central atoms of the Cu(H2) LCl and Cu LCl2 complex fragments are tetragonal bipyramid and tetragonal pyramid, respectively. In compound III, the copper atom is octahedrally surrounded by two L ligands in the mer configuration.

  3. Host-lattice systematics of EPR spectra of Mn2+-doped isomorphic metal hexakisantipyrine perchlorate and EPR of Cu2+ in copper pentakisantipyrine perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Sushil K.; Kahrizi, Mojtaba

    1985-08-01

    X-band EPR measurements on Mn2+-doped single crystals of isomorphous metal hexakisantipyrine perchlorate (metal=Ca, Cd, Mg, Co, and Pb) have been performed. For the case of calcium and cadmium metal hosts, the measurements were made from room temperature down to liquid helium temperature, while for the remaining metal hosts the measurements were made only at room temperature. The spin Hamiltonian parameters are rigorously evaluated using a least-squares fitting computer technique, especially adapted to electron-nuclear spin coupled systems. As for the systematics of the spin Hamiltonian parameters, at room temperature the variation of the zero field splitting parameters b02 and b04 is found to be approximately linear in the host metal ion radius. In order to estimate the Cu2+-Mn2+ exchange interaction, 5%-50% of Ca2+ ions in Mn2+-doped calcium hexakisantipyrine perchlorate were substituted for by Cu2+, and the EPR spectra were recorded from room temperature down to liquid helium temperature. However, even at liquid helium temperature, the presence of the paramagnetic ion Cu2+ in this host caused no significant change of the g value for Mn2+ as compared with that in the pure diamagnetic host indicating negligible Cu2+-Mn2+ exhange constant. EPR measurements on Cu2+ in copper pentakisantipyrine perchlorate were also made at room, liquid nitrogen, and liquid helium temperatures and the principal values and direction cosines of the principal axes of the g and A tensors were estimated, using a rigorous least-squares fitting procedure.

  4. 63Cu Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Viscosity Studies of Copper (I) Perchlorate in Mixed Solvents Containing Acetonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Dip Singh; Byrne, Lindsay; Quiekenden, Terry I.

    1998-12-01

    63Cu nuclear magnetic resonance and viscosity studies of 0.064 M copper (I) Perchlorate solutions have been made at 298 K in binary mixtures of acetonitrile (AN) with dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO), hexamethylphosphotriamide (HMPA), N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA), nitromethane (NM), propylene carbonate (PC) and 3-hydroxypropionitrile (3 HPN) at several compositions of the mixtures using a 500 MHz NMR Spectrometer and Ubbelohde viscometer, respectively. The chemical shift (δ), linewidth (Δ) and line intensity (I) of the 63Cu NMR signal in these mixed solvents have been measured relative to the 63Cu signal in 0.064 M copper (I) Perchlorate (CuClO4) solution in pure AN. The quadrupolar re-laxation rates (1/T2)Q, reorientational correlation times (τR) and quadrupolar coupling constants (QCC) of the copper (I) solvates have also been estimated from the data. The QCC values show a big variation in all solvent systems with the change of solvent composition, indicating the formation of mixed com-plexes. The variation of all NMR parameters with solvent composition shows strong effects of DMSO, HMPA, and DMA on the solvation behaviour of Cu + in the first three mixtures, and relatively much weaker effects of PC, NM and 3HPN in the other three mixtures.

  5. Boron nitride encapsulated copper nanoparticles: a facile one-step synthesis and their effect on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Caijin; liu, Qiuwen; Fan, Wenjie; Qiu, Xiaoqing

    2015-01-01

    Reactivity is of great importance for metal nanoparticles used as catalysts, biomaterials and advanced sensors, but seeking for high reactivity seems to be conflict with high chemical stability required for metal nanoparticles. There is a subtle balance between reactivity and stability. This could be reached for colloidal metal nanoparticles using organic capping reagents, whereas it is challenging for powder metal nanoparticles. Here, we developed an alternative approach to encapsulate copper nanoparticles with a chemical inertness material—hexagonal boron nitride. The wrapped copper nanoparticles not only exhibit high oxidation resistance under air atmosphere, but also keep excellent promoting effect on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate. This approach opens the way to design metal nanoparticles with both high stability and reactivity for nanocatalysts and their technological application. PMID:26567862

  6. Boron nitride encapsulated copper nanoparticles: a facile one-step synthesis and their effect on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Caijin; Liu, Qiuwen; Fan, Wenjie; Qiu, Xiaoqing

    2015-11-01

    Reactivity is of great importance for metal nanoparticles used as catalysts, biomaterials and advanced sensors, but seeking for high reactivity seems to be conflict with high chemical stability required for metal nanoparticles. There is a subtle balance between reactivity and stability. This could be reached for colloidal metal nanoparticles using organic capping reagents, whereas it is challenging for powder metal nanoparticles. Here, we developed an alternative approach to encapsulate copper nanoparticles with a chemical inertness material—hexagonal boron nitride. The wrapped copper nanoparticles not only exhibit high oxidation resistance under air atmosphere, but also keep excellent promoting effect on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate. This approach opens the way to design metal nanoparticles with both high stability and reactivity for nanocatalysts and their technological application.

  7. Effectiveness of removal of aqueous perchlorate by Cuprilig, a copper(II) derivative of Octolig.

    PubMed

    Martin, Dean F; Kondis, Nicholas P; Alldredge, Robert L

    2009-02-01

    The present study describes the effectiveness of removal of perchlorate ion by Octolig a commercially available immobilized ligand, IMLIG, and by Cuprilig, the cupric ion derivative of this material. Octolig consists of polyethylenediamine moieties covalently bound to a high-surface area silica gel (CAS Registry number = 404899-06-5). Perchlorate in drinking water is a nuisance anion that escapes from firms that produce rocket fuel, batteries, and fireworks and becomes a contaminant of groundwater. It may also be a natural component of the environment. Perchlorate ion can interfere with thyroid function and may also cause birth defects. Perchlorate contamination of water supplies is serious because of the difficulty in removing it, especially in the western United States where a combination of drought and water shortages exacerbate the problems of supplying safe drinking water to an increasing population. In this study, aqueous solutions were passed over a chromatography column containing samples of Cuprilig. Test water contained 70 microg perchlorate/L and effluent was below detection level (< 1 microg/L. Equally good results were obtained for Octolig in deionized water and in well water. Analyses were performed by a commercial laboratory. Mechanisms of interaction are proposed.

  8. Effectiveness of removal of aqueous perchlorate by Cuprilig, a copper(II) derivative of Octolig.

    PubMed

    Martin, Dean F; Kondis, Nicholas P; Alldredge, Robert L

    2009-02-01

    The present study describes the effectiveness of removal of perchlorate ion by Octolig a commercially available immobilized ligand, IMLIG, and by Cuprilig, the cupric ion derivative of this material. Octolig consists of polyethylenediamine moieties covalently bound to a high-surface area silica gel (CAS Registry number = 404899-06-5). Perchlorate in drinking water is a nuisance anion that escapes from firms that produce rocket fuel, batteries, and fireworks and becomes a contaminant of groundwater. It may also be a natural component of the environment. Perchlorate ion can interfere with thyroid function and may also cause birth defects. Perchlorate contamination of water supplies is serious because of the difficulty in removing it, especially in the western United States where a combination of drought and water shortages exacerbate the problems of supplying safe drinking water to an increasing population. In this study, aqueous solutions were passed over a chromatography column containing samples of Cuprilig. Test water contained 70 microg perchlorate/L and effluent was below detection level (< 1 microg/L. Equally good results were obtained for Octolig in deionized water and in well water. Analyses were performed by a commercial laboratory. Mechanisms of interaction are proposed. PMID:19123099

  9. PERCHLORATE FACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate is an anion (negative ion) with the formula C1O 4-. Perchlorate salts are famous in inorganic chemistry on account of their high solubilities. As a result, they are very difficult to remove. Although hot and concentrated perchloric acid is a strong oxidizing agent,...

  10. Cocrystallization of photosensitive energetic copper(II) perchlorate complexes with the nitrogen-rich ligand 1,2-Di(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)ethane.

    PubMed

    Evers, Jürgen; Gospodinov, Ivan; Joas, Manuel; Klapötke, Thomas M; Stierstorfer, Jörg

    2014-11-01

    Two recently introduced concepts in the design of new energetic materials, namely complexation and cocrystallization, have been applied in the synthesis and characterization of the energetic copper(II) compound "[Cu(dt-5-e)2(H2O)](ClO4)2," which consists of two different complex cations and can be described as a model energetic ionic cocrystal. The presence of both the N-rich 1,2-di(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)ethane ligand and oxidizing perchlorate counterion results in a new type of energetic material. The ionic complex cocrystal consists of a mononuclear and a trinuclear complex unit. It can be obtained by precipitation from perchloric acid or by dehydration of the related mononuclear coordination compound [Cu(dt-5-e)2(H2O)2](ClO4)2·2H2O at 70 °C in the solid state. The transformation starting at 60 °C was monitored by X-ray powder diffraction and thermal analysis. The energetic ionic cocrystal was shown to be a new primary explosive suitable for laser ignition. The different coordination spheres within the ionic cocrystal (octahedral and square pyramidal) were shown by UV/vis/NIR spectroscopy to result in excellent light absorption. PMID:25310513

  11. Cocrystallization of photosensitive energetic copper(II) perchlorate complexes with the nitrogen-rich ligand 1,2-Di(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)ethane.

    PubMed

    Evers, Jürgen; Gospodinov, Ivan; Joas, Manuel; Klapötke, Thomas M; Stierstorfer, Jörg

    2014-11-01

    Two recently introduced concepts in the design of new energetic materials, namely complexation and cocrystallization, have been applied in the synthesis and characterization of the energetic copper(II) compound "[Cu(dt-5-e)2(H2O)](ClO4)2," which consists of two different complex cations and can be described as a model energetic ionic cocrystal. The presence of both the N-rich 1,2-di(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)ethane ligand and oxidizing perchlorate counterion results in a new type of energetic material. The ionic complex cocrystal consists of a mononuclear and a trinuclear complex unit. It can be obtained by precipitation from perchloric acid or by dehydration of the related mononuclear coordination compound [Cu(dt-5-e)2(H2O)2](ClO4)2·2H2O at 70 °C in the solid state. The transformation starting at 60 °C was monitored by X-ray powder diffraction and thermal analysis. The energetic ionic cocrystal was shown to be a new primary explosive suitable for laser ignition. The different coordination spheres within the ionic cocrystal (octahedral and square pyramidal) were shown by UV/vis/NIR spectroscopy to result in excellent light absorption.

  12. Perchlorate Questions and Answers

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Environmental Epidemiology. This study reports on the estimated average dietary intakes of perchlorate and iodine based ... Dietary Intake of Perchlorate and Iodine" study? The estimated lower bound to upper bound average perchlorate intakes ...

  13. Perchlorate (ClO4) and Perchlorate Salts

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Perchlorate ( ClO4 - ) and Perchlorate Salts CASRN 7790 - 98 - 9 Ammonium perchlorate CASRN 7791 - 03 - 9 Lithium perchlorate CASRN 7778 - 74 - 7 Potassium perchlorate CASRN 7601 - 89 - 0 Sodium perchlorate This U.S . EPA IRIS Summary is based on the U.S . Government - sponsored technical review of

  14. Crystal structure of μ-oxalodi­hydroxamato-bis­[(2,2′-bipyrid­yl)(di­methyl sulfoxide-κO)copper(II)] bis­(perchlorate)

    PubMed Central

    Odarich, Irina A.; Pavlishchuk, Anna V.; Kalibabchuk, Valentina A.; Haukka, Matti

    2016-01-01

    The centrosymmetric binuclear complex, [Cu2(C2H2N2O4)(C10H8N2)2(C2H6OS)2](ClO4)2, contains two copper(II) ions, connected through an N-deprotonated oxalodi­hydroxamic acid dianion, two terminal 2,2′-bi­pyridine ligands, and two apically coordinating dimethylsulfoxide mol­ecules. Two non-coordinating perchlorate anions assure electrical neutrality. The copper(II) ions in the complex dication [Cu2(C10H8N2)2(μ-C2H2N2O4)(C2H6SO)2]2+ are in an O2N3 square-pyramidal donor environment, the Cu–Cu separation being 5.2949 (4) Å. Two hydroxamate groups in the deprotonated oxalodi­hydroxamic acid are located trans to one each other. In the crystal, O—H⋯O and C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the complex cations to the perchlorate anions. Further C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds combine with π–π contacts with a centroid-to-centroid separation of 3.6371 (12) Å to stack the mol­ecules along the a-axis direction. PMID:26958375

  15. Perchlorate isotope forensics.

    PubMed

    Böhlke, John Karl; Sturchio, Neil C; Gu, Baohua; Horita, Juske; Brown, Gilbert M; Jackson, W Andrew; Batista, Jacimaria; Hatzinger, Paul B

    2005-12-01

    Perchlorate has been detected recently in a variety of soils, waters, plants, and food products at levels that may be detrimental to human health. These discoveries have generated considerable interest in perchlorate source identification. In this study, comprehensive stable isotope analyses (37Cl/35Cl and 18O/17O/16O) of perchlorate from known synthetic and natural sources reveal systematic differences in isotopic characteristics that are related to the formation mechanisms. In addition, isotopic analyses of perchlorate extracted from groundwater and surface water demonstrate the feasibility of identifying perchlorate sources in contaminated environments on the basis of this technique. Both natural and synthetic sources of perchlorate have been identified in water samples from some perchlorate occurrences in the United States by the isotopic method. PMID:16316196

  16. Perchlorate isotope forensics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Böhlke, J.K.; Sturchio, N.C.; Gu, B.; Horita, J.; Brown, G.M.; Jackson, W.A.; Batista, J.; Hatzinger, P.B.

    2005-01-01

    Perchlorate has been detected recently in a variety of soils, waters, plants, and food products at levels that may be detrimental to human health. These discoveries have generated considerable interest in perchlorate source identification. In this study, comprehensive stable isotope analyses ( 37Cl/35Cl and 18O/17O/ 16O) of perchlorate from known synthetic and natural sources reveal systematic differences in isotopic characteristics that are related to the formation mechanisms. In addition, isotopic analyses of perchlorate extracted from groundwater and surface water demonstrate the feasibility of identifying perchlorate sources in contaminated environments on the basis of this technique. Both natural and synthetic sources of perchlorate have been identified in water samples from some perchlorate occurrences in the United States by the isotopic method. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of various photosensitive copper(II) complexes with 5-(1-methylhydrazinyl)-1H-tetrazole as ligand and perchlorate, nitrate, dinitramide, and chloride as anions.

    PubMed

    Joas, Manuel; Klapötke, Thomas M; Stierstorfer, Jörg; Szimhardt, Norbert

    2013-07-22

    The preparation of 5-(1-methylhydrazinyl)-1H-tetrazole monohydrate (1⋅H2O) and various copper(II) complexes with perchlorate (2 and 3), nitrate (4, 5, and 6), dinitramide (7), and chloride (8) is described. The coordination compounds (monomers, dimers, and polymers) were characterized through infrared spectroscopy and elemental analysis. Further, the structures of 2 and 4-8 were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 can act as a bidentate ligand in its neutral form (HMHT) and as a μ2- or μ3-bridging ligand in its deprotonated form (MHT). The energetic properties of the synthesized complexes, such as their sensitivities toward impact and friction, were determined, and laser ignition tests were performed. New information about the laser initiation process and the role of the anion in the initiation criterion was obtained. The perchlorate complexes 2 (T(decomp)=217 °C) and 3 (T(decomp)=206 °C) are potential primary explosives.

  18. Crystal structure of tin(II) perchlorate trihydrate

    PubMed Central

    Hennings, Erik; Schmidt, Horst; Köhler, Martin; Voigt, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The title compound, [Sn(H2O)3](ClO4)2, was synthesized by the redox reaction of copper(II) perchlorate hexa­hydrate and metallic tin in perchloric acid. Both the trigonal–pyramidal [Sn(H2O)3]2+ cations and tetra­hedral perchlorate anions lie on crystallographic threefold axes. In the crystal, the cations are linked to the anions by O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, generating (001) sheets. PMID:25552969

  19. Los Alamos National Laboratory Perchlorate Issues.

    SciTech Connect

    Hjeresen, Denny; Rae, Steve; Beers, Bob; Saladen, Mike; Barr, Alice; Pope, Alicia; Dziewinski, Lacek; Scott, Jim; Holcomb, Robert; Hollis, Diana; Leslie Dale,; Williams, Laurie; Strietelmeier, Betty; Carlson, Bryan; Alexander, Rick; Worland, Pete; Hanson, Steve; Stine, Jim; Hiskey, Mike; Archuleta, Jose; Kinkead, Scott; Sherrard, Ann; Longmire, Pat; Witkowski, Marc; Gard, Marvin

    2003-08-04

    This document reviews the chemical structure of the perchlorate anion and the uses of perchlorates, related health issues, applicable drinking water regulations, water supply system monitoring, current laboratory perchlorate use, management of perchlorate compound risks, potential perchlorate sites and sources, the search for a lower perchlorate detection limit, and treatment of perchlorate contamination.

  20. Crystal structure of trans-aqua­(perchlorato-κO)bis­(propane-1,3-di­amine-κ2 N,N′)copper(II) perchlorate

    PubMed Central

    Govindaraj, J.; Rajkumar, K.; Ganeshraja, A. S.; Anbalagan, K.; SubbiahPandi, A.

    2014-01-01

    In the title compound, [Cu(ClO4)(C3H10N2)2(H2O)]ClO4, the CuII atom has a distorted octa­hedral coordination sphere and is coordinated by the N atoms of two propane-1,3-di­amine ligands in the equatorial plane. The axial positions are occupied by a water O atom and an O atom of a disordered perchlorate anion [occupancy ratio 0.631 (9):0.369 (9)]. In the crystal, the various components are linked via O—H⋯O, N—H⋯O and C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming sheets lying parallel to (001). PMID:25484768

  1. Crystal structure of ortho-rhom-bic {bis-[(pyridin-2-yl)meth-yl](3,5,5,5-tetra-chloro-pent-yl)amine-κ(3) N,N',N''}chlorido-copper(II) perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Bussey, Katherine A; Cavalier, Annie R; Connell, Jennifer R; Mraz, Margaret E; Oshin, Kayode D; Pintauer, Tomislav; Gray, Danielle L; Parkin, Sean

    2015-07-01

    In the title compound, [CuCl(C17H19Cl4N3)]ClO4, the Cu(II) ion adopts a distorted square-planar geometry defined by one chloride ligand and the three nitro-gen atoms from the bis-[(pyridin-2-yl)meth-yl](3,5,5,5-tetra-chloro-pent-yl)amine ligand. The perchlorate counter-ion is disordered over three sets of sites with refined occupancies 0.0634 (17), 0.221 (16) and 0.145 (7). In addition, the hetero-scorpionate arm of the bis-[(pyridin-2-yl)meth-yl](3,5,5,5-tetra-chloro-pent-yl)amine ligand is disordered over two sets of sites with refined occupancies 0.839 (2) and 0.161 (2). In the crystal, weak Cu⋯Cl inter-actions between symmetry-related mol-ecules create a dimerization with a chloride occupying the apical position of the square-pyramidal geometry typical of many copper(II) chloride hetero-scorpionate complexes. PMID:26279883

  2. PERCHLORATE AS AN ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate anion (C104) has been found in drinking water supplies throughout the southwestern United States. I t is primarily associated with releases of ammonium perdhlorate by defense contractors, military operations, and aerospace programs. Ammonium perchlorate is used as ...

  3. Bioelectrical Perchlorate Remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrash, C.; Achenbach, L. A.; Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Several bioreactor designs are currently available for the ex-situ biological attenuation of perchlorate- contaminated waters and recently, some of these reactor designs were conditionally approved by the California Department of Health Services for application in the treatment of perchlorate contaminated drinking water. However, all of these systems are dependent on the continual addition of a chemical electron donor to sustain microbial activity and are always subject to biofouling and downstream water quality issues. In addition, residual labile electron donor in the reactor effluent can stimulate microbial growth in water distribution systems and contribute to the formation of potentially toxic trihalomethanes during disinfection by chlorination. As part of our ongoing studies into microbial perchlorate reduction we investigated the ability of dissimilatory perchlorate reducing bacteria (DPRB) to metabolize perchlorate using a negatively charged electrode (cathode) in the working chamber of a bioelectrical reactor (BER) as the primary electron donor. In this instance the DPRB use the electrons on the electrode surface either directly or indirectly in the form of electrolytically produced H2 as a source of reducing equivalents for nitrate and perchlorate reduction. As part of this investigation our fed-batch studies showed that DPRB could use electrons from a graphite cathode poised at -500mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) for the reduction of perchlorate and nitrate. We isolated a novel organism, Dechlorospirillum strain VDY, from the cathode surface after 70 days operation which readily reduced 100 mg.L-1 perchlorate in a mediatorless batch bioelectrical reactor (BER) in 6 days. Continuous up-flow BERs (UFBERs) seeded with active cultures of strain VDY continuously treated waters containing 100 mg.L-1 perchlorate with almost 100% efficiency throughout their operation achieving a non-optimized volumetric loading of 60 mg.L-1 reactor volume.day-1. The same UFBERs also treated

  4. Synthesis and crystal structure of [2,7,12-trimethyl-3,7,11,17-tetra-aza-bicyclo-[11.3.1]hepta-deca-1(17),13,15-triene-κ(4) N]copper(II) bis-(perchlorate).

    PubMed

    Hilvano, Edward Gabrielle V; Yang, Guang; Emnacen, Inno A; Rybak-Akimova, Elena V; Billones, Junie B; Carrillo, Maria Constancia O; Noll, Bruce C; Organo, Voltaire G

    2016-07-01

    The title copper(II) complex of a pyridine-containing macrocycle (PyMAC), [Cu(C16H28N4)](ClO4)2, has been prepared. The crystal structure reveals the Cu(II) atom to be octahedrally coordinated by a tetradentate aminopyridine macrocyclic ligand surrounding the metal cation in a square-planar geometry. Two weakly bound perchlorate counter-ions occupy the axial sites above and below the macrocyclic plane. The crystal studied was refined as a two-component pseudo-merohedral twin; the refined fractional contribution of the minor component is 38.77 (8). PMID:27555952

  5. Synthesis and crystal structure of [2,7,12-trimethyl-3,7,11,17-tetra­aza­bicyclo­[11.3.1]hepta­deca-1(17),13,15-triene-κ4 N]copper(II) bis­(perchlorate)

    PubMed Central

    Hilvano, Edward Gabrielle V.; Yang, Guang; Emnacen, Inno A.; Rybak-Akimova, Elena V.; Billones, Junie B.; Carrillo, Maria Constancia O.; Noll, Bruce C.; Organo, Voltaire G.

    2016-01-01

    The title copper(II) complex of a pyridine-containing macrocycle (PyMAC), [Cu(C16H28N4)](ClO4)2, has been prepared. The crystal structure reveals the CuII atom to be octahedrally coordinated by a tetradentate aminopyridine macrocyclic ligand surrounding the metal cation in a square-planar geometry. Two weakly bound perchlorate counter-ions occupy the axial sites above and below the macrocyclic plane. The crystal studied was refined as a two-component pseudo-merohedral twin; the refined fractional contribution of the minor component is 38.77 (8)% PMID:27555952

  6. Temperature Independent Catalytic Two-Electron Reduction of Dioxygen by Ferrocenes with a Tris[2-(2-pyridyl)ethyl]amine-Copper(II) Catalyst in the Presence of Perchloric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Das, Dipanwita; Lee, Yong-Min; Ohkubo, Kei; Nam, Wonwoo; Karlin, Kenneth D.; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2013-01-01

    Selective two-electron plus two-proton (2e−/2H+) reduction of O2 to hydrogen peroxide by ferrocene (Fc) or 1,1′-dimethylferrocene (Me2Fc) in the presence of perchloric acid is catalyzed efficiently by a mononuclear copper(II) complex, [CuII(tepa)]2+ {tepa = tris[2-(2-pyridyl)ethyl]amine} (1) in acetone. The E1/2 value for [CuII(tepa)]2+ as measured by cyclic voltammetry is 0.07 V vs Fc/Fc+ in acetone, being significantly positive, which makes it possible to use relatively weak one-electron reductants such as Fc and Me2Fc for the overall two-electron reduction of O2. Fast electron transfer from Fc or Me2Fc to 1 affords the corresponding CuI complex, [CuI(tepa)]+ (2), which reacts at low temperature (193 K) with O2, however only in presence of HClO4 to afford the hydroperoxo complex, [CuII(tepa)(OOH)]2+ (3). The detailed kinetic study on the homogeneous catalytic system reveals the rate-determining step to be the O2-binding process in the presence of HClO4 at lower temperature as well as at room temperature. The O2-binding kinetics in the presence of HClO4 were studied, demonstrating that the rate of formation of the hydroperoxo complex (3) as well as the overall catalytic reaction remained virtually the same with changing temperature. The apparent lack of an activation energy for the catalytic two-electron reduction of O2 is shown to result from the existence of a pre-equilibrium between 2 and O2 prior to the formation of the hydroperoxo complex 3. No further reduction of [CuII(tepa)(OOH)]2+ (3) by Fc or Me2Fc occurred, and instead 3 is protonated by HClO4 to yield H2O2 accompanied by regeneration of 1, thus completing the catalytic cycle for the two-electron reduction of O2 by Fc or Me2Fc. PMID:23394287

  7. Temperature-independent catalytic two-electron reduction of dioxygen by ferrocenes with a copper(II) tris[2-(2-pyridyl)ethyl]amine catalyst in the presence of perchloric acid.

    PubMed

    Das, Dipanwita; Lee, Yong-Min; Ohkubo, Kei; Nam, Wonwoo; Karlin, Kenneth D; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2013-02-20

    Selective two-electron plus two-proton (2e(-)/2H(+)) reduction of O(2) to hydrogen peroxide by ferrocene (Fc) or 1,1'-dimethylferrocene (Me(2)Fc) in the presence of perchloric acid is catalyzed efficiently by a mononuclear copper(II) complex, [Cu(II)(tepa)](2+) (1; tepa = tris[2-(2-pyridyl)ethyl]amine) in acetone. The E(1/2) value for [Cu(II)(tepa)](2+) as measured by cyclic voltammetry is 0.07 V vs Fc/Fc(+) in acetone, being significantly positive, which makes it possible to use relatively weak one-electron reductants such as Fc and Me(2)Fc for the overall two-electron reduction of O(2). Fast electron transfer from Fc or Me(2)Fc to 1 affords the corresponding Cu(I) complex [Cu(I)(tepa)](+) (2), which reacts at low temperature (193 K) with O(2), however only in the presence of HClO(4), to afford the hydroperoxo complex [Cu(II)(tepa)(OOH)](+) (3). A detailed kinetic study on the homogeneous catalytic system reveals the rate-determining step to be the O(2)-binding process in the presence of HClO(4) at lower temperature as well as at room temperature. The O(2)-binding kinetics in the presence of HClO(4) were studied, demonstrating that the rate of formation of the hydroperoxo complex 3 as well as the overall catalytic reaction remained virtually the same with changing temperature. The apparent lack of activation energy for the catalytic two-electron reduction of O(2) is shown to result from the existence of a pre-equilibrium between 2 and O(2) prior to the formation of the hydroperoxo complex 3. No further reduction of [Cu(II)(tepa)(OOH)](+) (3) by Fc or Me(2)Fc occurred, and instead 3 is protonated by HClO(4) to yield H(2)O(2) accompanied by regeneration of 1, thus completing the catalytic cycle for the two-electron reduction of O(2) by Fc or Me(2)Fc.

  8. Isotopic mapping of groundwater perchlorate plumes.

    PubMed

    Sturchio, Neil C; Hoaglund, John R; Marroquin, Roy J; Beloso, Abelardo D; Heraty, Linnea J; Bortz, Sarah E; Patterson, Thomas L

    2012-01-01

    Analyses of stable isotope ratios of chlorine and oxygen in perchlorate can, in some cases, be used for mapping and source identification of groundwater perchlorate plumes. This is demonstrated here for large, intersecting perchlorate plumes in groundwater from a region having extensive groundwater perchlorate contamination and a large population dependent on groundwater resources. The region contains both synthetic perchlorate derived from rocket fuel manufacturing and testing activities and agricultural perchlorate derived predominantly from imported Chilean (Atacama) nitrate fertilizer, along with a likely component of indigenous natural background perchlorate from local wet and dry atmospheric deposition. Most samples within each plume reflect either a predominantly synthetic or a predominantly agricultural perchlorate source and there is apparently a minor contribution from the indigenous natural background perchlorate. The existence of isotopically distinct perchlorate plumes in this area is consistent with other lines of evidence, including groundwater levels and flow paths as well as the historical land use and areal distribution of potential perchlorate sources.

  9. Dissimilatory perchlorate reduction: a review.

    PubMed

    Bardiya, Nirmala; Bae, Jae-Ho

    2011-05-20

    In the United States anthropogenic activities are mainly responsible for the wide spread perchlorate contamination of drinking water, surface water, groundwater, and soil. Even at microgram levels, perchlorate causes toxicity to flora and fauna and affects growth, metabolism and reproduction in humans and animals. Reports of antithyroid effects of perchlorate and its detection in common food items have raised serious public health concerns, leading to extensive decontamination efforts in recent years. Several physico-chemical removal and biological decontamination processes are being developed. Although promising, ion exchange is a non-selective and incomplete process as it merely transfers perchlorate from water to the resin. The perchlorate-laden spent resins (perchlorate 200-500 mg L(-1)) require regeneration resulting in production of concentrated brine (6-12% NaCl) or caustic waste streams. On the contrary, biological reduction completely degrades perchlorate into O(2) and innocuous Cl(-). High reduction potential of ClO(4)(-)/Cl(-) (E° =∼ 1.28 V) and ClO(3)(-)/Cl(-) pairs (E° =1.03 V) makes these contaminants thermodynamically ideal e(-) acceptors for microbial reduction. In recent years unique dissimilatory perchlorate reducing bacteria have been isolated and detailed studies pertaining to their microbiological, biochemical, genetics and phylogenetic aspects have been undertaken which is the subject of this review article while the various physico-chemical removal and biological reduction processes have been reviewed by others.

  10. Environmental Factors That Control Microbial Perchlorate Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Swades K.; O'Connor, Susan M.; Gustavson, Ruth L.; Achenbach, Laurie A.; Coates, John D.

    2002-01-01

    As part of a study to elucidate the environmental parameters that control microbial perchlorate respiration, we investigated the reduction of perchlorate by the dissimilatory perchlorate reducer Dechlorosoma suillum under a diverse set of environmental conditions. Our results demonstrated that perchlorate reduction by D. suillum only occurred under anaerobic conditions in the presence of perchlorate and was dependent on the presence of molybdenum. Perchlorate reduction was dependent on the presence of the enzyme chlorite dismutase, which was induced during metabolism of perchlorate. Anaerobic conditions alone were not enough to induce expression of this enzyme. Dissolved oxygen concentrations less than 2 mg liter−1 were enough to inhibit perchlorate reduction by D. suillum. Similarly to oxygen, nitrate also regulated chlorite dismutase expression and repressed perchlorate reduction by D. suillum. Perchlorate-grown cultures of D. suillum preferentially reduced nitrate in media with equimolar amounts of perchlorate and nitrate. In contrast, an extended (40 h) lag phase was observed if a similar nitrate-perchlorate medium was inoculated with a nitrate-grown culture. Perchlorate reduction commenced only when nitrate was completely removed in either of these experiments. In contrast to D. suillum, nitrate had no inhibitory effects on perchlorate reduction by the perchlorate reducer Dechloromonas agitata strain CKB. Nitrate was reduced to nitrite concomitant with perchlorate reduction to chloride. These studies demonstrate that microbial respiration of perchlorate is significantly affected by environmental conditions and perchlorate reduction is directly dependent on bioavailable molybdenum and the presence or absence of competing electron acceptors. A microbial treatment strategy can achieve and maintain perchlorate concentrations below the recommended regulatory level, but only in environments in which the variables described above can be controlled. PMID:12200296

  11. Perchlorate, iodine and the thyroid

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Angela M.; Pearce, Elizabeth N.; Braverman, Lewis E.

    2014-01-01

    In pharmacologic doses, perchlorate inhibits thyroidal iodine uptake and subsequently decreases thyroid hormone production. Although pharmacologic doses may be used in the treatment of hyperthyroidism, recent literature has focussed on the detection of low levels of perchlorate in the environment, groundwater and foodstuffs and their potential adverse effects on human thyroid function. This is of particular concern to the developing foetus and infant, whose normal neurodevelopment depends on adequate iodine intake for the production of thyroid hormones. Further research is needed to clarify the potential health effects of low-level chronic environmental perchlorate exposure. The health impact of environmental perchlorate may be dependent upon adequate iodine intake and should be interpreted in combination with other environmental exposures that are also potential thyroidal endocrine disruptors. PMID:20172477

  12. Copper

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Copper ; CASRN 7440 - 50 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects )

  13. Transport and biodegradation of perchlorate in soils.

    PubMed

    Tipton, Deborah K; Rolston, Dennis E; Scow, Kate M

    2003-01-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) contamination of ground water and surface water is a widespread problem, particularly in the western United States. This study examined the effect of biodegradation on perchlorate fate and transport in soils. Solute transport experiments were conducted on two surface soils. Pulses of solution containing perchlorate and Br- were applied to saturated soil columns at steady state water flow. Perchlorate behaved like a nonreactive tracer in Columbia loam (coarse-loamy, mixed, superactive, nonacid, thermic Oxyaquic Xerofluvent) but was degraded in Yolo loam (fine-silty, mixed, superactive, nonacid, thermic Mollic Xerofluvent). Batch experiments demonstrated that perchlorate removal from solution in Yolo loam was caused by biodegradation. Other batch experiments with Yolo loam surface and subsurface soils, Columbia loam surface soil, and dredge tailings demonstrated that perchlorate biodegradation required anaerobic conditions, an adequate carbon source, and an active perchlorate-degrading microbial population. The sequential reduction of perchlorate and NO3- by an indigenous soil microbial community in Yolo loam batch systems was also studied. Nitrate reduction occurred much sooner than perchlorate reduction in soils that had not been previously exposed to perchlorate, but NO3- and perchlorate were simultaneously reduced in soils previously exposed to perchlorate. The results of this study have implications for in situ remediation schemes and for agricultural soils that have been contaminated by perchlorate-tainted irrigation water. PMID:12549540

  14. Effect of nitrate on microbial perchlorate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Over the last decade perchlorate has been recognized as an important emerging water contaminant that poses a significant public health threat. Because of its chemical stability, low ionic charge density, and significant water solubility microbial remediation has been identified as the most feasible method for its in situ attenuation. Our previous studies have demonstrated that dissimilatory perchlorate reducing bacteria (DPRB) capable of the respiratory reduction of perchlorate into innocuous chloride are ubiquitous in soil and sedimentary environments. As part of their metabolism these organisms reduce perchlorate to chlorite which is subsequently dismutated into chloride and molecular oxygen. These initial steps are mediated by the perchlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase enzymes respectively. Previously we found that the activity of these organisms is dependent on the presence of molybdenum and is inhibited by the presence of oxygen and to different extents nitrate. However, to date, there is little understanding of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of perchlorate reduction by oxygen and nitrate. As a continuation of our studies into the factors that control DPRB activity we investigated these regulatory mechanisms in more detail as a model organism, Dechloromonas aromatica strain RCB, transitions from aerobic metabolism through nitrate reduction to perchlorate reduction. In series of growth transition studies where both nitrate and perchlorate were present, preference for nitrate to perchlorate was observed regardless of the nitrate to perchlorate ratio. Even when the organism was pre-grown anaerobically in perchlorate, nitrate was reduced prior to perchlorate. Using non-growth washed cell suspension, perchlorate- grown D. aromatica was capable of reducing both perchlorate and nitrate concomitantly suggesting the preferentially utilization of nitrate was not a result of enzyme functionality. To elucidate the mechanism for preferential utilization of

  15. Perchlorate uptake in spinach as related to perchlorate, nitrate and chloride concentrations in irrigation water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several studies have reported on the detection of perchlorate in edible leafy vegetables irrigated with Colorado River water. However, there is no information on spinach as related to perchlorate in irrigation water nor on the effect of other anions on perchlorate uptake. A greenhouse perchlorate up...

  16. Perchlorate Reduction by Yeast for Mars Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Alaisha

    2015-01-01

    Martian soil contains high levels (0.6 percentage by mass) of calcium perchlorate (Ca(ClO4)2), which readily dissociates into calcium and the perchlorate ion (ClO4-) in water. Even in trace amounts, perchlorates are toxic to humans and have been implicated in thyroid dysfunction. Devising methods to lessen perchlorate contamination is crucial to minimizing the health risks associated with human exploration and colonization of Mars. We designed a perchlorate reduction pathway, which sequentially reduces perchlorate to chloride (Cl-) and oxygen (O2), for implementation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using genes obtained from perchlorate reducing bacteria Azospira oryzae and Dechloromonas aromatica, we plan to assemble this pathway directly within S. cerevisiae through recombinational cloning. A perchlorate reduction pathway would enable S. cerevisiae to lower perchlorate levels and produce oxygen, which may be harvested or used directly by S. cerevisiae for aerobic growth and compound synthesis. Moreover, using perchlorate as an external electron acceptor could improve the efficiency of redox-imbalanced production pathways in yeast. Although several perchlorate reducing bacteria have been identified and utilized in water treatment systems on Earth, the widespread use of S. cerevisiae as a synthetic biology platform justifies the development of a perchlorate reducing strain for implementation on Mars.

  17. Reduction of perchlorate in river sediment.

    PubMed

    Simon, Rupert; Weber, Eric J

    2006-04-01

    The transformation of perchlorate was investigated in river sediment during laboratory batch and column studies to determine if reduction of perchlorate is a viable pathway in natural sediment without previous exposure to perchlorate. Perchlorate at an initial concentration of 10 microM was reduced quantitatively to chloride in 3 d after a lag phase of 2 d in sediment slurries amended with lactate. Raising the initial concentration of perchlorate to 1,000 microM increased the lag phase to 20 d before reduction occurred. At perchlorate concentrations greater than 1,000 microM, the reduction of perchlorate was not observed within 40 d. We speculate that the high concentration of perchlorate specifically was problematic to the microbes mediating the reduction of perchlorate. High levels of nitrate inhibited the reduction of perchlorate as well. In sediment slurries amended with 870 microM sodium nitrate, the reduction of perchlorate at an initial concentration of 100 microM did not occur before day 15 of the experiment, but complete removal of nitrate had occurred by day four. Sediment column studies further demonstrated the dependence of perchlorate reduction on endogenous nitrate levels.

  18. Uptake of perchlorate in terrestrial plants.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lu; Cañas, Jaclyn E; Cobb, George P; Jackson, William A; Anderson, Todd A

    2004-05-01

    Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), and soybean (Glycine max) were used to determine uptake of the perchlorate anion (100 ppb) from sand. Plants were watered with different ratios of Hydrosol (a diluted solution of Peters All-Purpose Plant Food) to Milli-Q water (18 MOmega) to determine if the presence of other nutrients (such as nitrate) influenced perchlorate uptake. Perchlorate concentrations in sand and plant tissues were determined weekly. Perchlorate uptake was observed in all three plant species. In most experiments, perchlorate was completely depleted from sand in which plants were growing. Perchlorate concentrations in lettuce were also significantly higher than those in cucumber and soybean (P < 0.0001). Perchlorate concentrations in sand decreased at a higher rate at lower ratios of Hydrosol to Milli-Q, indicating that plant (cucumber) uptake of perchlorate is influenced by the presence of external nutrients. The results of an 8-week uptake study in cucumber and a 6-week uptake study in lettuce suggest that a threshold perchlorate concentration is reached: for cucumber, 150 ppm and for lettuce, 750 ppm. Although the presence of external nutrients decreases the rate of perchlorate uptake by plants, significant concentrations of perchlorate occur in aboveground plant tissues even after relatively short periods of growth. The potential for trophic transfer of perchlorate from soil to higher organisms through plants exists.

  19. PERCHLORATE CROP INTERACTIONS VIA CONTAMINATED IRRIGATION WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate has contaminated water and sods at several locations in the United States. Perchlorate is water soluble, exceedingly mobile in aqueous systems, and can persist for many decades under typical ground- and surface water conditions. Perchlorate is of concern because of un...

  20. catena-Poly[[[(pyridine-κN)copper(II)]-μ-3-{1-[(2-amino-eth-yl)imino]-eth-yl}-6-methyl-2-oxo-2H-pyran-4-olato-κN,N,O:O] perchlorate].

    PubMed

    Ourari, Ali; Derafa, Wassila; Bouacida, Sofiane; Aggoun, Djouhra

    2011-12-01

    In the title compound, {[Cu(C(10)H(13)N(2)O(3))(C(5)H(5)N)]ClO(4)}(n), the Cu(II) atom has an N(3)O(2) coordination sphere. The complex contains two different ligands, viz. a pyridine mol-ecule and a Schiff base mol-ecule, resulting from the condensation of ethyl-enodiamine with dehydro-acetic acid. The Cu(II) atom exhibits a square-pyramidal geometry: three of the four donors of the pyramid base belong to the Schiff base ligand (an N atom from the amine group, a second N atom from the imine group and the O atom of the pyran-one residue) and the fourth donor is the pyridine N atom. The coordination around the metal ion is completed by a longer axial bond to the pyran-one O atom of an adjacent Schiff base, so forming a one-dimensional polymer. The complex has a +1 charge that is compensated by a perchlorate ion. The crystal packing, which can be described as alternating chains of cations and tetra-hedral perchlorate anions along the a axis, is stabilized by inter-molecular N-H⋯O, C-H⋯O and C-H⋯N hydrogen-bonding interactions. PMID:22199528

  1. catena-Poly[[[di-aqua-bis-[1,2-bis-(pyridin-4-yl)diazene]copper(II)]-μ-1,2-bis-(pyridin-4-yl)diazene] bis-(perchlorate)].

    PubMed

    Ballestero-Martínez, Ernesto; Campos-Fernández, Cristian Saul; Soto-Tellini, Victor Hugo; Gonzalez-Montiel, Simplicio; Martínez-Otero, Diego

    2013-06-01

    In the title compound, {[Cu(C10H8N4)3(H2O)2](ClO4)2} n , the coordination environment of the cationic Cu(II) atom is distorted octa-hedral, formed by pairs of symmetry-equivalent 1,2-bis-(pyridin-4-yl)diazene ligands, bridging 1,2-bis-(pyridin-4-yl)diazene ligands and two non-equivalent water mol-ecules. The 1,2-bis-(pyridin-4-yl)diazene mol-ecules form polymeric chains parallel to [-101] via azo bonds which are situated about inversion centres. Since the Cu(II) atom is situated on a twofold rotation axis, the monomeric unit has point symmetry 2. The perchlorate anions are disordered in a 0.536 (9):0.464 (9) ratio and are acceptors of water H atoms in medium-strong O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds with graph set R 4 (4)(12). The water mol-ecules, which are coordinated to the Cu(II) atom and are hydrogen-bonded to the perchlorate anions, form columns parallel to [010]. A π-π inter-action [centroid-centroid distance = 3.913 (2) Å] occurs between pyridine rings, and weak C-H⋯O inter-actions also occur. PMID:23794983

  2. catena-Poly[[[di­aqua­bis­[1,2-bis­(pyridin-4-yl)diazene]copper(II)]-μ-1,2-bis­(pyridin-4-yl)diazene] bis­(perchlorate)

    PubMed Central

    Ballestero-Martínez, Ernesto; Campos-Fernández, Cristian Saul; Soto-Tellini, Victor Hugo; Gonzalez-Montiel, Simplicio; Martínez-Otero, Diego

    2013-01-01

    In the title compound, {[Cu(C10H8N4)3(H2O)2](ClO4)2}n, the coordination environment of the cationic CuII atom is distorted octa­hedral, formed by pairs of symmetry-equivalent 1,2-bis­(pyridin-4-yl)diazene ligands, bridging 1,2-bis­(pyridin-4-yl)diazene ligands and two non-equivalent water mol­ecules. The 1,2-bis­(pyridin-4-yl)diazene mol­ecules form polymeric chains parallel to [-101] via azo bonds which are situated about inversion centres. Since the CuII atom is situated on a twofold rotation axis, the monomeric unit has point symmetry 2. The perchlorate anions are disordered in a 0.536 (9):0.464 (9) ratio and are acceptors of water H atoms in medium–strong O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds with graph set R 4 4(12). The water mol­ecules, which are coordinated to the CuII atom and are hydrogen-bonded to the perchlorate anions, form columns parallel to [010]. A π–π inter­action [centroid–centroid distance = 3.913 (2) Å] occurs between pyridine rings, and weak C—H⋯O inter­actions also occur. PMID:23794983

  3. Environmental Perchlorate Exposure: Potential Adverse Thyroid Effects

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Angela M.; Pearce, Elizabeth N.; Braverman, Lewis E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review This review will present a general overview of the sources, human studies, and proposed regulatory action regarding environmental perchlorate exposure. Recent findings Some recent studies have reported significant associations between urinary perchlorate concentrations, thyroid dysfunction, and decreased infant IQ in groups who would be particularly susceptible to perchlorate effects. An update regarding the recent proposed regulatory actions and potential costs surrounding amelioration of perchlorate contamination is provided. Summary The potential adverse thyroidal effects of environmental perchlorate exposure remain controversial, and further research is needed to further define its relationship to human health among pregnant and lactating women and their infants. PMID:25106002

  4. Organic carbon biostimulates rapid rhizodegradation of perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Yifru, Dawit D; Nzengung, Valentine A

    2008-12-01

    Previous hydroponics and field studies identified phytodegradation and rhizodegradation as the two main mechanisms by which plants metabolize perchlorate. Plant uptake and phytodegradation of perchlorate is a slower and undesired process that poses ecological risks resulting from phytoaccumulation of some fraction of the perchlorate. Meanwhile, rhizodegradation is a more rapid and favored process involving perchlorate-degrading bacteria utilizing dissolved organic carbon (DOC) as a carbon and energy (electron) source to rapidly degrade perchlorate to innocuous chloride. In the present study, rhizodegradation of perchlorate by willow trees (Salix nigra) was biostimulated using electron sources obtained from natural and artificial carbon sources. In bioreactors provided with carbon sources as 500 mg/L DOC, 25 to 40 mg/L of initial perchlorate concentrations were removed to below the ion chromatography method detection limit of 2 microg/L in approximately 9 d. For planted controls provided with no electron donors, the time required for the complete removal of the same doses of perchlorate was up to 70 d. Enhancement of rhizodegradation by organic carbon reduced the phytoaccumulated fraction of perchlorate by an order of magnitude from approximately 430 to 20 mg/kg. The implication of the present study is that the high fraction uptake and phytoaccumulation of perchlorate in agricultural products and the recycling of perchlorate into the ecosystem can be significantly curtailed by supplying electron donors derived from organic carbon sources to the root zone of plants.

  5. ASSESSMENT OF PERCHLORATE IN FERTILIZERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate has been positively detected only in those materials known to be derived from Chilean caliche, which constitute less than 0.2% of U.S. fertilizer application. The data obtained in the preponderance of investigations suggest that fertilizers do not contribute to envir...

  6. PERCHLORATE BEHAVIOR IN A MUNICIPAL LAKE FOLLOWING FIREWORKS DISPLAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate salts of potassium and ammonium are the primary oxidants in pyrotechnic mixtures, yet insufficient information is available regarding the relationship between fireworks displays and the environmental occurrence of perchlorate. Here we document changes in perchlorate ...

  7. Aripiprazole salts. II. Aripiprazole perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Freire, Eleonora; Polla, Griselda; Baggio, Ricardo

    2012-06-01

    The molecular structure of aripiprazole perchlorate (systematic name: 4-(2,3-dichlorophenyl)-1-{4-[(2-oxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinolin-7-yl)oxy]butyl}piperazin-1-ium perchlorate), C(23)H(28)Cl(2)N(3)O(2)(+)·ClO(4)(-), does not differ substantially from the recently published structure of aripiprazole nitrate [Freire, Polla & Baggio (2012). Acta Cryst. C68, o170-o173]. Both compounds have almost identical bond distances, bond angles and torsion angles. The two different counter-ions occupy equivalent places in the two structures, giving rise to very similar first-order `packing motifs'. However, these elemental arrangements interact with each other in different ways in the two structures, leading to two-dimensional arrays with quite different organizations.

  8. Microbial isotopic fractionation of perchlorate chlorine.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Max L; Ader, Magali; Chaudhuri, Swades; Coates, John D

    2003-08-01

    Perchlorate contamination can be microbially respired to innocuous chloride and thus can be treated effectively. However, monitoring a bioremediative strategy is often difficult due to the complexities of environmental samples. Here we demonstrate that microbial respiration of perchlorate results in a significant fractionation ( approximately -15 per thousand ) of the chlorine stable isotope composition of perchlorate. This can be used to quantify the extent of biotic degradation and to separate biotic from abiotic attenuation of this contaminant. PMID:12902300

  9. Crystal structure of ortho­rhom­bic {bis­[(pyridin-2-yl)meth­yl](3,5,5,5-tetra­chloro­pent­yl)amine-κ3 N,N′,N′′}chlorido­copper(II) perchlorate

    PubMed Central

    Bussey, Katherine A.; Cavalier, Annie R.; Connell, Jennifer R.; Mraz, Margaret E.; Oshin, Kayode D.; Pintauer, Tomislav; Gray, Danielle L.; Parkin, Sean

    2015-01-01

    In the title compound, [CuCl(C17H19Cl4N3)]ClO4, the CuII ion adopts a distorted square-planar geometry defined by one chloride ligand and the three nitro­gen atoms from the bis­[(pyridin-2-yl)meth­yl](3,5,5,5-tetra­chloro­pent­yl)amine ligand. The perchlorate counter-ion is disordered over three sets of sites with refined occupancies 0.0634 (17), 0.221 (16) and 0.145 (7). In addition, the hetero-scorpionate arm of the bis­[(pyridin-2-yl)meth­yl](3,5,5,5-tetra­chloro­pent­yl)amine ligand is disordered over two sets of sites with refined occupancies 0.839 (2) and 0.161 (2). In the crystal, weak Cu⋯Cl inter­actions between symmetry-related mol­ecules create a dimerization with a chloride occupying the apical position of the square-pyramidal geometry typical of many copper(II) chloride hetero-scorpionate complexes. PMID:26279883

  10. Kinetics for a membrane reactor reducing perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Padhye, Lokesh; Rainwater, Ken; Jackson, W Andrew; Morse, Audra

    2007-02-01

    The major objectives of this work were to operate and construct an autohydrogenotrophic reactor and estimate perchlorate degradation kinetics. The results show that autohydrogenotrophic bacteria were cultured in the reactor and capable of removing 3.6 mg/d of perchlorate in the presence of excess hydrogen (99% removal). The reactor was successful in treating the average influent perchlorate concentration of 532 microg/L to the level of 3 microg/L. A first-order relationship was obtained between the concentration of active biomass in the reactor and the hydraulic retention time for the given amount of substrate. During the kinetic loading study, perchlorate removal ranged from 100 to 50%. The kinetic rate of perchlorate degradation observed in this study was 1.62 hr(-1). The significant degradation of perchlorate in these samples indicates the ubiquity of perchlorate-reducing organisms. Additionally, nitrate was simultaneously removed during water treatment (greater than 90% removal). Because of the excess levels of hydrogen, simultaneous removal of nitrate was not believed to significantly affect perchlorate removal. The area of concern was the lack of complete control over biological treatment. The growth of sulfate-reducing organisms in the reactor negatively affected perchlorate removal efficiency. There were no significant effects observed on the dissolved organic carbon and total suspended solids concentration of the effluent, suggesting that the treatment did not produce a large amount of biomass washout.

  11. Biodegradation of rocket propellant waste, ammonium perchlorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naqvi, S. M. Z.; Latif, A.

    1975-01-01

    The short term effects of ammonium perchlorate on selected organisms were studied. A long term experiment was also designed to assess the changes incurred by ammonium perchlorate on the nitrogen and chloride contents of soil within a period of 3 years. In addition, an attempt was made to produce methane gas from anaerobic fermentation of the aquatic weed, Alternanthera philoxeroides.

  12. PHYTOTRANSFORMATION OF PERCHLORATE USING PARROT-FEATHER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate is an oxvanion that has been extensively is a strong oxidizing
    agent in solid rocket fuel. Contamination of groundwater has occurred as the result of Perchlorate use. Standard disposal practices during the 1950s through the 1970s did not reflect the current knowled...

  13. ADSORPTION CHARACTERISTICS OF PERCHLORATE IN SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate(CI04) is an oxyanion that originates as a contaminant in ground and surface waters from the dissolution of ammonium, potassium, magnesium or sodium salts. Perchlorate is mainly used in solid rocket fuels, explosives, and military batteries. Because of its potential ha...

  14. PHYTOREMEDIATION OF PERCHLORATE BY TOBACCO PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous studies have shown that tobacco plants are tolerant of perchlorate and will accumulate perchlorate in the plant tissues. The objective of this research was to determine the effectiveness of tobacco plants in phytoremediation, a technology that employs plants to degrade,...

  15. PERCHLORATE IN FERTILIZERS?: ANALYSIS BY RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently, we and others found perchlorate at high levels (approximately 500 - 8000 mg/kg) in 90+% of 25+ fertilizers (primarily lawn-and-garden products) that are not identified as containing components derived from mined Chile saltpeter, which is known to contain perchlorate as ...

  16. ACCUMULATION AND FATE OF PERCHLORATE IN PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate, a component of solid rocket fuels, has emerged as a potential threat to surface water and groundwater at several locations in the U.S. Perchlorate levels up to 16 ug/L were detected in Lake Mead and 5-9 ug/L in the lower Colorado River. The water from the Colorado Ri...

  17. PERCHLORATE ACCUMULATION FROM FERTILIZER IN LEAFY VEGETATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate contaminated water and soil has been identified in many areas of the United States. Previous studies indicated that the primary source of contamination was from industry and military operations that use perchlorate as an oxidzing agent. However, recent studies have fo...

  18. Novel biomarkers of perchlorate exposure in zebrafish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mukhi, S.; Carr, J.A.; Anderson, T.A.; Patino, R.

    2005-01-01

    Perchlorate inhibits iodide uptake by thyroid follicles and lowers thyroid hormone production. Although several effects of perchlorate on the thyroid system have been reported, the utility of these pathologies as markers of environmental perchlorate exposures has not been adequately assessed. The present study examined time-course and concentration-dependent effects of perchlorate on thyroid follicle hypertrophy, colloid depletion, and angiogenesis; alterations in whole-body thyroxine (T4) levels; and somatic growth and condition factor of subadult and adult zebrafish. Changes in the intensity of the colloidal T4 ring previously observed in zebrafish also were examined immunohistochemically. Three-month-old zebrafish were exposed to ammonium perchlorate at measured perchlorate concentrations of 0, 11, 90, 1,131, and 11,480 ppb for 12 weeks and allowed to recover in clean water for 12 weeks. At two weeks of exposure, the lowest-observed-effective concentrations (LOECs) of perchlorate that induced angiogenesis and depressed the intensity of colloidal T4 ring were 90 and 1,131 ppb, respectively; other parameters were not affected (whole-body T4 was not determined at this time). At 12 weeks of exposure, LOECs for colloid depletion, hypertrophy, angiogenesis, and colloidal T4 ring were 11,480, 1,131, 90, and 11 ppb, respectively. All changes were reversible, but residual effects on angiogenesis and colloidal T4 ring intensity were still present after 12 weeks of recovery (LOEC, 11,480 ppb). Whole-body T 4 concentration, body growth (length and weight), and condition factor were not affected by perchlorate. The sensitivity and longevity of changes in colloidal T4 ring intensity and angiogenesis suggest their usefulness as novel markers of perchlorate exposure. The 12-week LOEC for colloidal T4 ring is the lowest reported for any perchlorate biomarker in aquatic vertebrates. ?? 2005 SETAC.

  19. Perchlorate exposure and dose estimates in infants

    PubMed Central

    Valentín-Blasini, Liza; Blount, Benjamin C.; Otero-Santos, Samaret; Cao, Yang; Bernbaum, Judy C.; Rogan, Walter J.

    2011-01-01

    Perchlorate is a naturally occurring inorganic anion used as a component of solid rocket fuel, explosives, and pyrotechnics. Sufficiently high perchlorate intakes can modify thyroid function by competitively inhibiting iodide uptake in adults; however little is known about perchlorate exposure and health effects in infants. Food intake models predict that infants have higher perchlorate exposure doses than adults. For this reason, we measured perchlorate and related anions (nitrate, thiocyanate, and iodide) in 206 urine samples from 92 infants ages 1–377 days and calculated perchlorate intake dose for this population of infants. The median estimated exposure dose for this population of infants was 0.160 μg/kg/day. Of the 205 individual dose estimates, 9% exceeded the reference dose of 0.7 μg/kg/day; 6% of infants providing multiple samples had multiple perchlorate dose estimates above the reference dose. Estimated exposure dose differed by feeding method: breast-fed infants had a higher perchlorate exposure dose (geometric mean 0.220 μg/kg/day) than infants consuming cow milk-based formula (geometric mean 0.103 μg/kg/day, p<0.0001) or soy-based formula (geometric mean 0.027 μg/kg/day, p<0.0001), consistent with dose estimates based on dietary intake data. The ability of perchlorate to block adequate iodide uptake by the thyroid may have been reduced by the iodine-sufficient status of the infants studied (median urinary iodide 125 μg/L). Further research is needed to see whether these perchlorate intake doses lead to any health effects. PMID:21449579

  20. Perchlorate exposure and dose estimates in infants.

    PubMed

    Valentín-Blasini, Liza; Blount, Benjamin C; Otero-Santos, Samaret; Cao, Yang; Bernbaum, Judy C; Rogan, Walter J

    2011-05-01

    Perchlorate is a naturally occurring inorganic anion used as a component of solid rocket fuel, explosives, and pyrotechnics. Sufficiently high perchlorate intakes can modify thyroid function by competitively inhibiting iodide uptake in adults; however, little is known about perchlorate exposure and health effects in infants. Food intake models predict that infants have higher perchlorate exposure doses than adults. For this reason, we measured perchlorate and related anions (nitrate, thiocyanate, and iodide) in 206 urine samples from 92 infants ages 1-377 days and calculated perchlorate intake dose for this sample of infants. The median estimated exposure dose for this sample of infants was 0.160 μg/kg/day. Of the 205 individual dose estimates, 9% exceeded the reference dose of 0.7 μg/kg/day; 6% of infants providing multiple samples had multiple perchlorate dose estimates above the reference dose. Estimated exposure dose differed by feeding method: breast-fed infants had a higher perchlorate exposure dose (geometric mean 0.220 μg/kg/day) than infants consuming cow milk-based formula (geometric mean 0.103 μg/kg/day, p < 0.0001) or soy-based formula (geometric mean 0.027 μg/kg/day, p < 0.0001), consistent with dose estimates based on dietary intake data. The ability of perchlorate to block adequate iodide uptake by the thyroid may have been reduced by the iodine-sufficient status of the infants studied (median urinary iodide 125 μg/L). Further research is needed to see whether these perchlorate intake doses lead to any health effects.

  1. Energetic co-ordination compounds: synthesis, characterization and thermolysis studies on bis-(5-nitro-2H-tetrazolato-N2)tetraammine cobalt(III) perchlorate (BNCP) and its new transition metal (Ni/Cu/Zn) perchlorate analogues.

    PubMed

    Talawar, M B; Agrawal, A P; Asthana, S N

    2005-04-11

    Bis-(5-nitro-2H-tetrazolato-N2)tetraammine[cobalt(III)/nickel(III)] perchlorates (BNCP/BNNP) and mono-(5-nitro-H-tetrazolato-N)triammine [copper(II)/zinc(II)] perchlorates (MNCuP/MNZnP) have been synthesized during this work. The synthesis was carried out by addition of carbonato tetraammine metal [Co/Ni/Cu/Zn] nitrate [CTCN/CTNN/CTCuN/CTZnN] to the aqueous solution of sodium salt of 5-nitrotetrazole followed by reaction with perchloric acid. The precursors were synthesized by the reaction of aqueous solution of their respective nitrates with ammonium carbonate at 70 degrees C. The complexes and their precursors were characterized by determining metal and perchlorate content as well as infrared (IR), electron spectra for chemical analysis (ESCA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The TG profiles indicated that BNCP, BNNP and MNCuP are thermally stable up to the temperature of 260-278 degrees C unlike MNZnP (150 degrees C). Sudden exothermic decomposition was observed in case of bis-(5-nitro-2H-tetrazolato-N2)tetraammine cobalt(III) perchlorate, bis-(5-nitro-2H-tetrazolato-N2)tetraammine nickel(III) perchlorate and mono-(5-nitro-H-tetrazolato-N)triammine zinc(II) perchlorate resulting in the severe damage of the sample cup. Sensitivity data indicated that the Co/Ni/Cu complexes are more friction sensitive (3-4.8 kg) than mono-(5-nitro-H-tetrazolato-N)triammine zinc(II) perchlorate (14 kg). The impact sensitivity results of the complexes corresponded to h50% of 30-36 cm.

  2. Perchlorate reduction by microbes inhabiting oil reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebensteiner, Martin; Stams, Alfons; Lomans, Bart

    2014-05-01

    Microbial perchlorate and chlorate reduction is a unique type of anaerobic respiration as during reduction of (per)chlorate chlorite is formed, which is then split into chloride and molecular oxygen. In recent years it was demonstrated that (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria may employ oxygenase-dependent pathways for the degradation of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. These findings suggested that (per)chlorate may be used as oxygen-releasing compound in anoxic environments that contain hydrocarbons, such as polluted soil sites and oil reservoirs. We started to study perchlorate reduction by microbes possibly inhabiting oil reservoirs. One of the organisms studied was Archaeoglobus fulgidus. This extremely thermophilic archaeon is known as a major contributor to souring in hot oil reservoirs. A. fulgidus turned out to be able to use perchlorate as terminal electron acceptor for growth with lactate (Liebensteiner et al 2013). Genome based physiological experiments indicated that A. fulgidus possesses a novel perchlorate reduction pathway. Perchlorate is first reduced to chlorite, but chlorite is not split into chloride and molecular oxygen as occurs in bacteria. Rather, chlorite reacts chemically with sulfide, forming oxidized sulfur compounds, which are reduced to sulfide in the electron transport chain by the archaeon. The dependence of perchlorate reduction on sulfur compounds could be shown. The implications of our findings as novel strategy for microbiological enhanced oil recovery and for souring mitigation are discussed. Liebensteiner MG, Pinkse MWH, Schaap PJ, Stams AJM and Lomans BP (2013) Archaeal (per)chlorate reduction at high temperature, a matter of abiotic-biotic reactions. Science 340: 85-87

  3. Biodegradation of rocket propellent waste, ammonium perchlorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naqui, S. M. Z.

    1975-01-01

    The impact of the biodegradation rate of ammonium perchlorate on the environment was studied in terms of growth, metabolic rate, and total biomass of selected animal and plant species. Brief methodology and detailed results are presented.

  4. The Microbiology of Perchlorate in the Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    In the last decade perchlorate has been identified as an important groundwater component that poses potential health threat. Although primarily sourced anthropogenically, many recent studies have identified significant natural pools throughout the US and the natural mechanisms of its synthesis remain a mystery. As such, the true perchlorate concentrations naturally present in the environment are still unknown making its regulation problematic. Because of its solubility and non-reactivity the fate and transport of perchlorate in the environment is primarily a function of microbial activity. In the last seven years more than forty specialized perchlorate respiring organisms have been identified and characterized. These dissimilatory perchlorate reducing bacteria (DPRB) are metabolically diverse and environmental populations tend to be dominated by two primary genotypes, the Dechloromonas and the Azospira species. As such, the majority of our understanding of this metabolism is based on these organisms. These organisms are readily found in soil and sedimentary environments and often associate with the rhizosphere. Recent research has demonstrated an accumulation of these organisms along plant roots suggesting their catabolism of root exudates and molecular studies has demonstrated their existence as endophytic infections of the stem and leaves of actively growing Brachypodium grass plants although their exact role under these conditions is unknown. These microorganisms are generally not nutritionally fastidious and vitamin supplementation is unnecessary for growth although molybdenum is a required trace element for perchlorate reduction. The Dechloromonas and Azospira species generally grow optimally at pH values near neutrality in freshwater environments. Even so, recent field studies have shown that related deep-branching members of these genera often predominate in sites of adverse pH or salinity with some species being capable of growth and perchlorate respiration

  5. Perchlorate exposure from infant formula and comparisons with the perchlorate reference dose.

    PubMed

    Schier, Joshua G; Wolkin, Amy F; Valentin-Blasini, Lisa; Belson, Martin G; Kieszak, Stephanie M; Rubin, Carol S; Blount, Benjamin C

    2010-05-01

    Perchlorate exposure may be higher in infants compared with older persons, due to diet (infant formula) and body weight versus intake considerations. Our primary objective was to quantitatively assess perchlorate concentrations in commercially available powdered infant formulas (PIFs). Secondary objectives were: (1) to estimate exposure in infants under different dosing scenarios and compare them with the perchlorate reference dose (RfD); (2) estimate the perchlorate concentration in water used for preparing PIFs that would result in a dose exceeding the RfD; and (3) estimate iodine intakes from PIFs. We quantified perchlorate levels in three samples (different lot numbers) of reconstituted PIF (using perchlorate-free water) from commercial brands of PIF in each of the following categories: bovine milk-based with lactose, soy-based, bovine milk-based but lactose-free, and elemental (typically consisting of synthetic amino acids). Exposure modeling was conducted to determine whether the RfD might be exceeded in 48 dosing scenarios that were dependent on age, centile energy intake per unit of body weight, body weight percentile, and PIF perchlorate concentration. We obtained three different samples in each of the five brands of bovine- and soy-based PIF, three different samples in each of the three brands of lactose-free PIF, and three different samples in two brands of elemental PIF. The results were as follows: bovine milk-based with lactose (1.72 microg/l, range: 0.68-5.05); soy-based (0.21 microg/l, range: 0.10-0.44); lactose-free (0.27 microg/l, range: 0.03-0.93); and elemental (0.18 microg/l, range: 0.08-0.4). Bovine milk-based PIFs with lactose had a significantly higher concentration of perchlorate (P<0.05) compared with all. Perchlorate was a contaminant of all commercially available PIFs tested. Bovine milk-based PIFs with lactose had a significantly higher perchlorate concentration perchlorate than soy, lactose-free, and elemental PIFs. The perchlorate Rf

  6. SURVEY OF FERTILIZERS AND RELATED MATERIALS FOR PERCHLORATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The most comprehensive survey of fertilizers and other raw materials for perchlorate to date has been conducted to determine whether these could be significant contributors to environmental perchlorate contamination. Although the data span a large range of commercial products, th...

  7. INVESTIGATION OF AGRICULTURAL FERTILIZERS AND RELATED MATERIALS FOR PERCHLORATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The most comprehensive survey of fertilizers and other raw materials for perchlorate to date has been conducted to determine whether these could be significant contributors to environmental perchlorate contamination. Although the data span a large range of commercial products, th...

  8. Perchlorate and nitrate in situ bioremediation of ground water

    SciTech Connect

    Strietelmeier, E. A.; Nuttall, H. Eric; Hatzinger, Paul; Goltz, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Nitrate and perchlorate are growing worldwide problems as mobile anionic groundwater contaminants. Biological rduction of nitrate and perchlorate in groundwater is under development as a technology to address these problems.

  9. PERCHLORATE INDUCES HERMAPHRODITISM IN THREESPINE STICKLEBACKS

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, Richard R.; von Hippel, Frank A.; Cresko, William A.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, concern regarding perchlorate contamination has arisen in many contexts. Perchlorate has many military, commercial, and domestic applications, and it has been found in milk, drinking and irrigation water, and produce. Perchlorate is harmful at low levels, yet it remains unregulated in the United States while the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency attempts to establish acceptable exposure levels. The present study investigated potential reproductive effects on vertebrates using a model fish species, the threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus). Sticklebacks were raised from syngamy through sexual maturity in untreated water and in three target concentrations of sodium perchlorate–treated water. Perchlorate was found to interfere with the expression of nuptial coloration, courtship behavior, and normal sexual development. Genetic testing revealed that some females were masculinized to the extent that they produced both sperm and eggs, and histological analysis showed that these individuals had intersexual gonads (ovotestes) containing both oocytes and cells undergoing spermatogenesis. In vitro fertilizations revealed that those gametes were capable of self- and cross-fertilization. However, crosses using sperm derived from genetic females died either during the blastula phase or near the onset of organogenesis. Sperm derived from genetic males produced viable fry when crossed with eggs derived from genetic females from all treatments. To our knowledge, the present study provides the first evidence that perchlorate produces androgenic effects and is capable of inducing functional hermaphroditism in a nonhermaphroditic vertebrate. PMID:16916028

  10. ACCUMULATION OF PERCHLORATE IN TOBACCO PLANTS AND TOBACCO PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous field and laboratory studies with vascular plants have shown that perchlorate is transported from perchlorate fortified soils and is accumulated in the plant tissues and organs. This paper reports results of initial investigations on the accumulation of perchlorate in t...

  11. PERCHLORATE PHYTOREMEDIATION USING HARDWOOD TREES AND VASCULAR PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate has contaminated water and soils at several locations in the United States. Perchlorate is
    water soluble, exceedingly mobile in aqueous systems, and can persist for many decades under typical ground and surface water conditions. Perchlorate is of concern because of...

  12. DETERMINATION OF PERCHLORATE IN TOBACCO PLANTS AND TOBACCO PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous field and laboratory studies with vascular plants have shown that perchlorate is transported from perchlorate fortified soils and is accumulated in the plant tissues and organs. This paper reports results of initial investigations on the accumulation of perchlorate in t...

  13. Quantitative detection of perchlorate-reducing bacteria by real-time PCR targeting the perchlorate reductase gene.

    PubMed

    Nozawa-Inoue, Mamie; Jien, Mercy; Hamilton, Nicholas S; Stewart, Valley; Scow, Kate M; Hristova, Krassimira R

    2008-03-01

    A quantitative real-time PCR assay targeting the pcrA gene, encoding the catalytic subunit of perchlorate reductase, detected pcrA genes from perchlorate-reducing bacteria in three different genera and from soil microbial communities. Partial pcrA sequences indicated differences in the composition of perchlorate-reducing bacterial communities following exposure to different electron donors.

  14. Perchlorate behavior in a municipal lake following fireworks displays.

    PubMed

    Wilkin, Richard T; Fine, Dennis D; Burnett, Nicole G

    2007-06-01

    Perchlorate salts of potassium and ammonium are the primary oxidants in pyrotechnic mixtures, yet insufficient information is available regarding the relationship between fireworks displays and the environmental occurrence of perchlorate. Here we document changes in perchlorate concentrations in surface water adjacent to a site of fireworks displays from 2004 to 2006. Preceding fireworks displays, perchlorate concentrations in surface water ranged from 0.005 to 0.081 microg/L, with a mean value of 0.043 microg/L. Within 14 h after the fireworks, perchlorate concentrations spiked to values ranging from 24 to 1028x the mean baseline value. A maximum perchlorate concentration of 44.2 microg/L was determined following the July 4th event in 2006. After the fireworks displays, perchlorate concentrations decreased toward the background level within 20 to 80 days, with the rate of attenuation correlating to surface water temperature. Adsorption tests indicate that sediments underlying the water column have limited (< 100 nmol/g) capacity to remove perchlorate via chemical adsorption. Microcosms showed comparatively rapid intrinsic perchlorate degradation in the absence of nitrate consistent with the observed disappearance of perchlorate from the study site. This suggests that at sites with appropriate biogeochemical conditions, natural attenuation may be an important factor affecting the fate of perchlorate following fireworks displays.

