Science.gov

Sample records for copper perchlorates

  1. A screened hybrid density functional study on energetic complexes: cobalt, nickel and copper carbohydrazide perchlorates.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huisheng; Zhang, Tonglai; Zhang, Jianguo; Wang, Liqiong

    2010-07-15

    The molecular geometry, electronic structure, infrared spectra and thermochemical properties of cobalt and nickel tris(carbohydrazide) perchlorates (CoCP and NiCP) as well as copper bis(carbohydrazide) perchlorate (CuCP) were investigated using the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof (HSE) screened hybrid density functional. The results show that both perchlorate ions coordinate with the copper atom, and the interactions between copper and perchlorate are ionic, whereas all the metal-carbohydrazide interactions are covalent. Due to the delocalization from the sigma(N-H) bond orbital to the n*(M) antibond orbital, the amino stretching vibrations of these complexes show considerable red-shift compared with those of free carbohydrazide ligand. The calculated heats of reaction and formation indicate that the formations of these complexes are exothermic, and the order of their thermal stability is NiCP>CoCP>CuCP. These agree well with the experimental results. Finally, we find that there is a relationship between the energy gap and impact sensitivity.

  2. Uncommon isonicotinamide supramolecular synthons in copper(II) complexes directed by nitrate and perchlorate anions.

    PubMed

    Daković, Marijana; Popović, Zora

    2009-09-01

    The title compounds, trans-diaquabis(nitrato-kappaO)bis(pyridine-4-carboxamide-kappaN(1))copper(II), [Cu(NO(3))(2)(C(6)H(6)N(2)O)(2)(H(2)O)(2)], (I), and trans-diaquatetrakis(pyridine-4-carboxamide-kappaN(1))copper(II) bis(perchlorate), [Cu(C(6)H(6)N(2)O)(4)(H(2)O)(2)](ClO(4))(2), (II), are composed of mononuclear coordination entities involving Cu(II) ions and isonicotinamide. In (I), the centrosymmetric tetragonally distorted octahedral copper(II) environment contains trans-related isonicotinamide and water molecules in the equatorial plane and two nitrate ions occupying the axial sites. In (II), the equatorial plane of the C(2)-symmetric distorted octahedron is built up of four isonicotinamide ligands, while water molecules occupy the axial positions. The complex molecules of (I) and (II) are linked into three-dimensional supramolecular frameworks by O-H...O and N-H...O hydrogen bonds. The nitrate and perchlorate ions are building blocks that disturb the robust R(2)(2)(8) amide supramolecular motif commonly found in crystal structures of copper-isonicotinamide complexes.

  3. Crystal structures of copper(II) nitrate, copper(II) chloride, and copper(II) perchlorate complexes with 2-formylpyridine semicarbazone

    SciTech Connect

    Chumakov, Yu. M.; Tsapkov, V. I.; Antosyak, B. Ya.; Bairac, N. N.; Simonov, Yu. A.; Bocelli, G.; Pahontu, E.; Gulea, A. P.

    2009-05-15

    Compounds dinitrato(2-formylpyridinesemicarbazone)copper (I), dichloro(2-formylpyridinesemicarbazone) copper hemihydrate (II), and bis(2-formylpyridinesemicarbazone)copper(2+) perchlorate hydrate (III) are synthesized and their crystal structures are determined. In compounds I-III, the neutral 2-formylpyridine semicarbazone molecule (L) is tridentately attached to the copper atom via the N,N,O set of donor atoms. In compounds I and II, the Cu: L ratio is equal to 1: 1, whereas, in III, it is 1: 2. In complex I, the coordination sphere of the copper atom includes two nitrate ions with different structural functions in addition to the L ligand. The structure is built as a one-dimensional polymer in which the NO{sub 3} bidentate group fulfills a bridging function. The coordination polyhedron of the copper(2+) atom can be considered a distorted tetragonal bipyramid (4 + 1 + 1). Compound II has an ionic structure in which the main element is the [CuLCl{sub 2} . Cu(H{sub 2}O)LCl]{sup +} dimer. In the dimer, the copper atoms are linked via one of the {mu}{sub 2}-bridging chlorine atoms. The coordination polyhedra of the central atoms of the Cu(H{sub 2})LCl and CuLCl{sub 2} complex fragments are tetragonal bipyramid and tetragonal pyramid, respectively. In compound III, the copper atom is octahedrally surrounded by two L ligands in the mer configuration.

  4. Boron nitride encapsulated copper nanoparticles: a facile one-step synthesis and their effect on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Caijin; Liu, Qiuwen; Fan, Wenjie; Qiu, Xiaoqing

    2015-11-01

    Reactivity is of great importance for metal nanoparticles used as catalysts, biomaterials and advanced sensors, but seeking for high reactivity seems to be conflict with high chemical stability required for metal nanoparticles. There is a subtle balance between reactivity and stability. This could be reached for colloidal metal nanoparticles using organic capping reagents, whereas it is challenging for powder metal nanoparticles. Here, we developed an alternative approach to encapsulate copper nanoparticles with a chemical inertness material—hexagonal boron nitride. The wrapped copper nanoparticles not only exhibit high oxidation resistance under air atmosphere, but also keep excellent promoting effect on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate. This approach opens the way to design metal nanoparticles with both high stability and reactivity for nanocatalysts and their technological application.

  5. Boron nitride encapsulated copper nanoparticles: a facile one-step synthesis and their effect on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Caijin; liu, Qiuwen; Fan, Wenjie; Qiu, Xiaoqing

    2015-01-01

    Reactivity is of great importance for metal nanoparticles used as catalysts, biomaterials and advanced sensors, but seeking for high reactivity seems to be conflict with high chemical stability required for metal nanoparticles. There is a subtle balance between reactivity and stability. This could be reached for colloidal metal nanoparticles using organic capping reagents, whereas it is challenging for powder metal nanoparticles. Here, we developed an alternative approach to encapsulate copper nanoparticles with a chemical inertness material—hexagonal boron nitride. The wrapped copper nanoparticles not only exhibit high oxidation resistance under air atmosphere, but also keep excellent promoting effect on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate. This approach opens the way to design metal nanoparticles with both high stability and reactivity for nanocatalysts and their technological application. PMID:26567862

  6. Functionalized white graphene - Copper oxide nanocomposite: Synthesis, characterization and application as catalyst for thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Paulose, Sanoop; Raghavan, Rajeev; George, Benny K

    2017-05-15

    Reactivity is of great importance for metal oxide nanoparticles (MONP) used as catalysts and advanced materials, but seeking for higher reactivity seems to be conflict with high chemical stability required for MONP. There is direct balance between reactivity and stability of these MONP. This could be acheived for metal oxide by dispersing them in a substrate. Here, we report a simple, efficient and high-yield process for the production of copper oxide (CuO) nanoparticles dispersed on a chemically inert material, few-layer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) with a thickness around 1.7nm and lateral dimensions mostly below 200nm. The mechano-chemical reaction which take place at atmospheric pressure and room temperature involves a urea assisted exfoliation of pristine boron nitride. Copper oxide nanoparticles dispersed on the surface of these few layered h-BN reduced its tendency for aggregation. The optimum concentration of CuO:h-BN was found to be 2:1 which shows highest catalytic activity for the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate. The high catalytic activity of the in situ synthesized CuO-h-BN composite may be attributed to uniform distribution of CuO nanoparticles on the few layered h-BN which in turn provide a number of active sites on the surface due to non aggregation.

  7. Field dependent ordering temperature in copper pyrazine perchlorate, Cu(pz)2(ClO4)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landee, Christopher; Xiao, Fan; Turnbull, Mark; Tsyrulin, N.; Kenzelmann, Michel; van Tol, Hans

    2007-03-01

    Copper pyrazine perchlorate is a molecular-based 2D S=1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet (QHAF) with a moderate exchange constant (J/k = 17.5 K) and a saturation field of 60 T. The zero-field ordering temperature, as recently determined by muon spin relaxation experiments [1], is 4.3 K corresponding to excellent isolation (J'/J 8x10-4) between magnetic layers [2]. Recent studies of Cu(pz)2(ClO4)2 in applied fields (specific heat and ESR) show the ordering transition to increase with field by as much as 30% in a field of nine tesla. This effect will be discussed in terms of a field-induced anisotropy crossover model [3]. 1. T. Lancaster, S. J. Blundell et al, submitted for publication. 2. P. Sengupta, A. W. Sandvik, and R. R. P. Singh, Phys. Rev. B 68, 094423 (2003). 3. A. Cuccoli et al, Phys. Rev. B 68, 060402 (2003).

  8. PERCHLORATE FACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate is an anion (negative ion) with the formula C1O 4-. Perchlorate salts are famous in inorganic chemistry on account of their high solubilities. As a result, they are very difficult to remove. Although hot and concentrated perchloric acid is a strong oxidizing agent,...

  9. Di-mu-hydroxido-bis{[bis(6-methyl-2-pyridylmethyl)(2-phenylethyl)amine-kappa(3)N',N'',N''']copper(II)} bis(perchlorate).

    PubMed

    García, Ana María; Manzur, Jorge; Vega, Andrés

    2007-07-01

    The title compund, [Cu(2)(OH)(2)(C(22)H(25)N(3))(2)](ClO(4))(2), is a copper(II) dimer, with two [CuL](2+) units [L is bis(6-methyl-2-pyridylmethyl)(2-phenylethyl)amine] bridged by hydroxide groups to define the {[CuL](mu-OH)(2)[CuL]}(2+) cation. Charge balance is provided by perchlorate counter-anions. The cation has a crystallographic inversion centre halfway between the Cu(II) ions, which are separated by 3.0161 (8) Angstrom. The central core of the cation is an almost regular Cu(2)O(2) parallelogram of sides 1.931 (2) and 1.935 (2) Angstrom, with a Cu-O-Cu angle of 102.55 (11) degrees . The coordination geometry around each Cu(II) centre can be best described as a square-based pyramid, with three N atoms from L ligands and two hydroxide O atoms completing the coordination environment. Each cationic unit is hydrogen bonded to two perchlorate anions by means of hydroxide-perchlorate O-H...O interactions.

  10. Perchlorate mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes of beta-diketone and ethylene diamine derivatives: thermal, spectroscopic and biochemical studies.

    PubMed

    El-Ayaan, Usama; El-Metwally, Nashwa M; Youssef, Magdy M; El Bialy, Serry A A

    2007-12-31

    The present work carried out a study on perchlorate mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes which have been synthesized from ethylenediamine derivatives (3a-c) and beta-diketones. These complexes, namely [Cu(DA-Cl)(acac)H(2)O]ClO(4)4, [Cu(DA-Cl)(bzac)H(2)O]H(2)O.ClO(4)5, [Cu(DA-OMe)(acac)H(2)O]ClO(4)6, [Cu(DA-OMe)(bzac)H(2)O]ClO(4)7, [Cu(DA-H)(acac)H(2)O]2H(2)O.ClO(4)8 and [Cu(DA-H)(bzac)H(2)O]ClO(4)9 (where acac, acetylacetonate and bzac, benzoylacetonate) were characterized by elemental analysis, spectral (IR and UV-vis) and magnetic moment measurements. Thermal properties and decomposition kinetics of all complexes are investigated. The interpretation, mathematical analysis and evaluation of kinetic parameters (E, A, DeltaH, DeltaS and DeltaG) of all thermal decomposition stages have been evaluated using Coats-Redfern equation. The biochemical studies showed that, the diamines 3a-c have powerful effects on degradation of DNA and protein. The antibacterial screening demonstrated that, the diamine (DA-Cl), 3b has the maximum and broad activities against Gram +ve and Gram -ve bacterial strains.

  11. Perchlorate mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes of β-diketone and ethylene diamine derivatives: Thermal, spectroscopic and biochemical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Ayaan, Usama; El-Metwally, Nashwa M.; Youssef, Magdy M.; El Bialy, Serry A. A.

    2007-12-01

    The present work carried out a study on perchlorate mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes which have been synthesized from ethylenediamine derivatives ( 3a- c) and β-diketones. These complexes, namely [Cu(DA-Cl)(acac)H 2O]ClO 44, [Cu(DA-Cl)(bzac)H 2O]H 2O.ClO 45, [Cu(DA-OMe)(acac)H 2O]ClO 46, [Cu(DA-OMe)(bzac)H 2O]ClO 47, [Cu(DA-H)(acac)H 2O]2H 2O.ClO 48 and [Cu(DA-H)(bzac)H 2O]ClO 49 (where acac, acetylacetonate and bzac, benzoylacetonate) were characterized by elemental analysis, spectral (IR and UV-vis) and magnetic moment measurements. Thermal properties and decomposition kinetics of all complexes are investigated. The interpretation, mathematical analysis and evaluation of kinetic parameters ( E, A, Δ H, Δ S and Δ G) of all thermal decomposition stages have been evaluated using Coats-Redfern equation. The biochemical studies showed that, the diamines 3a- c have powerful effects on degradation of DNA and protein. The antibacterial screening demonstrated that, the diamine (DA-Cl), 3b has the maximum and broad activities against Gram +ve and Gram -ve bacterial strains.

  12. Poly[[bis­(μ-4,4′-bipyridine-κ2 N:N′)copper(I)] perchlorate 0.24-hydrate

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chun-Yan; Yao, Xue-Jun; Wang, Run-Ling; Xie, Cheng-Zhi

    2012-01-01

    The title copper(I) polymeric compound, {[Cu(C10H8N2)2]ClO4·0.24H2O}n, obtained by the reaction of Cu(ClO4)2 and 4,4′-bipyridine (4,4′-bpy) under hydro­thermal conditions, features a fourfold-inter­penetrated diamondoid coordination framework. The asymmetric unit consists of two CuI atoms, three 4,4′-bpy ligands in general positions and two halves of two centrosymmetric 4,4′-bpy ligands, two ClO4 − anions and water mol­ecule with a site-occupancy factor of 0.480 (17). The CuI atoms are in a distorted tetra­hedral coordination environment and are bridged by 4,4′-bpy ligands, forming a diamondoid cationic polymeric framework that encloses two symmetry-independent channels along [100], which accommodate perchlorate anions and water mol­ecules. PMID:22590146

  13. Perchlorate (ClO4) and Perchlorate Salts

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Perchlorate ( ClO4 - ) and Perchlorate Salts CASRN 7790 - 98 - 9 Ammonium perchlorate CASRN 7791 - 03 - 9 Lithium perchlorate CASRN 7778 - 74 - 7 Potassium perchlorate CASRN 7601 - 89 - 0 Sodium perchlorate This U.S . EPA IRIS Summary is based on the U.S . Government - sponsored technical review of

  14. Perchlorate Questions and Answers

    MedlinePlus

    ... EPA's Interim Health Advisory for Perchlorate in Public Water Systems On January 8, 2009, the Environmental Protection ... thyroid hormone. Questions and Answers about EPA’s Drinking Water Findings If perchlorate is present in my drinking ...

  15. Crystal structure of (perchlorato-κO)(1,4,7,10-tetra­aza­cyclo­dodecane-κ4 N)copper(II) perchlorate

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Jessica L.; Gerlach, Deidra L.; Papish, Elizabeth T.

    2017-01-01

    The crystal structure of the title salt, [Cu(ClO4)(C8H20N4)]ClO4, is reported. The CuII ion exhibits a square-pyramidal geometry and is coordinated by the four N atoms of the neutral 1,4,7,10-tetra­aza­cyclo­dodecane (cyclen) ligand and an O atom from one perchlorate anion, with the second perchlorate ion hydrogen-bonded to one of the amine N atoms of the cyclen ligand. Additional N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds between the amine H atoms and the coordinating and non-coordinating perchlorate groups create a three-dimensional network structure. Crystals were grown from a concentrated methanol solution at ambient temperature, resulting in no co-crystallization of solvent. PMID:28083129

  16. Crystal structure of (perchlorato-κO)(1,4,7,10-tetra-aza-cyclo-dodecane-κ(4)N)copper(II) perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Gray, Jessica L; Gerlach, Deidra L; Papish, Elizabeth T

    2017-01-01

    The crystal structure of the title salt, [Cu(ClO4)(C8H20N4)]ClO4, is reported. The Cu(II) ion exhibits a square-pyramidal geometry and is coordinated by the four N atoms of the neutral 1,4,7,10-tetra-aza-cyclo-dodecane (cyclen) ligand and an O atom from one perchlorate anion, with the second perchlorate ion hydrogen-bonded to one of the amine N atoms of the cyclen ligand. Additional N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds between the amine H atoms and the coordinating and non-coordinating perchlorate groups create a three-dimensional network structure. Crystals were grown from a concentrated methanol solution at ambient temperature, resulting in no co-crystallization of solvent.

  17. Perchlorate isotope forensics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Böhlke, J.K.; Sturchio, N.C.; Gu, B.; Horita, J.; Brown, G.M.; Jackson, W.A.; Batista, J.; Hatzinger, P.B.

    2005-01-01

    Perchlorate has been detected recently in a variety of soils, waters, plants, and food products at levels that may be detrimental to human health. These discoveries have generated considerable interest in perchlorate source identification. In this study, comprehensive stable isotope analyses ( 37Cl/35Cl and 18O/17O/ 16O) of perchlorate from known synthetic and natural sources reveal systematic differences in isotopic characteristics that are related to the formation mechanisms. In addition, isotopic analyses of perchlorate extracted from groundwater and surface water demonstrate the feasibility of identifying perchlorate sources in contaminated environments on the basis of this technique. Both natural and synthetic sources of perchlorate have been identified in water samples from some perchlorate occurrences in the United States by the isotopic method. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  18. Crystal structure of tin(II) perchlorate trihydrate

    PubMed Central

    Hennings, Erik; Schmidt, Horst; Köhler, Martin; Voigt, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The title compound, [Sn(H2O)3](ClO4)2, was synthesized by the redox reaction of copper(II) perchlorate hexa­hydrate and metallic tin in perchloric acid. Both the trigonal–pyramidal [Sn(H2O)3]2+ cations and tetra­hedral perchlorate anions lie on crystallographic threefold axes. In the crystal, the cations are linked to the anions by O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, generating (001) sheets. PMID:25552969

  19. PERCHLORATE IDENTIFICATION IN FERTILIZERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate has contaminated groundwater, drinking water, and soils at several locations in the United States. The primary source of contamination at sites that have been investigated to date seems to be from industrial and military operations that use perchlorate as an oxidizing...

  20. Perchlorate in Fertilizers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-01

    the art technology available to most analytical laboratories 4347. Several IC methods have been developed for the inalysis of trace perchlorate levels...Processes of Nitrate, Sulfate, Chloride, Iodate, Borate, Perchlorate and Chromate in the Caliches of Northen Chile" in IV Congreso Geologico Chileno

  1. Perchlorate Treatment Technology Update

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This issue paper has been prepared by EPA's Federal Facilities Forum to provide information about technologies available for treatment of perchlorate contamination in environmental media, including technologies that have been used to date and others that..

  2. Widespread Occurrence of Plant Perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, G.; Orris, G.; Jackson, W. A.; Rajagopalan, S.; Andraski, B.; Stonestrom, D.

    2007-12-01

    Perchlorate is a water soluble oxyanion containing four oxygens bonded to a single chlorine atom. High concentration of perchlorate can competitively block the uptake of iodide by the sodium iodide symporter and disrupt thyroid function. Due to this ability to potentially impair thyroid function, perchlorate in environmental exposure pathways has been of concern for more than a decade. Our knowledge of the spatial and temporal aspects of environmental perchlorate has increased dramatically in the past few years. To date, perchlorate has been found in numerous different environmental media, including water, soils and sediments, and plants, from many parts of the world. Perchlorate can be found in marine alage, food and plant samples from Asia, Africa, Europe, North and South America. It is becoming increasingly apparent that perchlorate in low levels is ubiquitous. Perchlorate has been found in several different carbon age-dated water and midden samples that pre-date the industrial age and agricultural use of Chilean nitrate fertilizers by thousands of years. While anthropogenic sources of perchlorate exist, the accumulating spatial and temporal evidence suggests that perchlorate must have a significant natural source. This natural source of perchlorate under the appropriate geochemical and climatic conditions is contributing a natural background level of perchlorate. Concentrations of perchlorate in soils appears to be influenced by soil geochemistry. Soils with low organic content usually have higher levels of perchlorate then soils with abundant organic matter. High levels of perchlorate have been found in remotely located xerophytes growing in aridosols and in deciduous phreatophytes growing in humid densely populated areas. Often the amount of perchlorate in a plant cannot be explained by the amount of perchlorate in either the soil or precipitation. Investigations into the relative source contribution of lithogenic, atmospheric and other sources and mechanisms

  3. PERCHLORATE AS AN ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate anion (C104) has been found in drinking water supplies throughout the southwestern United States. I t is primarily associated with releases of ammonium perdhlorate by defense contractors, military operations, and aerospace programs. Ammonium perchlorate is used as ...

  4. Di-u-hydroxo-bis{(acetonitrile)dibenzyl(6-methyl-2-pyridylmethyl)-amine-kappa2N,N]copper(II)} bis(perchlorate).

    PubMed

    Rojas, Dario; García, Ana María; Manzur, Jorge; Vega, Andrés

    2005-02-01

    The title compound corresponds to a copper(II) dimer, [Cu2(OH)2(C2H3N)2(C21H22N2)2](ClO4)2, where the metal centres are mu2-bridged by hydroxo groups. The coordination of each copper(II) centre is a slightly distorted square-based pyramid, with two N atoms from dibenzyl(6-methyl-2-pyridylmethyl)amine (BiBzMePMA) and two hydroxo O atoms occupying the basal positions, and the acetonitrile N atom at the apical position. The dimer is centrosymmetric, with a crystallographic inversion centre midway between the two Cu atoms [Cu...Cu = 2.9522 (9) A].

  5. Bioelectrical Perchlorate Remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrash, C.; Achenbach, L. A.; Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Several bioreactor designs are currently available for the ex-situ biological attenuation of perchlorate- contaminated waters and recently, some of these reactor designs were conditionally approved by the California Department of Health Services for application in the treatment of perchlorate contaminated drinking water. However, all of these systems are dependent on the continual addition of a chemical electron donor to sustain microbial activity and are always subject to biofouling and downstream water quality issues. In addition, residual labile electron donor in the reactor effluent can stimulate microbial growth in water distribution systems and contribute to the formation of potentially toxic trihalomethanes during disinfection by chlorination. As part of our ongoing studies into microbial perchlorate reduction we investigated the ability of dissimilatory perchlorate reducing bacteria (DPRB) to metabolize perchlorate using a negatively charged electrode (cathode) in the working chamber of a bioelectrical reactor (BER) as the primary electron donor. In this instance the DPRB use the electrons on the electrode surface either directly or indirectly in the form of electrolytically produced H2 as a source of reducing equivalents for nitrate and perchlorate reduction. As part of this investigation our fed-batch studies showed that DPRB could use electrons from a graphite cathode poised at -500mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) for the reduction of perchlorate and nitrate. We isolated a novel organism, Dechlorospirillum strain VDY, from the cathode surface after 70 days operation which readily reduced 100 mg.L-1 perchlorate in a mediatorless batch bioelectrical reactor (BER) in 6 days. Continuous up-flow BERs (UFBERs) seeded with active cultures of strain VDY continuously treated waters containing 100 mg.L-1 perchlorate with almost 100% efficiency throughout their operation achieving a non-optimized volumetric loading of 60 mg.L-1 reactor volume.day-1. The same UFBERs also treated

  6. Synthesis and crystal structure of [2,7,12-trimethyl-3,7,11,17-tetra-aza-bicyclo-[11.3.1]hepta-deca-1(17),13,15-triene-κ(4) N]copper(II) bis-(perchlorate).

    PubMed

    Hilvano, Edward Gabrielle V; Yang, Guang; Emnacen, Inno A; Rybak-Akimova, Elena V; Billones, Junie B; Carrillo, Maria Constancia O; Noll, Bruce C; Organo, Voltaire G

    2016-07-01

    The title copper(II) complex of a pyridine-containing macrocycle (PyMAC), [Cu(C16H28N4)](ClO4)2, has been prepared. The crystal structure reveals the Cu(II) atom to be octahedrally coordinated by a tetradentate aminopyridine macrocyclic ligand surrounding the metal cation in a square-planar geometry. Two weakly bound perchlorate counter-ions occupy the axial sites above and below the macrocyclic plane. The crystal studied was refined as a two-component pseudo-merohedral twin; the refined fractional contribution of the minor component is 38.77 (8).

  7. Synthesis and crystal structure of [2,7,12-trimethyl-3,7,11,17-tetra­aza­bicyclo­[11.3.1]hepta­deca-1(17),13,15-triene-κ4 N]copper(II) bis­(perchlorate)

    PubMed Central

    Hilvano, Edward Gabrielle V.; Yang, Guang; Emnacen, Inno A.; Rybak-Akimova, Elena V.; Billones, Junie B.; Carrillo, Maria Constancia O.; Noll, Bruce C.; Organo, Voltaire G.

    2016-01-01

    The title copper(II) complex of a pyridine-containing macrocycle (PyMAC), [Cu(C16H28N4)](ClO4)2, has been prepared. The crystal structure reveals the CuII atom to be octahedrally coordinated by a tetradentate aminopyridine macrocyclic ligand surrounding the metal cation in a square-planar geometry. Two weakly bound perchlorate counter-ions occupy the axial sites above and below the macrocyclic plane. The crystal studied was refined as a two-component pseudo-merohedral twin; the refined fractional contribution of the minor component is 38.77 (8)% PMID:27555952

  8. Perchlorate Regulatory Determination Fact Sheets

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Fact sheets have been developed for the perchlorate regulatory determination corresponding to the following stages published in the Federal Register: Final, Supplemental request for comments, and Preliminary.

  9. Isotopic mapping of groundwater perchlorate plumes.

    PubMed

    Sturchio, Neil C; Hoaglund, John R; Marroquin, Roy J; Beloso, Abelardo D; Heraty, Linnea J; Bortz, Sarah E; Patterson, Thomas L

    2012-01-01

    Analyses of stable isotope ratios of chlorine and oxygen in perchlorate can, in some cases, be used for mapping and source identification of groundwater perchlorate plumes. This is demonstrated here for large, intersecting perchlorate plumes in groundwater from a region having extensive groundwater perchlorate contamination and a large population dependent on groundwater resources. The region contains both synthetic perchlorate derived from rocket fuel manufacturing and testing activities and agricultural perchlorate derived predominantly from imported Chilean (Atacama) nitrate fertilizer, along with a likely component of indigenous natural background perchlorate from local wet and dry atmospheric deposition. Most samples within each plume reflect either a predominantly synthetic or a predominantly agricultural perchlorate source and there is apparently a minor contribution from the indigenous natural background perchlorate. The existence of isotopically distinct perchlorate plumes in this area is consistent with other lines of evidence, including groundwater levels and flow paths as well as the historical land use and areal distribution of potential perchlorate sources.

  10. Perchlorate as an environmental contaminant.

    PubMed

    Urbansky, Edward Todd

    2002-01-01

    Perchlorate anion (ClO4-) has been found in drinking water supplies throughout the southwestern United States. It is primarily associated with releases of ammonium perchlorate by defense contractors, military operations, and aerospace programs. Ammonium perchlorate is used as a solid oxidant in missile and rocket propulsion systems. Traces of perchlorate are found in Chile saltpeter, but the use of such fertilizer has not been associated with large scale contamination. Although it is a strong oxidant, perchlorate anion is very persistent in the environment due to the high activation energy associated with its reduction. At high enough concentrations, perchlorate can affect thyroid gland functions, where it is mistakenly taken up in place of iodide. A safe daily exposure has not yet been set, but is expected to be released in 2002. Perchlorate is measured in environmental samples primarily by ion chromatography. It can be removed by anion exchange or membrane filtration. It is destroyed by some biological and chemical processes. The environmental occurrence, toxicity, analytical chemistry, and remediative approaches are discussed.

  11. Copper

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Copper ; CASRN 7440 - 50 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects )

  12. Perchlorate Peer Review Frequent Questions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA believes that peer review is an important component of the scientific process. EPA will ask peer reviewers to comment on products that the agency will use to derive a Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) for perchlorate.

  13. Effect of nitrate on microbial perchlorate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Over the last decade perchlorate has been recognized as an important emerging water contaminant that poses a significant public health threat. Because of its chemical stability, low ionic charge density, and significant water solubility microbial remediation has been identified as the most feasible method for its in situ attenuation. Our previous studies have demonstrated that dissimilatory perchlorate reducing bacteria (DPRB) capable of the respiratory reduction of perchlorate into innocuous chloride are ubiquitous in soil and sedimentary environments. As part of their metabolism these organisms reduce perchlorate to chlorite which is subsequently dismutated into chloride and molecular oxygen. These initial steps are mediated by the perchlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase enzymes respectively. Previously we found that the activity of these organisms is dependent on the presence of molybdenum and is inhibited by the presence of oxygen and to different extents nitrate. However, to date, there is little understanding of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of perchlorate reduction by oxygen and nitrate. As a continuation of our studies into the factors that control DPRB activity we investigated these regulatory mechanisms in more detail as a model organism, Dechloromonas aromatica strain RCB, transitions from aerobic metabolism through nitrate reduction to perchlorate reduction. In series of growth transition studies where both nitrate and perchlorate were present, preference for nitrate to perchlorate was observed regardless of the nitrate to perchlorate ratio. Even when the organism was pre-grown anaerobically in perchlorate, nitrate was reduced prior to perchlorate. Using non-growth washed cell suspension, perchlorate- grown D. aromatica was capable of reducing both perchlorate and nitrate concomitantly suggesting the preferentially utilization of nitrate was not a result of enzyme functionality. To elucidate the mechanism for preferential utilization of

  14. Perchlorate uptake in spinach as related to perchlorate, nitrate and chloride concentrations in irrigation water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several studies have reported on the detection of perchlorate in edible leafy vegetables irrigated with Colorado River water. However, there is no information on spinach as related to perchlorate in irrigation water nor on the effect of other anions on perchlorate uptake. A greenhouse perchlorate up...

  15. PERCHLORATE CROP INTERACTIONS VIA CONTAMINATED IRRIGATION WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate has contaminated water and sods at several locations in the United States. Perchlorate is water soluble, exceedingly mobile in aqueous systems, and can persist for many decades under typical ground- and surface water conditions. Perchlorate is of concern because of un...

  16. Perchlorate Remediation Using New Nanoscale Polymer Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    Measurement of perchlorate, nitrate, sulfate, and chloride using ion chromatography : Ion chromatography was performed on a Dionex ICS100 system with...perchlorate, nitrate, and sulfate and chloride anions using Ion chromatography . 30    6. Adsorption Isotherm and Kinetic Measurements Batch test at... Ion chromatography was used to estimate chloride content in anions treated dendrigrafts (Figure 48). Dendrigrafts treated with perchlorate showed

  17. Perchlorate Reduction by Yeast for Mars Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Alaisha

    2015-01-01

    Martian soil contains high levels (0.6 percentage by mass) of calcium perchlorate (Ca(ClO4)2), which readily dissociates into calcium and the perchlorate ion (ClO4-) in water. Even in trace amounts, perchlorates are toxic to humans and have been implicated in thyroid dysfunction. Devising methods to lessen perchlorate contamination is crucial to minimizing the health risks associated with human exploration and colonization of Mars. We designed a perchlorate reduction pathway, which sequentially reduces perchlorate to chloride (Cl-) and oxygen (O2), for implementation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using genes obtained from perchlorate reducing bacteria Azospira oryzae and Dechloromonas aromatica, we plan to assemble this pathway directly within S. cerevisiae through recombinational cloning. A perchlorate reduction pathway would enable S. cerevisiae to lower perchlorate levels and produce oxygen, which may be harvested or used directly by S. cerevisiae for aerobic growth and compound synthesis. Moreover, using perchlorate as an external electron acceptor could improve the efficiency of redox-imbalanced production pathways in yeast. Although several perchlorate reducing bacteria have been identified and utilized in water treatment systems on Earth, the widespread use of S. cerevisiae as a synthetic biology platform justifies the development of a perchlorate reducing strain for implementation on Mars.

  18. catena-Poly[[[di­aqua­bis­[1,2-bis­(pyridin-4-yl)diazene]copper(II)]-μ-1,2-bis­(pyridin-4-yl)diazene] bis­(perchlorate)

    PubMed Central

    Ballestero-Martínez, Ernesto; Campos-Fernández, Cristian Saul; Soto-Tellini, Victor Hugo; Gonzalez-Montiel, Simplicio; Martínez-Otero, Diego

    2013-01-01

    In the title compound, {[Cu(C10H8N4)3(H2O)2](ClO4)2}n, the coordination environment of the cationic CuII atom is distorted octa­hedral, formed by pairs of symmetry-equivalent 1,2-bis­(pyridin-4-yl)diazene ligands, bridging 1,2-bis­(pyridin-4-yl)diazene ligands and two non-equivalent water mol­ecules. The 1,2-bis­(pyridin-4-yl)diazene mol­ecules form polymeric chains parallel to [-101] via azo bonds which are situated about inversion centres. Since the CuII atom is situated on a twofold rotation axis, the monomeric unit has point symmetry 2. The perchlorate anions are disordered in a 0.536 (9):0.464 (9) ratio and are acceptors of water H atoms in medium–strong O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds with graph set R 4 4(12). The water mol­ecules, which are coordinated to the CuII atom and are hydrogen-bonded to the perchlorate anions, form columns parallel to [010]. A π–π inter­action [centroid–centroid distance = 3.913 (2) Å] occurs between pyridine rings, and weak C—H⋯O inter­actions also occur. PMID:23794983

  19. catena-Poly[[[di-aqua-bis-[1,2-bis-(pyridin-4-yl)diazene]copper(II)]-μ-1,2-bis-(pyridin-4-yl)diazene] bis-(perchlorate)].

    PubMed

    Ballestero-Martínez, Ernesto; Campos-Fernández, Cristian Saul; Soto-Tellini, Victor Hugo; Gonzalez-Montiel, Simplicio; Martínez-Otero, Diego

    2013-06-01

    In the title compound, {[Cu(C10H8N4)3(H2O)2](ClO4)2} n , the coordination environment of the cationic Cu(II) atom is distorted octa-hedral, formed by pairs of symmetry-equivalent 1,2-bis-(pyridin-4-yl)diazene ligands, bridging 1,2-bis-(pyridin-4-yl)diazene ligands and two non-equivalent water mol-ecules. The 1,2-bis-(pyridin-4-yl)diazene mol-ecules form polymeric chains parallel to [-101] via azo bonds which are situated about inversion centres. Since the Cu(II) atom is situated on a twofold rotation axis, the monomeric unit has point symmetry 2. The perchlorate anions are disordered in a 0.536 (9):0.464 (9) ratio and are acceptors of water H atoms in medium-strong O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds with graph set R 4 (4)(12). The water mol-ecules, which are coordinated to the Cu(II) atom and are hydrogen-bonded to the perchlorate anions, form columns parallel to [010]. A π-π inter-action [centroid-centroid distance = 3.913 (2) Å] occurs between pyridine rings, and weak C-H⋯O inter-actions also occur.

  20. Environmental Perchlorate Exposure: Potential Adverse Thyroid Effects

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Angela M.; Pearce, Elizabeth N.; Braverman, Lewis E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review This review will present a general overview of the sources, human studies, and proposed regulatory action regarding environmental perchlorate exposure. Recent findings Some recent studies have reported significant associations between urinary perchlorate concentrations, thyroid dysfunction, and decreased infant IQ in groups who would be particularly susceptible to perchlorate effects. An update regarding the recent proposed regulatory actions and potential costs surrounding amelioration of perchlorate contamination is provided. Summary The potential adverse thyroidal effects of environmental perchlorate exposure remain controversial, and further research is needed to further define its relationship to human health among pregnant and lactating women and their infants. PMID:25106002

  1. Perchlorate natural attenuation in a riparian zone.

    PubMed

    Borden, Robert C; Knox, Sheri L; Lieberman, M Tony; Ogles, Dora

    2014-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence were used to document the natural attenuation of perchlorate in a shallow alluvial aquifer. In the upgradient, aerobic portion of the aquifer, perchlorate did not biodegrade. However, natural flushing by groundwater flow is reducing perchlorate concentrations in the aquifer over time. Perchlorate concentrations in the source area are expected to meet cleanup criteria in 11 to 27 years without active remedial measures. At the distal end of the plume, perchlorate is rapidly degraded as it migrates upward through organic rich littoral zone sediments. Apparent first-order degradation rates in groundwater were about 0.20 d(-1) and are consistent with laboratory macrocosm rates (0.12 d(-1)). qPCR results show a distinct region of the littoral zone where perchlorate degraders are elevated. The Eh within this zone varies from +0.1 to +0.3 V indicating perchlorate degraders can thrive in moderately oxidizing conditions. The study has shown that (i) there was no apparent perchlorate biodegradation in aerobic aquifer; (ii) perchlorate declines over time in aerobic aquifer due to flushing; (iii) there was a rapid perchlorate attenuation in organic rich littoral zone; and, (iv) qPCR results show large increases in perchlorate degraders in the littoral zone.

  2. ASSESSMENT OF PERCHLORATE IN FERTILIZERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate has been positively detected only in those materials known to be derived from Chilean caliche, which constitute less than 0.2% of U.S. fertilizer application. The data obtained in the preponderance of investigations suggest that fertilizers do not contribute to envir...

  3. PERCHLORATE BEHAVIOR IN A MUNICIPAL LAKE FOLLOWING FIREWORKS DISPLAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate salts of potassium and ammonium are the primary oxidants in pyrotechnic mixtures, yet insufficient information is available regarding the relationship between fireworks displays and the environmental occurrence of perchlorate. Here we document changes in perchlorate ...