  15. Perchlorate behavior in a municipal lake following fireworks displays.

    PubMed

    Wilkin, Richard T; Fine, Dennis D; Burnett, Nicole G

    2007-06-01

    Perchlorate salts of potassium and ammonium are the primary oxidants in pyrotechnic mixtures, yet insufficient information is available regarding the relationship between fireworks displays and the environmental occurrence of perchlorate. Here we document changes in perchlorate concentrations in surface water adjacent to a site of fireworks displays from 2004 to 2006. Preceding fireworks displays, perchlorate concentrations in surface water ranged from 0.005 to 0.081 microg/L, with a mean value of 0.043 microg/L. Within 14 h after the fireworks, perchlorate concentrations spiked to values ranging from 24 to 1028x the mean baseline value. A maximum perchlorate concentration of 44.2 microg/L was determined following the July 4th event in 2006. After the fireworks displays, perchlorate concentrations decreased toward the background level within 20 to 80 days, with the rate of attenuation correlating to surface water temperature. Adsorption tests indicate that sediments underlying the water column have limited (< 100 nmol/g) capacity to remove perchlorate via chemical adsorption. Microcosms showed comparatively rapid intrinsic perchlorate degradation in the absence of nitrate consistent with the observed disappearance of perchlorate from the study site. This suggests that at sites with appropriate biogeochemical conditions, natural attenuation may be an important factor affecting the fate of perchlorate following fireworks displays. PMID:17612176

  16. Perchlorate in Water Supplies: Sources, Exposures, and Health Effects.

    PubMed

    Steinmaus, Craig M

    2016-06-01

    Perchlorate exposure occurs from ingestion of natural or man-made perchlorate in food or water. Perchlorate is used in a variety of industrial products including missile fuel, fireworks, and fertilizers, and industrial contamination of drinking water supplies has occurred in a number of areas. Perchlorate blocks iodide uptake into the thyroid and decreases the production of thyroid hormone, a critical hormone for metabolism, neurodevelopment, and other physiologic functions. Occupational and clinical dosing studies have not identified clear adverse effects, but may be limited by small sample sizes, short study durations, and the inclusion of mostly healthy adults. Expanding evidence suggests that young children, pregnant women, fetuses, and people co-exposed to similarly acting agents may be especially susceptible to perchlorate. Given the ubiquitous nature of perchlorate exposure, and the importance of thyroid hormone for brain development, studying the impact of perchlorate on human health could have far-reaching public health implications. PMID:27026358

  17. PERCHLORATE CHEMISTRY: IMPLICATIONS FOR ANALYSIS AND REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since the discovery of perchlorate in the ground and surface waters of several western states, there has been increasing interest in the health effects resulting from chronic exposure to low (ppb) levels. With this concern has come a need to investigate technologies that might be...

  18. PERCHLORATE UPTAKE AND TRANSFORMATION IN AQUATIC PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ammonium Perchlorate (AP) is produced on a large scale by the chemical industry, for a wide range of applications for example, as a strong oxidizing agent in solid rocket fuel. AP must be washed out of the inventory periodically due to its limited shelf-life,and replaced with a f...

  19. Atmospheric origins of perchlorate on Mars and in the Atacama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catling, D. C.; Claire, M. W.; Zahnle, K. J.; Quinn, R. C.; Clark, B. C.; Hecht, M. H.; Kounaves, S.

    2010-01-01

    Isotopic studies indicate that natural perchlorate is produced on Earth in arid environments by the oxidation of chlorine species through pathways involving ozone or its photochemical products. With this analogy, we propose that the arid environment on Mars may have given rise to perchlorate through the action of atmospheric oxidants. A variety of hypothetical pathways can be proposed including photochemical reactions, electrostatic discharge, and gas-solid reactions. Because perchlorate-rich deposits in the Atacama desert are closest in abundance to perchlorate measured at NASA's Phoenix Lander site, we made a preliminary study of the means to produce Atacama perchlorate to help shed light on the origin of Martian perchlorate. We investigated gas phase pathways using a 1-D photochemical model. We found that perchlorate can be produced in sufficient quantities to explain the abundance of perchlorate in the Atacama from a proposed gas phase oxidation of chlorine volatiles to perchloric acid. The feasibility of gas phase production for the Atacama provides justification for future investigations of gas phase photochemistry as a possible source for Martian perchlorate.

  20. Plant-mediated transformation of perchlorate into chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Nzengung, V.A.; Wang, C.; Harvey, G.

    1999-05-01

    The decontamination of perchlorate-contaminated water by woody plants was investigated in sand and hydroponic bioreactors. Willow trees were found to be the most favorable woody plants with phraetophytic characteristics in comparative screen tests with eastern cottonwoods and Eucalyptus cineria. Willows decontaminated aqueous solutions dosed with 10--100 mg/.L of perchlorate to below the method detection limit of 2 {micro}g/L. Two phytoprocesses were identified as important in the remediation of perchlorate-contaminated water: (1) uptake and phytodegradation of perchlorate in the tree branches and leaves and (2) rhizodegradation. Exposure of rooted willow trees to perchlorate-dosed media stimulated rhizodegradation. Homogeneous degradation studies using media from the root zone of dosed willow trees confirmed that rhizosphere-associated microorganisms mediated the degradation of perchlorate to chloride. Experiments conducted with varying ranges of nitrate concentrations clearly indicated that high nitrate concentrations interfered with rhizodegradation of perchlorate. This study provides evidence that the efficacy of phytoremediation of perchlorate-contaminated environments may depend on the concentration of competing terminal electron acceptors, such as nitrate, and the nitrogen source of the nutrient solution., Since perchlorate does not volatilize from water readily, a perchlorate remediation scheme may involve an intensively cultivated plantation of trees with phraetophytic characteristics and irrigation with the contaminated water.

  1. Perchlorate Exposure and Thyroid Function in Ammonium Perchlorate Workers in Yicheng, China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongxia; Wu, Libing; Wang, Xia; Liu, Qin; Ding, Miaohong; Peng, Kailiang; Meng, Zhongji

    2014-01-01

    The impact of low level dust on the thyroid function of workers chronically exposed to ammonium perchlorate (AP) is uncertain and controversial. The aim of this study was to examine whether workers in China with long-term (>3 years) occupational exposure to low levels of AP dust had affected thyroid homeostasis. Mean occupational exposures to AP dust ranged from 0.43 to 1.17 mg/m3. Geometric means of post-shift urinary perchlorate levels were 20.5 µg/L for those exposed and 12.8 µg/L for the controls. No significant differences were found for thyroid function parameters of FT3, FT4, or log TSH or for TPO prevalence or thyroglobulin levels. Additionally, no differences in findings were observed for complete blood count (CBC), serum biochemical profile, or pulmonary function test. Median urinary iodine levels of 172 and 184 µg/L showed that the workers had sufficient iodine intake. This study found no effect on thyroid function from long term, low-level documented exposure to ammonium perchlorate. It is the first study to report both thyroid status parameters and urinary perchlorate, a biomarker of internal perchlorate exposure, in occupationally exposed workers in China. PMID:24810578

  2. Aquifer susceptibility to perchlorate contamination in a highly urbanized environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woolfenden, Linda R.; Trefly, Michael G.

    2007-01-01

    Perchlorate contamination from anthropogenic sources has been released into the Rialto-Colton, California, USA, groundwater flow system since the 1940s during its production, distribution, storage, and use. Preliminary analysis of lithological, geophysical, and water-chemistry data provided new understanding of the pathways of perchlorate migration that aid in assessing the susceptibility of drinking-water supplies to contamination within the Rialto-Colton basin. Vertical migration of perchlorate into the main water-producing aquifers is restricted by an areally extensive old soil surface; however, perchlorate data indicate contamination below this soil surface. Possible pathways for the downward migration of the contaminated water include wellbore flow and discontinuities in the old soil surface. Horizontal migration of perchlorate is influenced by lithology and faults within the basin. The basin fill is a heterogeneous mixture of boulders, gravel, sand, silt, and clay, and internal faults may restrict perchlorate migration in some areas.

  3. DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF AN ION CHROMATOGRAPHIC METHOD FOR DETERMINING PERCHLORATE IN FERTILIZERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method has been developed for the determination of perchlorate in fertilizers. Materials are leached with deionized water to dissolve any soluble perchlorate compounds. Ion chromatographic separation is followed by suppressed conductivity for detection. Perchlorate is retained ...

  4. ACCUMULATION OF PERCHLORATE IN TOBACCO PLANTS: DEVELOPMENT OF A PLANT KINETIC MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous studies have shown that tobacco plants are tolerant of perchlorate and will accumulate perchlorate in plant tissues. This research determined the uptake, translocation, and accumulation of perchlorate in tobacco plants. Three hydroponics growth studies were completed u...

  5. Evidence for the distribution of perchlorates on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Benton C.; Kounaves, Samuel P.

    2016-10-01

    Various Mars missions have detected Cl atoms, chlorides and perchlorates in martian surface materials. The global soils, in particular, always contain significant levels of observable Cl. Direct evidence points to this Cl being in the form of both chlorides and perchlorates, and possibly also chlorates and other oxychlorines. The most widespread measurements have been of Cl atoms, and cannot discern the chemical form. However, from separate evidence of perchlorate obtained at high latitudes (Phoenix lander) and low latitudes (Curiosity rover), it is likely that perchlorates are widespread, albeit in varying proportions relative to the total amount of ubiquitous Cl.

  6. Perchlorate and nitrate in leafy vegetables of North America.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, C A; Crump, K S; Krieger, R I; Khandaker, N R; Gibbs, J P

    2005-12-15

    In previous studies trace levels of perchlorate were found in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) irrigated with Colorado River water, which is contaminated with low levels of perchlorate from aerospace and defense related industries. In this paper, we report the results of a survey conducted across North America to evaluate the occurrence of perchlorate in leafy vegetables produced outside the lower Colorado River region, and evaluate the relative iodide uptake inhibition potential to perchlorate and nitrate in these leafy vegetables. Conventionally and organically produced lettuce and other leafy vegetable samples were collected from production fields and farmers' markets in the central and coastal valleys of California, New Mexico, Colorado, Michigan, Ohio, New York, Quebec, and New Jersey. Results show that 16% of the conventionally produced samples and 32% of the organically produced samples had quantifiable levels of perchlorate using ion chromatography. Estimated perchlorate exposure from organically produced leafy vegetables was approximately 2 times that of conventional produce, but generally less than 10% of the reference dose recommended by the National Academy of Sciences. Furthermore, the iodide uptake inhibition potential of perchlorate was less than 1% of that of the nitrate present. These data are consistent with those of other reported perchlorate survey work with lettuce, bottled water, breast milk, dairy milk, and human urine, and suggest a wide national presence of perchlorate. PMID:16475313

  7. Atmospheric Production of Perchlorate on Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claire, M.; Catling, D. C.; Zahnle, K. J.

    2009-12-01

    Natural production and preservation of perchlorate on Earth occurs only in arid environments. Isotopic evidence suggests a strong role for atmospheric oxidation of chlorine species via pathways including ozone or its photochemical derivatives. As the Martian atmosphere is both oxidizing and drier than the driest places on Earth, we propose an atmospheric origin for the Martian perchlorates measured by NASA's Phoenix Lander. A variety of hypothetical formation pathways can be proposed including atmospheric photochemical reactions, electrostatic discharge, and gas-solid reactions. Here, we investigate gas phase formation pathways using a 1-D photochemical model (Catling et al. 2009, accepted by JGR). Because perchlorate-rich deposits in the Atacama desert are closest in abundance to perchlorate measured at NASA's Phoenix Lander site, we start with a study of the means to produce Atacama perchlorate. We found that perchlorate can be produced in sufficient quantities to explain the abundance of perchlorate in the Atacama from a proposed gas phase oxidation of chlorine volatiles to perchloric acid. These results are sensitive to estimated reaction rates for ClO3 species. The feasibility of gas phase production for the Atacama provides justification for further investigations of gas phase photochemistry as a possible source for Martian perchlorate. In addition to the Atacama results, we will present a preliminary study incorporating chlorine chemistry into an existing Martian photochemical model (Zahnle et al. JGR 2008).

  8. Interaction of perchlorate and trichloroethene bioreductions in mixed anaerobic culture.

    PubMed

    Wen, Li-Lian; Yang, Qiang; Zhang, Zhao-Xin; Yi, Yang-Yi; Tang, Youneng; Zhao, He-Ping

    2016-11-15

    This work evaluated the interaction of perchlorate and trichloroethene (TCE), two common co-contaminants in groundwater, during bioreduction in serum bottles containing synthetic mineral salts media and microbial consortia. TCE at concentrations up to 0.3mM did not significantly affect perchlorate reduction; however, perchlorate concentrations higher than 0.1mM made the reduction of TCE significantly slower. Perchlorate primarily inhibited the reduction of vinyl chloride (VC, a daughter product of TCE) to ethene. Mechanistic analysis showed that the inhibition was mainly because perchlorate reduction is thermodynamically more favorable than reduction of TCE and its daughter products and not because of toxicity due to accumulation of dissolved oxygen produced during perchlorate reduction. As the initial perchlorate concentration increased from 0 to 600mg/L in a set of serum bottles, the relative abundance of Rhodocyclaceae (a putatively perchlorate-reducing genus) increased from 6.3 to 80.6%, while the relative abundance of Dehalococcoides, the only known genus that is able to reduce TCE all the way to ethene, significantly decreased. Similarly, the relative abundance of Proteobacteria (a phylum to which most known perchlorate-reducing bacteria belong) increased from 22% to almost 80%. PMID:27449607

  9. Perchlorate as an emerging contaminant in soil, water and food.

    PubMed

    Kumarathilaka, Prasanna; Oze, Christopher; Indraratne, S P; Vithanage, Meththika

    2016-05-01

    Perchlorate ( [Formula: see text] ) is a strong oxidizer and has gained significant attention due to its reactivity, occurrence, and persistence in surface water, groundwater, soil and food. Stable isotope techniques (i.e., ((18)O/(16)O and (17)O/(16)O) and (37)Cl/(35)Cl) facilitate the differentiation of naturally occurring perchlorate from anthropogenic perchlorate. At high enough concentrations, perchlorate can inhibit proper function of the thyroid gland. Dietary reference dose (RfD) for perchlorate exposure from both food and water is set at 0.7 μg kg(-1) body weight/day which translates to a drinking water level of 24.5 μg L(-1). Chromatographic techniques (i.e., ion chromatography and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry) can be successfully used to detect trace level of perchlorate in environmental samples. Perchlorate can be effectively removed by wide variety of remediation techniques such as bio-reduction, chemical reduction, adsorption, membrane filtration, ion exchange and electro-reduction. Bio-reduction is appropriate for large scale treatment plants whereas ion exchange is suitable for removing trace level of perchlorate in aqueous medium. The environmental occurrence of perchlorate, toxicity, analytical techniques, removal technologies are presented.

  10. Perchlorate in the Great Lakes: isotopic composition and origin.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Armen; Sturchio, Neil C; Morrison, Candice G; Beloso, Abelardo D; Guan, Yunbin; Eiler, John M; Jackson, W Andrew; Hatzinger, Paul B

    2014-10-01

    Perchlorate is a persistent and mobile contaminant in the environment with both natural and anthropogenic sources. Stable isotope ratios of oxygen (δ(18)O, Δ(17)O) and chlorine (δ(37)Cl) along with the abundance of the radioactive isotope (36)Cl were used to trace perchlorate sources and behavior in the Laurentian Great Lakes. These lakes were selected for study as a likely repository of recent atmospheric perchlorate deposition. Perchlorate concentrations in the Great Lakes range from 0.05 to 0.13 μg per liter. δ(37)Cl values of perchlorate from the Great Lakes range from +3.0‰ (Lake Ontario) to +4.0‰ (Lake Superior), whereas δ(18)O values range from -4.1‰ (Lake Superior) to +4.0‰ (Lake Erie). Great Lakes perchlorate has mass-independent oxygen isotopic variations with positive Δ(17)O values (+1.6‰ to +2.7‰) divided into two distinct groups: Lake Superior (+2.7‰) and the other four lakes (∼+1.7‰). The stable isotopic results indicate that perchlorate in the Great Lakes is dominantly of natural origin, having isotopic composition resembling that measured for indigenous perchlorate from preindustrial groundwaters of the western USA. The (36)Cl/Cl ratio of perchlorate varies widely from 7.4 × 10(-12) (Lake Ontario) to 6.7 × 10(-11) (Lake Superior). These (36)ClO4(-) abundances are consistent with an atmospheric origin of perchlorate in the Great Lakes. The relatively high (36)ClO4(-) abundances in the larger lakes (Lakes Superior and Michigan) could be explained by the presence of (36)Cl-enriched perchlorate deposited during the period of elevated atmospheric (36)Cl activity following thermonuclear bomb tests in the Pacific Ocean.

  11. Perchlorate Clinical Pharmacology and Human Health: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Soldin, Offie Porat; Braverman, Lewis E.; Lamm, Steven H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Potassium perchlorate has been used at various times during the last 50 years to treat hyperthyroidism. Since World War II ammonium perchlorate has been used as a propellant for rockets. In 1997, the assay sensitivity for perchlorate in water was improved from 0.4 mg/L (ppm) to 4 µg/L (ppb). As a result, public water supplies in Southern California were found to contain perchlorate ions in the range of 5 to 8 ppb, and those in Southern Nevada were found to contain 5 to 24 ppb. Research programs have been developed to assess the safety or risk from these exposures and to assist state and regulatory agencies in setting a reasonable safe level for perchlorate in drinking water. This report reviews the evidence on the human health effects of perchlorate exposure. Perchlorate is a competitive inhibitor of iodine uptake. All of its pharmacologic effects at current therapeutic levels or lower are associated with inhibition of the sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) on the thyroid follicular cell membrane. A review of the medical and occupational studies has been undertaken to identify perchlorate exposure levels at which thyroid hormone levels may be reduced or thyrotropin levels increased. This exposure level may begin in the 35 to 100 mg/d range. Volunteer studies have been designed to determine the exposure levels at which perchlorate begins to affect iodine uptake in humans. Such effects may begin at levels of approximately 1 mg/d. Environmental studies have assessed the thyroidal health of newborns and adults at current environmental exposures to perchlorate and have concluded that the present levels appear to be safe. Whereas additional studies are underway both in laboratory animals and in the field, it appears that a safe level can be established for perchlorate in water and that regulatory agencies and others are now trying to determine that level. PMID:11477312

  12. Perchlorate in the Great Lakes: isotopic composition and origin.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Armen; Sturchio, Neil C; Morrison, Candice G; Beloso, Abelardo D; Guan, Yunbin; Eiler, John M; Jackson, W Andrew; Hatzinger, Paul B

    2014-10-01

    Perchlorate is a persistent and mobile contaminant in the environment with both natural and anthropogenic sources. Stable isotope ratios of oxygen (δ(18)O, Δ(17)O) and chlorine (δ(37)Cl) along with the abundance of the radioactive isotope (36)Cl were used to trace perchlorate sources and behavior in the Laurentian Great Lakes. These lakes were selected for study as a likely repository of recent atmospheric perchlorate deposition. Perchlorate concentrations in the Great Lakes range from 0.05 to 0.13 μg per liter. δ(37)Cl values of perchlorate from the Great Lakes range from +3.0‰ (Lake Ontario) to +4.0‰ (Lake Superior), whereas δ(18)O values range from -4.1‰ (Lake Superior) to +4.0‰ (Lake Erie). Great Lakes perchlorate has mass-independent oxygen isotopic variations with positive Δ(17)O values (+1.6‰ to +2.7‰) divided into two distinct groups: Lake Superior (+2.7‰) and the other four lakes (∼+1.7‰). The stable isotopic results indicate that perchlorate in the Great Lakes is dominantly of natural origin, having isotopic composition resembling that measured for indigenous perchlorate from preindustrial groundwaters of the western USA. The (36)Cl/Cl ratio of perchlorate varies widely from 7.4 × 10(-12) (Lake Ontario) to 6.7 × 10(-11) (Lake Superior). These (36)ClO4(-) abundances are consistent with an atmospheric origin of perchlorate in the Great Lakes. The relatively high (36)ClO4(-) abundances in the larger lakes (Lakes Superior and Michigan) could be explained by the presence of (36)Cl-enriched perchlorate deposited during the period of elevated atmospheric (36)Cl activity following thermonuclear bomb tests in the Pacific Ocean. PMID:25171443

  13. Seasonal variation and factors influencing perchlorate in water, snow, soil and corns in Northeastern China.

    PubMed

    Ye, Long; You, Hong; Yao, Jie; Kang, Xi; Tang, Lu

    2013-03-01

    Seasonal variation and influencing factors of perchlorate in snow, surface soil, rain, surface water, groundwater and corn were studied. Seven hundreds and seventy samples were collected in different periods in Harbin and its vicinity, China. Perchlorate concentrations were analyzed by ion chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry. Results indicate that fireworks and firecrackers display from the Spring Festival to the Lantern Festival (February 2, 2011-February 17, 2011) can result in the occurrence of perchlorate in surface soil and snow. Perchlorate distribution is affected by wind direction in winter. Melting snow which contained perchlorate can dissolve perchlorate in surface soil, and then perchlorate can percolate into groundwater so that perchlorate concentrations in groundwater increased in spring. Perchlorate concentrations in groundwater and surface water decrease after rainy season in summer. Groundwater samples collected in the floodplain areas of the Songhua River and the Ashi River contained higher perchlorate concentrations than that far away with the rivers. The corns have the ability to accumulate perchlorate.

  14. Predicting perchlorate uptake in greenhouse lettuce from perchlorate, nitrate and chloride irrigation water concentrations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) has been detected in edible leafy vegetables irrigated with Colorado River water. The primary concern has been the ClO4- concentration in lettuce. There has been a limited number of studies on ClO4- uptake but the interactive effect of other anions on ClO4- uptake is not known in...

  15. High ozone increases soil perchlorate but does not affect foliar perchlorate content

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ozone (O3) is implicated in the natural source inventory of perchlorate (ClO4-), a hydrophilic salt that migrates to ground water and interferes with uptake of iodide in mammals, including humans. Tropospheric O3 is elevated in many areas. We previously showed (Grantz et al., 2013; Environmental Pol...

  16. Perchlorate Exposure Through Water and Milk in Istanbul.

    PubMed

    Can, Ozge; Blount, Ben; Valentin-Blasini, Liza; Erdemgil, Yigit; Uzunoglu, Deniz; Aksoy, Murat; Coskun, Abdurrahman; Serteser, Mustafa; Unsal, Ibrahim; Ozpinar, Aysel

    2016-09-01

    Perchlorate is a chemical pollutant that inhibits iodide uptake and may possibly impair thyroid function. Our previous study found widespread perchlorate exposure in non-pregnant, non-lactating, healthy women residing in Istanbul. The aim of this study is to assess the relative amounts of perchlorate exposure attributable to consumption of municipal water, bottled water and boxed milk available in Istanbul. Only trace levels of perchlorate were found in treated municipal water (58 % detectable, mean = 0.13 µg/L, maximum = 0.75 µg/L) and bottled water (7.4 % detectable, mean = perchlorate (mean = 4.53 µg/L; maximum = 6.21 µg/L). Median perchlorate exposure attributable to water and milk (0.007 µg/kg/day) is small compared both to the reference dose (0.7 µg/kg/day) and to total perchlorate exposure (0.13 µg/kg/day) in Istanbul. Therefore, additional studies are needed to identify the major sources of perchlorate exposure in Istanbul. PMID:27435977

  17. PERCHLORATE IDENTIFICATION IN FERTILIZERS AND ACCUMULATION IN LETTUCE SEEDLINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate has contaminated groundwater, drinking water and soils at several locations in the U.S. The primary source of contamination at sites that have been investigated to date seems to be from industrial and military operations that use Perchlorate as an oxidizing agent. How...

  18. Experimental chlorine stable isotope fractionation of perchlorate respiring bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ader, M.; Coleman, M.; Coates, J.; Chaudhuri, S.

    2006-12-01

    Perchlorate natural occurrences on earth are very limited and seem restricted to extremely arid environments such as nitrate deposits of the Atacama Desert of northern Chile, where perchlorate contents can reach 0.1 to 1%. Anthropogenically sourced perchlorate however is extensively used as a major component of explosives and rocket fuels. Careless disposal of these highly soluble and very stable perchlorates locally led to the contamination of drinking water, now recognised as posing a significant health threat. Recent studies have demonstrated that some microorganisms are able to completely reduce perchlorate to innocuous chloride, and offer a great potential for the bioremediation of contaminated waters. Provided that the isotopic fractionation associated with this reduction is significant, the measurement of the chloride isotopic composition of contaminated water is a powerful tool for monitoring the progress of in-situ remediation. We report here, the characterisation of the isotopic fractionation associated with perchlorate reduction performed by Dechlorosoma suillum strain PS during 3 culture experiments performed in a batch fermentor (anoxic, 37°°C, pH =7). The basal medium contained acetate as the electron donor and perchlorate as the electron acceptor. When possible, chloride salts were replaced by sulphate salts so as to lower the initial chloride content. The paired chlorine isotopic compositions of chloride and perchlorate in solutions sampled throughout the experiment were measured using the method described in Ader et al. 2001. The fractionation between chloride and perchlorate was calculated independently for each sample, using on the one hand the chloride content and isotopic composition and on the other hand the perchlorate content and isotopic composition. The results show that the fractionation is constant within error throughout the experiment for the 3 experiments with a weighted mean of -14.94±0.14‰. This value is much lower than the

  19. CHRONIC PERCHLORATE EXPOSURE CAUSES MORPHOLOGICAL ABNORMALITIES IN DEVELOPING STICKLEBACK

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, Richard R.; Von Hippel, Frank A.; O’Hara, Todd M.

    2011-01-01

    Few studies have examined the effects of chronic perchlorate exposure during growth and development, and fewer still have analyzed the effects of perchlorate over multiple generations. We describe morphological and developmental characteristics for threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) that were spawned and raised to sexual maturity in perchlorate-treated water (G1,2003) and for their offspring (G2,2004) that were not directly treated with perchlorate. The G1,2003 displayed a variety of abnormalities, including impaired formation of calcified traits, slower growth rates, aberrant sexual development, poor survivorship, and reduced pigmentation that allowed internal organs to be visible. Yet these conditions were absent when the offspring of contaminated fish (G2,2004) were raised in untreated water, suggesting a lack of transgenerational effects and that surviving populations may be able to recover following remediation of perchlorate-contaminated sites PMID:21465539

  20. Trace level perchlorate analysis by ion chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Johnson; Gandhi, Jay; Hedrick, Joe

    2005-08-26

    Perchlorate is commonly used as an oxidant in solid fuel propellant for rockets and missiles. Recently perchlorate contamination was found in many aquifers associated with Colorado River and other sites. Perchlorate was also found at elevated level in crops that use contaminated water for irrigation. Ion chromatography with conductivity detection could be used to measure perchlorate levels in drinking and wastewaters as per United States Environmental Protection Agency method 314, but at lower levels and with complexity of the matrix there could be false positive and/or false negative. This study was done to demonstrate the detection of perchlorate with lower detection limit with high ionic matrix by ion chromatography-mass spectrometry. PMID:16106848

  1. Weakening of ice by magnesium perchlorate hydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lenferinka, Hendrick J.; Durhama, William B.; Sternb, Laura A.; Patharec, Asmin V.

    2013-01-01

    We show that perchlorate hydrates, which have been detected at high circumpolar martian latitudes, have a dramatic effect upon the rheological behavior of polycrystalline water ice under conditions applicable to the North Polar Layered Deposits (NPLD). We conducted subsolidus creep tests on mixtures of ice and magnesium perchlorate hydrate, Mg(ClO4)2·6H2O (MP6), of 0.02, 0.05, 0.10, and 0.47 volume fraction MP6. We found these mixtures to be increasingly weak with increasing MP6 content. For mixtures with ⩽0.10 volume fraction MP6, we resolved a stress exponent of n ≈ 2 at low stresses transitioning to n ≈ 4 above 10 MPa. Scanning electron microscopy of deformed specimens revealed MP6 to be distributed as an interconnected film between ice grains. These results suggest that grain boundary sliding (GBS) may be enhanced with respect to pure ice. As the enhancement of GBS is expected in polycrystalline aggregates containing a few percent melt or otherwise weak material distributed along grain boundaries, the observed n ≈ 2 is consistent with the mutual accommodation of basal slip and GBS. If ice containing trace concentrations of MP6 is also much weaker than pure ice at low stresses, flow in the NPLD could be significantly enhanced, particularly at the warmer basal temperatures associated with higher martian obliquities.

  2. Reduction of perchlorate and nitrate by salt tolerant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Okeke, Benedict C; Giblin, Tara; Frankenberger, William T

    2002-01-01

    Spent regenerant brine from ion-exchange technology for the removal of perchlorate and nitrate produces a high salt waste stream, which requires remediation before disposal. Bioremediation is an attractive treatment option. In this study, we enriched for salt tolerant bacteria from sediments from Cargill salt evaporation facility (California, USA), the Salton Sea (California, USA), and a high density hydrocarbon oxidizing bacterial cocktail. The bacterial cocktail enrichment culture reduced ClO4- from 500 to 260 mg 1 in 4 weeks. Salt tolerant bacterial isolates from the enrichment cultures and two denitrifying salt tolerant bacteria, Haloferax denitrificans and Parococcus halodenitricans, substantially reduced perchlorate. The highest rate of perchlorate removal was recorded with the isolate, Citrobacter sp.: 32% reduction in 1 week. This bacterium substantially reduced perchlorate in 0-5% NaCl solutions and maximally at 30 degrees C and at an initial pH 7.5. In simulated brines containing 7.5% total solids, the Citrobacter sp. significantly reduced both perchlorate and nitrate with 34.9 and 15.6% reduction, respectively, in 1 week. Coculture of a potent perchlorate reducing, non-salt tolerant (non-saline) bacterium, perclace and the Citrobacter sp. proved most effective for perchlorate removal in the brine (46.4% in 1 week). This study demonstrates that both anions can be reduced in treatment of brines from ion exchange systems. PMID:12009133

  3. Perchlorate reduction by a novel chemolithoautotrophic, hydrogen-oxidizing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Husen; Bruns, Mary Ann; Logan, Bruce E

    2002-10-01

    Water treatment technologies are needed that can remove perchlorate from drinking water without introducing organic chemicals that stimulate bacterial growth in water distribution systems. Hydrogen is an ideal energy source for bacterial degradation of perchlorate as it leaves no organic residue and is sparingly soluble. We describe here the isolation of a perchlorate-respiring, hydrogen-oxidizing bacterium (Dechloromonas sp. strain HZ) that grows with carbon dioxide as sole carbon source. Strain HZ is a Gram-negative, rod-shaped facultative anaerobe that was isolated from a gas-phase anaerobic packed-bed biofilm reactor treating perchlorate-contaminated groundwater. The ability of strain HZ to grow autotrophically with carbon dioxide as the sole carbon source was confirmed by demonstrating that biomass carbon (100.9%) was derived from CO2. Chemolithotrophic growth with hydrogen was coupled with complete reduction of perchlorate (10 mM) to chloride with a maximum doubling time of 8.9 h. Strain HZ also grew using acetate as the electron donor and chlorate, nitrate, or oxygen (but not sulphate) as an electron acceptor. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA sequence placed strain HZ in the genus Dechloromonas within the beta subgroup of the Proteobacteria. The study of this and other novel perchlorate-reducing bacteria may lead to new, safe technologies for removing perchlorate and other chemical pollutants from drinking water.

  4. Perchlorate reduction by hydrogen autotrophic bacteria in a bioelectrochemical reactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zichao; Gao, Mengchun; Zhang, You; She, Zonglian; Ren, Yun; Wang, Zhe; Zhao, Congcong

    2014-09-01

    The autotrophic hydrogen reduction of perchlorate was investigated in batch modes in a proton-exchange membrane bioelectrochemical reactor. The phylogenic characterization of hydrogen-autotrophic perchlorate-reducing cultures in the cathode cell mainly included the genera Aureibacter tunicatorum, Fulvivirga kasyanovii, Thermotalea metallivorans (T), bacterium WHC2-6, and Thauera sp. Q20-C. The suitable H2SO4 supplement concentration was identified to be between 0.04 and 0.05 mol L(-1) in the anode cell. The perchlorate reduction was affected by the sludge concentration in the cathode cell, current intensity, and initial perchlorate concentration. The removal efficiency of perchlorate positively correlated with the current intensity, and the current intensity of 20, 40, 50, and 60 mA corresponded to removal efficiencies of 95.03, 96.29, 97.56 and 98.99%, respectively. When the current intensity was sufficient for hydrogen production, the kinetics of the perchlorate reduction conformed to a zero-order kinetics model, and the maximum specific substrate utilization rates for perchlorate (Vmax) ranged from 5.52 to 14.34 mg ClO4(-) g(-1) volatile suspended solid (VSS) h(-1).

  5. Effects of Perchlorate on Organic Molecules under Simulated Mars Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrier, B. L.; Kounaves, S. P.

    2014-12-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) was discovered in the northern polar region of Mars by the Mars Phoenix Lander in 2008 and has also been recently detected by the Curiosity Rover in Gale Crater [1,2]. Perchlorate has also been shown to be formed under current Mars conditions via the oxidation of mineral chlorides, further supporting the theory that perchlorate is present globally on Mars [3]. The discovery of perchlorate on Mars has raised important questions about the effects of perchlorate on the survival and detection of organic molecules. Although it has been shown that pyrolysis in the presence of perchlorate results in the alteration or destruction of organic molecules [4], few studies have been conducted on the potential effects of perchlorate on organic molecules under martian surface conditions. Although perchlorate is typically inert under Mars-typical temperatures [5], perchlorate does absorb high energy UV radiation, and has been shown to decompose to form reactive oxychlorine species such as chlorite (ClO2-) when exposed to martian conditions including UV or ionizing radiation [6,7]. Here we investigate the effects of perchlorate on the organic molecules tryptophan, benzoic acid and mellitic acid in order to determine how perchlorate may alter these compounds under Mars conditions. Experiments are performed in a Mars Simulation Chamber (MSC) capable of reproducing the temperature, pressure, atmospheric composition and UV flux found on Mars. Soil simulants are prepared consisting of SiO2 and each organic, as well as varying concentrations of perchlorate salts, and exposed in the MSC. Subsequent to exposure in the MSC samples are leached and the leachate analyzed by HPLC and LC-MS to determine the degree of degradation of the original organic and the identity of any potential decomposition products formed by oxidation or chlorination. References: [1] Kounaves et al., J. Geophys. Res. Planets, Vol. 115, p. E00E10, 2010 [2] Glavin et al., J. Geophys. Res. Planets, Vol

  6. Electron donors and co-contaminants affect microbial community composition and activity in perchlorate degradation.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiangyu; Xie, Yuxuan; Wang, Jinfeng; Wang, Jing; Liu, Fei

    2015-04-01

    Although microbial reduction of perchlorate (ClO4(-)) is a promising and effective method, our knowledge on the changes in microbial communities during ClO4(-) degradation is limited, especially when different electron donors are supplied and/or other contaminants are present. Here, we examined the effects of acetate and hydrogen as electron donors and nitrate and ammonium as co-contaminants on ClO4(-) degradation by anaerobic microcosms using six treatments. The process of degradation was divided into the lag stage (SI) and the accelerated stage (SII). Quantitative PCR was used to quantify four genes: pcrA (encoding perchlorate reductase), cld (encoding chlorite dismutase), nirS (encoding copper and cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase), and 16S rRNA. While the degradation of ClO4(-) with acetate, nitrate, and ammonia system (PNA) was the fastest with the highest abundance of the four genes, it was the slowest in the autotrophic system (HYP). The pcrA gene accumulated in SI and played a key role in initiating the accelerated degradation of ClO4(-) when its abundance reached a peak. Degradation in SII was primarily maintained by the cld gene. Acetate inhibited the growth of perchlorate-reducing bacteria (PRB), but its effect was weakened by nitrate (NO3(-)), which promoted the growth of PRB in SI, and therefore, accelerated the ClO4(-) degradation rate. In addition, ammonia (NH4(+)), as nitrogen sources, accelerated the growth of PRB. The bacterial communities' structure and diversity were significantly affected by electron donors and co-contaminants. Under heterotrophic conditions, both ammonia and nitrate promoted Azospira as the most dominant genera, a fact that might significantly influence the rate of ClO4(-) natural attenuation by degradation.

  7. Simultaneous removal of perchlorate and energetic compounds in munitions wastewater by zero-valent iron and perchlorate-respiring bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Se Chang; Hubbard, Brian; Cha, Daniel K; Kim, Byung J

    2014-01-01

    Ammonium perchlorate is one of the main constituents in Army's insensitive melt-pour explosive, PAX-21 in addition to RDX and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN). The objective of this study is to develop an innovative treatment process to remove both perchlorate and energetic compounds simultaneously from PAX-21 production wastewater. It was hypothesized that the pretreatment of PAX-21 wastewater with zero-valent iron (ZVI) would convert energetic compounds to products that are more amenable for biological oxidation and that these products serve as electron donors for perchlorate-reducing bacteria. Results of batch ZVI reduction experiments showed that DNAN was completely reduced to 2,4-diaminoanisole and RDX was completely reduced to formaldehyde. Anaerobic batch biodegradation experiments showed that perchlorate (30 mg L(-1)) in ZVI-treated PAX-21 wastewater was decreased to an undetectable level after 5 days. Batch biodegradation experiments also confirmed that formaldehyde in ZVI-treated wastewater was the primary electron donor for perchlorate-respiring bacteria. The integrated iron-anaerobic bioreactor system was effective in completely removing energetic compounds and perchlorate from the PAX-21 wastewater without adding an exogenous electron donor. This study demonstrated that ZVI pretreatment not only removed energetic compounds, but also transformed energetic compounds to products that can serve as the source of electrons for perchlorate-respiring bacteria.

  8. High pressure studies of potassium perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravica, Michael; Wang, Yonggang; Sneed, Daniel; Reiser, Sharissa; White, Melanie

    2016-09-01

    Two experiments are reported on KClO4 at extreme conditions. A static high pressure Raman study was first conducted to 18.9 GPa. Evidence for at least two new phases was observed: one between 2.4 and 7.7 GPa (possibly sluggish), and the second near 11.7 GPa. Then, the X-ray induced decomposition rate of potassium perchlorate (KClO4 → hν KCl + 2O2) was studied up to 15.2 GPa. The time-dependent growth of KCl and O2 was monitored. The decomposition rate slowed at higher pressures. We present the first direct evidence for O2 crystallization at higher pressures, demonstrating that O2 molecules aggregate at high pressure.

  9. The NAS Perchlorate Review: Adverse Effects?

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Richard B.; Corley, Richard; Cowan, Linda; Utiger, Robert D.

    2005-11-01

    To the editor: Drs. Ginsberg and Rice argue that the reference dose for perchlorate of 0.0007 mg/kg per day recommended by the National Academies’ Committee to Assess the Health Implications of Perchlorate Ingestion is not adequately protective. As members of the committee, we disagree. Ginsberg and Rice base their conclusion on three points. The first involves the designation of the point of departure as a NOEL (no-observed-effect level) versus a LOAEL (lowest-observed-adverse- effect level). The committee chose as its point of departure a dose of perchlorate (0.007 mg/kg per day) that when given for 14 days to 7 normal subjects did not cause a significant decrease in the group mean thyroid iodide uptake (Greer et al. 2002). Accordingly, the committee considered it a NOEL. Ginsberg and Rice focus on the fact that only 7 subjects were given that dose, and they 1seem to say that attention should be paid only to the results in those subjects in whom there was a 1fall in thyroid iodide uptake, and that the results in those in whom there was no fall or an increase should be ignored. They consider the dose to be a LOAEL because of the fall in uptake in those few subjects. It is important to note that a statistically significant decrease of, for example, 5% or even 10%, would not be biologically important and, more important, would not be sustained. For example, in another study (Braverman et al. 2004), administration of 0.04 mg/kg per day to normal subjects for 6 months had no effect on thyroid iodide uptake when measured at 3 and 6 months, and no effect on serum thyroid hormone or thyrotropin concentrations measured monthly (inspection of Figure 5A in the paper by Greer et al. suggests that this dose would inhibit thyroid iodide uptake by about 25% if measured at 2 weeks). The second issue involves database uncertainty. In clinical studies, perchlorate has been administered prospectively to 68 normal subjects for 2 weeks to 6 months. In one study (Brabant et al. 1992

  10. POLISHING THE EFFLUENT FROM AN ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL PERCHLORATE TREATMENT PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anaerobic biological processes effectively reduce perchlorate to chloride. However, the effluent can be biologically unstable, high in particulates and high in disinfection by-product precursor compounds. Such an effluent would be unsuitable for transmission into a drinking water...

  11. Novel miniaturized sensors for potentiometric batch and flow-injection analysis (FIA) of perchlorate in fireworks and propellants.

    PubMed

    Almeer, Saeed H M A; Zogby, Ibrahim A; Hassan, Saad S M

    2014-11-01

    Three planar miniaturized perchlorate membrane sensors (3×5 mm(2)) are prepared using a flexible Kaptan substrate coated with nitron-perchlorate (NT-ClO4) [sensor 1], methylene blue-perchlorate (MB-ClO4) [sensor II] and indium-porphyrin (In-Por) [sensor III] as electroactive materials in PVC membranes plasticized with 2-NPPE. Sensors I, II and III display near-Nernstian response for 1.0×10(-5)-1.0×10(-2), 3.1×10(-5)-1.0×10(-2) and 3.1×10(-6)-1.0×10(-2) mol L(-1) ClO4(-) with lower detection limits of 6.1×10(-6), 6.9×10(-6) and 1.2×10(-6) mol L(-1), and anionic calibration slopes of 50.9±0.4, 48.4±0.4 and 57.7±0.3 mV decade(-1), respectively. Methods for determining perchlorate using these sensors offer many attractive advantages including simplicity, flexibility, cost effectiveness, wide linear dynamic response range (0.1-1000 ppm), low detection limit (<1.2×10(-6) mol L(-1)≡0.1 ppm), small sample test volume (100 μL), safety, short response time (<20 s), long life span (~8 weeks), and extended wide working pH range (4.5-8.0). The sensors show high selectivity in the presence of some inorganic ions (e.g., PO4(3-), SO4(2-), S2O3(2-), NO2(-), NO3(-), N3(-), CN(-), Cl(-), Br(-), I(-)) and automation feasibility. Indium-porphyrin based membrane sensor (sensor III) is used as a detector in a wall-jet flow injection set-up to enable accurate flow injection analysis (FIA) of perchlorate in some fireworks without interferences from the associated reducing agents (sulfur and charcoal), binders (dextrin, lactose), coloring agents (calcium, strontium, copper, iron, sodium), color brighten (linseed oil) and regulators (aluminum flakes) which are commonly used in the formulations. The sensor is also used for perchlorate assessment in some propellant powders. The results fairly agree with data obtained by ion-chromatography.

  12. Novel miniaturized sensors for potentiometric batch and flow-injection analysis (FIA) of perchlorate in fireworks and propellants.

    PubMed

    Almeer, Saeed H M A; Zogby, Ibrahim A; Hassan, Saad S M

    2014-11-01

    Three planar miniaturized perchlorate membrane sensors (3×5 mm(2)) are prepared using a flexible Kaptan substrate coated with nitron-perchlorate (NT-ClO4) [sensor 1], methylene blue-perchlorate (MB-ClO4) [sensor II] and indium-porphyrin (In-Por) [sensor III] as electroactive materials in PVC membranes plasticized with 2-NPPE. Sensors I, II and III display near-Nernstian response for 1.0×10(-5)-1.0×10(-2), 3.1×10(-5)-1.0×10(-2) and 3.1×10(-6)-1.0×10(-2) mol L(-1) ClO4(-) with lower detection limits of 6.1×10(-6), 6.9×10(-6) and 1.2×10(-6) mol L(-1), and anionic calibration slopes of 50.9±0.4, 48.4±0.4 and 57.7±0.3 mV decade(-1), respectively. Methods for determining perchlorate using these sensors offer many attractive advantages including simplicity, flexibility, cost effectiveness, wide linear dynamic response range (0.1-1000 ppm), low detection limit (<1.2×10(-6) mol L(-1)≡0.1 ppm), small sample test volume (100 μL), safety, short response time (<20 s), long life span (~8 weeks), and extended wide working pH range (4.5-8.0). The sensors show high selectivity in the presence of some inorganic ions (e.g., PO4(3-), SO4(2-), S2O3(2-), NO2(-), NO3(-), N3(-), CN(-), Cl(-), Br(-), I(-)) and automation feasibility. Indium-porphyrin based membrane sensor (sensor III) is used as a detector in a wall-jet flow injection set-up to enable accurate flow injection analysis (FIA) of perchlorate in some fireworks without interferences from the associated reducing agents (sulfur and charcoal), binders (dextrin, lactose), coloring agents (calcium, strontium, copper, iron, sodium), color brighten (linseed oil) and regulators (aluminum flakes) which are commonly used in the formulations. The sensor is also used for perchlorate assessment in some propellant powders. The results fairly agree with data obtained by ion-chromatography. PMID:25127583

  13. Perchlorate in the feed-dairy continuum of the southwestern United States.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, C A; Blount, B C; Valentin-Blasini, L; Lesch, S M; Krieger, R I

    2008-07-01

    Perchlorate has the potential to cause thyroid dysfunction by inhibiting iodide uptake by the sodium iodide symporter. Perchlorate-contaminated waters may lead to human exposure through drinking water and food chain transfer in crops by way of irrigation water. Perchlorate has been found in dairy milk collected nationally and internationally. This study was conducted to evaluate perchlorate in the feed-dairy continuum in the southwestern United States. All feed products collected at dairies in this study had detectable levels of perchlorate as analyzed by ion chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The calculated total perchlorate intake across dairies ranged from 1.9 to 12.7 mg/cow per day. The variation in total perchlorate intake across dairies was largely associated with variation in forage and silage products. Alfalfa products were the single most important source of perchlorate intake variability among dairies. The estimated perchlorate intake from drinking water ranged from 0.01 mg per cow per day and was generally less than 2% of the total perchlorate intake. The perchlorate content of milk ranged from 0.9 to 10.3 microg/L and was similar to levels reported by the Food and Drug Administration's Total Diet Study. The perchlorate content of milk was significantly related to the presence of perchlorate in feed but the variation of perchlorate in milk could not be explained by feed intake alone.

  14. (Per)chlorate in Biology on Earth and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Wang, Ouwei; Barnum, Tyler P; Coates, John D

    2016-09-01

    Respiration of perchlorate and chlorate [collectively, (per)chlorate] was only recognized in the last 20 years, yet substantial advances have been made in our understanding of the underlying metabolisms. Although it was once considered solely anthropogenic, pervasive natural sources, both terrestrial and extraterrestrial, indicate an ancient (per)chlorate presence across our solar system. These discoveries stimulated interest in (per)chlorate microbiology, and the application of advanced approaches highlights exciting new facets. Forward and reverse genetics revealed new information regarding underlying molecular biology and associated regulatory mechanisms. Structural and functional analysis characterized core enzymes and identified novel reaction sequences. Comparative genomics elucidated evolutionary aspects, and stress analysis identified novel response mechanisms to reactive chlorine species. Finally, systems biology identified unique metabolic versatility and novel mechanisms of (per)chlorate respiration, including symbiosis and a hybrid enzymatic-abiotic metabolism. While many published studies focus on (per)chlorate and their basic metabolism, this review highlights seminal advances made over the last decade and identifies new directions and potential novel applications.

  15. Perchlorate Reductase Is Distinguished by Active Site Aromatic Gate Residues.

    PubMed

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Clark, Iain C; Carlson, Hans K; Maglaqui, Adrian P; Gau-Pan, Phonchien S; Redford, Steven A; Wong, Alan; Tainer, John A; Coates, John D

    2016-04-22

    Perchlorate is an important ion on both Earth and Mars. Perchlorate reductase (PcrAB), a specialized member of the dimethylsulfoxide reductase superfamily, catalyzes the first step of microbial perchlorate respiration, but little is known about the biochemistry, specificity, structure, and mechanism of PcrAB. Here we characterize the biophysics and phylogeny of this enzyme and report the 1.86-Å resolution PcrAB complex crystal structure. Biochemical analysis revealed a relatively high perchlorate affinity (Km = 6 μm) and a characteristic substrate inhibition compared with the highly similar respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI, which has a relatively much lower affinity for perchlorate (Km = 1.1 mm) and no substrate inhibition. Structural analysis of oxidized and reduced PcrAB with and without the substrate analog SeO3 (2-) bound to the active site identified key residues in the positively charged and funnel-shaped substrate access tunnel that gated substrate entrance and product release while trapping transiently produced chlorate. The structures suggest gating was associated with shifts of a Phe residue between open and closed conformations plus an Asp residue carboxylate shift between monodentate and bidentate coordination to the active site molybdenum atom. Taken together, structural and mutational analyses of gate residues suggest key roles of these gate residues for substrate entrance and product release. Our combined results provide the first detailed structural insight into the mechanism of biological perchlorate reduction, a critical component of the chlorine redox cycle on Earth.

  16. Occurrence of Perchlorate in Various Water Sources in South India.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, D; Rajesh, M P; Venkataraman, P; Purushoth, E; Darshan, B S; Chandraprabha, N

    2014-04-01

    Iodine is necessary for synthesis of thyroxine within the thyroid gland. Iodine deficiency leads to hypothyroidism and goitre. Sometimes, even when sufficient iodine is present in food and water, goitre occurs. This could be due to some other competing ions in the ingested food and water, which prevent incorporation of iodine into the thyroid gland. Perchlorate is one such ion and has thirty times more affinity to thyroid, than iodine. Perchlorate is discharged into the environment by fireworks and explosives industries. Hence, the perchlorate levels would be higher in and around such industries. This study was done to determine the perchlorate exposure to humans in their habitat. In this study, perchlorate levels in different water sources in localities with and without such industries were ascertained. The estimation was done by two methods (i) Thionine ion pair spectrophotometry and (ii) ion exchange chromatography with conductivity detection methods. In the results, perchlorate level was significantly high in different water sources of industrialized areas, when compared to non-industrial areas. These high levels could be the explanation for the high prevalence of goitre in areas with sufficient iodine availability.

  17. Occurrence of Perchlorate in Various Water Sources in South India.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, D; Rajesh, M P; Venkataraman, P; Purushoth, E; Darshan, B S; Chandraprabha, N

    2014-04-01

    Iodine is necessary for synthesis of thyroxine within the thyroid gland. Iodine deficiency leads to hypothyroidism and goitre. Sometimes, even when sufficient iodine is present in food and water, goitre occurs. This could be due to some other competing ions in the ingested food and water, which prevent incorporation of iodine into the thyroid gland. Perchlorate is one such ion and has thirty times more affinity to thyroid, than iodine. Perchlorate is discharged into the environment by fireworks and explosives industries. Hence, the perchlorate levels would be higher in and around such industries. This study was done to determine the perchlorate exposure to humans in their habitat. In this study, perchlorate levels in different water sources in localities with and without such industries were ascertained. The estimation was done by two methods (i) Thionine ion pair spectrophotometry and (ii) ion exchange chromatography with conductivity detection methods. In the results, perchlorate level was significantly high in different water sources of industrialized areas, when compared to non-industrial areas. These high levels could be the explanation for the high prevalence of goitre in areas with sufficient iodine availability. PMID:26563060

  18. Chlorine isotope fractionation during microbial reduction of perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Sturchio, Neil C; Hatzinger, Paul B; Arkins, Martha D; Suh, Christy; Heraty, Linnea J

    2003-09-01

    Perchlorate contamination of surface water and groundwater is an emerging public health problem that has adversely affected the drinking water supplies of millions of people in the western United States. Microbial reduction has shown promise as a cost-effective means for in situ bioremediation of perchlorate-contaminated water. Measurements of stable isotope ratios of light elements (H, C, N, O, S, Cl) can often be used to distinguish biodegradation of organic and inorganic molecules from abiotic loss mechanisms such as adsorption, dispersion, or volatilization because of the relatively large kinetic isotope effects accompanying biodegradation. We quantified chlorine isotope fractionation during perchlorate biodegradation by a common perchlorate-reducing bacterium, Dechlorosoma suillum, initially isolated from a perchlorate-contaminated groundwater source in southern California. The values of the chlorine isotopic fractionation factor alpha derived from two microcosm experiments were alpha = 0.9834 +/- 0.0001 (R2 = 0.9999) and alpha = 0.9871 +/- 0.0008 (R2 = 0.9832). These alpha values indicate that the rate of the 35ClO4 reduction is approximately 1.3-1.7% faster than that of the 37ClO4 reduction. This relatively large kinetic isotope effect indicates that chlorine isotope analysis provides a sensitive technique by which to document in situ bioremediation of perchlorate in groundwater.

  19. (Per)chlorate in Biology on Earth and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Wang, Ouwei; Barnum, Tyler P; Coates, John D

    2016-09-01

    Respiration of perchlorate and chlorate [collectively, (per)chlorate] was only recognized in the last 20 years, yet substantial advances have been made in our understanding of the underlying metabolisms. Although it was once considered solely anthropogenic, pervasive natural sources, both terrestrial and extraterrestrial, indicate an ancient (per)chlorate presence across our solar system. These discoveries stimulated interest in (per)chlorate microbiology, and the application of advanced approaches highlights exciting new facets. Forward and reverse genetics revealed new information regarding underlying molecular biology and associated regulatory mechanisms. Structural and functional analysis characterized core enzymes and identified novel reaction sequences. Comparative genomics elucidated evolutionary aspects, and stress analysis identified novel response mechanisms to reactive chlorine species. Finally, systems biology identified unique metabolic versatility and novel mechanisms of (per)chlorate respiration, including symbiosis and a hybrid enzymatic-abiotic metabolism. While many published studies focus on (per)chlorate and their basic metabolism, this review highlights seminal advances made over the last decade and identifies new directions and potential novel applications. PMID:27482739

  20. Perchlorate Reductase Is Distinguished by Active Site Aromatic Gate Residues.

    PubMed

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Clark, Iain C; Carlson, Hans K; Maglaqui, Adrian P; Gau-Pan, Phonchien S; Redford, Steven A; Wong, Alan; Tainer, John A; Coates, John D

    2016-04-22

    Perchlorate is an important ion on both Earth and Mars. Perchlorate reductase (PcrAB), a specialized member of the dimethylsulfoxide reductase superfamily, catalyzes the first step of microbial perchlorate respiration, but little is known about the biochemistry, specificity, structure, and mechanism of PcrAB. Here we characterize the biophysics and phylogeny of this enzyme and report the 1.86-Å resolution PcrAB complex crystal structure. Biochemical analysis revealed a relatively high perchlorate affinity (Km = 6 μm) and a characteristic substrate inhibition compared with the highly similar respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI, which has a relatively much lower affinity for perchlorate (Km = 1.1 mm) and no substrate inhibition. Structural analysis of oxidized and reduced PcrAB with and without the substrate analog SeO3 (2-) bound to the active site identified key residues in the positively charged and funnel-shaped substrate access tunnel that gated substrate entrance and product release while trapping transiently produced chlorate. The structures suggest gating was associated with shifts of a Phe residue between open and closed conformations plus an Asp residue carboxylate shift between monodentate and bidentate coordination to the active site molybdenum atom. Taken together, structural and mutational analyses of gate residues suggest key roles of these gate residues for substrate entrance and product release. Our combined results provide the first detailed structural insight into the mechanism of biological perchlorate reduction, a critical component of the chlorine redox cycle on Earth. PMID:26940877

  1. Thermal and Evolved Gas Analysis of Magnesium Perchlorate: Implications for Perchlorates in Soils at the Mars Phoenix Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, R.V.; Lauer, H. V.; Sutter, B.; Golden, D.C.; Boynton, W.V.

    2009-01-01

    Perchlorate salts were discovered in the soils around the Phoenix landing site on the northern plains of Mars [1]. Perchlorate was detected by an ion selective electrode that is part of the MECA Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL). The discovery of a mass 32 fragment (likely 02) by the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer (TEGA) provided additional confirmation of a strong oxidizer in the soils around the landing site. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the thermal and evolved gas behavior of perchlorate salts using TEGA-like laboratory testbed instruments. TEGA ovens were fabricated from high purity Ni. Hence, an additional objective of this paper is to determine the effects that Ni might have on the evolved gas behavior of perchlorate salts.

  2. Environmental Perchlorate and Thiocyanate Exposures and Infant Serum Thyroid Function

    PubMed Central

    Braverman, Lewis E.; He, Xuemei; Schuller, Kristin E.; Roussilhes, Alexandra; Jahreis, Katherine A.; Pearce, Elizabeth N.

    2012-01-01

    Background Breastfed infants rely on maternal iodine for thyroid hormone production required for neurodevelopment. Dietary iodine among women of childbearing age in the United States may be insufficient. Perchlorate (competitive inhibitor of the sodium/iodide symporter [NIS]) exposure is ubiquitous. Thiocyanate, from cigarettes and diet, is a weaker NIS inhibitor. Environmental perchlorate and thiocyanate exposures could decrease breast milk iodine by competitively inhibiting NIS in lactating breasts (thus impairing infants' iodine availability), and/or infants' thyroidal NIS to directly decrease infant thyroid function. The current study assessed the relationships between environmental perchlorate and thiocyanate exposures and infant serum thyroid function. Methods Iodine, perchlorate, and thiocyanate in breast milk, maternal and infant urine, and infant serum thyroid function tests were cross-sectionally measured in Boston-area women and their 1–3 month-old breastfed infants. Univariate and multivariable analyses assessed relationships between iodine, perchlorate, thiocyanate, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and free thyroxine (FT4) levels. Results In 64 mothers and infants, median (range) iodine levels were 45.6 μg/L (4.3–1080) in breast milk, 101.9 μg/L (27–570) in maternal urine, and 197.5 μg/L (40–785) in infant urine. Median perchlorate concentrations were 4.4 μg/L (0.5–29.5) in breast milk, 3.1 μg/L (0.2–22.4) in maternal urine, and 4.7 μg/L (0.3–25.3) in infant urine. There were no correlations between infant TSH or FT4 and iodine, perchlorate, and thiocyanate levels in breast milk, maternal urine, and infant urine. In multivariable analyses, perchlorate and thiocyanate levels in breast milk, maternal urine, and infant urine were not significant predictors of infant TSH or FT4. Conclusions Boston-area mothers and their breastfed infants are generally iodine sufficient. Although environmental perchlorate and thiocyanate

  3. Perchlorate in The Great Lakes: Distribution, Isotopic Composition and Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poghosyan, A.; Sturchio, N. C.; Jackson, W. A.; Guan, Y.; Eiler, J. M.; Hatzinger, P. B.

    2013-12-01

    Concentrations, stable chlorine and oxygen isotopic compositions, and 36Cl abundances of perchlorate were investigated in the five Laurentian Great Lakes. Samples were collected during monitoring cruises in 2007 and 2008 of the U.S. EPA's RV Lake Guardian and in 2010 at the water supply intake of Marquette, MI on the southern shore of Lake Superior. Concentrations of perchlorate were measured by IC/MS/MS at 24 locations, including one or two depth profiles in each lake. Mean concentrations (μg/L) are: Superior, 0.06 × 0.01; Michigan, 0.10 × 0.01; Huron, 0.11 × 0.01; Erie, 0.08 × 0.01, and Ontario, 0.09 × 0.01. Concentration vs. depth is nearly constant in each lake, indicating well-mixed conditions. Perchlorate was extracted from near-surface water by passing 15,000 to 80,000 L of water through 1-L cartridges containing Purolite A530E bifunctional anion-exchange resin. In the laboratory, perchlorate was eluted from the resin, purified, and precipitated as a >99% pure crystalline phase. Milligram amounts were recovered from each lake. Chlorine and oxygen isotopic analyses were performed at Caltech using the Cameca 7f-GEO SIMS instrument, following validation of the SIMS method with analyses of USGS-37 and USGS-38 isotopic reference materials. Results indicate a relatively narrow range in δ37Cl values (+2.9 to +3.9 ‰) and a wider range in δ18O values (-4.0 to +4.1 ‰), with a general geographic trend of increasing δ18O from west to east. Oxygen-17 was measured at UIC using dual-inlet IRMS of O2 produced by decomposition of KClO4. Great Lakes perchlorate has mass-independent oxygen isotopic variations with positive Δ17O values (+1.6 ‰ to +2.7 ‰) divided into two distinct groups: Lake Superior (+2.7 ‰) and the other four lakes (~ +1.7 ‰). The isotopic data indicate that perchlorate is dominantly of natural origin, having stable isotopic compositions resembling those of perchlorate from pre-industrial groundwaters in the western USA. The 36Cl

  4. Natural attenuation of perchlorate in denitrified groundwater.

    PubMed

    Robertson, William D; Roy, James W; Brown, Susan J; Van Stempvoort, Dale R; Bickerton, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring of a well-defined septic system groundwater plume and groundwater discharging to two urban streams located in southern Ontario, Canada, provided evidence of natural attenuation of background low level (ng/L) perchlorate (ClO4⁻) under denitrifying conditions in the field. The septic system site at Long Point contains ClO4⁻ from a mix of waste water, atmospheric deposition, and periodic use of fireworks, while the nitrate plume indicates active denitrification. Plume nitrate (NO3⁻ -N) concentrations of up to 103 mg/L declined with depth and downgradient of the tile bed due to denitrification and anammox activity, and the plume was almost completely denitrified beyond 35 m from the tile bed. The ClO4⁻ natural attenuation occurs at the site only when NO3⁻ -N concentrations are <0.3 mg/L, after which ClO4⁻ concentrations decline abruptly from 187 ± 202 to 11 ± 15 ng/L. A similar pattern between NO3⁻ -N and ClO4⁻ was found in groundwater discharging to the two urban streams. These findings suggest that natural attenuation (i.e., biodegradation) of ClO4⁻ may be commonplace in denitrified aquifers with appropriate electron donors present, and thus, should be considered as a remediation option for ClO4⁻ contaminated groundwater. PMID:23448242

  5. Natural attenuation of perchlorate in denitrified groundwater.

    PubMed

    Robertson, William D; Roy, James W; Brown, Susan J; Van Stempvoort, Dale R; Bickerton, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring of a well-defined septic system groundwater plume and groundwater discharging to two urban streams located in southern Ontario, Canada, provided evidence of natural attenuation of background low level (ng/L) perchlorate (ClO4⁻) under denitrifying conditions in the field. The septic system site at Long Point contains ClO4⁻ from a mix of waste water, atmospheric deposition, and periodic use of fireworks, while the nitrate plume indicates active denitrification. Plume nitrate (NO3⁻ -N) concentrations of up to 103 mg/L declined with depth and downgradient of the tile bed due to denitrification and anammox activity, and the plume was almost completely denitrified beyond 35 m from the tile bed. The ClO4⁻ natural attenuation occurs at the site only when NO3⁻ -N concentrations are <0.3 mg/L, after which ClO4⁻ concentrations decline abruptly from 187 ± 202 to 11 ± 15 ng/L. A similar pattern between NO3⁻ -N and ClO4⁻ was found in groundwater discharging to the two urban streams. These findings suggest that natural attenuation (i.e., biodegradation) of ClO4⁻ may be commonplace in denitrified aquifers with appropriate electron donors present, and thus, should be considered as a remediation option for ClO4⁻ contaminated groundwater.

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ELECTROSPRAY MASS SPECTROMETRIC METHOD FOR DETERMINING PERCHLORATE IN FERTILIZERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An electrospray mass spectrometric method has been developed for application to agricultural and horticultural fertilizers to determine perchlorate. After fertilizers are leached or dissolved in water, the method relies on the formation of stable ion pair complex of the perchlor...

  7. Removal of Perchlorate and Chlorate in Aquatic SystemsUsing Integrated Technologies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of its extremely low concentrations and strong resistance to most treatment technologies, perchlorate has become one of the biggest challenges currently being faced by the drinking water industry. Few studies have looked at electrochemical reduction of aqueous perchlorate...

  8. ASSOCIATION OF URINARY PERCHLORATE WITH INDIRECT MEASURES OFTHYROID DYSFUNCTION BASED ON NHANES 2001-2002

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Aims: Perchlorate is a widespread environmental pollutant. Previous population studies based on the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001-2002, showed that urinary perchlorate concentrations were associated with increased levels of thyroid stim...

  9. Developmental exposure to perchlorate alters synaptic transmission in hippocampus of the adult rat: in vivo studies.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate, a contaminant found in food and water supplies throughout the USA, blocks iodine uptake into the thyroid gland to reduce circulating levels of thyroid hormone. Neurological function accompanying developmental exposure to perchlorate was evaluated in the present study...

  10. ALTERNATIVE TECHNIQUES FOR MEASUREMENT OF PERCHLORATE IN FERTILIZER AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Perchlorate anion has been implicated as a potentially serious environmental pollutant, being found in drinking water and irrigated crops. Commercial fertilizers have recently been shown to contain high levels of Perchlorate impurities and thus be potentially important source...

  11. Thermal Decomposition Behavior of Ammonium Perchlorate and of an Ammonium-Perchlorate-Based Composite Propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrens, R.; Minier, L.

    1998-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) and ammonium-perchlorate-based composite propellants is studied using the simultaneous thermogravimetric modulated beam mass spectrometry (STMBMS) technique. The main objective of the present work is to evaluate whether the STMBMS can provide new data on these materials that will have sufficient detail on the reaction mechanisms and associated reaction kinetics to permit creation of a detailed model of the thermal decomposition process. Such a model is a necessary ingredient to engineering models of ignition and slow-cookoff for these AP-based composite propellants. Results show that the decomposition of pure AP is controlled by two processes. One occurs at lower temperatures (240 to 270 C), produces mainly H2O, O2, Cl2, N2O and HCl, and is shown to occur in the solid phase within the AP particles. 200(micro) diameter AP particles undergo 25% decomposition in the solid phase, whereas 20(micro) diameter AP particles undergo only 13% decomposition. The second process is dissociative sublimation of AP to NH3 + HClO4 followed by the decomposition of, and reaction between, these two products in the gas phase. The dissociative sublimation process occurs over the entire temperature range of AP decomposition, but only becomes dominant at temperatures above those for the solid-phase decomposition. AP-based composite propellants are used extensively in both small tactical rocket motors and large strategic rocket systems.

  12. The thermal decomposition behavior of ammonium perchlorate and of an ammonium-perchlorate-based composite propellant

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, R.; Minier, L.

    1998-03-24

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) and ammonium-perchlorate-based composite propellants is studied using the simultaneous thermogravimetric modulated beam mass spectrometry (STMBMS) technique. The main objective of the present work is to evaluate whether the STMBMS can provide new data on these materials that will have sufficient detail on the reaction mechanisms and associated reaction kinetics to permit creation of a detailed model of the thermal decomposition process. Such a model is a necessary ingredient to engineering models of ignition and slow-cookoff for these AP-based composite propellants. Results show that the decomposition of pure AP is controlled by two processes. One occurs at lower temperatures (240 to 270 C), produces mainly H{sub 2}O, O{sub 2}, Cl{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O and HCl, and is shown to occur in the solid phase within the AP particles. 200{micro} diameter AP particles undergo 25% decomposition in the solid phase, whereas 20{micro} diameter AP particles undergo only 13% decomposition. The second process is dissociative sublimation of AP to NH{sub 3} + HClO{sub 4} followed by the decomposition of, and reaction between, these two products in the gas phase. The dissociative sublimation process occurs over the entire temperature range of AP decomposition, but only becomes dominant at temperatures above those for the solid-phase decomposition. AP-based composite propellants are used extensively in both small tactical rocket motors and large strategic rocket systems.

  13. Chronic perchlorate exposure impairs stickleback reproductive behaviour and swimming performance

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, Richard R.; von Hippel, Frank A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary We describe behavioural changes in two generations of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of perchlorate. The first generation (G0,2002) was exposed as two-year-old adults to perchlorate in experimental groups ranging in concentration from less than the method detection limit (<1.1 ppb) to 18.6 ppm for up to 22 days during their courtship, spawning, egg guarding, and first five days of fry guarding. No differences were noted in the behaviour or reproductive output of these fish that were exposed as adults. However, perchlorate exposure throughout development caused widespread effects in the second generation (G1,2003), which was spawned and raised through sexual maturity in one of four nominal experimental groups (0, 30 and 100 ppm, and a ‘variable’ treatment that progressively increased from <1.1 ppb to approximately 60 ppm perchlorate). Dose-dependent effects were found during the G1,2003’s swimming and behavioural evaluations, including higher mortality rates among treated fish following stressful events. Perchlorate-exposed fish had higher failure rates during swimming trials and failed at lower flow rates than control fish. A number of treated fish exhibited seizures. Progressively fewer males completed benchmark metrics, such as nest building, spawning, nursery formation, or fry production, in a dose-dependent manner. Fewer males from higher treatments courted females, and those that did initiated courtship later and had a reduced behavioural repertoire compared to fish from lower treatments. The lowest observed adverse effect level (LOAEL) for swimming performance, reproductive behaviour, survivorship and recruitment was 30 ppm perchlorate (our lowest G1,2003 treatment), and near complete inhibition of reproductive activity was noted among males raised in 100 ppm perchlorate. A small number of treated G1,2003 females were isolated in aquaria, and some performed reproductive

  14. Modeling Perchlorate Contamination In Coastal Aquifer of Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakirevich, A.; Kuznetsov, M.; Adar, E.; Nativ, R.

    2010-12-01

    The mathematical model of water flow and contaminant transport was developed and applied for simulating the perchlorate migration in soil and groundwater, in the Israeli Coastal Aquifer. The three-dimensional mathematical model of groundwater flow is presented by set of two-dimensional flow equations for the multilayered system, considering the interflow between layers (based on the MODFLOW code). Perchlorate transport simulations were carried out using the MT3DMS model, which solves the 3-D advection-dispersion equation. Perchlorate was considered as a conservative contaminant: neither sorption nor degradation reactions were taken into account. The GMS 5.1 (Groundwater Modeling System) was adjusted and used as a major platform for the simulations. The hydraulic parameters of four major materials (sandstone, sand, loam and clay) composing the sub-aquifers of the coastal alluvial aquifer and the annual groundwater recharge were assessed by a combination of trial-and-error and least square optimization (the PEST code) using observed groundwater levels during 1978-2004. The location of the contaminant source was assigned to the effluents storage ponds, represented by a strip of 200x50m. The concentration of perchlorate in the percolated water was calculated as a function of time, using measured distribution of perchlorate along the vadose zone and transient simulations of one-dimensional water flow and contaminant transport in the unsaturated layered soil profile. Simulations results indicate that the estimated total mass of approximately 280 ton of perchlorate in the unsaturated zone will be washed out into the groundwater reservoir during the coming 25 years. Simulations of perchlorate migration in groundwater were carried out for the period of 2006-2030. The predicted average advection velocity of the plume was 15-20 m/year. The model allows forecast of the plume migration and assessment of water volume and perchlorate mass being extracted for different water

  15. Stable Cl And O Isotope Ratios Of Anthropogenic And Natural Perchlorates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beloso, A.; Sturchio, N. C.; Böhlke, J.; Gu, B.; Horita, J.; Brown, G.; Hatzinger, P.

    2004-12-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) in aqueous systems, even in low concentrations, is recognized to have potential human health risks. The drinking and irrigation water supplies of millions of people in the U.S. have recently been found to be contaminated with perchlorate, and this problem continues to become even more widespread. Perchlorate, as a highly soluble and relatively inert anion, tends to persist over long time periods and its removal by conventional water treatment technologies is difficult and expensive. Many known sources of perchlorate contamination are anthropogenic, resulting from its extensive use as an oxidizer component in solid propellants for missiles, rockets, and fireworks. However, certain fertilizers derived from Chilean nitrate evaporate deposits are known to contain a low percentage of perchlorate (<0.5%) that may contaminate groundwater. New isotopic evidence provides insights on the possible natural sources of perchlorate in surface and ground waters. Stable isotope ratios of Cl and O can now be used to determine whether the source of perchlorates in a given area is natural or anthropogenic. Microbial perchlorate reduction has a large (˜15 per mil) kinetic isotope effect, and this may be used to identify whether natural attenuation of perchlorate is occurring. Anthropogenic perchlorate salts in milligram amounts are readily analyzed for 37Cl and 18O isotopes. Extracting an isotopically measurable amount of perchlorate from natural waters, which are usually within ppb range of concentrations, is a challenge. But with the use of a new class of highly-selective bifunctional anion exchange resins, recovery of trace amounts of perchlorate for accurate isotopic analysis has been demonstrated. Isotopic characterization is being conducted on anthropogenic perchlorate reagents, natural perchlorate-bearing salt deposits, and perchlorate-bearing groundwaters. Significant and consistent isotopic differences in both the Cl and O isotope ratios between

  16. [Should we fear the perchlorate ion in the environment?].

    PubMed

    Desailloud, Rachel; Wemeau, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-01

    Perchlorate ions (ClO4(-)) are present in groundwater and are then present in distribution networks of drinking water destined for human consumption. The perchlorate ion comes mainly from ammonium salt manufactured for industrial activities or from arms of the First World War. Perchlorate ion is a competitive inhibitor of the sodium-iodide symporter and inhibits the synthesis of thyroid hormones. Values of toxicity have been published by the French agency ANSES and are used by authorities to limit the consumption of drinking water of some distribution networks by children and pregnant women especially in Nord-Pas-de-Calais and Picardie. Epidemiological data in other countries show no or little clinical effect in areas with similar contamination; it is therefore a precautionary principle. An effective substitution with iodine would limit the effects of the iodine deficiency itself but also would counteract the potential effects of an excess of perchlorate ions and also of other symporter inhibitors (thiocyanate, nitrate). Further studies are nevertheless needed to determine possible extra-thyroid effects of perchlorate ions. PMID:26585272

  17. Development of freshwater water-quality criteria for perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Dean, Kirk E; Palachek, Randy M; Noel, Jill M; Warbritton, Ryan; Aufderheide, John; Wireman, Jody

    2004-06-01

    The anion perchlorate (ClO4-) is an oxidizing component commonly used in solid propellants for rockets and missiles; in explosives, flares, fireworks, chemical processes, and automobile air-bag inflators; and for other assorted uses. With recent advances in analytical detection capability, perchlorate has been found in a variety of ground and surface waters throughout the United States. Because perchlorate has been associated with thyroid problems in humans and may have similar effects on wildlife, it is desirable to develop a water-quality criterion to assist in identifying concentrations of perchlorate in water likely to pose an ecological health risk. In the present study, we compiled all available data regarding the effects of perchlorate to aquatic organisms, and we performed additional toxicity and bioconcentration tests as required by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) for the development of water-quality criteria for aquatic life. A criterion maximum concentration of 20 mg/L and a criterion continuous concentration of 9.3 mg/L were calculated based on the test results. Although these are not formal Clean Water Act Section 304(a) criteria, which must be published by the U.S. EPA, these criteria may be useful in the determination of remedial action levels for contaminated sites, for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit limits, and other water-quality management practices. PMID:15376530

  18. Development of freshwater water-quality criteria for perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Dean, Kirk E; Palachek, Randy M; Noel, Jill M; Warbritton, Ryan; Aufderheide, John; Wireman, Jody

    2004-06-01

    The anion perchlorate (ClO4-) is an oxidizing component commonly used in solid propellants for rockets and missiles; in explosives, flares, fireworks, chemical processes, and automobile air-bag inflators; and for other assorted uses. With recent advances in analytical detection capability, perchlorate has been found in a variety of ground and surface waters throughout the United States. Because perchlorate has been associated with thyroid problems in humans and may have similar effects on wildlife, it is desirable to develop a water-quality criterion to assist in identifying concentrations of perchlorate in water likely to pose an ecological health risk. In the present study, we compiled all available data regarding the effects of perchlorate to aquatic organisms, and we performed additional toxicity and bioconcentration tests as required by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) for the development of water-quality criteria for aquatic life. A criterion maximum concentration of 20 mg/L and a criterion continuous concentration of 9.3 mg/L were calculated based on the test results. Although these are not formal Clean Water Act Section 304(a) criteria, which must be published by the U.S. EPA, these criteria may be useful in the determination of remedial action levels for contaminated sites, for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit limits, and other water-quality management practices.

  19. Developmental timing of perchlorate exposure alters threespine stickleback dermal bone

    PubMed Central

    Furin, Christoff G.; von Hippel, Frank A.; Postlethwait, John; Buck, C. Loren; Cresko, William A.; O’Hara, Todd M.

    2015-01-01

    Adequate levels of thyroid hormone are critical during development and metamorphosis, and for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Perchlorate, a common contaminant of water sources, inhibits thyroid function in vertebrates. We utilized threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) to determine if timing of perchlorate exposure during development impacts adult dermal skeletal phenotypes. Fish were exposed to water contaminated with perchlorate (30 mg/L or 100 mg/L) beginning at 0, 3, 7, 14, 21, 42, 154 or 305 days post fertilization until sexual maturity at one year of age. A reciprocal treatment moved stickleback from contaminated to clean water on the same schedule providing for different stages of initial exposure and different treatment durations. Perchlorate exposure caused concentration-dependent significant differences in growth for some bony traits. Continuous exposure initiated within the first 21 days post fertilization had the greatest effects on skeletal traits. Exposure to perchlorate at this early stage can result in small traits or abnormal skeletal morphology of adult fish which could affect predator avoidance and survival. PMID:25753171

  20. Intersubject Variability of Risk from Perchlorate in Community Water Supplies

    PubMed Central

    Crawford-Brown, Doug; Raucher, Bob; Harrod, Megan

    2006-01-01

    This article is a brief review and summary of the estimated incremental risks (increases in hazard quotient or decreases in thyroid uptake of iodine) to pregnant women (and hence their fetuses) associated with perchlorate exposure in community water supplies (CWSs). The analysis draws on the recent health effects review published in 2005 by the National Research Council (NRC). We focus on the potential level of risk borne by the NRC-identified most sensitive subpopulation (pregnant women and hence their fetuses). Other members of the population should be at a level of risk below that calculated here, and so protection of the sensitive subpopulation would protect the general public health. The analysis examines the intersubject distribution of risks to this sensitive subpopulation at various potential drinking water concentrations of perchlorate and also draws on estimates of the national occurrence of perchlorate in U.S. CWSs to estimate the variability of risks under defined regulatory scenarios. Results suggest that maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) of up to 24.5 μg/L should pose little or no incremental risk to the large majority of individuals in the most sensitive subpopulations exposed in the United States at current levels of perchlorate in water. The protectiveness of an MCL of 24.5 μg/L depends, however, on whether the study subjects in the health effects data used here may be assumed to have been exposed to background (non-drinking water) contributions of perchlorate. PMID:16835046

  1. [Should we fear the perchlorate ion in the environment?].

    PubMed

    Desailloud, Rachel; Wemeau, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-01

    Perchlorate ions (ClO4(-)) are present in groundwater and are then present in distribution networks of drinking water destined for human consumption. The perchlorate ion comes mainly from ammonium salt manufactured for industrial activities or from arms of the First World War. Perchlorate ion is a competitive inhibitor of the sodium-iodide symporter and inhibits the synthesis of thyroid hormones. Values of toxicity have been published by the French agency ANSES and are used by authorities to limit the consumption of drinking water of some distribution networks by children and pregnant women especially in Nord-Pas-de-Calais and Picardie. Epidemiological data in other countries show no or little clinical effect in areas with similar contamination; it is therefore a precautionary principle. An effective substitution with iodine would limit the effects of the iodine deficiency itself but also would counteract the potential effects of an excess of perchlorate ions and also of other symporter inhibitors (thiocyanate, nitrate). Further studies are nevertheless needed to determine possible extra-thyroid effects of perchlorate ions.

  2. THE REDUCTIVE TRANSFORMATION OF PERCHLORATE IN A FRESH WATER SEDIMENT: LABORATORY BATCH STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate is widely used as a propellant in solid rocket fuel, and has recently been found in ground, surface, and drinking water, in many cases above the interim action level of 18 ppb. Perchlorate is recalcitrant to chemical reduction, however, studies of perchlorate in pure ...

  3. THE REDUCTIVE TRANSFORMATION OF PERCHLORATE IN A FRESH WATER SEDIMENT: LABORATORY BATCH STUDIES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate is widely used as a propellant in solid rocket fuel, and has recently been found in ground, surface, and drinking water, in many cases above the interim action level of 18 ppb. Perchlorate is recalcitrant to chemical reduction, however, studies of perchlorate in pure ...

  4. PERCHLORATE-CROP INTERACTIONS FROM CONTAMINATED IRRIGATION WATER AND FERTILIZER APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate has contaminated water and soils at several locations in the United States. Perchlorate is water soluble, exceedingly mobile in aqueous systems, and can persist for many decades under typical ground and surface water conditions. Perchlorate is of concern because of un...

  5. Using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model to link urinary biomarker concentrations to dietary exposure of perchlorate

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to perchlorate is widespread in the United States and many studies have attempted to character the perchlorate exposure by estimating the average daily intakes of perchlorate. These approaches provided population-based estimates, but did not provide individual-level exp...

  6. 77 FR 52633 - Notice of a Public Meeting: Stakeholder Meeting Concerning EPA's Intent To Regulate Perchlorate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-30

    ... To Regulate Perchlorate Levels in Drinking Water AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... Drinking Water Regulation for Perchlorate. DATES: The public meeting and webcast will be held on September... Web site: http://water.epa.gov/drink/contaminants/unregulated/perchlorate.cfm . For questions...

  7. Perchlorate reduction in microbial electrolysis cell with polyaniline modified cathode.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia-Jia; Gao, Ming-Ming; Zhang, Gang; Wang, Xin-Hua; Wang, Shu-Guang; Song, Chao; Xu, Yan-Yan

    2015-02-01

    Excellent perchlorate reduction was obtained under various initial concentrations in a non-membrane microbial electrolysis cell with polyaniline (PANI) modified graphite cathode as sole electron donor. PANI modification is conducive to the formation of biofilm due to its porous structure and good electrocatalytic performance. Compared with cathode without biofilm, over 12% higher reduction rates were acquired in the presence of biocathode. The study demonstrates that, instead of perchlorate reduction, the main contribution of biofilm is involved in facilitate electron transfer from cathode to electrolyte. Interestingly, hairlike structure, referred as to pili-like, was observed in the biofilm as well as in the electrolyte. Additionally, the results show that pili were prone to formation under the condition of external electron field as sole electron donor. Analysis of microbial community suggests that perchlorate reduction bacteria community was most consistent with Azospiraoryzae strain DSM 13638 in the subdivision of the class Proteobacteria. PMID:25479396

  8. Crystal structure of iron(III) perchlorate nona-hydrate.

    PubMed

    Hennings, Erik; Schmidt, Horst; Voigt, Wolfgang

    2014-12-01

    Since the discovery of perchlorate salts on Mars and the known occurrence of ferric salts in the regolith, there is a distinct possibility that the title compound could form on the surface of Mars. [Fe(H2O)6](ClO4)3·3H2O was crystallized from aqueous solutions at low temperatures according to the solid-liquid phase diagram. It consists of Fe(H2O)6 octa-hedra (point group symmetry -3.) and perchlorate anions (point group symmetry .2) as well as non-coordinating water mol-ecules, as part of a second hydrogen-bonded coordination sphere around the cation. The perchlorate appears to be slightly disordered, with major-minor component occupancies of 0.773 (9):0.227 (9). PMID:25552970

  9. Direct Measurement of Perchlorate Exposure Biomarkers in a Highly Exposed Population: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Michelle; Copan, Lori; Olmedo, Luis; Patton, Sharyle; Haas, Robert; Atencio, Ryan; Xu, Juhua; Valentin-Blasini, Liza

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to perchlorate is ubiquitous in the United States and has been found to be widespread in food and drinking water. People living in the lower Colorado River region may have perchlorate exposure because of perchlorate in ground water and locally-grown produce. Relatively high doses of perchlorate can inhibit iodine uptake and impair thyroid function, and thus could impair neurological development in utero. We examined human exposures to perchlorate in the Imperial Valley among individuals consuming locally grown produce and compared perchlorate exposure doses to state and federal reference doses. We collected 24-hour urine specimen from a convenience sample of 31 individuals and measured urinary excretion rates of perchlorate, thiocyanate, nitrate, and iodide. In addition, drinking water and local produce were also sampled for perchlorate. All but two of the water samples tested negative for perchlorate. Perchlorate levels in 79 produce samples ranged from non-detect to 1816 ppb. Estimated perchlorate doses ranged from 0.02 to 0.51 µg/kg of body weight/day. Perchlorate dose increased with the number of servings of dairy products consumed and with estimated perchlorate levels in produce consumed. The geometric mean perchlorate dose was 70% higher than for the NHANES reference population. Our sample of 31 Imperial Valley residents had higher perchlorate dose levels compared with national reference ranges. Although none of our exposure estimates exceeded the U. S. EPA reference dose, three participants exceeded the acceptable daily dose as defined by bench mark dose methods used by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment. PMID:21394205

  10. Direct measurement of perchlorate exposure biomarkers in a highly exposed population: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    English, Paul; Blount, Ben; Wong, Michelle; Copan, Lori; Olmedo, Luis; Patton, Sharyle; Haas, Robert; Atencio, Ryan; Xu, Juhua; Valentin-Blasini, Liza

    2011-03-04

    Exposure to perchlorate is ubiquitous in the United States and has been found to be widespread in food and drinking water. People living in the lower Colorado River region may have perchlorate exposure because of perchlorate in ground water and locally-grown produce. Relatively high doses of perchlorate can inhibit iodine uptake and impair thyroid function, and thus could impair neurological development in utero. We examined human exposures to perchlorate in the Imperial Valley among individuals consuming locally grown produce and compared perchlorate exposure doses to state and federal reference doses. We collected 24-hour urine specimen from a convenience sample of 31 individuals and measured urinary excretion rates of perchlorate, thiocyanate, nitrate, and iodide. In addition, drinking water and local produce were also sampled for perchlorate. All but two of the water samples tested negative for perchlorate. Perchlorate levels in 79 produce samples ranged from non-detect to 1816 ppb. Estimated perchlorate doses ranged from 0.02 to 0.51 µg/kg of body weight/day. Perchlorate dose increased with the number of servings of dairy products consumed and with estimated perchlorate levels in produce consumed. The geometric mean perchlorate dose was 70% higher than for the NHANES reference population. Our sample of 31 Imperial Valley residents had higher perchlorate dose levels compared with national reference ranges. Although none of our exposure estimates exceeded the U. S. EPA reference dose, three participants exceeded the acceptable daily dose as defined by bench mark dose methods used by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment.

  11. Direct measurement of perchlorate exposure biomarkers in a highly exposed population: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    English, Paul; Blount, Ben; Wong, Michelle; Copan, Lori; Olmedo, Luis; Patton, Sharyle; Haas, Robert; Atencio, Ryan; Xu, Juhua; Valentin-Blasini, Liza

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to perchlorate is ubiquitous in the United States and has been found to be widespread in food and drinking water. People living in the lower Colorado River region may have perchlorate exposure because of perchlorate in ground water and locally-grown produce. Relatively high doses of perchlorate can inhibit iodine uptake and impair thyroid function, and thus could impair neurological development in utero. We examined human exposures to perchlorate in the Imperial Valley among individuals consuming locally grown produce and compared perchlorate exposure doses to state and federal reference doses. We collected 24-hour urine specimen from a convenience sample of 31 individuals and measured urinary excretion rates of perchlorate, thiocyanate, nitrate, and iodide. In addition, drinking water and local produce were also sampled for perchlorate. All but two of the water samples tested negative for perchlorate. Perchlorate levels in 79 produce samples ranged from non-detect to 1816 ppb. Estimated perchlorate doses ranged from 0.02 to 0.51 µg/kg of body weight/day. Perchlorate dose increased with the number of servings of dairy products consumed and with estimated perchlorate levels in produce consumed. The geometric mean perchlorate dose was 70% higher than for the NHANES reference population. Our sample of 31 Imperial Valley residents had higher perchlorate dose levels compared with national reference ranges. Although none of our exposure estimates exceeded the U. S. EPA reference dose, three participants exceeded the acceptable daily dose as defined by bench mark dose methods used by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment. PMID:21394205

  12. Preliminary assessment of perchlorate in ecological receptors at the Longhorn Army Ammunition Plant (LHAAP), Karnack, Texas.

    PubMed

    Smith, P N; Theodorakis, C W; Anderson, T A; Kendall, R J

    2001-10-01

    There have been increasing human health and ecological concerns about ionic perchlorate (ClO4-) since it was detected in drinking water sources in 1997. Perchlorate is known to affect thyroid function, causing subsequent hormone disruption and potential perturbations of metabolic activities. According to current estimates, perchlorate is found in the surface of groundwater of 14 states, including Texas. Longhorn Army Ammunition Plant, located in east central Texas, was a facility historically associated with perchlorate-containing propellants and rocket motors. Subsequently, perchlorate contamination in ground and surface waters at the facility has been reported. Soil, sediment, water, vegetation, and animal tissue samples were collected from several locations within the plant for a preliminary site assessment of perchlorate contamination. Perchlorate concentrations ranged from 555-5,557,000 ppb in vegetation, 811-2038 ppb in aquatic insects, below detection limits (ND) to 207 ppb in fish, ND-580 ppb in frogs, and ND-2328 ppb in mammals. Consistent with our hypothesis, aquatic organisms inhabiting perchlorate-contaminated surface water bodies contained detectable concentrations of perchlorate. Additionally, terrestrial organisms were exposed through pathways not necessarily related to contaminated surface waters. Therefore, these data demonstrate that aquatic and terrestrial species are exposed to perchlorate in the environment. To our knowledge, this represents the first incidence of perchlorate exposure among wild animals reported in the scientific literature.

  13. Combined bio-regeneration and ion-exchange system for perchlorate removal.

    PubMed

    Bae, B U

    2014-01-01

    In order to prove that perchlorate-laden resins could be bio-regenerated through direct contact with perchlorate-reducing bacteria (PRB), a combined bio-regeneration and ion-exchange (IX) system was operated. Two kinds of perchlorate-laden resins, nitrate-selective A520E and perchlorate-selective A530E, were successfully regenerated by PRB cultivated under anaerobic conditions. The bio-regeneration efficiency of perchlorate-laden resins increased with the amount of flow passed through the IX column. When the fully exhausted resin was bio-regenerated for 10 days at the flow rate of 2 BV (bed volume)/min and mixed liquor suspended solids concentration of 80 mg/L, almost 100% of IX capacity was recovered. A520E resin had higher bio-regeneration efficiency than A530E under all conditions, probably due to the fact that the perchlorate ion is more strongly bonded to the functional group of perchlorate-selective A530E resin. Measurement of perchlorate concentrations in the column effluents also revealed that the amount of perchlorate eluted from A520E resin was higher than that from A530E resin. Since only 10-20% of perchlorate was eluted from the resin during 10 days of bio-regeneration, the main mechanism of bio-regeneration appears to be the direct reduction of perchlorate by PRB on the resin. PMID:24804673

  14. Seasonal variation and factors influencing perchlorate in water, snow, soil and corns in Northeastern China.

    PubMed

    Ye, Long; You, Hong; Yao, Jie; Kang, Xi; Tang, Lu

    2013-03-01

    Seasonal variation and influencing factors of perchlorate in snow, surface soil, rain, surface water, groundwater and corn were studied. Seven hundreds and seventy samples were collected in different periods in Harbin and its vicinity, China. Perchlorate concentrations were analyzed by ion chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry. Results indicate that fireworks and firecrackers display from the Spring Festival to the Lantern Festival (February 2, 2011-February 17, 2011) can result in the occurrence of perchlorate in surface soil and snow. Perchlorate distribution is affected by wind direction in winter. Melting snow which contained perchlorate can dissolve perchlorate in surface soil, and then perchlorate can percolate into groundwater so that perchlorate concentrations in groundwater increased in spring. Perchlorate concentrations in groundwater and surface water decrease after rainy season in summer. Groundwater samples collected in the floodplain areas of the Songhua River and the Ashi River contained higher perchlorate concentrations than that far away with the rivers. The corns have the ability to accumulate perchlorate. PMID:23287025

  15. Simultaneous detection of perchlorate and bromate using rapid high-performance ion exchange chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and perchlorate removal in drinking water.

    PubMed

    West, Danielle M; Mu, Ruipu; Gamagedara, Sanjeewa; Ma, Yinfa; Adams, Craig; Eichholz, Todd; Burken, Joel G; Shi, Honglan

    2015-06-01

    Perchlorate and bromate occurrence in drinking water causes health concerns due to their effects on thyroid function and carcinogenicity, respectively. The purpose of this study was threefold: (1) to advance a sensitive method for simultaneous rapid detection of perchlorate and bromate in drinking water system, (2) to systematically study the occurrence of these two contaminants in Missouri drinking water treatment systems, and (3) to examine effective sorbents for minimizing perchlorate in drinking water. A rapid high-performance ion exchange chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPIC-MS/MS) method was advanced for simultaneous detection of perchlorate and bromate in drinking water. The HPIC-MS/MS method was rapid, required no preconcentration of the water samples, and had detection limits for perchlorate and bromate of 0.04 and 0.01 μg/L, respectively. The method was applied to determine perchlorate and bromate concentrations in total of 23 selected Missouri drinking water treatment systems during differing seasons. The water systems selected include different source waters: groundwater, lake water, river water, and groundwater influenced by surface water. The concentrations of perchlorate and bromate were lower than or near to method detection limits in most of the drinking water samples monitored. The removal of perchlorate by various adsorbents was studied. A cationic organoclay (TC-99) exhibited effective removal of perchlorate from drinking water matrices.

  16. An upper-bound assessment of the benefits of reducing perchlorate in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Lutter, Randall

    2014-10-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency plans to issue new federal regulations to limit drinking water concentrations of perchlorate, which occurs naturally and results from the combustion of rocket fuel. This article presents an upper-bound estimate of the potential benefits of alternative maximum contaminant levels for perchlorate in drinking water. The results suggest that the economic benefits of reducing perchlorate concentrations in drinking water are likely to be low, i.e., under $2.9 million per year nationally, for several reasons. First, the prevalence of detectable perchlorate in public drinking water systems is low. Second, the population especially sensitive to effects of perchlorate, pregnant women who are moderately iodide deficient, represents a minority of all pregnant women. Third, and perhaps most importantly, reducing exposure to perchlorate in drinking water is a relatively ineffective way of increasing iodide uptake, a crucial step linking perchlorate to health effects of concern.

  17. Perchlorate in fish from a contaminated site in east-central Texas.

    PubMed

    Theodorakis, Christopher; Rinchard, Jacques; Anderson, Todd; Liu, Fujun; Park, June-Woo; Costa, Filipe; McDaniel, Leslie; Kendall, Ronald; Waters, Aaron

    2006-01-01

    Perchlorate, a known thyroid endocrine disruptor, contaminates surface waters near military instillations where solid fuel rocket motors are manufactured or assembled. To assess potential perchlorate exposure to fish and the human population which may feed on them, fish were collected around the Naval Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant in McLennan County, TX, and analyzed for the presence of the perchlorate anion. The sampling sites included Lake Waco and Belton Lake, and several streams and rivers within their watersheds. The general tendency was that perchlorate was only found in a few species sampled, and perchlorate was not detected in every individual within these species. When detected in the fish, perchlorate tissue concentrations were greater than that in the water. This may be due to highly variable perchlorate concentrations in the water coupled with individual-level variation in elimination from the body, or to routes of exposure other than water. PMID:15993996

  18. Structure of aqueous sodium perchlorate solutions.

    PubMed

    General, Ignacio J; Asciutto, Eliana K; Madura, Jeffry D

    2008-12-01

    Salt solutions have been the object of study of many scientists through history, but one of the most important findings came along when the Hofmeister series were discovered. Their importance arises from the fact that they influence the relative solubility of proteins, and solubility is directly related to one of today's holy grails: protein folding. In this work we characterize one of the more-destabilizing salts in the series, sodium perchlorate, by studying it as an aqueous solution at various concentrations ranging from 0.08 to 1.60 mol/L. Molecular dynamics simulations at room temperature permitted a detailed study of the organization of solvent and cosolvent, in terms of its radial distribution functions, along with the study of the structure of hydrogen bonds in the ions' solvation shells. We found that the distribution functions have some variations in their shape as concentration changes, but the position of their peaks is mostly unaffected. Regarding water, the most salient fact is the noticeable (although small) change in the second hydration shell and even beyond, especially for g(O(w)***O(w)), showing that the locality of salt effects should not be restricted to considerations of only the first solvation shell. The perturbation of the second shell also appears in the study of the HB network, where the difference between the number of HBs around a water molecule and around the Na(+) cation gets much smaller as one goes from the first to the second solvation shell, yet the difference is not negligible. Nevertheless, the effect of the ions past their first hydration shell is not enough to make a noticeable change in the global HB network. The Kirkwood-Buff theory of liquids was applied to our system, in order to calculate the activity derivative of the cosolvent. This coefficient, along with a previously calculated preferential binding, allowed us to establish that if a folded AP peptide is immersed in the studied solution, becoming the solute, then

  19. PREDICTING FIELD PERFORMANCE OF HERBACEOUS SPECIES FOR PHYTOREMEDIATION OF PERCHLORATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results of these short-term experiments coupled with ecological knowledge of the nine herbaceous plant species tested suggest that several species may by successful in on-site remediation of perchlorate. The two wetland species which appear to be most suitable for field experimen...

  20. Potential Influence of Perchlorate on Organic Carbon in Martian Regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oze, C.; Vithanage, M. S.; Kumarathilaka, P. R.; Indraratne, S.; Horton, T. W.

    2014-12-01

    Perchlorate is a strong oxidizer present at elevated concentrations in surface martian regolith. Chemical and isotopic modification of potential organic carbon with perchlorate in martian regolith during H2O(l) interactions is unknown. Here we assess the relationship between martian levels of perchlorate and organic carbon present in life harbouring geologic material from Earth. These materials represent chemical (i.e., processed serpentine soils from Sri Lanka) and temperature (i.e., hydrothermal jarosite/goethite deposit from White Island, New Zealand) extremes to where life exists on Earth. Preliminary evidence demonstrates that organic carbon decreases and δ13C values are modified for ultramafic sediment in both perchlorate kinetic and incubation experiments. In hydrothermal jarosite/goethite with microbial communities present, total and organic carbon is maintained and little modification in δ13C values is apparent. These preliminary results suggest that surface hydrothermal deposits with mineralogically 'protected' organic carbon are preferable sites to assess the potential of life on Mars.

  1. The Impact of Temperature on Anaerobic Biological Perchlorate Treatment

    EPA Science Inventory

    A 20-month pilot-scale study was conducted to examine the impact of temperature on the performance of an anaerobic biological contactor used to treat perchlorate-contaminated water. The contactor was successfully acclimated with indigenous micro-organisms. Influent temperatures...

  2. POLISHING EFFLUENT FROM A PERCHLORATE-REDUCING ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL CONTACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency undertook at 3 ½ year pilot-scale biological perchlorate treatment study that included two long (311 and 340 days) examinations of anaerobic effluent polishing. The polishing system consisted of hydrogen peroxide addition and aeration, fo...

  3. Iodine supplementation and drinking-water perchlorate mitigation.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Thomas A; Peterson, Michael K; Charnley, Gail

    2015-06-01

    Ensuring adequate iodine intake is important, particularly among women of reproductive age, because iodine is necessary for early life development. Biologically based dose-response modeling of the relationships among iodide status, perchlorate dose, and thyroid hormone production in pregnant women has indicated that iodide intake has a profound effect on the likelihood that exposure to goitrogens will produce hypothyroxinemia. We evaluated the possibility of increasing iodine intake to offset potential risks from perchlorate exposure. We also explored the effect of dietary exposures to nitrate and thiocyanate on iodine uptake and thyroid hormone production. Our modeling indicates that the level of thyroid hormone perturbation associated with perchlorate exposures in the range of current regulatory limits is extremely small and would be overwhelmed by other goitrogen exposures. Our analysis also shows that microgram levels of iodine supplementation would be sufficient to prevent the goitrogenic effects of perchlorate exposure at current regulatory limits among at risk individuals. The human health risks from supplementing drinking water with iodine are negligible; therefore, this approach is worthy of regulatory consideration. PMID:25796570

  4. Iodine supplementation and drinking-water perchlorate mitigation.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Thomas A; Peterson, Michael K; Charnley, Gail

    2015-06-01

    Ensuring adequate iodine intake is important, particularly among women of reproductive age, because iodine is necessary for early life development. Biologically based dose-response modeling of the relationships among iodide status, perchlorate dose, and thyroid hormone production in pregnant women has indicated that iodide intake has a profound effect on the likelihood that exposure to goitrogens will produce hypothyroxinemia. We evaluated the possibility of increasing iodine intake to offset potential risks from perchlorate exposure. We also explored the effect of dietary exposures to nitrate and thiocyanate on iodine uptake and thyroid hormone production. Our modeling indicates that the level of thyroid hormone perturbation associated with perchlorate exposures in the range of current regulatory limits is extremely small and would be overwhelmed by other goitrogen exposures. Our analysis also shows that microgram levels of iodine supplementation would be sufficient to prevent the goitrogenic effects of perchlorate exposure at current regulatory limits among at risk individuals. The human health risks from supplementing drinking water with iodine are negligible; therefore, this approach is worthy of regulatory consideration.

  5. RAMAN SPECTROSCOPIC ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS AND PLANT TISSUE FOR PERCHLORATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Raman spectroscopy, without the need for prior chromatographic separation, was used for qualitative and quantitative analysis of 59 samples of fertilizers for perchlorate (ClO4-). These primarily lawn and garden products had no known link to Chile saltpeter, which is known to con...

  6. Perinatal exposure to perchlorate, thiocyanate, and nitrate in New Jersey mothers and newborns

    PubMed Central

    Blount, Benjamin C.; Rich, David Q.; Valentin-Blasini, Liza; Lashley, Susan; Ananth, Cande V.; Murphy, Eileen; Smulian, John C.; Spain, Betty J.; Barr, Dana B.; Ledoux, Thomas; Hore, Paromita; Robson, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Perchlorate is a commonly occurring environmental toxicant that may be transported across the placental barrier by the sodium-iodide symporter (NIS), possibly resulting in both increased perchlorate exposure and decreased iodide uptake by the fetus. Therefore, we measured levels of three physiologically relevant NIS-inhibitors (perchlorate, nitrate and thiocyanate) and iodide in maternal and fetal fluids collected during cesarean-section surgeries on 150 U.S. women. Geometric means of perchlorate, thiocyanate and nitrate levels in maternal urine (2.90, 947 and 47900 µg/L, respectively) were similar to previously published results, while urinary iodide levels (1420 µg/L) were significantly higher (p<0.0001), likely because of prevalent prenatal vitamin use in the study population (74%). Thiocyanate levels were higher in the maternal serum, cord serum, and amniotic fluid of smokers compared to women with environmental tobacco smoke exposure and non-smokers (p-values of 0.0006, p=0.0011, and 0.0026, respectively). Perchlorate was detected in most samples: urine (100%), maternal serum (94%), cord serum (67%), and amniotic fluid (97%). Maternal urinary perchlorate levels were positively correlated with perchlorate levels in amniotic fluid (r=0.57), indicating that maternal urine perchlorate is an effective biomarker of fetal perchlorate exposure. Maternal serum perchlorate was generally higher than cord serum perchlorate (median ratio 2.4:1 for paired samples), and maternal urine perchlorate was always higher than fetal amniotic fluid perchlorate levels (mean ratio 22:1); conversely, iodide levels were typically higher in fetal fluids compared to maternal fluids. We found no evidence of either disproportionate perchlorate accumulation or lack of iodide in the fetal compartment. In this panel of healthy infants, we found no association between cord blood levels of these anions and newborn weight, length and head circumference. PMID:19848174

  7. Nitrate and Perchlorate removal from groundwater by ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Burge, S; Halden, R

    1999-09-15

    This study was conducted to evaluate the performance of a small scale ion exchange unit (Krudico, Inc of Auborn, IA) for removal of nitrate and perchlorate from groundwater at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Site 300. The unit was able to treat 3,600 gallons of Site 300 groundwater, at an average influent concentration of 100 mg/L NO{sub 3}{sup -} before breakthrough occurred. The unit contained 2.5 ft{sup 3} of Sybron SR-7 resin. Seventy gallons of regeneration waste were generated (water treated to waste ratio of 51:1). The effluent concentration was about 20 mg/L NO{sub 3}{sup -}, which is equivalent to a treatment efficiency of at least 80%. There are several options for implementing this technology at Site 300. A target well, in the 817 area, has been selected. It has a 3 to 4 gpm flow rate, and concentrations of 90 mg/L NO{sub 3}{sup -} and 40 {micro}g/L perchlorate. The different treatment options include ion exchange treatment of nitrate only, nitrate and perchlorate, or perchlorate only. Option 1: For the treatment of nitrate only, this unit will be able to treat 3,700 gallons of water before regeneration is required. If both columns of the ion exchange unit are used, 7,400 gallons could be treated before the columns will need to be regenerated (producing 140 gallons of waste, per cycle or every 1.5 days). The effluent nitrate concentration is expected to be about 17 mg/L. Annual operation and maintenance costs are estimated to be $0.14 per gallon of water treated. Option 2: If only perchlorate is to be removed with ion exchange at the 817 area, a smaller unit should be considered. A 55 gallon canister filled with ion exchange resin should be able to reduce perchlorate concentrations in the groundwater from 40 {micro}g/L to non-detect levels for three years before the resin would need to be replaced. The contaminant-laden resin would be disposed of as hazardous waste. It is not practical to regenerate the resin because of the extreme difficulty of

  8. Perchlorate reduction by autotrophic bacteria in the presence of zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xueyuan; Amrhein, Christopher; Deshusses, Marc A; Matsumoto, Mark R

    2006-02-15

    A series of batch experiments were performed to study the combination of zero-valent iron (ZVI) with perchlorate-reducing microorganisms (PRMs) to remove perchlorate from groundwater. In this method, H2 produced during the process of iron corrosion by water is used by PRMs as an electron donor to reduce perchlorate to chloride. Perchlorate degradation rates followed Monod kinetics, with a normalized maximum utilization rate (rmax) of 9200 microg g(-1) (dry wt) h(-1) and a half-velocity constant (Ks) of 8900 microg L(-1). The overall rate of perchlorate reduction was affected by the biomass density within the system. An increase in the OD600 from 0.025 to 0.08 led to a corresponding 4-fold increase of perchlorate reduction rate. PRM adaptation to the local environment and initiation of perchlorate reduction was rapid under neutral pH conditions. At the initial OD600 of 0.015, perchlorate reduction followed pseudo-first-order reaction rates with constants of 0.059 and 0.033 h(-1) at initial pH 7 and 8, respectively. Once perchlorate reduction was established, the bioreductive process was insensitive to the increases of pH from near neutral to 9.0. In the presence of nitrate, perchlorate reduction rate was reduced, but not inhibited completely.

  9. Reduction of Perchlorate and Nitrate by Microbial Communities in Vadose Soil

    PubMed Central

    Nozawa-Inoue, Mamie; Scow, Kate M.; Rolston, Dennis E.

    2005-01-01

    Perchlorate contamination is a concern because of the increasing frequency of its detection in soils and groundwater and its presumed inhibitory effect on human thyroid hormone production. Although significant perchlorate contamination occurs in the vadose (unsaturated) zone, little is known about perchlorate biodegradation potential by indigenous microorganisms in these soils. We measured the effects of electron donor (acetate and hydrogen) and nitrate addition on perchlorate reduction rates and microbial community composition in microcosm incubations of vadose soil. Acetate and hydrogen addition enhanced perchlorate reduction, and a longer lag period was observed for hydrogen (41 days) than for acetate (14 days). Initially, nitrate suppressed perchlorate reduction, but once perchlorate started to be degraded, the process was stimulated by nitrate. Changes in the bacterial community composition were observed in microcosms enriched with perchlorate and either acetate or hydrogen. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis and partial sequencing of 16S rRNA genes recovered from these microcosms indicated that formerly reported perchlorate-reducing bacteria were present in the soil and that microbial community compositions were different between acetate- and hydrogen-amended microcosms. These results indicate that there is potential for perchlorate bioremediation by native microbial communities in vadose soil. PMID:16000806

  10. Thyroid function and reproductive success in rodents exposed to perchlorate via food and water.

    PubMed

    Smith, Philip N; Severt, Scott A; Jackson, J W Andrew; Anderson, Todd A

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine if exposure to perchlorate via food items would have effects on mammals similar to those caused by exposure through drinking water at approximately equivalent doses. Prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster) and deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) were used to assess the potential toxicity of perchlorate-contaminated food items. Voles and mice were divided randomly into three treatment groups--perchlorate-contaminated food (PCF), perchlorate-contaminated water (PCW), and control groups--such that each treatment group contained equal numbers of males and females. Rodents in PCF treatment groups were fed chow formulated with soybean plant matter that had been grown with perchlorate-contaminated irrigation water. Individuals in the control and PCF groups were provided distilled/deionized drinking water, whereas the PCW group received drinking water containing sodium perchlorate. Only slight differences among treatment groups were observed in a variety of endpoints, including reproductive success, tissue perchlorate concentrations, thyroid hormone concentrations, and thyroid histology. However, trends observed in the present study suggest that perchlorate exposure via water may result in slightly greater effects than exposure to perchlorate via food. These data and recent reports of perchlorate in a wide variety of food items indicate that exposure via food intake is an important consideration when examining cumulative risk among humans, livestock, and wildlife.

  11. Relative source contributions for perchlorate exposures in a lactating human cohort.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Andrea B; Dyke, Jason V; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2013-01-15

    Perchlorate is an iodine-uptake inhibitor and common contaminant of food and drinking water. Understanding the amount of perchlorate exposure occurring through non-water sources is essential for accurate estimates of human exposure levels, and establishment of drinking water limits for this pervasive contaminant. The study objective was to determine the amount of perchlorate intake derived from diet rather than water. Subjects provided drinking water samples, detailed fluid-intake records, 24h urine collections and four milk samples for nine days. Samples were analyzed for perchlorate by isotope dilution ion chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Amounts of perchlorate derived from drinking water and dietary sources were calculated for each individual. Water of local origin was found to contribute a minor fraction of perchlorate intake. Estimated fraction intake from drinking water ranged from 0 to 36%. The mean and median dose of perchlorate derived from non-water sources by lactating women was 0.18 μg/kg/day (range: 0.06 to 0.36 μg/kg/day.) Lactating women consumed more fluid (mean 2.424 L/day) than has been assumed in recent risk assessments for perchlorate. The data reported here indicate that lactating women may be exposed to perchlorate through dietary sources at markedly higher levels than estimated previously. Exposures to perchlorate from non-water sources may be higher than recent estimates, including those used to develop drinking water standards.

  12. The origin of naturally occurring perchlorate: the role of atmospheric processes.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Martinelango, P Kalyani; Jackson, W Andrew; Anderson, Todd A; Tian, Kang; Tock, Richard W; Rajagopalan, Srinath

    2005-03-15

    Perchlorate, an iodide uptake inhibitor, is increasingly being detected in new places and new matrices. Perchlorate contamination has been attributed largelyto the manufacture and use of ammonium perchlorate (the oxidizer in solid fuel rockets) and/or the earlier use of Chilean nitrate as fertilizer (approximately 0.1% perchlorate). However, there are regions such as the southern high plains (Texas Panhandle) where there is no clear historical or current evidence of the extensive presence of rocket fuel or Chilean fertilizer sources. The occurrence of easily measurable concentrations of perchlorate in such places is difficult to understand. In the southern high plains groundwater, perchlorate is better correlated with iodate, known to be of atmospheric origin, compared to any other species. We show that perchlorate is readily formed by a variety of simulated atmospheric processes. For example, it is formed from chloride aerosol by electrical discharge and by exposing aqueous chloride to high concentrations of ozone. We report that perchlorate is present in many rain and snow samples. This strongly suggests that some perchlorate is formed in the atmosphere and a natural perchlorate background of atmospheric origin should exist.

  13. Reduction of perchlorate and nitrate by microbial communities in vadose soil.

    PubMed

    Nozawa-Inoue, Mamie; Scow, Kate M; Rolston, Dennis E

    2005-07-01

    Perchlorate contamination is a concern because of the increasing frequency of its detection in soils and groundwater and its presumed inhibitory effect on human thyroid hormone production. Although significant perchlorate contamination occurs in the vadose (unsaturated) zone, little is known about perchlorate biodegradation potential by indigenous microorganisms in these soils. We measured the effects of electron donor (acetate and hydrogen) and nitrate addition on perchlorate reduction rates and microbial community composition in microcosm incubations of vadose soil. Acetate and hydrogen addition enhanced perchlorate reduction, and a longer lag period was observed for hydrogen (41 days) than for acetate (14 days). Initially, nitrate suppressed perchlorate reduction, but once perchlorate started to be degraded, the process was stimulated by nitrate. Changes in the bacterial community composition were observed in microcosms enriched with perchlorate and either acetate or hydrogen. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis and partial sequencing of 16S rRNA genes recovered from these microcosms indicated that formerly reported perchlorate-reducing bacteria were present in the soil and that microbial community compositions were different between acetate- and hydrogen-amended microcosms. These results indicate that there is potential for perchlorate bioremediation by native microbial communities in vadose soil.

  14. [Perchlorate removal from underground water by anaerobic biological reduction with bark].

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Liu, Fei; Chen, Nan; Chen, Hong-Han

    2013-07-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to check the feasibility of perchlorate removal from underground water with bark as a carbon source and reaction media, the effect of bark dosage, temperature and initial perchlorate concentrations on perchlorate reduction were also investigated. The results indicated that compared to corn cob, sweet potato and potato, bark in combination with perchlorate reducing microorganisms (PRMs) can efficiently achieve perchlorate removal from underground water, the concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) which was available to PRMs was the limiting factor that affected the perchlorate removal efficiency. Degradation of 10 mg perchlorate needed to consume 35-40 mg DOC when using bark as the solid carbon source. The removal rate of perchlorate was increased by about 3 fold when the bark dosage was increased from 1:500 to 3:500; however, further increase of solid-liquid ratio (over 5:500) provided no further benefit to the perchlorate reduction rate. The rate constant reached 1.365 mg x (L x d)(-1) at (38 +/- 1) degrees C which was the highest in the batch experiments. The activation energy was 31.08 kJ x mol(-1). Anaerobic biological reduction supported by bark had a good impact on the water quality; the high perchlorate concentration did not cause substrate inhibition. PMID:24028002

  15. Effects of perchlorate on growth of four wetland plants and its accumulation in plant tissues.

    PubMed

    He, Hongzhi; Gao, Haishuo; Chen, Guikui; Li, Huashou; Lin, Hai; Shu, Zhenzhen

    2013-10-01

    Perchlorate contamination in water is of concern because of uncertainties about toxicity and health effects, impact on ecosystems, and possible indirect exposure pathways to humans. Therefore, it is very important to investigate the ecotoxicology of perchlorate and to screen plant species for phytoremediation. Effects of perchlorate (20, 200, and 500 mg/L) on the growth of four wetland plants (Eichhornia crassipes, Acorus calamus L., Thalia dealbata, and Canna indica) as well as its accumulation in different plant tissues were investigated through water culture experiments. Twenty milligrams per liter of perchlorate had no significant effects on height, root length, aboveground part weight, root weight, and oxidizing power of roots of four plants, except A. calamus, and increasing concentrations of perchlorate showed that out of the four wetland plants, only A. calamus had a significant (p<0.05) dose-dependent decrease in these parameters. When treated with 500 mg/L perchlorate, these parameters and chlorophyll content in the leaf of plants showed significant decline contrasted to control groups, except the root length of E. crassipes and C. indica. The order of inhibition rates of perchlorate on root length, aboveground part weight and root weight, and oxidizing power of roots was: A. calamus > C. indica > T. dealbata > E. crassipes and on chlorophyll content in the leaf it was: A. calamus > T. dealbata > C. indica > E. crassipes. The higher the concentration of perchlorate used, the higher the amount of perchlorate accumulation in plants. Perchlorate accumulation in aboveground tissues was much higher than that in underground tissues and leaf was the main tissue for perchlorate accumulation. The order of perchlorate accumulation content and the bioconcentration factor in leaf of four plants was: E. crassipes > C. indica > T. dealbata > A. calamus. Therefore, E. crassipes might be an ideal plant with high tolerance ability and accumulation ability for constructing

  16. Interaction between perchlorate and iodine in the metamorphosis of Hyla versicolor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparling, D.W.; Harvey, G.; Nzengung, V.; Linder, Gregory L.; Krest, Sherry K.; Sparling, Donald W.; Little, Edward E.

    2003-01-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) is a water-soluble, inorganic anion that is often combined with ammonium, potassium or other cations for use in industry and agriculture. Ammonium perchlorate, for example, is a potent oxidizer and is used in various military applications including rocket fuel. It has also been found in an historically widely used fertilizer, Chilean nitrate and in other fertilizers. It has been found in ground and surface waters of over 30 states and is considered a human health risk. Because of its similar atomic radius and volume, perchlorate competes with iodide for thyroid uptake and storage and thereby inhibits production of thyroid hormones. Amphibians may be particularly affected by perchlorate because they rely on the thyroid for metamorphosis. This study exposed early larval Hyla versicolor to concentrations of perchlorate ranging from 2.2 to 50 ppm to determine the effects of perchlorate on a native amphibian. In addition, three controls, 0 perchlorate, 0 perchlorate with 0.10 ppm iodide (C + I) and 50 ppm perchlorate + 0.10 ppm iodide (50 + I) were tested. Mortality (<11% with all treatments) and growth appeared to be unaffected by perchlorate. Inhibition of development started with 2.2 ppm perchlorate and little or no development occurred at 22.9 ppm and above. This inhibition was particularly apparent at the latter stages of development including hindlimb formation and metamorphosis. The estimated EC50 for total inhibition of metamorphosis at 70 days of treatment was 3.63 ppm. There was no evidence of inhibition of development with the 50 + I, C + I, or controls, indicating that the presence of small concentrations of iodide could counter the effects of perchlorate. When tadpoles that had been inhibited by perchlorate were subsequently treated with iodide, development through prometamorphosis progressed but mortality was very high.

  17. Interaction between perchlorate and iodine in the metamorphosis of Hyla versicolor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparling, D.; Harvey, G.; Nzengung, V.; ,

    2003-01-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) is a water-soluble, inorganic anion that is often combined with ammonium, potassium or other cations for use in industry and agriculture. Ammonium perchlorate, for example, is a potent oxidizer and is used in various military applications including rocket fuel. It has also been found in an historically widely used fertilizer, Chilean nitrate and in other fertilizers. It has been found in ground and surface waters of over 30 states and is considered a human health risk. Because of its similar atomic radius and volume, perchlorate competes with iodide for thyroid uptake and storage and thereby inhibits production of thyroid hormones. Amphibians may be particularly affected by perchlorate because they rely on the thyroid for metamorphosis. This study exposed early larval Hyla versicolor to concentrations of perchlorate ranging from 2.2 to 50 ppm to determine the effects of perchlorate on a native amphibian. In addition, three controls, 0 perchlorate, 0 perchlorate with 0.10 ppm iodide (C + I) and 50 ppm perchlorate + 0.10 ppm iodide (50 + I) were tested. Mortality (< 11% with all treatments) and growth appeared to be unaffected by perchlorate. Inhibition of development started with 2.2 ppm perchlorate and little or no development occurred at 22.9 ppm and above. This inhibition was particularly apparent at the latter stages of development including hindlimb formation and metamorphosis. The estimated EC50 for total inhibition of metamorphosis at 70 days of treatment was 3.63 ppm. There was no evidence of inhibition of development with the 50 + I, C + I, or controls, indicating that the presence of small concentrations of iodide could counter the effects of perchlorate. When tadpoles that had been inhibited by perchlorate were subsequently treated with iodide, development through prometamorphosis progressed but mortality was very high.

  18. Sensitivity and adaptability of methanogens to perchlorates: Implications for life on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kral, Timothy A.; Goodhart, Timothy H.; Harpool, Joshua D.; Hearnsberger, Christopher E.; McCracken, Graham L.; McSpadden, Stanley W.

    2016-01-01

    In 2008, the Mars Phoenix Lander discovered perchlorate at its landing site, and in 2012, the Curiosity rover confirmed the presence of perchlorate on Mars. The research reported here was designed to determine if certain methanogens could grow in the presence of three different perchlorate salt solutions. The methanogens tested were Methanothermobacter wolfeii, Methanosarcina barkeri, Methanobacterium formicicum and Methanococcus maripaludis. Media were prepared containing 0%, 0.5%, 1.0%, 2%, 5% and 10% wt/vol magnesium perchlorate, sodium perchlorate, or calcium perchlorate. Organisms were inoculated into their respective media followed by incubation at each organism's growth temperature. Methane production, commonly used to measure methanogen growth, was measured by gas chromatography of headspace gas samples. Methane concentrations varied with species and perchlorate salt tested. However, all four methanogens produced substantial levels of methane in the presence of up to 1.0% perchlorate, but not higher. The standard procedure for growing methanogens typically includes sodium sulfide, a reducing agent, to reduce residual molecular oxygen. However, the sodium sulfide may have been reducing the perchlorate, thus allowing for growth of the methanogens. To investigate this possibility, experiments were conducted where stainless steel nails were used instead of sodium sulfide as the reducing agent. Prior to the addition of perchlorate and inoculation, the nails were removed from the liquid medium. Just as in the prior experiments, the methanogens produced methane at comparable levels to those seen with sodium sulfide as the reductant, indicating that sodium sulfide did not reduce the perchlorate to any significant extent. Additionally, cells metabolizing in 1% perchlorate were transferred to 2%, cells metabolizing in 2% were transferred to 5%, and finally cells metabolizing in 5% were transferred to 10%. All four species produced methane at 2% and 5%, but not 10

  19. Effects of perchlorate on growth of four wetland plants and its accumulation in plant tissues.

    PubMed

    He, Hongzhi; Gao, Haishuo; Chen, Guikui; Li, Huashou; Lin, Hai; Shu, Zhenzhen

    2013-10-01

    Perchlorate contamination in water is of concern because of uncertainties about toxicity and health effects, impact on ecosystems, and possible indirect exposure pathways to humans. Therefore, it is very important to investigate the ecotoxicology of perchlorate and to screen plant species for phytoremediation. Effects of perchlorate (20, 200, and 500 mg/L) on the growth of four wetland plants (Eichhornia crassipes, Acorus calamus L., Thalia dealbata, and Canna indica) as well as its accumulation in different plant tissues were investigated through water culture experiments. Twenty milligrams per liter of perchlorate had no significant effects on height, root length, aboveground part weight, root weight, and oxidizing power of roots of four plants, except A. calamus, and increasing concentrations of perchlorate showed that out of the four wetland plants, only A. calamus had a significant (p<0.05) dose-dependent decrease in these parameters. When treated with 500 mg/L perchlorate, these parameters and chlorophyll content in the leaf of plants showed significant decline contrasted to control groups, except the root length of E. crassipes and C. indica. The order of inhibition rates of perchlorate on root length, aboveground part weight and root weight, and oxidizing power of roots was: A. calamus > C. indica > T. dealbata > E. crassipes and on chlorophyll content in the leaf it was: A. calamus > T. dealbata > C. indica > E. crassipes. The higher the concentration of perchlorate used, the higher the amount of perchlorate accumulation in plants. Perchlorate accumulation in aboveground tissues was much higher than that in underground tissues and leaf was the main tissue for perchlorate accumulation. The order of perchlorate accumulation content and the bioconcentration factor in leaf of four plants was: E. crassipes > C. indica > T. dealbata > A. calamus. Therefore, E. crassipes might be an ideal plant with high tolerance ability and accumulation ability for constructing

  20. Detection of Perchlorate Anion on Functionalized Silver Colloids Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Tio, J.; Wang, W.; Gu, B.

    2005-01-01

    Perchlorate anion interferes with the uptake of iodide by the human thyroid gland and consequently disrupts the regulation of metabolism. Chronic exposure to high levels of perchlorate may lead to the formation of thyroid gland tumors. Although the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has not set a maximum contaminant level (MCL) for perchlorate, a draft drinking water range of 4-18 ppb based on 2 liter daily consumption of water has been established. The current EPA approved method for detecting perchlorate uses ion chromatography which has a detection limit of ~1ppb and involves lengthy analytical time in the laboratory. A unique combination of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect and the bifunctional anion exchange resin’s high selectivity may provide an alternative way to detect perchlorate at such low concentrations and with high specificity. SERS, which uses laser excitation of adsorbed perchlorate anions on silver nanoparticles, has been shown to detect perchlorate anions at concentrations as low as 50 ppb. Normal micro-Raman analysis of perchlorate sorbed onto the resin beads has detected an even lower concentration of 10 ppb. In an effort to integrate these two effects, silver nanoparticles were coated with N-trimethoxysilylpropyl-N,N,N-trimethylammonium chloride, a functional group similar to that found on the resin bead, and subsequently inserted into different perchlorate concentration environments. This method has resulted in perchlorate detection down to ~10 ppb and a more consistent detection of perchlorate anion at ~50 ppb than that of earlier methods. As suggested by the direct insertion of functionalized silver colloids into perchlorate samples, this technique may potentially allow for the development of a probe using on-site Raman spectrometry to detect significantly low concentrations of perchlorate in situ rather than in the laboratory.

  1. Copper transport.

    PubMed

    Linder, M C; Wooten, L; Cerveza, P; Cotton, S; Shulze, R; Lomeli, N

    1998-05-01

    In adult humans, the net absorption of dietary copper is approximately 1 mg/d. Dietary copper joins some 4-5 mg of endogenous copper flowing into the gastrointestinal tract through various digestive juices. Most of this copper returns to the circulation and to the tissues (including liver) that formed them. Much lower amounts of copper flow into and out of other major parts of the body (including heart, skeletal muscle, and brain). Newly absorbed copper is transported to body tissues in two phases, borne primarily by plasma protein carriers (albumin, transcuprein, and ceruloplasmin). In the first phase, copper goes from the intestine to the liver and kidney; in the second phase, copper usually goes from the liver (and perhaps also the kidney) to other organs. Ceruloplasmin plays a role in this second phase. Alternatively, liver copper can also exit via the bile, and in a form that is less easily reabsorbed. Copper is also present in and transported by other body fluids, including those bathing the brain and central nervous system and surrounding the fetus in the amniotic sac. Ceruloplasmin is present in these fluids and may also be involved in copper transport there. The concentrations of copper and ceruloplasmin in milk vary with lactational stage. Parallel changes occur in ceruloplasmin messenger RNA expression in the mammary gland (as determined in pigs). Copper in milk ceruloplasmin appears to be particularly available for absorption, at least in rats. PMID:9587137

  2. Copper transport.

    PubMed

    Linder, M C; Wooten, L; Cerveza, P; Cotton, S; Shulze, R; Lomeli, N

    1998-05-01

    In adult humans, the net absorption of dietary copper is approximately 1 mg/d. Dietary copper joins some 4-5 mg of endogenous copper flowing into the gastrointestinal tract through various digestive juices. Most of this copper returns to the circulation and to the tissues (including liver) that formed them. Much lower amounts of copper flow into and out of other major parts of the body (including heart, skeletal muscle, and brain). Newly absorbed copper is transported to body tissues in two phases, borne primarily by plasma protein carriers (albumin, transcuprein, and ceruloplasmin). In the first phase, copper goes from the intestine to the liver and kidney; in the second phase, copper usually goes from the liver (and perhaps also the kidney) to other organs. Ceruloplasmin plays a role in this second phase. Alternatively, liver copper can also exit via the bile, and in a form that is less easily reabsorbed. Copper is also present in and transported by other body fluids, including those bathing the brain and central nervous system and surrounding the fetus in the amniotic sac. Ceruloplasmin is present in these fluids and may also be involved in copper transport there. The concentrations of copper and ceruloplasmin in milk vary with lactational stage. Parallel changes occur in ceruloplasmin messenger RNA expression in the mammary gland (as determined in pigs). Copper in milk ceruloplasmin appears to be particularly available for absorption, at least in rats.

  3. Perchlorate and Superfund Response to Uncertainty and the Geochemical Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, K. P.

    2007-12-01

    Perchlorate, a chemical that had been known both in nature and through synthesis since the nineteenth century, only emerged into the limelight as an environmental contaminant in 1997. US EPA's Superfund Program became involved in perchlorate issues in the late 1980s and early 1990s due to the chemical's presence mixed with other contaminants at cleanup sites. Relying largely on pharmaceutical studies primarily from the 1950s and 1960s, EPA scientists in 1992 made a provisional estimate of toxicity and estimated that about 4 micrograms per liter (parts per billion or ppb) in drinking water would be protective. "Uncertainty factors" were incorporated to address for several identified information gaps. Results of new animal and human studies funded by the Defense Department and industry in the late 1990s shifted the concern from affects on adults with unhealthy thyroids to the potential developmental health risks to infants and children. EPA's January, 2002, draft toxicity assessment was referred to a committee of the National Research Council. In January, 2005, this committee recommended a "reference dose" based primarily on human clinical data. Many decisions remain on interpretation of the scientific recommendations for regulatory applications. After California's 1997 development of an analytical method to detect perchlorate in water to 4 ppb, EPA and state officials quickly discovered this chemical at 10 Superfund sites in the Pacific Southwest Region and at more than 30 other locations in California, Arizona and Nevada. Even before current research on the potential for natural sources of this anion, reported detections of perchlorate were investigated with reasonable care and appropriate skepticism. A brief overview of the search for likely sources of perchlorate detected in California water supplies is presented from a regional Superfund perspective. Some are clearly anthropogenic and others may be unrelated to industrial or disposal practices. Currently, there

  4. Environmental impacts of perchlorate with special reference to fireworks--a review.

    PubMed

    Sijimol, M R; Mohan, Mahesh

    2014-11-01

    Perchlorate is an inorganic anion that is used in solid rocket propellants, fireworks, munitions, signal flares, etc. The use of fireworks is identified as one of the main contributors in the increasing environmental perchlorate contamination. Although fireworks are displayed for entertainment, its environmental costs are dire. Perchlorates are also emerging as potent thyroid disruptors, and they have an impact on the ecology too. Many studies have shown that perchlorate contaminates the groundwater and the surface water, especially in the vicinity of fireworks manufacturing sites and fireworks display sites. The health and ecological impacts of perchlorate released in fireworks are yet to be fully assessed. This paper reviews fireworks as a source of perchlorate contamination and its expected adverse impacts.

  5. Environmental impacts of perchlorate with special reference to fireworks--a review.

    PubMed

    Sijimol, M R; Mohan, Mahesh

    2014-11-01

    Perchlorate is an inorganic anion that is used in solid rocket propellants, fireworks, munitions, signal flares, etc. The use of fireworks is identified as one of the main contributors in the increasing environmental perchlorate contamination. Although fireworks are displayed for entertainment, its environmental costs are dire. Perchlorates are also emerging as potent thyroid disruptors, and they have an impact on the ecology too. Many studies have shown that perchlorate contaminates the groundwater and the surface water, especially in the vicinity of fireworks manufacturing sites and fireworks display sites. The health and ecological impacts of perchlorate released in fireworks are yet to be fully assessed. This paper reviews fireworks as a source of perchlorate contamination and its expected adverse impacts. PMID:25004859

  6. Trends of perchlorate in Antarctic snow: Implications for atmospheric production and preservation in snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Su; Cox, Thomas S.; Cole-Dai, Jihong; Peterson, Kari M.; Shi, Guitao

    2016-09-01

    Perchlorate concentration ranges from a few to a few hundred ng kg-1 in surface and shallow-depth snow at three Antarctic locations (South Pole, Dome A, and central West Antarctica), with significant spatial variations dependent on snow accumulation rate and/or atmospheric production rate. An obvious trend of increasing perchlorate since the 1970s is seen in South Pole snow. The trend is possibly the result of stratospheric chlorine levels elevated by anthropogenic chlorine emissions; this is supported by the timing of a similar trend at Dome A. Alternatively, the trend may stem from postdepositional loss of snowpack perchlorate or a combination of both. The possible impact of stratospheric chlorine is consistent with evidence of perchlorate production in the stratosphere. Additionally, perchlorate concentration appears to be directly affected by the springtime Antarctic ozone hole. Therefore, perchlorate variations in Antarctic snow are likely linked to stratospheric chemistry and ozone over the Antarctic.

  7. BTA copper complexes.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Manfred; Gálvez-Ruiz, Juan Carlos; Klapötke, Thomas M; Mayer, Peter; Weber, Birgit; Weigand, Jan J

    2005-10-31

    Cupric oxide is one of the most important additives used (a) to catalyze decomposition reactions in gas generators to obtain cooler reaction gases, (b) as burning enhancer for ammonium perchlorate-based composite propellants, and (c) as coloring agent in pyrotechnics. In this context, the reaction of Cu(2+) ions in aqueous ammonia solution with bis(tetrazolyl)amine (H(2)bta) was investigated. Depending on the reaction conditions three complexes were obtained: Cu(bta)(NH(3))(2) (1), Cu(bta)(NH(3))(2).H(2)O (2), and (NH(4))(2)Cu(bta)(2).2.5H(2)O (3). The crystal structures of 1 and 2 are discussed with respect to the coordination mode of the dianion of N,N-bis(1(2)H-tetrazol-5-yl)-amine (bta), which mediates in the case of 1 and 2 weak superexchange interactions between the adjacent magnetic transition-metal Cu(II) cations. These antiferromagnetic interactions result from 1D copper chains over an hidden azide end-to-end bridge. Interestingly, the structural arrangement of 1 completely changes in the presence of crystal-bound water. Moreover, some physicochemical properties (e.g., heat of formation, friction, and impact sensitivity, DSC) of these complexes with respect to high-energetic materials are discussed.

  8. Analysis and Exposure Assessment of Perchlorate in Korean Dairy Products with LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sung-Hee; Lee, Ji-Woo; Mandy, Pawlas

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Perchlorate is an emerging contaminant that is found everywhere, including various foods. Perchlorate is known to disturb the production of thyroid hormones and leads to mental disorders in fetuses and infants, as well as metabolic problems in adults. In this study, we attempted to establish an LC-MS/MS method for measuring perchlorate in dairy products and used this developed method to investigate perchlorate levels in Korean milk and yogurt samples. Methods The developed method of perchlorate analysis requires a shaker and 1% acetic acid/acetonitrile as the extracting solvent. Briefly, the samples were extracted and then centrifuged (4000 rpm, 1hour), and the supernatant was then passed through a Envi™ Carb SPE cartridge that had been prewashed sequentially with 6 mL of acetonitrile and 6 mL of 1% acetic acid in water. The final volume of the sample extract was adjusted to 40 mL with reagent water and the final sample was filtered through a 0.20-µm pore size PTFE (Polytetrafluoroethylene) syringe filter prior to LC-MS/MS. Results The average levels of perchlorate in milk and yogurt samples were 5.63 ± 3.49 µg/L and 3.65 ± 2.42 µg/L, respectively. The perchlorate levels observed in milk samples in this study were similar to those reported from China, Japan, and the United States. Conclusions The exposure of Koreans to perchlorate through the consumption of dairy products was calculated based on the results of this study. For all age groups, the calculated exposure to perchlorate was below the reference of dose (0.7 µg/kg-day) proposed by the National Academy of Science, USA, but the perchlorate exposure of children was higher than that of adults. Therefore, further investigation of perchlorate in other food samples is needed to enable a more exact assessment of exposure of children to perchlorate. PMID:22125772

  9. A Potential Mechanism for Perchlorate Formation on Mars: Surface-Radiolysis-Initiated Atmospheric Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Eric; Atreya, Sushil K.; Kaiser, Ralf-Ingo; Mahaffy, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4–) is prevalent on Earth, and with observations of perchlorate on lunar samples and chondrite meteorites, along with recent observations indicating the presence of perchlorate (ClO4–) in the Martian surface by the Phoenix lander and the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover, it appears that the existence of perchlorate is widespread throughout the solar system. However, the abundance and isotopic composition of Martian perchlorate suggest that the perchlorate formation mechanism on Mars may involve a different path than perchlorate found elsewhere in the solar system. Motivated by this, we employ a one-dimensional chemical model to investigate the viability of perchlorate formation in the atmosphere of Mars, instigated by the radiolysis of the Martian surface by galactic cosmic rays. The surface-atmosphere interaction to produce Martian perchlorate involves the sublimation of chlorine oxides into the atmosphere, through surface radiolysis, and their subsequent synthesis to form perchloric acid (HClO4), followed by surface deposition and mineralization to form surface perchlorates. Considering the chlorine oxide, OClO, we find an OClO surface flux as low as 3.2x107 molecules cm–2 s–1, sublimated into the atmosphere from the surface could produce sufficient HClO4 to explain the perchlorate concentration on Mars, assuming an accumulation depth of 30 cm and integrated over the Amazonian period. Radiolysis provides an efficient pathway for the oxidation of chlorine, bypassing the efficient Cl/HCl recycling mechanism that characterizes HClO4 formation mechanisms proposed for the Earth but not Mars.

  10. Spectroscopic and Visual Evidence of Perchlorate Deliquescence Under Martian Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolakakos, George; Whiteway, James

    2015-04-01

    One of the key findings during the Phoenix and Mars Science Laboratory landed Mars missions has been the detection of perchlorate, a highly deliquescent salt. Perchlorates are of great interest on Mars due to their high affinity for water vapour as well as their ability to greatly depress the freezing point of water when in solution. This has intriguing biological implications as resulting brines could potentially provide a habitable environment for living organisms. Additionally, it has been speculated that these salts may play a significant role in influencing the hydrological cycle on Mars. In order to experimentally study water exchange processes between the surface and atmosphere on Mars and assess the feasibility of a future landed detection tool, a stand-off Raman spectroscopy instrument and environmental simulation chamber have been developed at York University. A sample of magnesium perchlorate consistent with the size of patches found at the Phoenix site has been subjected to the low water vapour pressure and temperatures found at polar Martian latitudes. Results indicate that at a water vapour pressure of ~2 Pa (-54°C frost point temperature), Raman spectroscopy is able to detect the onset of brine formation and provide a relative estimate of the quantity of water taken up by the sample until complete deliquescence is reached. Significant uptake of water from the atmosphere is observed to occur prior to the frost point temperature being reached and on time scales relevant to the Martian diurnal cycle. This result suggests that perchlorates in the Martian regolith can contribute to the hydrological cycle, pre-emptively reducing the water vapour pressure before saturation is reached.

  11. Nitrogen-15 spin-rotation relaxation in ammonium perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnden, Anne M. C.; Hunter, Brian K.; Brown, R. Julian C.

    The spin-lattice relaxation time has been measured for 15N in ammonium perchlorate in the temperature range 240 to 292 K. The temperature dependence of T, suggests that spin-rotation is the dominant relaxation mechanism, and this is confirmed by calculation and by nuclear Overhauser effect measurements. The spin-rotation coupling constant for 15NH 4+ is estimated to be 11.1 ± 0.2 kHz.

  12. Lithium perchlorate-nitromethane-promoted alkylation of anilines with arylmethanols.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Mao, Hai-Feng; Wang, Lu; Zou, Jian-Ping; Zhang, Wei

    2011-11-01

    A new application of lithium perchlorate-nitromethane (LPNM) for the formation of aromatic C-N and C-C bonds is introduced. LPNM-promoted reactions of anilines with diarylmethanols selectively generate N-alkylated anilines or mono and double Friedel-Crafts alkylation products under different conditions by changing the reaction time, reaction temperature, and the ratio of the reactants. This method does not require the use of transition metal catalysts to prepare alkylated aniline derivatives.

  13. 77 FR 64335 - Notification of a Public Teleconference of the Science Advisory Board; Perchlorate Advisory Panel

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-19

    ... Considerations and Interpretation of Recent Epidemiological Evidence to Develop a Maximum Contaminant Level Goal... Epidemiological Evidence to Develop a Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) for Perchlorate. The SAB...

  14. Hypochlorite treatments are not a significant source of perchlorate exposure in lettuce.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, C A; Fonseca, J M; Blount, B C; Krieger, R I

    2009-03-25

    Leafy vegetables, such as lettuce ( Lactuca sativa L), have been identified as a potential source of perchlorate exposure to humans. Perchlorate is of concern because excessive amounts may impair thyroid function by inhibiting iodide uptake by the sodium iodide symporter. Perchlorate has been identified as an oxidation product in sodium hypochlorite. Dilute hypochlorite solutions are widely used on lettuce as a preservative and as a treatment to reduce microbial food risks. However, the potential of hypochlorite to be a source of human perchlorate exposure from lettuce had not been evaluated. Studies were conducted with lettuce collected in the San Luis Valley of southern Colorado and in the lower Colorado River Valley of southwestern Arizona to represent conditions under which hypochlorite is applied to lettuce in the field and in salad processing facilities. We used spray and dipping solutions that were dilutions of concentrated sodium hypochlorite that would contain from 12000 and 120000 microg/L perchlorate. The perchlorate content of iceberg and romaine lettuce averaged 6.2 and 7.2 microg/kg fw in southern Colorado and 14.0 and 56.7 microg/kg fw in southwestern Arizona and there were no significant (P > 0.05) increases in the perchlorate content of lettuce due to hypochlorite treatments. Because of the relatively low concentrations of perchlorate present after dilution and the low volumes applied to lettuce, hypochlorite solutions do not appear to be a significant source of the perchlorate levels found in lettuce. PMID:19245207

  15. Perchlorate in sewage sludge, rice, bottled water and milk collected from different areas in China.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yali; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Yawei; Shi, Jianbo; Cai, Yaqi; Mou, Shifen; Jiang, Guibin

    2007-10-01

    As a new emerging environmental contaminant, perchlorate has prompted people to pay more attention. The presence of perchlorate in the human body can result in improper regulation of metabolism for adults. Furthermore, it also causes developmental and behavioral problems for infants and children because it can interfere with iodide uptake into the thyroid tissue. In this paper, perchlorate in sewage sludge, rice, bottled drinking water and milk was detected for investigating the perchlorate pollution status in China. The places, where the samples were collected, cover most regions of China. Therefore, the final data on perchlorate levels will give an indication of the perchlorate pollution status in China. The final determination of perchlorate was performed by ion chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry with negative mode. The concentration of perchlorate in sewage sludge, rice, bottled drinking water and milk was in the range of 0.56-379.9 microg/kg, 0.16-4.88 mug/kg, 0.037-2.013 microg/L and 0.30-9.1 microg/L, respectively. The results show that perchlorate has been widespread in China.

  16. Highly-selective and Regenerable Ion Exchange for Perchlorate Remediation, Recovery, and Environmental Forensics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, B.; Brown, G.

    2007-12-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) has recently emerged as a widespread contaminant found in drinking water and groundwater supplies in the United States and is known to disrupt thyroid function by inhibiting iodide uptake. Among various treatment technologies, the highly-selective and regenerable ion-exchange technology has recently been developed at ORNL for removing ClO4- from contaminated water. The selective ion exchange technology relies on a unique, highly specific resin to trap ClO4- from contaminated water. The treatment system is then regenerated and perchlorate is destroyed. The reaction that destroys ClO4- produces Cl- and Fe(III) that are used to regenerate the resin, resulting in practically zero secondary waste production. In comparison with conventional non-selective ion-exchange technology, this new treatment process is expected to result in not only a reduced O&M cost but also the elimination of the disposal of hazardous wastes containing perchlorate. Additionally, the selective and regenerable ion exchange technology has allowed the quantitative recovery of perchlorate from contaminated water for reuse, or from other environmental matrices such as sediment, groundwater, and salt deposits for perchlorate isotopic and source identification. Naturally-forming perchlorate has been found to contain distinct oxygen and chlorine isotope signatures or anomalies as compared with anthropogenic perchlorate and can thus provide unambiguous identification of the sources of perchlorate contamination as a powerful tool for the forensics of perchlorate in the environment.

  17. Containerized Wetland Bioreactor Evaluated for Perchlorate and Nitrate Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Dibley, V R; Krauter, P W

    2004-12-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLNL) designed and constructed an innovative containerized wetlands (bioreactor) system that began operation in November 2000 to biologically degrade perchlorate and nitrate under relatively low-flow conditions at a remote location at Site 300 known as Building 854. Since initial start-up, the system has processed over 3,463,000 liters of ground water and treated over 38 grams of perchlorate and 148 kilograms of nitrate. Site 300 is operated by the University of California as a high-explosives and materials testing facility supporting nuclear weapons research. The 11-square mile site located in northern California was added to the NPL in 1990 primarily due to the presence of elevated concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ground water. At the urging of the regulatory agencies, perchlorate was looked for and detected in the ground water in 1999. VOCs, nitrate and perchlorate were released into the soil and ground water in the Building 854 area as the result of accidental leaks during stability testing of weapons or from waste discharge practices that are no longer permitted at Site 300. Design of the wetland bioreactors was based on earlier studies showing that indigenous chlorate-respiring bacteria could effectively degrade perchlorate into nontoxic concentrations of chlorate, chlorite, oxygen, and chloride. Studies also showed that the addition of organic carbon would enhance microbial denitrification. Early onsite testing showed acetic acid to be a more effective carbon source than dried leaf matter, dried algae, or milk replacement starter; a nutrient and carbon source used in a Department of Defense phytoremediation demonstration. No inocula were added to the system. Groundwater was allowed to circulate through the bioreactor for three weeks to acclimate the wetland plants and to build a biofilm from indigenous flora. Using solar energy, ground water is pumped into granular

  18. Modeling aqueous perchlorate chemistries with applications to Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marion, G. M.; Catling, D. C.; Zahnle, K. J.; Claire, M. W.