  4. Preparation and Properties of Methylammonium, Perchlorate.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-05-01

    perchloric acid in ethanol and methylamine gas ( produced by heating methylamine solution) was bubbled into 71% perchloric acid. The use of bottled... produced . 2.4 Ammonium As methylamine solution contains a small amount of ammonia as an impurity the amount of AP present in the MAP was determined...principally by a proton transfer reaction to methylamine and perchloric acid, This dissociation reaction , any evaporation of the dissociation products

  5. Microbial isotopic fractionation of perchlorate chlorine.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Max L; Ader, Magali; Chaudhuri, Swades; Coates, John D

    2003-08-01

    Perchlorate contamination can be microbially respired to innocuous chloride and thus can be treated effectively. However, monitoring a bioremediative strategy is often difficult due to the complexities of environmental samples. Here we demonstrate that microbial respiration of perchlorate results in a significant fractionation ( approximately -15 per thousand ) of the chlorine stable isotope composition of perchlorate. This can be used to quantify the extent of biotic degradation and to separate biotic from abiotic attenuation of this contaminant.

  6. Aripiprazole salts. II. Aripiprazole perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Freire, Eleonora; Polla, Griselda; Baggio, Ricardo

    2012-06-01

    The molecular structure of aripiprazole perchlorate (systematic name: 4-(2,3-dichlorophenyl)-1-{4-[(2-oxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinolin-7-yl)oxy]butyl}piperazin-1-ium perchlorate), C(23)H(28)Cl(2)N(3)O(2)(+)·ClO(4)(-), does not differ substantially from the recently published structure of aripiprazole nitrate [Freire, Polla & Baggio (2012). Acta Cryst. C68, o170-o173]. Both compounds have almost identical bond distances, bond angles and torsion angles. The two different counter-ions occupy equivalent places in the two structures, giving rise to very similar first-order `packing motifs'. However, these elemental arrangements interact with each other in different ways in the two structures, leading to two-dimensional arrays with quite different organizations.

  7. Fire-assay collection of gold and silver by copper.

    PubMed

    Diamantatos, A

    1987-08-01

    Gold and silver are very effectively collected in copper after fire-assay fusion at 1200 degrees . The resultant copper button is dissolved in perchloric acid and the parting solution is diluted with an equal volume of water. Both gold and silver are precipitated in the copper perchlorate medium by reduction with formic acid or hydroquinone. The two noble metals are collected, dissolved in acids, and determined by atomic-absorption spectrometry. The proposed procedure is simple, relatively rapid, and has been successfully applied to ores, concentrates, furnace products, and copper alloys. Recoveries compare favourably with those obtained by the classical lead cupellation method.

  8. PHYTOTRANSFORMATION OF PERCHLORATE USING PARROT-FEATHER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate is an oxvanion that has been extensively is a strong oxidizing
    agent in solid rocket fuel. Contamination of groundwater has occurred as the result of Perchlorate use. Standard disposal practices during the 1950s through the 1970s did not reflect the current knowled...

  9. PHYTOREMEDIATION OF PERCHLORATE BY TOBACCO PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous studies have shown that tobacco plants are tolerant of perchlorate and will accumulate perchlorate in the plant tissues. The objective of this research was to determine the effectiveness of tobacco plants in phytoremediation, a technology that employs plants to degrade,...

  10. Biodegradation of rocket propellant waste, ammonium perchlorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naqvi, S. M. Z.; Latif, A.

    1975-01-01

    The short term effects of ammonium perchlorate on selected organisms were studied. A long term experiment was also designed to assess the changes incurred by ammonium perchlorate on the nitrogen and chloride contents of soil within a period of 3 years. In addition, an attempt was made to produce methane gas from anaerobic fermentation of the aquatic weed, Alternanthera philoxeroides.

  11. ACCUMULATION AND FATE OF PERCHLORATE IN PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate, a component of solid rocket fuels, has emerged as a potential threat to surface water and groundwater at several locations in the U.S. Perchlorate levels up to 16 ug/L were detected in Lake Mead and 5-9 ug/L in the lower Colorado River. The water from the Colorado Ri...

  12. PERCHLORATE ACCUMULATION FROM FERTILIZER IN LEAFY VEGETATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate contaminated water and soil has been identified in many areas of the United States. Previous studies indicated that the primary source of contamination was from industry and military operations that use perchlorate as an oxidzing agent. However, recent studies have fo...

  13. MARGINAL IODINE DEFICIENCY EXACERBATES PERCHLORATE THYROID TOXICITY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The environmental contaminant perchlorate disrupts thyroid homeostasis via inhibition of iodine uptake into the thyroid. This work tested whether iodine deficiency exacerbates the effects of perchlorate. Female 27 day-old LE rats were fed a custom iodine deficient diet with 0, 50...

  14. ADSORPTION CHARACTERISTICS OF PERCHLORATE IN SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate(CI04) is an oxyanion that originates as a contaminant in ground and surface waters from the dissolution of ammonium, potassium, magnesium or sodium salts. Perchlorate is mainly used in solid rocket fuels, explosives, and military batteries. Because of its potential ha...

  15. PERCHLORATE IN FERTILIZERS?: ANALYSIS BY RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently, we and others found perchlorate at high levels (approximately 500 - 8000 mg/kg) in 90+% of 25+ fertilizers (primarily lawn-and-garden products) that are not identified as containing components derived from mined Chile saltpeter, which is known to contain perchlorate as ...

  16. Atmospheric Formation of Perchlorate on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M.; Catling, D. C.; Claire, M.; Zahnle, K. J.

    2011-12-01

    In 2008, NASA's Mars Phoenix Lander measured perchlorate (salts containing ClO4-) concentrations of 0.6 wt%; an amount that is larger than the highest natural concentrations found on Earth [1,2]. However, the origin of Martian perchlorate is unknown. Perchlorates are interesting because some forms are highly deliquescent with very low eutectic temperatures, allowing the possibility of liquids on Mars today. Also, if perchlorates formed via photochemistry (as on Earth), potentially they can be used as a tracer of the past chemistry of the Martian atmosphere. On Earth, naturally-occurring perchlorate is found only in extremely arid areas, such as deserts or within stratospheric aerosols. Recently, [2] modeled the formation of perchlorate over the driest place on Earth, the Atacama Desert. In this mechanism, natural emissions of chlorine-containing volatiles (e.g. HCl) react with photochemically-produced oxidants to make perchloric acid, HClO4. The acid is then dry deposited onto the surface where it forms perchlorate salts. A similar process could have occurred on Mars when the planet was volcanically active. Here, we add halogen and sulfur chemistry to a Martian photochemical model [3] in order to study an analogous formation mechanism for perchlorate on Mars. The model applies for the period over which Mars was volcanically active and dry, as was the case during much of the Hesperian and Amazonian eras. The model boundary conditions include the deposition velocities of halogen species onto the surface, the odd-nitrogen flux from the ionosphere, and the composition of volcanic gases. Varying the boundary conditions tests the model sensitivity. Surface depositional fluxes for perchlorates, and also nitrates and sulfates, are calculated. Model results are then compared to observations of salts on the surface, providing insight into Martian surface mineralogy.

  17. Novel biomarkers of perchlorate exposure in zebrafish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mukhi, S.; Carr, J.A.; Anderson, T.A.; Patino, R.

    2005-01-01

    Perchlorate inhibits iodide uptake by thyroid follicles and lowers thyroid hormone production. Although several effects of perchlorate on the thyroid system have been reported, the utility of these pathologies as markers of environmental perchlorate exposures has not been adequately assessed. The present study examined time-course and concentration-dependent effects of perchlorate on thyroid follicle hypertrophy, colloid depletion, and angiogenesis; alterations in whole-body thyroxine (T4) levels; and somatic growth and condition factor of subadult and adult zebrafish. Changes in the intensity of the colloidal T4 ring previously observed in zebrafish also were examined immunohistochemically. Three-month-old zebrafish were exposed to ammonium perchlorate at measured perchlorate concentrations of 0, 11, 90, 1,131, and 11,480 ppb for 12 weeks and allowed to recover in clean water for 12 weeks. At two weeks of exposure, the lowest-observed-effective concentrations (LOECs) of perchlorate that induced angiogenesis and depressed the intensity of colloidal T4 ring were 90 and 1,131 ppb, respectively; other parameters were not affected (whole-body T4 was not determined at this time). At 12 weeks of exposure, LOECs for colloid depletion, hypertrophy, angiogenesis, and colloidal T4 ring were 11,480, 1,131, 90, and 11 ppb, respectively. All changes were reversible, but residual effects on angiogenesis and colloidal T4 ring intensity were still present after 12 weeks of recovery (LOEC, 11,480 ppb). Whole-body T 4 concentration, body growth (length and weight), and condition factor were not affected by perchlorate. The sensitivity and longevity of changes in colloidal T4 ring intensity and angiogenesis suggest their usefulness as novel markers of perchlorate exposure. The 12-week LOEC for colloidal T4 ring is the lowest reported for any perchlorate biomarker in aquatic vertebrates. ?? 2005 SETAC.

  18. Energetic co-ordination compounds: synthesis, characterization and thermolysis studies on bis-(5-nitro-2H-tetrazolato-N2)tetraammine cobalt(III) perchlorate (BNCP) and its new transition metal (Ni/Cu/Zn) perchlorate analogues.

    PubMed

    Talawar, M B; Agrawal, A P; Asthana, S N

    2005-04-11

    Bis-(5-nitro-2H-tetrazolato-N2)tetraammine[cobalt(III)/nickel(III)] perchlorates (BNCP/BNNP) and mono-(5-nitro-H-tetrazolato-N)triammine [copper(II)/zinc(II)] perchlorates (MNCuP/MNZnP) have been synthesized during this work. The synthesis was carried out by addition of carbonato tetraammine metal [Co/Ni/Cu/Zn] nitrate [CTCN/CTNN/CTCuN/CTZnN] to the aqueous solution of sodium salt of 5-nitrotetrazole followed by reaction with perchloric acid. The precursors were synthesized by the reaction of aqueous solution of their respective nitrates with ammonium carbonate at 70 degrees C. The complexes and their precursors were characterized by determining metal and perchlorate content as well as infrared (IR), electron spectra for chemical analysis (ESCA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The TG profiles indicated that BNCP, BNNP and MNCuP are thermally stable up to the temperature of 260-278 degrees C unlike MNZnP (150 degrees C). Sudden exothermic decomposition was observed in case of bis-(5-nitro-2H-tetrazolato-N2)tetraammine cobalt(III) perchlorate, bis-(5-nitro-2H-tetrazolato-N2)tetraammine nickel(III) perchlorate and mono-(5-nitro-H-tetrazolato-N)triammine zinc(II) perchlorate resulting in the severe damage of the sample cup. Sensitivity data indicated that the Co/Ni/Cu complexes are more friction sensitive (3-4.8 kg) than mono-(5-nitro-H-tetrazolato-N)triammine zinc(II) perchlorate (14 kg). The impact sensitivity results of the complexes corresponded to h50% of 30-36 cm.

  19. Alternative Causes of Wide-Spread, Low Concentration Perchlorate Impacts to Groundwater

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Chlorate Use for Defoliation Table 6 - 4 : Sodium Chlorate Application to Cotton Crops by State, 1991-2003 LIST OF FIGURES Figure 3-1: Display...Section 3); safety flares (Section 4 ); blasting explosives (Section 5); and ECP chlorine products (Section 6 ). SERDP 4 2005.05.05 Table 1-1...Copper Carbonate 10 Charcol 10 Dextrine 5 (additional %) Yellow Flame Potassium Perchlorate 70 Sodium Oxalate 14 Red Gum 6 Shellac 6 Dextrine 4

  20. Evaluation of Alternative Causes of Widespread, Low Concentration Perchlorate Impacts to Groundwater

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    was installed in each of eight of the completed boreholes. Monitoring wells consisted of 2.54 cm (1 inch) inside diameter polyvinyl chloride (PVC...70 Polyvinyl Chloride 10 Red Gum 5 Copper Oxide 6 Strontium Carbonate 9 Rice Starch 5 (additional %) Blue Flame Ammonium Perchlorate 70 Red Gum...millivolt NaCl sodium chloride NaClO3 sodium chlorate NaOCl sodium hypochlorite NaOH sodium hydroxide NASA National Aeronautics and Space

  1. Evaluation of Alternative Causes of Widespread, Low Concentration Perchlorate Impacts to Groundwater

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    diameter polyvinyl chloride (PVC) casing and a 0.254 millimeter (mm) (0.010-inch) slotted well screen wrapped in a Vylon™ mesh to prevent fine...Purple Flame Potassium Perchlorate 70 Polyvinyl Chloride 10 Red Gum 5 Copper Oxide 6 Strontium Carbonate 9 Rice Starch 5 (additional %) Blue...Personal Ultrapure Water System mV millivolt NaCl sodium chloride NaClO3 sodium chlorate NaOCl sodium hypochlorite NaOH sodium hydroxide NASA

  2. Electrochemical stimulation of microbial perchlorate reduction.

    PubMed

    Thrash, J Cameron; Van Trump, J Ian; Weber, Karrie A; Miller, Elisabeth; Achenbach, Laurie A; Coates, John D

    2007-03-01

    As part of our studies into the diversity of dissimilatory perchlorate reducing bacteria (DPRB) we investigated the reduction of perchlorate in the cathodic chamber of a bioelectrical reactor (BER). Our results demonstrated that washed cells of Dechloromonas and Azospira species readily reduced 90 mg L(-1) perchlorate in the BER with 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate (AQDS) as a mediator. No perchlorate was reduced in the absence of cells or AQDS, or in an open-circuit control. Similar results were observed when a natural microbial community was inoculated into a fed-batch BER. After 70 days of operation, a novel DPRB, strain VDY, was isolated which readily reduced perchlorate in a mediatorless BER. Continuous up-flow BERs (UFBERs) were seeded with active cultures of strain VDY, and perchlorate at a volumetric loading of 60 mg L(-1) day(-1) was successfully removed. Gas phase analysis indicated that low levels of H2 produced at the cathode surface through electrolysis may mediate this metabolism. The results of these studies demonstrate that biological perchlorate remediation can be facilitated through the use of a cathode as the primary electron donor, and that continuous treatment in such a system approaches current industry standards. This has important implications for the continuous treatment of this critical contaminant in industrial waste streams and drinking water.

  3. Perchlorate reduction by microbes inhabiting oil reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebensteiner, Martin; Stams, Alfons; Lomans, Bart

    2014-05-01

    Microbial perchlorate and chlorate reduction is a unique type of anaerobic respiration as during reduction of (per)chlorate chlorite is formed, which is then split into chloride and molecular oxygen. In recent years it was demonstrated that (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria may employ oxygenase-dependent pathways for the degradation of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. These findings suggested that (per)chlorate may be used as oxygen-releasing compound in anoxic environments that contain hydrocarbons, such as polluted soil sites and oil reservoirs. We started to study perchlorate reduction by microbes possibly inhabiting oil reservoirs. One of the organisms studied was Archaeoglobus fulgidus. This extremely thermophilic archaeon is known as a major contributor to souring in hot oil reservoirs. A. fulgidus turned out to be able to use perchlorate as terminal electron acceptor for growth with lactate (Liebensteiner et al 2013). Genome based physiological experiments indicated that A. fulgidus possesses a novel perchlorate reduction pathway. Perchlorate is first reduced to chlorite, but chlorite is not split into chloride and molecular oxygen as occurs in bacteria. Rather, chlorite reacts chemically with sulfide, forming oxidized sulfur compounds, which are reduced to sulfide in the electron transport chain by the archaeon. The dependence of perchlorate reduction on sulfur compounds could be shown. The implications of our findings as novel strategy for microbiological enhanced oil recovery and for souring mitigation are discussed. Liebensteiner MG, Pinkse MWH, Schaap PJ, Stams AJM and Lomans BP (2013) Archaeal (per)chlorate reduction at high temperature, a matter of abiotic-biotic reactions. Science 340: 85-87

  4. Validation of Chlorine and Oxygen Isotope Ratio Analysis to Differentiate Perchlorate Sources and to Document Perchlorate Biodegradation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    Guidance Document Validation of Chlorine and Oxygen Isotope Ratio Analysis To Differentiate Perchlorate Sources and to Document Perchlorate...Manual for Forensic Analysis of Perchlorate in Grotmdwater using W912-HQ-0 5-C-0022 Chlorine and Oxygen Isotopic Analyses 5b. GRANT NUMBER NA 5c...natural. Chlorine and oxygen isotopic analyses of perchlorate provide the primaty direct approach whereby different sources of perchlorate can be

  5. Biodegradation of rocket propellent waste, ammonium perchlorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naqui, S. M. Z.

    1975-01-01

    The impact of the biodegradation rate of ammonium perchlorate on the environment was studied in terms of growth, metabolic rate, and total biomass of selected animal and plant species. Brief methodology and detailed results are presented.

  6. Stable Isotope Systematics of Martian Perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, P.; Farley, K. A.; Archer, D., Jr.; Atreya, S. K.; Conrad, P. G.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Fairen, A.; Franz, H. B.; Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Malespin, C.; Ming, D. W.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Sutter, B.

    2015-12-01

    Chlorine isotopic compositions in HCl released during evolved gas analysis (EGA) runs have been detected by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument on the Curiosity rover ranging from approximately -9‰ to -50‰ δ37Cl, with two spatially and isotopically separated groups of samples averaging -15‰ and -45‰. These extremely low values are the first such detection of any known natural material; common terrestrial values very rarely exceed ±5‰, and the most extreme isotopic signature yet detected elsewhere in the solar system are values of around +24‰ on the Moon. The only other known location in the solar system with large negative chlorine isotopes is the Atacama Desert, where perchlorate with -14‰ δ37Cl has been detected. The Atacama perchlorate has unusual Δ17O signatures associated with it, indicating a formation mechanism involving O3, which suggests an atmospheric origin of the perchlorate and associated large isotopic anomalies. Identification of non-zero positive Δ17O signatures in the O2 released during EGA runs would allow definitive evidence for a similar process having occurred on Mars. Perchlorate is thought to be the most likely source of HCl in EGA runs due to the simultaneous onset of O2 release. If perchlorate is indeed the HCl source, atmospheric chemistry could be responsible for the observed isotopic anomalies, with variable extents of perchlorate production producing the isotopic variability. However, chloride salts have also been observed to release HCl upon heating; if the timing of O2 release is merely coincidental, observed HCl could be coming from chlorides. At thermodynamic equilibrium, the fractionation factor of perchlorate reduction is 0.93, meaning that differing amounts of post-deposition reduction of isotopically normal perchlorate to chloride could account for the highly variable Cl isotopes. Additionally, post-deposition reduction could account for the difference between the two Cl isotopic groups if perchlorate

  7. The Microbiology of Perchlorate in the Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    In the last decade perchlorate has been identified as an important groundwater component that poses potential health threat. Although primarily sourced anthropogenically, many recent studies have identified significant natural pools throughout the US and the natural mechanisms of its synthesis remain a mystery. As such, the true perchlorate concentrations naturally present in the environment are still unknown making its regulation problematic. Because of its solubility and non-reactivity the fate and transport of perchlorate in the environment is primarily a function of microbial activity. In the last seven years more than forty specialized perchlorate respiring organisms have been identified and characterized. These dissimilatory perchlorate reducing bacteria (DPRB) are metabolically diverse and environmental populations tend to be dominated by two primary genotypes, the Dechloromonas and the Azospira species. As such, the majority of our understanding of this metabolism is based on these organisms. These organisms are readily found in soil and sedimentary environments and often associate with the rhizosphere. Recent research has demonstrated an accumulation of these organisms along plant roots suggesting their catabolism of root exudates and molecular studies has demonstrated their existence as endophytic infections of the stem and leaves of actively growing Brachypodium grass plants although their exact role under these conditions is unknown. These microorganisms are generally not nutritionally fastidious and vitamin supplementation is unnecessary for growth although molybdenum is a required trace element for perchlorate reduction. The Dechloromonas and Azospira species generally grow optimally at pH values near neutrality in freshwater environments. Even so, recent field studies have shown that related deep-branching members of these genera often predominate in sites of adverse pH or salinity with some species being capable of growth and perchlorate respiration

  8. A Colorimetric Bioassay for Perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinnickel, M. L.; Smith, S.; Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Recognition of perchlorate (ClO4-) as a widespread contaminant across the United States and its potential adverse affects towards human health has motivated the EPA to place ClO4- on its contaminant candidate list for drinking water supplies. While a federal MCL has not yet been set, a recommended public health goal of 1 ppb (μg.L-1) was established by the US EPA in 2002. To date, methods of detection require use of sensitive ion chromatographic equipment that are expensive, time consuming, and require highly trained personnel for use. Our studies are focused on the development of a highly sensitive, simple, and robust colorimetric bioassay based on the primary enzyme involved in microbial ClO4- reduction, the perchlorate reductase (Pcr). A previously published assay used reduced methyl viologen (MV, the dye is reduced with sodium hydrosulfite) as an electron donor to demonstrate Pcr activity. The assay directly correlates the amount of MV oxidized with the amount of ClO4- reduced by assuming a transfer of four electrons. To test this assumption, we compared actual concentrations of MV oxidized to ClO4- reduced in this assay. ClO4- concentrations were determined using a Dionex ICS-500 ion chromatography system, while MV concentrations were determined using a standard curve generated at 578 nm. Comparisons between the two revealed that twelve molecules of MV were oxidized for each molecule of ClO4- reduced. The oxidation of these additional eight MV molecules is explained by the interaction of the dye with chlorite (the product of the Pcr reaction) and other contaminants that could be present in the enzyme prep. This unsettling result indicated this assay would be problematic for the detection of ClO4- in soil, which has many chemicals that could react with MV. To improve upon this assay, we have tried to reduce ClO4- using less reactive dyes and reductants. The reductants ascorbic acid, NADH, and dithiothreitol drive Pcr catalyzed ClO4- reduction, however, they

  9. SURVEY OF FERTILIZERS AND RELATED MATERIALS FOR PERCHLORATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The most comprehensive survey of fertilizers and other raw materials for perchlorate to date has been conducted to determine whether these could be significant contributors to environmental perchlorate contamination. Although the data span a large range of commercial products, th...

  10. INVESTIGATION OF AGRICULTURAL FERTILIZERS AND RELATED MATERIALS FOR PERCHLORATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The most comprehensive survey of fertilizers and other raw materials for perchlorate to date has been conducted to determine whether these could be significant contributors to environmental perchlorate contamination. Although the data span a large range of commercial products, th...

  11. The Effects of Perchlorate on Methane Production of Methanogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodhart, T.; Kral, T. A.

    2010-04-01

    In May 2008, the Phoenix space craft analyzed the martian soil, detecting perchlorate, which is a highly oxidizing compound and potentially harmful to organic matter. This presentation discusses the effects that perchlorate has on methanogen growth.

  12. Methane Production by Methanogens in Perchlorate-supplemented Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, K. L.; Gavin, P.; Goodhart, T.; Kral, T. A.

    2009-03-01

    Perchlorates, found on the martian surface, create a harsh environment. Methanogens are familiar with harsh environments and their growth was tested in perchlorate salt media. All four species of methanogens produced methane at all concentrations of each salt tested.

  13. Perchlorate exposure from infant formula and comparisons with the perchlorate reference dose.

    PubMed

    Schier, Joshua G; Wolkin, Amy F; Valentin-Blasini, Lisa; Belson, Martin G; Kieszak, Stephanie M; Rubin, Carol S; Blount, Benjamin C

    2010-05-01

    Perchlorate exposure may be higher in infants compared with older persons, due to diet (infant formula) and body weight versus intake considerations. Our primary objective was to quantitatively assess perchlorate concentrations in commercially available powdered infant formulas (PIFs). Secondary objectives were: (1) to estimate exposure in infants under different dosing scenarios and compare them with the perchlorate reference dose (RfD); (2) estimate the perchlorate concentration in water used for preparing PIFs that would result in a dose exceeding the RfD; and (3) estimate iodine intakes from PIFs. We quantified perchlorate levels in three samples (different lot numbers) of reconstituted PIF (using perchlorate-free water) from commercial brands of PIF in each of the following categories: bovine milk-based with lactose, soy-based, bovine milk-based but lactose-free, and elemental (typically consisting of synthetic amino acids). Exposure modeling was conducted to determine whether the RfD might be exceeded in 48 dosing scenarios that were dependent on age, centile energy intake per unit of body weight, body weight percentile, and PIF perchlorate concentration. We obtained three different samples in each of the five brands of bovine- and soy-based PIF, three different samples in each of the three brands of lactose-free PIF, and three different samples in two brands of elemental PIF. The results were as follows: bovine milk-based with lactose (1.72 microg/l, range: 0.68-5.05); soy-based (0.21 microg/l, range: 0.10-0.44); lactose-free (0.27 microg/l, range: 0.03-0.93); and elemental (0.18 microg/l, range: 0.08-0.4). Bovine milk-based PIFs with lactose had a significantly higher concentration of perchlorate (P<0.05) compared with all. Perchlorate was a contaminant of all commercially available PIFs tested. Bovine milk-based PIFs with lactose had a significantly higher perchlorate concentration perchlorate than soy, lactose-free, and elemental PIFs. The perchlorate Rf

  14. PERCHLORATE INDUCES HERMAPHRODITISM IN THREESPINE STICKLEBACKS

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, Richard R.; von Hippel, Frank A.; Cresko, William A.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, concern regarding perchlorate contamination has arisen in many contexts. Perchlorate has many military, commercial, and domestic applications, and it has been found in milk, drinking and irrigation water, and produce. Perchlorate is harmful at low levels, yet it remains unregulated in the United States while the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency attempts to establish acceptable exposure levels. The present study investigated potential reproductive effects on vertebrates using a model fish species, the threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus). Sticklebacks were raised from syngamy through sexual maturity in untreated water and in three target concentrations of sodium perchlorate–treated water. Perchlorate was found to interfere with the expression of nuptial coloration, courtship behavior, and normal sexual development. Genetic testing revealed that some females were masculinized to the extent that they produced both sperm and eggs, and histological analysis showed that these individuals had intersexual gonads (ovotestes) containing both oocytes and cells undergoing spermatogenesis. In vitro fertilizations revealed that those gametes were capable of self- and cross-fertilization. However, crosses using sperm derived from genetic females died either during the blastula phase or near the onset of organogenesis. Sperm derived from genetic males produced viable fry when crossed with eggs derived from genetic females from all treatments. To our knowledge, the present study provides the first evidence that perchlorate produces androgenic effects and is capable of inducing functional hermaphroditism in a nonhermaphroditic vertebrate. PMID:16916028

  15. PERCHLORATE PHYTOREMEDIATION USING HARDWOOD TREES AND VASCULAR PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate has contaminated water and soils at several locations in the United States. Perchlorate is
    water soluble, exceedingly mobile in aqueous systems, and can persist for many decades under typical ground and surface water conditions. Perchlorate is of concern because of...

  16. ACCUMULATION OF PERCHLORATE IN TOBACCO PLANTS AND TOBACCO PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous field and laboratory studies with vascular plants have shown that perchlorate is transported from perchlorate fortified soils and is accumulated in the plant tissues and organs. This paper reports results of initial investigations on the accumulation of perchlorate in t...

  17. DETERMINATION OF PERCHLORATE IN TOBACCO PLANTS AND TOBACCO PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous field and laboratory studies with vascular plants have shown that perchlorate is transported from perchlorate fortified soils and is accumulated in the plant tissues and organs. This paper reports results of initial investigations on the accumulation of perchlorate in t...

  18. 76 FR 7762 - Drinking Water: Regulatory Determination on Perchlorate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 141 RIN 2040-AF08 Drinking Water: Regulatory Determination on Perchlorate AGENCY... the Agency's) regulatory determination for perchlorate in accordance with the Safe Drinking Water Act... occur or there is a substantial likelihood that perchlorate will occur in public water systems with...

  19. Peptide Biomarkers as Evidence of Perchlorate Biodegradation▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Reema; Crawford, Ronald L.; Paszczynski, Andrzej J.

    2011-01-01

    Perchlorate is a known health hazard for humans, fish, and other species. Therefore, it is important to assess the response of an ecosystem exposed to perchlorate contamination. The data reported here show that a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach for the detection of perchlorate-reducing enzymes can be used to measure the ability of microorganisms to degrade perchlorate, including determining the current perchlorate degradation status. Signature peptides derived from chlorite dismutase (CD) and perchlorate reductase can be used as biomarkers of perchlorate presence and biodegradation. Four peptides each derived from CD and perchlorate reductase subunit A (PcrA) and seven peptides derived from perchlorate reductase subunit B (PcrB) were identified as signature biomarkers for perchlorate degradation, as these sequences are conserved in the majority of the pure and mixed perchlorate-degrading microbial cultures examined. However, chlorite dismutase signature biomarker peptides from Dechloromonas agitata CKB were found to be different from those in other cultures used and should also be included with selected CD biomarkers. The combination of these peptides derived from the two enzymes represents a promising perchlorate presence/biodegradation biomarker system. The biomarker peptides were detected at perchlorate concentrations as low as 0.1 mM and at different time points both in pure cultures and within perchlorate-reducing environmental enrichment consortia. The peptide biomarkers were also detected in the simultaneous presence of perchlorate and an alternate electron acceptor, nitrate. We believe that this technique can be useful for monitoring bioremediation processes for other anthropogenic environmental contaminants with known metabolic pathways. PMID:21115710

  20. Perchlorate behavior in a municipal lake following fireworks displays.

    PubMed

    Wilkin, Richard T; Fine, Dennis D; Burnett, Nicole G

    2007-06-01

    Perchlorate salts of potassium and ammonium are the primary oxidants in pyrotechnic mixtures, yet insufficient information is available regarding the relationship between fireworks displays and the environmental occurrence of perchlorate. Here we document changes in perchlorate concentrations in surface water adjacent to a site of fireworks displays from 2004 to 2006. Preceding fireworks displays, perchlorate concentrations in surface water ranged from 0.005 to 0.081 microg/L, with a mean value of 0.043 microg/L. Within 14 h after the fireworks, perchlorate concentrations spiked to values ranging from 24 to 1028x the mean baseline value. A maximum perchlorate concentration of 44.2 microg/L was determined following the July 4th event in 2006. After the fireworks displays, perchlorate concentrations decreased toward the background level within 20 to 80 days, with the rate of attenuation correlating to surface water temperature. Adsorption tests indicate that sediments underlying the water column have limited (< 100 nmol/g) capacity to remove perchlorate via chemical adsorption. Microcosms showed comparatively rapid intrinsic perchlorate degradation in the absence of nitrate consistent with the observed disappearance of perchlorate from the study site. This suggests that at sites with appropriate biogeochemical conditions, natural attenuation may be an important factor affecting the fate of perchlorate following fireworks displays.

  1. Perchlorate in Water Supplies: Sources, Exposures, and Health Effects.

    PubMed

    Steinmaus, Craig M

    2016-06-01

    Perchlorate exposure occurs from ingestion of natural or man-made perchlorate in food or water. Perchlorate is used in a variety of industrial products including missile fuel, fireworks, and fertilizers, and industrial contamination of drinking water supplies has occurred in a number of areas. Perchlorate blocks iodide uptake into the thyroid and decreases the production of thyroid hormone, a critical hormone for metabolism, neurodevelopment, and other physiologic functions. Occupational and clinical dosing studies have not identified clear adverse effects, but may be limited by small sample sizes, short study durations, and the inclusion of mostly healthy adults. Expanding evidence suggests that young children, pregnant women, fetuses, and people co-exposed to similarly acting agents may be especially susceptible to perchlorate. Given the ubiquitous nature of perchlorate exposure, and the importance of thyroid hormone for brain development, studying the impact of perchlorate on human health could have far-reaching public health implications.

  2. Fate and Transport of Perchlorate at California's Stringfellow Superfund Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenoyer, G. J.; Nuttall, H. E.; Paulson, R.; Wolfenden, A.; Aldern, J.

    2007-12-01

    Geologic conditions exert primary control over the fate and transport of perchlorate at the Stringfellow Superfund site. A buried valley filled with alluvium has been defined that extends from Pyrite Canyon, location of the former Stringfellow acid pits, down to near the Santa Ana River. The buried valley is cut into the underlying granitic bedrock, and appears to be a paleo-channel of the ancestral Pyrite Creek. The groundwater hydraulic gradient aligns closely with the buried valley, as does the perchlorate plume. The buried valley appears to be a preferential pathway for contaminant migration. Perchlorate concentrations in the downgradient portion of the plume have been slowly decreasing over time, suggesting that the groundwater extraction wells are effective at cutting off the source. Perchlorate degradation, however, appears to be minimal over most of the sandy aerobic aquifer, as concentrations of perchlorate persist over a 5-mile long plume. Scattered concentrations of perchlorate in the 1 to 12 ug/L range are widespread over a broad area adjacent to the plume and appear to be unrelated to the plume. Hydrogeologic analysis and perchlorate isotope analysis are being used to investigate whether these outlying concentrations may be related to the historic use of perchlorate- bearing mineral nitrate fertilizer. At the distal end of the plume, a marked change in the fate of perchlorate occurs beneath the Santa Ana River. Sampling of mini-piezometers installed into the river sediments shows that the perchlorate and nitrate concentrations fall to below detection as the aquifer environment changes from oxidizing to reducing conditions. In this local environment, it appears that anaerobic biodegradation reduces the perchlorate and nitrate. As a result of degradation of perchlorate, and possibly mixing of infiltrating river water beneath the losing portions of the river, perchlorate concentrations decrease to below 6 ug/L downgradient of the river. This presentation

  3. PERCHLORATE UPTAKE AND TRANSFORMATION IN AQUATIC PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ammonium Perchlorate (AP) is produced on a large scale by the chemical industry, for a wide range of applications for example, as a strong oxidizing agent in solid rocket fuel. AP must be washed out of the inventory periodically due to its limited shelf-life,and replaced with a f...

  4. PERCHLORATE CHEMISTRY: IMPLICATIONS FOR ANALYSIS AND REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since the discovery of perchlorate in the ground and surface waters of several western states, there has been increasing interest in the health effects resulting from chronic exposure to low (ppb) levels. With this concern has come a need to investigate technologies that might be...

  5. Perchlorate in Drinking Water Frequent Questions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Perchlorate occurs naturally in arid states in the Southwest United States, in nitrate fertilizer deposits in Chile, and in potash ore in the United States and Canada. It has also been found in some public drinking water systems and in food.

  6. Environmental Screening Assessment of Perchlorate Replacements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship ( QSAR ) model were used to determine or predict the fate, transport potential, and toxicological properties of...literature review and the QSAR modeling were used to rank the new compounds against perchlorate from a fate-and- transport/ toxicology prospective...32 5.3 Toxicological Comparison

  7. Plant-mediated transformation of perchlorate into chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Nzengung, V.A.; Wang, C.; Harvey, G.

    1999-05-01

    The decontamination of perchlorate-contaminated water by woody plants was investigated in sand and hydroponic bioreactors. Willow trees were found to be the most favorable woody plants with phraetophytic characteristics in comparative screen tests with eastern cottonwoods and Eucalyptus cineria. Willows decontaminated aqueous solutions dosed with 10--100 mg/.L of perchlorate to below the method detection limit of 2 {micro}g/L. Two phytoprocesses were identified as important in the remediation of perchlorate-contaminated water: (1) uptake and phytodegradation of perchlorate in the tree branches and leaves and (2) rhizodegradation. Exposure of rooted willow trees to perchlorate-dosed media stimulated rhizodegradation. Homogeneous degradation studies using media from the root zone of dosed willow trees confirmed that rhizosphere-associated microorganisms mediated the degradation of perchlorate to chloride. Experiments conducted with varying ranges of nitrate concentrations clearly indicated that high nitrate concentrations interfered with rhizodegradation of perchlorate. This study provides evidence that the efficacy of phytoremediation of perchlorate-contaminated environments may depend on the concentration of competing terminal electron acceptors, such as nitrate, and the nitrogen source of the nutrient solution., Since perchlorate does not volatilize from water readily, a perchlorate remediation scheme may involve an intensively cultivated plantation of trees with phraetophytic characteristics and irrigation with the contaminated water.

  8. Atmospheric origins of perchlorate on Mars and in the Atacama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catling, D. C.; Claire, M. W.; Zahnle, K. J.; Quinn, R. C.; Clark, B. C.; Hecht, M. H.; Kounaves, S.

    2010-01-01

    Isotopic studies indicate that natural perchlorate is produced on Earth in arid environments by the oxidation of chlorine species through pathways involving ozone or its photochemical products. With this analogy, we propose that the arid environment on Mars may have given rise to perchlorate through the action of atmospheric oxidants. A variety of hypothetical pathways can be proposed including photochemical reactions, electrostatic discharge, and gas-solid reactions. Because perchlorate-rich deposits in the Atacama desert are closest in abundance to perchlorate measured at NASA's Phoenix Lander site, we made a preliminary study of the means to produce Atacama perchlorate to help shed light on the origin of Martian perchlorate. We investigated gas phase pathways using a 1-D photochemical model. We found that perchlorate can be produced in sufficient quantities to explain the abundance of perchlorate in the Atacama from a proposed gas phase oxidation of chlorine volatiles to perchloric acid. The feasibility of gas phase production for the Atacama provides justification for future investigations of gas phase photochemistry as a possible source for Martian perchlorate.

  9. ACCUMULATION OF PERCHLORATE IN TOBACCO PLANTS: DEVELOPMENT OF A PLANT KINETIC MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous studies have shown that tobacco plants are tolerant of perchlorate and will accumulate perchlorate in plant tissues. This research determined the uptake, translocation, and accumulation of perchlorate in tobacco plants. Three hydroponics growth studies were completed u...

  10. DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF AN ION CHROMATOGRAPHIC METHOD FOR DETERMINING PERCHLORATE IN FERTILIZERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method has been developed for the determination of perchlorate in fertilizers. Materials are leached with deionized water to dissolve any soluble perchlorate compounds. Ion chromatographic separation is followed by suppressed conductivity for detection. Perchlorate is retained ...

  11. Perchlorate and Diet: Human Exposures, Risks, and Mitigation Strategies.

    PubMed

    Maffini, Maricel V; Trasande, Leonardo; Neltner, Thomas G

    2016-06-01

    Perchlorate is an endocrine-disrupting chemical that interferes with the normal functioning of the thyroid gland. Maternal thyroid dysfunction during gestation may alter fetal brain development. Perchlorate contamination is widespread: it is present in the body of all Americans tested and the majority of foods tested. The main sources of food contamination appear to be hypochlorite bleach, a disinfectant and sanitizer, that when poorly managed quickly degrades to perchlorate and perchlorate-laden plastic food packaging for dry food or localized contamination from manufacturing or processing of the chemical. Eliminating perchlorate from food packaging and improving bleach management, such as reducing concentration and storage time and temperature, would result in reduced perchlorate contamination of food and water.