    2010-06-01

    NASA's Phoenix lander identified perchlorate and carbonate salts on Mars. Perchlorates are rare on Earth, and carbonates have largely been ignored on Mars following the discovery by NASA's Mars Exploration Rovers of acidic precipitated minerals such as jarosite. In light of the Phoenix results, we updated the aqueous thermodynamic model FREZCHEM to include perchlorate chemistry. FREZCHEM models the Na-K-Mg-Ca-Fe(II)-Fe(III)-Al-H-Cl-Br-SO 4-NO 3-OH-HCO 3-CO 3-CO 2-O 2-CH 4-Si-H 2O system, with 95 solid phases. We added six perchlorate salts: NaClO 4·H 2O, NaClO 4·2H 2O, KClO 4, Mg(ClO 4) 2·6H 2O, Mg(ClO 4) 2·8H 2O, and Ca(ClO 4) 2·6H 2O. Modeled eutectic temperatures for Na, Mg, and Ca perchlorates ranged from 199 K (-74 °C) to 239 K (-34 °C) in agreement with experimental data. We applied FREZCHEM to the average solution chemistry measured by the Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) experiment at the Phoenix site when soil was added to water. FREZCHEM was used to estimate SO42- and alkalinity concentrations that were missing from the WCL data. The amount of SO42- is low compared to estimates from elemental abundance made by other studies on Mars. In the charge-balanced solution, the dominant cations were Mg 2+ and Na + and the dominant anions were ClO4-,SO42-, and alkalinity. The abundance of calcite measured at the Phoenix site has been used to infer that the soil may have been subject to liquid water in the past, albeit not necessarily locally; so we used FREZCHEM to evaporate (at 280.65 K) and freeze (from 280.65 to 213.15 K) the WCL-measured solution to provide insight into salts that may have been in the soil. Salts that precipitated under both evaporation and freezing were calcite, hydromagnesite, gypsum, KClO 4, and Mg(ClO 4) 2·8H 2O. Epsomite (MgSO 4·7H 2O) and NaClO 4·H 2O were favored by evaporation at temperatures >0 °C, while meridianite (MgSO 4·11H 2O), MgCl 2·12H 2O, and NaClO 4·2H 2O were favored at subzero temperatures. Incongruent melting

  19. Fatty acid profile in milk from goats, Capra aegagrus hircus, exposed to perchlorate and its relationship with perchlorate residues in human milk.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qiuqiong; Smith, Ernest E; Kirk, Andrea B; Liu, Fujun; Boylan, Lee Mallory; McCarty, Michael E; Hart, Sybil; Dong, Linxia; Cobb, George P; Jackson, W Andrew; Anderson, Todd A

    2007-10-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in milk are vital for normal growth and development of infant mammals. Changes in fatty acid composition were observed in milk fat from goats dosed with perchlorate (0.1 and 1 mg/kg body weight/day) for 31 days, but the effect was not persistent. Adaptation may be induced in these goats to compensate for the perchlorate effect. In an analysis of fatty acid composition in human milk samples, a weak negative correlation was observed between perchlorate concentrations and total PUFA in 38 human milk samples.

  20. Perchlorate in the Hydrologic Cycle - An Overview of Sources and Occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stonestrom, D. A.; Jackson, W.; Mayer, K.; Orris, G. J.

    2007-12-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) in water and food is of concern due to deleterious health affects associated with hypothyroidism. The presence of widespread perchlorate in 0-to-28 ka-old pristine ground water of the Middle Rio Grande Basin (Plummer et al., 2006, ES&T, DOI:10.1021/es051739h), in ground water >1 mile from agricultural activities in the Southern High Plains (Rajagapolan et al., 2006, ES&T, DOI:10.1021/es052155i), and in unsaturated zones throughout the arid and semiarid southwestern United States (Rao et al., 2007, ES&T, DOI:10.1021/es062853i) clearly indicates that perchlorate is a non-exotic component of the hydrologic cycle, at least in dry environments. The natural system has been greatly perturbed in places by human activities. Most anthropogenic inputs are associated with the manufacture and use of explosives and rocket fuel, providing concentrated sources of excess perchlorate to the hydrologic cycle. Perchlorate-containing fertilizers and irrigation provide dispersed sources within and down-gradient from agricultural areas. Natural sources include photochemically mediated reactions involving ozone at the land surface and in the lower atmosphere. A growing body of work indicates that a small, but persistent, meteoric source acting over thousands of years can explain observed accumulations of unsaturated-zone perchlorate in arid regions. In addition to meteoric sources, oxyanions produced during volcanogenic processes can include appreciable amounts of natural perchlorate. Terrestrial plants take up perchlorate in soil water, with some species of xerophytic succulents concentrating the anion to high levels. Similarly, perchlorate in marine plants indicates that perchlorate is part of marine biochemical cycles. Perchlorate-bearing marine sediments of late Tertiary age suggest that perchlorate has been part of global geochemical cycles for millions of years and, furthermore, can be preserved in the subsurface despite the nearly ubiquitous presence of

  1. Perchlorate exposure from food crops produced in the lower Colorado River region.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Charles A; Barraj, Leila M; Blount, Benjamin C; Scrafford, Carolyn G; Valentin-Blasini, Liza; Smith, Kimberly M; Krieger, Robert I

    2009-05-01

    The Colorado River shows low levels of perchlorate derived from aerospace- and defense-related fuel industries once located near the Las Vegas Wash. At sufficiently high dosages perchlorate can disrupt thyroid function by inhibiting uptake of iodide. The Colorado River is the primary source of irrigation water for most food crops grown in Southern California and Southwestern Arizona. The objective of this study was to evaluate potential perchlorate exposure from food crops produced in the lower Colorado River region (LCRR). The major food commodities produced in the region were sampled and perchlorate levels were determined by ion chromatography followed by detection using either conductivity or tandem mass spectrometry, depending on analyte levels. The Monte Carlo module of the Dietary Exposure Evaluation Model (DEEM) was used to derive an estimate of the 2-day average perchlorate intakes. Data were derived assuming that individuals residing in the LCRR get their fruits and vegetables from within the LCRR as well as from other areas in the United States, or assuming individuals living in the LCRR get their fruits and vegetables from the LCRR only. Perchlorate exposure estimates derived in this study are comparable to exploratory estimates by the US Food and Drug Administration. For infants and children, over 50% of the estimated perchlorate exposure was from milk. The relative impact of vegetables and fruit toward perchlorate exposure increased by age through adulthood. Cumulative perchlorate exposure estimates based on this hypothetical analysis could approach or exceed the NAS reference dose (RfD) for some population groups as drinking water levels exceeded 6 microg/l. However, few individuals are exposed to perchlorate in drinking water at levels above 4 microg/l in the United States and very few would be exposed to perchlorate levels exceeding the RfD, whether consuming food crops from within or outside the LCRR. PMID:18506207

  2. Fate of dietary perchlorate in lactating dairy cows: Relevance to animal health and levels in the milk supply.

    PubMed

    Capuco, A V; Rice, C P; Baldwin, R L; Bannerman, D D; Paape, M J; Hare, W R; Kauf, A C W; McCarty, G W; Hapeman, C J; Sadeghi, A M; Starr, J L; McConnell, L L; Van Tassell, C P

    2005-11-01

    Perchlorate is a goitrogenic anion that competitively inhibits the sodium iodide transporter and has been detected in forages and in commercial milk throughout the U.S. The fate of perchlorate and its effect on animal health were studied in lactating cows, ruminally infused with perchlorate for 5 weeks. Milk perchlorate levels were highly correlated with perchlorate intake, but milk iodine was unaffected, and there were no demonstrable health effects. We provide evidence that up to 80% of dietary perchlorate was metabolized, most likely in the rumen, which would provide cattle with a degree of refractoriness to perchlorate. Data presented are important for assessing the environmental impact on perchlorate concentrations in milk and potential for relevance to human health.

  3. Fate of dietary perchlorate in lactating dairy cows: Relevance to animal health and levels in the milk supply

    PubMed Central

    Capuco, A. V.; Rice, C. P.; Baldwin, R. L.; Bannerman, D. D.; Paape, M. J.; Hare, W. R.; Kauf, A. C. W.; McCarty, G. W.; Hapeman, C. J.; Sadeghi, A. M.; Starr, J. L.; McConnell, L. L.; Van Tassell, C. P.

    2005-01-01

    Perchlorate is a goitrogenic anion that competitively inhibits the sodium iodide transporter and has been detected in forages and in commercial milk throughout the U.S. The fate of perchlorate and its effect on animal health were studied in lactating cows, ruminally infused with perchlorate for 5 weeks. Milk perchlorate levels were highly correlated with perchlorate intake, but milk iodine was unaffected, and there were no demonstrable health effects. We provide evidence that up to 80% of dietary perchlorate was metabolized, most likely in the rumen, which would provide cattle with a degree of refractoriness to perchlorate. Data presented are important for assessing the environmental impact on perchlorate concentrations in milk and potential for relevance to human health. PMID:16260728

  4. High-nitrogen-based pyrotechnics: development of perchlorate-free green-light illuminants for military and civilian applications.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Jesse J; Raab, James M; Hann, Ronald K; Damavarapu, Reddy; Klapötke, Thomas M

    2012-06-01

    The development of perchlorate-free hand-held signal illuminants for the US Army's M195 green star parachute is described. Compared with the perchlorate-containing control, the optimized perchlorate-free illuminants were less sensitive toward various ignition stimuli while offering comparable burn times and visible-light outputs. The results were also important from the perspective of civilian fireworks because the development of perchlorate-free illuminants remains an important objective of the commercial fireworks industry.

  5. Equilibrium dialysis and ultrafiltration investigations of perchlorate removal from aqueous solution using poly(diallyldimethylammonium) chloride.

    PubMed

    Roach, Jim D; Tush, Daniel

    2008-02-01

    Use of perchlorate salts in military activities and the aerospace industry is widespread. These salts are highly water-soluble and are, to a large extent, kinetically inert as aqueous species. As a groundwater contaminant, perchlorate is now being detected in an increasing number of locations and is believed to interfere with the uptake of iodide by the thyroid, which can result in decreased hormone production. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) has established a reference dose for perchlorate of 0.0007 mg/kg/day, which translates to a drinking water equivalent level of 24.5 ppb. This study investigated the application of polyelectrolyte-enhanced ultrafiltration (PEUF) for the selective removal of perchlorate from aqueous solution through equilibrium dialysis and ultrafiltration experiments. Using poly(diallyldimethylammonium) chloride, the effectiveness and efficiency of PEUF in the removal of perchlorate from other aqueous solution components was investigated by testing parameters such as polyelectrolyte concentration, pH, and ionic strength. Removal of perchlorate from synthetic groundwater initially containing 10.3 ppm perchlorate and also containing chloride, sulfate, and carbonate was also examined. Perchlorate separations of greater than 95% were achieved, even in the presence of 10-fold excesses of competing ions. PMID:17915279

  6. Perchlorate and halophilic prokaryotes: implications for possible halophilic life on Mars.

    PubMed

    Oren, Aharon; Elevi Bardavid, Rahel; Mana, Lily

    2014-01-01

    In view of the finding of perchlorate among the salts detected by the Phoenix Lander on Mars, we investigated the relationships of halophilic heterotrophic microorganisms (archaea of the family Halobacteriaceae and the bacterium Halomonas elongata) toward perchlorate. All strains tested grew well in NaCl-based media containing 0.4 M perchlorate, but at the highest perchlorate concentrations, tested cells were swollen or distorted. Some species (Haloferax mediterranei, Haloferax denitrificans, Haloferax gibbonsii, Haloarcula marismortui, Haloarcula vallismortis) could use perchlorate as an electron acceptor for anaerobic growth. Although perchlorate is highly oxidizing, its presence at a concentration of 0.2 M for up to 2 weeks did not negatively affect the ability of a yeast extract-based medium to support growth of the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum. These findings show that presence of perchlorate among the salts on Mars does not preclude the possibility of halophilic life. If indeed the liquid brines that may exist on Mars are inhabited by salt-requiring or salt-tolerant microorganisms similar to the halophiles on Earth, presence of perchlorate may even be stimulatory when it can serve as an electron acceptor for respiratory activity in the anaerobic Martian environment.

  7. Occurrence and exposure evaluation of perchlorate in indoor dust and diverse food from Chengdu, China.

    PubMed

    Gan, Zhiwei; Pi, Lu; Li, Yiwen; Hu, Wenli; Su, Shijun; Qin, Xiaolei; Ding, Sanglan; Sun, Hongwen

    2015-12-01

    A total of 688 samples, including 520 food samples belonging to 29 food types in 10 groups, 63 drinking water, and 105 indoor dust samples were collected during May to November in 2014 in Chengdu and Tianjin (only dust samples in Tianjin), China to investigate the perchlorate levels in these samples and to estimate the related exposure to Chinese people. Significant difference in indoor dust perchlorate levels was found between Chengdu and Tianjin, with the concentrations ranging from 0.11 to 38.8 mg/kg in Chengdu, and from 0.72 to 119 mg/kg in Tianjin. The mean perchlorate levels in 10 groups of food samples were in the order of vegetables>wheaten flour≈egg, and wheaten flour>milk>sea food>livestock meats≈poultry≈freshwater fish>fruits>steamed rice, while no statistical difference in perchlorate levels was found between egg and milk. Exposure evaluation indicated that indoor dust contributed little (less than 5%) to the total daily perchlorate intake, and food consumption was the primary perchlorate exposure route for Chengdu people, followed by drinking water. Based on the median perchlorate levels obtained in this study, the daily perchlorate intake was below the reference does suggested by the US EPA. PMID:26218568

  8. MICROSCALE EXTRACTION OF PERCHLORATE IN DRINKING WATER WITH LOW LEVEL DETECTION BY ELECTROSPRAY-MASS SPECTROMETRY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Improper treatment and disposal of perchlorate can be an environmental hazard in regions where solid rocket motors are used, tested, or stored. The solubility and mobility of perchlorate lends itself to ground water contamination, and some of these sources are used for drinking ...

  9. REMOTE SENSING OF PERCHLORATE EFFECTS ON SALT CEDAR PRELIMINARY RESULTS FROM THE LAS VEGAS WASH

    EPA Science Inventory



    Sodium Perchlorate and ammonium Perchlorate, major components of solid rocket fuel, have been manufactured in the Las Vegas Valley immediately up gradient from the Las Vegas Wash, since 1945 and 1956, respectively. Measurements of emerging ground water quality in the vici...

  10. Uptake, elimination, and relative distribution of perchlorate in various tissues of channel catfish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, J.-W.; Bradford, C.M.; Rinchard, J.; Liu, F.; Wages, M.; Waters, A.; Kendall, R.J.; Anderson, T.A.; Theodorakis, C.W.

    2007-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the kinetics of uptake and elimination of perchlorate in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus. Perchlorate - an oxidizer used in solid fuel rockets, fireworks, and illuminating munitions - has been shown to effect thyroid function, causing hormone disruption and potential perturbations of metabolic activities. For the uptake study, catfish were exposed to 100 mg/L sodium perchlorate for 12 h to 5 d in the laboratory. Perchlorate in tissues was analyzed using ion chromatography. The highest perchlorate concentrations were found in the head and fillet, indicating that these tissues are the most important tissues to analyze when determining perchlorate uptake into large fish. To calculate uptake and elimination rate constants for fillet, gills, G-I tract, liver, and head, fish were exposed to 100 ppm sodium perchlorate for 5 days, and allowed to depurate in clean water for up to 20 days. The animals rapidly eliminated the perchlorate accumulated showing the highest elimination in fillet (Ke = 1.67 day -1) and lowest elimination in liver (Ke = 0.79 day -1). ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  11. COMMENT ON "PERCHLORATE IDENTIFICATION IN FERTILIZERS" AND THE SUBSEQUENT ADDITION/CORRECTION [LETTER TO EDITOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate contamination has been reported in several fertilizer materials and not just in mined Chile saltpeter, where it is a welo-known natural impurity. To survey fertilizers for perchlorate, two analytical techniques have been applied to 45 products that span agricultural, ...

  12. Supercooling and Ice Formation of Perchlorate Brines under Mars-relevant Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primm, K.; Gough, R. V.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Perchlorate salts, discovered in the Martian regolith at multiple landing sites, may provide pathways for liquid water stability on current Mars. It has previously been assumed that if perchlorate brines form in the Martian regolith via melting or deliquescence, they would be present only briefly because efflorescence into a crystal or freezing to ice would soon occur. Here, we used a Raman microscope to study the temperature and relative humidity (RH) conditions at which magnesium perchlorate brine will form ice. Although ice is thermodynamically predicted to form whenever the saturation with respect to ice (Sice) is greater than or equal to 1, ice formation by perchlorate brines did not occur until elevated Sice values were reached: Sice= 1.17, 1.29, and 1.25 at temperatures of 218 K, 230.5 K, and 244 K, respectively. If a magnesium perchlorate particle was allowed to deliquesce completely prior to experiencing ice supersaturation, the extent of supercooling was increased even further. These high supersaturation values imply perchlorate brines can exist over a wider range of conditions than previously believed. From these experiments it has been found that magnesium perchlorate exhibits supercooling well into the previous theoretical ice region of the stability diagram and that liquid brines on Mars could potentially exist for up to two additional hours per sol. This supercooling of magnesium perchlorate will help with the exploration of Mars by the Mars 2020 spacecraft by helping to understand the phase and duration of water existing in the Martian subsurface.

  13. PERFORMANCE OF POLYVINYL ALCOHOL GEL COLUMNS ON THE ION CHROMATOGRAPHIC DETERMINATION OF PERCHLORATE IN FERTILIZERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interest in possible sources of perchlorate (ClO4-) that could lead to environmental release has been heightened since the EPA placed this anion on its Contaminant Candidate List (CCL) for drinking water. Besides its association with defense and aerospace activities, perchlorate ...

  14. RAMAN SPECTRAL ANALYSIS OF PERCHLORATE CONTAMINATION IN COMMONLY-USED FERTILIZERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Raman spectroscopy (RS) was used for qualitative and quantitative analysis of perchlorate (ClO4-1) in 30+ commonly-used fertilizers. Perchlorate contamination is emerging as an important environmental issue since its discovery in water resources that are widely used for drinking...

  15. PERCHLORATE TROPHIC TRANSFER INCREASES TISSUE CONCENTRATIONS ABOVE AMBIENT WATER EXPOSURE ALONE IN A PREDATORY FISH

    PubMed Central

    Furin, Christoff G.; von Hippel, Frank A.; Hagedorn, Birgit; O’Hara, Todd M.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined effects of varying concentrations of the environmental contaminant perchlorate in northern pike (Esox lucius) based on exposure in water and/or from prey (threespine stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus). Routes of exposure to pike were through contaminated water at 0, 10 or 100 mg/L perchlorate for 49 days and/or through feeding one stickleback per day over 14 days that were previously maintained in water at 0, 10 or 100 mg/L perchlorate. Both water and food significantly contributed to pike tissue concentrations of perchlorate as compared to controls, but, as expected for a water-soluble contaminant, perchlorate did not biomagnify from prey to predatory fish. Pike gastrointestinal tissue retained significantly more perchlorate than other tissues combined. Route of exposure and concentration of perchlorate in various media are important to consider in risk assessment when evaluating uptake and tissue concentration of perchlorate because significantly higher tissue concentrations may result from combined prey and water exposures than from prey or water exposures alone in a concentration dependent manner. PMID:24188192

  16. Oxidimetric determination of thiourea, thiosulphate and sulphite with thallic perchlorate in acid medium.

    PubMed

    Sharma, P D; Gupta, Y K

    1974-02-01

    Conditions have been established for the titrimetric estimation of thiourea, thiosulphate and sulphite with thallic perchlorate, with visual end-points, in perchloric and sulphuric acid medium. In the direct determination, chloride and bromide interfere. In the indirect iodometric determination. Cu(2+) and Fe(2+) interfere, but chloride and bromide do not.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF A BETTER METHOD TO IDENTIFY AND MEASURE PERCHLORATE IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate (ClO4 -) is an oxidant used primarily in solid propellant for rockets, missiles, pyrotechnics, as a component in air bag inflators, and in highway safety flares. Perchlorate tainted water has been found throughout the southwestern United States where its source has o...

  18. Thyroid Hormones and Thyroid Disease in Relation to Perchlorate Dose and Residence Near a Superfund Site

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Ellen B.; Blount, Benjamin C.; Rasor, Marianne O’Neill; Lee, Jennifer S.; Alwis, Udeni; Srivastav, Anup; Kim, Kyoungmi

    2013-01-01

    Background Perchlorate is a widely occurring contaminant, which can competitively inhibit iodide uptake and thus thyroid hormone production. The health effects of chronic low dose perchlorate exposure are largely unknown. Objectives In a community-based study, we compared thyroid function and disease in women with differing likelihoods of prior and current perchlorate exposure. Methods Residential blocks were randomly selected from areas: 1) with potential perchlorate exposure via drinking water; 2) with potential exposure to environmental contaminants; and 3) neighboring but without such exposures. Eligibility included having lived in the area for ≥6 months and aged 20–50 years during 1988–1996 (during documented drinking water well contamination). We interviewed 814 women and collected blood samples (assayed for thyroid stimulating hormone [TSH] and free thyroxine [fT4]) from 431 interviewed women. Daily urine samples were assayed for perchlorate and iodide for 178 premenopausal women with blood samples. We performed multivariable regression analyses comparing thyroid function and disease by residential area and by urinary perchlorate dose adjusted for urinary iodide levels. Results Residential location and current perchlorate dose were not associated with thyroid function or disease. Conclusions No persistent effect of perchlorate on thyroid function or disease was found several years after contaminated wells were capped. PMID:22968349

  19. PERCHLORATE UPTAKE BY SALT CEDAR (TAMARIX RAMOSISSIMA) IN THE LAS VEGAS WASH RIPARIAN ECOSYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate ion (CIO4-) has been identified in samples of dormant salt cedar (Tamarix ramosissima) growing in the Las vegas Wash. Perchlorate is an oxidenat, but its reduction is kineticaly hindered. CXoncern over thyrpoid effects caused the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA...

  20. Perchlorate and halophilic prokaryotes: implications for possible halophilic life on Mars.

    PubMed

    Oren, Aharon; Elevi Bardavid, Rahel; Mana, Lily

    2014-01-01

    In view of the finding of perchlorate among the salts detected by the Phoenix Lander on Mars, we investigated the relationships of halophilic heterotrophic microorganisms (archaea of the family Halobacteriaceae and the bacterium Halomonas elongata) toward perchlorate. All strains tested grew well in NaCl-based media containing 0.4 M perchlorate, but at the highest perchlorate concentrations, tested cells were swollen or distorted. Some species (Haloferax mediterranei, Haloferax denitrificans, Haloferax gibbonsii, Haloarcula marismortui, Haloarcula vallismortis) could use perchlorate as an electron acceptor for anaerobic growth. Although perchlorate is highly oxidizing, its presence at a concentration of 0.2 M for up to 2 weeks did not negatively affect the ability of a yeast extract-based medium to support growth of the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum. These findings show that presence of perchlorate among the salts on Mars does not preclude the possibility of halophilic life. If indeed the liquid brines that may exist on Mars are inhabited by salt-requiring or salt-tolerant microorganisms similar to the halophiles on Earth, presence of perchlorate may even be stimulatory when it can serve as an electron acceptor for respiratory activity in the anaerobic Martian environment. PMID:24150694

  1. Perchlorate content of plant foliage reflects a wide range of species-dependent accumulation but not ozone-induced biosynthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perchlorate interferes with uptake of iodide in humans. Emission inventories do not explain observed distributions. Ozone is implicated in the natural origin of perchlorate, and has increased since pre-industrial times. Ozone produces perchlorate in vitro from chloride, and plant tissues contain chl...

  2. Laboratory modeling of perchlorates impact on subsurface life in martian-like environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vdovina, Maria; Pavlov, Anatoli; Shelegedin, Vladimir

    2010-05-01

    Phoenix mission has discovered an unusial hihg content of perchlorates in surface layer of the Mars. On the other hand large amount of water ice present in surface layer. Our laboratory modeling has demonstrated that terrestrial nonextremophile microorganisms can reproduce even under extremely low atmospheric pressure (0.01-0.1 mbar). Necessary conditions for metabolism and reproduction are the sublimation of ground ice through a thin upper layer of soilleading to liquid water films production and short episodes of warm temperatures in the vapor diffusion layer. Perchlorates could be a potential harmful factor for any type of life forms as strong oxidants. On the other hand, perchlorates effectively decrease temperature of water freezing point creating a possibilitity of the liquid water films existence even at temperatures below 0C. We presents the results of laboratory modelling of perchlorates impact on microorganisms in martian like conditions (P-T) at different concentratiion of perchlorates

  3. Widespread natural perchlorate in unsaturated zones of the southwest United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rao, B.; Anderson, T.A.; Orris, G.J.; Rainwater, K.A.; Rajagopalan, S.; Sandvig, R.M.; Scanlon, B.R.; Stonestrom, D.A.; Walvoord, M.A.; Jackson, W.A.

    2007-01-01

    A substantial reservoir (up to 1 kg ha-1) of natural perchlorate is present in diverse unsaturated zones of the arid and semi-arid southwestern United States. The perchlorate co-occurs with meteoric chloride that has accumulated in these soils throughout the Holocene [0 to 10-15 ka (thousand years ago)] and possibly longer periods. Previously, natural perchlorate widely believed to be limited to the Atacama Desert, now appears widespread in steppe-to-desert ecoregions. The perchlorate reservoir becomes sufficiently large to affect groundwater when recharge from irrigation or climate change flushes accumulated salts from the unsaturated zone. This new source may help explain increasing reports of perchlorate in dry region agricultural products and should be considered when evaluating overall source contributions. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  4. Removal of perchlorate in water by calcined MgAl-CO3 layered double hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yiqiong; Gao, Naiyun; Deng, Yang; Yu, Guoping

    2013-04-01

    Perchlorate is widely known as an inorganic endocrine disruptor. In this study, MgAl-CO3 layered double hydroxides with different Mg/Al molar ratios were prepared using a coprecipitation method and followed by a calcination process at a temperature range of 300 to 700 degrees C. Results showed that the best synthesis conditions were a calcination temperature of 550 degrees C and Mg/Al molar ratio of 3. Further, the adsorbent and its adsorption product were characterized by x-ray diffraction, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis. The layered double hydroxides structures in the adsorbent were lost during calcination at 550 degrees C but were reconstructed subsequent to adsorption of perchlorate, indicating that the "memory effect" appeared to play an important role in perchlorate adsorption. The perchlorate adsorption pattern was best described by the pseudo-second-order kinetics model, while the Freundlich isotherms appropriately explained perchlorate adsorption data.

  5. Discovery of Perchlorate at the Phoenix Landing Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, M. H.; Kounaves, S. P.; Quinn, R. C.; West, S. J.; Young, S. M.; Clark, B. C.; Deflores, L. P.; Kapit, J. A.; Gospodinova, K.; Smith, P. H.; Team, T. P.

    2008-12-01

    One of several payload components on the Phoenix Lander, the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) is a suite of instruments that includes a microscopy station (optical and atomic force), four wet chemistry laboratories (WCL), and a soil probe. After the addition of up to 1 cm3 of martian soil into 25 ml of an aqueous calibration solution, the WCL measures solution cation and anion concentration, including pH, as well as total conductivity and cyclic voltammetry. With the exception of a redundant coulombic titration of halides, all cation and anion measurements are made with ion selective electrodes (ISE). Among the species not directly measured are sulfate and carbonate, which can be inferred indirectly by the response to acid and Ba additions, and soluble Fe, which can sometimes be detected with cyclic voltammetry. Responses from several cation and anion sensors were observed almost immediately upon addition of soil to the solution. Most striking was a three order-of-magnitude increase of the Hofmeister series sensor, which could only be explained by a large concentration of the perchlorate ion, ClO4-. Perchlorates are highly water soluble oxidants, often deliquescent, and some are powerful freezing-point depressors that can form aqueous brines at mean Martian temperatures appropriate to this region, as low as -70 deg C. This combination of properties has implications that span the disciplines of geochemistry, atmospheric sciences, astrobiology, and the potential for future human exploration. An important qualification of any such discussion, however, is uncertainty about how widespread the distribution of perchlorate may be. Other WCL findings, including alkaline pH and buffered response to purposeful addition of acid consistent with the presence of carbonates, will also be summarized.

  6. Perchloric acid dissolution of graphite and pyrolytic carbon.

    PubMed

    Buzzelli, G; Mosen, A W

    1977-06-01

    Three procedures are described for the wet oxidation, with perchloric acid, of nuclear graphite, pyrocarbon-coated fuel particles, and other carbonaceous materials used in high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGRs). The first procedure is for dissolution of graphite and pyrolytic carbon, the second for dissolution of milligram quantities of HTGR fuel particles, and the last for dissolution of more easily oxidized carbonaceous materials such as charcoal. These procedures were developed primarily for the dissolution of irradiated materials before fission-product or burn-up analyses, but they are also used for dissolution of unirradiated materials.

  7. Reflectance spectra of hydrated sulfates, phosphates and perchlorates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, J. L.; Lane, M. D.; Dyar, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    Reflectance spectra of hydrated sulfates, phosphates, and perchlorates have multiple strong absorptions in the VNIR region. These bands are important for identification of hydrated salt minerals on Mars using CRISM and OMEGA data. Detecting specific minerals or mineral classes in this group provides constraints on the geochemical environments during their formation. Orbital detections of hydrated salt minerals by CRISM on Mars can support characterization of minerals on the surface by the MER and MSL rovers and the Phoenix lander. VNIR SPECTRAL CHARACTER OF HYDRATED SALTS Many spectral features are diagnostic of specific minerals, but others are common to all of these hydrated salts. Monohydrated sulfate spectra have strong bands near 2.1 and 2.4 μm, while polyhydrated sulfate spectra generally exhibit a band near 1.92-1.98 μm and a drop in reflectance near 2.4 μm. Phosphates appear to exhibit spectral properties similar to sulfates with features near 1.4-1.5 and 1.92-1.98 μm for hydrated samples. Several OH-bearing minerals exhibit features near 2.2 μm that could be confused with the band near 2.2 μm that is commonly attributed to Al/Si-OH bearing clays/silica on Mars. Perchlorate spectra have three dominant bands near 1.43-1.47, 1.93-2.0, and 2.41-2.44 μm depending on the type of cation present. Spectra are shown from 0.4-2.65 μm for selected sulfates (Figure 1) and phosphates/perchlorates (Figure 2) as this region is predominantly used by CRISM for identification of minerals. Figure 1. Spectra of selected hydrated sulfates: coquimbite, (Fe3+)2(SO4)3●9H2O, butlerite, Fe3+SO4(OH)●2H2O, rozenite, Fe2+SO4●4H2O, and szomolnokite, Fe2+SO4●H2O. Figure 2. Spectra of selected perchlorates and phosphates: wavellite, Al3(PO4)2(OH,F)3●5H2O, and baricite, (Mg,Fe2+)3(PO4)2●H2O.

  8. Perchlorate in groundwater: a synoptic survey of "pristine" sites in the coterminous United States.

    PubMed

    Parker, David R; Seyfferth, Angelia L; Reese, Brandi Kiel

    2008-03-01

    Perchlorate is widely used as an oxidant in solid rocket propellants and energetic applications, and it has frequently been detected in groundwaters at concentrations relevant to human health. The possibility of naturally occurring perchlorate has only recently received significant attention. Relying primarily on domestic, agricultural, and recreational wells, we utilized a network of volunteers to help collect 326 groundwater samples from across the coterminous United States. Care was taken to avoid known, USEPA-documented sites of perchlorate use or release, as well as perchlorate contamination due to disinfection using hypochlorite. Using IC-ESI-MS and a Cl18O4- internal standard, we achieved a method detection limit (MDL) of 40 ng/L perchlorate and a minimum reporting level (MRL) of 120 ng/L. Of the 326 samples, 147 (45%) were below the MDL, while 42 (13%) were between the MDL and the MRL. Of the 137 samples that could be quantified, most (109) contained < 1000 ng/L perchlorate; the remaining 28 samples contained from 1000 to 10400 ng/L. Our results support the notion that perchlorate occurs naturally in many groundwaters, but the unusually high concentrations (> 10000 ng/L) previously reported for the west-central Texas area appear to be anomalous. Perchlorate concentrations were positively correlated with nitrate levels (P < 0.001) but not with chloride concentrations. Opportunities exist for follow-up studies of perchlorate's origins using isotope forensics and for further elucidation of the role of atmospheric processes in the formation or transport of perchlorate.

  9. Characterization of Perchlorate in a New Frozen Human Urine Standard Reference Material

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lee L.; Jarrett, Jeffery M.; Davis, W. Clay; Kilpatrick, Eric L.; Oflaz, Rabia; Turk, Gregory C.; Leber, Dennis D.; Valentin, Liza; Morel-Espinosa, Maria; Blount, Benjamin C.

    2015-01-01

    Perchlorate, an inorganic anion, has recently been recognized as an environmental contaminant by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Urine is the preferred matrix for assessment of human exposure to perchlorate. Although the measurement technique for perchlorate in urine was developed in 2005, the calibration and quality assurance aspects of the metrology infrastructure for perchlorate are still lacking in that there is no certified reference material (CRM) traceable to the International System of Units (SI). To meet the quality assurance needs in biomonitoring measurements of perchlorate and the related anions that affect thyroid health, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) developed Standard Reference Material (SRM) 3668 Mercury, Perchlorate, and Iodide in Frozen Human Urine. SRM 3668 consists of perchlorate, nitrate, thiocyanate, iodine, and mercury in urine at two levels that represent the 50th and 95th percentiles, respectively, of the concentrations (with some adjustments) in the U.S. population. It is the first CRM being certified for perchlorate. Measurements leading to the certification of perchlorate were made collaboratively at NIST and CDC using three methods based on liquid or ion chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS or IC-MS/MS). Potential sources of bias were analyzed and results were compared for the three methods. Perchlorate in SRM 3668 Level I urine was certified to be 2.70 μg L−1 ± 0.21 μg L−1, and for SRM 3668 Level II urine, the certified value is 13.47 μg L−1 ± 0.96 μg L−1. PMID:22850897

  10. Perchlorate uptake by salt cedar (Tamarix ramosissima) in the Las Vegas wash riparian ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Urbansky, E T; Magnuson, M L; Kelty, C A; Brown, S K

    2000-07-10

    Perchlorate ion (ClO4-) has been identified in samples of dormant salt cedar (Tamarix ramosissima) growing in the Las Vegas Wash. Perchlorate is an oxidant, but its reduction is kinetically hindered. Concern over thyroid effects caused the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to add perchlorate to the drinking water Contaminant Candidate List (CCL). Beginning in 2001, utilities will look for perchlorate under the Unregulated Contaminants Monitoring Rule (UCMR). In wood samples acquired from the same plant growing in a contaminated stream, perchlorate concentrations were found as follows: 5-6 microg g(-1) in dry twigs extending above the water and 300 microg g(-1) in stalks immersed in the stream. Perchlorate was leached from samples of wood, and the resulting solutions were analyzed by ion chromatography after clean-up. The identification was confirmed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry after complexation of perchlorate with decyltrimethylammonium cation. Because salt cedar is regarded as an invasive species, there are large scale programs aimed at eliminating it. However, this work suggests that salt cedar might play a role in the ecological distribution of perchlorate as an environmental contaminant. Consequently, a thorough investigation of the fate and transport of perchlorate in tamarisks is required to assess the effects that eradication might have on perchlorate-tainted riparian ecosystems, such as the Las Vegas Wash. This is especially important since water from the wash enters Lake Mead and the Colorado River and has the potential to affect the potable water source of tens of millions of people as well as irrigation water used on a variety of crops, including much of the lettuce produced in the USA. PMID:10902849

  11. Occurrence of perchlorate in drinking water, groundwater, surface water and human saliva from India.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Praamsma, Meredith L; Oldi, John F; Kunisue, Tatsuya; Sinha, Ravindra K

    2009-06-01

    Perchlorate (ClO(4)(-)), which is used as an oxidizer in jet and rocket fuels, pyrotechnic devices and explosives, is a widespread contaminant in surface waters and groundwater of many countries. Perchlorate is known to affect thyroid function. Despite the compound's widespread occurrence and potential health effects, perchlorate levels in drinking water in India are not known. In this study, water samples collected from 13 locations in six states (n=66), and saliva samples collected from four locations in three states (n=74) in India, were analyzed for perchlorate using high performance liquid chromatography interfaced with tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). Perchlorate was detected in most (76%) of the water samples analyzed at concentrations above the quantitation limit of 0.02 microg L(-1); concentrations ranged from <0.02 to 6.9 microg L(-1) (mean: 0.42+/-1.1 microg L(-1); median: 0.07 microg L(-1)). Mean concentrations of perchlorate in drinking water, groundwater, bottled water, surface water and rain water were 0.1, 1.0, <0.02, 0.05 and <0.02 microg L(-1), respectively. From a total of 66 water samples analyzed, only three samples contained perchlorate levels above 1 microg L(-1); all three were groundwater samples. Perchlorate was found in the saliva samples analyzed at concentrations above 0.2 microg L(-1) and up to 4.7 microg L(-1) (mean: 1.3+/-1.3 microg L(-1); median: 0.91 microug L(-1)). No remarkable differences in perchlorate concentrations were found among the sampling locations of water or saliva or in subgroups stratified by gender or age. Perchlorate concentrations in water samples from India are one to two orders of magnitude lower than the concentrations reported for the United States.

  12. Perchlorate levels found in tap water collected from several cities in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Erdemgil, Yiğit; Gözet, Tuba; Can, Özge; Ünsal, İbrahim; Özpınar, Aysel

    2016-03-01

    Perchlorate is an inorganic anion that inhibits iodide transport to the thyroid by sodium-iodide transporters. Because perchlorate is highly soluble, stable, and mobile in water, drinking water is a potential source of perchlorate exposure. When exposed to perchlorate, thyroid dysfunction can be observed in sensitive populations (pregnant woman, infants, and children), especially those with iodide deficiency. The aim of this study was to determine the perchlorate levels in tap water from five cities in Turkey. Perchlorate concentrations of 145 tap water samples collected from Ankara, Isparta, Istanbul, Kayseri, and Sakarya were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Mean and median values were found to be 0.15 and 0.07 μg/L, respectively. The median values (25-75 % percentile) of Istanbul, Ankara, Sakarya, Isparta, and Kayseri were 0.08 μg/L (0.04-0.09 μg/L), 0.07 μg/L (0.07-0.21 μg/L), 0.04 μg/L (0.04-0.04 μg/L), 0.03 μg/L (0.02-0.07 μg/L), and 0.25 μg/L (0.23-0.31 μg/L), respectively. The median perchlorate level observed in Kayseri was significantly higher than those found at other cities (p < 0.05). Perchlorate concentrations in water samples were lower than the interim drinking water health advisory level (15 μg/L) determined by the US Environmental Protection Agency. This study showed that perchlorate in drinking water is not the main source of exposure in these cities. Future studies should be performed to determine perchlorate levels in other potential sources, such as food products.

  13. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1990-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  14. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1989-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  15. Copper Metallochaperones

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Nigel J.; Winge, Dennis R.

    2014-01-01

    The current state of knowledge on how copper metallochaperones support the maturation of cuproproteins is reviewed. Copper is needed within mitochondria to supply the CuA and intramembrane CuB sites of cytochrome oxidase, within the trans-Golgi network to supply secreted cuproproteins and within the cytosol to supply superoxide dismutase 1 (Sod1). Subpopulations of copper-zinc superoxide dismutase also localize to mitochondria, the secretory system, the nucleus and, in plants, the chloroplast, which also requires copper for plastocyanin. Prokaryotic cuproproteins are found in the cell membrane and in the periplasm of gram-negative bacteria. Cu(I) and Cu(II) form tight complexes with organic molecules and drive redox chemistry, which unrestrained would be destructive. Copper metallochaperones assist copper in reaching vital destinations without inflicting damage or becoming trapped in adventitious binding sites. Copper ions are specifically released from copper metallochaperones upon contact with their cognate cuproproteins and metal transfer is thought to proceed by ligand substitution. PMID:20205585

  16. Perchlorate, thiocyanate, and nitrate in edible cole crops (Brassica sp.) produced in the lower Colorado River region.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, C A; Blount, B C; Valentin-Blasini, L; Krieger, R I

    2007-12-01

    The Colorado River is contaminated with low levels of perchlorate. Perchlorate has the potential to disrupt thyroid function by inhibiting the uptake of iodide. Brassica are rich sources of thiocyanate and nitrate, also inhibitors of iodide uptake. This study was conducted to estimate potential human exposure to perchlorate, thiocyanate, and nitrate from Brassica sp. irrigated with Colorado River water. Results indicate that Brassica sp. irrigated with Colorado River water do accumulate trace levels of perchlorate. However, the levels of perchlorate observed are low relative to the nitrate and thiocyanate naturally present in these species and low relative to the reference dose recommended by the NAS and the USEPA. PMID:17962898

  17. Long-Range Transport of Perchlorate Observed in the Atmospheric Aerosols Collected at Okinawa Island, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handa, D.; Okada, K.; Kuroki, Y.; Nakama, Y.; Nakajima, H.; Arakaki, T.; Tanahara, A.; Oomori, T.; Miyagi, T.; Kadena, H.; Ishizaki, T.; Nakama, F.

    2007-12-01

    The study of perchlorate has become quite active in the U.S. in the last several years. Perchlorate has been recognized as a new environmental pollutant and it attracted much attention quickly in the world. The health concern about perchlorate stems from the fact that it displaces iodide in the thyroid gland, while iodine-containing thyroid hormones are essential for proper neural development from the fetal stage through the first years of life. In this study, we determined the concentrations of perchlorate ion present in the atmospheric aerosols collected in Okinawa Island, Japan. We then examined the relationships between the perchlorate concentrations and the environmental parameters and the climatic conditions peculiar to Okinawa. Bulk aerosol samples were collected on quartz filters by using a high volume air sampler at Cape Hedo Atmosphere and Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS). Each sampling duration was one week. The quartz filters with aerosols were stirred with Milli-Q pure water for three hours before perchlorate ion was extracted. The extracted perchlorate ion concentrations were determined by ion chromatography (ICS-2000, DIONEX). The mean perchlorate concentration for the samples collected at CHAAMS was 1.83 ng/m3, and the minimum was 0.18 ng/m3. The samples collected during November 21-27, 2005, January 23-30, 2006 and April 24-01, 2006 had highest perchlorate concentrations. For these three samples, we performed back trajectory analysis, and found that the air mass for the three samples arrived from the Asian continent. A relatively strong correlation (r2 = 0.55) was found between perchlorate and nss-sulfate concentrations for the CHAAMS samples. Furthermore, we analyzed perchlorate in the soils and the fertilizers used for sugar cane farming around the CHAAMS area. The Milli-Q extract of the soil and the fertilizers did not contain any detectable levels of perchlorate ions. Therefore, it was suggested that perchlorate found in the atmospheric

  18. Particle size distribution and perchlorate levels in settled dust from urban roads, parks, and roofs in Chengdu, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiwen; Shen, Yang; Pi, Lu; Hu, Wenli; Chen, Mengqin; Luo, Yan; Li, Zhi; Su, Shijun; Ding, Sanglan; Gan, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    A total of 27 settled dust samples were collected from urban roads, parks, and roofs in Chengdu, China to investigate particle size distribution and perchlorate levels in different size fractions. Briefly, fine particle size fractions (<250 μm) were the dominant composition in the settled dust samples, with mean percentages of 80.2%, 69.5%, and 77.2% for the urban roads, roofs, and the parks, respectively. Perchlorate was detected in all of the size-fractionated dust samples, with concentrations ranging from 73.0 to 6160 ng g(-1), and the median perchlorate levels increased with decreasing particle size. The perchlorate level in the finest fraction (<63 μm) was significantly higher than those in the coarser fractions. To our knowledge, this is the first report on perchlorate concentrations in different particle size fractions. The calculated perchlorate loadings revealed that perchlorate was mainly associated with finer particles (<125 μm). An exposure assessment indicated that exposure to perchlorate via settled road dust intake is safe to both children and adults in Chengdu, China. However, due to perchlorate mainly existing in fine particles, there is a potential for perchlorate to transfer into surface water and the atmosphere by runoff and wind erosion or traffic emission, and this could act as an important perchlorate pollution source for the indoor environment, and merits further study. PMID:26608047

  19. Potential mechanisms for bioregeneration of perchlorate-containing ion-exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Sharbatmaleki, Mohamadali; Unz, Richard F; Batista, Jacimaria R

    2015-05-15

    Ion-exchange (IX) is the most feasible technology for perchlorate removal from drinking water. Reuse of resins present challenges, however. Selective resins are non-regenerable, and are incinerated after one time use, while non-selective resins, when regenerable, produce a waste stream that contains high concentration of perchlorate that must be disposed of. A process to bioregenerate spent resin containing perchlorate with perchlorate-reducing bacteria (PRB) has been recently developed. In this research, potential mechanisms for bioregeneration of resin-attached perchlorate (RAP) were investigated. Batch bioregeneration experiments were performed using gel-type and macroporous-type resins. Various initial chloride concentrations and various resin bead sizes were used. The results of the bioregeneration experiments suggested that chloride, i.e. the product of perchlorate biodegradation, is more likely the desorbing agent of RAP; and increasing the concentration of chloride enhances the bioregeneration process. Both film and pore diffusion were found to be relevant with respect to the rate of perchlorate mass-transfer to the bulk liquid. Bioregeneration was found to be more effective for macroporous than for gel-type resins, especially in the case of macroporous resins with relatively small bead size in the presence of higher chloride concentration.

  20. Improved method for the determination of trace perchlorate in ground and drinking waters by ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Jackson, P E; Gokhale, S; Streib, T; Rohrer, J S; Pohl, C A

    2000-08-01

    Ammonium perchlorate, a key ingredient in solid rocket propellants, has been found in ground and surface waters in a number of U.S. states, and perchlorate contamination of public drinking water wells is now a serious problem in California. Perchlorate poses a health risk and preliminary data from the U.S. EPA reports that exposure to less than 4-18 microg/l provides adequate human health protection. An improved ion chromatographic method was developed for the determination of low microg/l levels of perchlorate in ground and drinking waters based on a Dionex IonPac AS16 column, an hydroxide eluent generated using an EG40 automated eluent generator, large loop (1000 microl) injection, and suppressed conductivity detection. The method is free of interferences from common inorganic anions, linear over the range of 2-100 microg/l perchlorate, and quantitative recoveries are obtained for low microg/l levels of perchlorate in spiked ground and drinking water samples. The MDL of 150 ng/l permits quantification of perchlorate below the levels that ensure adequate health protection.

  1. Determination of perchlorate in infant formula by isotope dilution ion chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z.; Lau, B.P.-Y.; Tague, B.; Sparling, M.; Forsyth, D.

    2011-01-01

    A sensitive and selective isotope dilution ion chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (ID IC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for the determination of perchlorate in infant formula. The perchlorate was extracted from infant formula by using 20 ml of methanol and 5 ml of 1% acetic acid. All samples were spiked with 18O4 isotope-labelled perchlorate internal standard prior to extraction. After purification on a graphitised carbon solid-phase extraction column, the extracts were injected into an ion chromatography system equipped with an Ionpac AS20 column for separation of perchlorate from other anions. The presence of perchlorate in samples was quantified by isotope dilution mass spectrometry. Analysis of both perchlorate and its isotope-labelled internal standard was carried out on a Waters Quattro Ultima triple quadrupole mass spectrometer operating in a multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) negative ionisation mode. The method was validated for linearity and range, accuracy, precision, sensitivity, and matrix effects. The limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.4 μg 1−1 for liquid infant formula and 0.95 μg kg−1 for powdered infant formula. The recovery ranged from 94% to 110% with an average of 98%. This method was used to analyse 39 infant formula, and perchlorate concentrations ranging from

  2. A bioassay for the detection of perchlorate in the ppb range.

    PubMed

    Heinnickel, Mark; Smith, Stephen C; Koo, Jonathan; O'Connor, Susan M; Coates, John D

    2011-04-01

    A bioassay for the determination of ppb (μg·L(-1)) concentrations of perchlorate has been developed and is described herein. The assay uses the enzyme perchlorate reductase (PR) from the perchlorate-reducing organism Dechloromonas agitata in purified and partially purified forms to detect perchlorate. The redox active dye phenazine methosulfate (PMS) is shown to efficiently shuttle electrons to PR from NADH. Perchlorate can be determined indirectly by monitoring NADH oxidization by PR. To lower the detection limit, we have shown that perchlorate can be concentrated on a solid-phase extraction (SPE) column that is pretreated with the cation decyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB). Perchlorate is eluted from these columns with a solution of 2 M NaCl and 200 mM morpholine propane sulfonic acid (MOPS, pH 12.5). By washing these columns with 15 mL of 2.5 mM DTAB and 15% acetone, contaminating ions, such as chlorate and nitrate, are removed without affecting the bioassay. Because of the effect of complex matrices on the SPE columns, the method of standard additions is used to analyze tap water and groundwater samples. The efficacy of the developed bioassay was demonstrated by analyzing samples from 2-17000 ppb in deionized lab water, tap water, and contaminated groundwater.

  3. Diversity of bacteria, archaea and protozoa in a perchlorate treating bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Anupama, V N; Prajeesh, P V G; Anju, S; Priya, P; Krishnakumar, B

    2015-08-01

    A microbial consortium reducing high level of perchlorate was developed and in a fed batch bioreactor using acetate as substrate perchlorate was reduced at 0.25 g/g vss. day. Under stable performance, the microbial community structure of the reactor was analyzed through molecular and phenotypic methods. The diversity of bacteria and archaea were analyzed through whole cell Fluorescence In-Situ Hybridization (FISH) and PCR-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE), whereas higher trophic community was analyzed phenotypically. FISH analysis revealed the presence of alpha, beta, gamma and delta proteobacteria in the sludge, dominated by beta proteobacteria (68.7%). DGGE analysis of bacteria revealed the presence of a single known perchlorate reducing bacterium-Dechloromonas, nitrate reducers like Thaeura and Azoarcus and a number of other genera so far not reported as perchlorate or nitrate reducing. The archaea community was represented by an acetoclastic methanogen, Methanosaeta harundinacea. We have also observed the presence of an acetate consuming flagellate, Polytomella sp. in significant number in the reactor. Archaea and protozoa community in perchlorate treating bioreactor is reported first time in this study and point out further the significance of non perchlorate reducing but acetate scavenging microbial groups in acetate fed perchlorate treating reactors.

  4. Perchlorate and nitrate treatment by ion exchange integrated with biological brine treatment.

    PubMed

    Lehman, S Geno; Badruzzaman, Mohammad; Adham, Samer; Roberts, Deborah J; Clifford, Dennis A

    2008-02-01

    Groundwater contaminated with perchlorate and nitrate was treated in a pilot plant using a commercially available ion exchange (IX) resin. Regenerant brine concentrate from the IX process, containing high perchlorate and nitrate, was treated biologically and the treated brine was reused in IX resin regeneration. The nitrate concentration of the feed water determined the exhaustion lifetime (i.e., regeneration frequency) of the resin; and the regeneration condition was determined by the perchlorate elution profile from the exhausted resin. The biological brine treatment system, using a salt-tolerant perchlorate- and nitrate-reducing culture, was housed in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). The biological process consistently reduced perchlorate and nitrate concentrations in the spent brine to below the treatment goals of 500 microg ClO4(-)/L and 0.5mg NO3(-)-N/L determined by equilibrium multicomponent IX modeling. During 20 cycles of regeneration, the system consistently treated the drinking water to below the MCL of nitrate (10 mgNO3(-)-N/L) and the California Department of Health Services (CDHS) notification level of perchlorate (i.e., 6 microg/L). A conceptual cost analysis of the IX process estimated that perchlorate and nitrate treatment using the IX process with biological brine treatment to be approximately 20% less expensive than using the conventional IX with brine disposal.

  5. Multi-cycle bioregeneration of spent perchlorate-containing macroporous selective anion-exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Sharbatmaleki, Mohamadali; Batista, Jacimaria R

    2012-01-01

    Ion exchange using perchlorate-selective resin is possibly the most feasible technology for perchlorate removal from water. However, in current water treatment applications, selective resins are used once and then incinerated, making the ion-exchange process economically and environmentally unsustainable. A new concept has been developed involving the biological regeneration of resin-containing perchlorate. This concept involves directly contacting perchlorate-containing resins with a perchlorate-reducing microbial culture. In this research, the feasibility of multi-cycle loading and bioregeneration of a macroporous perchlorate-selective resin was investigated. Loading and bioregeneration cycles were performed, using a bench-scale fermenter and a fluidized bed reactor followed by fouling removal and disinfection of the resin. The results revealed that selective macroporous resin can be employed successfully in a consecutive loading-bioregeneration ion-exchange process. Loss of resin capacity stabilized after a few cycles of bioregeneration, indicating that the number of loading and bioregeneration cycles that can be performed is likely greater than the five cycles tested. The results also revealed that most of the capacity loss in the resin is due to perchlorate buildup from previous regeneration cycles. The results further indicated that as the bioregeneration progresses, clogging of the resin pores results in strong mass transfer limitation in the bioregeneration process.

  6. Fluidized bed reactor for the biological treatment of ion-exchange brine containing perchlorate and nitrate.

    PubMed

    Patel, A; Zuo, G; Lehman, S G; Badruzzaman, M; Clifford, D A; Roberts, D J

    2008-10-01

    The removal of perchlorate and nitrate from contaminated drinking water using regenerable ion-exchange processes produces a high salt brine (3-10% NaCl) laden with high concentrations of perchlorate and nitrate. This bench-scale research describes the operation of acetate-fed granular activated carbon (GAC) based fluidized bed reactors (FBR) for perchlorate-only, and combined nitrate and perchlorate removal from synthetic brine (6% NaCl). The GAC was inoculated with a salt-tolerant culture developed by the authors and used previously in batch systems. An FBR was an effective design for perchlorate reduction and exhibited first-order degradation kinetics with respect to perchlorate concentrations. Nitrate was also removed by the organisms in the column and had no negative effects on the removal of perchlorate using the FBR design. However, at higher concentrations of nitrate the FBR was more difficult to operate due to loss of carbon and biomass from the formation of nitrogen bubbles and the high recycle flow rates needed.

  7. [Surveillance of perchlorate level in wine, seafood, polished rice, milk, powdered milk and yogurt].

    PubMed

    Takatsuki, Satoshi; Watanabe, Takahiro; Matsuda, Rieko

    2011-01-01

    Perchlorate, which may be naturally occurring or artificial in origin, inhibits iodide uptake into the thyroid gland and disturbs thyroid function. In order to investigate perchlorate contamination in foods in Japan, perchlorate levels in 28 wine samples, 20 seafood samples, 10 polished rice samples, 30 milk (include whole milk, composition modified milk, low fat milk, processed milk, milk drink) samples, 10 powdered milk samples and 10 yogurt samples were measured. Perchlorate was found in all wine, milk, powdered milk and yogurt samples tested. Perchlorate levels ranged from 0.2 ng/g to 103 ng/g in wine samples, from 2 ng/g to 11 ng/g in milk samples, from 3 ng/g to 35 ng/g in powdered milk samples, and from 2 ng/g to 11 ng/g in yogurt samples. Perchlorate levels in the seafood samples were under the LOQ (0.8 ng/g) in 8 samples and ranged from 0.8 ng/g to 72 ng/g in 12 samples. In all polished rice samples, perchlorate level was under the LOQ (1.0 ng/g).

  8. Exposure to perchlorate induces the formation of macrophage aggregates in the trunk kidney of zebrafish and mosquitofish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Capps, T.; Mukhi, S.; Rinchard, J.J.; Theodorakis, C.W.; Blazer, V.S.; Patino, R.

    2004-01-01

    Environmental contamination of ground and surface waters by perchlorate, derived from ammonium perchlorate (AP) and other perchlorate salts, is of increasing concern. Exposure to perchlorate can impair the thyroid endocrine system, which is thought to modulate renal and immune function in vertebrates. This study with zebrafish Danio rerio and eastern mosquitofish Gambusia holbrooki examined the histological effects of perchlorate on the trunk kidney, which in teleosts serves excretory and hemopoietic functions and therefore may be a target of perchlorate effects. Adult zebrafish of both sexes were exposed in the laboratory to waterborne, AP-derived perchlorate at measured concentrations of 18 mg/L for 8 weeks. Adult male mosquitofish were exposed to waterborne sodium perchlorate at measured perchlorate concentrations of 1-92 mg/L for 8 weeks. Control fish were kept in untreated water. The region of the body cavity containing the trunk kidney was processed from each fish for histological analysis. Macrophage aggregates (MAs), possible markers of contaminant exposure or immunotoxic effect, were present in the hemopoietic region of the kidney in both species exposed to perchlorate. The estimated percent area of kidney sections occupied by MAs was greater in zebrafish exposed to perchlorate at 18 mg/L (P < 0.05) than in controls. In male mosquitofish, the incidence of renal MAs increased proportionally with sodium perchlorate concentration and was significantly different from that of controls at 92 mg/L (P < 0.05). These observations confirm that in fish the kidney is affected by exposure to perchlorate. The concentrations of perchlorate at which the effects were noted are relatively high but within the range reported in some contaminated habitats.

  9. Effects of ammonium perchlorate on the reproductive performance and thyroid follicle histology of zebrafish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patino, R.; Wainscott, M.R.; Cruz-Li, E. I.; Balakrishnan, S.; McMurry, C.; Blazer, V.S.; Anderson, T.A.

    2003-01-01

    Adult zebrafish were reared up to eight weeks in control water or in water containing ammonium perchlorate (AP) at measured perchlorate concentrations of 18 (environmentally relevant, high) and 677 ppm. Groups of eight females were paired with four males on a weekly basis to assess AP effects on spawned egg volume, an index of reproductive performance. All treatments were applied to four to five spawning replicates. At 677 ppm, spawn volume was reduced within one week and became negligible after four weeks. At 18 ppm, spawn volume was unaffected even after eight weeks. Also, perchlorate at 18 ppm did not affect percentage egg fertilization. Fish were collected at the end of the exposures (677 ppm, four weeks; control and 18 ppm, eight weeks) for whole-body perchlorate content and thyroid histopathological analysis. Fish perchlorate levels were about one-hundredth of those of treatment water levels, indicating that waterborne perchlorate does not accumulate in whole fish. At 677 ppm for four weeks, perchlorate caused thyroid follicle cell (nuclear) hypertrophy and angiogenesis, whereas at 18 ppm for eight weeks, its effects were more pronounced and included hypertrophy, angiogenesis, hyperplasia, and colloid depletion. In conclusion, an eight-week exposure of adult zebrafish to 18 ppm perchlorate (high environmentally relevant concentrations) affected the histological condition of their thyroid follicles but not their reproductive performance. The effect of 677 ppm perchlorate on reproduction may be due to extrathyroidal toxicity. Further research is needed to determine if AP at lower environmentally relevant concentrations also affects the thyroid follicles of zebrafish.

  10. Stability of low levels of perchlorate in drinking water and natural water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stetson, S.J.; Wanty, R.B.; Helsel, D.R.; Kalkhoff, S.J.; Macalady, D.L.

    2006-01-01

    Perchlorate ion (ClO4-) is an environmental contaminant of growing concern due to its potential human health effects, impact on aquatic and land animals, and widespread occurrence throughout the United States. The determination of perchlorate cannot normally be carried out in the field. As such, water samples for perchlorate analysis are often shipped to a central laboratory, where they may be stored for a significant period before analysis. The stability of perchlorate ion in various types of commonly encountered water samples has not been generally examined-the effect of such storage is thus not known. In the present study, the long-term stability of perchlorate ion in deionized water, tap water, ground water, and surface water was examined. Sample sets containing approximately 1000, 100, 1.0, and 0.5 ??g l-1 perchlorate ion in deionized water and also in local tap water were formulated. These samples were analyzed by ion chromatography for perchlorate ion concentration against freshly prepared standards every 24 h for the first 7 days, biweekly for the next 4 weeks, and periodically after that for a total of 400 or 610 days for the two lowest concentrations and a total of 428 or 638 days for the high concentrations. Ground and surface water samples containing perchlorate were collected, held and analyzed for perchlorate concentration periodically over at least 360 days. All samples except for the surface water samples were found to be stable for the duration of the study, allowing for holding times of at least 300 days for ground water samples and at least 90 days for surface water samples. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Genetic Factors That Might Lead to Different Responses in Individuals Exposed to Perchlorate

    PubMed Central

    Scinicariello, Franco; Murray, H. Edward; Smith, Lester; Wilbur, Sharon; Fowler, Bruce A.

    2005-01-01

    Perchlorate has been detected in groundwater in many parts of the United States, and recent detection in vegetable and dairy food products indicates that contamination by perchlorate is more widespread than previously thought. Perchlorate is a competitive inhibitor of the sodium iodide symporter, the thyroid cell–surface protein responsible for transporting iodide from the plasma into the thyroid. An estimated 4.3% of the U.S. population is subclinically hypothyroid, and 6.9% of pregnant women may have low iodine intake. Congenital hypothyroidism affects 1 in 3,000 to 1 in 4,000 infants, and 15% of these cases have been attributed to genetic defects. Our objective in this review is to identify genetic biomarkers that would help define subpopulations sensitive to environmental perchlorate exposure. We review the literature to identify genetic defects involved in the iodination process of the thyroid hormone synthesis, particularly defects in iodide transport from circulation into the thyroid cell, defects in iodide transport from the thyroid cell to the follicular lumen (Pendred syndrome), and defects of iodide organification. Furthermore, we summarize relevant studies of perchlorate in humans. Because of perchlorate inhibition of iodide uptake, it is biologically plausible that chronic ingestion of perchlorate through contaminated sources may cause some degree of iodine discharge in populations that are genetically susceptible to defects in the iodination process of the thyroid hormone synthesis, thus deteriorating their conditions. We conclude that future studies linking human disease and environmental perchlorate exposure should consider the genetic makeup of the participants, actual perchlorate exposure levels, and individual iodine intake/excretion levels. PMID:16263499

  12. Genetic factors that might lead to different responses in individuals exposed to perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Scinicariello, Franco; Murray, H Edward; Smith, Lester; Wilbur, Sharon; Fowler, Bruce A

    2005-11-01

    Perchlorate has been detected in groundwater in many parts of the United States, and recent detection in vegetable and dairy food products indicates that contamination by perchlorate is more widespread than previously thought. Perchlorate is a competitive inhibitor of the sodium iodide symporter, the thyroid cell-surface protein responsible for transporting iodide from the plasma into the thyroid. An estimated 4.3% of the U.S. population is subclinically hypothyroid, and 6.9% of pregnant women may have low iodine intake. Congenital hypothyroidism affects 1 in 3,000 to 1 in 4,000 infants, and 15% of these cases have been attributed to genetic defects. Our objective in this review is to identify genetic biomarkers that would help define subpopulations sensitive to environmental perchlorate exposure. We review the literature to identify genetic defects involved in the iodination process of the thyroid hormone synthesis, particularly defects in iodide transport from circulation into the thyroid cell, defects in iodide transport from the thyroid cell to the follicular lumen (Pendred syndrome), and defects of iodide organification. Furthermore, we summarize relevant studies of perchlorate in humans. Because of perchlorate inhibition of iodide uptake, it is biologically plausible that chronic ingestion of perchlorate through contaminated sources may cause some degree of iodine discharge in populations that are genetically susceptible to defects in the iodination process of the thyroid hormone synthesis, thus deteriorating their conditions. We conclude that future studies linking human disease and environmental perchlorate exposure should consider the genetic makeup of the participants, actual perchlorate exposure levels, and individual iodine intake/excretion levels. PMID:16263499

  13. Genetic factors that might lead to different responses in individuals exposed to perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Scinicariello, Franco; Murray, H Edward; Smith, Lester; Wilbur, Sharon; Fowler, Bruce A

    2005-11-01

    Perchlorate has been detected in groundwater in many parts of the United States, and recent detection in vegetable and dairy food products indicates that contamination by perchlorate is more widespread than previously thought. Perchlorate is a competitive inhibitor of the sodium iodide symporter, the thyroid cell-surface protein responsible for transporting iodide from the plasma into the thyroid. An estimated 4.3% of the U.S. population is subclinically hypothyroid, and 6.9% of pregnant women may have low iodine intake. Congenital hypothyroidism affects 1 in 3,000 to 1 in 4,000 infants, and 15% of these cases have been attributed to genetic defects. Our objective in this review is to identify genetic biomarkers that would help define subpopulations sensitive to environmental perchlorate exposure. We review the literature to identify genetic defects involved in the iodination process of the thyroid hormone synthesis, particularly defects in iodide transport from circulation into the thyroid cell, defects in iodide transport from the thyroid cell to the follicular lumen (Pendred syndrome), and defects of iodide organification. Furthermore, we summarize relevant studies of perchlorate in humans. Because of perchlorate inhibition of iodide uptake, it is biologically plausible that chronic ingestion of perchlorate through contaminated sources may cause some degree of iodine discharge in populations that are genetically susceptible to defects in the iodination process of the thyroid hormone synthesis, thus deteriorating their conditions. We conclude that future studies linking human disease and environmental perchlorate exposure should consider the genetic makeup of the participants, actual perchlorate exposure levels, and individual iodine intake/excretion levels.

  14. Perchlorate Exposure Reduces Primordial Germ Cell Number in Female Threespine Stickleback.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Ann M; Earp, Nathanial C; Redmond, Mandy E; Postlethwait, John H; von Hippel, Frank A; Buck, C Loren; Cresko, William A

    2016-01-01

    Perchlorate is a common aquatic contaminant that has long been known to affect thyroid function in vertebrates, including humans. More recently perchlorate has been shown to affect primordial sexual differentiation in the aquatic model fishes zebrafish and threespine stickleback, but the mechanism has been unclear. Stickleback exposed to perchlorate from fertilization have increased androgen levels in the embryo and disrupted reproductive morphologies as adults, suggesting that perchlorate could disrupt the earliest stages of primordial sexual differentiation when primordial germ cells (PGCs) begin to form the gonad. Female stickleback have three to four times the number of PGCs as males during the first weeks of development. We hypothesized that perchlorate exposure affects primordial sexual differentiation by reducing the number of germ cells in the gonad during an important window of stickleback sex determination at 14-18 days post fertilization (dpf). We tested this hypothesis by quantifying the number of PGCs at 16 dpf in control and 100 mg/L perchlorate-treated male and female stickleback. Perchlorate exposure from the time of fertilization resulted in significantly reduced PGC number only in genotypic females, suggesting that the masculinizing effects of perchlorate observed in adult stickleback may result from early changes to the number of PGCs at a time critical for sex determination. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of a connection between an endocrine disruptor and reduction in PGC number prior to the first meiosis during sex determination. These findings suggest that a mode of action of perchlorate on adult reproductive phenotypes in vertebrates, including humans, such as altered fecundity and sex reversal or intersex gonads, may stem from early changes to germ cell development. PMID:27383240

  15. Perchlorate Exposure Reduces Primordial Germ Cell Number in Female Threespine Stickleback

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Ann M.; Earp, Nathanial C.; Redmond, Mandy E.; Postlethwait, John H.; von Hippel, Frank A.; Buck, C. Loren; Cresko, William A.

    2016-01-01

    Perchlorate is a common aquatic contaminant that has long been known to affect thyroid function in vertebrates, including humans. More recently perchlorate has been shown to affect primordial sexual differentiation in the aquatic model fishes zebrafish and threespine stickleback, but the mechanism has been unclear. Stickleback exposed to perchlorate from fertilization have increased androgen levels in the embryo and disrupted reproductive morphologies as adults, suggesting that perchlorate could disrupt the earliest stages of primordial sexual differentiation when primordial germ cells (PGCs) begin to form the gonad. Female stickleback have three to four times the number of PGCs as males during the first weeks of development. We hypothesized that perchlorate exposure affects primordial sexual differentiation by reducing the number of germ cells in the gonad during an important window of stickleback sex determination at 14–18 days post fertilization (dpf). We tested this hypothesis by quantifying the number of PGCs at 16 dpf in control and 100 mg/L perchlorate-treated male and female stickleback. Perchlorate exposure from the time of fertilization resulted in significantly reduced PGC number only in genotypic females, suggesting that the masculinizing effects of perchlorate observed in adult stickleback may result from early changes to the number of PGCs at a time critical for sex determination. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of a connection between an endocrine disruptor and reduction in PGC number prior to the first meiosis during sex determination. These findings suggest that a mode of action of perchlorate on adult reproductive phenotypes in vertebrates, including humans, such as altered fecundity and sex reversal or intersex gonads, may stem from early changes to germ cell development. PMID:27383240

  16. Perchlorate as a Ground-Water Tracer Along the Lower Colorado River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justet, L.; Lico, M. S.

    2008-12-01

    Anthropogenic perchlorate was first observed in the lower Colorado River (NV and AZ) in 1997. The perchlorate source was traced upstream from Hoover Dam and Lake Mead to Las Vegas Wash. Perchlorate migrated through the local surface- and ground-water systems to the Wash from nearby manufacturing facilities in Henderson, NV, which had been operating since the 1940s. The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) began monitoring perchlorate in the lower Colorado River at Willow Beach, located about 18 km south of the Dam, in 1997. A 3 μg/L reduction was observed at Willow Beach in 2003-2004, coincident with remediation at the Henderson site in 1999-2004. This observed decrease indicates that the effects of remediation rapidly propagated through the surface-water system below the Dam. In July 2008 water samples were collected and analyzed for perchlorate from eight springs along the lower Colorado River below Hoover Dam, from a discharge tunnel in the country rock at Hoover Dam, and from Lake Mead (above and below the thermocline). Lake Mead water collected above the thermocline east of Sentinel Island contained 3.9 μg/L perchlorate, while water below the thermocline contained 1.8 μg/L. Perchlorate concentrations were lower than the 2 to 4 μg/L quantitation limit for the six springs located more than 2 km south of the Dam. Samples from Pupfish Springs, about 0.9 km south of the Dam, contained 6.4-6.8 μg/L perchlorate. Water collected from the discharge tunnel in the Dam contained 8.2 μg/L perchlorate. Perchlorate concentrations observed at Pupfish Springs and the discharge tunnel in the Dam in 2008 are similar to those reported downstream at Willow Beach prior to 2003-2004 by NDEP indicating that the ground water travel time from the Dam to Pupfish Springs is between 4 and 70 years and the maximum flow velocities are between about 13-200 m/y. These rapid velocity estimates suggest that faults and fractures in the area are an important control on

  17. Reactions of atomic oxygen with the chlorate ion and the perchlorate ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anan'ev, Vladimir; Miklin, Mikhail; Kriger, Ludmila

    2014-06-01

    The reactions of the chlorate ion with atomic oxygen formed under photolysis of the nitrate ion introduced to potassium chlorate crystal by co-crystallization were studied by optical and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The perchlorate ion was found to form in solids as product of addition reaction of singlet atomic oxygen, formed under dissociation of the peroxynitrite ion - the product of isomerization of the excited nitrate ion. Triplet atomic oxygen does not react with the chlorate ion. The atomic oxygen formed under photolysis of the nitrate ion introduced to potassium perchlorate crystal by co-crystallization does not react with the perchlorate ion.

  18. Bacterial reduction of highly concentrated perchlorate: Kinetics and influence of co-existing electron acceptors, temperature, pH and electron donors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanping; Gao, Naiyun; Chu, Wenhai; Wang, Shuaifeng; Xu, Jianhong

    2016-04-01

    Perchlorate reduction kinetics and effects of various environmental conditions on removal of perchlorate from synthetic water were investigated to seek high-strength perchlorate removal using mixed perchlorate reducing bacteria. Results demonstrated that perchlorate (50-1500 mg L(-1)) could be degraded rapidly within 28 h under the optimal conditions. The maximum specific perchlorate reduction rate (qmax) and half saturation constant (Ks) were 0.92 mg-perchlorate (mg-dry weight)(-1) h(-1) and 157.7 mg L(-1), respectively. In the ClO4(-)-NO3(-) systems obvious but recoverable lags were caused in perchlorate reduction and the lag time increased with the ratio of nitrate to perchlorate concentration increasing from 0.5 to 3. While in the ClO4(-)-SO4(2-) systems inhibitions didn't occur until the ratio of sulfate to perchlorate concentration exceeded 10. The optimum temperature and pH value were 35 °C and 6.85, respectively. The optimal acetate-to-perchlorate ratio that could consume all perchlorate and acetate simultaneously was about 2. Dechloromonas, one of the most prominent perchlorate reducing bacteria, was identified as the dominant bacterium in the acclimated culture (69.33% of the whole clones). The study demonstrated that the perchlorate-acclimated mixed microorganisms can readily and efficiently realize reduction of highly concentrated perchlorate in wastewater.

  19. Organic corrosion inhibitors for aluminum in perchloric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Metikos-Hukovic, M.; Stupnisek-Lisac, E. . Dept. of Electrochemistry); Grubac, Z. . Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry)

    1994-02-01

    Substituted N-arylpyrroles containing carbaldehyde groups on a pyrrole ring and their inhibitive effects on the corrosion of aluminum (Al) in perchloric acid (HCIO[sub 4]) were investigated. Electrochemical measurements showed the organic compounds examined had good inhibiting properties at 40 C. The high inhibition effect of the N-aryl-2,5-dimethylpyrroles containing carbaldehyde groups on a pyrrole ring on corrosion of Al in acid media was explained on the basis of the electronic structure of the molecule and by the condensation characteristic of the carbaldehydes. Investigation of the influence of substitution type ([minus]F,[minus]Cl,[minus]NH[sub 2]) on the inhibiting characteristics of examined organic compounds showed the best inhibiting effect was from substituted N-arylpyrrole with fluorine in the ortho position of the phenyl ring.

  20. Iron/potassium perchlorate pellet burn rate measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, J.W.; Walters, R.R.

    1995-01-25

    A burn rate test having several advantages for low gas-producing pyrotechnic compacts has been developed. The technique involves use of a high speed video motion analysis system that allows immediate turnaround and produces all required data for rate computation on magnetic tape and becomes immediately available on the display screen. The test technique provides a quick method for material qualification along with data for improved reliability and function. Burn rate data has been obtained for both UPI and Eagle Pitcher Iron/Potassium Perchlorate blends. The data obtained for the UPI blends cover a range of composition, pellet density, and ambient (before ignition) pellet temperature. Burn rate data for the E-P blends were extended to include surface conditions or particle size as a variable parameter.

  1. Effect of nitrate, acetate, and hydrogen on native perchlorate-reducing microbial communities and their activity in vadose soil.

    PubMed

    Nozawa-Inoue, Mamie; Jien, Mercy; Yang, Kun; Rolston, Dennis E; Hristova, Krassimira R; Scow, Kate M

    2011-05-01

    The effect of nitrate, acetate, and hydrogen on native perchlorate-reducing bacteria (PRB) was examined by conducting microcosm tests using vadose soil collected from a perchlorate-contaminated site. The rate of perchlorate reduction was enhanced by hydrogen amendment and inhibited by acetate amendment, compared with unamendment. Nitrate was reduced before perchlorate in all amendments. In hydrogen-amended and unamended soils, nitrate delayed perchlorate reduction, suggesting that the PRB preferentially use nitrate as an electron acceptor. In contrast, nitrate eliminated the inhibitory effect of acetate amendment on perchlorate reduction and increased the rate and the extent, possibly because the preceding nitrate reduction/denitrification decreased the acetate concentration that was inhibitory to the native PRB. In hydrogen-amended and unamended soils, perchlorate reductase gene (pcrA) copies, representing PRB densities, increased with either perchlorate or nitrate reduction, suggesting that either perchlorate or nitrate stimulates the growth of the PRB. In contrast, in acetate-amended soil pcrA increased only when perchlorate was depleted: a large portion of the PRB may have not utilized nitrate in this amendment. Nitrate addition did not alter the distribution of the dominant pcrA clones in hydrogen-amended soil, likely because of the functional redundancy of PRB as nitrate-reducers/denitrifiers, whereas acetate selected different pcrA clones from those with hydrogen amendment.

  2. Effect of nitrate, acetate and hydrogen on native perchlorate-reducing microbial communities and their activity in vadose soil

    PubMed Central

    Nozawa-Inoue, Mamie; Jien, Mercy; Yang, Kun; Rolston, Dennis E.; Hristova, Krassimira R.; Scow, Kate M.

    2011-01-01

    Effect of nitrate, acetate and hydrogen on native perchlorate-reducing bacteria (PRB) was examined by conducting microcosm tests using vadose soil collected from a perchlorate-contaminated site. The rate of perchlorate reduction was enhanced by hydrogen amendment and inhibited by acetate amendment, compared to unamendment. Nitrate was reduced before perchlorate in all amendments. In hydrogen-amended and unamended soils, nitrate delayed perchlorate reduction, suggesting the PRB preferentially use nitrate as an electron acceptor. In contrast, nitrate eliminated the inhibitory effect of acetate amendment on perchlorate reduction and increased the rate and the extent, possibly because the preceding nitrate reduction/denitrification decreased the acetate concentration which was inhibitory to the native PRB. In hydrogen-amended and unamended soils, perchlorate reductase gene (pcrA) copies, representing PRB densities, increased with either perchlorate or nitrate reduction, suggesting either perchlorate or nitrate stimulates growth of the PRB. In contrast, in acetate-amended soil pcrA increased only when perchlorate was depleted: a large portion of the PRB may have not utilized nitrate in this amendment. Nitrate addition did not alter the distribution of the dominant pcrA clones in hydrogen-amended soil, likely because of the functional redundancy of PRB as nitrate-reducers/denitrifiers, whereas acetate selected different pcrA clones from those with hydrogen amendment. PMID:21284679

  3. Perchlorate disrupts embryonic androgen synthesis and reproductive development in threespine stickleback without changing whole-body levels of thyroid hormone

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Ann M.; Dillon, Danielle; Bernhardt, Richard A.; Torunsky, Roberta; Postlethwait, John H.; von Hippel, Frank A.; Buck, C. Loren; Cresko, William A.

    2014-01-01

    Perchlorate, an environmental contaminant, disrupts normal functioning of the thyroid. We previously showed that perchlorate disrupts behavior and gonad development, and induces external morphological changes in a vertebrate model organism, the threespine stickleback. Whether perchlorate alters these phenotypes via a thyroid-mediated mechanism, and the extent to which the effects depend on dose, are unknown. To address these questions, we chronically exposed stickleback to control conditions and to three concentrations of perchlorate (10, 30 and 100 ppm) at various developmental stages from fertilization to reproductive maturity. Adults chronically exposed to perchlorate had increased numbers of thyroid follicles and decreased numbers of thyrocytes. Surprisingly, T4 and T3 levels in larval, juvenile, and adult whole fish chronically exposed to perchlorate did not differ from controls, except at the lowest perchlorate dose, suggesting a non-monotonic dose response curve. We found no detectable abnormalities in external phenotype at any dose of perchlorate, indicating that the increased number of thyroid follicles compensated for the disruptive effects of these doses. In contrast to external morphology, gonadal development was altered substantially, with the highest dose of perchlorate causing the largest effects. Perchlorate increased the number both of early stage ovarian follicles in females and of advanced spermatogenic stages in males. Perchlorate also disrupted embryonic androgen levels. We conclude that chronic perchlorate exposure may not result in lasting adult gross morphological changes but can produce lasting modifications to gonads when compensation of T3 and T4 levels occurs by thyroid follicle hyperplasia. Perchlorate may therefore affect vertebrate development via both thyroidal and non-thyroidal mechanisms. PMID:25448260

  4. Occurrence and exposure assessment of perchlorate, iodide and nitrate ions from dairy milk and water in Japan and Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Guruge, Keerthi S; Wu, Qian; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2011-08-01

    Perchlorate is known to competitively interfere with iodide uptake by the thyroid gland and thereby human exposure to perchlorate is a public health concern. Prevalence of perchlorate in dairy milk is documented; nevertheless, co-occurrence of perchlorate with other thyroid-binding monovalent ions such as iodide and nitrate is not well understood. In this study, we analyzed perchlorate, iodide, and nitrate-N in dairy milk, water and other dairy-related samples collected from Japan and Sri Lanka. Concentrations of perchlorate in Japanese dairy milk samples ranged from 1.03 to 14.1 ng ml(-1); the corresponding concentrations in dairy milk and powdered milk from Sri Lanka were 1.14-38.5 ng ml(-1). Perchlorate concentrations in commercial milk were significantly higher in Japan than in Sri Lanka, while iodide and nitrate levels in milk between the two countries were comparable. All three ions were ubiquitously found in water samples from Japan and Sri Lanka. Analysis of colostrum and raw milk collected from cows fed with the same feed for over 30 days showed no significant temporal variations in perchlorate, iodide and nitrate-N concentrations. A significant positive correlation was found between the concentrations of perchlorate and iodide in Japanese commercial milk. The concentrations of perchlorate and nitrate-N in water samples analyzed from both countries also showed a significant positive correlation. The exposure estimation revealed that dairy milk provides a greater source for perchlorate and iodide, while water predominantly contributes nitrate-N intake for all age groups in both counties. Infants and children demonstrated the highest estimated perchlorate, iodide and nitrate-N intake on a body weight basis in comparison to other age groups. Therefore, further studies of risk associated with perchlorate may need to reconsider co-existence of iodine and other iodide transport inhibitors in food.

  5. Influence of magnesium perchlorate on the pyrolysis of organic compounds in Mars analogue soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steininger, H.; Goesmann, F.; Goetz, W.

    2012-10-01

    The Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) onboard the ExoMars-2018 rover shall apply thermal volatilization (TV), gas chromatography (GC) and mass spectrometry (MS) in order to search for organic compounds in the Martian soil. Here we describe a series of TV-GC-MS experiments on powdered basalt containing known organic compounds (benzoic acid or mellitic acid) at different concentrations (500 and 0.5 ppm). With reference to the discovery of perchlorate in Martian soils by the Phoenix Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) all pyrolysis experiments were performed both in presence of 0.6 wt% magnesium perchlorate and in absence of perchlorate. We find that benzoic acid (BA) is detectable at both concentrations, while mellitic acid (MA) is only detectable at high concentration (500 ppm). In both cases perchlorate strongly affects type and number of organic fragments generated during pyrolysis.

  6. Perchlorate: water and infant formulae contamination in France and risk assessment in infants.

    PubMed

    Vigreux-Besret, Carole; Mahé, Aurélie; Ledoux, Gérald; Garnier, Alexandra; Rosin, Christophe; Baert, Alain; Joyeux, Michel; Badot, Pierre-Marie; Panetier, Pascale; Rivière, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Perchlorate ions ClO4(-), known to inhibit competitively the uptake of iodine by the thyroid, have been detected in drinking water in France as well as in infant formulae. A tolerable daily intake (TDI) has been established at 0.7 µg kg(-1) bw day(-1) based on the inhibition of iodine uptake. Due to this mechanism of action, the iodine status could strongly influence the biological effect of perchlorate. Perchlorate concentrations in water and infant formulae were measured and the exposure of children under 6 months of age calculated. It appeared that the TDI could be exceeded in some children. As the iodine status is not optimal within the entire French population, there appears to be a need to clarify the sources of perchlorate ultimately to decrease exposure. PMID:25830716

  7. Evaluation of adult quail and egg production following exposure to perchlorate-treated water.

    PubMed

    Gentles, Angella; Surles, James; Smith, Ernest E

    2005-08-01

    Twenty-three adult female northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) quail were exposed to 0, 0.01, 0.1, and 1 mM ammonium perchlorate (AP) in drinking water for 30 d. Eggs laid in all treatment groups, including control, were collected, dated, given an identification number, and weighed. On day 30 of exposure, 10 birds were euthanized by carbon dioxide asphyxiation. Gross toxicological endpoints and thyroid histology were evaluated in 10 birds. Egg production and accumulation of perchlorate in the eggs (n = 10) and liver (n = 5) were determined. Perchlorate did not affect body or organ weights significantly; however, at 1 mM, AP caused alteration of thyroid gland morphology. Perchlorate did not affect egg production, but significant accumulation was observed in the eggs and livers of exposed birds.

  8. Perchlorate: Health Effects and Technologies for Its Removal from Water Resources

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Asha; Viraraghavan, Thiruvenkatachari

    2009-01-01

    Perchlorate has been found in drinking water and surface waters in the United States and Canada. It is primarily associated with release from defense and military operations. Natural sources include certain fertilizers and potash ores. Although it is a strong oxidant, perchlorate is very persistent in the environment. At high concentrations perchlorate can affect the thyroid gland by inhibiting the uptake of iodine. A maximum contaminant level has not been set, while a guidance value of 6 ppb has been suggested by Health Canada. Perchlorate is measured in environmental samples primarily by ion chromatography. It can be removed from water by anion exchange or membrane filtration. Biological and chemical processes are also effective in removing this species from water. PMID:19440526

  9. Perchlorate: water and infant formulae contamination in France and risk assessment in infants.

    PubMed

    Vigreux-Besret, Carole; Mahé, Aurélie; Ledoux, Gérald; Garnier, Alexandra; Rosin, Christophe; Baert, Alain; Joyeux, Michel; Badot, Pierre-Marie; Panetier, Pascale; Rivière, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Perchlorate ions ClO4(-), known to inhibit competitively the uptake of iodine by the thyroid, have been detected in drinking water in France as well as in infant formulae. A tolerable daily intake (TDI) has been established at 0.7 µg kg(-1) bw day(-1) based on the inhibition of iodine uptake. Due to this mechanism of action, the iodine status could strongly influence the biological effect of perchlorate. Perchlorate concentrations in water and infant formulae were measured and the exposure of children under 6 months of age calculated. It appeared that the TDI could be exceeded in some children. As the iodine status is not optimal within the entire French population, there appears to be a need to clarify the sources of perchlorate ultimately to decrease exposure.

  10. POLISHING THE EFFLUENT FROM AN ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL PERCHLORATE TREATMENT PROCESS - SLIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anaerobic biological processes effectively reduce perchlorate to chloride. However, the effluent can be biologically unstable, high in particulates and high in disinfection by-product precursor compounds. Such an effluent would be unsuitable for transmission into a drinking water...

  11. The Impact of Temperature on the Performance of Anaerobic Biological Treatment of Perchlorate in Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    A 20 month pilot-scale study was conducted to examine the impact of temperature on the performance of an anaerobic biological contactor used to treat perchlorate-contaminated water. The contactor was successfully acclimated with indigenous microorganisms. Influent temperatures ...

  12. The growth and dissolution of ammonium perchlorate crystals in a fluidized bed crystallizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanrikulu, S. Ü.; Eroğlu, I.; Bulutcu, A. N.; Özkar, S.

    1998-11-01

    The growth and the dissolution of ammonium perchlorate crystals were studied in pure and in sodium chloride containing aqueous solutions, in a fluidized bed crystallizer. The presence of sodium chloride in the solution reduced the growth and the dissolution rates of ammonium perchlorate crystals. The growth rates were interpreted in terms of supersaturation levels. The orders and rate constants were reported. The effectiveness factors were estimated from the growth rate data to evaluate the relative magnitude of the two resistances in series, diffusion and integration. The controlling mechanism is mainly by diffusion for the crystal growth of ammonium perchlorate in pure aqueous solution. However, both diffusion and integration steps affect the growth of ammonium perchlorate crystals in the presence of sodium chloride in solution.

  13. ANALYSIS OF HYDROPONIC FERTILIZER MATRIXES FOR PERCHLORATE: COMPARISON OF ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seven retail hydroponic nitrate fertilizer products, two liquid and five solid, were comparatively analyzed for the perchlorate anion (ClO4-) by ion chromatography (IC) with suppressed conductivity detection, complexation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (cESI-MS), norma...

  14. Thyroid Hormones and Moderate Exposure to Perchlorate during Pregnancy in Women in Southern California

    PubMed Central

    Steinmaus, Craig; Pearl, Michelle; Kharrazi, Martin; Blount, Benjamin C.; Miller, Mark D.; Pearce, Elizabeth N.; Valentin-Blasini, Liza; DeLorenze, Gerald; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.; Liaw, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Background: Findings from national surveys suggest that everyone in the United States is exposed to perchlorate. At high doses, perchlorate, thiocyanate, and nitrate inhibit iodide uptake into the thyroid and decrease thyroid hormone production. Small changes in thyroid hormones during pregnancy, including changes within normal reference ranges, have been linked to cognitive function declines in the offspring. Objectives: We evaluated the potential effects of low environmental exposures to perchlorate on thyroid function. Methods: Serum thyroid hormones and anti-thyroid antibodies and urinary perchlorate, thiocyanate, nitrate, and iodide concentrations were measured in 1,880 pregnant women from San Diego County, California, during 2000–2003, a period when much of the area’s water supply was contaminated from an industrial plant with perchlorate at levels near the 2007 California regulatory standard of 6 μg/L. Linear regression was used to evaluate associations between urinary perchlorate and serum thyroid hormone concentrations in models adjusted for urinary creatinine and thiocyanate, maternal age and education, ethnicity, and gestational age at serum collection. Results: The median urinary perchlorate concentration was 6.5 μg/L, about two times higher than in the general U.S. population. Adjusted associations were identified between increasing log10 perchlorate and decreasing total thyroxine (T4) [regression coefficient (β) = –0.70; 95% CI: –1.06, –0.34], decreasing free thyroxine (fT4) (β = –0.053; 95% CI: –0.092, –0.013), and increasing log10 thyroid-stimulating hormone (β = 0.071; 95% CI: 0.008, 0.133). Conclusions: These results suggest that environmental perchlorate exposures may affect thyroid hormone production during pregnancy. This could have implications for public health given widespread perchlorate exposure and the importance of thyroid hormone in fetal neurodevelopment. Citation: Steinmaus C, Pearl M, Kharrazi M, Blount BC

  15. Perchlorate in dust fall and indoor dust in Malta: An effect of fireworks.

    PubMed

    Vella, Alfred J; Chircop, Cynthia; Micallef, Tamara; Pace, Colette

    2015-07-15

    We report on the presence of perchlorate in the settleable dust of Malta, a small central Mediterranean island. Both dust fall collected directly as it precipitated from atmosphere over a period of one month and deposited indoor dust from domestic residences were studied. Perchlorate was determined by ion chromatography of water extracts of the collected dusts. Dust fall was collected from 43 towns during 2011 to 2013 and indoor dust was sampled from homes in the same localities. Perchlorate was detected in 108 of 153 samples of dust fall (71%) and in 28 of 37 indoor dust samples (76%). Detectable perchlorate in dust fall ranged from 0.52μgg(-1) to 561μgg(-1) with a median value of 6.2μgg(-1); in indoor dust, levels were from 0.79μgg(-1) to 53μgg(-1) with a median value of 7.8μgg(-1), the highest recorded anywhere to date. Statistical analysis suggested that there was no significant difference in perchlorate content of indoor dust and dust fall. Perchlorate levels in dust fall escalate during the summer in response to numerous religious feasts celebrated with fireworks and perchlorate persists at low μgg(-1) concentrations for several months beyond the summer festive period. In Malta, perchlorate derives exclusively from KClO4, imported for fireworks manufacture. Its residue in dust presents an exposure risk to the population, especially via ingestion by hand to mouth transfer. Our results suggest that wherever intensive burning of fireworks takes place, the environmental impact may be much longer lived than realised, mainly due to re-suspension and deposition of contaminated settled dust in the urban environment.

  16. The Relationship between Perchlorate in Drinking Water and Cord Blood Thyroid Hormones: First Experience from Iran

    PubMed Central

    Javidi, Ashraf; Rafiei, Nasim; Amin, Mohammad Mehdi; Hovsepian, Silva; Hashemipour, Mahin; Kelishadi, Roya; Taghian, Zahra; Mofateh, Samaneh; Poursafa, Parinaz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Considering the controversial information regarding the effects of perchlorate on thyroid function of high risk population as neonates, and given the high prevalence rate of thyroid disorders specially congenital hypothyroidism in our region, this study aims to investigate for the first time in Iran, the relationship between drinking groundwater perchlorate and cord blood thyroid hormones level in an industrial region. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, drinking groundwater perchlorate level of rural areas of Zarinshahr, Isfahan was measured. Simultaneously, cord blood level of thyroid hormones of neonates born in the studied region was measured. Thyroid function test of neonates in regions with low and high perchlorate level were compared. Results: In this study, 25 tap water samples were obtained for perchlorate measurement. Level of cord blood thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), T4 and T3 of 25 neonates were measured. Mean (standard deviation) of perchlorate, TSH, T4 and T3 was 3.59 (5.10) μg/l, 7.81 (4.14) mIU/m, 6.06 (0.85) mg/dl, and 63.46 (17.53) mg/dl, respectively. Mean levels of thyroid function tests were not different in low (<5 μg/l) and high level of drinking ground water perchlorate (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Perchlorate did not appear to be related to thyroid function of neonates in the studied industrial region. It seems that iodine status of the regions, as well as other environmental contaminants and genetic background, could impact on its relation with thyroid function of neonates. PMID:25789149

  17. Effects of Ammonium Perchlorate on Thyroid Function in Developing Fathead Minnows, Pimephales promelas

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Helen M.; Pickford, Daniel B.; Hutchinson, Thomas H.; Brown, J. Anne

    2005-01-01

    Perchlorate is a known environmental contaminant, largely due to widespread military use as a propellant. Perchlorate acts pharmacologically as a competitive inhibitor of thyroidal iodide uptake in mammals, but the impacts of perchlorate contamination in aquatic ecosystems and, in particular, the effects on fish are unclear. Our studies aimed to investigate the effects of concentrations of ammonium perchlorate that can occur in the environment (1, 10, and 100 mg/L) on the development of fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas. For these studies, exposures started with embryos of < 24-hr postfertilization and were terminated after 28 days. Serial sectioning of thyroid follicles showed thyroid hyperplasia with increased follicular epithelial cell height and reduced colloid in all groups of fish that had been exposed to perchlorate for 28 days, compared with control fish. Whole-body thyroxine (T4) content (a measure of total circulating T4) in fish exposed to 100 mg/L perchlorate was elevated compared with the T4 content of control fish, but 3,5,3′-triiodothyronine (T3) content was not significantly affected in any exposure group. Despite the apparent regulation of T3, after 28 days of exposure to ammonium perchlorate, fish exposed to the two higher levels (10 and 100 mg/L) were developmentally retarded, with a lack of scales and poor pigmentation, and significantly lower wet weight and standard length than were control fish. Our study indicates that environmental levels of ammonium perchlorate affect thyroid function in fish and that in the early life stages these effects may be associated with developmental retardation. PMID:15811828

  18. Perchlorate in dust fall and indoor dust in Malta: An effect of fireworks.

    PubMed

    Vella, Alfred J; Chircop, Cynthia; Micallef, Tamara; Pace, Colette

    2015-07-15

    We report on the presence of perchlorate in the settleable dust of Malta, a small central Mediterranean island. Both dust fall collected directly as it precipitated from atmosphere over a period of one month and deposited indoor dust from domestic residences were studied. Perchlorate was determined by ion chromatography of water extracts of the collected dusts. Dust fall was collected from 43 towns during 2011 to 2013 and indoor dust was sampled from homes in the same localities. Perchlorate was detected in 108 of 153 samples of dust fall (71%) and in 28 of 37 indoor dust samples (76%). Detectable perchlorate in dust fall ranged from 0.52μgg(-1) to 561μgg(-1) with a median value of 6.2μgg(-1); in indoor dust, levels were from 0.79μgg(-1) to 53μgg(-1) with a median value of 7.8μgg(-1), the highest recorded anywhere to date. Statistical analysis suggested that there was no significant difference in perchlorate content of indoor dust and dust fall. Perchlorate levels in dust fall escalate during the summer in response to numerous religious feasts celebrated with fireworks and perchlorate persists at low μgg(-1) concentrations for several months beyond the summer festive period. In Malta, perchlorate derives exclusively from KClO4, imported for fireworks manufacture. Its residue in dust presents an exposure risk to the population, especially via ingestion by hand to mouth transfer. Our results suggest that wherever intensive burning of fireworks takes place, the environmental impact may be much longer lived than realised, mainly due to re-suspension and deposition of contaminated settled dust in the urban environment. PMID:25828411

  19. Preparation of perlite-based magnesium perchlorate desiccant with colour indicator.

    PubMed

    Wu, L; He, H

    1994-05-01

    A new desiccant consisting of magnesium perchlorate, expanded perlite and metal chelate was prepared. The performance tests show that the desiccant is superior to magnesium perchlorate desiccant in dehydration efficiency, absorption capacity for water, flow resistance, color indicator and regeneration. It can reduce the amount of water in gases to approximately 0.7 ppm(v/v). Its applications in gas analysis and purification were investigated.

  20. Anaerobic treatment of army ammunition production wastewater containing perchlorate and RDX.

    PubMed

    Atikovic, Emina; Suidan, Makram T; Maloney, Stephen W

    2008-08-01

    Perchlorate is an oxidizer that has been routinely used in solid rocket motors by the Department of Defense and National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Royal Demolition Explosive (RDX) is a major component of military high explosives and is used in a wide variety of munitions. Perchlorate bearing wastewater typically results from production of solid rocket motors, while RDX is transferred to Army industrial wastewaters during load, assemble and pack operations for new munitions, and hot water or steam washout for disposal and deactivation of old munitions (commonly referred to as demilitarization, or simply demil). Biological degradation in Anaerobic Fluidized Bed Reactors (AFBR), has been shown to be an effective method for the removal of both perchlorate and RDX in contaminated wastewater. The focus of this study was to determine the effectiveness of removal of perchlorate and RDX, individually and when co-mingled, using ethanol as an electron donor under steady state conditions. Three AFBRs were used to assess the effectiveness of this process in treating the wastewater. The performance of the bioreactors was monitored relative to perchlorate, RDX, and chemical oxygen demand removal effectiveness. The experimental results demonstrated that the biodegradation of perchlorate and RDX was more effective in bioreactors receiving the single contaminant than in the bioreactor where both contaminants were fed.

  1. Perchlorate contamination of groundwater from fireworks manufacturing area in South India.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Tomohiko; Ogawa, Shohei P; Sugimoto, Rina; Ramu, Karri; Sudaryanto, Agus; Malarvannan, Govindan; Devanathan, Gnanasekaran; Ramaswamy, Babu Rajendran; Munuswamy, Natesan; Ganesh, Deavaraj Sankar; Sivakumar, Jeyaraj; Sethuraman, A; Parthasarathy, V; Subramanian, Annamalai; Field, Jennifer; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2013-07-01

    Perchlorate contamination was investigated in groundwater and surface water from Sivakasi and Madurai in the Tamil Nadu State of South India. Sensitive determination of perchlorate (LOQ = 0.005 μg/L) was achieved by large-volume (500 μL) injection ion chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Concentrations of perchlorate were <0.005-7,690 μg/L in groundwater (n = 60), <0.005-30.2 μg/L in surface water (n = 11), and 0.063-0.393 μg/L in tap water (n = 3). Levels in groundwater were significantly higher in the fireworks factory area than in the other locations, indicating that the fireworks and safety match industries are principal sources of perchlorate pollution. This is the first study that reports the contamination status of perchlorate in this area and reveals firework manufacture to be the pollution source. Since perchlorate levels in 17 out of 57 groundwater samples from Sivakasi, and none from Madurai, exceeded the drinking water guideline level proposed by USEPA (15 μg/L), further investigation on human health is warranted.

  2. Preliminary analyses for perchlorate in selected natural materials and their derivative products

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orris, G.J.; Harvey, G.J.; Tsui, D.T.; Eldrige, J.E.

    2003-01-01

    Increasing concern about sources of perchlorate contamination in ground and surface waters has led to interest in identifying potential sources of natural perchlorate and products derived from these natural sources. To date, most perchlorate found in ground and surface waters has been attributed to its major uses as an oxidizer in solid propellants for rockets, in fireworks and other explosives, and a variety of other uses of man-made perchlorate salts. However, perchlorate found in the soils, surface water, and ground water of some locations cannot be linked to an anthropogenic source. This paper contains preliminary data on the detection and non-detection of perchlorate in a variety of natural materials and their products, including some fertilizer materials. These data were previously presented at two conferences; once in poster session and once orally (Harvey and others, 1999; Orris and others, 2000). Although the results presented here are included in a journal article awaiting publication, the lack of public information on this topic has led to repeated requests for the data used as the basis for our presentations in 1999 and 2000.

  3. Perchlorate reduction by hydrogen autotrophic bacteria and microbial community analysis using high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wan, Dongjin; Liu, Yongde; Niu, Zhenhua; Xiao, Shuhu; Li, Daorong

    2016-02-01

    Hydrogen autotrophic reduction of perchlorate have advantages of high removal efficiency and harmless to drinking water. But so far the reported information about the microbial community structure was comparatively limited, changes in the biodiversity and the dominant bacteria during acclimation process required detailed study. In this study, perchlorate-reducing hydrogen autotrophic bacteria were acclimated by hydrogen aeration from activated sludge. For the first time, high-throughput sequencing was applied to analyze changes in biodiversity and the dominant bacteria during acclimation process. The Michaelis-Menten model described the perchlorate reduction kinetics well. Model parameters q(max) and K(s) were 2.521-3.245 (mg ClO4(-)/gVSS h) and 5.44-8.23 (mg/l), respectively. Microbial perchlorate reduction occurred across at pH range 5.0-11.0; removal was highest at pH 9.0. The enriched mixed bacteria could use perchlorate, nitrate and sulfate as electron accepter, and the sequence of preference was: NO3(-) > ClO4(-) > SO4(2-). Compared to the feed culture, biodiversity decreased greatly during acclimation process, the microbial community structure gradually stabilized after 9 acclimation cycles. The Thauera genus related to Rhodocyclales was the dominated perchlorate reducing bacteria (PRB) in the mixed culture.

  4. Accumulation and perchlorate exposure potential of lettuce produced in the Lower Colorado River region.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, C A; Krieger, R I; Khandaker, N; Moore, R C; Holts, K C; Neidel, L L

    2005-06-29

    The Colorado River is contaminated with perchlorate concentrations of 1.5-8 microg/L, an anion linked to thyroid dysfunction. Over 90% of the lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) consumed during the winter months in the United States is produced in the Lower Colorado River region. Studies were conducted in this region to survey the potential for lettuce perchlorate accumulation and estimate potential human exposure to perchlorate from lettuce. Total uptake of perchlorate in the above-ground plant of iceberg lettuce was approximately 5 g/ha. Exposure estimates ranged from 0.45 to 1.8 microg/day depending on lettuce types and trimming. For all lettuce types, hypothetical exposures were less than 4% of the reference dose recommended by the National Academy of Sciences. Results show the relative iodide uptake inhibition potential because of lettuce nitrate was 2 orders of magnitude greater than that associated with the corresponding trace levels of perchlorate. These data support the conclusion that potential perchlorate exposures from lettuce irrigated with Colorado River water are negligible relative to acute or long-term harmful amounts. PMID:15969537

  5. Mechanistic Studies on the Radiolytic Decomposition of Perchlorates on the Martian Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Andrew M.; Abplanalp, Matthew J.; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2016-04-01

    Perchlorates—inorganic compounds carrying the perchlorate ion ({{ClO}}4{}-)—were discovered at the north polar landing site of the Phoenix spacecraft and at the southern equatorial landing site of the Curiosity Rover within the Martian soil at levels of 0.4-0.6 wt%. This study explores in laboratory experiments the temperature-dependent decomposition mechanisms of hydrated perchlorates—namely magnesium perchlorate hexahydrate (Mg(ClO4)2·6H2O)—and provides yields of the oxygen-bearing species formed in these processes at Mars-relevant surface temperatures from 165 to 310 K in the presence of galactic cosmic-ray particles (GCRs). Our experiments reveal that the response of the perchlorates to the energetic electrons is dictated by the destruction of the perchlorate ion ({{ClO}}4{}-) and the inherent formation of chlorates ({{ClO}}3{}-) plus atomic oxygen (O). Isotopic substitution experiments reveal that the oxygen is released solely from the perchlorate ion and not from the water of hydration (H2O). As the mass spectrometer detects only molecular oxygen (O2) and no atomic oxygen (O), atomic oxygen recombines to molecular oxygen within the perchlorates, with the overall yield of molecular oxygen increasing as the temperature drops from 260 to 160 K. Absolute destruction rates and formation yields of oxygen are provided for the planetary modeling community.

  6. Impacts of natural organic matter on perchlorate removal by an advanced reduction process.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yuhang; Batchelor, Bill

    2014-01-01

    Perchlorate can be destroyed by Advanced Reduction Processes (ARPs) that combine chemical reductants (e.g., sulfite) with activating methods (e.g., UV light) in order to produce highly reactive reducing free radicals that are capable of rapid and effective perchlorate reduction. However, natural organic matter (NOM) exists widely in the environment and has the potential to influence perchlorate reduction by ARPs that use UV light as the activating method. Batch experiments were conducted to obtain data on the impacts of NOM and wavelength of light on destruction of perchlorate by the ARPs that use sulfite activated by UV light produced by low-pressure mercury lamps (UV-L) or by KrCl excimer lamps (UV-KrCl). The results indicate that NOM strongly inhibits perchlorate removal by both ARP, because it competes with sulfite for UV light. Even though the absorbance of sulfite is much higher at 222 nm than that at 254 nm, the results indicate that a smaller amount of perchlorate was removed with the UV-KrCl lamp (222 nm) than with the UV-L lamp (254 nm). The results of this study will help to develop the proper way to apply the ARPs as practical water treatment processes. PMID:24521418

  7. Rapid analysis of perchlorate in drinking water at parts per billion levels using microchip electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Gertsch, Jana C; Noblitt, Scott D; Cropek, Donald M; Henry, Charles S

    2010-05-01

    A microchip capillary electrophoresis (MCE) system has been developed for the determination of perchlorate in drinking water. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) recently proposed a health advisory limit for perchlorate in drinking water of 15 parts per billion (ppb), a level requiring large, sophisticated instrumentation, such as ion chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (IC-MS), for detection. An inexpensive, portable system is desired for routine online monitoring applications of perchlorate in drinking water. Here, we present an MCE method using contact conductivity detection for perchlorate determination. The method has several advantages, including reduced analysis times relative to IC, inherent portability, high selectivity, and minimal sample pretreatment. Resolution of perchlorate from more abundant ions was achieved using zwitterionic, sulfobetaine surfactants, N-hexadecyl-N,N-dimethyl-3-ammonio-1-propane sulfonate (HDAPS) and N-tetradecyl-N,N-dimethyl-3-ammonio-1-propane sulfonate (TDAPS). The system performance and the optimization of the separation chemistry, including the use of these surfactants to resolve perchlorate from other anions, are discussed in this work. The system is capable of detection limits of 3.4 +/- 1.8 ppb (n = 6) in standards and 5.6 +/- 1.7 ppb (n = 6) in drinking water.

  8. High-nitrogen-based pyrotechnics: perchlorate-free red- and green-light illuminants based on 5-aminotetrazole.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Jesse J; Moretti, Jared D

    2013-09-16

    Prototype testing of perchlorate-free hand-held signal illuminants for the US Army's M126 A1 red-star and M195 green-star parachute illuminants are described. Although previous perchlorate-free variants for these items have been developed based on high-nitrogen compounds that are not readily available, the new formulations consist of anhydrous 5-aminotetrazole as the suitable perchlorate replacement. Compared to the perchlorate-containing control, the disclosed illuminants exhibited excellent stabilities toward various ignition stimuli and had excellent pyrotechnic performance. The illuminants are important from both military and civil fireworks perspectives, as the perchlorate-free nature of the illuminants adequately address environmental concerns associated with perchlorate-containing red- and green-light-emitting illuminants. PMID:23950104

  9. High-nitrogen-based pyrotechnics: perchlorate-free red- and green-light illuminants based on 5-aminotetrazole.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Jesse J; Moretti, Jared D

    2013-09-16

    Prototype testing of perchlorate-free hand-held signal illuminants for the US Army's M126 A1 red-star and M195 green-star parachute illuminants are described. Although previous perchlorate-free variants for these items have been developed based on high-nitrogen compounds that are not readily available, the new formulations consist of anhydrous 5-aminotetrazole as the suitable perchlorate replacement. Compared to the perchlorate-containing control, the disclosed illuminants exhibited excellent stabilities toward various ignition stimuli and had excellent pyrotechnic performance. The illuminants are important from both military and civil fireworks perspectives, as the perchlorate-free nature of the illuminants adequately address environmental concerns associated with perchlorate-containing red- and green-light-emitting illuminants.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of an energetic compound Cu(Mtta)2(NO3)2 and effect on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qi; Chen, Sanping; Xie, Gang; Gao, Shengli

    2011-12-15

    An energetic coordination compound Cu(Mtta)(2)(NO(3))(2) has been synthesized by using 1-methyltetrazole (Mtta) as ligand and its structure has been characterized by X-ray single crystal diffraction. The central copper (II) cation was coordinated by four O atoms from two Mtta ligands and two N atoms from two NO(3)(-) anions to form a six-coordinated and distorted octahedral structure. 2D superamolecular layer structure was formed by the extensive intermolecular hydrogen bonds between Mtta ligands and NO(3)(-) anions. Thermal decomposition process of the compound was predicted based on DSC and TG-DTG analyses results. The kinetic parameters of the first exothermic process of the compound were studied by the Kissinger's and Ozawa-Doyle's methods. Sensitivity tests revealed that the compound was insensitive to mechanical stimuli. In addition, compound was explored as additive to promote the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) by differential scanning calorimetry.

  11. Catalytic destruction of perchlorate in ferric chloride and hydrochloric acid solution with control of temperature, pressure and chemical reagents

    DOEpatents

    Gu, Baohua; Cole, David R.; Brown, Gilbert M.

    2004-10-05

    A method is described to decompose perchlorate in a FeCl.sub.3 /HCl aqueous solution such as would be used to regenerate an anion exchange resin used to remove perchlorate. The solution is mixed with a reducing agent, preferably an organic alcohol and/or ferrous chloride, and can be heated to accelerate the decomposition of perchlorate. Lower temperatures may be employed if a catalyst is added.

  12. High-performing red-light-emitting pyrotechnic illuminants through the use of perchlorate-free materials.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Jared D; Sabatini, Jesse J; Poret, Jay C

    2014-07-01

    The development of perchlorate-free M662 40 mm illuminating pyrotechnic compositions is described. On the bases of cost, performance, and sensitivity, potassium periodate was determined to be most effective potassium perchlorate replacement in the compositions tested. The optimal periodate-based composition exceeded the performance of the perchlorate-containing control, exhibited low sensitivity values to impact, friction, and electrostatic discharge, and had high thermal onset temperatures.

  13. The Radar Effects of Perchlorate-Doped Ice in the Martian Polar Layered Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stillman, D.; Winebrenner, D. P.; Grimm, R. E.; Pathare, A.

    2010-12-01

    The presence of perchlorate in soil at near-polar latitudes on Mars suggests that dust in the ice of the North Polar Layered Deposits (NPLD) may introduce perchlorate impurities to that ice. Because eutectic temperatures of perchlorate salts range as low as 206 K (for magnesium perchlorate), perchlorate doping of NPLD ice may result in grain-scale liquid veins and softening of ice rheology at temperatures comparable to those computed for the base of the NPLD in the present climate. Any such softening would be important for understanding how processes including ice flow have shaped the NPLD. Observable consequences of such softening, or of the combination of perchlorate doping and temperatures that could cause softening, are thus similarly important. In particular, the dielectric properties of perchlorate-laden ice in a temperature gradient will change relatively rapidly at the point in the gradient near the eutectic temperature. Here we investigate the radar reflectivity of such a eutectic transition in ice with a model in which perchlorate concentration is constant and temperature varies linearly with depth in the ice. We have conducted measurements of the complex permittivity of Mg and Na perchlorate-doped ice over a range of temperatures (183 - 273 K) and concentrations. Below the eutectic temperature, the perchlorate-doped ice has electrical properties similar to that of choride-doped ice. However, above the eutectic temperature, some of the ice melts forming liquid at triple junctions. At concentrations above 3 mM, the liquid at triple junctions become connected forming brine channels, which greatly increase the dc conductivity and radar attenuation. At concentrations below 3 mM, the liquid at triple junctions are not connected and do not affect the dc conductivity. However, the liquid H2O molecules are able to rotate their permanent dipole at radar frequencies, thus causing an increase in radar attenuation. The MARSIS and SHARAD attenuation rates increase

  14. Possible Detection of Perchlorates by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument: Comparison with Previous Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro-Gonzalex, Rafael; Sutter, Brad; Archer, Doug; Ming, Doug; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; Franz, Heather; Glavin, Daniel; McAdam, Amy; Stern, Jennifer; McKay, Christopher; Coll, Patrice; Cabane, Michel; Mahaffy, Paul; Conrad, Pamela; Martin-Torres, Francisco; Zorzano-Mier, Maria; Grotzinger, John

    2013-01-01

    The first chemical analysis of soluble salts in the soil was carried out by the Phoenix Lander in the Martian Arctic [1]. Surprisingly, chlorine was present as magnesium or calcium perchlorate at 0.4 to 0.6 percent. Additional support for the identification of perchlorate came from the evolved gas analysis which detected the release of molecular oxygen at 350-550C [1]. When Mars-like soils from the Atacama Desert were spiked with magnesium perchlorate (1 percent) and heated using the Viking GC-MS protocol, nearly all the organics were combusted but a small amount was chlorinated, forming chloromethane and dichloromethane [2]. These chlorohydrocarbons were detected by the Viking GC-MS experiments when the Martian soil was analyzed but they were considered to be terrestrial contaminants [3]. Reinterpretation of the Viking results suggests <0.1 percent perchlorate and ppm levels of organic carbon at landing site 1 and 2 [2]. The suggestion of perchlorate in the Viking sites [2] has been challenged on the grounds that the detected compounds (CH3Cl and CH2Cl2) were carried from Earth [4]. Recently the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument on board the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) ran four samples from an aeolian bedform named Rocknest. The samples analyzed were portioned from the fifth scoop at this location. The samples were heated to 835C at 35C/min with a He flow. The SAM QMS detected a major oxygen release (300-500C) [5], coupled with the release of chlorinated hydrocarbons (chloromethane, dichloromethane, trichloromethane, and chloromethylpropene) detected both by SAM QMS and GC-MS derived from known Earth organic contaminants in the instrument [6]. Calcium perchlorate appears to be the best candidate for evolved O2 in the Rocknest samples at this time but other Cl species (e.g., chlorates) are possible and must be evaluated. The potential detection of perchlorates in Rocknest material adds weight to the argument that both Viking Landers measured signatures of

  15. Concurrent microbial reduction of high concentrations of nitrate and perchlorate in an ion exchange membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Fox, Shalom; Bruner, Tali; Oren, Yoram; Gilron, Jack; Ronen, Zeev

    2016-09-01

    We investigated effective simultaneous removal of high loads of nitrate and perchlorate from synthetic groundwater using an ion exchange membrane bioreactor (IEMB). The aim of this research was to characterize both transport aspects and biodegradation mechanisms involved in the treatment process of high loads of the two anions. Biodegradation process was proven to be efficient with over 99% efficiency of both perchlorate and nitrate, regardless of their load. The maximum biodegradation rates were 18.3 (mmol m(-2)  h(-1) ) and 5.5 (mmol m(-2)  h(-1) ) for nitrate and perchlorate, respectively. The presence of a biofilm on the bio-side of the membrane only slightly increased the nitrate and perchlorate transmembrane flux as compared to the measured flux during a Donnan dialysis experiment where there is no biodegradation of perchlorate and nitrate in the bio-compartment. The nitrate flux in presence of a biofilm was 18.3 (±1.9) (mmole m(-2)  h(-1) ), while without the biofilm, the flux was 16.9 (±1.5) (mmole m(-2)  h(-1) ) for the same feed inlet nitrate concentration of 4 mM. The perchlorate transmembrane flux increased similarly by an average of 5%. Samples of membrane biofilm and suspended bacteria from the bio-reactor were analyzed for diversity and abundance of the perchlorate and nitrate reducing bacteria. Klebsiella oxytoca, known as a glycerol fermenter, accounted for 70% of the suspended bacteria. In contrast, perchlorate and nitrate reducing bacteria predominated in the biofilm present on the membrane. These results are consistent with our proposed two stage biodegradation mechanism where glycerol is first fermented in the suspended phase of the bio-reactor and the fermentation products drive perchlorate and nitrate bio-reduction in the biofilm attached to the membrane. These results suggest that the niche exclusion of microbial populations in between the reactor and membrane is controlled by the fluxes of the electron donors and

  16. Perchlorate in the San Antonio Segment of the Edwards Aquifer, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahlquist, L.; Rajagapolan, S.; Jackson, W. A.

    2007-12-01

    Perchlorate has been detected in drinking-water supplies and can have adverse health effects on humans by disrupting thyroid function. Perchlorate and other constituents were analyzed from ground-water samples that were collected in 2004-06 from 99 wells completed in the San Antonio segment of the Edwards aquifer as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program. The fractured karstic carbonate Edwards aquifer, declared a sole-source aquifer by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, supplies nearly one-half million acre-feet per year for drinking water and other uses. Wells were located in a variety of land-use settings that included rangeland, agriculture, and urban; well types included domestic, public, and observation. Perchlorate was detected in 98 percent of the samples, and concentrations ranged from less than 0.05 to 3 micrograms per liter (μg/L). Five samples contained concentrations greater than 1 μg/L and were from wells in the urban northern San Antonio area. The results from three samples that contained perchlorate at concentrations greater than 2 μg/L are anomalous. Chloride concentration ranged from 5.6 to 69 milligrams per liter, typical for freshwater in the Edwards aquifer. No significant (r2 greater than 0.7) correlations were observed when perchlorate concentrations were correlated with depth to water, total depth of well, or concentrations of bicarbonate, nitrate, phosphate, sulfate, bromide, chloride, fluoride, calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, strontium, and dissolved solids. Tritium concentrations ranged from 1.2 to 2.9 tritium units in 31 of the 99 samples and indicate at least some fraction of modern water (post-atmospheric nuclear tests). No correlation between apparent tritium age and perchlorate concentration was observed, a possible indication that anthropogenic influences are not affecting observed perchlorate concentrations. The molar ratio of chloride to perchlorate ranged from 17,000 to 320

  17. Perchlorate accumulation and migration in the deep vadose zone in a semiarid region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, Harel; Weisbrod, Noam; Dahan, Ofer; Ronen, Zeev; Nativ, Ronit

    2009-11-01

    SummaryFor 25 years, a plant in Israel manufacturing ammonium perchlorate disposed of untreated wastewater in four unlined ponds. This study explores the transport mechanisms of perchlorate infiltrated from 1965 to 1990 from one of these active storage ponds into a deep (40 m) layered vadose zone and the underlying Israeli coastal aquifer. Perchlorate migration from 1990, when wastewater disposal ceased, until today, with infiltration due only to natural rain (˜500 mm y -1), was also studied. Several indirect methods were used, including: mass balance in the unsaturated zone profile, δ 18O and δ 2H profiles below the pond, and a comparison of the same sediment profiles in 2005 and 2007. The isotopic composition of the pore water could be divided into two separate groups: lighter (depleted) and heavier (enriched) samples. All samples in the lighter group were from the shallow vadose zone, above two clayey layers, and represent natural infiltration of rainwater. The enriched samples were from the deeper section of the unsaturated zone (20-40 m) and represent water used for perchlorate manufacturing 14 years prior to drilling. Consequently, the overall maximum infiltration rate was estimated to be 1.4 m y -1. Below the clayey layer almost identical perchlorate concentrations were found along the sediment profile in 2005 and 2007 (two boreholes, 3 m apart). Very different perchlorate profiles were observed above the clayey layers. This suggests that perchlorate below the clay layers (20-40 m) is practically stagnant under the current natural conditions. The reduction in perchlorate concentration in groundwater below the ponds vs. its increased concentration further downgradient supports the contention that the current migration of perchlorate from the vadose zone to the groundwater is very small. We estimate that perchlorate concentration in the groundwater under the infiltration pond, which was 187 mg l -1 in 2004, will reach 10 μg l -1 within about 14 years. The

  18. Concurrent microbial reduction of high concentrations of nitrate and perchlorate in an ion exchange membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Fox, Shalom; Bruner, Tali; Oren, Yoram; Gilron, Jack; Ronen, Zeev

    2016-09-01

    We investigated effective simultaneous removal of high loads of nitrate and perchlorate from synthetic groundwater using an ion exchange membrane bioreactor (IEMB). The aim of this research was to characterize both transport aspects and biodegradation mechanisms involved in the treatment process of high loads of the two anions. Biodegradation process was proven to be efficient with over 99% efficiency of both perchlorate and nitrate, regardless of their load. The maximum biodegradation rates were 18.3 (mmol m(-2)  h(-1) ) and 5.5 (mmol m(-2)  h(-1) ) for nitrate and perchlorate, respectively. The presence of a biofilm on the bio-side of the membrane only slightly increased the nitrate and perchlorate transmembrane flux as compared to the measured flux during a Donnan dialysis experiment where there is no biodegradation of perchlorate and nitrate in the bio-compartment. The nitrate flux in presence of a biofilm was 18.3 (±1.9) (mmole m(-2)  h(-1) ), while without the biofilm, the flux was 16.9 (±1.5) (mmole m(-2)  h(-1) ) for the same feed inlet nitrate concentration of 4 mM. The perchlorate transmembrane flux increased similarly by an average of 5%. Samples of membrane biofilm and suspended bacteria from the bio-reactor were analyzed for diversity and abundance of the perchlorate and nitrate reducing bacteria. Klebsiella oxytoca, known as a glycerol fermenter, accounted for 70% of the suspended bacteria. In contrast, perchlorate and nitrate reducing bacteria predominated in the biofilm present on the membrane. These results are consistent with our proposed two stage biodegradation mechanism where glycerol is first fermented in the suspended phase of the bio-reactor and the fermentation products drive perchlorate and nitrate bio-reduction in the biofilm attached to the membrane. These results suggest that the niche exclusion of microbial populations in between the reactor and membrane is controlled by the fluxes of the electron donors and

  19. Fate of perchlorate in a man-made reflecting pond following a fireworks display in Albany, New York, USA.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian; Oldi, John F; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2011-11-01

    Perchlorate is a widespread contaminant in aquatic environments. Despite this, the aquatic environmental fate of perchlorate released from fireworks displays is not well known. In the present study, we examined the fate of perchlorate in man-made reflecting ponds, from 2008 to 2010, following three fireworks displays in Albany, New York, USA. Immediately after the fireworks display, perchlorate in pond waters increased significantly, with concentrations from 30 to 1,480 times higher than the baseline values. Perchlorate concentrations in pond water increased from 0.11 µg/L to up to 519 µg/L, following the fireworks display in 2008. Perchlorate concentrations in pond water decreased at a first-order kinetic degradation rate, with a mean k(obs) value of 0.026 d⁻¹ and an average half-life of 29 d. The rate of perchlorate deposition into water bodies following fireworks displays was estimated to range from 670 to 2,620 g/ha. We also estimated the perchlorate ingestion rate by the inhalation of aerosols of pond water by people frequently near the ponds. The estimated daily intake of perchlorate through the ingestion of aerosols was 32% (226 ng/kg body wt), 13% (92 ng/kg body wt), and 6% (42 ng/kg body wt) of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's reference dose for infants, children, and adults, respectively.

  20. Copper cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Copper cyanide ; CASRN 544 - 92 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  1. Soil Flushing Through a Thick Vadose Zone: Perchlorate Removal Documented at Edwards AFB, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battey, T. F.; Shepard, A. J.; Tait, R. J.

    2007-12-01

    There are currently few viable alternatives for perchlorate remediation in the vadose zone, particularly for the relatively thick vadose zones that are typical in the arid southwest where many perchlorate sites occur. Perchlorate in the vadose zone occurs in the form of highly soluble salts that may represent a risk to human or ecological receptors, and may also represent a threat to the underlying groundwater. A soil flushing treatability study was conducted at Edwards Air Force Base in the Mojave Desert of southern California at a site with a 129-foot thick vadose zone consisting primarily of clayey sand. This study utilized an infiltration gallery in conjunction with extraction, treatment, and re-injection of groundwater at the site, which contained perchlorate-contaminated soil and groundwater. The study objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of the infiltration gallery to 1) introduce treated groundwater back into the aquifer and 2) wash the perchlorate from the vadose zone soils to the aquifer. The infiltration gallery consisted of slotted PVC pipes within a highly permeable engineered bed of washed gravel. The initial water introduced into the gallery was amended with potassium bromide tracer. A downhole neutron probe was used to track the movement of the wetting front downward and outward from the gallery. Successive neutron measurements in vertical access tubes revealed that the introduced water reached the 125-foot bottom of the access tubes 14 weeks after the water was introduced into the gallery. The bromide tracer was detected in groundwater immediately below the gallery approximately 1 week later. The infiltration gallery was able to sustain an average flow rate of 2.3 gallons per minute. Prior to infiltration, the perchlorate concentration in groundwater below the gallery was 4,500 µg/L. Approximately 18 weeks after the start of infiltration, a perchlorate spike of 72,400 µg/L was detected below the gallery. The increase in perchlorate

  2. US Food and Drug Administration's Total Diet Study: dietary intake of perchlorate and iodine.

    PubMed

    Murray, Clarence William; Egan, Sara Kathleen; Kim, Henry; Beru, Nega; Bolger, Philip Michael

    2008-11-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has conducted the Total Diet Study (TDS) since 1961, which designed to monitor the US food supply for chemical contaminants, nutritional elements, and toxic elements. Recently, perchlorate was analyzed in TDS samples. Perchlorate is used as an oxidizing agent in rocket propellant, is found in other items (e.g., explosives, road flares, fireworks, and car airbags), occurs naturally in some fertilizers, and may be generated under certain climatic conditions. It has been detected in surface and groundwater and in food. Perchlorate at high (e.g., pharmacological) doses can interfere with iodide uptake into the thyroid gland, disrupting its function. The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) has identified that "the fetuses of pregnant women who might have hypothyroidism or iodide deficiency as the most sensitive population." This study reports on intake estimates of perchlorate and iodine, a precursor to iodide, using the analytical results from the TDS. Estimated average perchlorate and iodine daily intakes as well as the contribution of specific food groups to total intakes were estimated for 14 age/sex subgroups of the US population. The estimated smallest lower bound to the largest upper bound average perchlorate intakes by the 14 age/sex groups range from 0.08 to 0.39 micrograms per kilogram body weight per day (microg/kg bw/day), compared with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reference dose (RfD) of 0.7 microg/kg bw/day. Infants and children demonstrated the highest estimated intakes of perchlorate on a body weight basis. The estimated average iodine intakes by the 14 age/sex groups reveal a lower bound (ND=0) and upper bound (ND=LOD) range of average intakes from 138 to 353 microg/person/day. Estimated iodine intakes by infants 6-11 months exceed their adequate intake (AI), and intakes by children and adult age/sex groups exceed their relevant estimated average requirement (EAR).

  3. Analysis of hydroponic fertilizer matrixes for perchlorate: comparison of analytical techniques.

    PubMed

    Collette, Timothy W; Williams, Ted L; Urbansky, Edward T; Magnuson, Matthew L; Hebert, Gretchen N; Strauss, Steven H

    2003-01-01

    Seven retail hydroponic nitrate fertilizer products, two liquid and five solid, were comparatively analyzed for the perchlorate anion (ClO4-) by ion chromatography (IC) with suppressed conductivity detection, complexation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (cESI-MS), normal Raman spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy using an attenuated total reflectance crystal (ATR-FTIR) coated with a thin film of an organometallic ion-exchange compound. Three of the five solid products were found by all techniques to contain perchlorate at the level of approximately 100-350 mg kg(-1). The remaining products did not contain perchlorate above the detection level of any of the techniques. Comparative analysis using several analytical techniques that depend on different properties of perchlorate allow for a high degree of certainty in both the qualitative and quantitative determinations. This proved particularly useful for these samples, due to the complexity of the matrix. Analyses of this type, including multiple spectroscopic confirmations, may also be useful for other complicated matrixes (e.g., biological samples) or in forensic/regulatory frameworks where data are likely to be challenged. While the source of perchlorate in these hydroponic products is not known, the perchlorate-to-nitrate concentration ratio (w/w) in the aqueous extracts is generally consistent with the historical weight percent of water soluble components in caliche, a nitrate-bearing ore found predominantly in Chile. This ore, which is the only well-established natural source of perchlorate, is mined and used, albeit minimally, as a nitrogen source in some fertilizer products.

  4. Developmental Exposure to Perchlorate Alters Synaptic Transmission in Hippocampus of the Adult Rat

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Mary E.; Sui, Li

    2008-01-01

    Background Perchlorate is an environmental contaminant that blocks iodine uptake into the thyroid gland and reduces thyroid hormones. This action of perchlorate raises significant concern over its effects on brain development. Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate neurologic function in rats after developmental exposure to perchlorate. Methods Pregnant rats were exposed to 0, 30, 300, or 1,000 ppm perchlorate in drinking water from gestational day 6 until weaning. Adult male offspring were evaluated on a series of behavioral tasks and neurophysiologic measures of synaptic function in the hippocampus. Results At the highest perchlorate dose, triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) were reduced in pups on postnatal day 21. T4 in dams was reduced relative to controls by 16%, 28%, and 60% in the 30-, 300-, and 1,000-ppm dose groups, respectively. Reductions in T4 were associated with increases in thyroid-stimulating hormone in the high-dose group. No changes were seen in serum T3. Perchlorate did not impair motor activity, spatial learning, or fear conditioning. However, significant reductions in baseline synaptic transmission were observed in hippocampal field potentials at all dose levels. Reductions in inhibitory function were evident at 300 and 1,000 ppm, and augmentations in long-term potentiation were observed in the population spike measure at the highest dose. Conclusions Dose-dependent deficits in hippocampal synaptic function were detectable with relatively minor perturbations of the thyroid axis, indicative of an irreversible impairment in synaptic transmission in response to developmental exposure to perchlorate. PMID:18560531

  5. Biomonitoring as a method for assessing exposure to perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Blount, Benjamin C; Valentín-Blasini, Liza

    2007-09-01

    Biomonitoring provides direct and quantitative information regarding human exposure to environmental toxicants, such as perchlorate (ClO(4)(-)). Because of concerns surrounding widespread exposure to ClO(4)(-), we are using biomonitoring methods to assess exposure to ClO(4)(-) and other physiologically relevant anions that can impact iodide uptake by the thyroid. These methods quantify ClO(4)(-), thiocyanate, nitrate, and iodide in human urine, milk, serum, blood spots, amniotic fluid, and infant formula using ion chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. In this paper we summarize recent ClO(4)(-) biomonitoring research and provide three additional examples of the utility of biomonitoring for characterizing ClO(4)(-) exposure. Specifically, we examine variability in ClO(4)(-) excretion, compare the relative importance of different exposure sources in adults, and estimate ClO(4)(-) exposure in formula-fed infants. These applications provide examples of how biomonitoring can improve individual exposure assessment. Individual biomarker data can subsequently be compared with individual thyroid function data to better evaluate potential linkage between ClO(4)(-) exposure and health. PMID:17822374

  6. The origins of perchlorate in the Martian soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrier, Brandi L.; Kounaves, Samuel P.

    2015-05-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) has been detected on Mars, but its production and distribution are unclear. Mechanisms requiring atmospheric chlorine are insufficient for measured concentrations. We conducted studies under Mars conditions using halite (NaCl) alone, soil simulants consisting of silica (SiO2), Fe2O3, Al2O3, and TiO2. After 170 h irradiation, samples analyzed by ion chromatography (IC) showed ClO4- and ClO3- present in all samples. When SiO2 was added, yield increased from 2 to 42 nmol and 0.4 to 2.6 nmol, respectively. We attribute this to SiO2 and metal oxides acting as photocatalysts, generating O2- radicals from O2 which react with chloride. Results show ClO4- and ClO3- can be produced photochemically on Cl minerals without atmospheric chlorine or aqueous conditions, and explain high concentration of ClO4- and ClO4-/Cl- ratios detected by Phoenix. They provide evidence that its distribution on Mars is dictated by distribution of chlorine and provide insight into the oxidizing nature of the soil and its potential effects on organics.

  7. Experimental and Numerical Study of Ammonium Perchlorate Counterflow Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smooke, M. D.; Yetter, R. A.; Parr, T. P.; Hanson-Parr, D. M.; Tanoff, M. A.

    1999-01-01

    Many solid rocket propellants are based on a composite mixture of ammonium perchlorate (AP) oxidizer and polymeric binder fuels. In these propellants, complex three-dimensional diffusion flame structures between the AP and binder decomposition products, dependent upon the length scales of the heterogeneous mixture, drive the combustion via heat transfer back to the surface. Changing the AP crystal size changes the burn rate of such propellants. Large AP crystals are governed by the cooler AP self-deflagration flame and burn slowly, while small AP crystals are governed more by the hot diffusion flame with the binder and burn faster. This allows control of composite propellant ballistic properties via particle size variation. Previous measurements on these diffusion flames in the planar two-dimensional sandwich configuration yielded insight into controlling flame structure, but there are several drawbacks that make comparison with modeling difficult. First, the flames are two-dimensional and this makes modeling much more complex computationally than with one-dimensional problems, such as RDX self- and laser-supported deflagration. In addition, little is known about the nature, concentration, and evolution rates of the gaseous chemical species produced by the various binders as they decompose. This makes comparison with models quite difficult. Alternatively, counterflow flames provide an excellent geometric configuration within which AP/binder diffusion flames can be studied both experimentally and computationally.

  8. Widespread occurrence of (per)chlorate in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, W. Andrew; Davila, Alfonso F.; Sears, Derek W. G.; Coates, John D.; McKay, Christopher P.; Brundrett, Maeghan; Estrada, Nubia; Böhlke, J. K.

    2015-11-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) and chlorate (ClO3-) are ubiquitous on Earth and ClO4- has also been found on Mars. These species can play important roles in geochemical processes such as oxidation of organic matter and as biological electron acceptors, and are also indicators of important photochemical reactions involving oxyanions; on Mars they could be relevant for human habitability both in terms of in situ resource utilization and potential human health effects. For the first time, we extracted, detected and quantified ClO4- and ClO3- in extraterrestrial, non-planetary samples: regolith and rock samples from the Moon, and two chondrite meteorites (Murchison and Fayetteville). Lunar samples were collected by astronauts during the Apollo program, and meteorite samples were recovered immediately after their fall. This fact, together with the heterogeneous distribution of ClO4- and ClO3- within some of the samples, and their relative abundance with respect to other soluble species (e.g., NO3-) are consistent with an extraterrestrial origin of the oxychlorine species. Our results, combined with the previously reported widespread occurrence on Earth and Mars, indicate that ClO4- and ClO3- could be present throughout the Solar System.

  9. Development of Ammonium Perchlorate + Aluminium Base Solid Propellant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, Norazila; Ali, Wan Khairuddin Wan

    2010-06-01

    Rocket propellant has been identified as a component that played an important role in the development of rockets. The ejected material in rocket propulsion is due to material called propellant. Without propellant, a rocket cannot be launched. Due to this reason, many have started to conduct research on new chemical compound of propellant with new technique if needed. The objectives of this study are to study the thermo-chemistry aspect of the composition and to determine the burning characteristics parameters. For this reason, this dissertation presented a detail preparation of developing a solid propellant using Ammonium Perchlorate (AP) as an oxidizer, Aluminum (Al) as fuel and Hydroxyl Terminated Polybutadiene (HTPB) as the binder. To determine the propellant performance such as burning rate, testing was conducted. From testing result the propellant composition oxidizer-fuel (76/11) at pressure 110 Psi gave the maximum burning rate. From test results the empirical constant, `a' and pressure exponent `n' were calculated for each different propellant compositions.

  10. Shock initiation of a heated ammonium perchlorate-based propellant

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, C.M.; Urtiew, P.A.; Tao, W.C.

    1996-04-01

    Solid propellants are containing ammonium perchlorate (AP), aluminum, and a carboxylterminated polybutadiene binder (CTPB) are known to burn reliably and to be very insensitive to transition to detonation under ambient conditions. In accident scenarios, these propellants may become more shock sensitive when they are subjected to heat and/or multiple impacts. The shock sensitivity of one such propellant, ANB-3066, is determined using embedded manganin pressure gauges at an elevated temperature of 170 C. The measured pressure histories are modeled using the Ignition and Growth reactive flow model of shock initiation and detonation. The experiments clearly show that ANB-3066 is not significant more shock sensitive at 170 C than it is at ambient temperature. The Ignition and Growth reactive flow calculations indicate that less than 20% of the chemical energy of AP and CTPB reactions is released at input shock pressures as high as 21 GPa. The aluminum component does not reach the high temperatures required for it to react. These results indicate that AP-based solid propellants are still extremely resistant to shock to detonation transition even when heated to temperatures close to the thermal decomposition temperature of the propellant formulation. The shock insensitivity of heated AP-based propellants is hypothesized to be due to the melting of the AP component during shock loading and the relatively low temperatures produced by the weakly exothermic decomposition of AP and binder.

  11. Biological perchlorate reduction in packed bed reactors using elemental sulfur.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Ashish K; Conneely, Teresa; Nüsslein, Klaus R; Ergas, Sarina J

    2009-06-15

    Sulfur-utilizing perchlorate (ClO4-)-reducing bacteria were enriched from a denitrifying wastewater seed with elemental sulfur (S0) as an electron donor. The enrichment was composed of a diverse microbial community, with the majority identified as members of the phylum Proteobacteria. Cultures were inoculated into bench-scale packed bed reactors (PBR) with S0 and crushed oyster shell packing media. High ClO4-concentrations (5-8 mg/L) were reduced to < 0.5 mg/L at an empty bed contact time (EBCT) of 13 h. Low C1O4- concentrations (60-120 microg/L), more typical of contaminated groundwater sites, were reduced to < 4 microg/L at an EBCT of 7.5 h. PBR performance decreased when effluent recirculation was applied or when smaller S0 particle sizes were used, indicating that mass transfer of ClO4- to the attached biofilm was not the limiting mechanism in this process, and that biofilm acclimation and growth were key factors in overall reactor performance. The presence of nitrate (6.5 mg N/L) inhibited ClO4- reduction. The microbial community composition was found to change with ClO4- availability from a majority of Beta-Proteobacteria near the influent end of the reactor to primarily sulfur-oxidizing bacteria near the effluent end of the reactor. PMID:19603663

  12. Metal-induced decomposition of perchlorate in pressurized hot water.

    PubMed

    Hori, Hisao; Sakamoto, Takehiko; Tanabe, Takashi; Kasuya, Miu; Chino, Asako; Wu, Qian; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2012-10-01

    Decomposition of perchlorate (ClO(4)(-)) in pressurized hot water (PHW) was investigated. Although ClO(4)(-) demonstrated little reactivity in pure PHW up to 300°C, addition of zerovalent metals to the reaction system enhanced the decomposition of ClO(4)(-) to Cl(-) with an increasing order of activity of (no metal)≈Al < Cu < Zn < Ni < Fe: the addition of iron powder led to the most efficient decomposition of ClO(4)(-). When the iron powder was added to an aqueous ClO(4)(-) solution (104 μM) and the mixture was heated at 150°C, ClO(4)(-) concentration fell below 0.58 μM (58 μg L(-1), detection limit of ion chromatography) in 1 h, and Cl(-) was formed with the yield of 85% after 6 h. The decomposition was accompanied by transformation of the zerovalent iron to Fe(3)O(4). This method was successfully used in the decomposition of ClO(4)(-) in a water sample contaminated with this compound, following fireworks display at Albany, New York, USA.

  13. Chlorine-36 as a tracer of perchlorate origin.

    PubMed

    Sturchio, Neil C; Caffee, Marc; Beloso, Abelardo D; Heraty, Linnea J; Böhlke, John Karl; Hatzinger, Paul B; Jackson, W Andrew; Gu, Baohua; Heikoop, Jeffrey M; Dale, Michael

    2009-09-15

    Perchlorate (ClO4(-)) is ubiquitous in the environment. It is produced naturally by atmospheric photochemical reactions, and also is synthesized in large quantities for military, aerospace, and industrial applications. Nitrate-enriched salt deposits of the Atacama Desert (Chile) contain high concentrations of natural ClO4(-), and have been exported worldwide since the mid-1800s for use in agriculture. The widespread introduction of synthetic and agricultural ClO4(-) into the environment has contaminated numerous municipal water supplies. Stable isotope ratio measurements of Cl and O have been applied for discrimination of different ClO4(-) sources in the environment. This study explores the potential of 36Cl measurements for further improving the discrimination of ClO4(-) sources. Groundwater and desert soil samples from the southwestern United States (U.S.) contain ClO4(-) having high 36Cl abundances (36Cl/Cl = 3100 x 10(-15) to 28,800 x 10(-15)), compared with those from the Atacama Desert (36Cl/Cl = 0.9 x 10(-15) to 590 x 10(-15)) and synthetic ClO4(-) reagents and products (36Cl/Cl = 0.0 x 10(-15) to 40 x 10(-15)). In conjunction with stable Cl and O isotope ratios, 36Cl data provide a clear distinction among three principal ClO4(-) source types in the environment of the southwestern U.S. PMID:19806723

  14. Chlorine-36 abundance in natural and synthetic perchlorate

    SciTech Connect

    Heikoop, Jeffrey M; Dale, M; Sturchio, Neil C; Caffee, M; Belosa, A D; Heraty, Jr., L J; Bohike, J K; Hatzinger, P B; Jackson, W A; Gu, B

    2009-01-01

    Perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) is ubiquitous in the environment. It occurs naturally as a product of atmospheric photochemical reactions, and is synthesized for military, aerospace, and industrial applications. Nitrate-enriched soils of the Atacama Desert (Chile) contain high concentrations of natural ClO{sub 4}{sup -}; nitrate produced from these soils has been exported worldwide since the mid-1800's for use in agriculture. The widespread introduction of synthetic and agricultural ClO{sub 4}{sup -} into the environment has complicated attempts to understand the geochemical cycle of ClO{sub 4}{sup -}. Natural ClO{sub 4}{sup -} samples from the southwestern United States have relatively high {sup 36}Cl abundances ({sup 36}Cl/Cl = 3,100 x 10{sup -15} to 28,800 x 10{sup -15}), compared with samples of synthetic ({sup 36}Cl/Cl = 0.0 x 10{sup -15} to 40 x 10{sup -15}) and Atacama Desert ({sup 36}Cl/Cl = 0.9 x 10{sup -15} to 590 x 10{sup -15}) ClO{sub 4}{sup -}. These data give a lower limit for the initial {sup 36}Cl abundance of natural ClO{sub 4}{sup -} and provide temporal and other constraints on its geochemical cycle.

  15. Chlorine-36 as a tracer of perchlorate origin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sturchio, N.C.; Caffee, M.; Beloso, A.D.; Heraty, L.J.; Böhlke, J.K.; Hatzinger, P.B.; Jackson, W.A.; Gu, B.; Heikoop, J.M.; Dale, M.

    2009-01-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) is ubiquitous in the environment. It is produced naturally by atmospheric photochemical reactions, and also is synthesized in large quantities for military, aerospace, and industrial applications. Nitrate-enriched salt deposits of the Atacama Desert (Chile) contain high concentrations of natural ClO4-, and have been exported worldwide since the mid-1800s for use in agriculture. The widespread introduction of synthetic and agricultural ClO4- into the environment has contaminated numerous municipal water supplies. Stable isotope ratio measurements of Cl and O have been applied for discrimination of different ClO4- sources in the environment. This study explores the potential of 36Cl measurements for further improving the discrimination of ClO4- sources. Groundwater and desert soil samples from the southwestern United States (U.S.) contain ClO4- having high 36Cl abundances (36Cl/Cl = 3100 ?? 10-15 to 28,800 ?? 10 -15), compared with those from the Atacama Desert (36Cl/Cl = 0.9 ?? 10-15 to 590 ?? 10-15) and synthetic ClO4- reagents and products (36Cl/Cl = 0.0 ?? 10-15 to 40 ?? 1015). In conjunction with stable Cl and O isotope ratios, 36Cl data provide a clear distinction among three principal. ClO4- source types in the environment of the southwestern U.S. ?? 2009 American Chemical Society.