  12. The NAS perchlorate review: questions remain about the perchlorate RfD.

    PubMed

    Ginsberg, Gary; Rice, Deborah

    2005-09-01

    Human exposure to perchlorate is commonplace because it is a contaminant of drinking water, certain foods, and breast milk. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted a perchlorate risk assessment in 2002 that yielded a reference dose (RfD) based on both the animal and human toxicology data. This assessment has been superceded by a recent National Academy of Science (NAS) review that derived a perchlorate RfD that is 20-fold greater (less stringent) than that derived by the U.S. EPA in 2002. The NAS-derived RfD was put on the U.S. EPA's Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database very quickly and with no further public review. In this commentary we raise concerns about the NAS approach to RfD development in three areas of toxicity assessment: the dose that the NAS described as a no observable adverse-effect level is actually associated with perchlorate-induced effects; consideration of uncertainties was insufficient; and the NAS considered the inhibition of iodine uptake to be a nonadverse effect. We conclude that risk assessors should carefully evaluate whether the IRIS RfD is the most appropriate value for assessing perchlorate risk.

  13. Perchlorate Contamination of Drinking Water: Regulatory Issues and Legislative Actions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-23

    perchlorate exposure at low levels, and because of the need for more research on water treatment technologies. Related issues involve water treatment ... treatment technologies and is funding several more demonstration projects during FY2005. Perchlorate cleanup is proceeding at several sites; however...SDWA). The agency listed perchlorate as a priority for further research on health effects and treatment technologies, and as a priority for collecting

  14. Perchlorate Contamination of Drinking Water: Regulatory Issues and Legislative Actions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-29

    and treatment technologies. Related issues include environmental cleanup and water treatment costs, which will be driven by federal and state...listed perchlorate as a priority for further research on health effects and treatment technologies and as a priority for collecting occurrence data...capabilities of monitoring and treatment technologies, and other sources of perchlorate exposure, such as food. The EPA continued to assess perchlorate

  15. In Situ Bioremediation of Perchlorate in Vadose Zone Source Areas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    analysis of perchlorate, chlorate , nitrate, sulfate, and RCRA metals. The pH level within the soil was also measured. During the January 2008 event...perchlorate concentration in all boring samples was 394 + Besides perchlorate, the soil samples collected from each borehole had chlorate concentrations...both chlorate and nitrate were highly variable within each borehole. The average soil pH was 8.9 108 mg/kg (n=41). While several soil samples

  16. Development of a drinking water regulation for perchlorate in California.

    PubMed

    Tikkanen, Maria W

    2006-05-10

    Perchlorate is an environmental contaminant often associated with military installations and rocket propellant manufacture and testing facilities across the U.S. Highly water soluble, perchlorate has been found by federal and state agencies at almost 400 sites within the U.S. in groundwater, surface water, soil or public drinking water. There is no federal drinking water standard for perchlorate, but it is on the drinking water Contaminant Candidate List, and falls under the Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring Rule (UCMR) for which monitoring is required. The recent National Academy of Science (NAS) report on the potential health effects of perchlorate recommended a perchlorate reference dose of 0.0007 mg/kg of body weight which would be equivalent to a drinking water concentration of 24.5 microg/L. In California, approximately 395 wells in 96 water systems have been shown to contain perchlorate, and about 90% of these are located in Southern California. Water taken from the Colorado River, a major surface water supply to Southern California, has had reported detections of perchlorate ranging from non-detect to 9 microg/L. California has established a Public Health Goal (PHG) of 6 microg/L for perchlorate, and a proposed drinking water regulation is imminent. This review details the regulatory process involved with particular attention given to the occurrence of perchlorate in California drinking water sources and analytical methodology utilized.

  17. Evidence for the distribution of perchlorates on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Benton C.; Kounaves, Samuel P.

    2016-10-01

    Various Mars missions have detected Cl atoms, chlorides and perchlorates in martian surface materials. The global soils, in particular, always contain significant levels of observable Cl. Direct evidence points to this Cl being in the form of both chlorides and perchlorates, and possibly also chlorates and other oxychlorines. The most widespread measurements have been of Cl atoms, and cannot discern the chemical form. However, from separate evidence of perchlorate obtained at high latitudes (Phoenix lander) and low latitudes (Curiosity rover), it is likely that perchlorates are widespread, albeit in varying proportions relative to the total amount of ubiquitous Cl.

  18. Kinetics of a chlorate-accumulating, perchlorate-reducing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Dudley, Margaret; Salamone, Anna; Nerenberg, Robert

    2008-05-01

    Kinetics parameters for perchlorate and chlorate reduction were determined for Dechlorosoma sp. HCAP-C, also known as Dechlorosoma sp. PCC, a novel perchlorate-reducing bacterium (PCRB) that accumulates significant amounts of chlorate during perchlorate reduction. This is the first report of such behavior, and we hypothesized the perchlorate reduction kinetics would be markedly different from other PCRB. In batch tests with initial perchlorate concentrations ranging from 200 to around 1400 mg/L, maximum chlorate accumulation ranged from 41 to 279 mg/L, and were consistently around 20% of the initial perchlorate concentration. For perchlorate, parameters were determined using a competitive inhibition model. The maximum specific substrate degradation rate qmaxP was 11.5mgClO4-/mgdry weight (DW)-d, and the half-maximum rate constant KP was 193 mgClO4-/L. For chlorate, the qmaxC was 8.3 mgClO3-/mgDW-d and the KC was 58.3 mgClO3-/L. The high KP values relative to conventional PCRB, values suggests that HCAP-C does not play a significant role at low perchlorate concentrations. However, the relatively high qmaxP, and the potential for syntrophic relationships with chlorate-reducing bacteria that relieve the effects of chlorate inhibition, suggest that HCAP-C could play a significant role at high perchlorate concentrations.

  19. Atmospheric Production of Perchlorate on Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claire, M.; Catling, D. C.; Zahnle, K. J.

    2009-12-01

    Natural production and preservation of perchlorate on Earth occurs only in arid environments. Isotopic evidence suggests a strong role for atmospheric oxidation of chlorine species via pathways including ozone or its photochemical derivatives. As the Martian atmosphere is both oxidizing and drier than the driest places on Earth, we propose an atmospheric origin for the Martian perchlorates measured by NASA's Phoenix Lander. A variety of hypothetical formation pathways can be proposed including atmospheric photochemical reactions, electrostatic discharge, and gas-solid reactions. Here, we investigate gas phase formation pathways using a 1-D photochemical model (Catling et al. 2009, accepted by JGR). Because perchlorate-rich deposits in the Atacama desert are closest in abundance to perchlorate measured at NASA's Phoenix Lander site, we start with a study of the means to produce Atacama perchlorate. We found that perchlorate can be produced in sufficient quantities to explain the abundance of perchlorate in the Atacama from a proposed gas phase oxidation of chlorine volatiles to perchloric acid. These results are sensitive to estimated reaction rates for ClO3 species. The feasibility of gas phase production for the Atacama provides justification for further investigations of gas phase photochemistry as a possible source for Martian perchlorate. In addition to the Atacama results, we will present a preliminary study incorporating chlorine chemistry into an existing Martian photochemical model (Zahnle et al. JGR 2008).

  20. Perchlorate Clinical Pharmacology and Human Health: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Soldin, Offie Porat; Braverman, Lewis E.; Lamm, Steven H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Potassium perchlorate has been used at various times during the last 50 years to treat hyperthyroidism. Since World War II ammonium perchlorate has been used as a propellant for rockets. In 1997, the assay sensitivity for perchlorate in water was improved from 0.4 mg/L (ppm) to 4 µg/L (ppb). As a result, public water supplies in Southern California were found to contain perchlorate ions in the range of 5 to 8 ppb, and those in Southern Nevada were found to contain 5 to 24 ppb. Research programs have been developed to assess the safety or risk from these exposures and to assist state and regulatory agencies in setting a reasonable safe level for perchlorate in drinking water. This report reviews the evidence on the human health effects of perchlorate exposure. Perchlorate is a competitive inhibitor of iodine uptake. All of its pharmacologic effects at current therapeutic levels or lower are associated with inhibition of the sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) on the thyroid follicular cell membrane. A review of the medical and occupational studies has been undertaken to identify perchlorate exposure levels at which thyroid hormone levels may be reduced or thyrotropin levels increased. This exposure level may begin in the 35 to 100 mg/d range. Volunteer studies have been designed to determine the exposure levels at which perchlorate begins to affect iodine uptake in humans. Such effects may begin at levels of approximately 1 mg/d. Environmental studies have assessed the thyroidal health of newborns and adults at current environmental exposures to perchlorate and have concluded that the present levels appear to be safe. Whereas additional studies are underway both in laboratory animals and in the field, it appears that a safe level can be established for perchlorate in water and that regulatory agencies and others are now trying to determine that level. PMID:11477312

  1. Potential perchlorate exposure from Citrus sp. irrigated with contaminated water.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, C A; Krieger, R I; Khandaker, N R; Valentin-Blasini, L; Blount, B C

    2006-05-10

    Citrus produced in the southwestern United States is often irrigated with perchlorate-contaminated water. This irrigation water includes Colorado River water which is contaminated with perchlorate from a manufacturing plant previously located near the Las Vegas Wash, and ground water from wells in Riverside and San Bernardino counties of California which are affected by a perchlorate plume associated with an aerospace facility once located near Redlands, California. Studies were conducted to evaluate the uptake and distribution of perchlorate in citrus irrigated with contaminated water, and estimate potential human exposure to perchlorate from the various citrus types including lemon (Citrus limon), grapefruit (Citrus paradise), and orange (Citrus sinensis) produced in the region. Perchlorate concentrations ranged from less than 2-9 microg/L for Colorado River water and from below detection to approximately 18 microg/L for water samples from wells used to irrigate citrus. Destructive sampling of lemon trees produced with Colorado River water show perchlorate concentrations larger in the leaves (1835 microg/kg dry weight (dw)) followed by the fruit (128 microg/kg dw). Mean perchlorate concentrations in roots, trunk, and branches were all less than 30 microg/kg dw. Fruit pulp analyzed in the survey show perchlorate concentrations ranged from below detection limit to 38 microg/kg fresh weight (fw), and were related to the perchlorate concentration of irrigation water. Mean hypothetical exposures (mug/person/day) of children and adults from lemons (0.005 and 0.009), grapefruit (0.03 and 0.24), and oranges (0.51 and 1.20) were estimated. These data show that potential perchlorate exposures from citrus in the southwestern United States are negligible relative to the reference dose recommended by the National Academy of Sciences.

  2. Thyroid-stimulating hormone increases active transport of perchlorate into thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Tran, Neil; Valentín-Blasini, Liza; Blount, Benjamin C; McCuistion, Caroline Gibbs; Fenton, Mike S; Gin, Eric; Salem, Andrew; Hershman, Jerome M

    2008-04-01

    Perchlorate blocks thyroidal iodide transport in a dose-dependent manner. The human sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) has a 30-fold higher affinity for perchlorate than for iodide. However, active transport of perchlorate into thyroid cells has not previously been demonstrated by direct measurement techniques. To demonstrate intracellular perchlorate accumulation, we incubated NIS-expressing FRTL-5 rat thyroid cells in various concentrations of perchlorate, and we used a sensitive ion chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method to measure perchlorate accumulation in the cells. Perchlorate caused a dose-related inhibition of 125-iodide uptake at 1-10 microM. The perchlorate content from cell lysate was analyzed, showing a higher amount of perchlorate in cells that were incubated in medium with higher perchlorate concentration. Thyroid-stimulating hormone increased perchlorate uptake in a dose-related manner, thus supporting the hypothesis that perchlorate is actively transported into thyroid cells. Incubation with nonradiolabeled iodide led to a dose-related reduction of intracellular accumulation of perchlorate. To determine potential toxicity of perchlorate, the cells were incubated in 1 nM to 100 microM perchlorate and cell proliferation was measured. Even the highest concentration of perchlorate (100 microM) did not inhibit cell proliferation after 72 h of incubation. In conclusion, perchlorate is actively transported into thyroid cells and does not inhibit cell proliferation.

  3. Biological Effects of Inadvertent Perchlorate Releases During Launch Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Electronics 30 September 2002 Approved by Martin Mach, Ph . D. Program Manager 30 September 2002 Report Documentation Page Report Date...coastal waters are constantly circulating, it is unlikely that phytoplankton or bacterioplankton will encounter such high levels of perchlorate for...propellant. This study focused on the effects of perchlorate on various ecosystem components and transformations such as bacterial and phytoplankton

  4. PERCHLORATE IDENTIFICATION IN FERTILIZERS AND ACCUMULATION IN LETTUCE SEEDLINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate has contaminated groundwater, drinking water and soils at several locations in the U.S. The primary source of contamination at sites that have been investigated to date seems to be from industrial and military operations that use Perchlorate as an oxidizing agent. How...

  5. Kinetics of biological perchlorate reduction and pH effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Lippincott, Lee; Meng, Xiaoguang

    2008-05-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to investigate the kinetics of perchlorate reduction by heterotrophic and mixed perchlorate-reducing bacteria. Substrate-utilizing and cellular maintenance models were employed to fit the experimental data for microbial perchlorate reduction. The half saturation constant, K(s), obtained in this study was below 0.1mg/L, which indicated that perchlorate-reducing bacteria are effective at utilizing low concentrations of perchlorate. The effect of pH on the kinetics of microbial perchlorate reduction was also studied. Perchlorate reduction occurred throughout the pH range from 5.0 to 9.0. Nevertheless, the rates of perchlorate removal by a unit mass of bacteria were significantly different at various pHs with a maximum rate at pH 7.0. The variation of q(max) with pH was described well with a Gaussian peak equation. This equation is expected to be applicable for practical purposes when pH effects need to be considered.

  6. Novel Electrochemical Process for Treatment of Perchlorate in Waste Water

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-06

    ESIX technology is effective and selective for perchlorate removal and can potentially be used for large-scale treatment of wastewater . vii 1...Final Report Novel Electrochemical Process for Treatment of Perchlorate in Waste Water SERDP Project ER-1433 MARCH 2011 Yuehe Lin...

  7. High ozone increases soil perchlorate but does not affect foliar perchlorate content

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ozone (O3) is implicated in the natural source inventory of perchlorate (ClO4-), a hydrophilic salt that migrates to ground water and interferes with uptake of iodide in mammals, including humans. Tropospheric O3 is elevated in many areas. We previously showed (Grantz et al., 2013; Environmental Pol...

  8. Predicting perchlorate uptake in greenhouse lettuce from perchlorate, nitrate and chloride irrigation water concentrations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) has been detected in edible leafy vegetables irrigated with Colorado River water. The primary concern has been the ClO4- concentration in lettuce. There has been a limited number of studies on ClO4- uptake but the interactive effect of other anions on ClO4- uptake is not known in...

  9. Development of an extraction method for perchlorate in soils.

    PubMed

    Cañas, Jaclyn E; Patel, Rashila; Tian, Kang; Anderson, Todd A

    2006-03-01

    Perchlorate originates as a contaminant in the environment from its use in solid rocket fuels and munitions. The current US EPA methods for perchlorate determination via ion chromatography using conductivity detection do not include recommendations for the extraction of perchlorate from soil. This study evaluated and identified appropriate conditions for the extraction of perchlorate from clay loam, loamy sand, and sandy soils. Based on the results of this evaluation, soils should be extracted in a dry, ground (mortar and pestle) state with Milli-Q water in a 1 ratio 1 soil ratio water ratio and diluted no more than 5-fold before analysis. When sandy soils were extracted in this manner, the calculated method detection limit was 3.5 microg kg(-1). The findings of this study have aided in the establishment of a standardized extraction method for perchlorate in soil.

  10. CHRONIC PERCHLORATE EXPOSURE CAUSES MORPHOLOGICAL ABNORMALITIES IN DEVELOPING STICKLEBACK

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, Richard R.; Von Hippel, Frank A.; O’Hara, Todd M.

    2011-01-01

    Few studies have examined the effects of chronic perchlorate exposure during growth and development, and fewer still have analyzed the effects of perchlorate over multiple generations. We describe morphological and developmental characteristics for threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) that were spawned and raised to sexual maturity in perchlorate-treated water (G1,2003) and for their offspring (G2,2004) that were not directly treated with perchlorate. The G1,2003 displayed a variety of abnormalities, including impaired formation of calcified traits, slower growth rates, aberrant sexual development, poor survivorship, and reduced pigmentation that allowed internal organs to be visible. Yet these conditions were absent when the offspring of contaminated fish (G2,2004) were raised in untreated water, suggesting a lack of transgenerational effects and that surviving populations may be able to recover following remediation of perchlorate-contaminated sites PMID:21465539

  11. Proteomic detection of proteins involved in perchlorate and chlorate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Reema; Deobald, Lee A; Crawford, Ronald L; Paszczynski, Andrzej J

    2009-09-01

    Mass spectrometry and a time-course cell lysis method were used to study proteins involved in perchlorate and chlorate metabolism in pure bacterial cultures and environmental samples. The bacterial cultures used included Dechlorosoma sp. KJ, Dechloromonas hortensis, Pseudomonas chloritidismutans ASK-1, and Pseudomonas stutzeri. The environmental samples included an anaerobic sludge enrichment culture from a sewage treatment plant, a sample of a biomass-covered activated carbon matrix from a bioreactor used for treating perchlorate-contaminated drinking water, and a waste water effluent sample from a paper mill. The approach focused on detection of perchlorate (and chlorate) reductase and chlorite dismutase proteins, which are the two central enzymes in the perchlorate (or chlorate) reduction pathways. In addition, acetate-metabolizing enzymes in pure bacterial samples and housekeeping proteins from perchlorate (or chlorate)-reducing microorganisms in environmental samples were also identified.

  12. Ecological Risk Assessment of Ammonium Perchlorate on Fish, Amphibians, and Small Mammals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-02-01

    The Effects of Contaminated and Reference Surface Waters on Metamorphosis in Xenopus Laevis ...; 4) Lethal Concentration Determination of Sodium...Perchlorate and Ammonium Chloride on Xenopus Laevis Eggs ... ; 5) Sublethal Effects of Ammonium Chloride, Ammonium Perchlorate, and Sodium Perchlorate on the...Development and Metamorphosis of Xenopus Laevis ; 6) Protocol Development for Determination of Effects of Perchlorate on Growth and Reproduction of

  13. Weakening of ice by magnesium perchlorate hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenferink, Hendrik J.; Durham, William B.; Stern, Laura A.; Pathare, Asmin V.

    2013-08-01

    We show that perchlorate hydrates, which have been detected at high circumpolar martian latitudes, have a dramatic effect upon the rheological behavior of polycrystalline water ice under conditions applicable to the North Polar Layered Deposits (NPLD). We conducted subsolidus creep tests on mixtures of ice and magnesium perchlorate hydrate, Mg(ClO4)2·6H2O (MP6), of 0.02, 0.05, 0.10, and 0.47 volume fraction MP6. We found these mixtures to be increasingly weak with increasing MP6 content. For mixtures with ⩽0.10 volume fraction MP6, we resolved a stress exponent of n ≈ 2 at low stresses transitioning to n ≈ 4 above 10 MPa. Scanning electron microscopy of deformed specimens revealed MP6 to be distributed as an interconnected film between ice grains. These results suggest that grain boundary sliding (GBS) may be enhanced with respect to pure ice. As the enhancement of GBS is expected in polycrystalline aggregates containing a few percent melt or otherwise weak material distributed along grain boundaries, the observed n ≈ 2 is consistent with the mutual accommodation of basal slip and GBS. If ice containing trace concentrations of MP6 is also much weaker than pure ice at low stresses, flow in the NPLD could be significantly enhanced, particularly at the warmer basal temperatures associated with higher martian obliquities.

  14. Weakening of ice by magnesium perchlorate hydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lenferinka, Hendrick J.; Durhama, William B.; Sternb, Laura A.; Patharec, Asmin V.

    2013-01-01

    We show that perchlorate hydrates, which have been detected at high circumpolar martian latitudes, have a dramatic effect upon the rheological behavior of polycrystalline water ice under conditions applicable to the North Polar Layered Deposits (NPLD). We conducted subsolidus creep tests on mixtures of ice and magnesium perchlorate hydrate, Mg(ClO4)2·6H2O (MP6), of 0.02, 0.05, 0.10, and 0.47 volume fraction MP6. We found these mixtures to be increasingly weak with increasing MP6 content. For mixtures with ⩽0.10 volume fraction MP6, we resolved a stress exponent of n ≈ 2 at low stresses transitioning to n ≈ 4 above 10 MPa. Scanning electron microscopy of deformed specimens revealed MP6 to be distributed as an interconnected film between ice grains. These results suggest that grain boundary sliding (GBS) may be enhanced with respect to pure ice. As the enhancement of GBS is expected in polycrystalline aggregates containing a few percent melt or otherwise weak material distributed along grain boundaries, the observed n ≈ 2 is consistent with the mutual accommodation of basal slip and GBS. If ice containing trace concentrations of MP6 is also much weaker than pure ice at low stresses, flow in the NPLD could be significantly enhanced, particularly at the warmer basal temperatures associated with higher martian obliquities.

  15. Wet Deposition of Perchlorate Over the Continental United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopalan, S.; Jackson, A. W.; Anderson, T. A.

    2007-12-01

    Natural perchlorate (ClO4-) has been detected in soil, vegetation, food products, and ground and drinking water supplies at various concentrations across the world. For almost a century natural perchlorate has been known to exist in Chilean nitrate deposits that are up to 16 million years old, and recent isotopic evidence has confirmed its source to be predominantly atmospheric. Although the source of natural perchlorate has been attributed to atmospheric deposition, there is almost no data available concerning the deposition rate of perchlorate from precipitation. This research effort, supported by SERDP, was designed to investigate the range of concentrations, and temporal and spatial variations in perchlorate deposition. Sub-samples of precipitation collected through the National Atmospheric Deposition program over a two year period were analyzed for perchlorate. Sample locations included 14 continental states, and Puerto Rico. Perchlorate has been detected (DL= 5 ng/L) in over 65 % of all samples tested with a mean value of 12.60 ± 13.60 ng/L and ranged from < 5 ng/L to 75 ng/L with higher concentrations predominantly in summer months and inland regions. The Cl- /ClO4- molar ratio varied over three orders of magnitude with few thousands inland to few millions near coastal regions. There were no significant correlations (r > 0.5) between ClO4- and other ions (Cl-, NO3-, SO4-2, Na+, K+, Ca+2, Mg+2, and NH4+). Results from this study will have important implications to the national perchlorate issue and may aid in explaining the occurrence of non-anthropogenic perchlorate being reported in arid and semi-arid areas.

  16. Effects of Perchlorate on Organic Molecules under Simulated Mars Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrier, B. L.; Kounaves, S. P.

    2014-12-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) was discovered in the northern polar region of Mars by the Mars Phoenix Lander in 2008 and has also been recently detected by the Curiosity Rover in Gale Crater [1,2]. Perchlorate has also been shown to be formed under current Mars conditions via the oxidation of mineral chlorides, further supporting the theory that perchlorate is present globally on Mars [3]. The discovery of perchlorate on Mars has raised important questions about the effects of perchlorate on the survival and detection of organic molecules. Although it has been shown that pyrolysis in the presence of perchlorate results in the alteration or destruction of organic molecules [4], few studies have been conducted on the potential effects of perchlorate on organic molecules under martian surface conditions. Although perchlorate is typically inert under Mars-typical temperatures [5], perchlorate does absorb high energy UV radiation, and has been shown to decompose to form reactive oxychlorine species such as chlorite (ClO2-) when exposed to martian conditions including UV or ionizing radiation [6,7]. Here we investigate the effects of perchlorate on the organic molecules tryptophan, benzoic acid and mellitic acid in order to determine how perchlorate may alter these compounds under Mars conditions. Experiments are performed in a Mars Simulation Chamber (MSC) capable of reproducing the temperature, pressure, atmospheric composition and UV flux found on Mars. Soil simulants are prepared consisting of SiO2 and each organic, as well as varying concentrations of perchlorate salts, and exposed in the MSC. Subsequent to exposure in the MSC samples are leached and the leachate analyzed by HPLC and LC-MS to determine the degree of degradation of the original organic and the identity of any potential decomposition products formed by oxidation or chlorination. References: [1] Kounaves et al., J. Geophys. Res. Planets, Vol. 115, p. E00E10, 2010 [2] Glavin et al., J. Geophys. Res. Planets, Vol

  17. Novel miniaturized sensors for potentiometric batch and flow-injection analysis (FIA) of perchlorate in fireworks and propellants.

    PubMed

    Almeer, Saeed H M A; Zogby, Ibrahim A; Hassan, Saad S M

    2014-11-01

    Three planar miniaturized perchlorate membrane sensors (3×5 mm(2)) are prepared using a flexible Kaptan substrate coated with nitron-perchlorate (NT-ClO4) [sensor 1], methylene blue-perchlorate (MB-ClO4) [sensor II] and indium-porphyrin (In-Por) [sensor III] as electroactive materials in PVC membranes plasticized with 2-NPPE. Sensors I, II and III display near-Nernstian response for 1.0×10(-5)-1.0×10(-2), 3.1×10(-5)-1.0×10(-2) and 3.1×10(-6)-1.0×10(-2) mol L(-1) ClO4(-) with lower detection limits of 6.1×10(-6), 6.9×10(-6) and 1.2×10(-6) mol L(-1), and anionic calibration slopes of 50.9±0.4, 48.4±0.4 and 57.7±0.3 mV decade(-1), respectively. Methods for determining perchlorate using these sensors offer many attractive advantages including simplicity, flexibility, cost effectiveness, wide linear dynamic response range (0.1-1000 ppm), low detection limit (<1.2×10(-6) mol L(-1)≡0.1 ppm), small sample test volume (100 μL), safety, short response time (<20 s), long life span (~8 weeks), and extended wide working pH range (4.5-8.0). The sensors show high selectivity in the presence of some inorganic ions (e.g., PO4(3-), SO4(2-), S2O3(2-), NO2(-), NO3(-), N3(-), CN(-), Cl(-), Br(-), I(-)) and automation feasibility. Indium-porphyrin based membrane sensor (sensor III) is used as a detector in a wall-jet flow injection set-up to enable accurate flow injection analysis (FIA) of perchlorate in some fireworks without interferences from the associated reducing agents (sulfur and charcoal), binders (dextrin, lactose), coloring agents (calcium, strontium, copper, iron, sodium), color brighten (linseed oil) and regulators (aluminum flakes) which are commonly used in the formulations. The sensor is also used for perchlorate assessment in some propellant powders. The results fairly agree with data obtained by ion-chromatography.

  18. National Cost Implications of a Potentional Perchlorate Regulation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In this study, a screening level cost assessment was conducted to evaluate the national cost implications of five potential regulatory levels for perchlorate in drinking water 4, 6, 12, 18, and 24 ?g/L.

  19. POLISHING THE EFFLUENT FROM AN ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL PERCHLORATE TREATMENT PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anaerobic biological processes effectively reduce perchlorate to chloride. However, the effluent can be biologically unstable, high in particulates and high in disinfection by-product precursor compounds. Such an effluent would be unsuitable for transmission into a drinking water...

  20. Perchlorate and thyroid function: what are the environmental issues?

    PubMed

    Hershman, Jerome M

    2005-05-01

    Ammonium perchlorate, used in the solid-propellant of rocket engines, has contaminated some water supplies and represents a potential public health hazard. Its toxicity is the result of the inhibition of the sodium iodide symporter resulting in reduced iodide uptake, possibly leading to reduced production of thyroid hormone. The fetus is the most vulnerable subject. Studies of newborn screening for thyroid function have yielded conflicting results and have not measured perchlorate or iodine intake. Based on short-term clinical studies in adults, less than 0.5 mg perchlorate per 70-kg adult will not lower thyroid uptake of radioiodine, while 1.6 mg/kg per day will lower thyroid uptake by 20%. To avoid interference with thyroid function, the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment recommended a public health goal of 6 microg perchlorate per liter of drinking water, but approximately three times that concentration is likely to be safe.

  1. Organic functionalisation of graphene catalysed by ferric perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; He, Junpo

    2014-12-25

    We have developed a method to prepare covalently functionalised graphene using ferric perchlorate as the catalyst. The resulting functionalised graphene was characterised by Raman spectroscopy, TGA, XPS, AFM, and dispersibility tests in organic or aqueous media.

  2. Re: Request for Correction: Drinking Water: Determination on Perchlorate

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Request for correction (RFC) of information developed and relied upon by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA or Agency) to support its determination to regulate perchlorate under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA).

  3. Behavioral response of dissimilatory perchlorate-reducing bacteria to different electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yvonne; Gustavson, Ruth L; Ali, Nadia; Weber, Karrie A; Westphal, Lacey L; Coates, John D

    2009-10-01

    The response behavior of three dissimilatory perchlorate-reducing bacteria to different electron acceptors (nitrate, chlorate, and perchlorate) was investigated with two different assays. The observed response was species-specific, dependent on the prior growth conditions, and was inhibited by oxygen. We observed attraction toward nitrate when Dechloromonas aromatica strain RCB and Azospira suillum strain PS were grown with nitrate. When D. aromatica and Dechloromonas agitata strain CKB were grown with perchlorate, both responded to nitrate, chlorate, and perchlorate. When A. suillum was grown with perchlorate, the organism responded to chlorate and perchlorate but not nitrate. A gene replacement mutant in the perchlorate reductase subunit (pcrA) of D. aromatica resulted in a loss of the attraction response toward perchlorate but had no impact on the nitrate response. Washed-cell suspension studies revealed that the perchlorate grown cells of D. aromatica reduced both perchlorate and nitrate, while A. suillum cells reduced perchlorate only. Based on these observations, energy taxis was proposed as the underlying mechanism for the responses to (per)chlorate by D. aromatica. To the best of our knowledge, this study represents the first investigation of the response behavior of perchlorate-reducing bacteria to environmental stimuli. It clearly demonstrates attraction toward chlorine oxyanions and the unique ability of these organisms to distinguish structurally analogous compounds, nitrate, chlorate, and perchlorate and respond accordingly.

  4. High pressure studies of potassium perchlorate

    SciTech Connect

    Pravica, Michael; Wang, Yonggang; Sneed, Daniel; Reiser, Sharissa; White, Melanie

    2016-07-29

    Two experiments are reported on KClO4 at extreme conditions. A static high pressure Raman study was first conducted to 18.9 GPa. Evidence for at least two new phases was observed: one between 2.4 and 7.7 GPa (possibly sluggish), and the second near 11.7 GPa. Then, the X-ray induced decomposition rate of potassium perchlorate (KClO4 hv→ KCl + 2O2) was studied up to 15.2 GPa. The time-dependent growth of KCl and O2 was monitored. The decomposition rate slowed at higher pressures. As a result, we present the first direct evidence for O2 crystallization at higher pressures, demonstrating that O2 molecules aggregate at high pressure.

  5. High pressure studies of potassium perchlorate

    DOE PAGES

    Pravica, Michael; Wang, Yonggang; Sneed, Daniel; ...

    2016-07-29

    Two experiments are reported on KClO4 at extreme conditions. A static high pressure Raman study was first conducted to 18.9 GPa. Evidence for at least two new phases was observed: one between 2.4 and 7.7 GPa (possibly sluggish), and the second near 11.7 GPa. Then, the X-ray induced decomposition rate of potassium perchlorate (KClO4 hv→ KCl + 2O2) was studied up to 15.2 GPa. The time-dependent growth of KCl and O2 was monitored. The decomposition rate slowed at higher pressures. As a result, we present the first direct evidence for O2 crystallization at higher pressures, demonstrating that O2 molecules aggregatemore » at high pressure.« less

  6. Dealing With Perchlorate in the Santa Clarita Valley, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulos, L.; Min, J.; Juby, G.; McLean, S.; Prasifka, D.; Brown, J.

    2004-05-01

    Castaic Lake Water Agency was faced with a dilemma: how to support the increasing water needs of a growing population in the Santa Clarita Valley with three to five wells in the area shut-down due to the presence of perchlorate. Carollo Engineers was hired to design a treatment program for the removal of perchlorate from Saugus Aquifer. Several unknowns challenged the project including an uncertainty in a regulatory MCL for perchlorate, lack of brine line in the area, and low chloride limits in LACSD sewer lines. The preliminary phase of the project was to identify and recommend perchlorate treatment processes for further bench and/or pilot-scale testing. Two alternatives were selected: 1) Three NSF certified perchlorate-selective ion exchange resins and 2) Two types of biological treatment systems. Selection criteria included: cost, minimal formation of wastes and full-scale demonstration of the processes. This paper will focus on the basis, design, and findings from three perchlorate-selective ion-exchange resins. Bench-scale testing of the ion-exchange resins was conducted over a period of 3 months. NDMA formation following chlorination and chloramination was investigated. The spent resins were further characterized for metals and uranium. Results: Adsorption cycles of two of the resins lasted more than 70,000 bed volumes before perchlorate was detected in the effluent of the columns (approximately 200,000- 550,000 gal/cu-ft resin). No NDMA was formed as a result of post-chlorination with free and combined chlorine, or as a result of prechlorination with free chlorine. The metals measured in the spent results were well below the TTLC and STLC limits, despite the long run times. Ion-exchange is therefore a feasible technology for treatment perchlorate in the Santa Clarita Valley.

  7. Biodegradation of Perchlorate in Laboratory Reactors Under Different Environmental Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    CADHS) 2002), throughout Southern California (CADHS 2002), and Western Texas (Christen 2003). Researchers have found perchlorate in lettuce (Hogue 2003...Krieger (2004) revealed that accumulation of perchlorate takes place in some plants, mostly in leafy greens. Studies on lettuce have shown that...accumulation occurs mostly in outer leaves and not in consumable portions, such as the head. Studies reported that, when lettuce was irrigated with

  8. Perchlorate Contamination of Drinking Water: Regulatory Issues and Legislative Actions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-04

    whether to regulate perchlorate and has cited the need for more research on health effects, water treatment techniques, and occurrence. Related issues...have involved environmental cleanup and water treatment costs, which will be driven by federal and state standards. Interagency disagreements over...effects and treatment technologies and for collecting occurrence data. In 1999, the EPA required water systems to monitor for perchlorate under the

  9. [Metabolism peculiarities of bacteria restoring chlorates and perchlorates].

    PubMed

    Smirnova, G F

    2010-01-01

    Bacteria facultative anaerobes capable to restore chlorine oxygen compounds - chlorates and perchlorates, using them as terminal acceptors of electrons, have been isolated from various natural sources. Chloride is the end product of this process. Besides chlorates and perchlorates the isolated bacteria also restored other electron acceptors: chromates, sulfates, nitrates, vanadates, manganates. The studied restored bacteria use awhole number of organic compounds as electron donors. The paper is presented in Russian.

  10. The NAS Perchlorate Review: Adverse Effects?

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Richard B.; Corley, Richard; Cowan, Linda; Utiger, Robert D.

    2005-11-01

    To the editor: Drs. Ginsberg and Rice argue that the reference dose for perchlorate of 0.0007 mg/kg per day recommended by the National Academies’ Committee to Assess the Health Implications of Perchlorate Ingestion is not adequately protective. As members of the committee, we disagree. Ginsberg and Rice base their conclusion on three points. The first involves the designation of the point of departure as a NOEL (no-observed-effect level) versus a LOAEL (lowest-observed-adverse- effect level). The committee chose as its point of departure a dose of perchlorate (0.007 mg/kg per day) that when given for 14 days to 7 normal subjects did not cause a significant decrease in the group mean thyroid iodide uptake (Greer et al. 2002). Accordingly, the committee considered it a NOEL. Ginsberg and Rice focus on the fact that only 7 subjects were given that dose, and they 1seem to say that attention should be paid only to the results in those subjects in whom there was a 1fall in thyroid iodide uptake, and that the results in those in whom there was no fall or an increase should be ignored. They consider the dose to be a LOAEL because of the fall in uptake in those few subjects. It is important to note that a statistically significant decrease of, for example, 5% or even 10%, would not be biologically important and, more important, would not be sustained. For example, in another study (Braverman et al. 2004), administration of 0.04 mg/kg per day to normal subjects for 6 months had no effect on thyroid iodide uptake when measured at 3 and 6 months, and no effect on serum thyroid hormone or thyrotropin concentrations measured monthly (inspection of Figure 5A in the paper by Greer et al. suggests that this dose would inhibit thyroid iodide uptake by about 25% if measured at 2 weeks). The second issue involves database uncertainty. In clinical studies, perchlorate has been administered prospectively to 68 normal subjects for 2 weeks to 6 months. In one study (Brabant et al. 1992

  11. Potentiometric perchlorate determination at nanomolar concentrations in vegetables.

    PubMed

    Leoterio, Dilmo M S; Paim, Ana Paula S; Belian, Mônica F; Galembeck, André; Lavorante, André F; Pinto, Edgar; Amorim, Célia G; Araújo, Alberto N; Montenegro, Maria C B S M

    2017-07-15

    In this work, an expeditious method based on the multi-commutated flow-analysis concept with potentiometric detection is proposed to perform determinations of the emergent contaminant perchlorate in vegetable matrices down to nanomolar concentration. To accomplish the task, a tubular shaped potentiometric sensor selective to perchlorate ion was constructed with a PVC membrane containing 12mmol/kg of the polyamine bisnaphthalimidopropyl-4,4'-diaminodiphenylmethane and 2-nitrophenyl phenyl ether 68% (w/w) as plasticizer casted on a conductive epoxy resin. Under optimal flow conditions, the sensor responded linearly in the concentration range of 6.3×10(-7)-1.0×10(-3)mol/L perchlorate. In order to extend the determinations to lower concentrations (4.6(±1.3)×10(-10)mol/L perchlorate), a column packed with 70mg of sodium 2,5,8,11,14-pentaoxa-1-silacyclotetradecane-polymer was coupled to the flow-system thus enabling prior pre-concentration of the perchlorate. The proposed procedure provides a simpler alternative for the determination of perchlorate in foods, nowadays only allowed by sophisticated and expensive equipment and laborious methods.