  16. Metal-induced decomposition of perchlorate in pressurized hot water.

    PubMed

    Hori, Hisao; Sakamoto, Takehiko; Tanabe, Takashi; Kasuya, Miu; Chino, Asako; Wu, Qian; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2012-10-01

    Decomposition of perchlorate (ClO(4)(-)) in pressurized hot water (PHW) was investigated. Although ClO(4)(-) demonstrated little reactivity in pure PHW up to 300°C, addition of zerovalent metals to the reaction system enhanced the decomposition of ClO(4)(-) to Cl(-) with an increasing order of activity of (no metal)≈Al < Cu < Zn < Ni < Fe: the addition of iron powder led to the most efficient decomposition of ClO(4)(-). When the iron powder was added to an aqueous ClO(4)(-) solution (104 μM) and the mixture was heated at 150°C, ClO(4)(-) concentration fell below 0.58 μM (58 μg L(-1), detection limit of ion chromatography) in 1 h, and Cl(-) was formed with the yield of 85% after 6 h. The decomposition was accompanied by transformation of the zerovalent iron to Fe(3)O(4). This method was successfully used in the decomposition of ClO(4)(-) in a water sample contaminated with this compound, following fireworks display at Albany, New York, USA. PMID:22840541

  17. Kinetics of chlorite dismutase in a perchlorate degrading reactor sludge.

    PubMed

    Nadaraja, Anupama Vijaya; Veetil, Prajeesh Gangadharan Puthiya; Vidyadharan, Athira; Bhaskaran, Krishnakumar

    2013-01-01

    Kinetics of chlorite dismutase (CD), the terminal enzyme involved in the perchlorate (ClO4(-)) reduction pathway, in a ClO4(-)-degrading bioreactor are reported in this study. Enzyme activity was determined from dissolved oxygen released during disproportionation of chlorite (ClO2(-)). CD activity was in the range 29.8-36.4 U/mg dry weight sludge, and kinetic constants Vmax and K(m) of the enzyme were 37.83 U/mg dry weight and 0.28 mM, respectively. Among reactor operational conditions, enzyme activity was observed at pH 4.0-9.0, with an optimum at pH 6.0. Redox potential in the range -50 to +120mV and NaCl up to 3.5 g/L had no significant effect on CD activity. However, co-occurring pollutants such as ammonium at 10 ppm, nitrite at 50 ppm and EDTA at 100 microM reduced CD activity substantially. The present study highlights ideal bioreactor conditions to avoid ClO2(-) toxicity, while indicating the buffering potential of a mixed microbial system against inhibiting factors to maintain stable CD activity in bioreactors.

  18. Association between Perchlorate and indirect indicators of thyroid dysfunction in NHANES 2001-2002, a Cross-Sectional, Hypothesis-Generating Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: A previous study observed associations of urinary perchlorate with thyroid hormones based on the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001-2002. Increased levels of urinary perchlorate were associated with increased levels of thyroid stimulating h...

  19. NOVEL ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN URINARY PERCHLORATE AND POTENTIALLY RELEVANT EFFECTS ON RISK FACTORS FOR HEART DISEASE BASED ON NHANES 2001-2002

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate is a widespread environmental pollutant, and is a thyroid hormone disruptor. A previous population study based on the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001-2002 database showed that urinary perchlorate concentrations were associated with signi...

  20. Microbial Community Structure during Nitrate and Perchlorate Reduction in Ion-exchange Brine Using the Hydrogen-based membrane Biofilm Reactor (MBIR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Detoxification of perchlorate by microbial communities under denitrifying conditions has been recently reported, although the identity of the mixed populations involved in perchlorate reduction is not well understood. In order to address this, the bacterial diversity of membrane ...

  1. Adaptive evolution of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 for developing resistance to perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta-Kolte, M. G.; Youngblut, M.; Redford, S.; Gregoire, P.; Carlson, H. K.; Coates, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Due to its toxic, explosive, and corrosive nature, inadvertent biological H2S production by sulfate reducing microorganisms (SRM) poses significant health and industrial operational risks. Anthropogenic sources are dominated by the oil industry where H2S in reservoir gases and fluids has an associated annual cost estimated at $90 billion globally. Our previous studies have identified perchlorate (ClO4-) as a selective and potent inhibitor of SRM in pure culture and complex microbial ecosystems. However, constant addition of inhibitors like perchlorate to natural ecosystems may result in a new adaptive selective pressure on SRM populations. With this in mind we investigated the ability of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20, a model oil reservoir SRM, to adapt to perchlorate and develop a resistance. Serial transfers of three parallel cultures with increasing concentrations of perchlorate up to 100 mM were generated and compared to wild-type strains that were transferred for same number of generations in absence of perchlorate. Genome sequencing revealed that all three adapted strains had single non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the same gene, Dde_2265, the sulfate adenylytransferase (ATP sulfurylase (ATPS)) (EC 2.7.7.4). ATPS catalyzes the first committed step in sulfate reduction and is essential in all SRM. IC50s against growth for these evolved strains demonstrated a three-fold increased resistance to perchlorate compared to wild-type controls. These evolved strains also had 5x higher transcriptional abundance of Dde_2265 compared to the wild-type strain. Biochemical characterization of the purified ATPS enzyme from both wild-type and the evolved strain showed that the mutant ATPS from the evolved strain was resistant to perchlorate inhibition of ATP turnover with a KI for perchlorate that was 3x greater relative to the wild-type ATPS. These results demonstrate that a single-base pair mutation in ATPS can have a significant impact on developing

  2. Trace Perchlorate in Background Ground Water and Local Precipitation, Northern Rio Grande Basin, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, M.; Longmire, P.; Granzow, K. P.; Englert, D.; Yanicak, S.; Larson, T.; Rearick, M.; Heikoop, J.; Perkins, G.

    2007-12-01

    Perchlorate occurs at detectable concentrations of 0.07 to 0.45 parts per billion (ppb) in ground water of background quality within the northern Rio Grande basin, New Mexico. Ground-water samples were collected from 47 wells and springs near Los Alamos, Santa Fe, and Taos, New Mexico. Analytical methods consisted of liquid and ion chromatography-mass spectrometry mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS and IC/MS/MS). An upper tolerance limit (mean plus two standard deviations) of 0.40 ppb was calculated from 184 analytical results for the background samples. Six distinguishable ground-water zones were sampled based on location, age, and hydrochemistry. In the Los Alamos area, ground water within the mountain-front and mountain-block region is mostly young or modern (less than 50 years). The regional aquifer including the White Rock Canyon springs are of sub-modern age (greater than 50 years). Tritium data from springs north of Taos indicate ground water of modern and sub-modern ages. Background perchlorate concentrations within the Los Alamos area were consistently higher than those measured in the Taos area. Ground water from the Taos area contains less perchlorate and has lower δ18O and δ2H values than ground water from the Los Alamos area. The elevation at which precipitation occurs with respect to recharge and/or the amount of evapotranspiration may play a role in perchlorate concentration in ground water. Natural variability, hydrogeology, and atmospheric inputs may also affect perchlorate concentration in ground water. A linear regression through perchlorate and chloride concentrations for all stations resulted in an r2 = 0. However, the r2 value of the Los Alamos regional aquifer for perchlorate versus chloride was 0.66. Thirteen precipitation samples were collected in the Los Alamos area. Results from eleven of these samples showed no perchlorate greater than 0.05 and 0.009 ppb, the method detection limit (MDL). Two precipitation samples analyzed using the IC

  3. Possible Calcite and Magnesium Perchlorate Interaction in the Mars Phoenix Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, K. M.; Sutter, B.; Ming, D. W.; Boynton, W. V.; Quinn, R. C.

    2012-01-01

    The Mars Phoenix Lander's TEGA instrument detected a calcium carbonate phase decomposing at high temperatures (approx.700 C) from the Wicked Witch soil sample [1]. TEGA also detected a lower temperature CO2 release between 400 C and 680 C [1]. Possible explanations given for this lower temperature CO2 release include thermal decomposition of Mg or Fe carbonates, a zeolitictype desorption reaction, or combustion of organic compounds in the soil [2]. The detection of 0.6 wt % soluble perchlorate by the Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) on Phoenix [3] has implications for the possibility of organic molecules in the soil. Ming et al. [4] demonstrated that perchlorates could have oxidized organic compounds to CO2 in TEGA, preventing detection of their characteristic mass fragments. Here, we propose that a perchlorate salt and calcium carbonate present in martian soil reacted to produce the 400 C - 680 C TEGA CO2 release. The parent salts of the perchlorate on Mars are unknown, but geochemical models using WCL data support the possible dominance of Mg-perchlorate salts [5]. Mg(ClO4)2 6H2O is the stable phase at ambient martian conditions [6], and breaks down at lower temperatures than carbonates giving off Cl2 and HCl gas [7,8]. Devlin and Herley [7] report two exotherms at 410-478 C and 473-533 C which correspond to the decomposition of Mg(ClO4)2.

  4. [Determination of iodide, thiocyanate and perchlorate ions in environmental water by two-dimensional ion chromatography].

    PubMed

    Lin, Li; Wang, Haibo; Shi, Yali

    2013-03-01

    A procedure for the determination of iodide, thiocyanate and perchlorate ions in environmental water by two-dimensional ion chromatography has been developed. At first the iodide, thiocyanate and perchlorate ions were separated from interfering ions by a column (IonPac AS16, 250 mm x 4 mm). The iodide ion, thiocyanate and perchlorate ions were then enriched with an enrichment column (MAC-200, 80 mm x 0.75 mm). In the 2nd-dimensional chromatography, iodide thiocyanate and perchlorate ions were separated and quantified by a capillary column (IonPac AS20 Capillary, 250 mm x 0.4 mm). The linear ranges were 0.05 -100 pg/L with correlation coefficients of 0. 999 9, and the detection limits were 0. 02 - 0.05 micro gg/L. The spiked recoveries of iodide, thiocyanate and perchlorate ions were in the range of 85.1% to 100.1%. The relative standard deviations of the recoveries were 1.7% to 4.9%.

  5. Determination of trace level perchlorate in drinking water and ground water by ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Jackson, P E; Laikhtman, M; Rohrer, J S

    1999-07-30

    Ammonium perchlorate, a key ingredient in solid rocket propellants, has recently been found in ground and surface waters in the USA in a number of states, including California, Nevada, Utah, and West Virginia. Perchlorate poses a health risk and preliminary data from the US Environmental Protection Agency reports that exposure to less than 4-18 micrograms/l provides adequate human health protection. An ion chromatographic method was developed for the determination of low microgram/l levels of perchlorate in drinking and ground waters based on a Dionex IonPac AS11 column, a 100 mM hydroxide eluent, large loop (1000 microliters) injection, and suppressed conductivity detection. The method is free of interferences from common anions, linear in the range of 2.5-100 micrograms/l, and quantitative recoveries were obtained for low microgram/l levels of perchlorate in spiked drinking and ground water samples. The method detection limit of 0.3 microgram/l permits quantification of perchlorate below the levels which ensure adequate health protection. A new polarizable anion analysis column, the IonPac AS16, and its potential applicability for this analysis is also discussed.

  6. Developmental timing of sodium perchlorate exposure alters angiogenesis, thyroid follicle proliferation and sexual maturation in stickleback

    PubMed Central

    Furin, Christoff G.; von Hippel, Frank A.; Postlethwait, John H.; Buck, C. Loren; Cresko, William A.; O’Hara, Todd M.

    2015-01-01

    Perchlorate, a common aquatic contaminant, is well known to disrupt homeostasis of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis. This study utilizes the threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) fish to determine if perchlorate exposure during certain windows of development has morphological effects on thyroid and gonads. Fish were moved from untreated water to perchlorate-contaminated water (30 and 100 mg/L) starting at 0, 3, 7, 14, 21, 42, 154 and 305 days post fertilization until approximately one year old. A reciprocal treatment (fish in contaminated water switched to untreated water) was conducted on the same schedule. Perchlorate exposure increased angiogenesis and follicle proliferation in thyroid tissue, delayed gonadal maturity, and skewed sex ratios towards males; effects depended on concentration and timing of exposure. This study demonstrates that perchlorate exposure beginning during the first 42 days of development has profound effects on stickleback reproductive and thyroid tissues, and by implication can impact population dynamics. Long-term exposure studies that assess contaminant effects at various stages of development provide novel information to characterize risk to aquatic organisms, to facilitate management of resources, and to determine sensitive developmental windows for further study of underlying mechanisms. PMID:25865142

  7. Perchlorate and Nitrate Remediation Efficiency and Microbial Diversity in a Containerized Wetland Bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jr., B D; Dibley, V; Pinkart, H; Legler, T

    2004-06-09

    We have developed a method to remove perchlorate (14 to 27 {micro}g/L) and nitrate (48 mg/L) from contaminated groundwater using a wetland bioreactor. The bioreactor has operated continuously in a remote field location for more than two years with a stable ecosystem of indigenous organisms. This study assesses the bioreactor for long-term perchlorate and nitrate remediation by evaluating influent and effluent groundwater for reduction-oxidation conditions and nitrate and perchlorate concentrations. Total community DNA was extracted and purified from 10-g sediment samples retrieved from vertical coring of the bioreactor during winter. Analysis by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of short, 16S rDNA, polymerase-chain-reaction products was used to identify dominant microorganisms. Bacteria genera identified were closely affiliated with bacteria widely distributed in soils, mud layers, and fresh water. Of the 17 dominant bands sequenced, most were gram negative and capable of aerobic or anaerobic respiration with nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor (Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Halomonas, and Nitrospira). Several identified genera (Rhizobium, Acinetobactor, and Xanthomonas) are capable of fixing atmospheric nitrogen into a combined form (ammonia) usable by host plants. Isolates were identified from the Proteobacteria class, known for the ability to reduce perchlorate. Initial bacterial assessments of sediments confirm the prevalence of facultative anaerobic bacteria capable of reducing perchlorate and nitrate in situ.

  8. Ion exchange membrane bioreactor for treating groundwater contaminated with high perchlorate concentrations.

    PubMed

    Fox, Shalom; Oren, Yoram; Ronen, Zeev; Gilron, Jack

    2014-01-15

    Perchlorate contamination of groundwater is a worldwide concern. The most cost efficient treatment for high concentrations is biological treatment. In order to improve and increase the acceptance of this treatment, there is a need to reduce the contact between micro organisms in the treatment unit and the final effluent. An ion exchange membrane bioreactor (IEMB), in which treated water is separated from the bioreactor, was suggested for this purpose. In this study, the IEMB's performance was studied at a concentration as high as 250mgL(-1) that were never studied before. In the bioreactor, glycerol was used as a low cost and nontoxic carbon and energy source for the reduction of perchlorate to chloride. We found that high perchlorate concentrations in the feed rendered the anion exchange membrane significantly less permeable to perchlorate. However, the presence of bacteria in the bio-compartment significantly increased the flux through the membrane by more than 25% in comparison to pure Donnan dialysis. In addition, the results suggested minimal secondary contamination (<3mgCL(-1)) of the treated water with the optimum feed of carbon substrate. Our results show that IEMB can efficiently treat groundwater contaminated with perchlorate as high as 250mgL(-1).

  9. In Situ Perchlorate Determination on Purolite A850 Ion Exchange Resin via Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Sinkov, Sergei I.; Bryan, Samuel A.

    2007-07-17

    The reported investigation represents a first step toward development of a sensor methodology for in-situ determination of ionic species retained on ion exchange column. Raman spectroscopy was demonstrated as a detection method for determining perchlorate loading on a non-selective ion exchange resin, Purolite A850 acrylic gel. This method has been established using laboratory water (DIW) samples and actual California ground water (CAGW) samples with the complexities of competing ions, dissolved organics, and other potential interfering agents. The detection limit for this method of monitoring perchlorate on resin was measured to be 0.014 meq g-1 for both DIW and CAGW systems. The anion selectivity of the A850 resin was determined via batch contact experiments using CAGW. Linear correlation between resin loading with perchlorate and the intensity of the Raman perchlorate signal was observed and quantitatively described. The obtained relationship was applied for the determination of the perchlorate retained on the A850 resin in the column elution experiments.

  10. Developmental timing of sodium perchlorate exposure alters angiogenesis, thyroid follicle proliferation and sexual maturation in stickleback.

    PubMed

    Furin, Christoff G; von Hippel, Frank A; Postlethwait, John H; Buck, C Loren; Cresko, William A; O'Hara, Todd M

    2015-08-01

    Perchlorate, a common aquatic contaminant, is well known to disrupt homeostasis of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis. This study utilizes the threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) fish to determine if perchlorate exposure during certain windows of development has morphological effects on thyroid and gonads. Fish were moved from untreated water to perchlorate-contaminated water (30 and 100mg/L) starting at 0, 3, 7, 14, 21, 42, 154 and 305 days post fertilization until approximately one year old. A reciprocal treatment (fish in contaminated water switched to untreated water) was conducted on the same schedule. Perchlorate exposure increased angiogenesis and follicle proliferation in thyroid tissue, delayed gonadal maturity, and skewed sex ratios toward males; effects depended on concentration and timing of exposure. This study demonstrates that perchlorate exposure beginning during the first 42 days of development has profound effects on stickleback reproductive and thyroid tissues, and by implication can impact population dynamics. Long-term exposure studies that assess contaminant effects at various stages of development provide novel information to characterize risk to aquatic organisms, to facilitate management of resources, and to determine sensitive developmental windows for further study of underlying mechanisms. PMID:25865142

  11. Perchlorate and nitrate remediation efficiency and microbial diversity in a containerized wetland bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Krauter, Paula; Daily, Bill; Dibley, Valerie; Pinkart, Holly; Legler, Tina

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a method to remove perchlorate (14-27 microg/L) and nitrate (48 mg/L) from contaminated groundwater using a wetland bioreactor. The bioreactor has operated continuously in a remote field location for more than 2 yr with a stable ecosystem of indigenous organisms. This study assesses the bioreactorfor long-term perchlorate and nitrate remediation by evaluating influent and effluent groundwater for oxidation-reduction conditions and nitrate and perchlorate concentrations. Total community DNA was extracted and purified from 10-g sediment samples retrieved from vertical coring of the bioreactor during winter. Analysis by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of short, 16S rDNA, polymerase-chainreaction products was used to identify dominant microorganisms. Bacteria genera identified were closely affiliated with bacteria widely distributed in soils, mud layers, and fresh water. Of the 17 dominant bands sequenced, most were gram negative and capable of aerobic or anaerobic respiration with nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor (Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Halomonas, and Nitrospira). Several identified genera (Rhizobium, Acinetobactor, and Xanthomonas) are capable of fixing atmospheric nitrogen into a combined form (ammonia) usable by host plants. Isolates were identified from the Proteobacteria class, known for the ability to reduce perchlorate. Initial bacterial assessments of sediments confirm the prevalence of facultative anaerobic bacteria capable of reducing perchlorate and nitrate in situ.

  12. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, H.; Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1990-01-09

    A composition of matter is described which is comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide. A method for making this composition of matter is also described. This invention relates to the art of powder metallurgy and, more particularly, it relates to dispersion strengthened metals.

  13. Capture and accumulation of perchlorate in lettuce. Effect of genotype, temperature, perchlorate concentration, and competition with anions.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Raúl; Palma, Paulina; Parker, David; Escudey, Mauricio

    2014-09-01

    Various studies have evaluated the accumulation of ClO4(-) in lettuce (Lactuca sativa), but very few have dealt with the variables that can interfere with its capture. The present study evaluates the transfer of ClO4(-) in two L. sativa varieties: butter head (L. sativa var. capitata) and cos lettuce (L. sativa var. crispa) under hydroponic conditions. The ClO4(-) concentrations used correspond to levels (1 and 2mgL(-1)), measured in irrigation water in the Iquique region in the north of Chile. Results indicate that the capture of ClO4(-) is dependent on its concentration, lettuce genotype, and temperature. The butter head variety accumulates the highest perchlorate concentrations. Anion competition involving NO3(-) (16 and 48mM), Cl(-) (23 and 56mM), and SO4(2-) (10 and 20mM) was evaluated, being NO3(-) (48mM), the most significant competition reducing the concentration of ClO4(-) in tissues of L. sativa varieties.

  14. Urinary perchlorate exposure and risk in women of reproductive age in a fireworks production area of China.

    PubMed

    Li, Qin; Yu, Yun-jiang; Wang, Fei-fei; Chen, Shi-wu; Yin, Yan; Lin, Hai-peng; Che, Fei; Sun, Peng; Qin, Juan; Liu, Jie; Wang, Hong-mei

    2014-07-01

    Perchlorate is used widely in fireworks, and, if ingested, it has the potential to disrupt thyroid function. The concentrations of perchlorate in water and soil samples and in urine samples of women of reproductive age from Liuyang, the largest fireworks production area in China, were investigated. The results showed that the average perchlorate concentrations in groundwater, surface water, farmland soil, and urine samples of women from the fireworks production area were significantly greater than those from the control area. The health risk of perchlorate ingested through drinking water was assessed based on the mode recommended by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. The values of hazard quotient of river water and groundwater in the fireworks production area were much greater than the safe level (=1), which indicates that adverse health effects may result from perchlorate when these sources of water are used as drinking water. These results indicated that the environment of the fireworks production area has been polluted by perchlorate and that residents were and are facing greater exposure doses of perchlorate. Fireworks production enterprises may be a major source of perchlorate contamination.

  15. SURVEY OF BOTTLED WATERS FOR PERCHLORATE BY ELECTROSPRAY IONIZATION MASS SPECTROMETRY (ESI-MS) AND ION CHROMATOGRAPHY (IC)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate has been identified in ground and surface waters around the US, including some that serve as supplies for drinking water. Because perchlorate salts are used as solid oxidants in rockets and ordnance, water contamination may occur near military or aerospace installatio...

  16. Urinary perchlorate exposure and risk in women of reproductive age in a fireworks production area of China.

    PubMed

    Li, Qin; Yu, Yun-jiang; Wang, Fei-fei; Chen, Shi-wu; Yin, Yan; Lin, Hai-peng; Che, Fei; Sun, Peng; Qin, Juan; Liu, Jie; Wang, Hong-mei

    2014-07-01

    Perchlorate is used widely in fireworks, and, if ingested, it has the potential to disrupt thyroid function. The concentrations of perchlorate in water and soil samples and in urine samples of women of reproductive age from Liuyang, the largest fireworks production area in China, were investigated. The results showed that the average perchlorate concentrations in groundwater, surface water, farmland soil, and urine samples of women from the fireworks production area were significantly greater than those from the control area. The health risk of perchlorate ingested through drinking water was assessed based on the mode recommended by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. The values of hazard quotient of river water and groundwater in the fireworks production area were much greater than the safe level (=1), which indicates that adverse health effects may result from perchlorate when these sources of water are used as drinking water. These results indicated that the environment of the fireworks production area has been polluted by perchlorate and that residents were and are facing greater exposure doses of perchlorate. Fireworks production enterprises may be a major source of perchlorate contamination. PMID:24859046

  17. Kinetics of nitrate and perchlorate reduction in ion exchange brine using the membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several sources of bacterial inocula were tested for their ability to reduce nitrate and perchlorate in synthetic ion-exchange spent brine (3-4.5% salinity) using a hydrogen-based membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR). Nitrate and perchlorate removal fluxes reached as high as 5.4 g N ...

  18. Martian Chlorine Chemistry: A Study of Perchlorate on the Martian Surface, Evidence of an Ongoing Formation Mechanism and Implications of a Complex Chlorine Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrier, Brandi L.

    2015-10-01

    The research presented herein addresses the detection of perchlorate on Mars, evidence of perchlorate in Mars meteorite EETA 79001, determination of the perchlorate parent salts at the Phoenix landing site, and the ongoing formation of perchlorate from chloride minerals as well as from other oxychlorine species. The detection of perchlorate in three samples by the Phoenix Wet Chemistry Laboratory and the implication of these results are discussed. The further detection of perchlorate in Mars meteorite EETA 79001 by ion chromatography and the determination of the parent salts of the perchlorate detected at the Phoenix landing site by electrochemical analyses and ion chromatography are detailed and the implications of the identity of the parent salts are discussed. The possible formation pathways for martian perchlorate are then explored and a possible mechanism for ongoing perchlorate formation on the martian surface is detailed. Perchlorate is shown to be formed upon exposure of chloride minerals, as well as of chlorite and chlorate salts, to current Mars relevant conditions including temperature, pressure, ultraviolet radiation and atmospheric composition. The implications of this ongoing perchlorate formation for the survival and detection of organics, the oxidizing nature of the soil, formation of liquid brines and recurring slope lineae are discussed. Further preliminary experiments have been conducted to investigate the effects of perchlorate formation on the survival and degradation of organic compounds.

  19. Perchlorate radiolysis on Mars and the origin of martian soil reactivity.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Richard C; Martucci, Hana F H; Miller, Stephanie R; Bryson, Charles E; Grunthaner, Frank J; Grunthaner, Paula J

    2013-06-01

    Results from the Viking biology experiments indicate the presence of reactive oxidants in martian soils that have previously been attributed to peroxide and superoxide. Instruments on the Mars Phoenix Lander and the Mars Science Laboratory detected perchlorate in martian soil, which is nonreactive under the conditions of the Viking biology experiments. We show that calcium perchlorate exposed to gamma rays decomposes in a CO2 atmosphere to form hypochlorite (ClO(-)), trapped oxygen (O2), and chlorine dioxide (ClO2). Our results show that the release of trapped O2 (g) from radiation-damaged perchlorate salts and the reaction of ClO(-) with amino acids that were added to the martian soils can explain the results of the Viking biology experiments. We conclude that neither hydrogen peroxide nor superoxide is required to explain the results of the Viking biology experiments.

  20. Methods for the stable isotopic analysis of chlorine in chlorate and perchlorate compounds.

    PubMed

    Ader, M; Coleman, M L; Doyle, S P; Stroud, M; Wakelin, D

    2001-10-15

    Chlorate and perchlorate compounds, used as herbicides, solid fuel propellants, and explosives, are increasingly recognized as pollutants in groundwater. Stable isotope characterization would permit both environmental monitoring of extent of remediation and forensic characterization. Stoichiometric reduction to chloride (greater than 98% yield), by Fe(II) for chlorate and alkaline fusion-decomposition for perchlorate, allows analysis by standard methods to give highly reproducible and accurate delta37Cl results (0.05/1000, 2 x standard error). Analysis of various compounds from different suppliers yielded delta37Cl values for chlorate samples near to +0.2/1000 (SMOC), but one has within-sample heterogeneity of 0.5/1000, possibly due to crystallization processes during manufacture. Results for perchlorate samples also are generally near +0.2/1000, but one is +2.3/1000 (SMOC). The initial results suggest that both forensic and environmental applications might be feasible.

  1. A simplified method for obtaining high-purity perchlorate from groundwater for isotope analyses.

    SciTech Connect

    vonKiparski, G; Hillegonds, D

    2011-04-04

    Investigations into the occurrence and origin of perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) found in groundwater from across North America have been sparse until recent years, and there is mounting evidence that natural formation mechanisms are important. New opportunities for identifying groundwater perchlorate and its origin have arisen with the utilization of improved detection methods and sampling techniques. Additionally, application of the forensic potential of isotopic measurements has begun to elucidate sources, potential formation mechanisms and natural attenuation processes. Procedures developed appear to be amenable to enable high precision stable isotopic analyses, as well as lower precision AMS analyses of {sup 36}Cl. Immediate work is in analyzing perchlorate isotope standards and developing full analytical accuracy and uncertainty expectations. Field samples have also been collected, and will be analyzed when final qa/qc samples are deemed acceptable.

  2. Methods for the stable isotopic analysis of chlorine in chlorate and perchlorate compounds.

    PubMed

    Ader, M; Coleman, M L; Doyle, S P; Stroud, M; Wakelin, D

    2001-10-15

    Chlorate and perchlorate compounds, used as herbicides, solid fuel propellants, and explosives, are increasingly recognized as pollutants in groundwater. Stable isotope characterization would permit both environmental monitoring of extent of remediation and forensic characterization. Stoichiometric reduction to chloride (greater than 98% yield), by Fe(II) for chlorate and alkaline fusion-decomposition for perchlorate, allows analysis by standard methods to give highly reproducible and accurate delta37Cl results (0.05/1000, 2 x standard error). Analysis of various compounds from different suppliers yielded delta37Cl values for chlorate samples near to +0.2/1000 (SMOC), but one has within-sample heterogeneity of 0.5/1000, possibly due to crystallization processes during manufacture. Results for perchlorate samples also are generally near +0.2/1000, but one is +2.3/1000 (SMOC). The initial results suggest that both forensic and environmental applications might be feasible. PMID:11681470

  3. Identification of an anaerobic bacterium which reduces perchlorate and chlorate as Wolinella succinogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, W.; Attaway, H. |

    1995-12-31

    Perchlorate and chlorate salts are widely used by the chemical, aerospace and defense industries as oxidizers in propellant, explosives and pyrotechnics. The authors have isolated a anaerobic bacterium which is capable of the dissimilatory reduction of both perchlorate and chlorate for energy and growth. Strain HAP-1 is a gram negative, thin rod, non-sporeforming, highly motile strict anaerobe. Antibiotic resistance profiles, utilization of carbon substrates and electron acceptors demonstrated similar physiological characteristics to Wolinella succinogenes. Pairwise comparisons of 16S RNA sequences showed only a 0.75% divergence between strain HAP-1 and W. succinogenes. Physiological, morphological and 16S RRNA sequence data indicate strain HAP-1 is a subspecies of W. succinogenes that can utilize perchlorate and chlorate as terminal electron acceptors.

  4. Perchlorate radiolysis on Mars and the origin of martian soil reactivity.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Richard C; Martucci, Hana F H; Miller, Stephanie R; Bryson, Charles E; Grunthaner, Frank J; Grunthaner, Paula J

    2013-06-01

    Results from the Viking biology experiments indicate the presence of reactive oxidants in martian soils that have previously been attributed to peroxide and superoxide. Instruments on the Mars Phoenix Lander and the Mars Science Laboratory detected perchlorate in martian soil, which is nonreactive under the conditions of the Viking biology experiments. We show that calcium perchlorate exposed to gamma rays decomposes in a CO2 atmosphere to form hypochlorite (ClO(-)), trapped oxygen (O2), and chlorine dioxide (ClO2). Our results show that the release of trapped O2 (g) from radiation-damaged perchlorate salts and the reaction of ClO(-) with amino acids that were added to the martian soils can explain the results of the Viking biology experiments. We conclude that neither hydrogen peroxide nor superoxide is required to explain the results of the Viking biology experiments. PMID:23746165

  5. Copper urine test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The copper urine test is performed by collecting urine at specific times for a 24-hour period. The urine is tested for the amount of copper present. The copper urine test is used to determine the presence of Wilson ...

  6. Perchlorate enhances transmission in skeletal muscle excitation- contraction coupling

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The effects of the anion perchlorate (present extracellularly at 8 mM) were studied on functional skeletal muscle fibers from Rana pipiens, voltage-clamped in a Vaseline gap chamber. Established methods were used to monitor intramembranous charge movement and flux of Ca release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) during pulse depolarization. Saponin permeabilization of the end portions of the fiber segment (Irving, M., J. Maylie, N. L. Sizto, and W. K. Chandler. 1987. Journal of General Physiology. 89:1-41) substantially reduced the amount of charge moving during conventional control pulses, thus minimizing a technical error that plagued our previous studies. Perchlorate prolonged the ON time course of charge movement, especially at low and intermediate voltages. The OFFs were also made slower, the time constant increasing twofold. The hump kinetic component was exaggerated by ClO4- or was made to appear in fibers that did not have it in reference conditions. ClO4- had essentially no kinetic ON effects at high voltages (> or = 10 mV). ClO4- changed the voltage distribution of mobile charge. In single Boltzmann fits, the midpoint potential V was shifted -20 mV and the steepness parameter K was reduced by 4.7 mV (or 1.78-fold), but the maximum charge was unchanged (n = 9). Total Ca content in the SR, estimated using the method of Schneider et al. (Schneider, M. F., B. J. Simon, and G. Szucs. 1987. Journal of Physiology. 392:167-192) for correcting for depletion, stayed constant over tens of minutes in reference conditions but decayed in ClO4- at an average rate of 0.3 mumol/liter myoplasmic water per s. ClO4- changed the kinetics of release flux, reducing the fractional inactivation of release after the peak. ClO4- shifted the voltage dependence of Ca release flux. In particular, the threshold voltage for Ca release was shifted by about -20 mV, and the activation of the steady component of release flux was shifted by > 20 mV in the negative direction. The shift of

  7. Dracorhodin perchlorate induces the apoptosis of glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Luo, Junjie; Meng, Linghu; Pan, Taifeng; Zhao, Binjie; Tang, Zhen-Gang; Dai, Yongjian

    2016-04-01

    Dracorhodin perchlorate (Dp), a synthetic analogue of the antimicrobial anthocyanin red pigment, has recently been shown to induce apoptotic cell death in various types of cancer cells. Yet, the inhibitory effect of Dp on human glioma cells remains uninvestigated. Therefore, in the present study, 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and flow cytometry were used to detect cell viability and cell cycle progression in glioma U87MG and T98G cells, respectively. Annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide double staining and JC-1 staining were separately applied to determine cellular apoptosis and mitochondrial membrane potential damage in the cells. The expression levels of associated proteins involved in cell cycle progression and apoptosis were measured by western blotting. The activities of caspase‑9/-3 were determined by Caspase-Glo-9/3 assay. The results indicated that Dp treatment significantly inhibited cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and blocked cell cycle progression at the G1/S phase in the U87MG and T98G cells via the upregulation of p53 and p21 protein expression, and simultaneous downregulation of Cdc25A, Cdc2 and P-Cdc2 protein expression. Additionally, Dp treatment led to the loss of cellular mitochondrial membrane potential, and the release of cytochrome c, and strongly induced the occurence of apoptosis. Increased expression levels of Bim and Bax protein and the downregulated expression of Bcl-2 protein were observed. Caspase-9/-3 were activated and their activities were elevated after Dp treatment. These findings indicate that Dp inhibits cell proliferation, induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in glioma cells, and is a possible candidate for glioma treatment. PMID:26846469

  8. Chlorine-36 as a tracer of perchlorate origin

    SciTech Connect

    Sturchio, N. C.; Caffee, M.; BelosoJr., Abelardo D.; Heraty, L. J.; Bohlke, J. K.; Hatzinger, Paul B.; Jackson, A.; Gu, Baohua

    2009-01-01

    Perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) is ubiquitous in the environment. It is produced naturally by atmospheric photochemical reactions, and also is synthesized in large quantities for military, aerospace, and industrial applications. Nitrate-enriched salt deposits of the Atacama Desert (Chile) contain high concentrations of natural ClO{sub 4}{sup -}, and have been exported worldwide since the mid-1800s for use in agriculture. The widespread introduction of synthetic and agricultural ClO{sub 4}{sup -} into the environment has contaminated numerous municipal water supplies. Stable isotope ratio measurements of Cl and O have been applied for discrimination of different ClO{sub 4}{sup -} sources in the environment. This study explores the potential of {sup 36}Cl measurements for further improving the discrimination of ClO{sub 4}{sup -} sources. Groundwater and desert soil samples from the southwestern United States (U.S.) contain ClO{sub 4}{sup -} having high {sup 36}Cl abundances ({sup 36}Cl/Cl = 3100 x 10{sup -15} to 28,800 x 10{sup -15}), compared with those from the Atacama Desert ({sup 36}Cl/Cl = 0.9 x 10{sup -15} to 590 x 10{sup -15}) and synthetic ClO{sub 4}{sup -} reagents and products ({sup 36}Cl/Cl = 0.0 x 10{sup -15} to 40 x 10{sup -15}). In conjunction with stable Cl and O isotope ratios, {sup 36}Cl data provide a clear distinction among three principal ClO{sub 4}{sup -} source types in the environment of the southwestern U.S.

  9. Perchlorate in Lake Water from an Operating Diamond Mine.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lianna J D; Ptacek, Carol J; Blowes, David W; Groza, Laura G; Moncur, Michael C

    2015-07-01

    Mining-related perchlorate [ClO4(-)] in the receiving environment was investigated at the operating open-pit and underground Diavik diamond mine, Northwest Territories, Canada. Samples were collected over four years and ClO4(-) was measured in various mine waters, the 560 km(2) ultraoligotrophic receiving lake, background lake water and snow distal from the mine. Groundwaters from the underground mine had variable ClO4(-) concentrations, up to 157 μg L(-1), and were typically an order of magnitude higher than concentrations in combined mine waters prior to treatment and discharge to the lake. Snow core samples had a mean ClO4(-) concentration of 0.021 μg L(-1) (n=16). Snow and lake water Cl(-)/ClO4(-) ratios suggest evapoconcentration was not an important process affecting lake ClO4(-) concentrations. The multiyear mean ClO4(-) concentrations in the lake were 0.30 μg L(-1) (n = 114) in open water and 0.24 μg L(-1) (n = 107) under ice, much below the Canadian drinking water guideline of 6 μg L(-1). Receiving lake concentrations of ClO4(-) generally decreased year over year and ClO4(-) was not likely [biogeo]chemically attenuated within the receiving lake. The discharge of treated mine water was shown to contribute mining-related ClO4(-) to the lake and the low concentrations after 12 years of mining were attributed to the large volume of the receiving lake.

  10. Effects of prolonged exposure to perchlorate on thyroid and reproductive function in zebrafish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mukhi, S.; Patino, R.

    2007-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of prolonged exposure to perchlorate on (1) thyroid status and reproductive performance of adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) and (2) F1 embryo survival and early larval development. Using a static-renewal procedure, mixed sex populations of adult zebrafish were exposed to 0, 10, and 100 mg/l nominal concentrations of waterborne perchlorate for 10 weeks. Thyroid histology was qualitatively assessed, and females and males were separated and further exposed to their respective treatments for six additional weeks. Eight females in each tank replicate (n = 3) were paired weekly with four males from the same respective treatment, and packed-egg (spawn) volume (PEV) was measured each of the last five weeks. At least once during weeks 14-16 of exposure, other end points measured included fertilization rate, fertilized egg diameter, hatching rate, standard length, and craniofacial development of 4-day-postfertilization larvae and thyroid hormone content of 3.5-h embryos and of exposed mothers. At 10 weeks of exposure, perchlorate at both concentrations caused thyroidal hypertrophy and colloid depletion. A marked reduction in PEV was observed toward the end of the 6-week spawning period, but fertilization and embryo hatching rates were unaffected. Fertilized egg diameter and larval length were increased by parental exposure to perchlorate. Larval head depth was unaffected but the forward protrusion of the lower jaw-associated cartilage complexes, Meckel's and ceratohyal, was decreased. Exposure to both concentrations of perchlorate inhibited whole-body thyroxine content in mothers and embryos, but triiodothyronine content was unchanged. In conclusion, prolonged exposure of adult zebrafish to perchlorate not only disrupts their thyroid endocrine system but also impairs reproduction and influences early F1 development. ?? 2007 Oxford University Press.

  11. Perchlorate Data for Streams and Groundwater in Selected Areas of the United States, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalkhoff, Stephen J.; Stetson, Sarah J.; Lund, Kris D.; Wanty, Richard B.; Linder, Gregory L.

    2010-01-01

    This report presents data collected as part of a reconnaissance study to evaluate the occurrence of perchlorate in rivers and streams and in shallow aquifers in selected areas of the United States. Perchlorate, a component in rocket fuels, fireworks, and some explosives is soluble in water and persists in soils and water for long periods. It is biologically active at relatively low-levels in the environment, and has been identified as an endocrine-disrupting chemical. The purpose of this reconnaissance was to determine the occurrence of perchlorate in agricultural areas of the Midwestern and North-Central United States and in arid Central and Western parts of the United States. Samples were collected from 171 sites on rivers and streams and 146 sites from wells during the summer and early fall of 2004. Samples were collected from surface-water sites in 19 states and from wells in 5 states. Perchlorate was detected in samples collected in 15 states and was detected in 34 of 182 samples from rivers and streams and in 64 of 148 groundwater samples at concentrations equal to or greater than 0.4 micrograms per liter. Perchlorate concentrations were 1.0 micrograms per liter or greater in surface-water samples from seven states and in groundwater samples in four states. Only one surface-water and one groundwater sample had concentrations greater than 5.0 micrograms per liter. Perchlorate concentrations in followup samples collected from 1 to 3 months after the initial sample were unchanged at four of five stream sites.

  12. Fractionation of stable isotopes in perchlorate and nitrate during in situ biodegradation in a sandy aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Hatzinger, Paul B.; Bohlke, J. K.; Sturchio, N. C.; Gu, Baohua

    2009-01-01

    An in situ experiment was performed in a shallow alluvial aquifer in Maryland to quantify the fractionation of stable isotopes in perchlorate (Cl and O) and nitrate (N and O) during biodegradation. An emulsified soybean oil substrate that was previously injected into this aquifer provided the electron donor necessary for biological perchlorate reduction and denitrification. During the field experiment, groundwater extracted from an upgradient well was pumped into an injection well located within the in situ oil barrier, and then groundwater samples were withdrawn for the next 30 h. After correction for dilution (using Br-as a conservative tracer of the injectate), perchlorate concentrations decreased by 78 % and nitrate concentrations decreased by 87 %, during the initial 8.6 h after the injection. The observed ratio of fractionation effects of O and Cl isotopes in perchlorate (ε18O/ε37Cl) was 2.6, which is similar to that observed in the laboratory using pure cultures (2.5). Denitrification by indigenous bacteria fractionated O and N isotopes in nitrate at a ratio of approximately 0.8 (ε18O/ε15N), which is within the range of values reported previously for denitrification. However, the magnitudes of the individual apparent in situ isotope fractionation effects for perchlorate and nitrate were appreciably smaller than those reported in homogeneous closed systems (0.2 to 0.6 times), even after adjustment for dilution. These results indicate that (1) isotope fractionation factor ratios (ε18O/ε37Cl, ε18O/ε15N) derived from homogeneous laboratory systems (e.g., pure culture studies) can be used qualitatively to confirm the occurrence of in situ biodegradation of both perchlorate and nitrate, but (2) the magnitudes of the individual apparent  values cannot be used quantitatively to estimate the in situ extent of biodegradation of either anion.

  13. Trace determination of perchlorate using electromembrane extraction and capillary electrophoresis with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Kiplagat, Isaac K; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Kubáň, Pavel; Boček, Petr

    2011-11-01

    Electromembrane extraction (EME) and CE with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (CE-C(4) D) was applied to rapid and sensitive determination of perchlorate in drinking water and environmental samples. Porous polypropylene hollow fiber impregnated with 1-heptanol acted as a supported liquid membrane (SLM) and perchlorate was transported and preconcentrated in the fiber lumen on application of electric field. High selectivity of perchlorate determination and its baseline separation from major inorganic anions was achieved in CE-C(4) D using background electrolyte solution consisting of 7.5 mM L-histidine and 40 mM acetic acid at pH 4.1. The analytical method showed excellent parameters in terms of reproducibility; RSD values for migration times and peak areas at a spiked concentration of 15 μg/L of perchlorate (US EPA recommended limit for drinking water) were below 0.2 and 8.7%, respectively, in all examined water samples. Linear calibration curves were obtained for perchlorate in the concentration range 1-100 μg/L (r(2) ≥0.999) with limits of detection at 1 μg/L for tap water and at 0.25-0.35 μg/L for environmental and bottled potable water samples. Recoveries at 15 μg/L of perchlorate were between 95.9 and 106.7% with minimum and maximum recovery values for snow and bottled potable water samples, respectively.

  14. Fractionation of stable isotopes in perchlorate and nitrate during in situ biodegradation in a sandy aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohlke, Johnkarl F.; Hatzinger, P.B.; Sturchio, N.C.; Gu, B.; Heraty, L.J.; Borden, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    An in situ experiment was performed in a shallow alluvial aquifer in Maryland to quantify the fractionation of stable isotopes in perchlorate (Cl and O) and nitrate (N and O) during biodegradation. An emulsified soybean oil substrate that was previously injected into this aquifer provided the electron donor necessary for biological perchlorate reduction and denitrification. During the field experiment, groundwater extracted from an upgradient well was pumped into an injection well located within the in situ oil barrier, and then groundwater samples were withdrawn for the next 30 h. After correction for dilution (using Br– as a conservative tracer of the injectate), perchlorate concentrations decreased by 78% and nitrate concentrations decreased by 82% during the initial 8.6 h after the injection. The observed ratio of fractionation effects of O and Cl isotopes in perchlorate (e18O/e37Cl) was 2.6, which is similar to that observed in the laboratory using pure cultures (2.5). Denitrification by indigenous bacteria fractionated O and N isotopes in nitrate at a ratio of ~0.8 (e18O/e15N), which is within the range of values reported previously for denitrification. However, the magnitudes of the individual apparent in situ isotope fractionation effects for perchlorate and nitrate were appreciably smaller than those reported in homogeneous closed systems (0.2 to 0.6 times), even after adjustment for dilution. These results indicate that (1) isotope fractionation factor ratios (e18O/e37Cl, e18O/e15N) derived from homogeneous laboratory systems (e.g. pure culture studies) can be used qualitatively to confirm the occurrence of in situ biodegradation of both perchlorate and nitrate, but (2) the magnitudes of the individual apparent e values cannot be used quantitatively to estimate the in situ extent of biodegradation of either anion.

  15. Occurrence of perchlorate in drinking water and seawater in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Her, Namguk; Jeong, Hyunchan; Kim, Jongsung; Yoon, Yeomin

    2011-08-01

    Concentrations of perchlorate were determined by both liquid-chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and ion chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (IC-MS/MS) in 520 tap-water, 48 bottled-water, and 9 seawater samples obtained or purchased from >100 different locations in South Korea. The method detection limits were 0.013 μg/L for LC-MS and 0.005 μg/L for IC-MS/MS, and the limits of quantification (LOQs) were 0.10 μg/L for LC-MS and 0.032 μg/L for IC-MS/MS. Perchlorate was detected in most (80%) of the tap-water samples, with concentrations higher than the LOQ; the concentrations ranged from <1.0 to 6.1 μg/L (mean 0.56). Perchlorate was detected by IC-MS/MS in many (n = 23) of the bottled-water samples, with concentrations higher then the LOQ, ranging from 0.04 to 0.29 μg/L (mean 0.07 ± 0.01). The concentrations of perchlorate in all seawater samples collected from the various locations were higher than the LOQ, with a mean concentration of 1.15 ± 0.01 μg/L (maximum 6.11 and minimum 0.11). This study provides further evidence that drinking-water sources have been contaminated by perchlorate. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive study on perchlorate assessment in drinking water and seawater in South Korea.

  16. Effects of larval-juvenile treatment with perchlorate and co-treatment with thyroxine on zebrafish sex ratios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mukhi, S.; Torres, L.; Patino, R.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of larval-juvenile exposure to perchlorate, a thyroid hormone synthesis inhibitor, on the establishment of gonadal sex ratios in zebrafish. Zebrafish were exposed to untreated water or water containing perchlorate at 100 or 250 ppm for a period of 30 days starting at 3 days postfertilization (dpf). Recovery treatments consisted of a combination of perchlorate and exogenous thyroxine (T4; 10 nM). Thyroid histology was assessed at the end of the treatment period (33 dpf), and gonadal histology and sex ratios were determined in fish that were allowed an additional 10-day period of growth in untreated water. As expected, exposure to perchlorate caused changes in thyroid histology consistent with hypothyroidism and these effects were reversed by co-treatment with exogenous T4. Perchlorate did not affect fish survival but co-treatment with T4 induced higher mortality. However, relative to the corresponding perchlorate concentration, co-treatment with T4 caused increased mortality only at a perchlorate concentration of 100 ppm. Perchlorate alone or in the presence of T4 suppressed body length at 43 dpf relative to control values. Perchlorate exposure skewed the sex ratio toward female in a concentration-dependent manner, and co-treatment with T4 not only blocked the feminizing effect of perchlorate but also overcompensated by skewing the sex ratio towards male. Moreover, co-treatment with T4 advanced the onset of spermatogenesis in males. There was no clear association between sex ratios and larval survival or growth. We conclude that endogenous thyroid hormone plays a role in the establishment of gonadal sex phenotype during early development in zebrafish. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Urinary Perchlorate and Thyroid Hormone Levels in Adolescent and Adult Men and Women Living in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Blount, Benjamin C.; Pirkle, James L.; Osterloh, John D.; Valentin-Blasini, Liza; Caldwell, Kathleen L.

    2006-01-01

    Background Perchlorate is commonly found in the environment and known to inhibit thyroid function at high doses. Assessing the potential effect of low-level exposure to perchlorate on thyroid function is an area of ongoing research. Objectives We evaluated the potential relationship between urinary levels of perchlorate and serum levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and total thyroxine (T4) in 2,299 men and women, ≥ 12 years of age, participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) during 2001–2002. Methods We used multiple regression models of T4 and TSH that included perchlorate and covariates known to be or likely to be associated with T4 or TSH levels: age, race/ethnicity, body mass index, estrogen use, menopausal status, pregnancy status, premenarche status, serum C-reactive protein, serum albumin, serum cotinine, hours of fasting, urinary thiocyanate, urinary nitrate, and selected medication groups. Results Perchlorate was not a significant predictor of T4 or TSH levels in men. For women overall, perchlorate was a significant predictor of both T4 and TSH. For women with urinary iodine < 100 μg/L, perchlorate was a significant negative predictor of T4 (p < 0.0001) and a positive predictor of TSH (p = 0.001). For women with urinary iodine ≥ 100 μg/L, perchlorate was a significant positive predictor of TSH (p = 0.025) but not T4 (p = 0.550). Conclusions These associations of perchlorate with T4 and TSH are coherent in direction and independent of other variables known to affect thyroid function, but are present at perchlorate exposure levels that were unanticipated based on previous studies. PMID:17185277

  18. Metastable Aqueous Perchlorate Solutions At The Phoenix Landing Site: Experimental Studies Of Phase Transitions Relevant To Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Raina; Chevrier, V.; Baustian, K. J.; Wise, M. E.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2010-10-01

    Perchlorate salts, recently discovered at the Phoenix landing site, are known to readily absorb water vapor from the atmosphere and deliquesce into an aqueous solution at room temperature. Here we examine the deliquescence (transition from crystalline solid to liquid) and also efflorescence (transition from liquid to crystalline solid) of perchlorate salts at low temperatures relevant to Mars. A Raman microscope equipped with an environmental cell was used to determine the deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) and efflorescence relative humidity (ERH) of Na+ and Mg2+ perchlorate salts as a function of both temperature (-50 to 0C) and hydration state. We find that the deliquescence of anhydrous sodium perchlorate is only slightly dependent on temperature and occurs at 38(±3)% RH. The DRH of sodium perchlorate monohydrate, however, increases with decreasing temperature from 51% at 0C to 64% at -45C. The DRH of magnesium perchlorate hexahydrate, the phase most relevant to Mars, also increases with decreasing temperature from 42% at 0C to 64% at -50C. The efflorescence of salt solutions is known to occur at a lower relative humidity than deliquescence due to the kinetic inhibition of the crystallization process. We find that this hysteresis effect does occur during low temperature perchlorate phase transitions, as the ERH values of sodium and magnesium perchlorate solutions are 13(±2)% RH and 19(±3)% RH, respectively. These results indicate that perchlorate salts could exist as metastable, supersaturated, aqueous perchlorate solutions over a wide range of Martian RH and temperature conditions. We estimate the salts could be aqueous solutions for up to 16 hours per day at the Phoenix landing site. This research was supported by a NASA MFRP and NSF-ATM grant.

  19. Microbial perchlorate reduction: A precise laboratory determination of the chlorine isotope fractionation and its possible biochemical basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ader, Magali; Chaudhuri, Swades; Coates, John D.; Coleman, Max

    2008-05-01

    Perchlorate-reducing bacteria fractionate chlorine stable isotopes giving a powerful approach to monitor the extent of microbial consumption of perchlorate in contaminated sites undergoing remediation or natural perchlorate containing sites. This study reports the full experimental data and methodology used to re-evaluate the chlorine isotope fractionation of perchlorate reduction in duplicate culture experiments of Azospira suillum strain PS at 37 °C (Δ 37Cl Cl --ClO 4-) previously reported, without a supporting data set by Coleman et al. [Coleman, M.L., Ader, M., Chaudhuri, S., Coates, J.D., 2003. Microbial Isotopic Fractionation of Perchlorate Chlorine. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 69, 4997-5000] in a reconnaissance study, with the goal of increasing the accuracy and precision of the isotopic fractionation determination. The method fully described here for the first time, allows the determination of a higher precision Δ 37Cl Cl --ClO 4- value, either from accumulated chloride content and isotopic composition or from the residual perchlorate content and isotopic composition. The result sets agree perfectly, within error, giving average Δ 37Cl Cl --ClO 4- = - 14.94 ± 0.15‰. Complementary use of chloride and perchlorate data allowed the identification and rejection of poor quality data by applying mass and isotopic balance checks. This precise Δ 37Cl Cl --ClO 4- value can serve as a reference point for comparison with future in situ or microcosm studies but we also note its similarity to the theoretical equilibrium isotopic fractionation between a hypothetical chlorine species of redox state + 6 and perchlorate at 37 °C and suggest that the first electron transfer during perchlorate reduction may occur at isotopic equilibrium between an enzyme-bound chlorine and perchlorate.

  20. Contact Electrification of Regolith Particles and Chloride Electrolysis: Synthesis of Perchlorates on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennakone, K.

    2016-10-01

    Contact electrification of chloride-impregnated martian regolith particles due to eolian agitation and moisture condensation on coalesced oppositely charged grains may lead to spontaneous electrolysis that generates hypochlorite, chlorite, chlorate, and perchlorate with a concomitant reduction of water to hydrogen. This process is not curtailed even if moisture condenses as ice because chloride ionizes on the surface of ice. Limitations dictated by potentials needed for electrolysis and breakdown electric fields enable estimation of the required regolith grain size. The estimated dimension turns out to be of the same order of magnitude as the expected median size of martian regolith, and a simple calculation yields the optimum rate of perchlorate production.

  1. A low cost igniter utilizing an SCB and titanium sub-hydride potassium perchlorate pyrotechnic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickes, R. W., Jr.; Grubelich, M. C.; Hartman, J. K.; McCampbell, C. B.; Churchill, J. K.

    1994-01-01

    A conventional NSI (NASA Standard Initiator) normally employs a hot-wire ignition element to ignite ZPP (zirconium potassium perchlorate). With minor modifications to the interior of a header similar to an NSI device to accommodate an SCB (semiconductor bridge), a low cost initiator was obtained. In addition, the ZPP was replaced with THKP (titanium sub-hydride potassium perchlorate) to obtain increased overall gas production and reduced static-charge sensitivity. This paper reports on the all-fire and no-fire levels obtained and on a dual mix device that uses THKP as the igniter mix and a thermite as the output mix.

  2. Growth and optical characterizations on 3-aminophenol perchlorate (3-AMPP) crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Boopathi, K. Ramasamy, P.

    2014-04-24

    A single crystal of organic nonlinear optical material 3-aminophenol perchlorate (3-AMP) was successfully grown by the slow evaporation solution method. Single-crystal X-ray diffractrometer was utilized to measure unit cell parameters and to confirm lattice parameter. 3-aminophenol perchlorate belongs to monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}. The optical transparency window in the UV-vis-NIR region is found to be good for nonlinear optical applications second harmonic studies were carried out. The second harmonic output intensity was tested using the Kurtz and Perry powder method and was found to be 1.1 times that of potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP)

  3. A low cost igniter utilizing an SCB and titanium sub-hydride potassium perchlorate pyrotechnic

    SciTech Connect

    Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Grubelich, M.C.; Hartman, J.K.; McCampbell, C.B.; Churchill, J.K.

    1993-12-31

    A conventional NSI (NASA standard initiator) normally employs a hot-wire ignition element to ignite ZPP (zirconium potassium perchlorate). With minor modifications to the interior of a header similar to an NSI device to accommodate an SCB (semiconductor bridge), a low cost initiator was obtained. In addition, the ZPP was replaced with THKP (titanium subhydride potassium perchlorate) to obtain increased overall gas production and reduced static-charge sensitivity. This paper reports on the all-fire and no-fire levels obtained and on a dual mix device that uses THKP as the igniter mix and a thermite as the output mix.

  4. Development of a Reference Dose for Perchlorate: Current Issues and Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pleus, R. C.; Goodman, G.; Mattie, D. R.

    2000-01-01

    The perchlorate anion (ClO4) is typically manufactured as the ammonium salt. The most common use of ammonium perchlorate is in the aerospace program as a component of solid rocket fuel. The perchlorate anion is exceedingly stable under environmental conditions and has been found in ground and surface waters in CA, NV, UT, AZ, TX, AK, NY, MD, WV and FL. The National Center for Environmental Assessment (NCEA) of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) is in the process of developing an oral reference dose (RfD) for perchlorate. An oral RfD is a body-weight-adjusted dose that can be consumed daily over an entire lifetime with the expectation of no adverse health effects. Once developed, the new RfD will be used by US EPA as the basis of a safe-drinking-water level (SDWL) guideline. US EPA and regional regulatory agencies will then jointly or separately propose clean-up action levels for ground and surface waters at contaminated sites. The toxicological database on CIO4- as of March 1997 was determined by an expert peer-review panel to be inadequate for the purpose of deriving an oral RfD. For example, little or no experimental data existed on the subchronic, reproductive, or developmental toxicity of perchlorate. To fill gaps in the toxicological database, eight animal studies were designed by a government-industry consortium that included US EPA and AFRL. These studies were performed in 1997-1998. It has been known for many years that in the thyroid, high doses of perchlorate block the function of iodide by competing for iodide binding sites. Perchlorate was used in the 1950s-60s as a treatment for Graves' disease (a hyperthyroid condition). Because of what was already known about the pharmacological mode of action of perchlorate, specific concerns addressed in the design of the recent animal studies included the potential for developmental toxicity, notably neurological development. Upon review of complete study reports from four of the studies and

  5. High Pressure Burn Rate Measurements on an Ammonium Perchlorate Propellant

    SciTech Connect

    Glascoe, E A; Tan, N

    2010-04-21

    High pressure deflagration rate measurements of a unique ammonium perchlorate (AP) based propellant are required to design the base burn motor for a Raytheon weapon system. The results of these deflagration rate measurements will be key in assessing safety and performance of the system. In particular, the system may experience transient pressures on the order of 100's of MPa (10's kPSI). Previous studies on similar AP based materials demonstrate that low pressure (e.g. P < 10 MPa or 1500 PSI) burn rates can be quite different than the elevated pressure deflagration rate measurements (see References and HPP results discussed herein), hence elevated pressure measurements are necessary in order understand the deflagration behavior under relevant conditions. Previous work on explosives have shown that at 100's of MPa some explosives will transition from a laminar burn mechanism to a convective burn mechanism in a process termed deconsolidative burning. The resulting burn rates that are orders-of-magnitude faster than the laminar burn rates. Materials that transition to the deconsolidative-convective burn mechanism at elevated pressures have been shown to be considerably more violent in confined heating experiments (i.e. cook-off scenarios). The mechanisms of propellant and explosive deflagration are extremely complex and include both chemical, and mechanical processes, hence predicting the behavior and rate of a novel material or formulation is difficult if not impossible. In this work, the AP/HTPB based material, TAL-1503 (B-2049), was burned in a constant volume apparatus in argon up to 300 MPa (ca. 44 kPSI). The burn rate and pressure were measured in-situ and used to calculate a pressure dependent burn rate. In general, the material appears to burn in a laminar fashion at these elevated pressures. The experiment was reproduced multiple times and the burn rate law using the best data is B = (0.6 {+-} 0.1) x P{sup (1.05{+-}0.02)} where B is the burn rate in mm/s and

  6. Probability of detecting perchlorate under natural conditions in deep groundwater in California and the Southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    We use data from 1626 groundwater samples collected in California, primarily from public drinking water supply wells, to investigate the distribution of perchlorate in deep groundwater under natural conditions. The wells were sampled for the California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment Priority Basin Project. We develop a logistic regression model for predicting probabilities of detecting perchlorate at concentrations greater than multiple threshold concentrations as a function of climate (represented by an aridity index) and potential anthropogenic contributions of perchlorate (quantified as an anthropogenic score, AS). AS is a composite categorical variable including terms for nitrate, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds. Incorporating water-quality parameters in AS permits identification of perturbation of natural occurrence patterns by flushing of natural perchlorate salts from unsaturated zones by irrigation recharge as well as addition of perchlorate from industrial and agricultural sources. The data and model results indicate low concentrations (0.1-0.5 μg/L) of perchlorate occur under natural conditions in groundwater across a wide range of climates, beyond the arid to semiarid climates in which they mostly have been previously reported. The probability of detecting perchlorate at concentrations greater than 0.1 μg/L under natural conditions ranges from 50-70% in semiarid to arid regions of California and the Southwestern United States to 5-15% in the wettest regions sampled (the Northern California coast). The probability of concentrations above 1 μg/L under natural conditions is low (generally <3%).

  7. The colloidal thyroxine (T4) ring as a novel biomarker of perchlorate exposure in the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hu, F.; Sharma, Bibek; Mukhi, S.; Patino, R.; Carr, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if changes in colloidal thyroxine (T4) immunoreactivity can be used as a biomarker of perchlorate exposure in amphibian thyroid tissue. Larval African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis) were exposed to 0, 1, 8, 93, and 1131 ??g perchlorate/l for 38 and 69 days to cover the normal period of larval development and metamorphosis. The results of this study confirmed the presence of an immunoreactive colloidal T4 ring in thyroid follicles of X. laevis and demonstrated that the intensity of this ring is reduced in a concentration-dependent manner by perchlorate exposure. The smallest effective concentration of perchlorate capable of significantly reducing colloidal T4 ring intensity was 8 ??g perchlorate/l. The intensity of the immunoreactive colloidal T4 ring is a more sensitive biomarker of perchlorate exposure than changes in hind limb length, forelimb emergence, tail resorption, thyrocyte hypertrophy, or colloid depletion. We conclude that the colloidal T4 ring can be used as a sensitive biomarker of perchlorate-induced thyroid disruption in amphibians. ?? Copyright 2006 Oxford University Press.

  8. Probability of detecting perchlorate under natural conditions in deep groundwater in California and the southwestern United States.

    PubMed

    Fram, Miranda S; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-02-15

    We use data from 1626 groundwater samples collected in California, primarily from public drinking water supply wells, to investigate the distribution of perchlorate in deep groundwater under natural conditions. The wells were sampled for the California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment Priority Basin Project. We develop a logistic regression model for predicting probabilities of detecting perchlorate at concentrations greater than multiple threshold concentrations as a function of climate (represented by an aridity index) and potential anthropogenic contributions of perchlorate (quantified as an anthropogenic score, AS). AS is a composite categorical variable including terms for nitrate, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds. Incorporating water-quality parameters in AS permits identification of perturbation of natural occurrence patterns by flushing of natural perchlorate salts from unsaturated zones by irrigation recharge as well as addition of perchlorate from industrial and agricultural sources. The data and model results indicate low concentrations (0.1-0.5 μg/L) of perchlorate occur under natural conditions in groundwater across a wide range of climates, beyond the arid to semiarid climates in which they mostly have been previously reported. The probability of detecting perchlorate at concentrations greater than 0.1 μg/L under natural conditions ranges from 50-70% in semiarid to arid regions of California and the Southwestern United States to 5-15% in the wettest regions sampled (the Northern California coast). The probability of concentrations above 1 μg/L under natural conditions is low (generally <3%).

  9. Kinetics of nitrate and perchlorate reduction in ion-exchange brine using the membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR).

    PubMed

    Van Ginkel, Steven W; Ahn, Chang Hoon; Badruzzaman, Mohammad; Roberts, Deborah J; Lehman, S Geno; Adham, Samer S; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2008-09-01

    Several sources of bacterial inocula were tested for their ability to reduce nitrate and perchlorate in synthetic ion-exchange spent brine (30-45 g/L) using a hydrogen-based membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR). Nitrate and perchlorate removal fluxes reached as high as 5.4 g Nm(-2)d(-1) and 5.0 g ClO(4)m(-2)d(-1), respectively, and these values are similar to values obtained with freshwater MBfRs. Nitrate and perchlorate removal fluxes decreased with increasing salinity. The nitrate fluxes were roughly first order in H(2) pressure, but roughly zero-order with nitrate concentration. Perchlorate reduction rates were higher with lower nitrate loadings, compared to high nitrate loadings; this is a sign of competition for H(2). Nitrate and perchlorate reduction rates depended strongly on the inoculum. An inoculum that was well acclimated (years) to nitrate and perchlorate gave markedly faster removal kinetics than cultures that were acclimated for only a few months. These results underscore that the most successful MBfR bioreduction of nitrate and perchlorate in ion-exchange brine demands a well-acclimated inoculum and sufficient hydrogen availability.

  10. Chemisorption of oxygen onto activated carbon can enhance the stability of biological perchlorate reduction in fixed bed biofilm reactors.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young Chul; Li, Xu; Raskin, Lutgarde; Morgenroth, Eberhard

    2008-07-01

    Fixed bed biofilm reactors with granular activated carbon (GAC) or glass beads as support media were used to evaluate the influence of short-term (12h) and long-term (23 days) increases of influent dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations on biological perchlorate removal. The goal was to evaluate the extent by which chemisorption of oxygen to GAC can enhance the stability of biological perchlorate reduction. Baseline influent concentrations were 50 microg/L of perchlorate, 2 mg/L of acetate as C, and 1mg/L of DO. Perchlorate removal in the glass bead reactor seized immediately after increasing influent DO concentrations from 1 to 4 mg/L since glass beads have no sorptive capacity. In the biologically active carbon (BAC) reactor, chemisorption of oxygen to GAC removed a substantial fraction of the influent DO, and perchlorate removal was maintained during short-term increases of influent DO levels up to 8 mg/L. During long-term exposure to influent DO concentrations of 8.5mg/L, effluent perchlorate and DO concentrations increased slowly. Subsequent exposure of the BAC reactor bed to low DO concentrations partially regenerated the capacity for oxygen chemisorption. Microbial analyses indicated similar microbial communities in both reactors, which confirmed that the differences in reactor performance during dynamic loading conditions could be attributed to the sorptive properties of GAC. Using a sorptive biofilm support medium can enhance biological perchlorate removal under dynamic loading conditions.

  11. RAMAN ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZER AND PLANT TISSUE EXTRACTS FOR PERCHLORATE CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently, we and others found perchlorate at high levels (approximately 500 - 8000 mg/kg) in ~ 90% of 25+ fertilizers products (primarily lawn-and-garden type) with no known link to mined nitrate-bearing Chilean ore. This ore is used, albeit in small scale, in fertilizer product...

  12. Creatinine adjustment of spot urine samples and 24 h excretion of iodine, selenium, perchlorate, and thiocyanate.

    PubMed

    Ohira, Shin-ichi; Kirk, Andrea B; Dyke, Jason V; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2008-12-15

    Creatinine (CR) adjustment is widely used for the estimation of urinary 24 h excretion from spot urine samples. We have compared CR-adjusted values for urinary iodine, selenium, perchlorate, and thiocyanate to measured 24 h excretion. The urine samples were collected from a cohort of 14 breastfeeding mothers with both spot samples and 24 h collection, 52 24 h and spot sample pairs where the 24 h CR value fell within the "normal" adult female CR excretion range of 0.6-1.6 g/day were considered for this analysis. In addition, a nonlactating female and a male subject provided all micturitions for 1 and 5 days, respectively. Creatinine was analyzed with a Jáffe reaction-based automated analyzer. Iodine and selenium were determined with induction coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Perchlorate and thiocyanate were measured with ion chromatography (IC)-isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Creatinine-adjusted values were poor substitutes of the actual 24 h excretion values (average deviation +/-69, 78, 105, and 104% for iodine, selenium, perchlorate, and thiocyanate, respectively.). Over a 5 day period, the 24 h iodine excretion predicted based on creatinine adjustment of spot samples for the same individual deviated between -83.5 to +101% from the actual measured value, the minimum absolute error being 2.5%. Creatinine adjustment for estimation of 24 h excretion from spot samples was not effective for iodine, selenium, perchlorate, or thiocyanate.

  13. METAMORPHIC INHIBITION OF XENOPUS LAEVIS BY SODIUM PERCHLORATE: EFFECTS ON DEVELOPMENT AND THYROID HISTOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perchlorate anion inhibits thyroid hormone (TH) synthesis via inhibition of the sodium-iodide symporter. It is, therefore, a good model chemical to aid in the development of a bioassay to screen chemicals for effects on thyroid function. Xenopus laevis larvae were exposed to ...

  14. PERCHLORATE LEVELS IN SAMPLES OF SODIUM NITRATE FERTILIZER DERIVED FROM CHILEAN CALICHE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Paleogeochemical deposits in northern Chile are a rich source of naturally occurring sodium nitrate. These caliche ores are mined and processed to isolate NaNO3 (16-0-0) for use in fertilizers. Coincidentally, these very same deposits are a natural soure of perchlorate anion (C...

  15. Groundwater movement, recharge, and perchlorate occurrence in a faulted alluvial aquifer in California (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izbicki, John A.; Teague, Nicholas F.; Hatzinger, Paul B.; Bohlke, John Karl; Sturchio, Neil C.

    2015-01-01

    Perchlorate from military, industrial, and legacy agricultural sources is present within an alluvial aquifer in the Rialto-Colton groundwater subbasin, 80 km east of Los Angeles, California (USA). The area is extensively faulted, with water-level differences exceeding 60 m across parts of the Rialto-Colton Fault separating the Rialto-Colton and Chino groundwater subbasins. Coupled well-bore flow and depth-dependent water-quality data show decreases in well yield and changes in water chemistry and isotopic composition, reflecting changing aquifer properties and groundwater recharge sources with depth. Perchlorate movement through some wells under unpumped conditions from shallower to deeper layers underlying mapped plumes was as high as 13 kg/year. Water-level maps suggest potential groundwater movement across the Rialto-Colton Fault through an overlying perched aquifer. Upward flow through a well in the Chino subbasin near the Rialto-Colton Fault suggests potential groundwater movement across the fault through permeable layers within partly consolidated deposits at depth. Although potentially important locally, movement of groundwater from the Rialto-Colton subbasin has not resulted in widespread occurrence of perchlorate within the Chino subbasin. Nitrate and perchlorate concentrations at the water table, associated with legacy agricultural fertilizer use, may be underestimated by data from long-screened wells that mix water from different depths within the aquifer.

  16. ISSUES IN MANAGING THE RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH PERCHLORATE IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) contamination of ground and surface waters has placed drinking water supplies at risk in communities throughout the US, especially in the West. Several major assessment studies of that risk in terms of health and environmental impact are ...

  17. METHOD FOR THE DETERMINATION OF PERCHLORATE ANION IN PLANT AND SOLID MATRICES BY ION CHROMATOGRAPHY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A standardized method for the analysis of perchlorate in plants was developed, based on dry weight, and applied to the analysis of plant organs, foodstuffs, and plant products. The procedure greatly reduced the ionic interferences in water extracts of plant materials. Ion chro...

  18. A Survey on the Temporal and Spatial Distribution of Perchlorate in the Potomac River

    EPA Science Inventory

    Samples of river water and treated drinking water were obtained from eight sites along the Potomac River between western Maryland and Washington DC. Samples were collected each month from October 2007 to September 2008 and analyzed for perchlorate by ion chromatography/mass spec...

  19. Kinetics and mechanism of the thermooxidate destruction of polybutadiene rubber in perchloric acid vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Didikin, B.P.; Korobeinchev, O.P.; Orlov, V.N.

    1983-11-01

    This article examines the interaction of perchloric acid with films of polymer. The thermooxidative destruction of polybutadiene rubber was investigated with an apparatus which included a reactor with systems for dispensing the perchloric acid and inert diluent (argon) and for moving the rubber specimen in vacuum, a quartz microprobe joined to the ion source of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and a system for recording the mass spectra, temperature, and pressure. Topics considered include the time dependence of the rates of formation of HC1, CO, O/sub 2/, CO/sub 2/, and H/sub 2/O; the effects of perchloric acid partial pressure on the reaction rate; the effects of rubber film thickness on the reaction rate; the effects of temperature on the reaction rate; the effects of the Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalyst on the reaction rate; and the application of the kinetic data to analyzing the pyrolysis of mixed systems. The rubber reaction rate was determined from the degree of conversion of the perchloric acid, which is related to that of the rubber.

  20. Reactive Transport Model of Sulfur Cycling as Impacted by Perchlorate and Nitrate Treatments.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yiwei; Hubbard, Christopher G; Li, Li; Bouskill, Nicholas; Molins, Sergi; Zheng, Liange; Sonnenthal, Eric; Conrad, Mark E; Engelbrektson, Anna; Coates, John D; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B

    2016-07-01

    Microbial souring in oil reservoirs produces toxic, corrosive hydrogen sulfide through microbial sulfate reduction, often accompanying (sea)water flooding during secondary oil recovery. With data from column experiments as constraints, we developed the first reactive-transport model of a new candidate inhibitor, perchlorate, and compared it with the commonly used inhibitor, nitrate. Our model provided a good fit to the data, which suggest that perchlorate is more effective than nitrate on a per mole of inhibitor basis. Critically, we used our model to gain insight into the underlying competing mechanisms controlling the action of each inhibitor. This analysis suggested that competition by heterotrophic perchlorate reducers and direct inhibition by nitrite produced from heterotrophic nitrate reduction were the most important mechanisms for the perchlorate and nitrate treatments, respectively, in the modeled column experiments. This work demonstrates modeling to be a powerful tool for increasing and testing our understanding of reservoir-souring generation, prevention, and remediation processes, allowing us to incorporate insights derived from laboratory experiments into a framework that can potentially be used to assess risk and design optimal treatment schemes. PMID:27267666

  1. Developmental exposure to perchlorate alters synaptic transmission in hippocampus of the adult rat.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Food Quality Protection Act and Safe Drinking Water Act mandate the EPA to identify potential health risks associated with chemicals that act on the endocrine system. Perchlorate, a contaminant found in food and water supplies throughout the USA, blocks iodine uptake into the...

  2. The Impact of Temperature on Anaerobic Biological Perchlorate Removal and Aerobic Polishing of the Effluent - paper

    EPA Science Inventory

    This abstract describes a pilot-scale evaluation of anaerobic biological perchlorate (C1O4) removal followed by aerobic effluent polishing. The anaerobic biological contactor operated for 3.5 years. During that period, two effluent polishing evaluations, lasting 311 an...

  3. The Impact of Temperature on Anaerobic Biological Perchlorate Removal and Aerobic Polishing of the Effluent

    EPA Science Inventory

    This abstract describes a pilot-scale evaluation of anaerobic biological perchlorate (C1O4) removal followed by aerobic effluent polishing. The anaerobic biological contactor operated for 3.5 years. During that period, two effluent polishing evaluations, lasting 311 an...

  4. A SIMPLE MODEL FOR THE UPTAKE, TRANSLOCATION, AND ACCUMULATION OF PERCHLORATE IN TOBACCO PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple mathematical model is being developed to describe the uptake, translocation, and accumulation of perchlorate in tobacco plants. The model defines a plant as a set of compartments, consisting of mass balance differential equations and plant-specific physiological paramet...

  5. (Per)chlorate reduction by an acetogenic bacterium, Sporomusa sp., isolated from an underground gas storage

    PubMed Central

    Mehboob, Farrakh; van Gelder, Antonie H.; Rijpstra, W. Irene C.; Damsté, Jaap S. Sinninghe; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    2010-01-01

    A mesophilic bacterium, strain An4, was isolated from an underground gas storage reservoir with methanol as substrate and perchlorate as electron acceptor. Cells were Gram-negative, spore-forming, straight to curved rods, 0.5–0.8 μm in diameter, and 2–8 μm in length, growing as single cells or in pairs. The cells grew optimally at 37°C, and the pH optimum was around 7. Strain An4 converted various alcohols, organic acids, fructose, acetoin, and H2/CO2 to acetate, usually as the only product. Succinate was decarboxylated to propionate. The isolate was able to respire with (per)chlorate, nitrate, and CO2. The G+C content of the DNA was 42.6 mol%. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain An4 was most closely related to Sporomusa ovata (98% similarity). The bacterium reduced perchlorate and chlorate completely to chloride. Key enzymes, perchlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase, were detected in cell-free extracts. PMID:20680263

  6. Periodate salts as pyrotechnic oxidizers: development of barium- and perchlorate-free incendiary formulations.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Jared D; Sabatini, Jesse J; Chen, Gary

    2012-07-01

    In a flash: pyrotechnic incendiary formulations with good stabilities toward various ignition stimuli have been developed without the need for barium or perchlorate oxidizers. KIO(4) and NaIO(4) were introduced as pyrotechnic oxidizers and exhibited excellent pyrotechnic performance. The periodate salts may garner widespread use in military and civilian fireworks because of their low hygroscopicities and high chemical reactivities.

  7. QUANTITATION OF PERCHLORATE ION: PRACTICES AND ADVANCES APPLIED TO THE ANALYSIS OF COMMON MATRICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1997, low level perchlorate contamination (<50 ng mL-1 or parts per billion) was discovered in the western United States. Since that time, it has been found in sites scattered around the nation. Although the Environmental Protection Agency has not established a regulation fo...

  8. COMPARISON AND EVALUATION OF LABORATORY PERFORMANCE ON A METHOD FOR THE DETERMINATION OF PERCHLORATE IN FERTILIZERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report details the interlaboratory validation of a method for the determination of perchlorate in fertilizers. In this method (EPA/600/R-01/026), a solid sample of fertilizer is first ground. subsequently, the ground material is either leached with deionized water to dissolv...

  9. Periodate salts as pyrotechnic oxidizers: development of barium- and perchlorate-free incendiary formulations.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Jared D; Sabatini, Jesse J; Chen, Gary

    2012-07-01

    In a flash: pyrotechnic incendiary formulations with good stabilities toward various ignition stimuli have been developed without the need for barium or perchlorate oxidizers. KIO(4) and NaIO(4) were introduced as pyrotechnic oxidizers and exhibited excellent pyrotechnic performance. The periodate salts may garner widespread use in military and civilian fireworks because of their low hygroscopicities and high chemical reactivities. PMID:22639415

  10. A STUDY ON THE ACCUMULATION OF PERCHLORATE IN YOUNG HEAD LETTUCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The overall objective of this study was to demonstrate in a greenhouse study the potential for incorporation of perchlorate from aqueous solutions of 10, 50, 100, 500, 1,000, 5,000, and 10,000 ppb into an agricultural food crop (lettuce; Lactuca sativa), which is typically grown ...

  11. Preparation and Analysis of Solid Solutions in the Potassium Perchlorate-Permanganate System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Garrett K.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an experiment, designed for and tested in an advanced inorganic laboratory methods course for college seniors and graduate students, that prepares and analyzes several samples in the nearly ideal potassium perchlorate-permanganate solid solution series. The results are accounted for by a theoretical treatment based upon aqueous…

  12. Double-Polymer-Modified Pencil Lead for Stripping Voltammetry of Perchlorate in Drinking Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izadyar, Anahita; Kim, Yushin; Ward, Michelle M.; Amemiya, Shigeru

    2012-01-01

    The inexpensive and disposable electrode based on a double-polymer-modified pencil lead is proposed for upper-division undergraduate instrumental laboratories to enable the highly sensitive detection of perchlorate. Students fabricate and utilize their own electrodes in the 3-4 h laboratory session to learn important concepts and methods of…

  13. NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES (NAS) REVIEW OF THE HEALTH IMPLICATIONS OF PERCHLORATE INGESTION (2005)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the interest of resolving scientific questions, the EPA, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration - members of a broader Interagency Working Group on Perchlorate led by the Office of Science and Technology Polic...

  14. DETERMINATION OF PERCHLORATE AT PARTS-PER-BILLION LEVELS IN PLANTS BY ION CHROMATOGRAPHY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method for the analysis of perchlorate in plants was developed, based on dry weight, and applied to the analysis of plant organs, foodstuffs, and plant products. The method reduced greatly the ionic interferences in water extracts of plant materials. The high background conduct...

  15. DISTRIBUTION OF PERCHLORATE IN SAMPLES OF SODIUM NITRATE (CHILE SALTPETER) FERTILIZER DERIVED FROM NATURAL CALICHE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two lots of sodium nitrate fertilizer derived from Chilean caliche were analyzed to determine the distribution of perchlorate throughout the material. Although our samples represent a limited amount, we found that distribution was essentially homogeneous in any 100-g portion. Whe...

  16. Groundwater movement, recharge, and perchlorate occurrence in a faulted alluvial aquifer in California (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izbicki, John A.; Teague, Nicholas F.; Hatzinger, Paul B.; Böhlke, J. K.; Sturchio, Neil C.

    2015-05-01

    Perchlorate from military, industrial, and legacy agricultural sources is present within an alluvial aquifer in the Rialto-Colton groundwater subbasin, 80 km east of Los Angeles, California (USA). The area is extensively faulted, with water-level differences exceeding 60 m across parts of the Rialto-Colton Fault separating the Rialto-Colton and Chino groundwater subbasins. Coupled well-bore flow and depth-dependent water-quality data show decreases in well yield and changes in water chemistry and isotopic composition, reflecting changing aquifer properties and groundwater recharge sources with depth. Perchlorate movement through some wells under unpumped conditions from shallower to deeper layers underlying mapped plumes was as high as 13 kg/year. Water-level maps suggest potential groundwater movement across the Rialto-Colton Fault through an overlying perched aquifer. Upward flow through a well in the Chino subbasin near the Rialto-Colton Fault suggests potential groundwater movement across the fault through permeable layers within partly consolidated deposits at depth. Although potentially important locally, movement of groundwater from the Rialto-Colton subbasin has not resulted in widespread occurrence of perchlorate within the Chino subbasin. Nitrate and perchlorate concentrations at the water table, associated with legacy agricultural fertilizer use, may be underestimated by data from long-screened wells that mix water from different depths within the aquifer.

  17. LOW-LEVEL DETERMINATION OF PERCHLORATE IN DRINKING WATER USING ION CHROMATOGRAPHY MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate is a drinking water contaminant originating from the dissolution of the salts of ammonium, potassium, magnesium, or sodium in water. It is used primarily as an oxidant in solid propellant for rockets, missiles, pyrotechnics, as a component in air bag inflators, and i...

  18. DETERMINATION OF PERCHLORATE AT PARTS-PER-BILLION LEVELS IN PLANTS BY ION CHROMATOGRAPHY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A standardized method for the analysis of perchlorate in plants was developed, based on dry weight, and applied to the analysis of plant organs, foodstuffs, and plant products. The procedure greatly reduced the ionic interferences in water extracts of plant materials. The high ba...

  19. DETERMINATION OF PERCHLORATE IN SOME FERTILIZERS AND PLANT TISSUE BY RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have successfully used Raman spectroscopy for the direct qualitative and quantitative analysis of perchlorate in fertilizer extracts without the need for chromatographic separation. This approach is attractive because Raman is not hindered by the presence of water or of high ...

  20. [Copper and copper alloys. Technology updates].

    PubMed

    Loconsolo, V; Crespi, M

    2012-01-01

    The correlations between copper and copper alloys and human health have been the subject of some recent and extensive scientific researches. The voluntary risks evaluation, which anticipated the EU REACH Directive application, has shown that copper is a "safe" product for human health and for environment. In addition, it could be of great help thanks to its antibacterial properties. Copper tube can contribute in a relevant way to the prevention of water systems pollution by Legionella. Also the spreading of nosocomial infections is significantly contrasted by the use of copper and copper alloys for the production of articles intended for being frequently touched by people. The Environmental Protection Agency of the United States has in fact "registered" as antibacterial over 350 of copper alloys. PMID:23213799

  1. Mechanisms of direct inhibition of the respiratory sulfate-reduction pathway by (per)chlorate and nitrate

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Hans K; Kuehl, Jennifer V; Hazra, Amrita B; Justice, Nicholas B; Stoeva, Magdalena K; Sczesnak, Andrew; Mullan, Mark R; Iavarone, Anthony T; Engelbrektson, Anna; Price, Morgan N; Deutschbauer, Adam M; Arkin, Adam P; Coates, John D

    2015-01-01

    We investigated perchlorate (ClO4−) and chlorate (ClO3−) (collectively (per)chlorate) in comparison with nitrate as potential inhibitors of sulfide (H2S) production by mesophilic sulfate-reducing microorganisms (SRMs). We demonstrate the specificity and potency of (per)chlorate as direct SRM inhibitors in both pure cultures and undefined sulfidogenic communities. We demonstrate that (per)chlorate and nitrate are antagonistic inhibitors and resistance is cross-inducible implying that these compounds share at least one common mechanism of resistance. Using tagged-transposon pools we identified genes responsible for sensitivity and resistance in Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20. We found that mutants in Dde_2702 (Rex), a repressor of the central sulfate-reduction pathway were resistant to both (per)chlorate and nitrate. In general, Rex derepresses its regulon in response to increasing intracellular NADH:NAD+ ratios. In cells in which respiratory sulfate reduction is inhibited, NADH:NAD+ ratios should increase leading to derepression of the sulfate-reduction pathway. In support of this, in (per)chlorate or nitrate-stressed wild-type G20 we observed higher NADH:NAD+ ratios, increased transcripts and increased peptide counts for genes in the core Rex regulon. We conclude that one mode of (per)chlorate and nitrate toxicity is as direct inhibitors of the central sulfate-reduction pathway. Our results demonstrate that (per)chlorate are more potent inhibitors than nitrate in both pure cultures and communities, implying that they represent an attractive alternative for controlling sulfidogenesis in industrial ecosystems. Of these, perchlorate offers better application logistics because of its inhibitory potency, solubility, relative chemical stability, low affinity for mineral cations and high mobility in environmental systems. PMID:25405978

  2. Occurrence of perchlorate in indoor dust from the United States and eleven other countries: implications for human exposure.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yanjian; Wu, Qian; Abualnaja, Khalid O; Asimakopoulos, Alexandros G; Covaci, Adrian; Gevao, Bondi; Johnson-Restrepo, Boris; Kumosani, Taha A; Malarvannan, Govindan; Moon, Hyo-Bang; Nakata, Haruhiko; Sinha, Ravindra K; Minh, Tu Binh; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2015-02-01

    Perchlorate is a widespread environmental contaminant and potent thyroid hormone disrupting compound. Despite this, very little is known with regard to the occurrence of this compound in indoor dust and the exposure of humans to perchlorate through dust ingestion. In this study, 366 indoor dust samples were collected from 12 countries, the USA, Colombia, Greece, Romania, Japan, Korea, Pakistan, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, India, Vietnam, and China, during 2010-2014. Dust samples were extracted by 1% (v/v) methylamine in water. Analyte separation was achieved by an ion exchange (AS-21) column and analysis was performed by high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). The overall concentrations of perchlorate in dust were in the range of 0.02-104μg/g (geometric mean: 0.41μg/g). The indoor dust samples from China contained the highest concentrations (geometric mean: 5.38μg/g). No remarkable differences in perchlorate concentrations in dust were found among various microenvironments (i.e., car, home, office, and laboratory). The estimated median daily intake (EDI) of perchlorate for toddlers through dust ingestion in the USA, Colombia, Greece, Romania, Japan, Korea, Pakistan, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, India, Vietnam, and China was 1.89, 0.37, 1.71, 0.74, 4.90, 7.20, 0.60, 0.80, 1.55, 0.70, 2.15, and 21.3ng/kgbodyweight (bw)/day, respectively. Although high concentrations of perchlorate were measured in some dust samples, the contribution of dust to total perchlorate intake was <5% of the total perchlorate intake in humans. This is the first multinational survey on the occurrence of perchlorate in indoor dust.

  3. Thyroid endocrine disruption in stonerollers and cricket frogs from perchlorate-contaminated streams in east-central Texas.

    PubMed

    Theodorakis, Christopher W; Rinchard, Jacques; Carr, James A; Park, June-Woo; McDaniel, Leslie; Liu, Fujun; Wages, Michael

    2006-02-01

    In October 2001 and March 2002, a field survey of central stonerollers (Campostoma anomalum) from perchlorate-contaminated streams in central Texas was conducted to assess thyroid endocrine disruption. A survey of adult male and female cricket frogs (Acris crepitans) was performed at the same site between 2001 and 2003. Perchlorate is an oxidizer primarily used in solid-fuel rockets, and many sites that processed or used perchlorate are now contaminated. Histological analysis revealed that the fish from contaminated sites had increased thyroid follicular hyperplasia, hypertrophy, and colloid depletion. Multivariate analysis was generally found to be more powerful than univariate analysis. Seasonal differences existed in the degree of thyroidal perturbation were discovered, and fish were generally less sensitive to thyroidal perturbations in March compared to October. Thyroidal histological indicators were also correlated to levels of perchlorate in the fish, water, and periphyton. Periphyton was frequently most strongly correlated to thyroidal indices, suggesting that exposure through the food chain may be of import. In addition, one of the presumed reference sites turned out to be contaminated with perchlorate, and this was reflected by thyroidal biomarkers before perchlorate was detected in the stream water or biota. There was no evidence of colloid depletion or hyperplasia in frogs from any of the sites, although frogs from two sites with greatest mean water perchlorate concentrations exhibited significantly greater follicle cell hypertrophy. Furthermore, there was a significant positive correlation between follicle cell height and mean water perchlorate concentrations for frogs collected from all sites. This is the first known published account of perchlorate-induced thyroid disruption in fish under field situations, only the second known published account for amphibians, and also points out the value of biomarkers for contaminant biomonitoring.

  4. Occurrence of perchlorate in indoor dust from the United States and eleven other countries: implications for human exposure.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yanjian; Wu, Qian; Abualnaja, Khalid O; Asimakopoulos, Alexandros G; Covaci, Adrian; Gevao, Bondi; Johnson-Restrepo, Boris; Kumosani, Taha A; Malarvannan, Govindan; Moon, Hyo-Bang; Nakata, Haruhiko; Sinha, Ravindra K; Minh, Tu Binh; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2015-02-01

    Perchlorate is a widespread environmental contaminant and potent thyroid hormone disrupting compound. Despite this, very little is known with regard to the occurrence of this compound in indoor dust and the exposure of humans to perchlorate through dust ingestion. In this study, 366 indoor dust samples were collected from 12 countries, the USA, Colombia, Greece, Romania, Japan, Korea, Pakistan, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, India, Vietnam, and China, during 2010-2014. Dust samples were extracted by 1% (v/v) methylamine in water. Analyte separation was achieved by an ion exchange (AS-21) column and analysis was performed by high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). The overall concentrations of perchlorate in dust were in the range of 0.02-104μg/g (geometric mean: 0.41μg/g). The indoor dust samples from China contained the highest concentrations (geometric mean: 5.38μg/g). No remarkable differences in perchlorate concentrations in dust were found among various microenvironments (i.e., car, home, office, and laboratory). The estimated median daily intake (EDI) of perchlorate for toddlers through dust ingestion in the USA, Colombia, Greece, Romania, Japan, Korea, Pakistan, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, India, Vietnam, and China was 1.89, 0.37, 1.71, 0.74, 4.90, 7.20, 0.60, 0.80, 1.55, 0.70, 2.15, and 21.3ng/kgbodyweight (bw)/day, respectively. Although high concentrations of perchlorate were measured in some dust samples, the contribution of dust to total perchlorate intake was <5% of the total perchlorate intake in humans. This is the first multinational survey on the occurrence of perchlorate in indoor dust. PMID:25461426

  5. Physiological and Genetic Description of Dissimilatory Perchlorate Reduction by the Novel Marine Bacterium Arcobacter sp. Strain CAB

    PubMed Central

    Carlström, Charlotte I.; Wang, Ouwei; Melnyk, Ryan A.; Bauer, Stefan; Lee, Joyce; Engelbrektson, Anna; Coates, John D.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT A novel dissimilatory perchlorate-reducing bacterium (DPRB), Arcobacter sp. strain CAB, was isolated from a marina in Berkeley, CA. Phylogenetically, this halophile was most closely related to Arcobacter defluvii strain SW30-2 and Arcobacter ellisii. With acetate as the electron donor, strain CAB completely reduced perchlorate (ClO4−) or chlorate (ClO3−) [collectively designated (per)chlorate] to innocuous chloride (Cl−), likely using the perchlorate reductase (Pcr) and chlorite dismutase (Cld) enzymes. When grown with perchlorate, optimum growth was observed at 25 to 30°C, pH 7, and 3% NaCl. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) preparations were dominated by free-swimming straight rods with 1 to 2 polar flagella per cell. Strain CAB utilized a variety of organic acids, fructose, and hydrogen as electron donors coupled to (per)chlorate reduction. Further, under anoxic growth conditions strain CAB utilized the biogenic oxygen produced as a result of chlorite dismutation to oxidize catechol via the meta-cleavage pathway of aerobic catechol degradation and the catechol 2,3-dioxygenase enzyme. In addition to (per)chlorate, oxygen and nitrate were alternatively used as electron acceptors. The 3.48-Mb draft genome encoded a distinct perchlorate reduction island (PRI) containing several transposases. The genome lacks the pcrC gene, which was previously thought to be essential for (per)chlorate reduction, and appears to use an unrelated Arcobacter c-type cytochrome to perform the same function. PMID:23695836

  6. Fractionation of stable isotopes in perchlorate and nitrate during in situ biodegradation in a sandy aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatzinger, P.B.; Böhlke, J.K.; Sturchio, N.C.; Gu, B.; Heraty, L.J.; Borden, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    Environmental context. Perchlorate (ClO4-) and nitrate (NO3-) are common co-contaminants in groundwater, with both natural and anthropogenic sources. Each of these compounds is biodegradable, so in situ enhanced bioremediation is one alternative for treating them in groundwater. Because bacteria typically fractionate isotopes during biodegradation, stable isotope analysis is increasingly used to distinguish this process from transport or mixing-related decreases in contaminant concentrations. However, for this technique to be useful in the field to monitor bioremediation progress, isotope fractionation must be quantified under relevant environmental conditions. In the present study, we quantify the apparent in situ fractionation effects for stable isotopes in ClO4- (Cl and O) and NO3- (N and O) resulting from biodegradation in an aquifer. Abstract. An in situ experiment was performed in a shallow alluvial aquifer in Maryland to quantify the fractionation of stable isotopes in perchlorate (Cl and O) and nitrate (N and O) during biodegradation. An emulsified soybean oil substrate that was previously injected into this aquifer provided the electron donor necessary for biological perchlorate reduction and denitrification. During the field experiment, groundwater extracted from an upgradient well was pumped into an injection well located within the in situ oil barrier, and then groundwater samples were withdrawn for the next 30 h. After correction for dilution (using Br- as a conservative tracer of the injectate), perchlorate concentrations decreased by 78% and nitrate concentrations decreased by 82% during the initial 8.6 h after the injection. The observed ratio of fractionation effects of O and Cl isotopes in perchlorate (18O/37Cl) was 2.6, which is similar to that observed in the laboratory using pure cultures (2.5). Denitrification by indigenous bacteria fractionated O and N isotopes in nitrate at a ratio of ???0.8 (18O/15N), which is within the range of values

  7. Formation of aqueous solutions on Mars via deliquescence of chloride-perchlorate binary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, R. V.; Chevrier, V. F.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2014-05-01

    Perchlorate salts, known to exist on Mars, can readily absorb water vapor and deliquesce into aqueous solutions even at low temperatures. The multiple soluble ionic species, such as chloride salts, present in the Martian subsurface may affect this deliquescence. Here we study the deliquescence (solid to aqueous transition) and efflorescence (aqueous to solid transition) of three perchlorate/chloride mixtures: KClO4/KCl at 253 K, NaClO4/NaCl at 243 and 253 K, and Mg(ClO4)2/MgCl2 at 243 and 253 K. A Raman microscope with an environmental cell was used to monitor the phase transitions of internally mixed ClO-4/Cl- particles as a function of the perchlorate mole fraction. The eutonic relative humidity (where deliquescence begins to occur regardless of ClO-4 mole fraction), deliquescence relative humidity (DRH, where complete deliquescence occurs), and efflorescence relative humidity (ERH) were measured for several perchlorate mole ratios for each cation system. At the temperatures studied, the eutonic relative humidity was measured to be 28% RH for Mg(ClO4)2/MgCl2 mixtures, 38% RH for NaClO4/NaCl mixtures, and 82% RH for KClO4/KCl mixtures. The DRH depends on the perchlorate mole ratio, but is below the DRH of the least deliquescent (highest DRH) pure salt. When humidity is lowered around an aqueous salt mixture, we find that efflorescence occurs at an RH below the DRH due to the kinetic inhibition of crystallization. The ERH values of the salt solutions were as low as 5% RH for Mg(ClO4)2/MgCl2 mixtures, as low as 13% RH for NaClO4/NaCl mixtures, and as low as 66% RH for KClO4/KCl mixtures. The low eutonic RH values for the Na+ and Mg2+ perchlorate/chloride mixtures are important: wherever Mg(ClO4)2 and MgCl2 or NaClO4 and NaCl coexist at the temperatures studied, mixtures will contain a stable aqueous phase above 28 or 38% RH, respectively, regardless of the perchlorate mole fraction. This liquid water may persist until 5 or 13% RH, respectively.

  8. Investigation of Perchlorate and Water at the Surface of Mars with Raman Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolakakos, G.; Whiteway, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    A major accomplishment of the NASA Phoenix Mars mission was the identification of perchlorate (ClO4-) in the regolith by the Wet Chemistry Laboratory instrument. More recently, the Sample Analysis at Mars instrument on the NASA Curiosity Rover detected the presence of perchlorate in Gale Crater, suggesting that it is globally distributed. Perchlorates are of great interest on Mars due to their high affinity for water vapor (deliquescence) as well as their ability to greatly depress the freezing point of water when in solution. This has intriguing biological implications as resulting brines could potentially provide a habitable environment for living organisms. Additionally, it has been speculated that these salts may play a significant role in the hydrological cycle on Mars. A sample of magnesium perchlorate was subjected to the water vapor pressure and temperatures found at the landing site of the Phoenix Mars mission. Laser Raman scattering was applied to detect the onset of deliquescence and provide a relative estimate of the quantity of water taken up and subsequently released by the sample. As the temperature of the sample decreased at the same rate as measured on Mars during the evening, significant uptake of water from the atmosphere was observed to occur prior to the frost point temperature being reached. As the temperature was lowered, water uptake continued as saturation was reached and frost formed on the surface surrounding the perchlorate sample. Freezing of the brine film was observed at the eutectic temperature of -67°C and thawing occurred at a temperature of -62°C.

  9. Adsorption of perchlorate and other oxyanions onto magnetic permanently confined micelle arrays (Mag-PCMAs).

    PubMed

    Clark, Kristin K; Keller, Arturo A

    2012-03-01

    The removal of oxyanions found in drinking water sources -perchlorate, nitrate, phosphate, and sulfate- onto magnetic permanently confined micelle arrays (Mag-PCMAs) was studied. We determined the removal efficiency in both competitive and non-competitive environments, as many of these anions are present in these sources. Mag-PCMA removed over 98% of the aqueous perchlorate anions across a concentration range of 60-500 μg/L. Nitrate was absorbed 100% over a concentration range of 10-35 mg/L as nitrate. Removal of phosphate was 95.7% for 0.2-2.45 mg/L as phosphate. Sulfate was 100% absorbed across a concentration range of 5-20 mg/L and an average 75.7% for 5-50 mg/L. The sorption isotherms followed a Freundlich relationship with K(f) values of 2.00, 2.05, 1.9, and 3.86 mg/g for nitrate, perchlorate, phosphate, and sulfate respectively. Perchlorate and nitrate did not compete significantly for binding on Mag-PCMAs, with almost equal sorption, greater than 90%, for both anions in elevated concentrations. This is a distinguishing feature from ion exchange resins or activated carbon with cationic surfactants, where these anions have been shown to compete for sorption sites. At the concentrations studied, phosphate and sulfate also do not exhibit significant competition. Desorption for reuse was successful at pH 10. This reusable magnetic sorbent can thus be used to rapidly remove target anions such as perchlorate from water in the presence or absence of other oxyanions.

  10. An Ion-selective Electrode for Anion Perchlorate in Thick-film Technology

    PubMed Central

    Segui, María Jesús; Lizondo-Sabater, Josefa; Martínez-Máñez, Ramon; Sancenon, Félix; Soto, Juan; Garcia-Breijo, Eduardo; Gil, Luis

    2006-01-01

    The ionophore 1,4,7,10,13-penta(n-octyl)-1,4,7,10,13-pentaazacyclopentadecane (L1) was used for the development of miniaturised perchlorate-selective electrodes in thick-film technology. Different PVC membranes containing L1 and the plasticizers o-nitrophenyl octyl ether (NPOE), dibutyl phthalate (DBP), bis(2-ethylhexyl)sebacate (DOS) and dibutyl sebacate (DBS) were prepared and placed on a graphite working electrode manufactured by using thick film serigraphic technology. The perchlorate selective electrode containing DBS as plasticizer showed a potentiometric Nernstian response of -57 mV per decade in a range of perchlorate concentration from 1 × 10-4 to 1 × 10-1 M with a detection limit of 5 × 10-5 M. The ion selective electrodes containing DBP and NPOE as plasticizers exhibit a working range from 6.3 × 10-5 to 1 × 10-1 M and 7.4 × 10-5 to 1 × 10-1 M for perchlorate, respectively, with a detection limit of ca. 2.2 × 10-5 M. For all three electrodes a response time of ca. 5 s was found. The prepared electrodes do not show appreciable decay of the slope for at least 25 days. Potentiometric selectivity coefficients (log KpotClO4-,X-) with respect to the primary anion perchlorate were evaluated using the fixed interference method. These coefficients are of the order of 10-1.7 or smaller, indicating the relatively poor interference of the different anions studied.

  11. Perchlorate in the United States. Analysis of relative source contributions to the food chain.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Dyke, Jason V; Kirk, Andrea B; Jackson, W Andrew

    2006-11-01

    Perchlorate has been considered by some a potential threat to human health, especially to developing infants and children because it may inhibit iodide uptake by the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) of the thyroid. In the United States, during the last several decades, environmental perchlorate has had three recognized sources stemming from (a) its use as an oxidizer (including in rocket propellants), (b) its presence in Chilean nitrate fertilizer (CNF), and (c) natural production. An analysis of the relative source strengths and how they may influence entry into the food chain has not been conducted. Averaged over the last --60 years, we estimate that the source strengths have been (a) 10.6, (b) 0.75, and (c) 0.13-0.64 Gg/y for the United States as a whole. Of this, while (b) and (c) represent actual dispersed amounts, the figure in (a) is the amount of perchlorate produced and only a fraction (f) of it has been dispersed and often in a more localized fashion. In addition, dispersal of (b) has taken place only over agricultural land. Considering that the total land area in the United States is 5.5 x the arable land area, in terms of incorporation into the food chain,the figure cited in (b) has a proportionately greater impact. Most estimates of fwill thus suggest that over the considered period, the contribution of CNF to incorporation of perchlorate in the food chain has likely been comparable to oxidizer perchlorate, with natural production being a lesser source. Fireworks presently constitute a potentially important source of increasing importance but a quantitative impact cannotyet be assessed.

  12. Analysis of perchlorate in water and soil by electrospray LC/MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Paul; Minteer, Mark; Willey, Janice

    2004-01-15

    A method has been developed for the determination of perchlorate in water and soil matrixes using electrospray liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. Perchlorate is quantitated by monitoring the ion signal from mass 83, which is formed by a loss of an oxygen atom from the perchlorate molecular ion. The method was developed to be effective and economical in production laboratory analysis of perchlorate in environmental water and soil samples. Data were gathered to define method sensitivity, performance, selectivity, and robustness. Analyte stability, method susceptibility to interferences, and the reliability of the chlorine isotope ratio as an identification tool were examined. The aqueous method detection limit (MDL) is 0.05 microg/L and was determined using an actual groundwater matrix. The soil MDL is 0.5 microg/kg and was determined using Ottawa sand. The stability study was performed by spiking water samples at 0.25, 10, and 20 microg/L and analyzing them 50 days later. Acceptable recoveries were obtained for all samples. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for the replicate analyses in the stability study indicates that the method is capable of RSD values less than 5% in a relatively clean groundwater matrix. The ionization suppression study was performed by spiking water samples containing 1000 mg/L carbonate, chloride, and sulfate with 0.05 and 0.5 microg/L perchlorate and then measuring the recovery of the spike. The results indicate that the procedure does not have significant suppression effects at the high salt levels tested. Calibration, quality control sample, field sample, and suppression study data were combined to examine isotope ratio reliability. The results of that work show that chlorine isotope ratios can be used to define statistical process control limits for use as an additional analyte identification tool. PMID:14719899

  13. Removing perchlorate from samples to facilitate organics detection by pyrolitic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Kiparski, Guntram R.; Parker, David R.; Tsapin, Alexandre I.

    2013-07-01

    Thermal volatilization or pyrolysis of solid samples followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TV-GC-MS) or other downstream analyses has proven robustness and has been adopted for the extraction of organic compounds for their detection in planetary lander science missions (e.g., Viking Lander GC-MS, Phoenix TEGA, MSL SAM, and the future ExoMars MOMA). Pyrolysis to extract organic compounds from soil has limitations when oxidants co-occur in the analyzed sample unless the desired end product is CO2. Pyrolysis of such soils may result in oxidation of organics to CO2 during heating, and thus make organics characterization difficult, if not impossible. Analytical investigations seeking to identify organics in martian soils containing oxidants could benefit from the deployment of technologies that remove known and putative oxidants prior to thermal volatilization. We conducted a series of experiments in order to determine if a polymeric anion exchange resin, commonly used for removing the perchlorate anion from contaminated municipal water supplies, could sustain its substantial perchlorate removal capability while keeping organic compounds intact for downstream detection. We demonstrated that this resin can strongly bind perchlorate from aqueous solution while simultaneously leaving amino acids substantially unaltered. The perchlorate-binding resin could be easily adopted as a pre-treatment for martian soil extracts to create analytical systems with improved organics characterization capabilities compatible with existing TV-GC-MS systems. We propose this strategy to aid detection and characterization of putative martian organics co-situated with perchlorate at sampling sites.

  14. Accumulation of perchlorate in aquatic and terrestrial plants at a field scale.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kui; Anderson, Todd A; Jones, Matthew W; Smith, Philip N; Jackson, W Andrew

    2004-01-01

    Previous laboratory-scale studies have documented perchlorate ClO(-)(4) uptake by different plant species, but less information is available at field scale, where ClO(-)(4) uptake may be affected by environmental conditions, such as distance to streams or shallow water tables, exposure duration, and species. This study examined uptake of ClO(-)(4) in smartweed (Polygonum spp.) and watercress (Nasturtium spp.) as well as more than forty trees, including ash (Fraxinus greggii A. Gray), chinaberry (Melia azedarach L.), elm (Ulmus parvifolia Jacq.), willow (Salix nigra Marshall), mulberry [Broussonetia papyrifera (L.) Vent.], and hackberry (Celtis laevigata Willd.) from multiple streams surrounding a perchlorate-contaminated site. Results indicate a large potential for ClO(-)(4) accumulation in aquatic and terrestrial plants, with ClO(-)(4) concentration in plant tissues approximately 100 times higher than that in bulk water. Perchlorate accumulation in leaves of terrestrial plants was also dependent on species, with hackberry, willow, and elm having a strong potential to accumulate ClO(-)(4). Generally, trees located closer to the stream had a higher ClO(-)(4) accumulation than trees located farther away from the stream. Seasonal leaf sampling of terrestrial plants indicated that ClO(-)(4) accumulation also was affected by exposure duration, with highest accumulation observed in the late growing cycle, although leaf concentrations for a given tree were highly variable. Perchlorate may be re-released into the environment via leaching and rainfall as indicated by lower perchlorate concentrations in collected leaf litter. Information obtained from this study will be helpful to understand the fate of ClO(-)(4) in macrophytes and natural systems.

  15. Accumulation of perchlorate in aquatic and terrestrial plants at a field scale.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kui; Anderson, Todd A; Jones, Matthew W; Smith, Philip N; Jackson, W Andrew

    2004-01-01

    Previous laboratory-scale studies have documented perchlorate ClO(-)(4) uptake by different plant species, but less information is available at field scale, where ClO(-)(4) uptake may be affected by environmental conditions, such as distance to streams or shallow water tables, exposure duration, and species. This study examined uptake of ClO(-)(4) in smartweed (Polygonum spp.) and watercress (Nasturtium spp.) as well as more than forty trees, including ash (Fraxinus greggii A. Gray), chinaberry (Melia azedarach L.), elm (Ulmus parvifolia Jacq.), willow (Salix nigra Marshall), mulberry [Broussonetia papyrifera (L.) Vent.], and hackberry (Celtis laevigata Willd.) from multiple streams surrounding a perchlorate-contaminated site. Results indicate a large potential for ClO(-)(4) accumulation in aquatic and terrestrial plants, with ClO(-)(4) concentration in plant tissues approximately 100 times higher than that in bulk water. Perchlorate accumulation in leaves of terrestrial plants was also dependent on species, with hackberry, willow, and elm having a strong potential to accumulate ClO(-)(4). Generally, trees located closer to the stream had a higher ClO(-)(4) accumulation than trees located farther away from the stream. Seasonal leaf sampling of terrestrial plants indicated that ClO(-)(4) accumulation also was affected by exposure duration, with highest accumulation observed in the late growing cycle, although leaf concentrations for a given tree were highly variable. Perchlorate may be re-released into the environment via leaching and rainfall as indicated by lower perchlorate concentrations in collected leaf litter. Information obtained from this study will be helpful to understand the fate of ClO(-)(4) in macrophytes and natural systems. PMID:15356223

  16. Contribution of tap water to chlorate and perchlorate intake: a market basket study.

    PubMed

    Asami, Mari; Yoshida, Nobue; Kosaka, Koji; Ohno, Koichi; Matsui, Yoshihiko

    2013-10-01

    The contributions of water to total levels of chlorate and perchlorate intake were determined using food and water samples from a market basket study from 10 locations in Japan between 2008 and 2009. Foods were categorized into 13 groups and analyzed along with tap water. The average total chlorate intake was 333 (min. 193-max. 486) μg/day for samples cooked with tap water. The contribution of tap water to total chlorate intake was as high as 47%-58%, although total chlorate intake was less than 32% of the tolerable daily intake, 1500 μg/day for body weight of 50 kg. For perchlorate, daily intake from water was 0.7 (0.1-4.4) μg/day, which is not high compared to the average total intake of 14 (2.5-84) μg/day, while the reference dose (RfD) is 35 μg/day and the provisional maximum tolerable daily intake (PMTDI) is 500 μg/day for body weight of 50 kg. The highest intake of perchlorate was 84 μg/day, where concentrations in foods were high, but not in water. The contribution of water to total perchlorate intake ranged from 0.5% to 22%, while the ratio of highest daily intake to RfD was 240% and that to PMTDI was 17%. Eight baby formulas were also tested--total chlorate and perchlorate intakes were 147 (42-332) μg/day and 1.11 (0.05-4.5) μg/day, respectively, for an ingestion volume of 1 L/day if prepared with tap water.

  17. Effect of Plant Uptake on Perchlorate Isotopic Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, N. L.; Jackson, W. A.; Bohlke, J. K.; Sturchio, N. C.; Gu, B.; Rao, B.; Hatzinger, P. B.; Harvey, G.; Burkey, K.; McGrath, M. T.; Sevanthi, R.

    2013-12-01

    The occurrence of perchlorate (ClO4-) in the environment is attributed to both synthetic and natural sources. Unlike anthropogenic ClO4-, natural ClO4- exhibits a wide range in isotopic compositions, suggesting that natural ClO4- is formed through more than one pathway and/or undergoes post-depositional isotopic fractionation processes. One of these processes could be plant uptake and metabolism. Plants are known to reversibly accumulate ClO4-. However, there is little information available regarding the ability for plants to isotopically fractionate ClO4-. Plants could alter ClO4-isotopic composition either by mass dependent fractionation via transport carriers in the root, diffusion limitations through the root, translocation within the plant, reduction of ClO4- by plant enzymes, or non-specific exchange of oxygen in ClO4- catalyzed by plant compounds/processes. We examined the potential for plants to alter the isotopic composition of ClO4- (δ37Cl, δ18O, and Δ17O) in both hydroponic and field scale experiments. Hydroponically grown snap bean plants were exposed to variable ClO4-concentrations (2mg/L and 10mg/L) in solutions prepared from ClO4- with both normal and anomalous O isotopic abundances. At maturity, we evaluated the uptake of ClO4-relative to other anions and the isotopic compositions of ClO4- in both plants and growth solutions. Additional experiments involved field scale exposures of snap beans to irrigation water containing low levels (< 10 ug/L) of ClO4-. The majority of the initial mass of ClO4- for both the low and high exposure hydroponic treatments was recovered in the growth solutions (20-40%) or plant compartments (40-60%), while some mass was not recovered (~20%). ClO4- isotopic compositions were essentially identical between recovered ClO4- in the plant tissues and hydroponic solutions. Anion ratios indicate that ClO4-was accumulated similarly to NO3- but preferentially to Cl- (~4X). In field experiments, the isotopic composition of ClO4

  18. [Copper transport and metabolism].

    PubMed

    Kurasaki, Masaaki; Saito, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    In this review, copper metabolism and transport in mammalian tissues are introduced and discussed. Firstly, the copper required amounts and LD50 levels are shown to explain the difficult balances of copper in the cells between necessity and toxicity. Furthermore, on the basis of literatures published, relationship between copper-binding metallothioneins and mechanisms for the absorption and excretion of copper or hereditary copper metabolic disorders metabolism abnormality symptom are explained. Finally it has been indicated that apoptosis induced by heavy metals, especially copper was initiated by production of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress in the cells. To understand precise mechanism for copper homeostasis in mammalian cells, further investigation will be needed to clarify the copper behaviors in normal and abnormal situations. PMID:27455798

  19. Dissimilatory perchlorate reduction linked to aerobic methane oxidation via chlorite dismutase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, R. S.; Baesman, S. M.; Miller, L. G.

    2013-12-01

    The presence of methane (CH4) in the atmosphere of Mars is controversial yet the evidence has aroused scientific interest, as CH4 could be a harbinger of extant or extinct microbial life. There are various oxidized compounds present on the surface of Mars that could serve as electron acceptors for the anaerobic oxidation of CH4, including perchlorate (ClO4-). We examined the role of perchlorate, chlorate (ClO3-) and chlorite (ClO2-) as oxidants linked to CH4 oxidation. Dissimilatory perchlorate reduction begins with reduction of ClO4- to ClO2- and ends with dismutation of chlorite to yield chloride (Cl-) and molecular oxygen (O2). We explored the potential for aerobic CH4 oxidizing bacteria to couple with oxygen derived from chlorite dismutation during dissimilatory perchlorate reduction. Methane (0.2 kPa) was completely removed within several days from the N2-flushed headspace above cell suspensions of methanotrophs (Methylobacter albus strain BG8) and perchlorate reducing bacteria (Dechloromonas agitata strain CKB) in the presence of 5 mM ClO2-. Similar rates of CH4 consumption were observed for these mixed cultures whether they were co-mingled or segregated under a common headspace, indicating that direct contact of cells was not required for methane consumption to occur. We also observed complete removal of 0.2 kPa CH4 in bottles containing dried soil (enriched in methanotrophs by CH4 additions over several weeks) and D. agitata CKB and in the presence of 10 mM ClO2-. This soil (seasonally exposed sediment) collected from the shoreline of a freshwater lake (Searsville Lake, CA) demonstrated endogenous CH4 uptake as well as perchlorate, chlorate and chlorite reduction/dismutation. However, these experiments required physical separation of soil from the aqueous bacterial culture to allow for the partitioning of O2 liberated from chlorite dismutation into the shared headspace. Although dissimilatory reduction of ClO4- and ClO3- could be inferred from the

  20. Potential Influence of Perchlorate on Heavy Metals and Organic Carbon in Serpentine Soil; Implications for Martian Regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oze, C.; Kumarathilaka, P. R.; Indraratne, S.; Vithanage, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Prasanna Kumarathilaka Chemical and Environmental Systems Modeling Research Group, National Institute of Fundamental Studies, Kandy, Sri LankaPerchlorate (ClO4-) concentrations as high as 1 Wt.% have been reported in Martian regolith. Perchlorate is a strong oxidizer capable of accelerating heavy and/or trace metal release into regolith/soil and reacting with organic matter/compounds (if present). Here, we assess interactions between perchlorate and an analogous Martian regolith (i.e., serpentine soil) to simulate and understand the fate of Mn, Ni and Co and organic carbon. Pre-characterized serpentine soil collected from Sri Lanka was used for this study. Incubation experiments were performed with three perchlorate concentrations (1, 0.75 and 0.5 w/w) and sequential and single extractions assessed solid phase metal fractionation in serpentine sediments after 3 weeks and 1 year, respectively. Additionally, total organic carbon (TOC) of the residues were analyzed. These experiments demonstrate a high release of Mn compared to Ni and Co. Metal concentrations in exchangeable and bioavailable fractions increased with increasing perchlorate concentrations. Exchangeable Ni, Mn and Co increased 5.9, 69.6 and 44.6% and bioavailable Ni, Mn and Co increased 5.5, 92.3 and 72.8%, respectively, after 1 year compared to 3 weeks. Additionally, TOC decreased with increasing perchlorate concentration. For example, TOC decreased by 14.3% after 1 year compared to a 3 week incubation period. Overall, this study confirms the accelerated release of metals and the removal of organic carbon with increasing perchlorate concentrations. Furthermore, this study illustrates how perchlorate may present additional challenges to current Martian life studies and the future human habitation of Mars.Prasanna Kumarathilaka Chemical and Environmental Systems Modeling Research Group, National Institute of Fundamental Studies, Kandy, Sri LankaPerchlorate (ClO4-) concentrations as high as 1 Wt.% have

  1. In situ bioremediation of nitrate and perchlorate in vadose zone soil for groundwater protection using gaseous electron donor injection technology.

    PubMed

    Evans, Patrick J; Trute, Mary M

    2006-12-01

    When present in the vadose zone, potentially toxic nitrate and perchlorate anions can be persistent sources of groundwater contamination. Gaseous electron donor injection technology (GEDIT), an anaerobic variation of petroleum hydrocarbon bioventing, involves injecting electron donor gases, such as hydrogen or ethyl acetate, into the vadose zone, to stimulate biodegradation of nitrate and perchlorate. Laboratory microcosm studies demonstrated that hydrogen and ethanol promoted nitrate and perchlorate reduction in vadose zone soil and that moisture content was an important factor. Column studies demonstrated that transport of particular electron donors varied significantly; ethyl acetate and butyraldehyde were transported more rapidly than butyl acetate and ethanol. Nitrate removal in the column studies, up to 100%, was best promoted by ethyl acetate. Up to 39% perchlorate removal was achieved with ethanol and was limited by insufficient incubation time. The results demonstrate that GEDIT is a promising remediation technology warranting further validation.

  2. Perchlorate exposure is associated with oxidative stress and indicators of serum iron homeostasis among NHANES 2005-2008 subjects

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT Perchlorate (ClO4-), an oxidizing agent, is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant. Several studies have investigated its thyroid hormone disrupting properties. Its associations with other biological measures are largely unknown. This study, combining 2005-2008 National H...

  3. Oxygen and chlorine isotopic fractionation during perchlorate biodegradation: laboratory results and implications for forensics and natural attenuation studies.

    PubMed

    Sturchio, Neil C; Böhlke, John Karl; Beloso, Abelardo D; Streger, Sheryl H; Heraty, Linnea J; Hatzinger, Paul B

    2007-04-15

    Perchlorate is a widespread environmental contaminant having both anthropogenic and natural sources. Stable isotope ratios of O and Cl in a given sample of perchlorate may be used to distinguish its source(s). Isotopic ratios may also be useful for identifying the extent of biodegradation of perchlorate, which is critical for assessing natural attenuation of this contaminant in groundwater. For this approach to be useful, however, the kinetic isotopic fractionations of O and Cl during perchlorate biodegradation must first be determined as a function of environmental variables such as temperature and bacterial species. A laboratory study was performed in which the O and Cl isotope ratios of perchlorate were monitored as a function of degradation by two separate bacterial strains (Azospira suillum JPLRND and Dechlorospirillum sp. FBR2) at both 10 degrees C and 22 degrees C with acetate as the electron donor. Perchlorate was completely reduced by both strains within 280 h at 22 degrees C and 615 h at 10 degrees C. Measured values of isotopic fractionation factors were epsilon(18)O = -36.6 to -29.0% per hundred and epsilon(37)Cl = -14.5 to -11.5% per hundred, and these showed no apparent systematic variation with either temperature or bacterial strain. An experiment using (18)O-enriched water (delta(18)O = +198% per hundred) gave results indistinguishable from those observed in the isotopically normal water (delta(18)O = -8.1% per hundred) used in the other experiments, indicating negligible isotope exchange between perchlorate and water during biodegradation. The fractionation factor ratio epsilon(18)O/epsilon(37)Cl was nearly invariant in all experiments at 2.50 +/- 0.04. These data indicate that isotope ratio analysis will be useful for documenting perchlorate biodegradation in soils and groundwater. The establishment of a microbial fractionation factor ratio (epsilon(18)O/ epsilon(37)Cl) also has significant implications for forensic studies. PMID:17533841

  4. Oxygen and chlorine isotopic fractionation during perchlorate biodegradation: Laboratory results and implications for forensics and natural attenuation studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sturchio, N.C.; Böhlke, J.K.; Beloso, A.D.; Streger, S.H.; Heraty, L.J.; Hatzinger, P.B.

    2007-01-01

    Perchlorate is a widespread environmental contaminant having both anthropogenic and natural sources. Stable isotope ratios of O and Cl in a given sample of perchlorate may be used to distinguish its source(s). Isotopic ratios may also be useful for identifying the extent of biodegradation of perchlorate, which is critical for assessing natural attenuation of this contaminant in groundwater. For this approach to be useful, however, the kinetic isotopic fractionations of O and Cl during perchlorate biodegradation must first be determined as a function of environmental variables such as temperature and bacterial species. A laboratory study was performed in which the O and Cl isotope ratios of perchlorate were monitored as a function of degradation by two separate bacterial strains (Azospira suillum JPLRND and Dechlorospirillum sp. FBR2) at both 10??C and 22??C with acetate as the electron donor. Perchlorate was completely reduced by both strains within 280 h at 22??C and 615 h at 10??C. Measured values of isotopic fractionation factors were ??18O = -36.6 to -29.0??? and ??37Cl = -14.5 to -11.5???, and these showed no apparent systematic variation with either temperature or bacterial strain. An experiment using 18O-enriched water (??18O = +198???) gave results indistinguishable from those observed in the isotopically normal water (??18O = -8.1???) used in the other experiments, indicating negligible isotope exchange between perchlorate and water during biodegradation. The fractionation factor ratio ??18O/??37Cl was nearly invariant in all experiments at 2.50 ?? 0.04. These data indicate that isotope ratio analysis will be useful for documenting perchlorate biodegradation in soils and groundwater. The establishment of a microbial fractionation factor ratio (??18O/??37Cl) also has significant implications for forensic studies. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  5. The Nitrate/Perchlorate Ratio on Mars As an Indicator for Habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, J. C.; Sutter, B.; McKay, C. P.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Freissinet, C.; Conrad, P. G.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Ming, D. W.; Martín-Torres, J.; Zorzano, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Discovery of indigenous martian nitrogen in Mars surface materials has important implications for habitability and the potential development of a nitrogen cycle at some point in martian history. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity Rover detected evolved nitric oxide (NO) gas during pyrolysis of scooped aeolian sediments and drilled mudstone acquired in Gale Crater. The detection of NO suggests an indigenous source of fixed nitrogen, and may indicate a mineralogical sink for atmospheric N2 in the form of nitrate. The ratio of nitrate to oxychlorine species (e.g. perchlorate) may provide insight into the extent of development of a nitrogen cycle on Mars. Nitrate and perchlorate on Earth are geochemically related in arid environments such as the Atacama Desert and the Dry Valleys of Antarctica due to their similar mobilities and deposition mechanisms [1,2]. Here, low NO3-/ClO4- molar ratios (~1000) dominate, in comparison to other places on Earth, where the main nitrate source is biological fixation of N2 to NO3-, and there is no corresponding biological source of perchlorate, resulting in much higher NO3-/ClO4- molar ratios (~10,000). The NO3-/ClO4- molar ratio is estimated to be ~ 0.05 on Mars based on SAM measurements at Gale Crater [3]. The possibility exists that perchlorate brines could leach and increase nitrate concentrations at depth, increasing the martian NO3-/ClO4- ratio in the subsurface. However, it is unknown whether terrestrial NO3-/ClO4- molar ratios could be achieved by this mechanism. Nevertheless, the low NO3-/ClO4- the ratio detected by SAM suggests that N fixation to nitrate on Mars, whether biologically mediated or abiotic, was extremely limited compared to the potentially ongoing abiotic formation and deposition of oxychlorine species on the martian surface. [1] Kounaves, S.P. et al. "Discovery of natural perchlorate in the Antarctic dry valleys and its global implications." ES&T44

  6. A Reservoir of Natural Perchlorate in Unsaturated Zones of Arid and Semi-Arid Regions, Southwestern USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, B. A.; Stonestrom, D. A.; Anderson, T. A.; Orris, G. J.; Rajagapolan, S.; Sandvig, R. M.; Scanlon, B. R.; Walvoord, M. A.; Jackson, W.

    2006-12-01

    Natural perchlorate (ClO4-) is generally present in unsaturated zones of steppe-to-desert regions of the arid and semi-arid southwestern United States. The perchlorate is associated with atmospherically deposited chloride that has accumulated throughout the Holocene. To assess this natural reservoir, we analyzed unsaturated-zone profiles from ten sites across Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, and Utah for perchlorate and other anions. The sampled sites represent a wide range of precipitation (0.1 0.5 m yr-1), dominant vegetation, soil type, underlying geology, and include five distinct ecological regions: Chihuahuan, Mojave, and southern Great Basin deserts; Arizona-New Mexico semi-desert; and Texas High Plains dry steppe. Concentrations of perchlorate correlated closely with chloride and bromide. The perchlorate reservoir (up to 1 kg ha-1) is sufficiently large to impact groundwater when natural recharge during pluvial periods or induced recharge after conversion to agriculture flushes accumulated salts from the unsaturated zone. This little explored source can explain perchlorate in milk and other agricultural products far from anthropogenic contamination, and should be considered when evaluating overall exposure risk.

  7. Microbial redox processes in deep subsurface environments and the potential application of (per)chlorate in oil reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Liebensteiner, Martin G.; Tsesmetzis, Nicolas; Stams, Alfons J. M.; Lomans, Bartholomeus P.

    2014-01-01

    The ability of microorganisms to thrive under oxygen-free conditions in subsurface environments relies on the enzymatic reduction of oxidized elements, such as sulfate, ferric iron, or CO2, coupled to the oxidation of inorganic or organic compounds. A broad phylogenetic and functional diversity of microorganisms from subsurface environments has been described using isolation-based and advanced molecular ecological techniques. The physiological groups reviewed here comprise iron-, manganese-, and nitrate-reducing microorganisms. In the context of recent findings also the potential of chlorate and perchlorate [jointly termed (per)chlorate] reduction in oil reservoirs will be discussed. Special attention is given to elevated temperatures that are predominant in the deep subsurface. Microbial reduction of (per)chlorate is a thermodynamically favorable redox process, also at high temperature. However, knowledge about (per)chlorate reduction at elevated temperatures is still scarce and restricted to members of the Firmicutes and the archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus. By analyzing the diversity and phylogenetic distribution of functional genes in (meta)genome databases and combining this knowledge with extrapolations to earlier-made physiological observations we speculate on the potential of (per)chlorate reduction in the subsurface and more precisely oil fields. In addition, the application of (per)chlorate for bioremediation, souring control, and microbial enhanced oil recovery are addressed. PMID:25225493

  8. Tetranitroacetimidic acid: a high oxygen oxidizer and potential replacement for ammonium perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Vo, Thao T; Parrish, Damon A; Shreeve, Jean'ne M

    2014-08-27

    Considerable work has been focused on developing replacements for ammonium perchlorate (AP), a primary choice for solid rocket and missile propellants, due to environmental concerns resulting from the release of perchlorate into groundwater systems [corrected]. Additionally, the generation of hydrochloric acid contributes to high concentrations of acid rain and to ozone layer depletion. En route to synthesizing salts that contain cationic FOX-7, a novel, high oxygen-containing oxidizer, tetranitroacetimidic acid (TNAA), has been synthesized and fully characterized. The properties of TNAA were found to be exceptional, with a calculated specific impulse exceeding that of AP, leading to its high potential as a replacement for AP. TNAA can be synthesized easily in a one-step process by the nitration of FOX-7 in high yield (>93%). The synthesis, properties, and chemical reactivity of TNAA have been examined.

  9. Perchlorate Detection at Nanomolar Concentrations by Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Baohua; Ruan, Chuanmin; Wang, Wei

    2009-01-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4) has emerged as a widespread environmental contaminant and been detected in various food products and even in human breast milk and urine. This research developed a sensing technique based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for rapid screening and monitoring of this contaminant in groundwater and surface water. The technique was found to be capable of detecting ClO4 at concentrations as low as 10-9 M (or ~0.1 g/L) by using 2-dimethylaminoethanethiol (DMAE) modified gold nanoparticles as a SERS substrate. Quantitative analysis of ClO4 was validated with good reproducibility by using both simulated and contaminated groundwater samples. When coupled with a portable Raman spectrometer, this technique thus has the potential to be used as a in situ, rapid screening tool for perchlorate in the environment.

  10. Laboratory investigation of perchlorate deliquescence at the surface of Mars with a Raman scattering lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolakakos, George; Whiteway, James A.

    2015-10-01

    A sample of magnesium perchlorate hexahydrate was subjected to the water vapor pressure and temperatures found at the landing site of the Phoenix Mars mission. Laser Raman scattering was applied to detect the onset of deliquescence and provide a relative estimate of the quantity of water taken up and subsequently released by the sample. As the temperature of the sample decreased at the same rate as measured on Mars during the evening, significant uptake of water from the atmosphere was observed to occur prior to the frost point temperature being reached. As the temperature was lowered further, the relative humidity over ice increased to 100% and frost formed on the surface surrounding the perchlorate sample. Freezing of the brine film was observed at the eutectic temperature of -67°C, and thawing occurred at a temperature of -62°C.

  11. The processing, properties and use of the pyrotechnic mixture titanium subhydride/potassium perchlorate

    SciTech Connect

    Massis, T.M.

    1996-07-01

    Development of this pyrotechnic occurred because of the need for a static insensitive material to meet personnel safety requirements and related system safety issues in nuclear weapon energetic material component designs. Ti subhydride materials are made by the thermal dehydrding of commercial Ti hydride powder to the desired equivalent hydrogen composition in the Ti lattice. These Ti subhydrides, when blended with K perchlorate, meet the static insensitivity requirement of not being initiated from an equivalent human body electrostatic discharge. Individual material and blend qualification requirements provide a reproducible material from lot to lot. These pyrotechnic formulations meet the high reliability requirements (0.9995) for initiation and performance parameters and have the necessary stability and compatibility to meet long lived requirements of more than 25 years. Various experiences and problems are also discussed that have led to a mature technology for Ti subhydride/K perchlorate during its use in energetic material component designs.

  12. The Investigation of Perchlorate/Iron Phase Mixtures as A Possible Source of Oxygen Detected by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument in Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Heil, E.; Morris, R. V.; Archer, P. D.; Ming, D. W.; Niles, P. B.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Franz, H.; Freissinet C.; Glavin, D. P.; McAdam, A. C.; Mahaffy, P.; Martin-Torres, F. Javier; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Paz-Zorzano, Maria; Stern, J. C.; McKay, C. P.

    2015-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument onboard the Curiosity rover detected O2 and HCl gas releases from the Rocknest (RN) eolian bedform and the John Klein (JK) and Cumberland (CB) drill hole materials in Gale Crater. Chlorinated hydrocarbons have also been detected by the SAM quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometer (GCMS). These detections along with the detection of perchlorate (ClO4-) by the Mars Phoenix Lander's Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) suggesting perchlorate is a possible candidate for evolved O2 and chlorine species. Laboratory thermal analysis of individual per-chlorates has yet to provide an unequivocal temperature match to the SAM O2 and HCl release data. These detections along with the detection of perchlorate (ClO4-) by the Mars Phoenix Lander's Wet Chemistry Laboratory suggested perchlorate is a possible candidate for evolved O2 and chlorine species. Laboratory thermal analysis of pure perchlorates has yet to provide an unequivocal temperature match to the SAM O2 and HCl release data. Analog laboratory analysis of iron mineralogy detected in Gale materials that was physically mixed with Ca- and Mg-perchlorate has been shown to catalyze lower O2 release temperatures and approach some SAM O2 release data. Instead of physical mixtures used in previous work, the work presented here utilized perchlorate solutions added to Fe phases. This technique allowed for perchlorate to come in closer contact with the Fe-phase and may more closely mimic Mars conditions where humidity can increase enough to cause deliquescence of the highly hygroscopic perchlorate phases. The objective of this work is to: 1) Utilize a laboratory SAM analog instrument to evaluate the O2 release temperatures from Mg- and Ca-perchlorates solutions applied to Fephases detetected in Gale Crate; and 2) Determine if perchlorate solutions can provide improved matches with the SAM O2 temperature release profiles.

  13. Perchlorate transport and inhibition of the sodium iodide symporter measured with the yellow fluorescent protein variant YFP-H148Q/I152L

    SciTech Connect

    Cianchetta, Stefano; Bernardo, Julie di; Romeo, Giovanni; Rhoden, Kerry J.

    2010-03-15

    Perchlorate is an environmental contaminant that impairs thyroid function by interacting with the sodium iodide symporter (NIS), the transporter responsible for iodide uptake in the thyroid gland. Perchlorate is well known as a competitive inhibitor of iodide transport by NIS, and recent evidence demonstrates that NIS can also transport perchlorate. In this study, we evaluated the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) variant YFP-H148Q/I152L, as a genetically encodable biosensor of intracellular perchlorate concentration monitored by real-time fluorescence microscopy. Fluorescence of recombinant YFP-H148Q/I152L was suppressed by perchlorate and iodide with similar affinities of 1.2 mM and 1.6 mM, respectively. Perchlorate suppressed YFP-H148Q/I152L fluorescence in FRTL-5 thyroid cells and NIS-expressing COS-7 cells, but had no effect on COS-7 cells lacking NIS. Fluorescence changes in FRTL-5 cells were Na{sup +}-dependent, consistent with the Na{sup +}-dependence of NIS activity. Perchlorate uptake in FRTL-5 cells resulted in 10-fold lower intracellular concentrations than iodide uptake, and was characterized by a higher affinity (K{sub m} 4.6 muM for perchlorate and 34.8 muM for iodide) and lower maximal velocity (V{sub max} 6.8 muM/s for perchlorate and 39.5 muM/s for iodide). Perchlorate also prevented iodide-induced changes in YFP-H148Q/I152L fluorescence in FRTL-5 cells, with half-maximal inhibition occurring at 1.1-1.6 muM. In conclusion, YFP-H148Q/I152L detects perchlorate accumulation by thyroid and other NIS-expressing cells, and reveals differences in the kinetics of perchlorate versus iodide transport by NIS.

  14. The use of chlorate, nitrate, and perchlorate to promote crude oil mineralization in salt marsh sediments.

    PubMed

    Brundrett, Maeghan; Horita, Juske; Anderson, Todd; Pardue, John; Reible, Danny; Jackson, W Andrew

    2015-10-01

    Due to the high volume of crude oil released by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the salt marshes along the gulf coast were contaminated with crude oil. Biodegradation of crude oil in salt marshes is primarily limited by oxygen availability due to the high organic carbon content of the soil, high flux rate of S(2-), and saturated conditions. Chlorate, nitrate, and perchlorate were evaluated for use as electron acceptors in comparison to oxygen by comparing oil transformation and mineralization in mesocosms consisting of oiled salt marsh sediment from an area impacted by the BP Horizon oil spill. Mineralization rates were determined by measuring CO2 production and δ (13)C of the produced CO2 and compared to transformation evaluated by measuring the alkane/hopane ratios over a 4-month period. Total alkane/hopane ratios decreased (~55-70 %) for all treatments in the following relative order: aerated ≈ chlorate > nitrate > perchlorate. Total CO2 produced was similar between treatments ranging from 550-700 mg CO2-C. The δ (13)C-CO2 values generally ranged between the indigenous carbon and oil values (-17 and -27‰, respectively). Oil mineralization was greatest for the aerated treatments and least for the perchlorate amended. Our results indicate that chlorate has a similar potential as oxygen to support oil mineralization in contaminated salt marshes, but nitrate and perchlorate were less effective. The use of chlorate as a means to promote oil mineralization in situ may be a promising means to remediate contaminated salt marshes while preventing unwanted secondary impacts related to nutrient management as in the case of nitrate amendments. PMID:25854211

  15. Sweet and Sour: Attenuating Sulfidogenesis in an Advective Flow Column System with Perchlorate or Nitrate Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelbrektson, A. L.; Hubbard, C. G.; Piceno, Y.; Boussina, A.; Jin, Y.; Dubinsky, E. A.; Tom, L.; Hu, P.; Conrad, M. E.; Anderson, G. L.; Coates, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) biogenesis in oil reservoirs is a primary cause of souring and of associated costs in reservoir and pipeline maintenance. In addition to the corrosive effects of the H2S itself, abiotic and biological oxidation also generates sulfuric acid, further degrading metallic surfaces. Amending these environments with perchlorate (ClO4-) resolves these problems by inhibition of biological sulfate reduction and re-oxidation of H2S to elemental sulfur by dissimilatory (per)chlorate reducing bacteria (DPRB). Triplicate flow through columns packed with San Francisco bay sediment were flushed with bay water ([SO4=] = 25-30 mM) containing yeast extract with 50 mM inhibitor concentrations (NO3-or ClO4-) decreasing to 25 mM and finally 12.5 mM. Influent and effluent geochemistry was monitored and DNA was prepared from the sediment bed for microbial community analysis. Souring was reversed by both treatments (at 50 mM) compared to the control columns that had no ion addition. Nitrate began to re-sour when treatment concentration was decreased to 25 mM but treatment had to be decreased to 12.5 mM before the perchlorate treated columns began to re-sour. However, the treated columns re-soured to a lesser extent than the control columns. Phylochip microbial community analyses indicated microbial community shifts and phylogenetic clustering by treatment. Isotopic analysis of sulfate showed trends that broadly agreed with the geochemistry but also suggested further sulfur cycling was occurring. This study indicates that perchlorate shows great promise as an inhibitor of sulfidogenesis in natural communities and provides insight into which organisms are involved in this process.

  16. The use of chlorate, nitrate, and perchlorate to promote crude oil mineralization in salt marsh sediments.

    PubMed

    Brundrett, Maeghan; Horita, Juske; Anderson, Todd; Pardue, John; Reible, Danny; Jackson, W Andrew

    2015-10-01

    Due to the high volume of crude oil released by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the salt marshes along the gulf coast were contaminated with crude oil. Biodegradation of crude oil in salt marshes is primarily limited by oxygen availability due to the high organic carbon content of the soil, high flux rate of S(2-), and saturated conditions. Chlorate, nitrate, and perchlorate were evaluated for use as electron acceptors in comparison to oxygen by comparing oil transformation and mineralization in mesocosms consisting of oiled salt marsh sediment from an area impacted by the BP Horizon oil spill. Mineralization rates were determined by measuring CO2 production and δ (13)C of the produced CO2 and compared to transformation evaluated by measuring the alkane/hopane ratios over a 4-month period. Total alkane/hopane ratios decreased (~55-70 %) for all treatments in the following relative order: aerated ≈ chlorate > nitrate > perchlorate. Total CO2 produced was similar between treatments ranging from 550-700 mg CO2-C. The δ (13)C-CO2 values generally ranged between the indigenous carbon and oil values (-17 and -27‰, respectively). Oil mineralization was greatest for the aerated treatments and least for the perchlorate amended. Our results indicate that chlorate has a similar potential as oxygen to support oil mineralization in contaminated salt marshes, but nitrate and perchlorate were less effective. The use of chlorate as a means to promote oil mineralization in situ may be a promising means to remediate contaminated salt marshes while preventing unwanted secondary impacts related to nutrient management as in the case of nitrate amendments.

  17. Reanalysis of the Viking results suggests perchlorate and organics at midlatitudes on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-González, Rafael; Vargas, Edgar; de la Rosa, José; Raga, Alejandro C.; McKay, Christopher P.

    2010-12-01

    The most comprehensive search for organics in the Martian soil was performed by the Viking Landers. Martian soil was subjected to a thermal volatilization process to vaporize and break organic molecules, and the resultant gases and volatiles were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Only water at 0.1-1.0 wt% was detected, with traces of chloromethane at 15 ppb, at Viking landing site 1, and water at 0.05-1.0 wt% and carbon dioxide at 50-700 ppm, with traces of dichloromethane at 0.04-40 ppb, at Viking landing site 2. These chlorohydrocarbons were considered to be terrestrial contaminants, although they had not been detected at those levels in the blank runs. Recently, perchlorate was discovered in the Martian Arctic soil by the Phoenix Lander. Here we show that when Mars-like soils from the Atacama Desert containing 32 ± 6 ppm of organic carbon are mixed with 1 wt% magnesium perchlorate and heated, nearly all the organics present are decomposed to water and carbon dioxide, but a small amount is chlorinated, forming 1.6 ppm of chloromethane and 0.02 ppm of dichloromethane at 500°C. A chemical kinetics model was developed to predict the degree of oxidation and chlorination of organics in the Viking oven. Reinterpretation of the Viking results therefore suggests ≤0.1% perchlorate and 1.5-6.5 ppm organic carbon at landing site 1 and ≤0.1% perchlorate and 0.7-2.6 ppm organic carbon at landing site 2. The detection of organics on Mars is important to assess locations for future experiments to detect life itself.

  18. Composition change of uranium perchlorates with organic ligands upon mechanochemical activation of exchange processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zazhogin, A. P.; Zazhogin, A. A.; Komyak, A. I.; Umreiko, D. S.

    2008-03-01

    Results of studies on the effect of mechanochemical activation of ligand exchange processes in uranyl perchlorate-dimethylsulfoxide are presented. Spectroscopic data show that mechanical activation of the exchange process in this system results in the replacement of H2O in the first coordination sphere of uranyl UO{2/2+} by DMSO to form nanocrystals with a defined ligand sphere. Possible factors governing the noted features are considered.

  19. The ionic product of water in highly concentrated sodium perchlorate solutions.

    PubMed

    Turonek, M L; Hefter, G T; May, P M

    1998-03-01

    The ionic product of water, pK(w)=-log[H(+)][OH(-)], has been determined in aqueous solutions of sodium perchlorate over the concentration range of 1.0-8.0 M at 25 degrees C from high-precision potentiometric titrations carried out in cells with liquid junction using both glass and hydrogen electrodes. The glass electrode results are systematically lower probably as a result of interference by Na(+) ions.

  20. Copper-tantalum alloy

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.

    1986-07-15

    A tantalum-copper alloy can be made by preparing a consumable electrode consisting of an elongated copper billet containing at least two spaced apart tantalum rods extending longitudinally the length of the billet. The electrode is placed in a dc arc furnace and melted under conditions which co-melt the copper and tantalum to form the alloy.

  1. On copper peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, L.

    1988-01-01

    The action of hydrogen superoxide on copper salts in alcoholic solutions is studied. The action of hydrogen peroxide on copper hydroxide in alcoholic suspensions, and the action of ethereal hydrogen peroxide on copper hydroxide are discussed. It is concluded that using the procedure proposed excludes almost entirely the harmful effect of hydrolysis.

  2. Demystifying Controlling Copper Corrosion

    EPA Science Inventory

    The LCR systematically misses the highest health and corrosion risk sites for copper. Additionally, there are growing concerns for WWTP copper in sludges and discharge levels. There are many corrosion control differences between copper and lead. This talk explains the sometimes c...