  12. (Per)chlorate in Biology on Earth and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Wang, Ouwei; Barnum, Tyler P; Coates, John D

    2016-09-08

    Respiration of perchlorate and chlorate [collectively, (per)chlorate] was only recognized in the last 20 years, yet substantial advances have been made in our understanding of the underlying metabolisms. Although it was once considered solely anthropogenic, pervasive natural sources, both terrestrial and extraterrestrial, indicate an ancient (per)chlorate presence across our solar system. These discoveries stimulated interest in (per)chlorate microbiology, and the application of advanced approaches highlights exciting new facets. Forward and reverse genetics revealed new information regarding underlying molecular biology and associated regulatory mechanisms. Structural and functional analysis characterized core enzymes and identified novel reaction sequences. Comparative genomics elucidated evolutionary aspects, and stress analysis identified novel response mechanisms to reactive chlorine species. Finally, systems biology identified unique metabolic versatility and novel mechanisms of (per)chlorate respiration, including symbiosis and a hybrid enzymatic-abiotic metabolism. While many published studies focus on (per)chlorate and their basic metabolism, this review highlights seminal advances made over the last decade and identifies new directions and potential novel applications.

  13. Thermodynamic targeting of microbial perchlorate reduction by selective electron donors.

    PubMed

    Van Trump, James Ian; Coates, John D

    2009-04-01

    Here we describe 2,6-anthrahydroquinone disulfonate (AH(2)DS) as a model thermodynamically 'targeting' electron donor capable of selectively stimulating respiratory processes relevant to the bioremediation of perchlorate. Pure cultures of Dechloromonas aromatica, Dechloromonas agitata and Azospira suillum, as well as uncharacterized microbial consortia, were capable of stoichiometrically reducing perchlorate to chloride upon oxidation of AH(2)DS to the corresponding quinone 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate (AQDS). No degradation of the anthraquinone structure was observed, and no organism tested grew by this metabolism. Thermodynamic calculations suggest that AH(2)DS oxidation should support nitrate and perchlorate reduction, whereas sulfate reduction and methanogenesis are predicted to be unfavorable. Mixed community microcosms oxidizing AH(2)DS reduced nitrate and perchlorate, whereas sulfate reduction never occurred. In contrast, microcosms amended with acetate respired nitrate, perchlorate and sulfate, as would be predicted by thermodynamic calculation. Our results suggest that the thermodynamic properties of hydroquinones allow for targeted stimulation of only a subset of potential respiratory processes. This observation could help improve enhanced in situ bioremediation of perchlorate by negating many of the detrimental aspects of biofouling.

  14. Thermal and Evolved Gas Analysis of Magnesium Perchlorate: Implications for Perchlorates in Soils at the Mars Phoenix Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, R.V.; Lauer, H. V.; Sutter, B.; Golden, D.C.; Boynton, W.V.

    2009-01-01

    Perchlorate salts were discovered in the soils around the Phoenix landing site on the northern plains of Mars [1]. Perchlorate was detected by an ion selective electrode that is part of the MECA Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL). The discovery of a mass 32 fragment (likely 02) by the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer (TEGA) provided additional confirmation of a strong oxidizer in the soils around the landing site. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the thermal and evolved gas behavior of perchlorate salts using TEGA-like laboratory testbed instruments. TEGA ovens were fabricated from high purity Ni. Hence, an additional objective of this paper is to determine the effects that Ni might have on the evolved gas behavior of perchlorate salts.

  15. Perchlorate Formation on Mineral Surfaces under Ambient Mars Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrier, B. L.; Kounaves, S. P.

    2013-12-01

    Perchlorate(ClO4-) was first discovered in the northern polar region of mars by the Mars Phoenix Lander in 2008 and was also recently detected by the Mars Science Laboratory in Gale crater, indicating a possible planet-wide distribution [1,2]. The discovery of perchlorate on mars has led to numerous questions regarding its formation pathways, intermediate oxychlorine species that may be present, and their capacity to oxidize organics that may be present in the surface and sub-surface. If perchlorate is formed photochemically in the atmosphere as on earth, it would be expected that the large amount of perchlorate on mars (~0.6% by weight detected by Phoenix) would have been formed mainly in the distant past when volcanic activity on mars was more prevalent and more chlorine was available in the atmosphere, however recent research shows that perchlorate is broken down over time by gamma rays, suggesting an ongoing source of perchlorate production [3]. This suggests an ongoing mechanism for perchlorate formation. Our current research is aimed at understanding different mechanisms for perchlorate formation on mineral surfaces under ambient mars conditions. Experiments are performed in a Mars Simulation Chamber (MSC) capable of reproducing the temperature, pressure, atmospheric composition and UV fluence found on mars. Soil simulants are prepared consisting of SiO2 and various minerals that are known to be present on mars, as well as Cl-, OCl-, ClO2- or ClO3- and exposed in the MSC for varying lengths of time. Samples are subsequently analyzed for perchlorate formation using ion chromatography. To date, perchlorate has been shown to be formed relatively easily under simulated martian conditions from both ClO2- and ClO3- starting materials without invoking an atmospheric source of chlorine. References: [1] Hecht et al, Science, Vol. 325, p. 64-67, 2009 [2] Kerr, Science, Vol. 340, p. 138, 2013 [3] Quinn et al, Astrobiology, Vol. 13(6) p. 515-20, 2013

  16. Environmental Perchlorate and Thiocyanate Exposures and Infant Serum Thyroid Function

    PubMed Central

    Braverman, Lewis E.; He, Xuemei; Schuller, Kristin E.; Roussilhes, Alexandra; Jahreis, Katherine A.; Pearce, Elizabeth N.

    2012-01-01

    Background Breastfed infants rely on maternal iodine for thyroid hormone production required for neurodevelopment. Dietary iodine among women of childbearing age in the United States may be insufficient. Perchlorate (competitive inhibitor of the sodium/iodide symporter [NIS]) exposure is ubiquitous. Thiocyanate, from cigarettes and diet, is a weaker NIS inhibitor. Environmental perchlorate and thiocyanate exposures could decrease breast milk iodine by competitively inhibiting NIS in lactating breasts (thus impairing infants' iodine availability), and/or infants' thyroidal NIS to directly decrease infant thyroid function. The current study assessed the relationships between environmental perchlorate and thiocyanate exposures and infant serum thyroid function. Methods Iodine, perchlorate, and thiocyanate in breast milk, maternal and infant urine, and infant serum thyroid function tests were cross-sectionally measured in Boston-area women and their 1–3 month-old breastfed infants. Univariate and multivariable analyses assessed relationships between iodine, perchlorate, thiocyanate, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and free thyroxine (FT4) levels. Results In 64 mothers and infants, median (range) iodine levels were 45.6 μg/L (4.3–1080) in breast milk, 101.9 μg/L (27–570) in maternal urine, and 197.5 μg/L (40–785) in infant urine. Median perchlorate concentrations were 4.4 μg/L (0.5–29.5) in breast milk, 3.1 μg/L (0.2–22.4) in maternal urine, and 4.7 μg/L (0.3–25.3) in infant urine. There were no correlations between infant TSH or FT4 and iodine, perchlorate, and thiocyanate levels in breast milk, maternal urine, and infant urine. In multivariable analyses, perchlorate and thiocyanate levels in breast milk, maternal urine, and infant urine were not significant predictors of infant TSH or FT4. Conclusions Boston-area mothers and their breastfed infants are generally iodine sufficient. Although environmental perchlorate and thiocyanate

  17. Perchlorate in The Great Lakes: Distribution, Isotopic Composition and Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poghosyan, A.; Sturchio, N. C.; Jackson, W. A.; Guan, Y.; Eiler, J. M.; Hatzinger, P. B.

    2013-12-01

    Concentrations, stable chlorine and oxygen isotopic compositions, and 36Cl abundances of perchlorate were investigated in the five Laurentian Great Lakes. Samples were collected during monitoring cruises in 2007 and 2008 of the U.S. EPA's RV Lake Guardian and in 2010 at the water supply intake of Marquette, MI on the southern shore of Lake Superior. Concentrations of perchlorate were measured by IC/MS/MS at 24 locations, including one or two depth profiles in each lake. Mean concentrations (μg/L) are: Superior, 0.06 × 0.01; Michigan, 0.10 × 0.01; Huron, 0.11 × 0.01; Erie, 0.08 × 0.01, and Ontario, 0.09 × 0.01. Concentration vs. depth is nearly constant in each lake, indicating well-mixed conditions. Perchlorate was extracted from near-surface water by passing 15,000 to 80,000 L of water through 1-L cartridges containing Purolite A530E bifunctional anion-exchange resin. In the laboratory, perchlorate was eluted from the resin, purified, and precipitated as a >99% pure crystalline phase. Milligram amounts were recovered from each lake. Chlorine and oxygen isotopic analyses were performed at Caltech using the Cameca 7f-GEO SIMS instrument, following validation of the SIMS method with analyses of USGS-37 and USGS-38 isotopic reference materials. Results indicate a relatively narrow range in δ37Cl values (+2.9 to +3.9 ‰) and a wider range in δ18O values (-4.0 to +4.1 ‰), with a general geographic trend of increasing δ18O from west to east. Oxygen-17 was measured at UIC using dual-inlet IRMS of O2 produced by decomposition of KClO4. Great Lakes perchlorate has mass-independent oxygen isotopic variations with positive Δ17O values (+1.6 ‰ to +2.7 ‰) divided into two distinct groups: Lake Superior (+2.7 ‰) and the other four lakes (~ +1.7 ‰). The isotopic data indicate that perchlorate is dominantly of natural origin, having stable isotopic compositions resembling those of perchlorate from pre-industrial groundwaters in the western USA. The 36Cl

  18. Rate and extent of aqueous perchlorate removal by iron surfaces.

    PubMed

    Moore, Angela M; De Leon, Corinne H; Young, Thomas M

    2003-07-15

    The rate and extent of perchlorate reduction on several types of iron metal was studied in batch and column reactors. Mass balances performed on the batch experiments indicate that perchlorate is initially sorbed to the iron surface, followed by a reduction to chloride. Perchlorate removal was proportional to the iron dosage in the batch reactors, with up to 66% removal in 336 h in the highest dosage system (1.25 g mL(-1)). Surface-normalized reaction rates among three commercial sources of iron filings were similar for acid-washed samples. The most significant perchlorate removal occurred in solutions with slightly acidic or near-neutral initial pH values. Surface mediation of the reaction is supported by the absence of reduction in batch experiments with soluble Fe2+ and also by the similarity in specific reaction rate constants (kSA) determined for three different iron types. Elevated soluble chloride concentrations significantly inhibited perchlorate reduction, and lower removal rates were observed for iron samples with higher amounts of background chloride contamination. Perchlorate reduction was not observed on electrolytic sources of iron or on a mixed-phase oxide (Fe3O4), suggesting that the reactive iron phase is neither pure zerovalent iron nor the mixed oxide alone. A mixed valence iron hydr(oxide) coating or a sorbed Fe2+ surface complex represent the most likely sites for the reaction. The observed reaction rates are too slow for immediate use in remediation system design, but the findings may provide a basis for future development of cost-effective abiotic perchlorate removal techniques.

  19. ASSOCIATION OF URINARY PERCHLORATE WITH INDIRECT MEASURES OFTHYROID DYSFUNCTION BASED ON NHANES 2001-2002

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Aims: Perchlorate is a widespread environmental pollutant. Previous population studies based on the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001-2002, showed that urinary perchlorate concentrations were associated with increased levels of thyroid stim...

  20. Developmental exposure to perchlorate alters synaptic transmission in hippocampus of the adult rat: in vivo studies.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate, a contaminant found in food and water supplies throughout the USA, blocks iodine uptake into the thyroid gland to reduce circulating levels of thyroid hormone. Neurological function accompanying developmental exposure to perchlorate was evaluated in the present study...

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ELECTROSPRAY MASS SPECTROMETRIC METHOD FOR DETERMINING PERCHLORATE IN FERTILIZERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An electrospray mass spectrometric method has been developed for application to agricultural and horticultural fertilizers to determine perchlorate. After fertilizers are leached or dissolved in water, the method relies on the formation of stable ion pair complex of the perchlor...

  2. ALTERNATIVE TECHNIQUES FOR MEASUREMENT OF PERCHLORATE IN FERTILIZER AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Perchlorate anion has been implicated as a potentially serious environmental pollutant, being found in drinking water and irrigated crops. Commercial fertilizers have recently been shown to contain high levels of Perchlorate impurities and thus be potentially important source...

  3. Removal of Perchlorate and Chlorate in Aquatic SystemsUsing Integrated Technologies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of its extremely low concentrations and strong resistance to most treatment technologies, perchlorate has become one of the biggest challenges currently being faced by the drinking water industry. Few studies have looked at electrochemical reduction of aqueous perchlorate...

  4. Oxygen and Chlorine Isotopic Fractionation During Microbial Reduction of Perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beloso, A. D.; Sturchio, N. C.; Böhlke, J. K.; Streger, S. H.; Heraty, L. J.; Hatzinger, P. B.

    2006-12-01

    Perchlorate is a widespread environmental contaminant that has both anthropogenic and natural sources. Stable isotope ratios of O and Cl in perchlorate have been used recently to distinguish perchlorate of different origins. Isotopic ratios may also be useful for identifying the occurrence and extent of biodegradation of perchlorate in natural environments, information that is critical for assessing natural attenuation of this contaminant. For this approach to be useful, however, the extent of isotopic fractionation of both Cl and O by bacteria must be determined, and the influence of environmental variables on this process must be defined. During this laboratory study, the O and Cl isotope ratios of perchlorate were monitored as a function of degradation by two separate bacterial species (Azospira suillum JPLRND and Dechlorospirillum sp. FBR2) at both 10 °C and 22 °C with acetate as the electron donor. Perchlorate was completely degraded by both strains within 280 hr at 22 °C and 615 hr at 10 °C. Measured values of isotopic fractionation factors were ɛ18O = -36.6 to -29.0 ‰ and ɛ37Cl = -14.5 to - 11.5 ‰, and these showed no apparent systematic variation with either temperature or bacterial strain. One experiment using 18O-enriched water (δ18O = 200‰) gave results indistinguishable from those observed in isotopically normal water, indicating little or no isotopic exchange between perchlorate and water during biodegradation. The fractionation factor ratio ɛ18O/ɛ37Cl was nearly invariant in all experiments at 2.50 ± 0.04. These data indicate that isotopic analysis will be useful for documenting perchlorate biodegradation in soils and groundwater. The establishment of a microbial fractionation factor ratio (ɛ18O/ɛ37Cl) also has significance for forensic studies, as these data indicate that fractionation via biodegradation will not cause the reported mass-dependent Cl and O isotopic signatures of synthetic and natural perchlorate to overlap.

  5. Chronic perchlorate exposure impairs stickleback reproductive behaviour and swimming performance

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, Richard R.; von Hippel, Frank A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary We describe behavioural changes in two generations of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of perchlorate. The first generation (G0,2002) was exposed as two-year-old adults to perchlorate in experimental groups ranging in concentration from less than the method detection limit (<1.1 ppb) to 18.6 ppm for up to 22 days during their courtship, spawning, egg guarding, and first five days of fry guarding. No differences were noted in the behaviour or reproductive output of these fish that were exposed as adults. However, perchlorate exposure throughout development caused widespread effects in the second generation (G1,2003), which was spawned and raised through sexual maturity in one of four nominal experimental groups (0, 30 and 100 ppm, and a ‘variable’ treatment that progressively increased from <1.1 ppb to approximately 60 ppm perchlorate). Dose-dependent effects were found during the G1,2003’s swimming and behavioural evaluations, including higher mortality rates among treated fish following stressful events. Perchlorate-exposed fish had higher failure rates during swimming trials and failed at lower flow rates than control fish. A number of treated fish exhibited seizures. Progressively fewer males completed benchmark metrics, such as nest building, spawning, nursery formation, or fry production, in a dose-dependent manner. Fewer males from higher treatments courted females, and those that did initiated courtship later and had a reduced behavioural repertoire compared to fish from lower treatments. The lowest observed adverse effect level (LOAEL) for swimming performance, reproductive behaviour, survivorship and recruitment was 30 ppm perchlorate (our lowest G1,2003 treatment), and near complete inhibition of reproductive activity was noted among males raised in 100 ppm perchlorate. A small number of treated G1,2003 females were isolated in aquaria, and some performed reproductive

  6. Modeling Perchlorate Contamination In Coastal Aquifer of Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakirevich, A.; Kuznetsov, M.; Adar, E.; Nativ, R.

    2010-12-01

    The mathematical model of water flow and contaminant transport was developed and applied for simulating the perchlorate migration in soil and groundwater, in the Israeli Coastal Aquifer. The three-dimensional mathematical model of groundwater flow is presented by set of two-dimensional flow equations for the multilayered system, considering the interflow between layers (based on the MODFLOW code). Perchlorate transport simulations were carried out using the MT3DMS model, which solves the 3-D advection-dispersion equation. Perchlorate was considered as a conservative contaminant: neither sorption nor degradation reactions were taken into account. The GMS 5.1 (Groundwater Modeling System) was adjusted and used as a major platform for the simulations. The hydraulic parameters of four major materials (sandstone, sand, loam and clay) composing the sub-aquifers of the coastal alluvial aquifer and the annual groundwater recharge were assessed by a combination of trial-and-error and least square optimization (the PEST code) using observed groundwater levels during 1978-2004. The location of the contaminant source was assigned to the effluents storage ponds, represented by a strip of 200x50m. The concentration of perchlorate in the percolated water was calculated as a function of time, using measured distribution of perchlorate along the vadose zone and transient simulations of one-dimensional water flow and contaminant transport in the unsaturated layered soil profile. Simulations results indicate that the estimated total mass of approximately 280 ton of perchlorate in the unsaturated zone will be washed out into the groundwater reservoir during the coming 25 years. Simulations of perchlorate migration in groundwater were carried out for the period of 2006-2030. The predicted average advection velocity of the plume was 15-20 m/year. The model allows forecast of the plume migration and assessment of water volume and perchlorate mass being extracted for different water

  7. Natural attenuation of perchlorate in denitrified groundwater.

    PubMed

    Robertson, William D; Roy, James W; Brown, Susan J; Van Stempvoort, Dale R; Bickerton, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring of a well-defined septic system groundwater plume and groundwater discharging to two urban streams located in southern Ontario, Canada, provided evidence of natural attenuation of background low level (ng/L) perchlorate (ClO4⁻) under denitrifying conditions in the field. The septic system site at Long Point contains ClO4⁻ from a mix of waste water, atmospheric deposition, and periodic use of fireworks, while the nitrate plume indicates active denitrification. Plume nitrate (NO3⁻ -N) concentrations of up to 103 mg/L declined with depth and downgradient of the tile bed due to denitrification and anammox activity, and the plume was almost completely denitrified beyond 35 m from the tile bed. The ClO4⁻ natural attenuation occurs at the site only when NO3⁻ -N concentrations are <0.3 mg/L, after which ClO4⁻ concentrations decline abruptly from 187 ± 202 to 11 ± 15 ng/L. A similar pattern between NO3⁻ -N and ClO4⁻ was found in groundwater discharging to the two urban streams. These findings suggest that natural attenuation (i.e., biodegradation) of ClO4⁻ may be commonplace in denitrified aquifers with appropriate electron donors present, and thus, should be considered as a remediation option for ClO4⁻ contaminated groundwater.

  8. Neonatal thyroxine level and perchlorate in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Li, F X; Byrd, D; Deyhle, G M; Sesser, D E; Skeels, M R; Lamm, S H

    2000-02-01

    Environmental contamination of drinking water has been observed for perchlorate, a chemical able to affect thyroid function. This study examines whether that exposure affected the thyroid function of newborns. Neonatal blood thyroxine (T4) levels for days 1 to 4 of life were compared for newborns from the city of Las Vegas, Nevada, which has perchlorate in its drinking water, and those from the city of Reno, Nevada, which does not (detection limit, 4 micrograms/L [ppb]). This study is based on blood T4 analyses from more than 23,000 newborns in these two cities during the period April 1998 through June 1999. No difference was found in the mean blood T4 levels of the newborns from these two cities. Drinking water perchlorate levels measured monthly for Las Vegas ranged during this study period from non-detectable for 8 months to levels of 9 to 15 ppb for 7 months. Temporal differences in mean T4 level were noted in both cities but were unrelated to the perchlorate exposure. This study was sufficiently sensitive to detect the effects of gender, birth weight, and the day of life on which the blood sample was taken on the neonatal T4 level, but it detected no effect from environmental exposures to perchlorate that ranged up to 15 micrograms/L (ppb).

  9. Developmental timing of perchlorate exposure alters threespine stickleback dermal bone

    PubMed Central

    Furin, Christoff G.; von Hippel, Frank A.; Postlethwait, John; Buck, C. Loren; Cresko, William A.; O’Hara, Todd M.

    2015-01-01

    Adequate levels of thyroid hormone are critical during development and metamorphosis, and for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Perchlorate, a common contaminant of water sources, inhibits thyroid function in vertebrates. We utilized threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) to determine if timing of perchlorate exposure during development impacts adult dermal skeletal phenotypes. Fish were exposed to water contaminated with perchlorate (30 mg/L or 100 mg/L) beginning at 0, 3, 7, 14, 21, 42, 154 or 305 days post fertilization until sexual maturity at one year of age. A reciprocal treatment moved stickleback from contaminated to clean water on the same schedule providing for different stages of initial exposure and different treatment durations. Perchlorate exposure caused concentration-dependent significant differences in growth for some bony traits. Continuous exposure initiated within the first 21 days post fertilization had the greatest effects on skeletal traits. Exposure to perchlorate at this early stage can result in small traits or abnormal skeletal morphology of adult fish which could affect predator avoidance and survival. PMID:25753171

  10. Thermal Decomposition Behavior of Ammonium Perchlorate and of an Ammonium-Perchlorate-Based Composite Propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrens, R.; Minier, L.

    1998-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) and ammonium-perchlorate-based composite propellants is studied using the simultaneous thermogravimetric modulated beam mass spectrometry (STMBMS) technique. The main objective of the present work is to evaluate whether the STMBMS can provide new data on these materials that will have sufficient detail on the reaction mechanisms and associated reaction kinetics to permit creation of a detailed model of the thermal decomposition process. Such a model is a necessary ingredient to engineering models of ignition and slow-cookoff for these AP-based composite propellants. Results show that the decomposition of pure AP is controlled by two processes. One occurs at lower temperatures (240 to 270 C), produces mainly H2O, O2, Cl2, N2O and HCl, and is shown to occur in the solid phase within the AP particles. 200(micro) diameter AP particles undergo 25% decomposition in the solid phase, whereas 20(micro) diameter AP particles undergo only 13% decomposition. The second process is dissociative sublimation of AP to NH3 + HClO4 followed by the decomposition of, and reaction between, these two products in the gas phase. The dissociative sublimation process occurs over the entire temperature range of AP decomposition, but only becomes dominant at temperatures above those for the solid-phase decomposition. AP-based composite propellants are used extensively in both small tactical rocket motors and large strategic rocket systems.

  11. The thermal decomposition behavior of ammonium perchlorate and of an ammonium-perchlorate-based composite propellant

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, R.; Minier, L.

    1998-03-24

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) and ammonium-perchlorate-based composite propellants is studied using the simultaneous thermogravimetric modulated beam mass spectrometry (STMBMS) technique. The main objective of the present work is to evaluate whether the STMBMS can provide new data on these materials that will have sufficient detail on the reaction mechanisms and associated reaction kinetics to permit creation of a detailed model of the thermal decomposition process. Such a model is a necessary ingredient to engineering models of ignition and slow-cookoff for these AP-based composite propellants. Results show that the decomposition of pure AP is controlled by two processes. One occurs at lower temperatures (240 to 270 C), produces mainly H{sub 2}O, O{sub 2}, Cl{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O and HCl, and is shown to occur in the solid phase within the AP particles. 200{micro} diameter AP particles undergo 25% decomposition in the solid phase, whereas 20{micro} diameter AP particles undergo only 13% decomposition. The second process is dissociative sublimation of AP to NH{sub 3} + HClO{sub 4} followed by the decomposition of, and reaction between, these two products in the gas phase. The dissociative sublimation process occurs over the entire temperature range of AP decomposition, but only becomes dominant at temperatures above those for the solid-phase decomposition. AP-based composite propellants are used extensively in both small tactical rocket motors and large strategic rocket systems.

  12. qPCR assays to quantify genes and gene expression associated with microbial perchlorate reduction.

    PubMed

    De Long, Susan K; Kinney, Kerry A; Kirisits, Mary Jo

    2010-11-01

    Quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays targeting cld (developed in this work) and pcrA (previously described) were used to quantify these perchlorate-related genes in a perchlorate-reducing enrichment culture. Transcript copies were quantified in perchlorate-reducing Rhodocyclaceae strain JDS4. Oxygen and nitrate inhibited expression of cld and pcrA.

  13. PERCHLORATE-CROP INTERACTIONS FROM CONTAMINATED IRRIGATION WATER AND FERTILIZER APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate has contaminated water and soils at several locations in the United States. Perchlorate is water soluble, exceedingly mobile in aqueous systems, and can persist for many decades under typical ground and surface water conditions. Perchlorate is of concern because of un...

  14. Photooxidation of chloride by oxide minerals: implications for perchlorate on Mars.

    PubMed

    Schuttlefield, Jennifer D; Sambur, Justin B; Gelwicks, Melissa; Eggleston, Carrick M; Parkinson, B A

    2011-11-09

    We show that highly oxidizing valence band holes, produced by ultraviolet (UV) illumination of naturally occurring semiconducting minerals, are capable of oxidizing chloride ion to perchlorate in aqueous solutions at higher rates than other known natural perchlorate production processes. Our results support an alternative to atmospheric reactions leading to the formation of high concentrations of perchlorate on Mars.

  15. THE REDUCTIVE TRANSFORMATION OF PERCHLORATE IN A FRESH WATER SEDIMENT: LABORATORY BATCH STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate is widely used as a propellant in solid rocket fuel, and has recently been found in ground, surface, and drinking water, in many cases above the interim action level of 18 ppb. Perchlorate is recalcitrant to chemical reduction, however, studies of perchlorate in pure ...

  16. THE REDUCTIVE TRANSFORMATION OF PERCHLORATE IN A FRESH WATER SEDIMENT: LABORATORY BATCH STUDIES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate is widely used as a propellant in solid rocket fuel, and has recently been found in ground, surface, and drinking water, in many cases above the interim action level of 18 ppb. Perchlorate is recalcitrant to chemical reduction, however, studies of perchlorate in pure ...

  17. Using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model to link urinary biomarker concentrations to dietary exposure of perchlorate

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to perchlorate is widespread in the United States and many studies have attempted to character the perchlorate exposure by estimating the average daily intakes of perchlorate. These approaches provided population-based estimates, but did not provide individual-level exp...

  18. Perchlorate reduction in microbial electrolysis cell with polyaniline modified cathode.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia-Jia; Gao, Ming-Ming; Zhang, Gang; Wang, Xin-Hua; Wang, Shu-Guang; Song, Chao; Xu, Yan-Yan

    2015-02-01

    Excellent perchlorate reduction was obtained under various initial concentrations in a non-membrane microbial electrolysis cell with polyaniline (PANI) modified graphite cathode as sole electron donor. PANI modification is conducive to the formation of biofilm due to its porous structure and good electrocatalytic performance. Compared with cathode without biofilm, over 12% higher reduction rates were acquired in the presence of biocathode. The study demonstrates that, instead of perchlorate reduction, the main contribution of biofilm is involved in facilitate electron transfer from cathode to electrolyte. Interestingly, hairlike structure, referred as to pili-like, was observed in the biofilm as well as in the electrolyte. Additionally, the results show that pili were prone to formation under the condition of external electron field as sole electron donor. Analysis of microbial community suggests that perchlorate reduction bacteria community was most consistent with Azospiraoryzae strain DSM 13638 in the subdivision of the class Proteobacteria.

  19. Crystal structure of iron(III) perchlorate nona-hydrate.

    PubMed

    Hennings, Erik; Schmidt, Horst; Voigt, Wolfgang

    2014-12-01

    Since the discovery of perchlorate salts on Mars and the known occurrence of ferric salts in the regolith, there is a distinct possibility that the title compound could form on the surface of Mars. [Fe(H2O)6](ClO4)3·3H2O was crystallized from aqueous solutions at low temperatures according to the solid-liquid phase diagram. It consists of Fe(H2O)6 octa-hedra (point group symmetry -3.) and perchlorate anions (point group symmetry .2) as well as non-coordinating water mol-ecules, as part of a second hydrogen-bonded coordination sphere around the cation. The perchlorate appears to be slightly disordered, with major-minor component occupancies of 0.773 (9):0.227 (9).

  20. EPR evidence for magnetic exchange through a four-carbon aliphatic bridge in a binuclear copper(II) complex. Single crystal x-ray structure of 7,7'-(1,4-butanediyl)-bis(2,12-dimethyl-3,7,11,17-tetraazabicyclo(11. 3. 1)heptadeca-1(17),2,11,13,15-pentaene)nickel(II)) perchlorate monohydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, K.A.; Brown, D.R.; Timken, M.D.; Van Derveer, D.G.; Belford, R.L.; Barefield, E.K.

    1988-12-01

    The single crystal x-ray structure of the title, binuclear nickel(II) complex has been determined and the compound used as a host for EPR investigations of the analogous copper(II) complex. The impetus for this work was an earlier suggestion that magnetic exchange interactions detected by EPR spectroscopy on frozen solutions of the biscopper(II) complex were a result of a direct copper-copper interaction in a closed conformation of the binuclear species. Results reported here suggest that the complex exists in the open conformation where the distance between metal centres is maximized and that the magnetic exchange occurs by a super-exchange mechanism through the aliphatic chain. The /vert bar/J/vert bar/ value for the exchange interaction is greater than 0.018 cm/sup /minus/1/. Crystal data for (Ni/sub 2/C/sub 34/H/sub 50/N/sub 8/)(ClO/sub 4/)/sub 4/ /center dot/ H/sub 2/O (298 K): monoclinic, space group P2/sub 1//n, a = 13.560(3), b = 11.678(2), c = 15.377(3) /angstrom/, /beta/ = = 108.48(2)/degree/, /rho//sub calcd/ = 1.588 g cm/sup /minus/3/ for Z = 2 and M/sub r/ = 1104.1, R = 0.068, R/sub w/ = 0.76. The intramolecular Ni-Ni distance is 9.13 /angstrom/. The analogous copper complex is isomorphorus with the nickel complex.

  1. Direct Measurement of Perchlorate Exposure Biomarkers in a Highly Exposed Population: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Michelle; Copan, Lori; Olmedo, Luis; Patton, Sharyle; Haas, Robert; Atencio, Ryan; Xu, Juhua; Valentin-Blasini, Liza

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to perchlorate is ubiquitous in the United States and has been found to be widespread in food and drinking water. People living in the lower Colorado River region may have perchlorate exposure because of perchlorate in ground water and locally-grown produce. Relatively high doses of perchlorate can inhibit iodine uptake and impair thyroid function, and thus could impair neurological development in utero. We examined human exposures to perchlorate in the Imperial Valley among individuals consuming locally grown produce and compared perchlorate exposure doses to state and federal reference doses. We collected 24-hour urine specimen from a convenience sample of 31 individuals and measured urinary excretion rates of perchlorate, thiocyanate, nitrate, and iodide. In addition, drinking water and local produce were also sampled for perchlorate. All but two of the water samples tested negative for perchlorate. Perchlorate levels in 79 produce samples ranged from non-detect to 1816 ppb. Estimated perchlorate doses ranged from 0.02 to 0.51 µg/kg of body weight/day. Perchlorate dose increased with the number of servings of dairy products consumed and with estimated perchlorate levels in produce consumed. The geometric mean perchlorate dose was 70% higher than for the NHANES reference population. Our sample of 31 Imperial Valley residents had higher perchlorate dose levels compared with national reference ranges. Although none of our exposure estimates exceeded the U. S. EPA reference dose, three participants exceeded the acceptable daily dose as defined by bench mark dose methods used by the California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment. PMID:21394205

  2. A bioinspired iron catalyst for nitrate and perchlorate reduction.

    PubMed

    Ford, Courtney L; Park, Yun Ji; Matson, Ellen M; Gordon, Zachary; Fout, Alison R

    2016-11-11

    Nitrate and perchlorate have considerable use in technology, synthetic materials, and agriculture; as a result, they have become pervasive water pollutants. Industrial strategies to chemically reduce these oxyanions often require the use of harsh conditions, but microorganisms can efficiently reduce them enzymatically. We developed an iron catalyst inspired by the active sites of nitrate reductase and (per)chlorate reductase enzymes. The catalyst features a secondary coordination sphere that aids in oxyanion deoxygenation. Upon reduction of the oxyanions, an iron(III)-oxo is formed, which in the presence of protons and electrons regenerates the catalyst and releases water.

  3. Preliminary assessment of perchlorate in ecological receptors at the Longhorn Army Ammunition Plant (LHAAP), Karnack, Texas.

    PubMed

    Smith, P N; Theodorakis, C W; Anderson, T A; Kendall, R J

    2001-10-01

    There have been increasing human health and ecological concerns about ionic perchlorate (ClO4-) since it was detected in drinking water sources in 1997. Perchlorate is known to affect thyroid function, causing subsequent hormone disruption and potential perturbations of metabolic activities. According to current estimates, perchlorate is found in the surface of groundwater of 14 states, including Texas. Longhorn Army Ammunition Plant, located in east central Texas, was a facility historically associated with perchlorate-containing propellants and rocket motors. Subsequently, perchlorate contamination in ground and surface waters at the facility has been reported. Soil, sediment, water, vegetation, and animal tissue samples were collected from several locations within the plant for a preliminary site assessment of perchlorate contamination. Perchlorate concentrations ranged from 555-5,557,000 ppb in vegetation, 811-2038 ppb in aquatic insects, below detection limits (ND) to 207 ppb in fish, ND-580 ppb in frogs, and ND-2328 ppb in mammals. Consistent with our hypothesis, aquatic organisms inhabiting perchlorate-contaminated surface water bodies contained detectable concentrations of perchlorate. Additionally, terrestrial organisms were exposed through pathways not necessarily related to contaminated surface waters. Therefore, these data demonstrate that aquatic and terrestrial species are exposed to perchlorate in the environment. To our knowledge, this represents the first incidence of perchlorate exposure among wild animals reported in the scientific literature.

  4. Aluminum-based drinking-water treatment residuals: a novel sorbent for perchlorate removal.

    PubMed

    Makris, Konstantinos C; Sarkar, Dibyendu; Datta, Rupali

    2006-03-01

    Perchlorate contamination of aquifers and drinking-water supplies has led to stringent regulations in several states to reduce perchlorate concentrations in water at acceptable levels for human consumption. Several perchlorate treatment technologies exist, but there is significant cost associated with their use, and the majority of them are unable to degrade perchlorate to innocuous chloride. We propose the use of a novel sorbent for perchlorate, i.e. an aluminum-based drinking-water treatment residual (Al-WTR), which is a by-product of the drinking-water treatment process. Perchlorate sorption isotherms (23+/-1 degrees C) showed that the greatest amount (65%) of perchlorate removed by the Al-WTR was observed with the lowest initial perchlorate load (10 mg L(-1)) after only 2 h of contact time. Increasing the contact time to 24 h, perchlorate removal increased from 65 to 76%. A significant correlation was observed between the amounts of perchlorate removed with evolved chloride in solution, suggesting degradation of perchlorate to chloride.

  5. Perchlorate adsorption and desorption on activated carbon and anion exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Yoon, In-Ho; Meng, Xiaoguang; Wang, Chao; Kim, Kyoung-Woong; Bang, Sunbaek; Choe, Eunyoung; Lippincott, Lee

    2009-05-15

    The mechanisms of perchlorate adsorption on activated carbon (AC) and anion exchange resin (SR-7 resin) were investigated using Raman, FTIR, and zeta potential analyses. Batch adsorption and desorption results demonstrated that the adsorption of perchlorate by AC and SR-7 resin was reversible. The reversibility of perchlorate adsorption by the resin was also proved by column regeneration test. Solution pH significantly affected perchlorate adsorption and the zeta potential of AC, while it did not influence perchlorate adsorption and the zeta potential of resin. Zeta potential measurements showed that perchlorate was adsorbed on the negatively charged AC surface. Raman spectra indicated the adsorption resulted in an obvious position shift of the perchlorate peak, suggesting that perchlorate was associated with functional groups on AC at neutral pH through interactions stronger than electrostatic interaction. The adsorbed perchlorate on the resin exhibited a Raman peak at similar position as the aqueous perchlorate, indicating that perchlorate was adsorbed on the resin through electrostatic attraction between the anion and positively charged surface sites.

  6. Discovery of natural perchlorate in the Antarctic Dry Valleys and its global implications.

    PubMed

    Kounaves, Samuel P; Stroble, Shannon T; Anderson, Rachel M; Moore, Quincy; Catling, David C; Douglas, Susanne; McKay, Christopher P; Ming, Douglas W; Smith, Peter H; Tamppari, Leslie K; Zent, Aaron P

    2010-04-01

    In the past few years, it has become increasingly apparent that perchlorate (ClO(4)(-)) is present on all continents, except the polar regions where it had not yet been assessed, and that it may have a significant natural source. Here, we report on the discovery of perchlorate in soil and ice from several Antarctic Dry Valleys (ADVs) where concentrations reach up to 1100 microg/kg. In the driest ADV, perchlorate correlates with atmospherically deposited nitrate. Far from anthropogenic activity, ADV perchlorate provides unambiguous evidence that natural perchlorate is ubiquitous on Earth. The discovery has significant implications for the origin of perchlorate, its global biogeochemical interactions, and possible interactions with the polar ice sheets. The results support the hypotheses that perchlorate is produced globally and continuously in the Earth's atmosphere, that it typically accumulates in hyperarid areas, and that it does not build up in oceans or other wet environments most likely because of microbial reduction on a global scale.

  7. An upper-bound assessment of the benefits of reducing perchlorate in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Lutter, Randall

    2014-10-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency plans to issue new federal regulations to limit drinking water concentrations of perchlorate, which occurs naturally and results from the combustion of rocket fuel. This article presents an upper-bound estimate of the potential benefits of alternative maximum contaminant levels for perchlorate in drinking water. The results suggest that the economic benefits of reducing perchlorate concentrations in drinking water are likely to be low, i.e., under $2.9 million per year nationally, for several reasons. First, the prevalence of detectable perchlorate in public drinking water systems is low. Second, the population especially sensitive to effects of perchlorate, pregnant women who are moderately iodide deficient, represents a minority of all pregnant women. Third, and perhaps most importantly, reducing exposure to perchlorate in drinking water is a relatively ineffective way of increasing iodide uptake, a crucial step linking perchlorate to health effects of concern.

  8. Simultaneous detection of perchlorate and bromate using rapid high-performance ion exchange chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and perchlorate removal in drinking water.

    PubMed

    West, Danielle M; Mu, Ruipu; Gamagedara, Sanjeewa; Ma, Yinfa; Adams, Craig; Eichholz, Todd; Burken, Joel G; Shi, Honglan

    2015-06-01

    Perchlorate and bromate occurrence in drinking water causes health concerns due to their effects on thyroid function and carcinogenicity, respectively. The purpose of this study was threefold: (1) to advance a sensitive method for simultaneous rapid detection of perchlorate and bromate in drinking water system, (2) to systematically study the occurrence of these two contaminants in Missouri drinking water treatment systems, and (3) to examine effective sorbents for minimizing perchlorate in drinking water. A rapid high-performance ion exchange chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPIC-MS/MS) method was advanced for simultaneous detection of perchlorate and bromate in drinking water. The HPIC-MS/MS method was rapid, required no preconcentration of the water samples, and had detection limits for perchlorate and bromate of 0.04 and 0.01 μg/L, respectively. The method was applied to determine perchlorate and bromate concentrations in total of 23 selected Missouri drinking water treatment systems during differing seasons. The water systems selected include different source waters: groundwater, lake water, river water, and groundwater influenced by surface water. The concentrations of perchlorate and bromate were lower than or near to method detection limits in most of the drinking water samples monitored. The removal of perchlorate by various adsorbents was studied. A cationic organoclay (TC-99) exhibited effective removal of perchlorate from drinking water matrices.

  9. Perchlorate uptake in spinach as related to perchlorate, nitrate, and chloride concentrations in irrigation water.

    PubMed

    Ha, Wonsook; Suarez, Donald L; Lesch, Scott M

    2011-11-01

    Several studies have reported on the detection of perchlorate (ClO(4)(-)) in edible leafy vegetables irrigated with Colorado River water. However, there is no information on spinach as related to ClO(4)(-) in irrigation water nor on the effect of other anions on ClO(4)(-) uptake. A greenhouse ClO(4)(-) uptake experiment using spinach was conducted to investigate the impact of presence of chloride (Cl(-)) and nitrate (NO(3)(-)) on ClO(4)(-) uptake under controlled conditions. We examined three concentrations of ClO(4)(-), 40, 220, and 400 nmol(c)/L (nanomoles of charge per liter of solution), three concentrations of Cl(-), 2.5, 13.75, and 25 mmol(c)/L, and NO(3)(-) at 2, 11, and 20 mmol(c)/L. The results revealed that ClO(4)(-) was taken up the most when NO(3)(-) and Cl(-) were lowest in concentration in irrigation water. More ClO(4)(-) was detected in spinach leaves than that in the root tissue. Relative to lettuces, spinach accumulated more ClO(4)(-) in the plant tissue. Perchlorate was accumulated in spinach leaves more than reported for outer leaves of lettuce at 40 nmol(c)/L of ClO(4)(-) in irrigation water. The results also provided evidence that spinach selectively took up ClO(4)(-) relative to Cl(-). We developed a predictive model to describe the ClO(4)(-) concentration in spinach as related to the Cl(-), NO(3)(-), and ClO(4)(-) concentration in irrigation water.

  10. POLISHING EFFLUENT FROM A PERCHLORATE-REDUCING ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL CONTACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency undertook at 3 ½ year pilot-scale biological perchlorate treatment study that included two long (311 and 340 days) examinations of anaerobic effluent polishing. The polishing system consisted of hydrogen peroxide addition and aeration, fo...

  11. Iodine supplementation and drinking-water perchlorate mitigation.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Thomas A; Peterson, Michael K; Charnley, Gail

    2015-06-01

    Ensuring adequate iodine intake is important, particularly among women of reproductive age, because iodine is necessary for early life development. Biologically based dose-response modeling of the relationships among iodide status, perchlorate dose, and thyroid hormone production in pregnant women has indicated that iodide intake has a profound effect on the likelihood that exposure to goitrogens will produce hypothyroxinemia. We evaluated the possibility of increasing iodine intake to offset potential risks from perchlorate exposure. We also explored the effect of dietary exposures to nitrate and thiocyanate on iodine uptake and thyroid hormone production. Our modeling indicates that the level of thyroid hormone perturbation associated with perchlorate exposures in the range of current regulatory limits is extremely small and would be overwhelmed by other goitrogen exposures. Our analysis also shows that microgram levels of iodine supplementation would be sufficient to prevent the goitrogenic effects of perchlorate exposure at current regulatory limits among at risk individuals. The human health risks from supplementing drinking water with iodine are negligible; therefore, this approach is worthy of regulatory consideration.

  12. Potential Influence of Perchlorate on Organic Carbon in Martian Regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oze, C.; Vithanage, M. S.; Kumarathilaka, P. R.; Indraratne, S.; Horton, T. W.

    2014-12-01

    Perchlorate is a strong oxidizer present at elevated concentrations in surface martian regolith. Chemical and isotopic modification of potential organic carbon with perchlorate in martian regolith during H2O(l) interactions is unknown. Here we assess the relationship between martian levels of perchlorate and organic carbon present in life harbouring geologic material from Earth. These materials represent chemical (i.e., processed serpentine soils from Sri Lanka) and temperature (i.e., hydrothermal jarosite/goethite deposit from White Island, New Zealand) extremes to where life exists on Earth. Preliminary evidence demonstrates that organic carbon decreases and δ13C values are modified for ultramafic sediment in both perchlorate kinetic and incubation experiments. In hydrothermal jarosite/goethite with microbial communities present, total and organic carbon is maintained and little modification in δ13C values is apparent. These preliminary results suggest that surface hydrothermal deposits with mineralogically 'protected' organic carbon are preferable sites to assess the potential of life on Mars.

  13. RAMAN SPECTROSCOPIC ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS AND PLANT TISSUE FOR PERCHLORATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Raman spectroscopy, without the need for prior chromatographic separation, was used for qualitative and quantitative analysis of 59 samples of fertilizers for perchlorate (ClO4-). These primarily lawn and garden products had no known link to Chile saltpeter, which is known to con...

  14. Elimination of Perchlorate Oxidizers from Pyrotechnic Flare Compositions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-09

    Figure 2. NJIT Scaled-up Planetary Mixer Mill for Mechanical Alloy Production......................9 Figure 3.NJIT Particle Size Distribution and SEM...Performance Parameters of Lab Scale Flares of Mk 124 and Perchlorate-Free RSF-4 Red Compositions...energy fuel ingredients as well as the pyrotechnic compositions made from them were measured, together with the performance parameters of the flare

  15. In-Situ Bioreduction and Removal of Ammonium Perchlorate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-09

    20 4.8.4 Genomic library construction...such as tobacco and lettuce the perchlorate accumulates and persists during processing into the final shelf products, such as cigarettes, cigars and... Genomic DNA suspensions from cell cultures were obtained by microcentrifugation of 1.5 ml cultures of DPRB, resuspended in 40 µl of SIGMA

  16. Direct Fixed-Bed Biological Perchlorate Destruction Demonstration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    exchange (IX) (Tripp et al., 2003; Gu et al., 2001), reverse osmosis/ nanofiltration (Amy et al., 2003), electrodialysis reversal (Booth et al., 2000), and...Typical abiotic perchlorate treatment processes include IX (Tripp et al., 2003; Gu et al., 2001), reverse osmosis/ nanofiltration (Amy et al., 2003

  17. Structure of aqueous sodium perchlorate solutions.

    PubMed

    General, Ignacio J; Asciutto, Eliana K; Madura, Jeffry D

    2008-12-04

    Salt solutions have been the object of study of many scientists through history, but one of the most important findings came along when the Hofmeister series were discovered. Their importance arises from the fact that they influence the relative solubility of proteins, and solubility is directly related to one of today's holy grails: protein folding. In this work we characterize one of the more-destabilizing salts in the series, sodium perchlorate, by studying it as an aqueous solution at various concentrations ranging from 0.08 to 1.60 mol/L. Molecular dynamics simulations at room temperature permitted a detailed study of the organization of solvent and cosolvent, in terms of its radial distribution functions, along with the study of the structure of hydrogen bonds in the ions' solvation shells. We found that the distribution functions have some variations in their shape as concentration changes, but the position of their peaks is mostly unaffected. Regarding water, the most salient fact is the noticeable (although small) change in the second hydration shell and even beyond, especially for g(O(w)***O(w)), showing that the locality of salt effects should not be restricted to considerations of only the first solvation shell. The perturbation of the second shell also appears in the study of the HB network, where the difference between the number of HBs around a water molecule and around the Na(+) cation gets much smaller as one goes from the first to the second solvation shell, yet the difference is not negligible. Nevertheless, the effect of the ions past their first hydration shell is not enough to make a noticeable change in the global HB network. The Kirkwood-Buff theory of liquids was applied to our system, in order to calculate the activity derivative of the cosolvent. This coefficient, along with a previously calculated preferential binding, allowed us to establish that if a folded AP peptide is immersed in the studied solution, becoming the solute, then

  18. Copper hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Fage, Simon W; Faurschou, Annesofie; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2014-10-01

    The world production of copper is steadily increasing. Although humans are widely exposed to copper-containing items on the skin and mucosa, allergic reactions to copper are only infrequently reported. To review the chemistry, biology and accessible data to clarify the implications of copper hypersensitivity, a database search of PubMed was performed with the following terms: copper, dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, contact hypersensitivity, contact sensitization, contact allergy, patch test, dental, IUD, epidemiology, clinical, and experimental. Human exposure to copper is relatively common. As a metal, it possesses many of the same qualities as nickel, which is a known strong sensitizer. Cumulative data on subjects with presumed related symptoms and/or suspected exposure showed that a weighted average of 3.8% had a positive patch test reaction to copper. We conclude that copper is a very weak sensitizer as compared with other metal compounds. However, in a few and selected cases, copper can result in clinically relevant allergic reactions.

  19. Nitrate and Perchlorate removal from groundwater by ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Burge, S; Halden, R

    1999-09-15

    This study was conducted to evaluate the performance of a small scale ion exchange unit (Krudico, Inc of Auborn, IA) for removal of nitrate and perchlorate from groundwater at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Site 300. The unit was able to treat 3,600 gallons of Site 300 groundwater, at an average influent concentration of 100 mg/L NO{sub 3}{sup -} before breakthrough occurred. The unit contained 2.5 ft{sup 3} of Sybron SR-7 resin. Seventy gallons of regeneration waste were generated (water treated to waste ratio of 51:1). The effluent concentration was about 20 mg/L NO{sub 3}{sup -}, which is equivalent to a treatment efficiency of at least 80%. There are several options for implementing this technology at Site 300. A target well, in the 817 area, has been selected. It has a 3 to 4 gpm flow rate, and concentrations of 90 mg/L NO{sub 3}{sup -} and 40 {micro}g/L perchlorate. The different treatment options include ion exchange treatment of nitrate only, nitrate and perchlorate, or perchlorate only. Option 1: For the treatment of nitrate only, this unit will be able to treat 3,700 gallons of water before regeneration is required. If both columns of the ion exchange unit are used, 7,400 gallons could be treated before the columns will need to be regenerated (producing 140 gallons of waste, per cycle or every 1.5 days). The effluent nitrate concentration is expected to be about 17 mg/L. Annual operation and maintenance costs are estimated to be $0.14 per gallon of water treated. Option 2: If only perchlorate is to be removed with ion exchange at the 817 area, a smaller unit should be considered. A 55 gallon canister filled with ion exchange resin should be able to reduce perchlorate concentrations in the groundwater from 40 {micro}g/L to non-detect levels for three years before the resin would need to be replaced. The contaminant-laden resin would be disposed of as hazardous waste. It is not practical to regenerate the resin because of the extreme difficulty of

  20. Validation of Chlorine and Oxygen Isotope Ratio Analysis To Differentiate Perchlorate Sources and To Document Perchlorate Biodegradation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-31

    2006). Based on radiocarbon dating , many of the water samples containing ClO4- recharged the aquifer between 10,000 and 28,000 years ago...57  5.3.2 Groundwater Dating ...Perchlorate ................ 91  7.1.4 Groundwater Dating and Other Supporting Data .......................................... 94  7.1.5 Summary of

  1. Copper transport.

    PubMed

    Linder, M C; Wooten, L; Cerveza, P; Cotton, S; Shulze, R; Lomeli, N

    1998-05-01

    In adult humans, the net absorption of dietary copper is approximately 1 mg/d. Dietary copper joins some 4-5 mg of endogenous copper flowing into the gastrointestinal tract through various digestive juices. Most of this copper returns to the circulation and to the tissues (including liver) that formed them. Much lower amounts of copper flow into and out of other major parts of the body (including heart, skeletal muscle, and brain). Newly absorbed copper is transported to body tissues in two phases, borne primarily by plasma protein carriers (albumin, transcuprein, and ceruloplasmin). In the first phase, copper goes from the intestine to the liver and kidney; in the second phase, copper usually goes from the liver (and perhaps also the kidney) to other organs. Ceruloplasmin plays a role in this second phase. Alternatively, liver copper can also exit via the bile, and in a form that is less easily reabsorbed. Copper is also present in and transported by other body fluids, including those bathing the brain and central nervous system and surrounding the fetus in the amniotic sac. Ceruloplasmin is present in these fluids and may also be involved in copper transport there. The concentrations of copper and ceruloplasmin in milk vary with lactational stage. Parallel changes occur in ceruloplasmin messenger RNA expression in the mammary gland (as determined in pigs). Copper in milk ceruloplasmin appears to be particularly available for absorption, at least in rats.

  2. Characterization of perchlorate in a new frozen human urine standard reference material.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lee L; Jarrett, Jeffery M; Davis, W Clay; Kilpatrick, Eric L; Oflaz, Rabia; Turk, Gregory C; Leber, Dennis D; Valentin, Liza; Morel-Espinosa, Maria; Blount, Benjamin C

    2012-10-01

    Perchlorate, an inorganic anion, has recently been recognized as an environmental contaminant by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Urine is the preferred matrix for assessment of human exposure to perchlorate. Although the measurement technique for perchlorate in urine was developed in 2005, the calibration and quality assurance aspects of the metrology infrastructure for perchlorate are still lacking in that there is no certified reference material (CRM) traceable to the International System of Units. To meet the quality assurance needs in biomonitoring measurements of perchlorate and the related anions that affect thyroid health, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), developed Standard Reference Material (SRM) 3668 Mercury, Perchlorate, and Iodide in Frozen Human Urine. SRM 3668 consists of perchlorate, nitrate, thiocyanate, iodine, and mercury in urine at two levels that represent the 50th and 95th percentiles, respectively, of the concentrations (with some adjustments) in the US population. It is the first CRM being certified for perchlorate. Measurements leading to the certification of perchlorate were made collaboratively at NIST and CDC using three methods based on liquid or ion chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Potential sources of bias were analyzed, and results were compared for the three methods. Perchlorate in SRM 3668 Level I urine was certified to be 2.70 ± 0.21 μg L(-1), and for SRM 3668 Level II urine, the certified value is 13.47 ± 0.96 μg L(-1).

  3. Perchlorate reduction during electrochemically induced pitting corrosion of zero-valent titanium (ZVT).

    PubMed

    Lee, Chunwoo; Batchelor, Bill; Park, Sung Hyuk; Han, Dong Suk; Abdel-Wahab, Ahmed; Kramer, Timothy A

    2011-12-15

    Zero-valent metals and ionic metal species are a popular reagent for the abatement of contaminants in drinking water and groundwater and perchlorate is a contaminant of increasing concern. However, perchlorate degradation using commonly used reductants such as zero-valent metals and soluble reduced metal species is kinetically limited. Titanium in the zero-valent and soluble states has a high thermodynamic potential to reduce perchlorate. Here we show that perchlorate is effectively reduced to chloride by soluble titanium species in a system where the surface oxide film is removed from ZVT and ZVT is oxidized during electrochemically induced pitting corrosion to produce reactive soluble species. The pitting potential of ZVT was measured as 12.77±0.04 V (SHE) for a 100 mM solution of perchlorate. The rate of perchlorate reduction was independent of the imposed potential as long as the potential was maintained above the pitting potential, but it was proportional to the applied current. Solution pH and surface area of ZVT electrodes showed negligible effects on rates of perchlorate reduction. Although perchlorate is effectively reduced during electrochemically induced corrosion of ZVT, this process may not be immediately applicable to perchlorate treatment due to the high potentials needed to produce active reductants, the amount of titanium consumed, the inhibition of perchlorate removal by chloride, and oxidation of chloride to chlorine.

  4. Reduction of Perchlorate and Nitrate by Microbial Communities in Vadose Soil

    PubMed Central

    Nozawa-Inoue, Mamie; Scow, Kate M.; Rolston, Dennis E.

    2005-01-01

    Perchlorate contamination is a concern because of the increasing frequency of its detection in soils and groundwater and its presumed inhibitory effect on human thyroid hormone production. Although significant perchlorate contamination occurs in the vadose (unsaturated) zone, little is known about perchlorate biodegradation potential by indigenous microorganisms in these soils. We measured the effects of electron donor (acetate and hydrogen) and nitrate addition on perchlorate reduction rates and microbial community composition in microcosm incubations of vadose soil. Acetate and hydrogen addition enhanced perchlorate reduction, and a longer lag period was observed for hydrogen (41 days) than for acetate (14 days). Initially, nitrate suppressed perchlorate reduction, but once perchlorate started to be degraded, the process was stimulated by nitrate. Changes in the bacterial community composition were observed in microcosms enriched with perchlorate and either acetate or hydrogen. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis and partial sequencing of 16S rRNA genes recovered from these microcosms indicated that formerly reported perchlorate-reducing bacteria were present in the soil and that microbial community compositions were different between acetate- and hydrogen-amended microcosms. These results indicate that there is potential for perchlorate bioremediation by native microbial communities in vadose soil. PMID:16000806

  5. Relative source contributions for perchlorate exposures in a lactating human cohort.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Andrea B; Dyke, Jason V; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2013-01-15

    Perchlorate is an iodine-uptake inhibitor and common contaminant of food and drinking water. Understanding the amount of perchlorate exposure occurring through non-water sources is essential for accurate estimates of human exposure levels, and establishment of drinking water limits for this pervasive contaminant. The study objective was to determine the amount of perchlorate intake derived from diet rather than water. Subjects provided drinking water samples, detailed fluid-intake records, 24h urine collections and four milk samples for nine days. Samples were analyzed for perchlorate by isotope dilution ion chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Amounts of perchlorate derived from drinking water and dietary sources were calculated for each individual. Water of local origin was found to contribute a minor fraction of perchlorate intake. Estimated fraction intake from drinking water ranged from 0 to 36%. The mean and median dose of perchlorate derived from non-water sources by lactating women was 0.18 μg/kg/day (range: 0.06 to 0.36 μg/kg/day.) Lactating women consumed more fluid (mean 2.424 L/day) than has been assumed in recent risk assessments for perchlorate. The data reported here indicate that lactating women may be exposed to perchlorate through dietary sources at markedly higher levels than estimated previously. Exposures to perchlorate from non-water sources may be higher than recent estimates, including those used to develop drinking water standards.

  6. Thyroid function and reproductive success in rodents exposed to perchlorate via food and water.

    PubMed

    Smith, Philip N; Severt, Scott A; Jackson, J W Andrew; Anderson, Todd A

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine if exposure to perchlorate via food items would have effects on mammals similar to those caused by exposure through drinking water at approximately equivalent doses. Prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster) and deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) were used to assess the potential toxicity of perchlorate-contaminated food items. Voles and mice were divided randomly into three treatment groups--perchlorate-contaminated food (PCF), perchlorate-contaminated water (PCW), and control groups--such that each treatment group contained equal numbers of males and females. Rodents in PCF treatment groups were fed chow formulated with soybean plant matter that had been grown with perchlorate-contaminated irrigation water. Individuals in the control and PCF groups were provided distilled/deionized drinking water, whereas the PCW group received drinking water containing sodium perchlorate. Only slight differences among treatment groups were observed in a variety of endpoints, including reproductive success, tissue perchlorate concentrations, thyroid hormone concentrations, and thyroid histology. However, trends observed in the present study suggest that perchlorate exposure via water may result in slightly greater effects than exposure to perchlorate via food. These data and recent reports of perchlorate in a wide variety of food items indicate that exposure via food intake is an important consideration when examining cumulative risk among humans, livestock, and wildlife.

  7. Environmentally relevant concentrations of ammonium perchlorate inhibit development and metamorphosis in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Goleman, Wanda L; Urquidi, Lina J; Anderson, Todd A; Smith, Ernest E; Kendall, Ronald J; Carr, James A

    2002-02-01

    We determined whether environmentally relevant concentrations of ammonium perchlorate alter development and metamorphosis in Xenopus laevis. Eggs and larvae were exposed to varying concentrations of ammonium perchlorate or control medium for 70 d. Most treatment-related mortality was observed within 5 d after exposure and was due in large part to reduced hatching success. The 5- and 70-d median lethal concentrations (LC50s) were 510 +/- 36 mg ammonium perchlorate/L and 223 +/- 13 mg ammonium perchlorate/L, respectively. Ammonium perchlorate did not cause any concentration-related developmental abnormalities at concentrations below the 70-d LC50. Ammonium perchlorate inhibited metamorphosis in a concentration-dependent manner as evident from effects on forelimb emergence, tail resorption, and hindlimb growth. These effects were observed after exposure to ammonium perchlorate concentrations in the parts-per-billion range, at or below concentrations reported in surface waters contaminated with ammonium perchlorate. Ammonium perchlorate significantly inhibited tail resorption after a 14-d exposure in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) Endocrine Disruptor Screening and Testing Committee (EDSTAC) Tier I frog metamorphosis assay for thyroid disruption in amphibians. We believe that ammonium perchlorate may pose a threat to normal development and growth in natural amphibian populations.

  8. Detection of Perchlorate Anion on Functionalized Silver Colloids Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Tio, J.; Wang, W.; Gu, B.

    2005-01-01

    Perchlorate anion interferes with the uptake of iodide by the human thyroid gland and consequently disrupts the regulation of metabolism. Chronic exposure to high levels of perchlorate may lead to the formation of thyroid gland tumors. Although the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has not set a maximum contaminant level (MCL) for perchlorate, a draft drinking water range of 4-18 ppb based on 2 liter daily consumption of water has been established. The current EPA approved method for detecting perchlorate uses ion chromatography which has a detection limit of ~1ppb and involves lengthy analytical time in the laboratory. A unique combination of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect and the bifunctional anion exchange resin’s high selectivity may provide an alternative way to detect perchlorate at such low concentrations and with high specificity. SERS, which uses laser excitation of adsorbed perchlorate anions on silver nanoparticles, has been shown to detect perchlorate anions at concentrations as low as 50 ppb. Normal micro-Raman analysis of perchlorate sorbed onto the resin beads has detected an even lower concentration of 10 ppb. In an effort to integrate these two effects, silver nanoparticles were coated with N-trimethoxysilylpropyl-N,N,N-trimethylammonium chloride, a functional group similar to that found on the resin bead, and subsequently inserted into different perchlorate concentration environments. This method has resulted in perchlorate detection down to ~10 ppb and a more consistent detection of perchlorate anion at ~50 ppb than that of earlier methods. As suggested by the direct insertion of functionalized silver colloids into perchlorate samples, this technique may potentially allow for the development of a probe using on-site Raman spectrometry to detect significantly low concentrations of perchlorate in situ rather than in the laboratory.

  9. Effects of perchlorate on growth of four wetland plants and its accumulation in plant tissues.

    PubMed

    He, Hongzhi; Gao, Haishuo; Chen, Guikui; Li, Huashou; Lin, Hai; Shu, Zhenzhen

    2013-10-01

    Perchlorate contamination in water is of concern because of uncertainties about toxicity and health effects, impact on ecosystems, and possible indirect exposure pathways to humans. Therefore, it is very important to investigate the ecotoxicology of perchlorate and to screen plant species for phytoremediation. Effects of perchlorate (20, 200, and 500 mg/L) on the growth of four wetland plants (Eichhornia crassipes, Acorus calamus L., Thalia dealbata, and Canna indica) as well as its accumulation in different plant tissues were investigated through water culture experiments. Twenty milligrams per liter of perchlorate had no significant effects on height, root length, aboveground part weight, root weight, and oxidizing power of roots of four plants, except A. calamus, and increasing concentrations of perchlorate showed that out of the four wetland plants, only A. calamus had a significant (p<0.05) dose-dependent decrease in these parameters. When treated with 500 mg/L perchlorate, these parameters and chlorophyll content in the leaf of plants showed significant decline contrasted to control groups, except the root length of E. crassipes and C. indica. The order of inhibition rates of perchlorate on root length, aboveground part weight and root weight, and oxidizing power of roots was: A. calamus > C. indica > T. dealbata > E. crassipes and on chlorophyll content in the leaf it was: A. calamus > T. dealbata > C. indica > E. crassipes. The higher the concentration of perchlorate used, the higher the amount of perchlorate accumulation in plants. Perchlorate accumulation in aboveground tissues was much higher than that in underground tissues and leaf was the main tissue for perchlorate accumulation. The order of perchlorate accumulation content and the bioconcentration factor in leaf of four plants was: E. crassipes > C. indica > T. dealbata > A. calamus. Therefore, E. crassipes might be an ideal plant with high tolerance ability and accumulation ability for constructing

  10. Interaction between perchlorate and iodine in the metamorphosis of Hyla versicolor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparling, D.; Harvey, G.; Nzengung, V.; ,

    2003-01-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) is a water-soluble, inorganic anion that is often combined with ammonium, potassium or other cations for use in industry and agriculture. Ammonium perchlorate, for example, is a potent oxidizer and is used in various military applications including rocket fuel. It has also been found in an historically widely used fertilizer, Chilean nitrate and in other fertilizers. It has been found in ground and surface waters of over 30 states and is considered a human health risk. Because of its similar atomic radius and volume, perchlorate competes with iodide for thyroid uptake and storage and thereby inhibits production of thyroid hormones. Amphibians may be particularly affected by perchlorate because they rely on the thyroid for metamorphosis. This study exposed early larval Hyla versicolor to concentrations of perchlorate ranging from 2.2 to 50 ppm to determine the effects of perchlorate on a native amphibian. In addition, three controls, 0 perchlorate, 0 perchlorate with 0.10 ppm iodide (C + I) and 50 ppm perchlorate + 0.10 ppm iodide (50 + I) were tested. Mortality (< 11% with all treatments) and growth appeared to be unaffected by perchlorate. Inhibition of development started with 2.2 ppm perchlorate and little or no development occurred at 22.9 ppm and above. This inhibition was particularly apparent at the latter stages of development including hindlimb formation and metamorphosis. The estimated EC50 for total inhibition of metamorphosis at 70 days of treatment was 3.63 ppm. There was no evidence of inhibition of development with the 50 + I, C + I, or controls, indicating that the presence of small concentrations of iodide could counter the effects of perchlorate. When tadpoles that had been inhibited by perchlorate were subsequently treated with iodide, development through prometamorphosis progressed but mortality was very high.

  11. Interaction between perchlorate and iodine in the metamorphosis of Hyla versicolor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparling, D.W.; Harvey, G.; Nzengung, V.; Linder, Gregory L.; Krest, Sherry K.; Sparling, Donald W.; Little, Edward E.

    2003-01-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) is a water-soluble, inorganic anion that is often combined with ammonium, potassium or other cations for use in industry and agriculture. Ammonium perchlorate, for example, is a potent oxidizer and is used in various military applications including rocket fuel. It has also been found in an historically widely used fertilizer, Chilean nitrate and in other fertilizers. It has been found in ground and surface waters of over 30 states and is considered a human health risk. Because of its similar atomic radius and volume, perchlorate competes with iodide for thyroid uptake and storage and thereby inhibits production of thyroid hormones. Amphibians may be particularly affected by perchlorate because they rely on the thyroid for metamorphosis. This study exposed early larval Hyla versicolor to concentrations of perchlorate ranging from 2.2 to 50 ppm to determine the effects of perchlorate on a native amphibian. In addition, three controls, 0 perchlorate, 0 perchlorate with 0.10 ppm iodide (C + I) and 50 ppm perchlorate + 0.10 ppm iodide (50 + I) were tested. Mortality (<11% with all treatments) and growth appeared to be unaffected by perchlorate. Inhibition of development started with 2.2 ppm perchlorate and little or no development occurred at 22.9 ppm and above. This inhibition was particularly apparent at the latter stages of development including hindlimb formation and metamorphosis. The estimated EC50 for total inhibition of metamorphosis at 70 days of treatment was 3.63 ppm. There was no evidence of inhibition of development with the 50 + I, C + I, or controls, indicating that the presence of small concentrations of iodide could counter the effects of perchlorate. When tadpoles that had been inhibited by perchlorate were subsequently treated with iodide, development through prometamorphosis progressed but mortality was very high.

  12. Perchlorate reduction by autotrophic bacteria attached to zerovalent iron in a flow-through reactor.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xueyuan; Amrhein, Christopher; Deshusses, Marc A; Matsumoto, Mark R

    2007-02-01

    Biological reduction of perchlorate by autotrophic microorganisms attached to zerovalent iron (ZVI) was studied in flow-through columns. The effects of pH, flow rate, and influent perchlorate and nitrate concentrations on perchlorate reduction were investigated. Excellent perchlorate removal performance (> or = 99%) was achieved at empty bed residence times (EBRTs) ranging from 0.3 to 63 h and an influent perchlorate concentration of 40-600 microg L(-1). At the longest liquid residence times, when the influent pH was above 7.5, a significant increase of the effluent pH was observed (pH > 10.0), which led to a decrease of perchlorate removal. Experiments at short residence times revealed that the ZVI column inoculated with local soil (Colton, CA) containing a mixed culture of denitrifiers exhibited much better performance than the columns inoculated with Dechloromonas sp. HZ for reduction of both perchlorate and nitrate. As the flow rate was varied between 2 and 50 mL min(-1), corresponding to empty bed contact times of 0.15-3.8 h, a maximum perchlorate elimination capacity of 3.0 +/- 0.7 g m(-3) h(-1) was obtained in a soil-inoculated column. At an EBRT of 0.3 h and an influent perchlorate concentration of 30 microg L(-1), breakthrough (> 6 ppb) of perchlorate in the effluent did not occur until the nitrate concentration in the influent was 1500 times (molar) greater than that of perchlorate. The mass of microorganisms attached on the solid ZVI/sand was found to be 3 orders of magnitude greater than that in the pore liquid, indicating that perchlorate was primarily reduced by bacteria attached to ZVI. Overall, the process appears to be a promising alternative for perchlorate remediation.

  13. Sensitivity and adaptability of methanogens to perchlorates: Implications for life on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kral, Timothy A.; Goodhart, Timothy H.; Harpool, Joshua D.; Hearnsberger, Christopher E.; McCracken, Graham L.; McSpadden, Stanley W.

    2016-01-01

    In 2008, the Mars Phoenix Lander discovered perchlorate at its landing site, and in 2012, the Curiosity rover confirmed the presence of perchlorate on Mars. The research reported here was designed to determine if certain methanogens could grow in the presence of three different perchlorate salt solutions. The methanogens tested were Methanothermobacter wolfeii, Methanosarcina barkeri, Methanobacterium formicicum and Methanococcus maripaludis. Media were prepared containing 0%, 0.5%, 1.0%, 2%, 5% and 10% wt/vol magnesium perchlorate, sodium perchlorate, or calcium perchlorate. Organisms were inoculated into their respective media followed by incubation at each organism's growth temperature. Methane production, commonly used to measure methanogen growth, was measured by gas chromatography of headspace gas samples. Methane concentrations varied with species and perchlorate salt tested. However, all four methanogens produced substantial levels of methane in the presence of up to 1.0% perchlorate, but not higher. The standard procedure for growing methanogens typically includes sodium sulfide, a reducing agent, to reduce residual molecular oxygen. However, the sodium sulfide may have been reducing the perchlorate, thus allowing for growth of the methanogens. To investigate this possibility, experiments were conducted where stainless steel nails were used instead of sodium sulfide as the reducing agent. Prior to the addition of perchlorate and inoculation, the nails were removed from the liquid medium. Just as in the prior experiments, the methanogens produced methane at comparable levels to those seen with sodium sulfide as the reductant, indicating that sodium sulfide did not reduce the perchlorate to any significant extent. Additionally, cells metabolizing in 1% perchlorate were transferred to 2%, cells metabolizing in 2% were transferred to 5%, and finally cells metabolizing in 5% were transferred to 10%. All four species produced methane at 2% and 5%, but not 10

  14. Perchlorate and Superfund Response to Uncertainty and the Geochemical Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, K. P.

    2007-12-01

    Perchlorate, a chemical that had been known both in nature and through synthesis since the nineteenth century, only emerged into the limelight as an environmental contaminant in 1997. US EPA's Superfund Program became involved in perchlorate issues in the late 1980s and early 1990s due to the chemical's presence mixed with other contaminants at cleanup sites. Relying largely on pharmaceutical studies primarily from the 1950s and 1960s, EPA scientists in 1992 made a provisional estimate of toxicity and estimated that about 4 micrograms per liter (parts per billion or ppb) in drinking water would be protective. "Uncertainty factors" were incorporated to address for several identified information gaps. Results of new animal and human studies funded by the Defense Department and industry in the late 1990s shifted the concern from affects on adults with unhealthy thyroids to the potential developmental health risks to infants and children. EPA's January, 2002, draft toxicity assessment was referred to a committee of the National Research Council. In January, 2005, this committee recommended a "reference dose" based primarily on human clinical data. Many decisions remain on interpretation of the scientific recommendations for regulatory applications. After California's 1997 development of an analytical method to detect perchlorate in water to 4 ppb, EPA and state officials quickly discovered this chemical at 10 Superfund sites in the Pacific Southwest Region and at more than 30 other locations in California, Arizona and Nevada. Even before current research on the potential for natural sources of this anion, reported detections of perchlorate were investigated with reasonable care and appropriate skepticism. A brief overview of the search for likely sources of perchlorate detected in California water supplies is presented from a regional Superfund perspective. Some are clearly anthropogenic and others may be unrelated to industrial or disposal practices. Currently, there

  15. Environmental impacts of perchlorate with special reference to fireworks--a review.

    PubMed

    Sijimol, M R; Mohan, Mahesh

    2014-11-01

    Perchlorate is an inorganic anion that is used in solid rocket propellants, fireworks, munitions, signal flares, etc. The use of fireworks is identified as one of the main contributors in the increasing environmental perchlorate contamination. Although fireworks are displayed for entertainment, its environmental costs are dire. Perchlorates are also emerging as potent thyroid disruptors, and they have an impact on the ecology too. Many studies have shown that perchlorate contaminates the groundwater and the surface water, especially in the vicinity of fireworks manufacturing sites and fireworks display sites. The health and ecological impacts of perchlorate released in fireworks are yet to be fully assessed. This paper reviews fireworks as a source of perchlorate contamination and its expected adverse impacts.

  16. Archaeal (Per)Chlorate Reduction at High Temperature: An Interplay of Biotic and Abiotic Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebensteiner, Martin G.; Pinkse, Martijn W. H.; Schaap, Peter J.; Stams, Alfons J. M.; Lomans, Bart P.

    2013-04-01

    Perchlorate and chlorate anions [(per)chlorate] exist in the environment from natural and anthropogenic sources, where they can serve as electron acceptors for bacteria. We performed growth experiments combined with genomic and proteomic analyses of the hyperthermophile Archaeoglobus fulgidus that show (per)chlorate reduction also extends into the archaeal domain of life. The (per)chlorate reduction pathway in A. fulgidus relies on molybdo-enzymes that have similarity with bacterial enzymes; however, chlorite is not enzymatically split into chloride and oxygen. Evidence suggests that it is eliminated by an interplay of abiotic and biotic redox reactions involving sulfur compounds. Biological (per)chlorate reduction by ancient archaea at high temperature may have prevented accumulation of perchlorate in early terrestrial environments and consequently given rise to oxidizing conditions on Earth before the rise of oxygenic photosynthesis.

  17. Trends of perchlorate in Antarctic snow: Implications for atmospheric production and preservation in snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Su; Cox, Thomas S.; Cole-Dai, Jihong; Peterson, Kari M.; Shi, Guitao

    2016-09-01

    Perchlorate concentration ranges from a few to a few hundred ng kg-1 in surface and shallow-depth snow at three Antarctic locations (South Pole, Dome A, and central West Antarctica), with significant spatial variations dependent on snow accumulation rate and/or atmospheric production rate. An obvious trend of increasing perchlorate since the 1970s is seen in South Pole snow. The trend is possibly the result of stratospheric chlorine levels elevated by anthropogenic chlorine emissions; this is supported by the timing of a similar trend at Dome A. Alternatively, the trend may stem from postdepositional loss of snowpack perchlorate or a combination of both. The possible impact of stratospheric chlorine is consistent with evidence of perchlorate production in the stratosphere. Additionally, perchlorate concentration appears to be directly affected by the springtime Antarctic ozone hole. Therefore, perchlorate variations in Antarctic snow are likely linked to stratospheric chemistry and ozone over the Antarctic.