  3. [Copper pathology (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Mallet, B; Romette, J; Di Costanzo, J D

    1982-01-30

    Copper is an essential dietary component, being the coenzyme of many enzymes with oxidase activity, e.g. ceruloplasmin, superoxide dismutase, monoamine oxidase, etc. The metabolism of copper is complex and imperfectly known. Active transport of copper through the intestinal epithelial cells involves metallothionein, a protein rich in sulfhydryl groups which also binds the copper in excess and probably prevents absorption in toxic amounts. In hepatocytes a metallothionein facilitates absorption by a similar mechanism and regulates copper distribution in the liver: incorporation in an apoceruloplasmin, storage and synthesis of copper-dependent enzymes. Metallothioneins and ceruloplasmin are essential to adequate copper homeostasis. Apart from genetic disorders, diseases involving copper usually result from hypercupraemia of varied origin. Wilson's disease and Menkes' disease, although clinically and pathogenetically different, are both marked by low ceruloplasmin and copper serum levels. The excessive liver retention of copper in Wilson's disease might be due to increased avidity of hepatic metallothioneins for copper and decreased biliary excretion through lysosomal dysfunction. Menkes' disease might be due to low avidity of intestinal and hepatic metallothioneins for copper. The basic biochemical defect responsible for these two hereditary conditions has not yet been fully elucidated.

  4. Widespread occurrence of perchlorate in water, foodstuffs and human urine collected from Kuwait and its contribution to human exposure.

    PubMed

    Alomirah, Husam F; Al-Zenki, Sameer F; Alaswad, Marivi C; Alruwaih, Noor A; Wu, Qian; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2016-06-01

    Perchlorate is a thyroid hormone-disrupting compound and is reported to occur widely in the environment. Little is known on human exposure to perchlorate in Kuwait. In this study, 218 water samples, 618 commonly consumed foodstuffs and 532 urine samples collected from Kuwait were analysed to assess the exposure of the Kuwaiti population to perchlorate. For the estimation of daily intake of perchlorate, food consumption rates were obtained from the National Nutrition Survey in the State of Kuwait (NNSSK). The results showed that leafy vegetables accounted for a major share of perchlorate exposure among the Kuwaiti population at 0.062 µg kg(-)(1) bw day(-)(1) (36.2%), followed by fruits at 0.026 µg kg(-)(1) bw day(-)(1) (15.3%) and non-leafy vegetables at 0.017 µg kg(-)(1) bw day(-)(1) (10.1%). The urinary perchlorate geometric mean (GM) concentrations ranged from 8.51 to 17.1 µg l(-)(1) for the five age groups, which were higher than those reported in other countries. The estimated urinary perchlorate exposure for the Kuwaiti general population was 0.42 µg kg(-)(1) bw day(-)(1), which was higher than that reported for the United States. The dietary intake of perchlorate for the Kuwaiti population ranged from 0.14 to 0.67 µg kg(-)(1) bw day(-)(1) for the five age groups, with a mean total daily intake of 0.17 µg kg(-)(1) bw day(-)(1) for the general population. The highest estimated dietary mean daily intake of perchlorate (0.67 µg kg(-)(1) bw day(-)(1)) was found for children at 3-5 years. The estimated dietary perchlorate exposure in Kuwait is higher than the recommended mean reference dose (RfD) but lower than that of provisional maximum tolerable daily intake (PMTDI) set by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA). PMID:27248576

  5. Widespread occurrence of perchlorate in water, foodstuffs and human urine collected from Kuwait and its contribution to human exposure.

    PubMed

    Alomirah, Husam F; Al-Zenki, Sameer F; Alaswad, Marivi C; Alruwaih, Noor A; Wu, Qian; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2016-06-01

    Perchlorate is a thyroid hormone-disrupting compound and is reported to occur widely in the environment. Little is known on human exposure to perchlorate in Kuwait. In this study, 218 water samples, 618 commonly consumed foodstuffs and 532 urine samples collected from Kuwait were analysed to assess the exposure of the Kuwaiti population to perchlorate. For the estimation of daily intake of perchlorate, food consumption rates were obtained from the National Nutrition Survey in the State of Kuwait (NNSSK). The results showed that leafy vegetables accounted for a major share of perchlorate exposure among the Kuwaiti population at 0.062 µg kg(-)(1) bw day(-)(1) (36.2%), followed by fruits at 0.026 µg kg(-)(1) bw day(-)(1) (15.3%) and non-leafy vegetables at 0.017 µg kg(-)(1) bw day(-)(1) (10.1%). The urinary perchlorate geometric mean (GM) concentrations ranged from 8.51 to 17.1 µg l(-)(1) for the five age groups, which were higher than those reported in other countries. The estimated urinary perchlorate exposure for the Kuwaiti general population was 0.42 µg kg(-)(1) bw day(-)(1), which was higher than that reported for the United States. The dietary intake of perchlorate for the Kuwaiti population ranged from 0.14 to 0.67 µg kg(-)(1) bw day(-)(1) for the five age groups, with a mean total daily intake of 0.17 µg kg(-)(1) bw day(-)(1) for the general population. The highest estimated dietary mean daily intake of perchlorate (0.67 µg kg(-)(1) bw day(-)(1)) was found for children at 3-5 years. The estimated dietary perchlorate exposure in Kuwait is higher than the recommended mean reference dose (RfD) but lower than that of provisional maximum tolerable daily intake (PMTDI) set by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA).

  6. Perchlorate contamination from the detonation of insensitive high-explosive rounds.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Michael R; Walsh, Marianne E; Ramsey, Charles A; Brochu, Sylvie; Thiboutot, Sonia; Ampleman, Guy

    2013-11-15

    The insensitive high-explosive PAX-21 was the first of its kind fielded in an artillery munition by the United States military. This formulation contains three main components: RDX, dinitroanisole, and ammonium perchlorate (AP). In March 2012, detonation tests were conducted on PAX-21 60mm mortar rounds to determine the energetic residues resulting from high-order and blow-in-place (BIP) detonations. Post-detonation residues were sampled and analyzed for the three main PAX-21 components. Concentrations of RDX and dinitroanisole in the samples were quite low, less than 0.1% of the munitions' original organic explosive filler mass, indicating high order or near high order detonations. However, disproportionately high concentrations of AP occurred in all residues. The residues averaged 15% of the original AP following high-order detonations and 38% of the original AP mass following the BIP operations. There was no correlation between AP residues and the RDX and dinitroanisole. Perchlorate readily leached from the detonation residues, with over 99% contained in the aqueous portion of the samples. Use of these rounds will result in billions of liters of water contaminated above drinking water perchlorate limits. As a result of this research, PAX-21 mortar rounds are currently restricted from use on US training ranges.

  7. Perchlorate Radiolysis on Mars and the Origin of Martian Soil Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Martucci, Hana F.H.; Miller, Stephanie R.; Bryson, Charles E.; Grunthaner, Frank J.; Grunthaner, Paula J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Results from the Viking biology experiments indicate the presence of reactive oxidants in martian soils that have previously been attributed to peroxide and superoxide. Instruments on the Mars Phoenix Lander and the Mars Science Laboratory detected perchlorate in martian soil, which is nonreactive under the conditions of the Viking biology experiments. We show that calcium perchlorate exposed to gamma rays decomposes in a CO2 atmosphere to form hypochlorite (ClO−), trapped oxygen (O2), and chlorine dioxide (ClO2). Our results show that the release of trapped O2 (g) from radiation-damaged perchlorate salts and the reaction of ClO− with amino acids that were added to the martian soils can explain the results of the Viking biology experiments. We conclude that neither hydrogen peroxide nor superoxide is required to explain the results of the Viking biology experiments. Key Words: Mars—Radiolysis—Organic degradation—in situ measurement—Planetary habitability and biosignatures. Astrobiology 13, 515–520. PMID:23746165

  8. Comparative assessment of the environmental sustainability of existing and emerging perchlorate treatment technologies for drinking water.

    PubMed

    Choe, Jong Kwon; Mehnert, Michelle H; Guest, Jeremy S; Strathmann, Timothy J; Werth, Charles J

    2013-05-01

    Environmental impacts of conventional and emerging perchlorate drinking water treatment technologies were assessed using life cycle assessment (LCA). Comparison of two ion exchange (IX) technologies (i.e., nonselective IX with periodic regeneration using brines and perchlorate-selective IX without regeneration) at an existing plant shows that brine is the dominant contributor for nonselective IX, which shows higher impact than perchlorate-selective IX. Resource consumption during the operational phase comprises >80% of the total impacts. Having identified consumables as the driving force behind environmental impacts, the relative environmental sustainability of IX, biological treatment, and catalytic reduction technologies are compared more generally using consumable inputs. The analysis indicates that the environmental impacts of heterotrophic biological treatment are 2-5 times more sensitive to influent conditions (i.e., nitrate/oxygen concentration) and are 3-14 times higher compared to IX. However, autotrophic biological treatment is most environmentally beneficial among all. Catalytic treatment using carbon-supported Re-Pd has a higher (ca. 4600 times) impact than others, but is within 0.9-30 times the impact of IX with a newly developed ligand-complexed Re-Pd catalyst formulation. This suggests catalytic reduction can be competitive with increased activity. Our assessment shows that while IX is an environmentally competitive, emerging technologies also show great promise from an environmental sustainability perspective.

  9. The amide protonation of (-)-N-benzoylcytisine in its perchlorate salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybył, Anna K.; Kubicki, Maciej; Hoffmann, Marcin

    2014-08-01

    The 13C NMR spectrum of (-)-N-benzoylcytisine perchlorate does not show a double set of signals typical of amide compounds, although this effect has been observed for the other diamine derivatives of cytisine. This observation means that in solution there must be the state of equilibrium between two forms of the cation with the protonated amide groups. DFT calculations have indeed indicated two preferred tautomeric forms with protonated oxygen atoms of amide groups. In the solid state however, according to X-ray analysis of perchlorate and perchlorate hydrate of N-benzoylcytisine the oxygen atom of the amide group in the six-membered ring A is preferred protonation site as compared with the oxygen in benzoic moiety. (-)-N-benzoylcytisine salt is the first compound from among the known derivatives of quinolizidine alkaloids that are not N-oxides, in which in solid state only the oxygen atom at cyclic amide is protonated instead of nitrogen atom or oxygen in benzoic moiety.

  10. Operational implementation of ammonium perchlorate biodegradation. Final report, July 1997--June 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Coppola, E.N.; Rine, J.; Startzell, G.

    1998-06-19

    This technology is a low-cost biodegradation process that converts the perchlorate ion (ClO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}) in process wastewater to chloride (Cl{sup {minus}}). Perchlorate can be reduced from a concentration greater than 1.0% to a concentration below detection limits (< 0.5 ppm). Effluents from this process can be discharged directly to conventional sewage treatment facilities. This process will: (1) Reduce environmental liability to DoD and its contractors by reducing the generation of hazardous wastes; (2) Minimize adverse impact of environmental compliance to DoD support operations; (3) Reduce cost for solid rocket propellant and large rocket motor disposal; (4) Facilitate component, propellant, and propellant ingredient recovery and reuse; and (5) Enable the continued use of AP, a critical defense material, in propulsion systems for the DoD. The objective of this demonstration was to provide a production-scale, operational validation of the ammonium perchlorate (AP) biodegradation process that was developed by the Air Force Research Laboratory. Components of an existing pilot-scale demonstration unit were modified and integrated into existing waste treatment facilities at Thiokol`s production plant near Brigham City, Utah.

  11. Risk assessment, remedial decisions and the challenge to protect public health: the perchlorate case study.

    PubMed

    Baier-Anderson, Cal

    2006-05-10

    While scientists have a responsibility to defer judgment in the absence of conclusive data, public health and ecological protection require that government regulators make decisions based on available information. The risk assessment paradigm has evolved to help risk managers balance risks to public health with the cost of pollution control and remediation. Risk assessments are designed to be reasonably protective of public health, however the time and money required to develop and evaluate a robust scientific database can significantly delay regulatory action while exposures continue. The federal assessment of perchlorate, a component of rocket fuel and a thyroid toxicant, is presented here as a case study that demonstrates some of the limitations of risk assessment in protecting public health. Perchlorate was detected in a city well field that lies beneath a military training range at Aberdeen Proving Ground, a U.S. Army garrison in Maryland. Cleanup was put on hold, pending promulgation of a national drinking water standard for perchlorate. This case study (1) illustrates the challenge of preventing chemical exposures in the absence of promulgated standards, and (2) makes recommendations for approaches to preventing exposures to chemicals of unknown, or uncertain toxicity before they occur.

  12. Research Advances: Perchlorate in Dairy and Breast Milk Samples; NO Glow on Mars; Physical Chemistry to the Rescue: Differentiating Nicotinic and Cholinergic Agonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Angela G.

    2005-07-01

    Perchlorate levels in milk suggest widespread presence of the chemical. NO emissions indicate circulation in Martian atmosphere. Modeling reveals subtle differences in drug membrane receptor interactions.

  13. Pure CuCr2O4 nanoparticles: Synthesis, characterization and their morphological and size effects on the catalytic thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Seyed Ghorban; Abazari, Reza; Gavi, Azam

    2014-11-01

    In the present paper a pure phase of the copper chromite spinel nanoparticles (CuCr2O4 SNPs) were synthesized via the sol-gel route using citric acid as a complexing agent. Then, the CuCr2O4 SNPs has been characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). In the next step, with the addition of Cu-Cr-O nanoparticles (NPs), the effects of different parameters such as Cu-Cr-O particle size and the Cu/Cr molar ratios on the thermal behavior of Cu-Cr-O NPs + AP (ammonium perchlorate) mixtures were investigated. As such, the catalytic effect of the Cu-Cr-O NPs for thermal decomposition of AP was evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). TGA/DSC results showed that the samples with different morphologies exhibited different catalytic activity in different stages of thermal decomposition of AP. Also, in the presence of Cu-Cr-O nanocatalysts, all of the exothermic peaks of AP shifted to a lower temperature, indicating the thermal decomposition of AP was enhanced. Moreover, the heat released (ΔH) in the presence of Cu-Cr-O nanocatalysts was increased to 1490 J g-1.

  14. Inhibition of microbial sulfate reduction in a flow-through column system by (per)chlorate treatment

    PubMed Central

    Engelbrektson, Anna; Hubbard, Christopher G.; Tom, Lauren M.; Boussina, Aaron; Jin, Yong T.; Wong, Hayden; Piceno, Yvette M.; Carlson, Hans K.; Conrad, Mark E.; Anderson, Gary; Coates, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction is a primary cause of oil reservoir souring. Here we show that amendment with chlorate or perchlorate [collectively (per)chlorate] potentially resolves this issue. Triplicate packed columns inoculated with marine sediment were flushed with coastal water amended with yeast extract and one of nitrate, chlorate, or perchlorate. Results showed that although sulfide production was dramatically reduced by all treatments, effluent sulfide was observed in the nitrate (10 mM) treatment after an initial inhibition period. In contrast, no effluent sulfide was observed with (per)chlorate (10 mM). Microbial community analyses indicated temporal community shifts and phylogenetic clustering by treatment. Nitrate addition stimulated Xanthomonadaceae and Rhizobiaceae growth, supporting their role in nitrate metabolism. (Per)chlorate showed distinct effects on microbial community structure compared with nitrate and resulted in a general suppression of the community relative to the untreated control combined with a significant decrease in sulfate reducing species abundance indicating specific toxicity. Furthermore, chlorate stimulated Pseudomonadaceae and Pseudoalteromonadaceae, members of which are known chlorate respirers, suggesting that chlorate may also control sulfidogenesis by biocompetitive exclusion of sulfate-reduction. Perchlorate addition stimulated Desulfobulbaceae and Desulfomonadaceae, which contain sulfide oxidizing and elemental sulfur-reducing species respectively, suggesting that effluent sulfide concentrations may be controlled through sulfur redox cycling in addition to toxicity and biocompetitive exclusion. Sulfur isotope analyses further support sulfur cycling in the columns, even when sulfide is not detected. This study indicates that (per)chlorate show great promise as inhibitors of sulfidogenesis in natural communities and provides insight into which organisms and respiratory processes are involved. PMID:25071731

  15. Mesophilic, Circumneutral Anaerobic Iron Oxidation as a Remediation Mechanism for Radionuclides, Nitrate and Perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, S.; Thrash, J. C.; Coates, J. D.

    2008-12-01

    Iron oxidation is a novel anaerobic metabolism where microorganisms obtain reducing equivalents from the oxidization of Fe(II) and assimilate carbon from organic carbon compounds or CO2. Recent evidence indicates that in combination with the activity of dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, anaerobic microbial Fe(II) oxidation can also contribute to the global iron redox cycle. Studies have also proved that Fe(II)- oxidation is ubiquitous in diverse environments and produce a broad range of insoluble iron forms as end products. These biogenic Fe(III)-oxides and mixed valence Fe minerals have a very high adsorption capacity of heavy metals and radionuclides. Adsorption and immobilization by these biogenic Fe phases produced at circumneutral pH, is now considered a very effective mode of remediation of radionuclides like Uranium, especially under variable redox conditions. By coupling soluble and insoluble Fe(II) oxidation with nitrate and perchlorate as terminal electron acceptors in-situ, anaerobic Fe-oxidation can also be used for environmental cleanup of Fe through Fe-mineral precipitation, as well as nitrate and perchlorate through reduction. Coupling of Fe as the sole electron and energy source to the reduction of perchlorate or nitrate boosts the metabolism without building up biomass hence also taking care of biofouling. To understand the mechanisms by which microorganisms can grow at circumneutral pH by mesophilic, anaerobic iron oxidation and the ability of microorganisms to reduce nitrate and perchlorate coupled to iron oxidation recent work in our lab involved the physiological characterization of Dechlorospirillum strain VDY which was capable of anaerobic iron-oxidation with either nitrate or perchlorate serving as terminal electron acceptor. Under non-growth conditions, VDY oxidized 3mM Fe(II) coupled to nitrate reduction, and 2mM Fe(II) coupled to perchlorate reduction, in 24 hours. It contained a copy of the RuBisCO cbbM subunit gene which was

  16. catena-Poly[[[(2,2′-bipyrid­yl)copper(II)]-μ-l-alaninato] perchlorate monohydrate

    PubMed Central

    Braban, Mircea; Haiduc, Ionel; Lönnecke, Peter

    2009-01-01

    In the structure of the polymeric title complex, {[Cu(C3H6NO2)(C10H8N2)]ClO4·H2O}n, the carboxyl­ate group of the chelating amino acid is further linked to a neighbouring Cu centre, generating a supra­molecular single-stranded chain parallel to [010]. The structure displays inter­molecular N—H⋯O and O—H⋯O hydrogen bonding, which consolidates the crystal packing. PMID:21581521

  17. Rapid measurement of perchlorate in polar ice cores down to sub-ng L(-1) levels without pre-concentration.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Kari; Cole-Dai, Jihong; Brandis, Derek; Cox, Thomas; Splett, Scott

    2015-10-01

    An ion chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (IC-ESI-MS/MS) method has been developed for rapid and accurate measurement of perchlorate in polar snow and ice core samples in which perchlorate concentrations are expected to be as low as 0.1 ng L(-1). Separation of perchlorate from major inorganic species in snow is achieved with an ion chromatography system interfaced to an AB SCIEX triple quadrupole mass spectrometer operating in multiple reaction monitoring mode. Under optimized conditions, the limit of detection and lower limit of quantification without pre-concentration have been determined to be 0.1 and 0.3 ng L(-1), respectively, with a linear dynamic range of 0.3-10.0 ng L(-1) in routine measurement. These represent improvements over previously reported methods using similar analytical techniques. The improved method allows fast, accurate, and reproducible perchlorate quantification down to the sub-ng L(-1) level and will facilitate perchlorate measurement in the study of natural perchlorate production with polar ice cores in which perchlorate concentrations are anticipated to vary in the low and sub-ng L(-1) range. Initial measurements of perchlorate in ice core samples from central Greenland show that typical perchlorate concentrations in snow dated prior to the Industrial Revolution are about 0.8 ng L(-1), while perchlorate concentrations are significantly higher in recent (post-1980) snow, suggesting that anthropogenic sources are a significant contributor to perchlorate in the current environment.

  18. Levels, indoor-outdoor relationships and exposure risks of airborne particle-associated perchlorate and chlorate in two urban areas in Eastern Asia.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lan; Yang, Lingxiao; Chen, Jianmin; Toda, Kei; Wang, Xinfeng; Zhang, Junmei; Yamasaki, Dai; Nakamura, Yukihide; Sui, Xiao; Zheng, Longfei; Wen, Liang; Xu, Caihong; Wang, Wenxing

    2015-09-01

    Indoor and outdoor concentrations of PM2.5-associated perchlorate (ClO4(-)) and chlorate (ClO3(-)) were investigated in Jinan, China, and size-resolved perchlorate and chlorate were studied in Kumamoto, Japan. The average outdoor PM2.5-associated concentrations of perchlorate and chlorate were 4.18 ng m(-3) and 2.82 ng m(-3), respectively, in Jinan. Perchlorate and chlorate were mainly distributed in fine particles, and their approximate PM2.5-associated concentrations were 0.04 ng m(-3) and 4.14 ng m(-3), respectively, in Kumamoto. The ratios of ClO3(-)/ClO4(-) ranged from 18.72 to 360.22 in Kumamoto and from 0.03 to 7.45 in Jinan. The highest concentration of perchlorate (173.76 ng m(-3)) was observed on Spring Festival Eve. This finding and the significant correlation between perchlorate and fireworks-related components (Cl(-) and K(+)) indicated that the fireworks display was a significant source of perchlorate in Jinan. The indoor concentrations of perchlorate and chlorate in Jinan were 3.54 ng m(-3) (range, 0.14-125.14 ng m(-3)) and 0.94 ng m(-3) (range, 0.10-1.80 ng m(-3)), respectively. In the absence of an indoor source of perchlorate, the occurrence of indoor concentrations higher than those found outdoors was a common effect of individual fireworks displays near the sampling sites, coupled with meteorological influences and poor indoor diffusion conditions. The exposure risks of perchlorate and chlorate indoors indicated that the potential risk of perchlorate exposure to children during fireworks displays is deserving of concern.

  19. Levels, indoor-outdoor relationships and exposure risks of airborne particle-associated perchlorate and chlorate in two urban areas in Eastern Asia.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lan; Yang, Lingxiao; Chen, Jianmin; Toda, Kei; Wang, Xinfeng; Zhang, Junmei; Yamasaki, Dai; Nakamura, Yukihide; Sui, Xiao; Zheng, Longfei; Wen, Liang; Xu, Caihong; Wang, Wenxing

    2015-09-01

    Indoor and outdoor concentrations of PM2.5-associated perchlorate (ClO4(-)) and chlorate (ClO3(-)) were investigated in Jinan, China, and size-resolved perchlorate and chlorate were studied in Kumamoto, Japan. The average outdoor PM2.5-associated concentrations of perchlorate and chlorate were 4.18 ng m(-3) and 2.82 ng m(-3), respectively, in Jinan. Perchlorate and chlorate were mainly distributed in fine particles, and their approximate PM2.5-associated concentrations were 0.04 ng m(-3) and 4.14 ng m(-3), respectively, in Kumamoto. The ratios of ClO3(-)/ClO4(-) ranged from 18.72 to 360.22 in Kumamoto and from 0.03 to 7.45 in Jinan. The highest concentration of perchlorate (173.76 ng m(-3)) was observed on Spring Festival Eve. This finding and the significant correlation between perchlorate and fireworks-related components (Cl(-) and K(+)) indicated that the fireworks display was a significant source of perchlorate in Jinan. The indoor concentrations of perchlorate and chlorate in Jinan were 3.54 ng m(-3) (range, 0.14-125.14 ng m(-3)) and 0.94 ng m(-3) (range, 0.10-1.80 ng m(-3)), respectively. In the absence of an indoor source of perchlorate, the occurrence of indoor concentrations higher than those found outdoors was a common effect of individual fireworks displays near the sampling sites, coupled with meteorological influences and poor indoor diffusion conditions. The exposure risks of perchlorate and chlorate indoors indicated that the potential risk of perchlorate exposure to children during fireworks displays is deserving of concern. PMID:25898387

  20. Molecular assessment of inoculated and indigenous bacteria in biofilms from a pilot-scale perchlorate-reducing bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Logan, B E; Regan, J M; Achenbach, L A; Bruns, M A

    2005-04-01

    Bioremediation of perchlorate-contaminated groundwater can occur via bacterial reduction of perchlorate to chloride. Although perchlorate reduction has been demonstrated in bacterial pure cultures, little is known about the efficacy of using perchlorate-reducing bacteria as inoculants for bioremediation in the field. A pilot-scale, fixed-bed bioreactor containing plastic support medium was used to treat perchlorate-contaminated groundwater at a site in Southern California. The bioreactor was inoculated with a field-grown suspension of the perchlorate-respiring bacterium Dechlorosoma sp. strain KJ and fed groundwater containing indigenous bacteria and a carbon source amendment. Because the reactor was flushed weekly to remove accumulated biomass, only bacteria capable of growing in biofilms in the reactor were expected to survive. After 26 days of operation, perchlorate was not detected in bioreactor effluent. Perchlorate remained undetected by ion chromatography (detection limit 4 mug L(-1)) during 6 months of operation, after which the reactor was drained. Plastic medium was subsampled from top, middle, and bottom locations of the reactor for shipment on blue ice and storage at -80 degrees C prior to analysis. Microbial community DNA was extracted from successive washes of thawed biofilm material for PCR-based community profiling by 16S-23S ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA). No DNA sequences characteristic of strain KJ were recovered from any RISA bands. The most intense bands yielded DNA sequences with high similarities to Dechloromonas spp., a closely related but different genus of perchlorate-respiring bacteria. Additional sequences from RISA profiles indicated presence of representatives of the low G+C gram-positive bacteria and the Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides group. Confocal scanning laser microscopy and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were also used to examine biofilms using genus-specific 16S ribosomal RNA probes. FISH was more

  1. Comparison of biotic and abiotic treatment approaches for co-mingled perchlorate, nitrate, and nitramine explosives in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, C. E.; Fuller, M. E.; Condee, C. W.; Lowey, J. M.; Hatzinger, P. B.

    2007-01-01

    Biological and abiotic approaches for treating co-mingled perchlorate, nitrate, and nitramine explosives in groundwater were compared in microcosm and column studies. In microcosms, microscale zero-valent iron (mZVI), nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI), and nickel catalyzed the reduction of RDX and HMX from initial concentrations of 9 and 1 mg/L, respectively, to below detection (0.02 mg/L), within 2 h. The mZVI and nZVI also degraded nitrate (3 mg/L) to below 0.4 mg/L, but none of the metal catalysts were observed to appreciably reduce perchlorate (˜ 5 mg/L) in microcosms. Perchlorate losses were observed after approximately 2 months in columns of aquifer solids treated with mZVI, but this decline appears to be the result of biodegradation rather than abiotic reduction. An emulsified vegetable oil substrate was observed to effectively promote the biological reduction of nitrate, RDX and perchlorate in microcosms, and all four target contaminants in the flow-through columns. Nitrate and perchlorate were biodegraded most rapidly, followed by RDX and then HMX, although the rates of biological reduction for the nitramine explosives were appreciably slower than observed for mZVI or nickel. A model was developed to compare contaminant degradation mechanisms and rates between the biotic and abiotic treatments.

  2. (Per)chlorate Reduction by the Thermophilic Bacterium Moorella perchloratireducens sp. nov., Isolated from Underground Gas Storage▿

    PubMed Central

    Balk, Melike; van Gelder, Ton; Weelink, Sander A.; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    2008-01-01

    A thermophilic bacterium, strain An10, was isolated from underground gas storage with methanol as a substrate and perchlorate as an electron acceptor. Cells were gram-positive straight rods, 0.4 to 0.6 μm in diameter and 2 to 8 μm in length, growing as single cells or in pairs. Spores were terminal with a bulged sporangium. The temperature range for growth was 40 to 70°C, with an optimum at 55 to 60°C. The pH optimum was around 7. The salinity range for growth was between 0 and 40 g NaCl liter−1 with an optimum at 10 g liter−1. Strain An10 was able to grow on CO, methanol, pyruvate, glucose, fructose, cellobiose, mannose, xylose, and pectin. The isolate was able to respire with (per)chlorate, nitrate, thiosulfate, neutralized Fe(III) complexes, and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate. The G+C content of the DNA was 57.6 mol%. On the basis of 16S rRNA analysis, strain An10 was most closely related to Moorella thermoacetica and Moorella thermoautotrophica. The bacterium reduced perchlorate and chlorate completely to chloride. Key enzymes, perchlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase, were detected in cell extracts. Strain An10 is the first thermophilic and gram-positive bacterium with the ability to use (per)chlorate as a terminal electron acceptor. PMID:17981952

  3. Comparison of biotic and abiotic treatment approaches for co-mingled perchlorate, nitrate, and nitramine explosives in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, C E; Fuller, M E; Condee, C W; Lowey, J M; Hatzinger, P B

    2007-01-30

    Biological and abiotic approaches for treating co-mingled perchlorate, nitrate, and nitramine explosives in groundwater were compared in microcosm and column studies. In microcosms, microscale zero-valent iron (mZVI), nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI), and nickel catalyzed the reduction of RDX and HMX from initial concentrations of 9 and 1 mg/L, respectively, to below detection (0.02 mg/L), within 2 h. The mZVI and nZVI also degraded nitrate (3 mg/L) to below 0.4 mg/L, but none of the metal catalysts were observed to appreciably reduce perchlorate ( approximately 5 mg/L) in microcosms. Perchlorate losses were observed after approximately 2 months in columns of aquifer solids treated with mZVI, but this decline appears to be the result of biodegradation rather than abiotic reduction. An emulsified vegetable oil substrate was observed to effectively promote the biological reduction of nitrate, RDX and perchlorate in microcosms, and all four target contaminants in the flow-through columns. Nitrate and perchlorate were biodegraded most rapidly, followed by RDX and then HMX, although the rates of biological reduction for the nitramine explosives were appreciably slower than observed for mZVI or nickel. A model was developed to compare contaminant degradation mechanisms and rates between the biotic and abiotic treatments. PMID:17055109

  4. Bioregeneration of perchlorate-laden gel-type anion-exchange resin in a fluidized bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Arjun K; Sharbatmaleki, Mohamadali; Batista, Jacimaria R

    2010-05-15

    Selective ion-exchange resins are very effective to remove perchlorate from contaminated waters. However, these resins are currently incinerated after one time use, making the ion-exchange process incomplete and unsustainable for perchlorate removal. Resin bioregeneration is a new concept that combines ion-exchange with biological reduction by directly contacting perchlorate-laden resins with a perchlorate-reducing bacterial culture. In this research, feasibility of the bioregeneration of perchlorate-laden gel-type anion-exchange resin was investigated. Bench-scale bioregeneration experiments, using a fluidized bed reactor and a bioreactor, were performed to evaluate the feasibility of the process and to gain insight into potential mechanisms that control the process. The results of the bioregeneration tests suggested that the initial phase of the bioregeneration process might be controlled by kinetics, while the later phase seems to be controlled by diffusion. Feasibility study showed that direct bioregeneration of gel-type resin was effective in a fluidized-bed reactor, and that the resin could be defouled, reused, and repeatedly regenerated using the method applied in this research.

  5. Estimates of exposures to perchlorate from consumption of human milk, dairy milk, and water, and comparison to current reference dose.

    PubMed

    Baier-Anderson, Cal; Blount, Benjamin C; Lakind, Judy S; Naiman, Daniel Q; Wilbur, Sharon B; Tan, Shirlee

    2006-02-01

    To develop an enforceable drinking water standard from a health-based reference dose, sources of exposure and relevant exposure factors across the U.S. population must be considered. Human exposures, expressed as an estimated daily exposure, can be used to evaluate the health protectiveness of a range of potential regulatory values, thus providing a scientific foundation on which decisions can be based. Recent evidence points to detectable levels of perchlorate in milk and other foods. The purpose of this article is to estimate human exposure to perchlorate from ingestion of drinking water, human milk, and dairy milk. Drinking-water exposure was based on a range of possible regulatory values, derived from the recently established reference dose. Exposure to perchlorate from the consumption of milk was based on exploratory Food and Drug Administration dairy milk data, and on additional published perchlorate concentrations in dairy and human milk samples. This effort is exploratory in nature due to the limited data available at this time. However, it is anticipated that these exposure estimates and comparison with the current reference dose will stimulate dialogue and research that will advance the risk assessment for perchlorate.

  6. Estimated dietary exposure of Canadians to perchlorate through the consumption of fruits and vegetables available in Ottawa markets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongwen; Forsyth, Don; Lau, Benjamin P-Y; Pelletier, Luc; Bronson, Roni; Gaertner, Dean

    2009-10-14

    There has been increasing concern over the contamination of drinking water and food with perchlorate. Studies have reported perchlorate in a variety of foods, including lettuce, milk, fruits, and juices. In this study, 150 food samples were analyzed by ion chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (IC-MS/MS) to determine the concentrations of perchlorate in imported and domestic fruits and vegetables available from retail outlets in Ottawa, Canada. Perchlorate was found in most of the tested food types with concentrations appearing to vary by commodity and country of origin. Levels ranged from nondetectable to 536 microg/kg, with Guatemalan cantaloupes (156 +/- 232 microg/kg), United States spinach (133 +/- 24.9 microg/kg), Chilean green grapes (45.5 +/- 13.3 microg/kg), and United States Romaine lettuce (29.1 +/- 10.5 microg/kg) having the highest concentrations. Dietary exposure to perchlorate from analyzed fruits and vegetables was estimated to be approximately 36.6 and 41.1 ng/kg bw/day for toddlers (1-4 yrs) and children (5-11yrs), respectively.

  7. Bis(2,2′-bipyridyl-κ2 N,N′)dichlorido­rhodium(III) perchlorate

    PubMed Central

    Dikhtiarenko, Alla; Torre-Fernández, Laura; García-Granda, Santiago; García, José R.; Gimeno, José

    2012-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, [RhCl2(C10H8N2)2]ClO4, consists of one unit of the cationic complex [RhCl2(bipy)2]+ and one uncoordinated perchlorate anion. The RhIII atom is coordinated by four N atoms from two bipyridyl ligands and two Cl atoms, forming a distorted octa­hedral environment. The Cl ligands are cis. Two intramolecular C—H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds occur in the cationic complex . In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked together by a hydrogen-bond network involving the H atoms of bipyridyl rings and perchlorate anions. An O atom of the perchlorate anion is disordered over two sites, with an occupancy-factor ratio of 0.78 (3):0.22 (3). PMID:22719282

  8. The influence of perchlorates on the fluorescence quenching of 9,10-dichloroanthracene by bromide salts in acetone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mac, Marek; Tokarczyk, Bogdan

    1999-05-01

    Fluorescence quenching of 9,10-dichloroanthracene by lithium bromide and tetra- n-butylammonium bromide in acetone has been investigated in the presence of perchlorate salts. In the presence of LiBr, the Stern-Volmer (S-V) plots exhibit downward curvatures indicating that two species are responsible for the quenching process, namely free bromide anions and lithium bromide ion pairs. The addition of a perchlorate salt modifies the S-V dependencies due to the influence of perchlorates on the degree of lithium bromide dissociation. The association constant of lithium bromide has been determined by conductivity measurements and it agrees well with the estimates made from the fluorescence quenching measurements. The mechanism of fluorescence quenching by lithium bromide is discussed on the basis of electron transfer and the heavy-atom effect.

  9. Light and variable 37Cl/35Cl ratios in rocks from Gale Crater, Mars: Possible signature of perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, K. A.; Martin, P.; Archer, P. D.; Atreya, S. K.; Conrad, P. G.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Fairén, A. G.; Franz, H. B.; Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Malespin, C.; Ming, D. W.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Sutter, B.

    2016-03-01

    Cl isotope ratios measured on HCl thermally evolved from as-yet-unknown phases in sedimentary rocks and sand in Gale Crater provide unexpected insights to the Martian surficial Cl cycle. The seven samples yield δ37Cl values ranging from - 1 ± 25 ‰ to - 51 ± 5 ‰. Five analyses from two samples of the Sheepbed mudstone (Yellowknife Bay study area) are analytically indistinguishable with a mean δ37Cl of - 11 ± 7 ‰ (1 σ). In contrast, four mudstones/sandstones from the Kimberley and Pahrump study areas also yielded indistinguishable ratios, but with a mean δ37Cl of - 43 ± 6 ‰. The Rocknest sand deposit gave a highly uncertain δ37Cl value of - 7 ± 44 ‰. These light and highly variable δ37Cl values are unique among known solar system materials. Two endmember models are offered to account for these observations, and in both, perchlorate, with its extreme ability to fractionate Cl isotopes, is critical. In the first model, SAM is detecting HCl from an oxychlorine compound (e.g., perchlorate) produced from volcanic gas emissions by atmospheric chemical reactions. Similar reactions in Earth's atmosphere may be responsible for the isotopically lightest known Cl outside of this study, in perchlorate from the Atacama Desert. Some of the Gale Crater δ37Cl values are more negative than those in Atacama perchlorate, but because reaction mechanisms and associated fractionation factors are unknown, it is impossible to assess whether this difference is prohibitive. If the negative δ37Cl signal is produced in this fashion, the isotopic variability among samples could arise either from variations in the relative size of the reactant chloride and product perchlorate reservoirs, or from variations in the fraction of perchlorate reduced back to chloride after deposition. Such reduction strongly enriches 37Cl in the residual perchlorate. Perchlorate reduction alone offers an alternative endmember model that can explain the observed data if SAM measured HCl derived

  10. The Effects of Perchlorates on the Permafrost Methanogens: Implication for Autotrophic Life on Mars

    PubMed Central

    Shcherbakova, Viktoria; Oshurkova, Viktoria; Yoshimura, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    The terrestrial permafrost represents a range of possible cryogenic extraterrestrial ecosystems on Earth-like planets without obvious surface ice, such as Mars. The autotrophic and chemolithotrophic psychrotolerant methanogens are more likely than aerobes to function as a model for life forms that may exist in frozen subsurface environments on Mars, which has no free oxygen, inaccessible organic matter, and extremely low amounts of unfrozen water. Our research on the genesis of methane, its content and distribution in permafrost horizons of different ages and origin demonstrated the presence of methane in permanently frozen fine-grained sediments. Earlier, we isolated and described four strains of methanogenic archaea of Methanobacterium and Methanosarcina genera from samples of Pliocene and Holocene permafrost from Eastern Siberia. In this paper we study the effect of sodium and magnesium perchlorates on growth of permafrost and nonpermafrost methanogens, and present evidence that permafrost hydogenotrophic methanogens are more resistant to the chaotropic agent found in Martian soil. In this paper we study the effect of sodium and magnesium perchlorates on the growth of permafrost and nonpermafrost methanogens, and present evidence that permafrost hydogenotrophic methanogens are more resistant to the chaotropic agent found in Martian soil. Furthermore, as shown in the studies strain M2T M. arcticum, probably can use perchlorate anion as an electron acceptor in anaerobic methane oxidation. Earth’s subzero subsurface environments are the best approximation of environments on Mars, which is most likely to harbor methanogens; thus, a biochemical understanding of these pathways is expected to provide a basis for designing experiments to detect autotrophic methane-producing life forms on Mars.

  11. The Effects of Perchlorates on the Permafrost Methanogens: Implication for Autotrophic Life on Mars.

    PubMed

    Shcherbakova, Viktoria; Oshurkova, Viktoria; Yoshimura, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    The terrestrial permafrost represents a range of possible cryogenic extraterrestrial ecosystems on Earth-like planets without obvious surface ice, such as Mars. The autotrophic and chemolithotrophic psychrotolerant methanogens are more likely than aerobes to function as a model for life forms that may exist in frozen subsurface environments on Mars, which has no free oxygen, inaccessible organic matter, and extremely low amounts of unfrozen water. Our research on the genesis of methane, its content and distribution in permafrost horizons of different ages and origin demonstrated the presence of methane in permanently frozen fine-grained sediments. Earlier, we isolated and described four strains of methanogenic archaea of Methanobacterium and Methanosarcina genera from samples of Pliocene and Holocene permafrost from Eastern Siberia. In this paper we study the effect of sodium and magnesium perchlorates on growth of permafrost and nonpermafrost methanogens, and present evidence that permafrost hydogenotrophic methanogens are more resistant to the chaotropic agent found in Martian soil. In this paper we study the effect of sodium and magnesium perchlorates on the growth of permafrost and nonpermafrost methanogens, and present evidence that permafrost hydogenotrophic methanogens are more resistant to the chaotropic agent found in Martian soil. Furthermore, as shown in the studies strain M2(T) M. arcticum, probably can use perchlorate anion as an electron acceptor in anaerobic methane oxidation. Earth's subzero subsurface environments are the best approximation of environments on Mars, which is most likely to harbor methanogens; thus, a biochemical understanding of these pathways is expected to provide a basis for designing experiments to detect autotrophic methane-producing life forms on Mars. PMID:27682103

  12. The Effects of Perchlorates on the Permafrost Methanogens: Implication for Autotrophic Life on Mars

    PubMed Central

    Shcherbakova, Viktoria; Oshurkova, Viktoria; Yoshimura, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    The terrestrial permafrost represents a range of possible cryogenic extraterrestrial ecosystems on Earth-like planets without obvious surface ice, such as Mars. The autotrophic and chemolithotrophic psychrotolerant methanogens are more likely than aerobes to function as a model for life forms that may exist in frozen subsurface environments on Mars, which has no free oxygen, inaccessible organic matter, and extremely low amounts of unfrozen water. Our research on the genesis of methane, its content and distribution in permafrost horizons of different ages and origin demonstrated the presence of methane in permanently frozen fine-grained sediments. Earlier, we isolated and described four strains of methanogenic archaea of Methanobacterium and Methanosarcina genera from samples of Pliocene and Holocene permafrost from Eastern Siberia. In this paper we study the effect of sodium and magnesium perchlorates on growth of permafrost and nonpermafrost methanogens, and present evidence that permafrost hydogenotrophic methanogens are more resistant to the chaotropic agent found in Martian soil. In this paper we study the effect of sodium and magnesium perchlorates on the growth of permafrost and nonpermafrost methanogens, and present evidence that permafrost hydogenotrophic methanogens are more resistant to the chaotropic agent found in Martian soil. Furthermore, as shown in the studies strain M2T M. arcticum, probably can use perchlorate anion as an electron acceptor in anaerobic methane oxidation. Earth’s subzero subsurface environments are the best approximation of environments on Mars, which is most likely to harbor methanogens; thus, a biochemical understanding of these pathways is expected to provide a basis for designing experiments to detect autotrophic methane-producing life forms on Mars. PMID:27682103

  13. The Effects of Perchlorates on the Permafrost Methanogens: Implication for Autotrophic Life on Mars.

    PubMed

    Shcherbakova, Viktoria; Oshurkova, Viktoria; Yoshimura, Yoshitaka

    2015-09-09

    The terrestrial permafrost represents a range of possible cryogenic extraterrestrial ecosystems on Earth-like planets without obvious surface ice, such as Mars. The autotrophic and chemolithotrophic psychrotolerant methanogens are more likely than aerobes to function as a model for life forms that may exist in frozen subsurface environments on Mars, which has no free oxygen, inaccessible organic matter, and extremely low amounts of unfrozen water. Our research on the genesis of methane, its content and distribution in permafrost horizons of different ages and origin demonstrated the presence of methane in permanently frozen fine-grained sediments. Earlier, we isolated and described four strains of methanogenic archaea of Methanobacterium and Methanosarcina genera from samples of Pliocene and Holocene permafrost from Eastern Siberia. In this paper we study the effect of sodium and magnesium perchlorates on growth of permafrost and nonpermafrost methanogens, and present evidence that permafrost hydogenotrophic methanogens are more resistant to the chaotropic agent found in Martian soil. In this paper we study the effect of sodium and magnesium perchlorates on the growth of permafrost and nonpermafrost methanogens, and present evidence that permafrost hydogenotrophic methanogens are more resistant to the chaotropic agent found in Martian soil. Furthermore, as shown in the studies strain M2(T) M. arcticum, probably can use perchlorate anion as an electron acceptor in anaerobic methane oxidation. Earth's subzero subsurface environments are the best approximation of environments on Mars, which is most likely to harbor methanogens; thus, a biochemical understanding of these pathways is expected to provide a basis for designing experiments to detect autotrophic methane-producing life forms on Mars.

  14. High adherence copper plating process

    DOEpatents

    Nignardot, Henry

    1993-01-01

    A process for applying copper to a substrate of aluminum or steel by electrodeposition and for preparing an aluminum or steel substrate for electrodeposition of copper. Practice of the invention provides good adhesion of the copper layer to the substrate.

  15. Structural and magnetic characterization of a tetranuclear copper(II) cubane stabilized by intramolecular metal cation-π interactions.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Raffaello; Rivière, Eric; Giorgi, Michel; Jamet, Hélène; Rousselot-Pailley, Pierre; Réglier, Marius; Simaan, A Jalila; Tron, Thierry

    2013-05-20

    A novel tetranuclear copper(II) complex (1) was synthesized from the self-assembly of copper(II) perchlorate and the ligand N-benzyl-1-(2-pyridyl)methaneimine (L(1)). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies revealed that complex 1 consists of a Cu4(OH)4 cubane core, where the four copper(II) centers are linked by μ3-hydroxo bridges. Each copper(II) ion is in a distorted square-pyramidal geometry. X-ray analysis also evidenced an unusual metal cation-π interaction between the copper ions and phenyl substituents of the ligand. Calculations based on the density functional theory method were used to quantify the strength of this metal-π interaction, which appears as an important stabilizing parameter of the cubane core, possibly acting as a driving parameter in the self-aggregation process. In contrast, using the ligand N-phenethyl-1-(2-pyridyl)methaneimine (L(2)), which only differs from L(1) by one methylene group, the same synthetic procedure led to a binuclear bis(μ-hydroxo)copper(II) complex (2) displaying intermolecular π-π interactions or, by a slight variation of the experimental conditions, to a mononuclear complex (3). These complexes were studied by X-ray diffraction techniques. The magnetic properties of complexes 1 and 2 are reported and discussed.

  16. Formation of oxidizing species via irradiation of perchlorates using high-energy electrons and D 2 + ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crandall, Parker B.; Gillis-Davis, Jeffrey J.; Kaiser, Ralf-Ingo

    2016-10-01

    The perchlorate ion (ClO4–) has garnered particular interest in recent years following the discovery of perchlorate salts in the Martian regolith at levels of 0.4–0.6 wt% by the Phoenix lander in 2006 and Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover in 2013. Due to their oxidizing properties, perchlorates are suspected to play a contributing role to the surprising lack of organics on the Martian surface. In this study, magnesium perchlorate hexahydrate (Mg(ClO4)2●6H2O) samples were irradiated with monoenergetic beams of 5 keV electrons and D2+ ions separately, sequentially, and simultaneously to simulate the effects of galactic cosmic ray exposure of perchlorates. The irradiation experiments were carried out under ultra-high vacuum conditions at 50 K, after which the samples were slowly heated to 300 K (0.5 K min–1) while desorbing products were monitored by quadrupole mass spectrometry. In all cases, molecular oxygen (O2) was detected upon the onset of irradiation and again during the warmup phase. In the case of simultaneous irradiation, deuterated water (D2O) and deuterium peroxide (D2O2) were also detected as the sample was heated whereas in the D2+ experiment small amounts of D2O2 was found exclusively. When samples were irradiated sequentially, the production of D2O2 was dependent upon the sample being irradiated with D2+ ions prior to electrons. These experiments show that perchlorates are capable of producing multiple oxidizing agents (O2, D2O2) which may also account for the lack of organics on the Martian surface.

  17. Perchlorate exposure does not modulate temporal variation of whole-body thyroid and androgen hormone content in threespine stickleback

    PubMed Central

    Gardell, Alison M.; Dillon, Danielle M.; Smayda, Lauren C.; von Hippel, Frank A.; Cresko, William A.; Postlethwait, John H.; Buck, C. Loren

    2015-01-01

    Previously we showed that exposure of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) to the endocrine disruptor perchlorate results in pronounced structural changes in thyroid and gonad, while surprisingly, whole-body thyroid hormone concentrations remain unaffected. To test for hormone titer variations on a finer scale, we evaluated the interactive effects of time (diel and reproductive season) and perchlorate exposure on whole-body contents of triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4), and 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) in captive stickleback. Adult stickleback were exposed to 100 ppm perchlorate or control water and sampled at four-hour intervals across the 24-hour day and at one time-point (1100 h) weekly across the reproductive season (May-July). Neither whole-body T3 nor T4 concentration significantly differed across the day in control or perchlorate treated stickleback. Across the reproductive season, whole-body T3 concentration remained stable while T4 significantly increased. However, neither hormone concentration was significantly affected by perchlorate, verifying our previous studies. The concentration of whole-body 11-KT, a major fish androgen, displayed significant diel variation and also steadily declined across the reproductive season in untreated males; perchlorate exposure did not influence the concentration of 11-KT in either diel or reproductive season schedules. Diel and reproductive season variations in 11-KT content in male stickleback are likely related to reproductive physiology and behavior. The observed increase in T4 content across the reproductive season may be reflective of increased energy investment in reproduction near the end of the life cycle. PMID:25733204

  18. Biodegradation of perchlorate from real and synthetic effluent by Proteobacterium ARJR SMBS in a stirred tank bioreactor system.

    PubMed

    Raj, J R Anoop; Muruganandam, L

    2013-01-01

    The present work is a laboratory-scale study of perchlorate degradation using Proteobacterium ARJR SMBS in a stirred tank bioreactor (STBR). Anaerobically grown cultures of ARJR SMBS exposed to a variety of ClO4(-) levels within the range 30 to 150 mg L(-1) under anoxic conditions have been studied. The chloride released was measured and the average value found to be 43.55 mg L(-1). The average daily value of perchlorate degradation rate in this system was 17.24 mg L(-1) at optimum pH 7.5 and 0.25% NaCl salinity. The mixed liquor suspension solids of the system gradually increased from 0.025-0.156 g L(-1) during the operating period of 55 days. Mass balance indicated that the chloride produced was 0.45 mole per mole of perchlorate. The salinity of the system varied from 2.50-18.46 g L(-1), dependent primarily upon the inlet perchlorate concentration. The degradation mechanism, which obeyed a first-order substrate-utilizing kinetic model, allowed the growth rates and the half-saturation constants to be determined. The maximum observed anoxic growth rates (0.83-1.2 h(-1)) for ARJR SMBS in a synthetic effluent (SE) were considerably higher than in real effluent (RE) (0.45-0.59 h(-1)). The biomass yield of ARJR SMBS in STBR was higher in SE (1 +/- 0.4 mg L(-1)) than in RE (1 +/- 0.1 mg L(-1)). From the experimental findings, the uptake of perchlorate by the bacterium is suggested to be a non-interfacially-based mechanism. Under steady state operating condition the performance of the reactor was comparatively lower for RE than for SE but still offers significant control over the degradation of perchlorate under full-scale conditions.

  19. Reanalysis of the Viking results suggests perchlorate and organics at mid-latitudes on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Vargas, E.; de La Rosa, J.; Raga, A. C.; McKay, C.

    2010-12-01

    The most comprehensive search for organics in the Martian soil was performed by the Viking Landers. Martian soil was subjected to a thermal volatilization process in order to vaporize and break organic molecules, and the resultant gases and volatiles were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Only water at 0.1-1.0 wt% was detected with traces of chloromethane at 15 ppb in the Viking Landing site 1, and water at 0.05-1.0 wt% and carbon dioxide at 50-700 ppm with traces of dichloromethane at 0.04-40 ppb in the Viking Landing site 2. The abundance ratio of the 35Cl and 37Cl isotopes in these chlorohydrocarbons was 3:1, corresponding to the terrestrial isotopic abundance. Therefore, these chlorohydrocarbons were considered to be terrestrial contaminants although they had not been detected at those levels in the blank runs. Recently, perchlorate was discovered in the Martian Arctic soil by the Phoenix Lander. Here we show that when Mars-like soils from the Atacama Desert with 32±6 ppm of organic carbon are mixed with 1 wt% magnesium perchlorate and heated nearly all the organics present are decomposed to water and carbon dioxide, but a small amount are chlorinated forming 1.6 ppm of chloromethane and 0.02 ppm of dichloromethane at 500○C. A chemical kinetics model was developed to predict the degree of oxidation and chlorination of organics in the Viking oven. The isotopic distribution of 35Cl and 37Cl for Mars is not known. Studies on Earth indicate that there is no isotopic fractionation of chlorine in the mantle or crust, despite the fact that it is significantly depleted on the planet as compare to solar abundances. The 37Cl/35Cl isotopic ratio in carbonaceous chondrites is similar to the Earth’s value, which suggests that the terrestrial planets, including Mars, were all formed from a similar reservoir of chlorine species in the presolar nebulae and that there was no further isotopic fractionation during the Earth’s differentiation or late

  20. Growth, morphological, mechanical and dielectric studies of semi organic NLO single crystal: L-argininium perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aruna, S.; Bhagavannarayana, G.; Palanisamy, M.; Thomas, Preema C.; Varghese, Babu; Sagayaraj, P.

    2007-03-01

    Optically good quality single crystal of L-argininium perchlorate (abbreviated as LARPCL), a promising analog of LAP was successfully grown by slow solvent evaporation technique at room temperature. The unit cell parameters and the morphology of LARPCL single crystals were determined by single crystal XRD. The Vickers microhardness measurements were carried out on the grown crystals to estimate the mechanical properties. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss of the crystal were measured as a function of frequency and temperature, and the results are discussed.

  1. Crystal structure of 2-cyano-1-methyl­pyridinium perchlorate

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Vu D.; McCormick, Cameron A.; Mague, Joel T.; Koplitz, Lynn V.

    2015-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title salt, C7H7N2 +·ClO4 −, comprises two independent formula units. The solid-state structure comprises corrugated layers of cations and of anions, approximately parallel to (010). The supra­molecular layers are stabilized and connected by C—H⋯O hydrogen bonding to consolidate a three-dimensional architecture. A close pyridin­ium–perchlorate N⋯O contact [2.867 (5) Å] is noted. The crystal was refined as an inversion twin. PMID:26594561

  2. Purification of human genomic DNA from whole blood using sodium perchlorate in place of phenol.

    PubMed

    Johns, M B; Paulus-Thomas, J E

    1989-08-01

    We have developed a new, rapid method for the extraction of human genomic DNA from whole blood samples. Traditionally, genomic DNA has been extracted from blood by overnight proteinase K digestion of lysed peripheral lymphocytes followed by phenol/chloroform extraction. In addition to being time consuming, the use of phenol involves inherent risks due to the toxic nature of the reagent. Our method for the extraction of DNA from whole blood uses sodium perchlorate and chloroform instead of phenol with a significant time savings realized as well as fewer hazards to the technician. Furthermore, DNA prepared by this new method is an excellent substrate for restriction endonuclease digestion and Southern hybridization analysis.

  3. Copper-containing zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Price, G.L.; Kanazirev, V.

    1996-12-10

    A catalyst useful in the conversion of nitrogen oxides or in the synthesis of nitriles or imines from amines, is formed by preparing an intimate mechanical mixture of a copper (II)-containing species, such as CuO or CuCl{sub 2}, or elemental copper, with a zeolite having a pore mouth comprising 10 oxygen atoms, such as ZSM-5, converting the elemental copper or copper (II) to copper (I), and driving the copper (I) into the zeolite.

  4. Copper-containing zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Price, Geoffrey L.; Kanazirev, Vladislav

    1996-01-01

    A catalyst useful in the conversion of nitrogen oxides or in the synthesis of nitriles or imines from amines, formed by preparing an intimate mechanical mixture of a copper (II)-containing species, such as CuO or CuCl.sub.2, or elemental copper, with a zeolite having a pore mouth comprising 10 oxygen atoms, such as ZSM-5, converting the elemental copper or copper (II) to copper (I), and driving the copper (I) into the zeolite.

  5. Combined effects of perchlorate, thiocyanate, and iodine on thyroid function in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007–08

    SciTech Connect

    Steinmaus, Craig; Miller, Mark D.; Cushing, Lara; Blount, Benjamin C.; Smith, Allan H.

    2013-05-15

    Perchlorate, thiocyanate, and low iodine intake can all decrease iodide intake into the thyroid gland. This can reduce thyroid hormone production since iodide is a key component of thyroid hormone. Previous research has suggested that each of these factors alone may decrease thyroid hormone levels, but effect sizes are small. We hypothesized that people who have all three factors at the same time have substantially lower thyroid hormone levels than people who do not, and the effect of this combined exposure is substantially larger than the effects seen in analyses focused on only one factor at a time. Using data from the 2007–2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, subjects were categorized into exposure groups based on their urinary perchlorate, iodine, and thiocyanate concentrations, and mean serum thyroxine concentrations were compared between groups. Subjects with high perchlorate (n=1939) had thyroxine concentrations that were 5.0% lower (mean difference=0.40 μg/dl, 95% confidence interval=0.14–0.65) than subjects with low perchlorate (n=2084). The individual effects of iodine and thiocyanate were even smaller. Subjects with high perchlorate, high thiocyanate, and low iodine combined (n=62) had thyroxine concentrations 12.9% lower (mean difference=1.07 μg/dl, 95% confidence interval=0.55–1.59) than subjects with low perchlorate, low thiocyanate, and adequate iodine (n=376). Potential confounders had little impact on results. Overall, these results suggest that concomitant exposure to perchlorate, thiocyanate, and low iodine markedly reduces thyroxine production. This highlights the potential importance of examining the combined effects of multiple agents when evaluating the toxicity of thyroid-disrupting agents. -- Highlights: ► Recent data suggest that essentially everyone in the US is exposed to perchlorate. ► Perchlorate exposure may be associated with lower thyroid hormone levels. ► Some groups may be more susceptible to

  6. Perchlorate in indoor dust and human urine in China: contribution of indoor dust to total daily intake.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Chen, Xiaojia; Wang, Dou; Li, Rudan; Ma, Yufang; Mo, Weiwen; Sun, Hongwen; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2015-02-17

    Perchlorate is used in fireworks and China is the largest fireworks producer and consumer in the world. Information regarding human exposure to perchlorate is scarce in China, and exposure via indoor dust ingestion (EDI indoor dust) has rarely been evaluated. In this study, perchlorate was found in indoor dust (detection rate: 100%, median: 47.4 μg/g), human urine (99%, 26.2 ng/mL), drinking water (100%, 3.99 ng/mL), and dairy milk (100%, 12.3 ng/mL) collected from cities that have fireworks manufacturing areas (Yueyang and Nanchang) and in cities that do not have fireworks manufacturing industries (Tianjin, Shijiazhuang, Yuxi and Guilin) in China. In comparison with perchlorate levels reported for other countries, perchlorate levels in urine samples from fireworks sites and nonfireworks sites in China were higher. Median indoor dust perchlorate concentrations were positively correlated (r = 0.964, p < 0.001) with outdoor dust perchlorate levels reported previously. The total daily intake (EDI total) of perchlorate, estimated based on urinary levels, ranged from 0.090 to 27.72 μg/kg body weight (bw)/day for all studied participants; the percentage of donors who had EDI total exceeding the reference dose (RfD) recommended by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) was 79%, 48%, and 25% for toddlers (median: 1.829 μg/kg bw/day), adults (0.669 μg/kg bw/day), and children (median: 0.373 μg/kg bw/day), respectively. Toddlers (0.258 μg/kg bw/day) had the highest median EDI indoor dust, which was 2 to 5 times greater than the EDI indoor dust calculated for other age groups (the range of median values: 0.044 to 0.127 μg/kg bw/day). Contribution of indoor dust to EDItotal was 26%, 28%, and 7% for toddlers, children, and adults, respectively. Indoor dust contributed higher percentage to EDI total than that by dairy milk (0.5-5%).

  7. Perchlorate in indoor dust and human urine in China: contribution of indoor dust to total daily intake.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Chen, Xiaojia; Wang, Dou; Li, Rudan; Ma, Yufang; Mo, Weiwen; Sun, Hongwen; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2015-02-17

    Perchlorate is used in fireworks and China is the largest fireworks producer and consumer in the world. Information regarding human exposure to perchlorate is scarce in China, and exposure via indoor dust ingestion (EDI indoor dust) has rarely been evaluated. In this study, perchlorate was found in indoor dust (detection rate: 100%, median: 47.4 μg/g), human urine (99%, 26.2 ng/mL), drinking water (100%, 3.99 ng/mL), and dairy milk (100%, 12.3 ng/mL) collected from cities that have fireworks manufacturing areas (Yueyang and Nanchang) and in cities that do not have fireworks manufacturing industries (Tianjin, Shijiazhuang, Yuxi and Guilin) in China. In comparison with perchlorate levels reported for other countries, perchlorate levels in urine samples from fireworks sites and nonfireworks sites in China were higher. Median indoor dust perchlorate concentrations were positively correlated (r = 0.964, p < 0.001) with outdoor dust perchlorate levels reported previously. The total daily intake (EDI total) of perchlorate, estimated based on urinary levels, ranged from 0.090 to 27.72 μg/kg body weight (bw)/day for all studied participants; the percentage of donors who had EDI total exceeding the reference dose (RfD) recommended by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) was 79%, 48%, and 25% for toddlers (median: 1.829 μg/kg bw/day), adults (0.669 μg/kg bw/day), and children (median: 0.373 μg/kg bw/day), respectively. Toddlers (0.258 μg/kg bw/day) had the highest median EDI indoor dust, which was 2 to 5 times greater than the EDI indoor dust calculated for other age groups (the range of median values: 0.044 to 0.127 μg/kg bw/day). Contribution of indoor dust to EDItotal was 26%, 28%, and 7% for toddlers, children, and adults, respectively. Indoor dust contributed higher percentage to EDI total than that by dairy milk (0.5-5%). PMID:25587720

  8. Health effects assessment for environmental perchlorate contamination: the dose response for inhibition of thyroidal radioiodine uptake in humans.

    PubMed

    Greer, Monte A; Goodman, Gay; Pleus, Richard C; Greer, Susan E

    2002-09-01

    Application of a sensitive new detection method has revealed widespread perchlorate contamination of groundwater in the southwestern United States, typically at 0.005-0.020 mg/L (5-20 ppb). Perchlorate is a competitive inhibitor of the process by which iodide is actively transported from the bloodstream into the thyroid. This inhibitory action of perchlorate is the basis of its pharmaceutical use (in the treatment of hyperthyroidism) as well as its potential toxicity. To establish the dose response in humans for perchlorate inhibition of thyroidal iodide uptake and any short-term effects on thyroid hormones, we gave perchlorate in drinking water at 0.007, 0.02, 0.1, or 0.5 mg/kg-day to 37 male and female volunteers for 14 days. In 24 subjects we performed 8- and 24-hr measurements of thyroidal (123)I uptake (RAIU) before exposure, on exposure days 2 (E2) and 14 (E14), and 15 days postexposure (P15). In another 13 subjects we omitted both E2 studies and the 8-hr P15 study. We observed a strong correlation between the 8- and 24-hr RAIU over all dose groups and measurement days. We found no difference between E2 and E14 in the inhibition of RAIU produced by a given perchlorate dose. We also found no sex difference. On both E2 and E14, the dose response was a negative linear function of the logarithm of dose. Based on the dose response for inhibition of the 8- and 24-hr RAIU on E14 in all subjects, we derived estimates of the true no-effect level: 5.2 and 6.4 micro g/kg-day, respectively. Given default body weight and exposure assumptions, these doses would be ingested by an adult if the drinking-water supply contained perchlorate at concentrations of approximately 180 and 220 micro g/L (ppb), respectively. On P15, RAIU was not significantly different from baseline. In 24 subjects we measured serum levels of thyroxine (total and free), triiodothyronine, and thyrotropin in blood sampled 16 times throughout the study. Only the 0.5 mg/kg-day dose group showed any effect

  9. Health effects assessment for environmental perchlorate contamination: the dose response for inhibition of thyroidal radioiodine uptake in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Monte A; Goodman, Gay; Pleus, Richard C; Greer, Susan E

    2002-01-01

    Application of a sensitive new detection method has revealed widespread perchlorate contamination of groundwater in the southwestern United States, typically at 0.005-0.020 mg/L (5-20 ppb). Perchlorate is a competitive inhibitor of the process by which iodide is actively transported from the bloodstream into the thyroid. This inhibitory action of perchlorate is the basis of its pharmaceutical use (in the treatment of hyperthyroidism) as well as its potential toxicity. To establish the dose response in humans for perchlorate inhibition of thyroidal iodide uptake and any short-term effects on thyroid hormones, we gave perchlorate in drinking water at 0.007, 0.02, 0.1, or 0.5 mg/kg-day to 37 male and female volunteers for 14 days. In 24 subjects we performed 8- and 24-hr measurements of thyroidal (123)I uptake (RAIU) before exposure, on exposure days 2 (E2) and 14 (E14), and 15 days postexposure (P15). In another 13 subjects we omitted both E2 studies and the 8-hr P15 study. We observed a strong correlation between the 8- and 24-hr RAIU over all dose groups and measurement days. We found no difference between E2 and E14 in the inhibition of RAIU produced by a given perchlorate dose. We also found no sex difference. On both E2 and E14, the dose response was a negative linear function of the logarithm of dose. Based on the dose response for inhibition of the 8- and 24-hr RAIU on E14 in all subjects, we derived estimates of the true no-effect level: 5.2 and 6.4 micro g/kg-day, respectively. Given default body weight and exposure assumptions, these doses would be ingested by an adult if the drinking-water supply contained perchlorate at concentrations of approximately 180 and 220 micro g/L (ppb), respectively. On P15, RAIU was not significantly different from baseline. In 24 subjects we measured serum levels of thyroxine (total and free), triiodothyronine, and thyrotropin in blood sampled 16 times throughout the study. Only the 0.5 mg/kg-day dose group showed any effect

  10. Improved Electroformed Structural Copper and Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.; Hudson, W.; Babcock, B.; Edwards, R.

    1998-01-01

    Electroforming offers a superior means for fabricating internally cooled heat exchangers and structures subjected to thermal environments. Copper is deposited from many such applications because of the good thermal conductivity. It suffers from mediocre yield strength as a structural material and loses mechanical strength at intermediate temperatures. Mechanical properties similar to those of electroformed nickel are desired. Phase 1 examined innovative means to improve deposited copper structural performance. Yield strengths as high as 483 MPa (70 ksi) were obtained with useful ductility while retaining a high level of purity essential to good thermal conductivity. Phase 2 represents a program to explore new additive combinations in copper electrolytes to produce a more fine, equiaxed grain which can be thermally stabilized by other techniques such as alloying in modest degrees and dispersion strengthening. Evaluation of new technology - such as the codeposition of fullerness (diamond-like) particles were made to enhance thermal conductivity in low alloys. A test fire quality tube-bundle engine was fabricated using these copper property improvement concepts to show the superiority of the new coppers and fabrications methods over competitive technologies such as brazing and plasma deposition.

  11. Copper Delivery by Metallochaperone Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, A.C.

    2010-03-08

    Copper is an essential element in all living organisms, serving as a cofactor for many important proteins and enzymes. Metallochaperone proteins deliver copper ions to specific physiological partners by direct protein-protein interactions. The Atx1-like chaperones transfer copper to intracellular copper transporters, and the CCS chaperones shuttle copper to copper,zinc superoxide dismutase. Crystallographic studies of these two copper chaperone families have provided insights into metal binding and target recognition by metallochaperones and have led to detailed molecular models for the copper transfer mechanism.

  12. Thyroid status of female rhesus monkeys and preliminary information on impact of perchlorate administration.

    PubMed

    Ozpinar, Aysel; Golub, Mari S; Poppenga, Robert H; Blount, Benjamin C; Gillespie, Jerry R

    2011-07-01

    Thyroid status was assessed in adult female rhesus monkey breeders at the California National Primate Research Center at the beginning of the breeding season. The 95% confidence intervals for thyrotropin (TSH), thyroxine (T(4)) and triiodothyronine (T(3)) (n = 66-80) were similar to those previously reported in smaller samples of macaque monkeys. Based on human criteria, 10 of 80 monkeys (12%) were hypothyroid (TSH > 2.0 µIU/mL). Because hypothyroxinaemia can be a risk factor in pregnancy, T(4) status was compared with past breeding history, breeding outcome for that season and general health records in a subset of 42 breeders. Age, weight and parity did not differ between monkeys in the lowest T(4) quartile as compared with those in the upper three quartiles. However, T(4) concentrations were significantly associated with the number of missed menstrual cycles during the previous breeding season. In additional work, three healthy lactating rhesus monkeys were given three different doses of environmental contaminant and thyroid iodine uptake inhibitor, ammonium perchlorate (0.006, 0.34, 12.8 mg/kg/day, respectively) in food for two weeks. Thyroid status variables (TSH, T(4), T(3), thyroid radioactive iodine uptake) were then measured. In the monkey receiving the highest perchlorate dose, iodine uptake was suppressed relative to baseline. The study shows the availability of tools to study thyroid status in rhesus monkeys, the variability of thyroid status in the breeder colony and the potential ability of environmental factors to influence thyroid status.

  13. Temporal variability in urinary concentrations of perchlorate, nitrate, thiocyanate and iodide among children

    PubMed Central

    MERVISH, NANCY; BLOUNT, BEN; VALENTIN-BLASINI, LIZA; BRENNER, BARBARA; GALVEZ, MAIDA P.; WOLFF, MARY S.; TEITELBAUM, SUSAN L.

    2012-01-01

    Perchlorate, nitrate and thiocyanate are ubiquitous in the environment, and human exposure to these chemicals is accurately measured in urine. Biomarkers of these chemicals represent a person's recent exposure, however, little is known on the temporal variability of the use of a single measurement of these biomarkers. Healthy Hispanic and Black children (6–10-year-old) donated urine samples over 6 months. To assess temporal variability, we used three statistical methods (n = 29; 153 urine samples): intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), Spearman's correlation coefficient between concentrations measured at different timepoints and surrogate category analysis to assess how well tertile ranking by a single biomarker measurement represented the average concentration over 6 months. The ICC measure of reproducibility was poor (0.10–0.12) for perchlorate, nitrate and iodide; and fair for thiocyanate (0.36). The correlations for each biomarker across multiple sampling times ranged from 0.01–0.57. Surrogate analysis showed consistent results for almost every surrogate tertile. Results demonstrate fair temporal reliability in the spot urine concentrations of the three NIS inhibitors and iodide. Surrogate analysis show that single-spot urine samples reliably categorize participant's exposure providing support for the use of a single sample as an exposure measure in epidemiological studies that use relative ranking of exposure. PMID:22166811

  14. Nano-Ammonium Perchlorate: Preparation, Characterization, and Evaluation in Composite Propellant Formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumari, A.; Mehilal; Jain, S.; Jain, M. K.; Bhattacharya, B.

    2013-07-01

    Nanomaterials are finding applications in explosives and propellant formulations due to their large surface area and high surface energy. This high surface energy is responsible for the low activation energy and increase in burning rate of the composition. Therefore, a successful attempt has been made to prepare nano-ammonium perchlorate using a nonaqueous method by dissolving ammonium perchlorate (AP) in methanol followed by adding the dissolved AP to the hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB), homogenization, and vacuum distillation of the solvent. The nano-AP thus formed was characterized using a NANOPHOX particle size analyzer (Sympatec, Germany), transmission electron microscopy (FEI, Hillsboro, OR), X-ray diffraction (PANalytical B.V., The Netherlands) and scanning electron microscopy (Ikon Analytical Equipment Pvt. Ltd., Mumbai, India) for particle size, purity, and morphology, respectively. The thermal behavior of nano-AP was also studied using differential thermal analysis-thermo gravimetric analysis (DTA-TGA). The data indicated that the particle size of the prepared AP was in the range of 21-52 nm and the thermal decomposition temperature was lower than that of coarse AP. Characterized nano-AP was subsequently used in composite propellant formulation up to 5% with 86% solid loading and studied for different properties. The results showed a 14% increase in burning rate in comparison to standard propellant composition with desired mechanical properties.

  15. Change of iodine load and thyroid homeostasis induced by ammonium perchlorate in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Xia; Ding, Miao-Hong; Liu, Qin; Peng, Kai-Liang

    2014-10-01</