  18. A Potential Mechanism for Perchlorate Formation on Mars: Surface-Radiolysis-Initiated Atmospheric Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Eric; Atreya, Sushil K.; Kaiser, Ralf-Ingo; Mahaffy, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) is prevalent on Earth, and with observations of perchlorate on lunar samples and chondrite meteorites, along with recent observations indicating the presence of perchlorate (ClO4-) in the Martian surface by the Phoenix lander and the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover, it appears that the existence of perchlorate is widespread throughout the solar system. However, the abundance and isotopic composition of Martian perchlorate suggest that the perchlorate formation mechanism on Mars may involve a different path than perchlorate found elsewhere in the solar system. Motivated by this, we employ a one-dimensional chemical model to investigate the viability of perchlorate formation in the atmosphere of Mars, instigated by the radiolysis of the Martian surface by galactic cosmic rays. The surface-atmosphere interaction to produce Martian perchlorate involves the sublimation of chlorine oxides into the atmosphere, through surface radiolysis, and their subsequent synthesis to form perchloric acid (HClO4), followed by surface deposition and mineralization to form surface perchlorates. Considering the chlorine oxide, OClO, we find an OClO surface flux as low as 3.2x107 molecules cm-2 s-1, sublimated into the atmosphere from the surface could produce sufficient HClO4 to explain the perchlorate concentration on Mars, assuming an accumulation depth of 30 cm and integrated over the Amazonian period. Radiolysis provides an efficient pathway for the oxidation of chlorine, bypassing the efficient Cl/HCl recycling mechanism that characterizes HClO4 formation mechanisms proposed for the Earth but not Mars.

  19. Evaluation of Potential for Monitored Natural Attenuation of Perchlorate in Groundwater

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    Perchlorate-Impacted Groundwater for Base Case 8-4 Cost Components for Extraction and Treatment of Perchlorate-Impacted Groundwater for Base Case 8-5...consumed, increasing the likelihood of perchlorate biodegradation in the natural environment (Coates and Jackson, 2009). Trace amounts of molybdenum are...chlorinated solvents (USEPA, 1998) have been in use for many years. These documents describe systematic steps for delineating contaminant plumes

  20. Analysis and Exposure Assessment of Perchlorate in Korean Dairy Products with LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sung-Hee; Lee, Ji-Woo; Mandy, Pawlas

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Perchlorate is an emerging contaminant that is found everywhere, including various foods. Perchlorate is known to disturb the production of thyroid hormones and leads to mental disorders in fetuses and infants, as well as metabolic problems in adults. In this study, we attempted to establish an LC-MS/MS method for measuring perchlorate in dairy products and used this developed method to investigate perchlorate levels in Korean milk and yogurt samples. Methods The developed method of perchlorate analysis requires a shaker and 1% acetic acid/acetonitrile as the extracting solvent. Briefly, the samples were extracted and then centrifuged (4000 rpm, 1hour), and the supernatant was then passed through a Envi™ Carb SPE cartridge that had been prewashed sequentially with 6 mL of acetonitrile and 6 mL of 1% acetic acid in water. The final volume of the sample extract was adjusted to 40 mL with reagent water and the final sample was filtered through a 0.20-µm pore size PTFE (Polytetrafluoroethylene) syringe filter prior to LC-MS/MS. Results The average levels of perchlorate in milk and yogurt samples were 5.63 ± 3.49 µg/L and 3.65 ± 2.42 µg/L, respectively. The perchlorate levels observed in milk samples in this study were similar to those reported from China, Japan, and the United States. Conclusions The exposure of Koreans to perchlorate through the consumption of dairy products was calculated based on the results of this study. For all age groups, the calculated exposure to perchlorate was below the reference of dose (0.7 µg/kg-day) proposed by the National Academy of Science, USA, but the perchlorate exposure of children was higher than that of adults. Therefore, further investigation of perchlorate in other food samples is needed to enable a more exact assessment of exposure of children to perchlorate. PMID:22125772

  1. Study of the Deposition of Ammonium Perchlorate Following the Static Firing of MK-58 Rocket Motors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    hyperthyroidism , gas generators, electrolytes for lithium cells, and as chemical reagents. The occurrence of perchlorate in the environment is... treatments for the remediation of perchlorate in the environment (Refs. 10, 11). The debate on the acceptable levels of perchlorate in drinking...Biodegradation for Water Treatment ”, Environ. Sci. and Tecnol., Vol. 39 pp. 239A-247A, 2005. [11] Hatzinger, P.B., Whittier, C.M., Arkins, M.D., Bryan

  2. Basis of the Massachusetts Reference Dose and Drinking Water Standard for Perchlorate

    PubMed Central

    Zewdie, Tsedash; Smith, C. Mark; Hutcheson, Michael; West, Carol Rowan

    2010-01-01

    Objective Perchlorate inhibits the uptake of iodide in the thyroid. Iodide is required to synthesize hormones critical to fetal and neonatal development. Many water supplies and foods are contaminated with perchlorate. Exposure standards are needed but controversial. Here we summarize the basis of the Massachusetts (MA) perchlorate reference dose (RfD) and drinking water standard (DWS), which are considerably lower and more health protective than related values derived by several other agencies. We also review information regarding perchlorate risk assessment and policy. Data sources MA Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) scientists, with input from a science advisory committee, assessed a wide range of perchlorate risk and exposure information. Health outcomes associated with iodine insufficiency were considered, as were data on perchlorate in drinking water disinfectants. Data synthesis We used a weight-of-the-evidence approach to evaluate perchlorate risks, paying particular attention to sensitive life stages. A health protective RfD (0.07 μg/kg/day) was derived using an uncertainty factor approach with perchlorate-induced iodide uptake inhibition as the point of departure. The MA DWS (2 μg/L) was based on risk management decisions weighing information on perchlorate health risks and its presence in certain disinfectant solutions used to treat drinking water for pathogens. Conclusions Current data indicate that perchlorate exposures attributable to drinking water in individuals at sensitive life stages should be minimized and support the MA DEP perchlorate RfD and DWS. Widespread exposure to perchlorate and other thyroid toxicants in drinking water and foods suggests that more comprehensive policies to reduce overall exposures and enhance iodine nutrition are needed. PMID:20056583

  3. Perchlorate exposure in lactating women in an urban community in New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Borjan, Marija; Marcella, Stephen; Blount, Benjamin; Greenberg, Michael; Zhang, Junfeng Jim; Murphy, Eileen; Valentin-Blasini, Liza; Robson, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Perchlorate is most widely known as a solid oxidant for missile and rocket propulsion systems although it is also present as a trace contaminant in some fertilizers. It has been detected in drinking water, fruits, and vegetables throughout New Jersey and most of the United States. At sufficiently high doses, perchlorate interferes with the uptake of iodine into the thyroid and may interfere with the development of the skeletal system and the central nervous system of infants. Therefore, it is important to quantify perchlorate in breast milk to understand potential perchlorate exposure in infants. In this study we measured perchlorate in breast milk, urine, and drinking water collected from 106 lactating mothers from Central New Jersey. Each subject was asked to provide three sets of samples over a 3-month period. The average±SD perchlorate level in drinking water, breast milk, and urine was 0.168±0.132 ng/mL (n=253), 6.80±8.76 ng/mL (n=276), and 3.19±3.64 ng/mL (3.51±6.79 μg/g creatinine) (n=273), respectively. Urinary perchlorate levels were lower than reference range values for women of reproductive age (5.16±11.33 μg/g creatinine, p=0.03), likely because of perchlorate secretion in breast milk. Drinking water perchlorate levels were ≤1.05 ng/mL and were not positively correlated with either breast milk or urine perchlorate levels. These findings together suggest that drinking water was not the most important perchlorate exposure source for these women. Creatinine-adjusted urine perchlorate levels were strongly correlated with breast milk perchlorate levels (r=0.626, p=<0.0005). Breast milk perchlorate levels in this study are consistent with widespread perchlorate exposure in lactating women and thus infants. This suggests that breast milk may be a source of exposure to perchlorate in infants.

  4. Hypochlorite treatments are not a significant source of perchlorate exposure in lettuce.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, C A; Fonseca, J M; Blount, B C; Krieger, R I

    2009-03-25

    Leafy vegetables, such as lettuce ( Lactuca sativa L), have been identified as a potential source of perchlorate exposure to humans. Perchlorate is of concern because excessive amounts may impair thyroid function by inhibiting iodide uptake by the sodium iodide symporter. Perchlorate has been identified as an oxidation product in sodium hypochlorite. Dilute hypochlorite solutions are widely used on lettuce as a preservative and as a treatment to reduce microbial food risks. However, the potential of hypochlorite to be a source of human perchlorate exposure from lettuce had not been evaluated. Studies were conducted with lettuce collected in the San Luis Valley of southern Colorado and in the lower Colorado River Valley of southwestern Arizona to represent conditions under which hypochlorite is applied to lettuce in the field and in salad processing facilities. We used spray and dipping solutions that were dilutions of concentrated sodium hypochlorite that would contain from 12000 and 120000 microg/L perchlorate. The perchlorate content of iceberg and romaine lettuce averaged 6.2 and 7.2 microg/kg fw in southern Colorado and 14.0 and 56.7 microg/kg fw in southwestern Arizona and there were no significant (P > 0.05) increases in the perchlorate content of lettuce due to hypochlorite treatments. Because of the relatively low concentrations of perchlorate present after dilution and the low volumes applied to lettuce, hypochlorite solutions do not appear to be a significant source of the perchlorate levels found in lettuce.

  5. Lithium perchlorate-nitromethane-promoted alkylation of anilines with arylmethanols.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Mao, Hai-Feng; Wang, Lu; Zou, Jian-Ping; Zhang, Wei

    2011-11-01

    A new application of lithium perchlorate-nitromethane (LPNM) for the formation of aromatic C-N and C-C bonds is introduced. LPNM-promoted reactions of anilines with diarylmethanols selectively generate N-alkylated anilines or mono and double Friedel-Crafts alkylation products under different conditions by changing the reaction time, reaction temperature, and the ratio of the reactants. This method does not require the use of transition metal catalysts to prepare alkylated aniline derivatives.

  6. Parameters for the Pyrolysis of Organic Material - Perchlorate Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steininger, Harald; Goesmann, Fred; Goetz, Walter

    2013-04-01

    The ESA-lead Mars rover ExoMars (launch in 2018) will carry a suit of instruments, one of the in-struments is the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer MOMA. Organic material in the Martian soil will be either pyrolyzed at temperatures of up to 1000°C and separated by gas chromatography or volatilized with the help of an UV-laser. A mass spectrometer will be the detector for both methods. Chlorinated organics have been detected in pyroly-sis GC-MS experiments on Mars two times. The first time during the Viking mission in 1976 and a second time with the Sample Analysis on Mars (SAM) in-strument onboard the Curiosity rover in 2012. [1] [2] The presence of perchlorates found by the Phoenix mission in 2008 [3] lead to the discovery that organic molecules not only get oxidized during pyrolysis, but also chlorinated organic compounds can be pro-duced. [4] The parameters used for pyrolysis and the sample composition especially the distribution of organics and perchlorates within the sample and the concentrations of organics and perchlorate have a huge influence on the products created. It is possible to change the condi-tions of the pyrolysis by spatially separating the organ-ics from the perchlorates that the chloromethanes get the major product of the pyrolysis. This might help to understand the results of the (SAM) instrument yield-ing mono-, di- and trichloromethane and a chlorinated 4-hydrocarbon molecule. References: [1] Biemann K et al. (1977) JGR, 82, 4641-4658. [2] Grotzinger J. P et al. (2011) AGU Fall Meeting U13A-01 [3] Hecht M. H., et al. (2009) Science, 325 64-67. [4] Steininger H., Goesmann F., Goetz W. (2011) Planet. & Space Sci., 71, 9-17. Acknowledgments: This work was funded by DLR (FKZ 50QX1001)

  7. Spectroscopic and Visual Evidence of Perchlorate Deliquescence Under Martian Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolakakos, George; Whiteway, James

    2015-04-01

    One of the key findings during the Phoenix and Mars Science Laboratory landed Mars missions has been the detection of perchlorate, a highly deliquescent salt. Perchlorates are of great interest on Mars due to their high affinity for water vapour as well as their ability to greatly depress the freezing point of water when in solution. This has intriguing biological implications as resulting brines could potentially provide a habitable environment for living organisms. Additionally, it has been speculated that these salts may play a significant role in influencing the hydrological cycle on Mars. In order to experimentally study water exchange processes between the surface and atmosphere on Mars and assess the feasibility of a future landed detection tool, a stand-off Raman spectroscopy instrument and environmental simulation chamber have been developed at York University. A sample of magnesium perchlorate consistent with the size of patches found at the Phoenix site has been subjected to the low water vapour pressure and temperatures found at polar Martian latitudes. Results indicate that at a water vapour pressure of ~2 Pa (-54°C frost point temperature), Raman spectroscopy is able to detect the onset of brine formation and provide a relative estimate of the quantity of water taken up by the sample until complete deliquescence is reached. Significant uptake of water from the atmosphere is observed to occur prior to the frost point temperature being reached and on time scales relevant to the Martian diurnal cycle. This result suggests that perchlorates in the Martian regolith can contribute to the hydrological cycle, pre-emptively reducing the water vapour pressure before saturation is reached.

  8. Perchlorate Contamination of Drinking Water: Regulatory Issues and Legislative Actions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-16

    Hypothyroidism , Newborn Thyroid Function, and Environmental Perchlorate Exposure Among Residents of a Southern California Community,” Journal of Occupational...thyroid hormone as biochemical events that might precede adverse effects, and identified hypothyroidism as the first adverse effect. Because of research...women who might have hypothyroidism or iodide deficiency) and noted that the RfD was supported by clinical studies, occupational and environmental

  9. Integrated Ion Exchange Regeneration Process for Perchlorate in Drinking Water

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    or below notification level, 10 nanograms per liter (ng/L), for nitrosamines . The performance of IIX was evaluated through several cycles to...facility construction. IIX was not found to increase nitrosamines or other semivolatile organic compounds in treated water. Perchlorate-loaded resin...reducing operating costs. Re-use of resin also reduces nitrosamine and nitrosamine precursor residuals associated with installation of virgin resin

  10. Tailored Granular Activated Carbon Treatment of Perchlorate in Drinking Water

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    Lead Bed) reduced perchlorate concentrations below 6 µg/ L for ~15,000 BVs. The tailoring agent was not detectable after the guard bed. Achieved...United States, state standards or advisory levels are still evolving, and currently range from 1 to 18 micrograms per liter (µg/ L ) (http...United States, state standards or advisory levels are still evolving, and currently range from 1 to 18 µg/ L . The need for cost effective treatment is

  11. Kinetics analysis of a salt-tolerant perchlorate-reducing bacterium: effects of sodium, magnesium, and nitrate.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yeyuan; Roberts, Deborah J

    2013-08-06

    Salt-tolerant perchlorate-reducing bacteria can be used to regenerate ion-exchange brines or resins exhausted with perchlorate. A salt-tolerant perchlorate-reducing Marinobacter vinifirmus strain P4B1 was recently purified. This study determined the effects of Na(+) and Mg(2+) concentrations on the perchlorate reduction rate of P4B1. The results showed that strain P4B1 could utilize perchlorate and grow in the presence of 1.8% to 10.2% NaCl. Lower NaCl concentrations allowed faster perchlorate reduction. The addition of Mg(2+) to the culture showed significant effects on perchlorate reduction when perchlorate was the sole electron acceptor. A molar Mg(2+)/Na(+) ratio of ∼0.11 optimized perchlorate degradation and cell growth. When perchlorate and nitrate were both present, nitrate reduction did not start significantly until perchlorate was below 100 mg/L. Tests with washed cell suspensions indicated that strain P4B1 had both perchlorate and nitrate reduction enzymes. When the culture was exposed to both perchlorate and nitrate, the nitrate reduction enzyme activity was low. The maximum specific substrate utilization rate (Vm) and the half saturation coefficient (KS) for P4B1 (30 g/L NaCl) determined in this study were 0.049 ± 0.003 mg ClO4(-)/mg VSS-h and 18 ± 4 mg ClO4(-)/L, respectively.

  12. Perchlorate in the Hydrologic Cycle - An Overview of Sources and Occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stonestrom, D. A.; Jackson, W.; Mayer, K.; Orris, G. J.

    2007-12-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) in water and food is of concern due to deleterious health affects associated with hypothyroidism. The presence of widespread perchlorate in 0-to-28 ka-old pristine ground water of the Middle Rio Grande Basin (Plummer et al., 2006, ES&T, DOI:10.1021/es051739h), in ground water >1 mile from agricultural activities in the Southern High Plains (Rajagapolan et al., 2006, ES&T, DOI:10.1021/es052155i), and in unsaturated zones throughout the arid and semiarid southwestern United States (Rao et al., 2007, ES&T, DOI:10.1021/es062853i) clearly indicates that perchlorate is a non-exotic component of the hydrologic cycle, at least in dry environments. The natural system has been greatly perturbed in places by human activities. Most anthropogenic inputs are associated with the manufacture and use of explosives and rocket fuel, providing concentrated sources of excess perchlorate to the hydrologic cycle. Perchlorate-containing fertilizers and irrigation provide dispersed sources within and down-gradient from agricultural areas. Natural sources include photochemically mediated reactions involving ozone at the land surface and in the lower atmosphere. A growing body of work indicates that a small, but persistent, meteoric source acting over thousands of years can explain observed accumulations of unsaturated-zone perchlorate in arid regions. In addition to meteoric sources, oxyanions produced during volcanogenic processes can include appreciable amounts of natural perchlorate. Terrestrial plants take up perchlorate in soil water, with some species of xerophytic succulents concentrating the anion to high levels. Similarly, perchlorate in marine plants indicates that perchlorate is part of marine biochemical cycles. Perchlorate-bearing marine sediments of late Tertiary age suggest that perchlorate has been part of global geochemical cycles for millions of years and, furthermore, can be preserved in the subsurface despite the nearly ubiquitous presence of

  13. Investigating the Deliquescence Relative Humidity of Perchlorate Salts as a Function of Temperature: Implications for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, R. V.; Baustian, K. J.; Wise, M. E.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2009-12-01

    Recent observations suggest perchlorate salts are present in the regolith at the polar regions of Mars. Perchlorates are deliquescent, meaning they absorb significant water from the atmosphere and become an aqueous solution. Deliquescence of perchlorate salts is a possible explanation for the appearance and growth of droplet-like spheroids on a strut of the Phoenix lander. The relative humidity at which this deliquescence occurs (DRH) is often temperature-dependent, and the only value reported thus far is DRH = 44% for sodium perchlorate at room temperature. However, the deliquescence of perchlorate salts at Martian temperatures has not been studied, and the temperature dependence of this process is important for predicting the ability of liquid water to be stable on the Martian surface and in the shallow subsurface. To study the deliquescence of perchlorate at Martian temperatures, we are using a Raman microscope paired with an environmental cell. Deliquescence can be detected both spectrally and by visual inspection. We have determined that the DRH of pure perchlorate salts is independent of temperature. However, the DRH of pure perchlorate may be affected by the presence of minerals known to exist on Mars, such as phyllosilicates. Some clay minerals have unique water adsorption properties, and these competing water adsorption mechanisms may inhibit the ability of perchlorate salts to deliquesce, effectively shrinking the proposed window of aqueous perchlorate solution stability. For this reason, we also report DRH values for perchlorate mixed with analog minerals. These studies will help determine the likelihood of liquid water on present-day Mars and constrain the latitudes, seasons, and times of day in which it could exist.

  14. Perchlorate exposure from food crops produced in the lower Colorado River region.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Charles A; Barraj, Leila M; Blount, Benjamin C; Scrafford, Carolyn G; Valentin-Blasini, Liza; Smith, Kimberly M; Krieger, Robert I

    2009-05-01

    The Colorado River shows low levels of perchlorate derived from aerospace- and defense-related fuel industries once located near the Las Vegas Wash. At sufficiently high dosages perchlorate can disrupt thyroid function by inhibiting uptake of iodide. The Colorado River is the primary source of irrigation water for most food crops grown in Southern California and Southwestern Arizona. The objective of this study was to evaluate potential perchlorate exposure from food crops produced in the lower Colorado River region (LCRR). The major food commodities produced in the region were sampled and perchlorate levels were determined by ion chromatography followed by detection using either conductivity or tandem mass spectrometry, depending on analyte levels. The Monte Carlo module of the Dietary Exposure Evaluation Model (DEEM) was used to derive an estimate of the 2-day average perchlorate intakes. Data were derived assuming that individuals residing in the LCRR get their fruits and vegetables from within the LCRR as well as from other areas in the United States, or assuming individuals living in the LCRR get their fruits and vegetables from the LCRR only. Perchlorate exposure estimates derived in this study are comparable to exploratory estimates by the US Food and Drug Administration. For infants and children, over 50% of the estimated perchlorate exposure was from milk. The relative impact of vegetables and fruit toward perchlorate exposure increased by age through adulthood. Cumulative perchlorate exposure estimates based on this hypothetical analysis could approach or exceed the NAS reference dose (RfD) for some population groups as drinking water levels exceeded 6 microg/l. However, few individuals are exposed to perchlorate in drinking water at levels above 4 microg/l in the United States and very few would be exposed to perchlorate levels exceeding the RfD, whether consuming food crops from within or outside the LCRR.

  15. Containerized Wetland Bioreactor Evaluated for Perchlorate and Nitrate Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Dibley, V R; Krauter, P W

    2004-12-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLNL) designed and constructed an innovative containerized wetlands (bioreactor) system that began operation in November 2000 to biologically degrade perchlorate and nitrate under relatively low-flow conditions at a remote location at Site 300 known as Building 854. Since initial start-up, the system has processed over 3,463,000 liters of ground water and treated over 38 grams of perchlorate and 148 kilograms of nitrate. Site 300 is operated by the University of California as a high-explosives and materials testing facility supporting nuclear weapons research. The 11-square mile site located in northern California was added to the NPL in 1990 primarily due to the presence of elevated concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ground water. At the urging of the regulatory agencies, perchlorate was looked for and detected in the ground water in 1999. VOCs, nitrate and perchlorate were released into the soil and ground water in the Building 854 area as the result of accidental leaks during stability testing of weapons or from waste discharge practices that are no longer permitted at Site 300. Design of the wetland bioreactors was based on earlier studies showing that indigenous chlorate-respiring bacteria could effectively degrade perchlorate into nontoxic concentrations of chlorate, chlorite, oxygen, and chloride. Studies also showed that the addition of organic carbon would enhance microbial denitrification. Early onsite testing showed acetic acid to be a more effective carbon source than dried leaf matter, dried algae, or milk replacement starter; a nutrient and carbon source used in a Department of Defense phytoremediation demonstration. No inocula were added to the system. Groundwater was allowed to circulate through the bioreactor for three weeks to acclimate the wetland plants and to build a biofilm from indigenous flora. Using solar energy, ground water is pumped into granular

  16. High-nitrogen-based pyrotechnics: development of perchlorate-free green-light illuminants for military and civilian applications.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Jesse J; Raab, James M; Hann, Ronald K; Damavarapu, Reddy; Klapötke, Thomas M

    2012-06-01

    The development of perchlorate-free hand-held signal illuminants for the US Army's M195 green star parachute is described. Compared with the perchlorate-containing control, the optimized perchlorate-free illuminants were less sensitive toward various ignition stimuli while offering comparable burn times and visible-light outputs. The results were also important from the perspective of civilian fireworks because the development of perchlorate-free illuminants remains an important objective of the commercial fireworks industry.

  17. Perchlorate content of plant foliage reflects a wide range of species-dependent accumulation but not ozone-induced biosynthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perchlorate interferes with uptake of iodide in humans. Emission inventories do not explain observed distributions. Ozone is implicated in the natural origin of perchlorate, and has increased since pre-industrial times. Ozone produces perchlorate in vitro from chloride, and plant tissues contain chl...

  18. FATE OF DIETARY PERCHLORATE IN LACTATING DAIRY COWS: RELEVANCE TO ANIMAL HEALTH AND LEVELS IN THE MILK SUPPLY.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perchlorate is a goitrogenic anion that competitively inhibits the sodium iodide transporter and has been detected in forages and in commercial milk throughout the U.S. The fate of perchlorate and its effect on animal health were studied in lactating cows, ruminally infused with perchlorate for fiv...

  19. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1990-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  20. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1989-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  1. Thyroid hormones and thyroid disease in relation to perchlorate dose and residence near a superfund site.

    PubMed

    Gold, Ellen B; Blount, Benjamin C; O'Neill Rasor, Marianne; Lee, Jennifer S; Alwis, Udeni; Srivastav, Anup; Kim, Kyoungmi

    2013-07-01

    Perchlorate is a widely occurring contaminant, which can competitively inhibit iodide uptake and thus thyroid hormone production. The health effects of chronic low dose perchlorate exposure are largely unknown. In a community-based study, we compared thyroid function and disease in women with differing likelihoods of prior and current perchlorate exposure. Residential blocks were randomly selected from areas: (1) with potential perchlorate exposure via drinking water; (2) with potential exposure to environmental contaminants; and (3) neighboring but without such exposures. Eligibility included having lived in the area for ≥6 months and aged 20-50 years during 1988-1996 (during documented drinking water well contamination). We interviewed 814 women and collected blood samples (assayed for thyroid stimulating hormone and free thyroxine) from 431 interviewed women. Daily urine samples were assayed for perchlorate and iodide for 178 premenopausal women with blood samples. We performed multivariable regression analyses comparing thyroid function and disease by residential area and by urinary perchlorate dose adjusted for urinary iodide levels. Residential location and current perchlorate dose were not associated with thyroid function or disease. No persistent effect of perchlorate on thyroid function or disease was found several years after contaminated wells were capped.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF A BETTER METHOD TO IDENTIFY AND MEASURE PERCHLORATE IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate (ClO4 -) is an oxidant used primarily in solid propellant for rockets, missiles, pyrotechnics, as a component in air bag inflators, and in highway safety flares. Perchlorate tainted water has been found throughout the southwestern United States where its source has o...

  3. Microscale extraction of perchlorate in drinking water with low level detection by electrospray-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Magnuson, M L; Urbansky, E T; Kelty, C A

    2000-06-21

    Improper treatment and disposal of perchlorate can be an environmental hazard in regions where solid rocket motors are used, tested, or stored. The solubility and mobility of perchlorate lends itself to ground water contamination, and some of these sources are used for drinking water. Perchlorate in drinking water has been determined at sub-mug l(-1) levels by extraction of the ion-pair formed between the perchlorate ion and a cationic surfactant with electrospray-mass spectrometry detection. Confidence in the selective quantification of the perchlorate ion is increased through both the use of the mass based detection as well as the selectivity of the ion pair. This study investigates several extraction solvents and experimental work-up procedures in order to achieve high sample throughput. The method detection limit for perchlorate based on 3.14sigma(n-1) of seven replicate injections was 300 ng l(-1) (parts-per-trillion) for methylene chloride extraction and 270 ng l(-1) for methyl isobutyl ketone extraction. Extraction with methylene chloride produces linear calibration curves, enabling standard addition to be used to quantify perchlorate in drinking water. Perchlorate determination of a contaminated water compared favorably with results determined by ion chromatography.

  4. Perchlorate and halophilic prokaryotes: implications for possible halophilic life on Mars.

    PubMed

    Oren, Aharon; Elevi Bardavid, Rahel; Mana, Lily

    2014-01-01

    In view of the finding of perchlorate among the salts detected by the Phoenix Lander on Mars, we investigated the relationships of halophilic heterotrophic microorganisms (archaea of the family Halobacteriaceae and the bacterium Halomonas elongata) toward perchlorate. All strains tested grew well in NaCl-based media containing 0.4 M perchlorate, but at the highest perchlorate concentrations, tested cells were swollen or distorted. Some species (Haloferax mediterranei, Haloferax denitrificans, Haloferax gibbonsii, Haloarcula marismortui, Haloarcula vallismortis) could use perchlorate as an electron acceptor for anaerobic growth. Although perchlorate is highly oxidizing, its presence at a concentration of 0.2 M for up to 2 weeks did not negatively affect the ability of a yeast extract-based medium to support growth of the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum. These findings show that presence of perchlorate among the salts on Mars does not preclude the possibility of halophilic life. If indeed the liquid brines that may exist on Mars are inhabited by salt-requiring or salt-tolerant microorganisms similar to the halophiles on Earth, presence of perchlorate may even be stimulatory when it can serve as an electron acceptor for respiratory activity in the anaerobic Martian environment.

  5. Uptake, elimination, and relative distribution of perchlorate in various tissues of channel catfish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, J.-W.; Bradford, C.M.; Rinchard, J.; Liu, F.; Wages, M.; Waters, A.; Kendall, R.J.; Anderson, T.A.; Theodorakis, C.W.

    2007-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the kinetics of uptake and elimination of perchlorate in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus. Perchlorate - an oxidizer used in solid fuel rockets, fireworks, and illuminating munitions - has been shown to effect thyroid function, causing hormone disruption and potential perturbations of metabolic activities. For the uptake study, catfish were exposed to 100 mg/L sodium perchlorate for 12 h to 5 d in the laboratory. Perchlorate in tissues was analyzed using ion chromatography. The highest perchlorate concentrations were found in the head and fillet, indicating that these tissues are the most important tissues to analyze when determining perchlorate uptake into large fish. To calculate uptake and elimination rate constants for fillet, gills, G-I tract, liver, and head, fish were exposed to 100 ppm sodium perchlorate for 5 days, and allowed to depurate in clean water for up to 20 days. The animals rapidly eliminated the perchlorate accumulated showing the highest elimination in fillet (Ke = 1.67 day -1) and lowest elimination in liver (Ke = 0.79 day -1). ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  6. Anaerobic Treatment of Wastewaters Containing Perchlorate from Munitions Handling and Production

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    result in hypothyroidism , mental retardation, and speech and hearing degradation. Treatment technology Perchlorate treatment technologies are...the perchlorate perturbation did not affect overall performance of the three bioreactors. There was no pH fluctuation, accumulation of volatile fatty...increased to 14.5 times its stoichiometric amount (day 591). This rise in ethanol significantly affected performance of the bioreactor during the

  7. PERFORMANCE OF POLYVINYL ALCOHOL GEL COLUMNS ON THE ION CHROMATOGRAPHIC DETERMINATION OF PERCHLORATE IN FERTILIZERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interest in possible sources of perchlorate (ClO4-) that could lead to environmental release has been heightened since the EPA placed this anion on its Contaminant Candidate List (CCL) for drinking water. Besides its association with defense and aerospace activities, perchlorate ...

  8. 77 FR 52633 - Notice of a Public Meeting: Stakeholder Meeting Concerning EPA's Intent To Regulate Perchlorate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-30

    ... To Regulate Perchlorate Levels in Drinking Water AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... Drinking Water Regulation for Perchlorate. DATES: The public meeting and webcast will be held on September... Crystal Drive, Arlington, VA 22202. A government issued photo ID is required to obtain access to...

  9. PERCHLORATE UPTAKE BY SALT CEDAR (TAMARIX RAMOSISSIMA) IN THE LAS VEGAS WASH RIPARIAN ECOSYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate ion (CIO4-) has been identified in samples of dormant salt cedar (Tamarix ramosissima) growing in the Las vegas Wash. Perchlorate is an oxidenat, but its reduction is kineticaly hindered. CXoncern over thyrpoid effects caused the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA...

  10. RAMAN SPECTRAL ANALYSIS OF PERCHLORATE CONTAMINATION IN COMMONLY-USED FERTILIZERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Raman spectroscopy (RS) was used for qualitative and quantitative analysis of perchlorate (ClO4-1) in 30+ commonly-used fertilizers. Perchlorate contamination is emerging as an important environmental issue since its discovery in water resources that are widely used for drinking...

  11. Validation of a Novel Bioassay for Low-level Perchlorate Determination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    investigator PMS phenazine methosulfate PMSH reduced phenazine methosulfate ppb parts per billion PR plate reader QA quality assurance QC... phenazine methosulfate (PMS) as an electron shuttle. Hence the amount of perchlorate in an aqueous sample can be determined enzymatically by monitoring the...201019, which is based on perchlorate reductase (PCR) activity coupled to reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) oxidation, with phenazine

  12. MICROSCALE EXTRACTION OF PERCHLORATE IN DRINKING WATER WITH LOW LEVEL DETECTION BY ELECTROSPRAY-MASS SPECTROMETRY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Improper treatment and disposal of perchlorate can be an environmental hazard in regions where solid rocket motors are used, tested, or stored. The solubility and mobility of perchlorate lends itself to ground water contamination, and some of these sources are used for drinking ...

  13. Equilibrium dialysis and ultrafiltration investigations of perchlorate removal from aqueous solution using poly(diallyldimethylammonium) chloride.

    PubMed

    Roach, Jim D; Tush, Daniel

    2008-02-01

    Use of perchlorate salts in military activities and the aerospace industry is widespread. These salts are highly water-soluble and are, to a large extent, kinetically inert as aqueous species. As a groundwater contaminant, perchlorate is now being detected in an increasing number of locations and is believed to interfere with the uptake of iodide by the thyroid, which can result in decreased hormone production. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) has established a reference dose for perchlorate of 0.0007 mg/kg/day, which translates to a drinking water equivalent level of 24.5 ppb. This study investigated the application of polyelectrolyte-enhanced ultrafiltration (PEUF) for the selective removal of perchlorate from aqueous solution through equilibrium dialysis and ultrafiltration experiments. Using poly(diallyldimethylammonium) chloride, the effectiveness and efficiency of PEUF in the removal of perchlorate from other aqueous solution components was investigated by testing parameters such as polyelectrolyte concentration, pH, and ionic strength. Removal of perchlorate from synthetic groundwater initially containing 10.3 ppm perchlorate and also containing chloride, sulfate, and carbonate was also examined. Perchlorate separations of greater than 95% were achieved, even in the presence of 10-fold excesses of competing ions.

  14. Hybrid Adsorption-Membrane Biological Reactors for Improved Performance and Reliability of Perchlorate Removal Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    carbon supply for the autotrophic perchlorate reducing bacteria. The membrane used in the reactor is a hollow-fiber microfiltration membrane made from...1 HYBRID ADSORPTION- MEMBRANE BIOLOGICAL REACTORS FOR IMPROVED PERFORMANCE AND RELIABILITY OF PERCHLORATE REMOVAL PROCESSES L.C. Schideman...Center Champaign, IL 61826, USA ABSTRACT This study introduces the novel HAMBgR process (Hybrid Adsorption Membrane Biological Reactor) and

  15. REMOTE SENSING OF PERCHLORATE EFFECTS ON SALT CEDAR PRELIMINARY RESULTS FROM THE LAS VEGAS WASH

    EPA Science Inventory



    Sodium Perchlorate and ammonium Perchlorate, major components of solid rocket fuel, have been manufactured in the Las Vegas Valley immediately up gradient from the Las Vegas Wash, since 1945 and 1956, respectively. Measurements of emerging ground water quality in the vici...

  16. Perchlorate and chlorate reduction by the Crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix and two thermophilic Firmicutes.

    PubMed

    Liebensteiner, Martin G; Pinkse, Martijn W H; Nijsse, Bart; Verhaert, Peter D E M; Tsesmetzis, Nicolas; Stams, Alfons J M; Lomans, Bart P

    2015-12-01

    This study reports the ability of one hyperthermophilic and two thermophilic microorganisms to grow anaerobically by the reduction of chlorate and perchlorate. Physiological, genomic and proteome analyses suggest that the Crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix reduces perchlorate with a periplasmic enzyme related to nitrate reductases, but that it lacks a functional chlorite-disproportionating enzyme (Cld) to complete the pathway. Aeropyrum pernix, previously described as a strictly aerobic microorganism, seems to rely on the chemical reactivity of reduced sulfur compounds with chlorite, a mechanism previously reported for perchlorate-reducing Archaeoglobus fulgidus. The chemical oxidation of thiosulfate (in excessive amounts present in the medium) and the reduction of chlorite result in the release of sulfate and chloride, which are the products of a biotic-abiotic perchlorate reduction pathway in Ae. pernix. The apparent absence of Cld in two other perchlorate-reducing microorganisms, Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans and Moorella glycerini strain NMP, and their dependence on sulfide for perchlorate reduction is consistent with the observations made on Ar. fulgidus. Our findings suggest that microbial perchlorate reduction at high temperature differs notably from the physiology of perchlorate- and chlorate-reducing mesophiles and that it is characterized by the lack of a chlorite dismutase and is enabled by a combination of biotic and abiotic reactions.

  17. COMMENT ON "PERCHLORATE IDENTIFICATION IN FERTILIZERS" AND THE SUBSEQUENT ADDITION/CORRECTION [LETTER TO EDITOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate contamination has been reported in several fertilizer materials and not just in mined Chile saltpeter, where it is a welo-known natural impurity. To survey fertilizers for perchlorate, two analytical techniques have been applied to 45 products that span agricultural, ...

  18. The impact of temperature on the performance of anaerobic biological treatment of perchlorate in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Dugan, Nicholas R; Williams, Daniel J; Meyer, Maria; Schneider, Ross R; Speth, Thomas F; Metz, Deborah H

    2009-04-01

    A 20-month pilot-scale study was conducted to examine the impact of temperature on the performance of an anaerobic biological contractor used to treat perchlorate-contaminated water. The contractor was successfully acclimated with indigenous microorganisms. Influent temperatures varied from 1.4 to 30 degrees C. The objectives of the study were to investigate the effects of temperature on perchlorate removal, nitrate removal, nitrite formation, dissolved oxygen consumption, sulfide production, and nutrient acetate consumption. The results confirmed that consistent biological perchlorate removal to 2 microg /L is feasible at temperatures above 10 degrees C. Effluent concentrations of perchlorate, nitrate, and dissolved oxygen varied inversely with temperature, while sulfide varied positively with temperature. Under the conditions that prevailed during this study, 10 degrees C was a threshold temperature below which microbial activity, including perchlorate reduction, decreased dramatically.

  19. Removal of perchlorate in water by calcined MgAl-CO3 layered double hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yiqiong; Gao, Naiyun; Deng, Yang; Yu, Guoping

    2013-04-01

    Perchlorate is widely known as an inorganic endocrine disruptor. In this study, MgAl-CO3 layered double hydroxides with different Mg/Al molar ratios were prepared using a coprecipitation method and followed by a calcination process at a temperature range of 300 to 700 degrees C. Results showed that the best synthesis conditions were a calcination temperature of 550 degrees C and Mg/Al molar ratio of 3. Further, the adsorbent and its adsorption product were characterized by x-ray diffraction, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis. The layered double hydroxides structures in the adsorbent were lost during calcination at 550 degrees C but were reconstructed subsequent to adsorption of perchlorate, indicating that the "memory effect" appeared to play an important role in perchlorate adsorption. The perchlorate adsorption pattern was best described by the pseudo-second-order kinetics model, while the Freundlich isotherms appropriately explained perchlorate adsorption data.

  20. Effects of intense alpha irradiation on the behavior of americium in perchlorate solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kornilov, A.S.; Frolov, A.A.; Vasil'ev, V.Ya.

    1987-05-01

    Studies have been made on the radiation chemistry of americium(VI) and americium(V) in solutions of perchloric acid and sodium perchlorate. The reduction rate is related to the dose rate and perchlorate concentration. The radiolysis products in perchlorate solutions are vigorous reducing agents for americium(VI). There is a correlation between the yield in the reduction of americium(VI) and the yield of radiolysis products. Prolonged storage of saturated weakly acid solutions of sodium perchlorate containing americium(III) and curium(III) causes the deposition of the actinoid hydroxides as well as sodium chlorate and chloride. The americium in the precipitate is partially oxidized to the pentavalent state.

  1. Copper Metallochaperones

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Nigel J.; Winge, Dennis R.

    2014-01-01

    The current state of knowledge on how copper metallochaperones support the maturation of cuproproteins is reviewed. Copper is needed within mitochondria to supply the CuA and intramembrane CuB sites of cytochrome oxidase, within the trans-Golgi network to supply secreted cuproproteins and within the cytosol to supply superoxide dismutase 1 (Sod1). Subpopulations of copper-zinc superoxide dismutase also localize to mitochondria, the secretory system, the nucleus and, in plants, the chloroplast, which also requires copper for plastocyanin. Prokaryotic cuproproteins are found in the cell membrane and in the periplasm of gram-negative bacteria. Cu(I) and Cu(II) form tight complexes with organic molecules and drive redox chemistry, which unrestrained would be destructive. Copper metallochaperones assist copper in reaching vital destinations without inflicting damage or becoming trapped in adventitious binding sites. Copper ions are specifically released from copper metallochaperones upon contact with their cognate cuproproteins and metal transfer is thought to proceed by ligand substitution. PMID:20205585

  2. Perchlorate levels found in tap water collected from several cities in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Erdemgil, Yiğit; Gözet, Tuba; Can, Özge; Ünsal, İbrahim; Özpınar, Aysel

    2016-03-01

    Perchlorate is an inorganic anion that inhibits iodide transport to the thyroid by sodium-iodide transporters. Because perchlorate is highly soluble, stable, and mobile in water, drinking water is a potential source of perchlorate exposure. When exposed to perchlorate, thyroid dysfunction can be observed in sensitive populations (pregnant woman, infants, and children), especially those with iodide deficiency. The aim of this study was to determine the perchlorate levels in tap water from five cities in Turkey. Perchlorate concentrations of 145 tap water samples collected from Ankara, Isparta, Istanbul, Kayseri, and Sakarya were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Mean and median values were found to be 0.15 and 0.07 μg/L, respectively. The median values (25-75 % percentile) of Istanbul, Ankara, Sakarya, Isparta, and Kayseri were 0.08 μg/L (0.04-0.09 μg/L), 0.07 μg/L (0.07-0.21 μg/L), 0.04 μg/L (0.04-0.04 μg/L), 0.03 μg/L (0.02-0.07 μg/L), and 0.25 μg/L (0.23-0.31 μg/L), respectively. The median perchlorate level observed in Kayseri was significantly higher than those found at other cities (p < 0.05). Perchlorate concentrations in water samples were lower than the interim drinking water health advisory level (15 μg/L) determined by the US Environmental Protection Agency. This study showed that perchlorate in drinking water is not the main source of exposure in these cities. Future studies should be performed to determine perchlorate levels in other potential sources, such as food products.

  3. Specific adsorption of perchlorate anions on Pt{hkl} single crystal electrodes.

    PubMed

    Attard, Gary A; Brew, Ashley; Hunter, Katherine; Sharman, Jonathan; Wright, Edward

    2014-07-21

    The voltammetry of Pt{111}, Pt{100}, Pt{110} and Pt{311} single crystal electrodes as a function of perchloric acid concentration (0.05-2.00 M) has been studied in order to test the assertion made in recent reports by Watanabe et al. that perchlorate anions specifically adsorb on polycrystalline platinum. Such an assertion would have significant ramifications for our understanding of electrocatalytic processes at platinum surfaces since perchlorate anions at low pH have classically been assumed not to specifically adsorb. For Pt{111}, it is found that OHad and electrochemical oxide states are both perturbed significantly as perchloric acid concentration is increased. We suggest that this is due to specific adsorption of perchlorate anions competing with OHad for adsorption sites. The hydrogen underpotential deposition (H UPD) region of Pt{111} however remains unchanged although evidence for perchlorate anion decomposition to chloride on Pt{111} is reported. In contrast, for Pt{100} no variation in the onset of electrochemical oxide formation is found nor any shift in the potential of the OHad state which normally results from the action of specifically adsorbing anions. This suggests that perchlorate anions are non-specifically adsorbed on this plane although strong changes in all H UPD states are observed as perchloric acid concentration is increased. This manifests itself as a redistribution of charge from the H UPD state situated at more positive potential to the one at more negative potential. For Pt{110} and Pt{311}, marginal changes in the onset of electrochemical oxide formation are recorded, associated with specific adsorption of perchlorate. Specific adsorption of perchlorate anions on Pt{111} is deleterious to electrocatalytic activity in relation to the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) as measured using a rotating disc electrode (RDE) in a hanging meniscus configuration. This study supports previous work suggesting that a large component of the ORR

  4. Characterization of Perchlorate in a New Frozen Human Urine Standard Reference Material

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lee L.; Jarrett, Jeffery M.; Davis, W. Clay; Kilpatrick, Eric L.; Oflaz, Rabia; Turk, Gregory C.; Leber, Dennis D.; Valentin, Liza; Morel-Espinosa, Maria; Blount, Benjamin C.

    2015-01-01

    Perchlorate, an inorganic anion, has recently been recognized as an environmental contaminant by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Urine is the preferred matrix for assessment of human exposure to perchlorate. Although the measurement technique for perchlorate in urine was developed in 2005, the calibration and quality assurance aspects of the metrology infrastructure for perchlorate are still lacking in that there is no certified reference material (CRM) traceable to the International System of Units (SI). To meet the quality assurance needs in biomonitoring measurements of perchlorate and the related anions that affect thyroid health, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) developed Standard Reference Material (SRM) 3668 Mercury, Perchlorate, and Iodide in Frozen Human Urine. SRM 3668 consists of perchlorate, nitrate, thiocyanate, iodine, and mercury in urine at two levels that represent the 50th and 95th percentiles, respectively, of the concentrations (with some adjustments) in the U.S. population. It is the first CRM being certified for perchlorate. Measurements leading to the certification of perchlorate were made collaboratively at NIST and CDC using three methods based on liquid or ion chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS or IC-MS/MS). Potential sources of bias were analyzed and results were compared for the three methods. Perchlorate in SRM 3668 Level I urine was certified to be 2.70 μg L−1 ± 0.21 μg L−1, and for SRM 3668 Level II urine, the certified value is 13.47 μg L−1 ± 0.96 μg L−1. PMID:22850897

  5. Discovery of Perchlorate at the Phoenix Landing Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, M. H.; Kounaves, S. P.; Quinn, R. C.; West, S. J.; Young, S. M.; Clark, B. C.; Deflores, L. P.; Kapit, J. A.; Gospodinova, K.; Smith, P. H.; Team, T. P.

    2008-12-01

    One of several payload components on the Phoenix Lander, the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) is a suite of instruments that includes a microscopy station (optical and atomic force), four wet chemistry laboratories (WCL), and a soil probe. After the addition of up to 1 cm3 of martian soil into 25 ml of an aqueous calibration solution, the WCL measures solution cation and anion concentration, including pH, as well as total conductivity and cyclic voltammetry. With the exception of a redundant coulombic titration of halides, all cation and anion measurements are made with ion selective electrodes (ISE). Among the species not directly measured are sulfate and carbonate, which can be inferred indirectly by the response to acid and Ba additions, and soluble Fe, which can sometimes be detected with cyclic voltammetry. Responses from several cation and anion sensors were observed almost immediately upon addition of soil to the solution. Most striking was a three order-of-magnitude increase of the Hofmeister series sensor, which could only be explained by a large concentration of the perchlorate ion, ClO4-. Perchlorates are highly water soluble oxidants, often deliquescent, and some are powerful freezing-point depressors that can form aqueous brines at mean Martian temperatures appropriate to this region, as low as -70 deg C. This combination of properties has implications that span the disciplines of geochemistry, atmospheric sciences, astrobiology, and the potential for future human exploration. An important qualification of any such discussion, however, is uncertainty about how widespread the distribution of perchlorate may be. Other WCL findings, including alkaline pH and buffered response to purposeful addition of acid consistent with the presence of carbonates, will also be summarized.

  6. Reflectance spectra of hydrated sulfates, phosphates and perchlorates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, J. L.; Lane, M. D.; Dyar, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    Reflectance spectra of hydrated sulfates, phosphates, and perchlorates have multiple strong absorptions in the VNIR region. These bands are important for identification of hydrated salt minerals on Mars using CRISM and OMEGA data. Detecting specific minerals or mineral classes in this group provides constraints on the geochemical environments during their formation. Orbital detections of hydrated salt minerals by CRISM on Mars can support characterization of minerals on the surface by the MER and MSL rovers and the Phoenix lander. VNIR SPECTRAL CHARACTER OF HYDRATED SALTS Many spectral features are diagnostic of specific minerals, but others are common to all of these hydrated salts. Monohydrated sulfate spectra have strong bands near 2.1 and 2.4 μm, while polyhydrated sulfate spectra generally exhibit a band near 1.92-1.98 μm and a drop in reflectance near 2.4 μm. Phosphates appear to exhibit spectral properties similar to sulfates with features near 1.4-1.5 and 1.92-1.98 μm for hydrated samples. Several OH-bearing minerals exhibit features near 2.2 μm that could be confused with the band near 2.2 μm that is commonly attributed to Al/Si-OH bearing clays/silica on Mars. Perchlorate spectra have three dominant bands near 1.43-1.47, 1.93-2.0, and 2.41-2.44 μm depending on the type of cation present. Spectra are shown from 0.4-2.65 μm for selected sulfates (Figure 1) and phosphates/perchlorates (Figure 2) as this region is predominantly used by CRISM for identification of minerals. Figure 1. Spectra of selected hydrated sulfates: coquimbite, (Fe3+)2(SO4)3●9H2O, butlerite, Fe3+SO4(OH)●2H2O, rozenite, Fe2+SO4●4H2O, and szomolnokite, Fe2+SO4●H2O. Figure 2. Spectra of selected perchlorates and phosphates: wavellite, Al3(PO4)2(OH,F)3●5H2O, and baricite, (Mg,Fe2+)3(PO4)2●H2O.

  7. The dissolution of an anthracite coal with perchloric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Hood, G.E.; Hyatt, A.G.; McGowan, C.W.

    1996-10-01

    Lignite coal, bituminous coal and several oil shales have previously been dissolved using perchloric acid of varying boiling point and subsequent oxidizing ability. These organic deposits generally dissolved between 150 and 160{degrees}C. This indicated that the aliphatic ether oxygen bond was being broken during the dissolution process. This dissolution process was performed on an anthracite coal because of the coal`s low oxygen content. The anthracite coal dissolved between 180 and 190{degrees}C making it similar to high-vol bituminous coal from New Zealand. Earlier work has indicated that carbon-carbon double bonds are being attacked during the dissolution process at the higher temperatures.

  8. Perchlorate, thiocyanate, and nitrate in edible cole crops (Brassica sp.) produced in the lower Colorado River region.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, C A; Blount, B C; Valentin-Blasini, L; Krieger, R I

    2007-12-01

    The Colorado River is contaminated with low levels of perchlorate. Perchlorate has the potential to disrupt thyroid function by inhibiting the uptake of iodide. Brassica are rich sources of thiocyanate and nitrate, also inhibitors of iodide uptake. This study was conducted to estimate potential human exposure to perchlorate, thiocyanate, and nitrate from Brassica sp. irrigated with Colorado River water. Results indicate that Brassica sp. irrigated with Colorado River water do accumulate trace levels of perchlorate. However, the levels of perchlorate observed are low relative to the nitrate and thiocyanate naturally present in these species and low relative to the reference dose recommended by the NAS and the USEPA.

  9. Long-Range Transport of Perchlorate Observed in the Atmospheric Aerosols Collected at Okinawa Island, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handa, D.; Okada, K.; Kuroki, Y.; Nakama, Y.; Nakajima, H.; Arakaki, T.; Tanahara, A.; Oomori, T.; Miyagi, T.; Kadena, H.; Ishizaki, T.; Nakama, F.

    2007-12-01

    The study of perchlorate has become quite active in the U.S. in the last several years. Perchlorate has been recognized as a new environmental pollutant and it attracted much attention quickly in the world. The health concern about perchlorate stems from the fact that it displaces iodide in the thyroid gland, while iodine-containing thyroid hormones are essential for proper neural development from the fetal stage through the first years of life. In this study, we determined the concentrations of perchlorate ion present in the atmospheric aerosols collected in Okinawa Island, Japan. We then examined the relationships between the perchlorate concentrations and the environmental parameters and the climatic conditions peculiar to Okinawa. Bulk aerosol samples were collected on quartz filters by using a high volume air sampler at Cape Hedo Atmosphere and Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS). Each sampling duration was one week. The quartz filters with aerosols were stirred with Milli-Q pure water for three hours before perchlorate ion was extracted. The extracted perchlorate ion concentrations were determined by ion chromatography (ICS-2000, DIONEX). The mean perchlorate concentration for the samples collected at CHAAMS was 1.83 ng/m3, and the minimum was 0.18 ng/m3. The samples collected during November 21-27, 2005, January 23-30, 2006 and April 24-01, 2006 had highest perchlorate concentrations. For these three samples, we performed back trajectory analysis, and found that the air mass for the three samples arrived from the Asian continent. A relatively strong correlation (r2 = 0.55) was found between perchlorate and nss-sulfate concentrations for the CHAAMS samples. Furthermore, we analyzed perchlorate in the soils and the fertilizers used for sugar cane farming around the CHAAMS area. The Milli-Q extract of the soil and the fertilizers did not contain any detectable levels of perchlorate ions. Therefore, it was suggested that perchlorate found in the atmospheric

  10. The rapid adsorption-microbial reduction of perchlorate from aqueous solution by novel amine-crosslinked magnetic biopolymer resin.

    PubMed

    Song, Wen; Gao, Baoyu; Wang, Hailan; Xu, Xing; Xue, Moxi; Zha, Minchao; Gong, Bo

    2017-03-12

    The aim of this work was to study the adsorption characters of resin, microbial reduction of perchlorate and combined process of perchlorate removal in aqueous solution. Study demonstrated the adsorption equilibrium was achieved in 120min, which based on ion exchange reaction. Dissolved perchlorate (100mg/L) can be completely removed by acclimated anaerobic sludge in 15h, and the concentrated perchlorate (∼200mg/g) on the surface of resin would be effectively microbial reduced after 3days. Neutral environment (pH=7.4), higher biomass and additional electron donor can apparently improve the biological reduction efficiency of concentrated perchlorate. Addition of many co-anions showed the competition adsorption towards perchlorate, especially in the presence of NO3(-). This study provides an effective method for perchlorate reduction by the adsorption-microbial process.

  11. Exposure to perchlorate induces the formation of macrophage aggregates in the trunk kidney of zebrafish and mosquitofish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Capps, T.; Mukhi, S.; Rinchard, J.J.; Theodorakis, C.W.; Blazer, V.S.; Patino, R.

    2004-01-01

    Environmental contamination of ground and surface waters by perchlorate, derived from ammonium perchlorate (AP) and other perchlorate salts, is of increasing concern. Exposure to perchlorate can impair the thyroid endocrine system, which is thought to modulate renal and immune function in vertebrates. This study with zebrafish Danio rerio and eastern mosquitofish Gambusia holbrooki examined the histological effects of perchlorate on the trunk kidney, which in teleosts serves excretory and hemopoietic functions and therefore may be a target of perchlorate effects. Adult zebrafish of both sexes were exposed in the laboratory to waterborne, AP-derived perchlorate at measured concentrations of 18 mg/L for 8 weeks. Adult male mosquitofish were exposed to waterborne sodium perchlorate at measured perchlorate concentrations of 1-92 mg/L for 8 weeks. Control fish were kept in untreated water. The region of the body cavity containing the trunk kidney was processed from each fish for histological analysis. Macrophage aggregates (MAs), possible markers of contaminant exposure or immunotoxic effect, were present in the hemopoietic region of the kidney in both species exposed to perchlorate. The estimated percent area of kidney sections occupied by MAs was greater in zebrafish exposed to perchlorate at 18 mg/L (P < 0.05) than in controls. In male mosquitofish, the incidence of renal MAs increased proportionally with sodium perchlorate concentration and was significantly different from that of controls at 92 mg/L (P < 0.05). These observations confirm that in fish the kidney is affected by exposure to perchlorate. The concentrations of perchlorate at which the effects were noted are relatively high but within the range reported in some contaminated habitats.

  12. Diversity of bacteria, archaea and protozoa in a perchlorate treating bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Anupama, V N; Prajeesh, P V G; Anju, S; Priya, P; Krishnakumar, B

    2015-08-01

    A microbial consortium reducing high level of perchlorate was developed and in a fed batch bioreactor using acetate as substrate perchlorate was reduced at 0.25 g/g vss. day. Under stable performance, the microbial community structure of the reactor was analyzed through molecular and phenotypic methods. The diversity of bacteria and archaea were analyzed through whole cell Fluorescence In-Situ Hybridization (FISH) and PCR-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE), whereas higher trophic community was analyzed phenotypically. FISH analysis revealed the presence of alpha, beta, gamma and delta proteobacteria in the sludge, dominated by beta proteobacteria (68.7%). DGGE analysis of bacteria revealed the presence of a single known perchlorate reducing bacterium-Dechloromonas, nitrate reducers like Thaeura and Azoarcus and a number of other genera so far not reported as perchlorate or nitrate reducing. The archaea community was represented by an acetoclastic methanogen, Methanosaeta harundinacea. We have also observed the presence of an acetate consuming flagellate, Polytomella sp. in significant number in the reactor. Archaea and protozoa community in perchlorate treating bioreactor is reported first time in this study and point out further the significance of non perchlorate reducing but acetate scavenging microbial groups in acetate fed perchlorate treating reactors.

  13. A review of perchlorate (ClO4(-)) occurrence in fruits and vegetables.

    PubMed

    Calderón, R; Godoy, F; Escudey, M; Palma, P

    2017-02-01

    Since the 1990s, a large number of studies around the world have reported the presence of perchlorate in different types of environmental matrices. In view of their inherent characteristics, such as high solubility, mobility, persistence, and low affinity for the surface of soil, perchlorates are mobilized through the water-soil system and accumulate in edible plant species of high human consumption. However, the ingestion of food products containing perchlorate represents a potential health risk to people due to their adverse effects on thyroid, hormone, and neuronal development, mainly in infants and fetuses. At present, research has been centered on determining sources, fates, and remediation methods and not on its real extension in vegetables under farming conditions. This review presents a comprehensive overview and update of the frequent detection of perchlorate in fruits and vegetables produced and marketed around the world. Additionally, the impact of fertilizer on the potential addition of perchlorate to soil and its mobility in the water-soil-plant system is discussed. This review is organized into the following sections: sources of perchlorate, mobility in the water-soil system, presence in fruits and vegetables in different countries, international regulations, and toxicological studies. Finally, recommendations for future studies concerning perchlorate in fruits and vegetables are presented.

  14. Contribution of ammonium ions to the lethality and antimetamorphic effects of ammonium perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Goleman, Wanda L; Carr, James A

    2006-04-01

    Ammonium perchlorate (AP) is a widespread military waste product in the United States and is a potent thyroid function disruptor in all vertebrates tested thus far. To determine the relative contribution of ammonium ions to the toxicity of AP, we exposed embryonic and larval Xenopus laevis to various concentrations of sodium perchlorate (SP) or ammonium chloride (AC). Ammonium perchlorate was significantly more lethal than SP; 5-d LC50s were 83 and 2,780 mg/L, respectively. To determine whether ammonium ions contribute to the antithyroid effects of AP, we exposed embryonic and larval X. laevis to two sublethal, environmentally relevant concentrations of AP or identical concentrations of AC or SP. At the smaller concentration, only AP delayed metamorphosis and reduced hindlimb growth. Sodium perchlorate and AP, but not AC, prevented metamorphosis and reduced hindlimb growth at the greater concentration. Although AP was slightly more effective in reducing outward manifestations of thyroid disruption, both perchlorate salts, unlike AC, caused profound histopathologic changes in the thyroid. Exposure to the higher concentration of either perchlorate salt produced a feminizing effect, resulting in a skewed sex ratio. We conclude that ammonium ions contribute significantly to the toxicity of AP but not to the direct antithyroid effects of perchlorate.

  15. [Surveillance of perchlorate level in wine, seafood, polished rice, milk, powdered milk and yogurt].

    PubMed

    Takatsuki, Satoshi; Watanabe, Takahiro; Matsuda, Rieko

    2011-01-01

    Perchlorate, which may be naturally occurring or artificial in origin, inhibits iodide uptake into the thyroid gland and disturbs thyroid function. In order to investigate perchlorate contamination in foods in Japan, perchlorate levels in 28 wine samples, 20 seafood samples, 10 polished rice samples, 30 milk (include whole milk, composition modified milk, low fat milk, processed milk, milk drink) samples, 10 powdered milk samples and 10 yogurt samples were measured. Perchlorate was found in all wine, milk, powdered milk and yogurt samples tested. Perchlorate levels ranged from 0.2 ng/g to 103 ng/g in wine samples, from 2 ng/g to 11 ng/g in milk samples, from 3 ng/g to 35 ng/g in powdered milk samples, and from 2 ng/g to 11 ng/g in yogurt samples. Perchlorate levels in the seafood samples were under the LOQ (0.8 ng/g) in 8 samples and ranged from 0.8 ng/g to 72 ng/g in 12 samples. In all polished rice samples, perchlorate level was under the LOQ (1.0 ng/g).

  16. Nitrate and (per)chlorate reduction pathways in (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Oosterkamp, Margreet J; Mehboob, Farrakh; Schraa, Gosse; Plugge, Caroline M; Stams, Alfons J M

    2011-01-01

    The reduction of (per)chlorate and nitrate in (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria shows similarities and differences. (Per)chlorate reductase and nitrate reductase both belong to the type II DMSO family of enzymes and have a common bis(molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide)molybdenum cofactor. There are two types of dissimilatory nitrate reductases. With respect to their localization, (per)chlorate reductase is more similar to the dissimilatory periplasmic nitrate reductase. However, the periplasmic, unlike the membrane-bound, respiratory nitrate reductase, is not able to use chlorate. Structurally, (per)chlorate reductase is more similar to respiratory nitrate reductase, since these reductases have analogous subunits encoded by analogous genes. Both periplasmic (per)chlorate reductase and membrane-bound nitrate reductase activities are induced under anoxic conditions in the presence of (per)chlorate and nitrate respectively. During microbial (per)chlorate reduction, molecular oxygen is generated. This is not the case for nitrate reduction, although an atypical reaction in nitrite reduction linked to oxygen formation has been described recently. Microbial oxygen production during reduction of oxyanions may enhance biodegradation of pollutants under anoxic conditions.

  17. Stability of low levels of perchlorate in drinking water and natural water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stetson, S.J.; Wanty, R.B.; Helsel, D.R.; Kalkhoff, S.J.; Macalady, D.L.

    2006-01-01

    Perchlorate ion (ClO4-) is an environmental contaminant of growing concern due to its potential human health effects, impact on aquatic and land animals, and widespread occurrence throughout the United States. The determination of perchlorate cannot normally be carried out in the field. As such, water samples for perchlorate analysis are often shipped to a central laboratory, where they may be stored for a significant period before analysis. The stability of perchlorate ion in various types of commonly encountered water samples has not been generally examined-the effect of such storage is thus not known. In the present study, the long-term stability of perchlorate ion in deionized water, tap water, ground water, and surface water was examined. Sample sets containing approximately 1000, 100, 1.0, and 0.5 ??g l-1 perchlorate ion in deionized water and also in local tap water were formulated. These samples were analyzed by ion chromatography for perchlorate ion concentration against freshly prepared standards every 24 h for the first 7 days, biweekly for the next 4 weeks, and periodically after that for a total of 400 or 610 days for the two lowest concentrations and a total of 428 or 638 days for the high concentrations. Ground and surface water samples containing perchlorate were collected, held and analyzed for perchlorate concentration periodically over at least 360 days. All samples except for the surface water samples were found to be stable for the duration of the study, allowing for holding times of at least 300 days for ground water samples and at least 90 days for surface water samples. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of ammonium perchlorate on the reproductive performance and thyroid follicle histology of zebrafish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patino, R.; Wainscott, M.R.; Cruz-Li, E. I.; Balakrishnan, S.; McMurry, C.; Blazer, V.S.; Anderson, T.A.

    2003-01-01

    Adult zebrafish were reared up to eight weeks in control water or in water containing ammonium perchlorate (AP) at measured perchlorate concentrations of 18 (environmentally relevant, high) and 677 ppm. Groups of eight females were paired with four males on a weekly basis to assess AP effects on spawned egg volume, an index of reproductive performance. All treatments were applied to four to five spawning replicates. At 677 ppm, spawn volume was reduced within one week and became negligible after four weeks. At 18 ppm, spawn volume was unaffected even after eight weeks. Also, perchlorate at 18 ppm did not affect percentage egg fertilization. Fish were collected at the end of the exposures (677 ppm, four weeks; control and 18 ppm, eight weeks) for whole-body perchlorate content and thyroid histopathological analysis. Fish perchlorate levels were about one-hundredth of those of treatment water levels, indicating that waterborne perchlorate does not accumulate in whole fish. At 677 ppm for four weeks, perchlorate caused thyroid follicle cell (nuclear) hypertrophy and angiogenesis, whereas at 18 ppm for eight weeks, its effects were more pronounced and included hypertrophy, angiogenesis, hyperplasia, and colloid depletion. In conclusion, an eight-week exposure of adult zebrafish to 18 ppm perchlorate (high environmentally relevant concentrations) affected the histological condition of their thyroid follicles but not their reproductive performance. The effect of 677 ppm perchlorate on reproduction may be due to extrathyroidal toxicity. Further research is needed to determine if AP at lower environmentally relevant concentrations also affects the thyroid follicles of zebrafish.

  19. Kinetics of nitrate and perchlorate removal and biofilm stratification in an ion exchange membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Ricardo, Ana R; Carvalho, Gilda; Velizarov, Svetlozar; Crespo, João G; Reis, Maria A M

    2012-09-15

    The biological degradation of nitrate and perchlorate was investigated in an ion exchange membrane bioreactor (IEMB) using a mixed anoxic microbial culture and ethanol as the carbon source. In this process, a membrane-supported biofilm reduces nitrate and perchlorate delivered through an anion exchange membrane from a polluted water stream, containing 60 mg/L of NO₃⁻ and 100 μg/L of ClO₄⁻. Under ammonia limiting conditions, the perchlorate reduction rate decreased by 10%, whereas the nitrate reduction rate was unaffected. Though nitrate and perchlorate accumulated in the bioreactor, their concentrations in the treated water (2.8 ± 0.5 mg/L of NO₃⁻ and 7.0 ± 0.8 μg/L of ClO₄⁻, respectively) were always below the drinking water regulatory levels, due to Donnan dialysis control of the ionic transport in the system. Kinetic parameters determined for the mixed microbial culture in suspension showed that the nitrate reduction rate was 35 times higher than the maximum perchlorate reduction rate. It was found that perchlorate reduction was inhibited by nitrate, since after nitrate depletion perchlorate reduction rate increased by 77%. The biofilm developed in the IEMB was cryosectioned and the microbial population was analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The results obtained seem to indicate that the kinetic advantage of nitrate reduction favored accumulation of denitrifiers near the membrane, whereas per(chlorate) reducing bacteria were mainly positioned at the biofilm outer surface, contacting the biomedium. As a consequence of the biofilm stratification, the reduction of perchlorate and nitrate occur sequentially in space allowing for the removal of both ions in the IEMB.

  20. Genetic factors that might lead to different responses in individuals exposed to perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Scinicariello, Franco; Murray, H Edward; Smith, Lester; Wilbur, Sharon; Fowler, Bruce A

    2005-11-01

    Perchlorate has been detected in groundwater in many parts of the United States, and recent detection in vegetable and dairy food products indicates that contamination by perchlorate is more widespread than previously thought. Perchlorate is a competitive inhibitor of the sodium iodide symporter, the thyroid cell-surface protein responsible for transporting iodide from the plasma into the thyroid. An estimated 4.3% of the U.S. population is subclinically hypothyroid, and 6.9% of pregnant women may have low iodine intake. Congenital hypothyroidism affects 1 in 3,000 to 1 in 4,000 infants, and 15% of these cases have been attributed to genetic defects. Our objective in this review is to identify genetic biomarkers that would help define subpopulations sensitive to environmental perchlorate exposure. We review the literature to identify genetic defects involved in the iodination process of the thyroid hormone synthesis, particularly defects in iodide transport from circulation into the thyroid cell, defects in iodide transport from the thyroid cell to the follicular lumen (Pendred syndrome), and defects of iodide organification. Furthermore, we summarize relevant studies of perchlorate in humans. Because of perchlorate inhibition of iodide uptake, it is biologically plausible that chronic ingestion of perchlorate through contaminated sources may cause some degree of iodine discharge in populations that are genetically susceptible to defects in the iodination process of the thyroid hormone synthesis, thus deteriorating their conditions. We conclude that future studies linking human disease and environmental perchlorate exposure should consider the genetic makeup of the participants, actual perchlorate exposure levels, and individual iodine intake/excretion levels.

  1. Perchlorate Exposure Reduces Primordial Germ Cell Number in Female Threespine Stickleback

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Ann M.; Earp, Nathanial C.; Redmond, Mandy E.; Postlethwait, John H.; von Hippel, Frank A.; Buck, C. Loren; Cresko, William A.

    2016-01-01

    Perchlorate is a common aquatic contaminant that has long been known to affect thyroid function in vertebrates, including humans. More recently perchlorate has been shown to affect primordial sexual differentiation in the aquatic model fishes zebrafish and threespine stickleback, but the mechanism has been unclear. Stickleback exposed to perchlorate from fertilization have increased androgen levels in the embryo and disrupted reproductive morphologies as adults, suggesting that perchlorate could disrupt the earliest stages of primordial sexual differentiation when primordial germ cells (PGCs) begin to form the gonad. Female stickleback have three to four times the number of PGCs as males during the first weeks of development. We hypothesized that perchlorate exposure affects primordial sexual differentiation by reducing the number of germ cells in the gonad during an important window of stickleback sex determination at 14–18 days post fertilization (dpf). We tested this hypothesis by quantifying the number of PGCs at 16 dpf in control and 100 mg/L perchlorate-treated male and female stickleback. Perchlorate exposure from the time of fertilization resulted in significantly reduced PGC number only in genotypic females, suggesting that the masculinizing effects of perchlorate observed in adult stickleback may result from early changes to the number of PGCs at a time critical for sex determination. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of a connection between an endocrine disruptor and reduction in PGC number prior to the first meiosis during sex determination. These findings suggest that a mode of action of perchlorate on adult reproductive phenotypes in vertebrates, including humans, such as altered fecundity and sex reversal or intersex gonads, may stem from early changes to germ cell development. PMID:27383240

  2. Genetic Factors That Might Lead to Different Responses in Individuals Exposed to Perchlorate

    PubMed Central

    Scinicariello, Franco; Murray, H. Edward; Smith, Lester; Wilbur, Sharon; Fowler, Bruce A.

    2005-01-01

    Perchlorate has been detected in groundwater in many parts of the United States, and recent detection in vegetable and dairy food products indicates that contamination by perchlorate is more widespread than previously thought. Perchlorate is a competitive inhibitor of the sodium iodide symporter, the thyroid cell–surface protein responsible for transporting iodide from the plasma into the thyroid. An estimated 4.3% of the U.S. population is subclinically hypothyroid, and 6.9% of pregnant women may have low iodine intake. Congenital hypothyroidism affects 1 in 3,000 to 1 in 4,000 infants, and 15% of these cases have been attributed to genetic defects. Our objective in this review is to identify genetic biomarkers that would help define subpopulations sensitive to environmental perchlorate exposure. We review the literature to identify genetic defects involved in the iodination process of the thyroid hormone synthesis, particularly defects in iodide transport from circulation into the thyroid cell, defects in iodide transport from the thyroid cell to the follicular lumen (Pendred syndrome), and defects of iodide organification. Furthermore, we summarize relevant studies of perchlorate in humans. Because of perchlorate inhibition of iodide uptake, it is biologically plausible that chronic ingestion of perchlorate through contaminated sources may cause some degree of iodine discharge in populations that are genetically susceptible to defects in the iodination process of the thyroid hormone synthesis, thus deteriorating their conditions. We conclude that future studies linking human disease and environmental perchlorate exposure should consider the genetic makeup of the participants, actual perchlorate exposure levels, and individual iodine intake/excretion levels. PMID:16263499

  3. Reactions of atomic oxygen with the chlorate ion and the perchlorate ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anan'ev, Vladimir; Miklin, Mikhail; Kriger, Ludmila

    2014-06-01

    The reactions of the chlorate ion with atomic oxygen formed under photolysis of the nitrate ion introduced to potassium chlorate crystal by co-crystallization were studied by optical and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The perchlorate ion was found to form in solids as product of addition reaction of singlet atomic oxygen, formed under dissociation of the peroxynitrite ion - the product of isomerization of the excited nitrate ion. Triplet atomic oxygen does not react with the chlorate ion. The atomic oxygen formed under photolysis of the nitrate ion introduced to potassium perchlorate crystal by co-crystallization does not react with the perchlorate ion.

  4. Perchlorate on Mars: a chemical hazard and a resource for humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davila, Alfonso F.; Willson, David; Coates, John D.; McKay, Christopher P.

    2013-10-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4 -) is widespread in Martian soils at concentrations between 0.5 and 1%. At such concentrations, perchlorate could be an important source of oxygen, but it could also become a critical chemical hazard to astronauts. In this paper, we review the dual implications of ClO4 - on Mars, and propose a biochemical approach for removal of perchlorate from Martian soil that would be energetically cheap, environmentally friendly and could be used to obtain oxygen both for human consumption and to fuel surface operations.

  5. Perchlorate disrupts embryonic androgen synthesis and reproductive development in threespine stickleback without changing whole-body levels of thyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Ann M; Dillon, Danielle; Bernhardt, Richard R; Torunsky, Roberta; Postlethwait, John H; von Hippel, Frank A; Loren Buck, C; Cresko, William A

    2015-01-01

    Perchlorate, an environmental contaminant, disrupts normal functioning of the thyroid. We previously showed that perchlorate disrupts behavior and gonad development, and induces external morphological changes in a vertebrate model organism, the threespine stickleback. Whether perchlorate alters these phenotypes via a thyroid-mediated mechanism, and the extent to which the effects depend on dose, are unknown. To address these questions, we chronically exposed stickleback to control conditions and to three concentrations of perchlorate (10, 30 and 100ppm) at various developmental stages from fertilization to reproductive maturity. Adults chronically exposed to perchlorate had increased numbers of thyroid follicles and decreased numbers of thyrocytes. Surprisingly, T4 and T3 levels in larval, juvenile, and adult whole fish chronically exposed to perchlorate did not differ from controls, except at the lowest perchlorate dose, suggesting a non-monotonic dose response curve. We found no detectable abnormalities in external phenotype at any dose of perchlorate, indicating that the increased number of thyroid follicles compensated for the disruptive effects of these doses. In contrast to external morphology, gonadal development was altered substantially, with the highest dose of perchlorate causing the largest effects. Perchlorate increased the number both of early stage ovarian follicles in females and of advanced spermatogenic stages in males. Perchlorate also disrupted embryonic androgen levels. We conclude that chronic perchlorate exposure may not result in lasting adult gross morphological changes but can produce lasting modifications to gonads when compensation of T3 and T4 levels occurs by thyroid follicle hyperplasia. Perchlorate may therefore affect vertebrate development via both thyroidal and non-thyroidal mechanisms.

  6. Development of drinking water standards for perchlorate in the United States.

    PubMed

    Kucharzyk, Katarzyna H; Crawford, Ronald L; Cosens, Barbara; Hess, Thomas F

    2009-01-01

    Perchlorate, an anion that originates as a contaminant in ground and surface waters, is both naturally occurring and manmade. Because of its toxicity, there has been increased interest in setting drinking water safety standards and in health effects when perchlorate is present at low (parts per billion (ppb)) levels. In January 2009, the EPA issued a heath advisory to assist state and local officials in addressing local contamination of perchlorate in drinking water. The interim health advisory level of 15 micrograms per liter (microg/L), or ppb, is based on the reference dose recommended by the National Research Council (NRC) of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). This paper describes scope and extent of contaminant issues and a legal process of setting standards for perchlorate concentration in drinking water in the United States of America.

  7. Multi-Objective Optimization of an In situ Bioremediation Technology to Treat Perchlorate-Contaminated Groundwater

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation shows how a multi-objective optimization method is integrated into a transport simulator (MT3D) for estimating parameters and cost of in-situ bioremediation technology to treat perchlorate-contaminated groundwater.

  8. POLISHING THE EFFLUENT FROM AN ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL PERCHLORATE TREATMENT PROCESS - SLIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anaerobic biological processes effectively reduce perchlorate to chloride. However, the effluent can be biologically unstable, high in particulates and high in disinfection by-product precursor compounds. Such an effluent would be unsuitable for transmission into a drinking water...

  9. Influence of magnesium perchlorate on the pyrolysis of organic compounds in Mars analogue soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steininger, H.; Goesmann, F.; Goetz, W.

    2012-10-01

    The Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) onboard the ExoMars-2018 rover shall apply thermal volatilization (TV), gas chromatography (GC) and mass spectrometry (MS) in order to search for organic compounds in the Martian soil. Here we describe a series of TV-GC-MS experiments on powdered basalt containing known organic compounds (benzoic acid or mellitic acid) at different concentrations (500 and 0.5 ppm). With reference to the discovery of perchlorate in Martian soils by the Phoenix Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) all pyrolysis experiments were performed both in presence of 0.6 wt% magnesium perchlorate and in absence of perchlorate. We find that benzoic acid (BA) is detectable at both concentrations, while mellitic acid (MA) is only detectable at high concentration (500 ppm). In both cases perchlorate strongly affects type and number of organic fragments generated during pyrolysis.

  10. Perchlorate: Health Effects and Technologies for Its Removal from Water Resources

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Asha; Viraraghavan, Thiruvenkatachari

    2009-01-01

    Perchlorate has been found in drinking water and surface waters in the United States and Canada. It is primarily associated with release from defense and military operations. Natural sources include certain fertilizers and potash ores. Although it is a strong oxidant, perchlorate is very persistent in the environment. At high concentrations perchlorate can affect the thyroid gland by inhibiting the uptake of iodine. A maximum contaminant level has not been set, while a guidance value of 6 ppb has been suggested by Health Canada. Perchlorate is measured in environmental samples primarily by ion chromatography. It can be removed from water by anion exchange or membrane filtration. Biological and chemical processes are also effective in removing this species from water. PMID:19440526

  11. Validation of a Novel Bioassay for Low-level Perchlorate Determination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    PD percent difference PI principal investigator PMS phenazine methosulfate PMSH reduced phenazine methosulfate PR plate reader QA...based on coupling perchlorate reduction to NADH oxidation using phenazine methosulfate (PMS) as an electron shuttle to transfer electrons from NADH

  12. ANALYSIS OF HYDROPONIC FERTILIZER MATRIXES FOR PERCHLORATE: COMPARISON OF ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seven retail hydroponic nitrate fertilizer products, two liquid and five solid, were comparatively analyzed for the perchlorate anion (ClO4-) by ion chromatography (IC) with suppressed conductivity detection, complexation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (cESI-MS), norma...

  13. Perchlorate Selectivity of Anion Exchange Resins as Evaluated Using Ion-Selective Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kenji; Mitsuda, Shin'ya; Ohtake, Naomi; Murashige, Natsuki; Ohmuro, Satoshi; Yuchi, Akio

    2017-01-01

    The selectivity coefficients reported for perchlorate of the high selectivity on anion exchange resins (AXRs) have not been consistent with one another. Possible errors by the unique use of four parameters (concentrations of two anions in two phases) were experimentally verified. The concentrations of perchlorate buffered at low levels (10(-6) - 10(-4) mol L(-1)) by two forms of AXRs were successfully determined by potentiometry with a perchlorate ion-selective electrode. This gave reasonable coefficients. The coefficients for perchlorate on several AXRs were independent of the relative exchange (RE), in contrast to the previous reports. On the other hand, the coefficients for fluoride of the low selectivity that were examined for comparison decreased with an increase in RE, and the dependency was more remarkable for the resins of large exchange capacity.

  14. (Ferrocenylmeth­yl)trimethyl­ammonium perchlorate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying-Chun

    2012-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title complex, [Fe(C5H5)(C9H15N)]ClO4, contains one discrete (ferrocenylmeth­yl)trimethyl­ammonium cation and one perchlorate anion. The anion is disordered over two sets of sites, with refined occupancies of 0.776 (8) and 0.224 (8). The distances from the Fe atom to the centroids of the unsubstituted and substituted cyclo­penta­dienyl (Cp) rings are 1.650 (1) and 1.640 (1) Å, respectively. The Cp rings form a dihedral angle of 2.66 (3)°. PMID:22346865

  15. Thyroid Hormones and Moderate Exposure to Perchlorate during Pregnancy in Women in Southern California

    PubMed Central

    Steinmaus, Craig; Pearl, Michelle; Kharrazi, Martin; Blount, Benjamin C.; Miller, Mark D.; Pearce, Elizabeth N.; Valentin-Blasini, Liza; DeLorenze, Gerald; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.; Liaw, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Background: Findings from national surveys suggest that everyone in the United States is exposed to perchlorate. At high doses, perchlorate, thiocyanate, and nitrate inhibit iodide uptake into the thyroid and decrease thyroid hormone production. Small changes in thyroid hormones during pregnancy, including changes within normal reference ranges, have been linked to cognitive function declines in the offspring. Objectives: We evaluated the potential effects of low environmental exposures to perchlorate on thyroid function. Methods: Serum thyroid hormones and anti-thyroid antibodies and urinary perchlorate, thiocyanate, nitrate, and iodide concentrations were measured in 1,880 pregnant women from San Diego County, California, during 2000–2003, a period when much of the area’s water supply was contaminated from an industrial plant with perchlorate at levels near the 2007 California regulatory standard of 6 μg/L. Linear regression was used to evaluate associations between urinary perchlorate and serum thyroid hormone concentrations in models adjusted for urinary creatinine and thiocyanate, maternal age and education, ethnicity, and gestational age at serum collection. Results: The median urinary perchlorate concentration was 6.5 μg/L, about two times higher than in the general U.S. population. Adjusted associations were identified between increasing log10 perchlorate and decreasing total thyroxine (T4) [regression coefficient (β) = –0.70; 95% CI: –1.06, –0.34], decreasing free thyroxine (fT4) (β = –0.053; 95% CI: –0.092, –0.013), and increasing log10 thyroid-stimulating hormone (β = 0.071; 95% CI: 0.008, 0.133). Conclusions: These results suggest that environmental perchlorate exposures may affect thyroid hormone production during pregnancy. This could have implications for public health given widespread perchlorate exposure and the importance of thyroid hormone in fetal neurodevelopment. Citation: Steinmaus C, Pearl M, Kharrazi M, Blount BC

  16. Deliquescence of calcium perchlorate: A route to liquid water on Mars and other possibly habitable planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolbert, M.; Nuding, D.; Gough, R. V.

    2013-05-01

    The Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) aboard the Phoenix Mars Lander identified the presence of 0.5% perchlorate (ClO4-). Reanalysis of the Viking gas chromatography-mass spectrometry results also suggests perchlorate was present in the soil and the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover has potentially found perchlorate as well. Perchlorate salts are known to readily absorb water vapor from the atmosphere and deliquesce into an aqueous solution. We have previously performed laboratory studies to better understand the deliquescence (crystalline solid to aqueous salt) and also efflorescence (aqueous salt to crystalline solid) of several perchlorate salts at low temperatures. We found that NaClO4 and Mg(ClO4)2 are highly deliquescent, forming aqueous solutions at humidity values as low as 40% RH and at temperatures as low as 223 K. We also observed a significant hysteresis that occurs during efflorescence of these salt solutions, expected due to the kinetic inhibition of crystal nucleation. The efflorescence relative humidity values of sodium and magnesium perchlorate solutions are 13% RH and 19% RH, respectively, indicating that perchlorate salts could exist as stable or metastable aqueous solutions over a wide range of Martian RH and temperature conditions. Although the low temperature deliquescence of several perchlorate salts is now well characterized, instruments onboard Phoenix and MSL have identified calcium perchlorate (Ca(ClO4)2) as the likely parent salt. Calcium perchlorate is known for its highly deliquescent properties and low eutectic point; however, the deliquescence and efflorescence of this salt have not yet been quantified as a function of temperature. We have used Raman microscopy to examine the deliquescence and efflorescence of Ca(ClO4)2 under relevant Martian temperatures. A extremely low DRH of ~1% for the anhydrous Ca(ClO4)2 at 273 K was observed, which could allow for formation of aqueous solutions under very low RH environmental conditions

  17. Evaluation of an Innovative Technology for Treatment of Water Contaminated with Perchlorate and Organic Compounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-26

    2004). Exposure to perchlorate can result in negative health effects including hypothyroidism and various other thyroid disorders (NRC, 2005). Ion...that is being evaluated to determine if it can more cost effectively remove perchlorate than conventional technologies. A question that has been...technology (e.g., ease of implementation) it appears the T-GAC/GAC technology has the potential to cost effectively treat water contaminated by

  18. Perchlorate Destruction and Potable Water Production Using Membrane Biofilm Reduction and Membrane Filtration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-18

    58 Figure 5.14 Optimization Perchlorate and Influent Flow (a) and Recycle Flow (b) .................... 59 Figure 5.15 Optimization...Total Nitrogen and Influent Flow (a) and Recycle Flow (b) ............... 60 Figure 5.16 Effect of Influent Flow Rate on Perchlorate Removal...Figure 5.18 MBfR1 Batch Test with Varying Recycle Ratios ..................................................... 63 Figure 5.19 MBfR2 Batch Test with

  19. 1-Benzyl-piperazine-1,4-diium bis-(perchlorate) monohydrate.

    PubMed

    Kaabi, Kamel; El Glaoui, Meher; Jeanneau, Erwann; Rzaigui, Mohamed; Ben Nasr, Cherif

    2010-06-23

    In the title compound, C(11)H(18)N(2) (2+)·2ClO(4) (-)·H(2)O, one perchlor-ate anion is disordered over two orientations in a 0.66 (3):0.34 (3) ratio. Inter-molecular O-H⋯O, N-H⋯O and C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the cations, anions and water mol-ecules into ribbons extending along [100].

  20. Effects of Ammonium Perchlorate on Thyroid Function in Developing Fathead Minnows, Pimephales promelas

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Helen M.; Pickford, Daniel B.; Hutchinson, Thomas H.; Brown, J. Anne

    2005-01-01

    Perchlorate is a known environmental contaminant, largely due to widespread military use as a propellant. Perchlorate acts pharmacologically as a competitive inhibitor of thyroidal iodide uptake in mammals, but the impacts of perchlorate contamination in aquatic ecosystems and, in particular, the effects on fish are unclear. Our studies aimed to investigate the effects of concentrations of ammonium perchlorate that can occur in the environment (1, 10, and 100 mg/L) on the development of fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas. For these studies, exposures started with embryos of < 24-hr postfertilization and were terminated after 28 days. Serial sectioning of thyroid follicles showed thyroid hyperplasia with increased follicular epithelial cell height and reduced colloid in all groups of fish that had been exposed to perchlorate for 28 days, compared with control fish. Whole-body thyroxine (T4) content (a measure of total circulating T4) in fish exposed to 100 mg/L perchlorate was elevated compared with the T4 content of control fish, but 3,5,3′-triiodothyronine (T3) content was not significantly affected in any exposure group. Despite the apparent regulation of T3, after 28 days of exposure to ammonium perchlorate, fish exposed to the two higher levels (10 and 100 mg/L) were developmentally retarded, with a lack of scales and poor pigmentation, and significantly lower wet weight and standard length than were control fish. Our study indicates that environmental levels of ammonium perchlorate affect thyroid function in fish and that in the early life stages these effects may be associated with developmental retardation. PMID:15811828

  1. The Relationship between Perchlorate in Drinking Water and Cord Blood Thyroid Hormones: First Experience from Iran

    PubMed Central

    Javidi, Ashraf; Rafiei, Nasim; Amin, Mohammad Mehdi; Hovsepian, Silva; Hashemipour, Mahin; Kelishadi, Roya; Taghian, Zahra; Mofateh, Samaneh; Poursafa, Parinaz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Considering the controversial information regarding the effects of perchlorate on thyroid function of high risk population as neonates, and given the high prevalence rate of thyroid disorders specially congenital hypothyroidism in our region, this study aims to investigate for the first time in Iran, the relationship between drinking groundwater perchlorate and cord blood thyroid hormones level in an industrial region. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, drinking groundwater perchlorate level of rural areas of Zarinshahr, Isfahan was measured. Simultaneously, cord blood level of thyroid hormones of neonates born in the studied region was measured. Thyroid function test of neonates in regions with low and high perchlorate level were compared. Results: In this study, 25 tap water samples were obtained for perchlorate measurement. Level of cord blood thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), T4 and T3 of 25 neonates were measured. Mean (standard deviation) of perchlorate, TSH, T4 and T3 was 3.59 (5.10) μg/l, 7.81 (4.14) mIU/m, 6.06 (0.85) mg/dl, and 63.46 (17.53) mg/dl, respectively. Mean levels of thyroid function tests were not different in low (<5 μg/l) and high level of drinking ground water perchlorate (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Perchlorate did not appear to be related to thyroid function of neonates in the studied industrial region. It seems that iodine status of the regions, as well as other environmental contaminants and genetic background, could impact on its relation with thyroid function of neonates. PMID:25789149

  2. Nitrate and Perchlorate Destruction and Potable Water Production Using Membrane Biofilm Reduction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    membranes pressurized with hydrogen gas (H2). Hydrogen is fed to the lumen of hollow-fiber gas -transfer membranes, and bacteria grow naturally as a...be generated from natural processes, the majority of occurrence in the United States (U.S.) is from anthropogenic sources. Perchlorate is a human... gas to promote autotrophic bioreduction of perchlorate to chloride ion and nitrate to nitrogen gas . Hydrogen is fed to the lumen of hollow-fiber gas

  3. Removal of Perchlorate from Water and Wastewater by Catalytic Hydrogen Gas Membrane Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    the indirect electrochemical Ti-TiO2 methods under ambient and slightly above ambient conditions. Weak adsorption of perchlorate onto the metal...observed for a period of less than 8 hours under various ambient conditions. In light of the difficulty in perchlorate reduction, it was agreed that...to chloride under ambient conditions for the treatment of either surface water or groundwater, with the exception of the two methods developed in

  4. Perchlorate in dust fall and indoor dust in Malta: An effect of fireworks.

    PubMed

    Vella, Alfred J; Chircop, Cynthia; Micallef, Tamara; Pace, Colette

    2015-07-15

    We report on the presence of perchlorate in the settleable dust of Malta, a small central Mediterranean island. Both dust fall collected directly as it precipitated from atmosphere over a period of one month and deposited indoor dust from domestic residences were studied. Perchlorate was determined by ion chromatography of water extracts of the collected dusts. Dust fall was collected from 43 towns during 2011 to 2013 and indoor dust was sampled from homes in the same localities. Perchlorate was detected in 108 of 153 samples of dust fall (71%) and in 28 of 37 indoor dust samples (76%). Detectable perchlorate in dust fall ranged from 0.52μgg(-1) to 561μgg(-1) with a median value of 6.2μgg(-1); in indoor dust, levels were from 0.79μgg(-1) to 53μgg(-1) with a median value of 7.8μgg(-1), the highest recorded anywhere to date. Statistical analysis suggested that there was no significant difference in perchlorate content of indoor dust and dust fall. Perchlorate levels in dust fall escalate during the summer in response to numerous religious feasts celebrated with fireworks and perchlorate persists at low μgg(-1) concentrations for several months beyond the summer festive period. In Malta, perchlorate derives exclusively from KClO4, imported for fireworks manufacture. Its residue in dust presents an exposure risk to the population, especially via ingestion by hand to mouth transfer. Our results suggest that wherever intensive burning of fireworks takes place, the environmental impact may be much longer lived than realised, mainly due to re-suspension and deposition of contaminated settled dust in the urban environment.

  5. Autotrophic perchlorate reduction kinetics of a microbial consortium using elemental sulfur as an electron donor.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mengchun; Wang, Sen; Jin, Chunji; She, Zonglian; Zhao, Congcong; Zhao, Yangguo; Zhang, Jian; Ren, Yun

    2015-07-01

    The perchlorate reduction kinetic parameters of a microbial consortium using elemental sulfur (S(0)) as an electron donor were investigated in batch experiments. Standard Monod substrate utilization and biomass accumulation models were employed to fit the experimental data for microbial perchlorate reduction. The maximum observed yield coefficient for the microbial consortium was 0.19 mg dry weight (DW) mg(-1) ClO4 (-), suggesting that the microbial consortium had a slow growth rate using S(0) as the electron donor. The maximum specific substrate utilization rate (q max) and half saturation constant (K s) for microbial perchlorate reduction were 0.14 mg ClO4 (-) mg(-1) DW day(-1) and 5.71 mg L(-1), respectively, which indicated that the microbial consortium could effectively utilize perchlorate as an electron acceptor. The variation of q max with pH was described well by using a Gaussian peak equation, and the maximal value of q max was obtained at pH 6.7. The presence of nitrate in perchlorate-contaminated water delayed the onset of sulfur autotrophic perchlorate reduction. The modified Gompertz equation could adequately describe the formation of Cl(-) and SO4(2-) during the process of sulfur autotrophic perchlorate reduction. The SO4(2-) production exceeded the theoretical SO4(2-) production due to S(0) disproportionation. The kinetic parameters for microbial perchlorate reduction are essential to design biological treatment systems, as well as to predict and evaluate their performance.

  6. Oral (drinking water) developmental toxicity study of ammonium perchlorate in New Zealand White rabbits.

    PubMed

    York, R G; Brown, W R; Girard, M F; Dollarhide, J S

    2001-01-01

    This developmental toxicity study was conducted to evaluate the embryo-fetal toxicity and teratogenic potential of ammonium perchlorate in New Zealand White [Hra:(NZW)SPF] rabbits. Pregnant rabbits were given continual access to ammonium perchlorate in drinking water at target doses of 0, 0.1, 1.0, 10.0, 30.0, and 100.0 mg/kg-day on gestation days 6 through 28. The actual consumed doses in the study were 0, 0.1, 0.9, 10.4, 30.3, and 102.3 mg/kg-day. The rabbits were sacrificed on gestation day 29, and fetuses were examined for developmental alterations. In addition, blood was collected from does for determination of serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), triiodothyronine (T3), and thyroxine (T4) levels and the thyroid was subjected to histopathologic examination. No maternal deaths were attributed to perchlorate exposure. Ammonium perchlorate as high as 100.0 mg/kg-day did not affect caesarean sectioning or litter parameters studied, and all values were found to be within the historical ranges of the laboratory. The litter averages for corpora lutea, implantations, litter sizes, live and dead fetuses, percent dead or resorbed conceptuses, and fetal body weights were comparable and also did not differ significantly in the six dose groups. All placentae appeared normal and no dam had a litter consisting of only resorbed conceptuses. The maternal thyroid was the target organ for ammonium perchlorate in this study. Increased incidence of thyroid follicular hypertrophy was observed in does treated with > or =10 mg/kg-day perchlorate and significantly decreased T4 was observed in does treated with > or =30 mg/kg-day. Based on these data, the maternal no-observable-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for ammonium perchlorate was 1.0 mg/kg-day. The developmental NOAEL for ammonium perchlorate was found to be 100.0 mg/kg-day for rabbits.

  7. Rapid analysis of perchlorate in drinking water at parts per billion levels using microchip electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Gertsch, Jana C; Noblitt, Scott D; Cropek, Donald M; Henry, Charles S

    2010-05-01

    A microchip capillary electrophoresis (MCE) system has been developed for the determination of perchlorate in drinking water. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) recently proposed a health advisory limit for perchlorate in drinking water of 15 parts per billion (ppb), a level requiring large, sophisticated instrumentation, such as ion chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (IC-MS), for detection. An inexpensive, portable system is desired for routine online monitoring applications of perchlorate in drinking water. Here, we present an MCE method using contact conductivity detection for perchlorate determination. The method has several advantages, including reduced analysis times relative to IC, inherent portability, high selectivity, and minimal sample pretreatment. Resolution of perchlorate from more abundant ions was achieved using zwitterionic, sulfobetaine surfactants, N-hexadecyl-N,N-dimethyl-3-ammonio-1-propane sulfonate (HDAPS) and N-tetradecyl-N,N-dimethyl-3-ammonio-1-propane sulfonate (TDAPS). The system performance and the optimization of the separation chemistry, including the use of these surfactants to resolve perchlorate from other anions, are discussed in this work. The system is capable of detection limits of 3.4 +/- 1.8 ppb (n = 6) in standards and 5.6 +/- 1.7 ppb (n = 6) in drinking water.

  8. Anaerobic treatment of army ammunition production wastewater containing perchlorate and RDX.

    PubMed

    Atikovic, Emina; Suidan, Makram T; Maloney, Stephen W

    2008-08-01

    Perchlorate is an oxidizer that has been routinely used in solid rocket motors by the Department of Defense and National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Royal Demolition Explosive (RDX) is a major component of military high explosives and is used in a wide variety of munitions. Perchlorate bearing wastewater typically results from production of solid rocket motors, while RDX is transferred to Army industrial wastewaters during load, assemble and pack operations for new munitions, and hot water or steam washout for disposal and deactivation of old munitions (commonly referred to as demilitarization, or simply demil). Biological degradation in Anaerobic Fluidized Bed Reactors (AFBR), has been shown to be an effective method for the removal of both perchlorate and RDX in contaminated wastewater. The focus of this study was to determine the effectiveness of removal of perchlorate and RDX, individually and when co-mingled, using ethanol as an electron donor under steady state conditions. Three AFBRs were used to assess the effectiveness of this process in treating the wastewater. The performance of the bioreactors was monitored relative to perchlorate, RDX, and chemical oxygen demand removal effectiveness. The experimental results demonstrated that the biodegradation of perchlorate and RDX was more effective in bioreactors receiving the single contaminant than in the bioreactor where both contaminants were fed.

  9. Perchlorate reduction by hydrogen autotrophic bacteria and microbial community analysis using high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wan, Dongjin; Liu, Yongde; Niu, Zhenhua; Xiao, Shuhu; Li, Daorong

    2016-02-01

    Hydrogen autotrophic reduction of perchlorate have advantages of high removal efficiency and harmless to drinking water. But so far the reported information about the microbial community structure was comparatively limited, changes in the biodiversity and the dominant bacteria during acclimation process required detailed study. In this study, perchlorate-reducing hydrogen autotrophic bacteria were acclimated by hydrogen aeration from activated sludge. For the first time, high-throughput sequencing was applied to analyze changes in biodiversity and the dominant bacteria during acclimation process. The Michaelis-Menten model described the perchlorate reduction kinetics well. Model parameters q(max) and K(s) were 2.521-3.245 (mg ClO4(-)/gVSS h) and 5.44-8.23 (mg/l), respectively. Microbial perchlorate reduction occurred across at pH range 5.0-11.0; removal was highest at pH 9.0. The enriched mixed bacteria could use perchlorate, nitrate and sulfate as electron accepter, and the sequence of preference was: NO3(-) > ClO4(-) > SO4(2-). Compared to the feed culture, biodiversity decreased greatly during acclimation process, the microbial community structure gradually stabilized after 9 acclimation cycles. The Thauera genus related to Rhodocyclales was the dominated perchlorate reducing bacteria (PRB) in the mixed culture.

  10. Mechanistic Studies on the Radiolytic Decomposition of Perchlorates on the Martian Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Andrew M.; Abplanalp, Matthew J.; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2016-04-01

    Perchlorates—inorganic compounds carrying the perchlorate ion ({{ClO}}4{}-)—were discovered at the north polar landing site of the Phoenix spacecraft and at the southern equatorial landing site of the Curiosity Rover within the Martian soil at levels of 0.4-0.6 wt%. This study explores in laboratory experiments the temperature-dependent decomposition mechanisms of hydrated perchlorates—namely magnesium perchlorate hexahydrate (Mg(ClO4)2·6H2O)—and provides yields of the oxygen-bearing species formed in these processes at Mars-relevant surface temperatures from 165 to 310 K in the presence of galactic cosmic-ray particles (GCRs). Our experiments reveal that the response of the perchlorates to the energetic electrons is dictated by the destruction of the perchlorate ion ({{ClO}}4{}-) and the inherent formation of chlorates ({{ClO}}3{}-) plus atomic oxygen (O). Isotopic substitution experiments reveal that the oxygen is released solely from the perchlorate ion and not from the water of hydration (H2O). As the mass spectrometer detects only molecular oxygen (O2) and no atomic oxygen (O), atomic oxygen recombines to molecular oxygen within the perchlorates, with the overall yield of molecular oxygen increasing as the temperature drops from 260 to 160 K. Absolute destruction rates and formation yields of oxygen are provided for the planetary modeling community.

  11. Perchlorate formation on Mars through surface radiolysis-initiated atmospheric chemistry: A potential mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Eric H; Atreya, Sushil K; Kaiser, Ralf I; Mahaffy, Paul R

    2016-08-01

    Recent observations of the Martian surface by the Phoenix lander and the Sample Analysis at Mars indicate the presence of perchlorate (ClO4(-)). The abundance and isotopic composition of these perchlorates suggest that the mechanisms responsible for their formation in the Martian environment may be unique in our solar system. With this in mind, we propose a potential mechanism for the production of Martian perchlorate: the radiolysis of the Martian surface by galactic cosmic rays, followed by the sublimation of chlorine oxides into the atmosphere and their subsequent synthesis to form perchloric acid (HClO4) in the atmosphere, and the surface deposition and subsequent mineralization of HClO4 in the regolith to form surface perchlorates. To evaluate the viability of this mechanism, we employ a one-dimensional chemical model, examining chlorine chemistry in the context of Martian atmospheric chemistry. Considering the chlorine oxide, OClO, we find that an OClO flux as low as 3.2 × 10(7) molecules cm(-2) s(-1) sublimated into the atmosphere from the surface could produce sufficient HClO4 to explain the perchlorate concentration on Mars, assuming an accumulation depth of 30 cm and integrated over the Amazonian period. Radiolysis provides an efficient pathway for the oxidation of chlorine, bypassing the efficient Cl/HCl recycling mechanism that characterizes HClO4 formation mechanisms proposed for the Earth but not Mars.

  12. Perchlorate contamination of groundwater from fireworks manufacturing area in South India.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Tomohiko; Ogawa, Shohei P; Sugimoto, Rina; Ramu, Karri; Sudaryanto, Agus; Malarvannan, Govindan; Devanathan, Gnanasekaran; Ramaswamy, Babu Rajendran; Munuswamy, Natesan; Ganesh, Deavaraj Sankar; Sivakumar, Jeyaraj; Sethuraman, A; Parthasarathy, V; Subramanian, Annamalai; Field, Jennifer; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2013-07-01

    Perchlorate contamination was investigated in groundwater and surface water from Sivakasi and Madurai in the Tamil Nadu State of South India. Sensitive determination of perchlorate (LOQ = 0.005 μg/L) was achieved by large-volume (500 μL) injection ion chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Concentrations of perchlorate were <0.005-7,690 μg/L in groundwater (n = 60), <0.005-30.2 μg/L in surface water (n = 11), and 0.063-0.393 μg/L in tap water (n = 3). Levels in groundwater were significantly higher in the fireworks factory area than in the other locations, indicating that the fireworks and safety match industries are principal sources of perchlorate pollution. This is the first study that reports the contamination status of perchlorate in this area and reveals firework manufacture to be the pollution source. Since perchlorate levels in 17 out of 57 groundwater samples from Sivakasi, and none from Madurai, exceeded the drinking water guideline level proposed by USEPA (15 μg/L), further investigation on human health is warranted.

  13. Perchlorate formation on Mars through surface radiolysis-initiated atmospheric chemistry: A potential mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Eric H.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2016-08-01

    Recent observations of the Martian surface by the Phoenix lander and the Sample Analysis at Mars indicate the presence of perchlorate (ClO4-). The abundance and isotopic composition of these perchlorates suggest that the mechanisms responsible for their formation in the Martian environment may be unique in our solar system. With this in mind, we propose a potential mechanism for the production of Martian perchlorate: the radiolysis of the Martian surface by galactic cosmic rays, followed by the sublimation of chlorine oxides into the atmosphere and their subsequent synthesis to form perchloric acid (HClO4) in the atmosphere, and the surface deposition and subsequent mineralization of HClO4 in the regolith to form surface perchlorates. To evaluate the viability of this mechanism, we employ a one-dimensional chemical model, examining chlorine chemistry in the context of Martian atmospheric chemistry. Considering the chlorine oxide, OClO, we find that an OClO flux as low as 3.2 × 107 molecules cm-2 s-1 sublimated into the atmosphere from the surface could produce sufficient HClO4 to explain the perchlorate concentration on Mars, assuming an accumulation depth of 30 cm and integrated over the Amazonian period. Radiolysis provides an efficient pathway for the oxidation of chlorine, bypassing the efficient Cl/HCl recycling mechanism that characterizes HClO4 formation mechanisms proposed for the Earth but not Mars.

  14. Preliminary analyses for perchlorate in selected natural materials and their derivative products

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orris, G.J.; Harvey, G.J.; Tsui, D.T.; Eldrige, J.E.

    2003-01-01

    Increasing concern about sources of perchlorate contamination in ground and surface waters has led to interest in identifying potential sources of natural perchlorate and products derived from these natural sources. To date, most perchlorate found in ground and surface waters has been attributed to its major uses as an oxidizer in solid propellants for rockets, in fireworks and other explosives, and a variety of other uses of man-made perchlorate salts. However, perchlorate found in the soils, surface water, and ground water of some locations cannot be linked to an anthropogenic source. This paper contains preliminary data on the detection and non-detection of perchlorate in a variety of natural materials and their products, including some fertilizer materials. These data were previously presented at two conferences; once in poster session and once orally (Harvey and others, 1999; Orris and others, 2000). Although the results presented here are included in a journal article awaiting publication, the lack of public information on this topic has led to repeated requests for the data used as the basis for our presentations in 1999 and 2000.

  15. Impacts of natural organic matter on perchlorate removal by an advanced reduction process.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yuhang; Batchelor, Bill

    2014-01-01

    Perchlorate can be destroyed by Advanced Reduction Processes (ARPs) that combine chemical reductants (e.g., sulfite) with activating methods (e.g., UV light) in order to produce highly reactive reducing free radicals that are capable of rapid and effective perchlorate reduction. However, natural organic matter (NOM) exists widely in the environment and has the potential to influence perchlorate reduction by ARPs that use UV light as the activating method. Batch experiments were conducted to obtain data on the impacts of NOM and wavelength of light on destruction of perchlorate by the ARPs that use sulfite activated by UV light produced by low-pressure mercury lamps (UV-L) or by KrCl excimer lamps (UV-KrCl). The results indicate that NOM strongly inhibits perchlorate removal by both ARP, because it competes with sulfite for UV light. Even though the absorbance of sulfite is much higher at 222 nm than that at 254 nm, the results indicate that a smaller amount of perchlorate was removed with the UV-KrCl lamp (222 nm) than with the UV-L lamp (254 nm). The results of this study will help to develop the proper way to apply the ARPs as practical water treatment processes.

  16. Accumulation and perchlorate exposure potential of lettuce produced in the Lower Colorado River region.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, C A; Krieger, R I; Khandaker, N; Moore, R C; Holts, K C; Neidel, L L

    2005-06-29

    The Colorado River is contaminated with perchlorate concentrations of 1.5-8 microg/L, an anion linked to thyroid dysfunction. Over 90% of the lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) consumed during the winter months in the United States is produced in the Lower Colorado River region. Studies were conducted in this region to survey the potential for lettuce perchlorate accumulation and estimate potential human exposure to perchlorate from lettuce. Total uptake of perchlorate in the above-ground plant of iceberg lettuce was approximately 5 g/ha. Exposure estimates ranged from 0.45 to 1.8 microg/day depending on lettuce types and trimming. For all lettuce types, hypothetical exposures were less than 4% of the reference dose recommended by the National Academy of Sciences. Results show the relative iodide uptake inhibition potential because of lettuce nitrate was 2 orders of magnitude greater than that associated with the corresponding trace levels of perchlorate. These data support the conclusion that potential perchlorate exposures from lettuce irrigated with Colorado River water are negligible relative to acute or long-term harmful amounts.

  17. Enzymes responsible for chlorate reduction by Pseudomonas sp. are different from those used for perchlorate reduction by Azospira sp.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Lisa M; Trimble, John J; Logan, Bruce E

    2005-06-15

    Pseudomonas sp. PDA is an unusual bacterium due to its ability to respire using chlorate under aerobic conditions. The chlorate reductase produced by PDA was shown to be intrinsically different from the enzyme responsible for chlorate and perchlorate [(per)chlorate] reduction produced by Azospira sp. KJ based on subunit composition and other enzyme properties. The perchlorate reductase from strain KJ appeared to have two subunits (100 and 40 kDa) while the chlorate reductase from PDA had three subunits (60, 48, and 27 kDa). N-terminal amino acid sequencing of the 100 kDa protein from strain KJ showed a 77% similarity with the perchlorate reductase alpha subunit from another perchlorate-respiring bacterium, Dechloromonas agitata, while the N-terminus amino acid sequence of the 60 kDa protein from strain PDA did not show a similarity to previously isolated chlorate or perchlorate reductases.

  18. High-nitrogen-based pyrotechnics: perchlorate-free red- and green-light illuminants based on 5-aminotetrazole.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Jesse J; Moretti, Jared D

    2013-09-16

    Prototype testing of perchlorate-free hand-held signal illuminants for the US Army's M126 A1 red-star and M195 green-star parachute illuminants are described. Although previous perchlorate-free variants for these items have been developed based on high-nitrogen compounds that are not readily available, the new formulations consist of anhydrous 5-aminotetrazole as the suitable perchlorate replacement. Compared to the perchlorate-containing control, the disclosed illuminants exhibited excellent stabilities toward various ignition stimuli and had excellent pyrotechnic performance. The illuminants are important from both military and civil fireworks perspectives, as the perchlorate-free nature of the illuminants adequately address environmental concerns associated with perchlorate-containing red- and green-light-emitting illuminants.

  19. Catalytic destruction of perchlorate in ferric chloride and hydrochloric acid solution with control of temperature, pressure and chemical reagents

    DOEpatents

    Gu, Baohua; Cole, David R.; Brown, Gilbert M.

    2004-10-05

    A method is described to decompose perchlorate in a FeCl.sub.3 /HCl aqueous solution such as would be used to regenerate an anion exchange resin used to remove perchlorate. The solution is mixed with a reducing agent, preferably an organic alcohol and/or ferrous chloride, and can be heated to accelerate the decomposition of perchlorate. Lower temperatures may be employed if a catalyst is added.

  20. Evaluation of Perchlorate Sources in the Rialto-Colton and Chino California Subbasins using Chlorine and Oxygen Isotope Ratio Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    Desert of Chile and atmospheric perchlorate. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of isotopic data to distinguish somces of...hydrogeologic data . The stable isotope and chlOI~ne-36 data provided relatively unambiguous discrinunation of synthetic and Atacama perchlorate sources...vii List of Tables Table 3.1. Perchlorate concentrations and Cl and O isotope data for samples collected from wells

  1. High-performing red-light-emitting pyrotechnic illuminants through the use of perchlorate-free materials.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Jared D; Sabatini, Jesse J; Poret, Jay C

    2014-07-07

    The development of perchlorate-free M662 40 mm illuminating pyrotechnic compositions is described. On the bases of cost, performance, and sensitivity, potassium periodate was determined to be most effective potassium perchlorate replacement in the compositions tested. The optimal periodate-based composition exceeded the performance of the perchlorate-containing control, exhibited low sensitivity values to impact, friction, and electrostatic discharge, and had high thermal onset temperatures.

  2. Copper cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Copper cyanide ; CASRN 544 - 92 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  3. Integration of adsorption and direct bio-reduction of perchlorate on surface of cotton stalk based resin.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhongfei; Xu, Xing; Gao, Baoyu; Yue, Qinyan; Song, Wen

    2015-12-01

    In this work, perchlorate was first adsorbed by the cotton stalk based resin (CS-resin) and then the laden perchlorate was directly reduced by mixed perchlorate reduction bacteria (PRB) on surface of CS-resin. The characteristics of cotton stalk, clean CS-resin, perchlorate-laden CS-resin and bio-regenerated CS-resin were evaluated by XPS, FT-IR, SEM, zeta potential measurements. All characteristics showed clearly that (i) adsorption mechanism of perchlorate onto CS-resin was based on electrostatic attraction; (ii) biological destruction of laden perchlorate was effective for bio-regenerating the saturated CS-resin. The experimental adsorption capacities (Qexp) of perchlorate by CS-resin achieved at equilibrium condition was about 138.9 mg/g. Reduction rate of laden perchlorate on surface of CS-resin were about 2.12, 1.67, 0.032 and 0.009 mg/g(CS-resin)/d for initial redox potentials poised at -193, -70, +169, and +363 mV, respectively. This indicated that the rapid reduction of laden perchlorate may occur only when conditions were present to cause a low Eh.

  4. Fate of perchlorate in a man-made reflecting pond following a fireworks display in Albany, New York, USA.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian; Oldi, John F; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2011-11-01

    Perchlorate is a widespread contaminant in aquatic environments. Despite this, the aquatic environmental fate of perchlorate released from fireworks displays is not well known. In the present study, we examined the fate of perchlorate in man-made reflecting ponds, from 2008 to 2010, following three fireworks displays in Albany, New York, USA. Immediately after the fireworks display, perchlorate in pond waters increased significantly, with concentrations from 30 to 1,480 times higher than the baseline values. Perchlorate concentrations in pond water increased from 0.11 µg/L to up to 519 µg/L, following the fireworks display in 2008. Perchlorate concentrations in pond water decreased at a first-order kinetic degradation rate, with a mean k(obs) value of 0.026 d⁻¹ and an average half-life of 29 d. The rate of perchlorate deposition into water bodies following fireworks displays was estimated to range from 670 to 2,620 g/ha. We also estimated the perchlorate ingestion rate by the inhalation of aerosols of pond water by people frequently near the ponds. The estimated daily intake of perchlorate through the ingestion of aerosols was 32% (226 ng/kg body wt), 13% (92 ng/kg body wt), and 6% (42 ng/kg body wt) of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's reference dose for infants, children, and adults, respectively.

  5. Perchlorate in the San Antonio Segment of the Edwards Aquifer, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahlquist, L.; Rajagapolan, S.; Jackson, W. A.

    2007-12-01

    Perchlorate has been detected in drinking-water supplies and can have adverse health effects on humans by disrupting thyroid function. Perchlorate and other constituents were analyzed from ground-water samples that were collected in 2004-06 from 99 wells completed in the San Antonio segment of the Edwards aquifer as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program. The fractured karstic carbonate Edwards aquifer, declared a sole-source aquifer by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, supplies nearly one-half million acre-feet per year for drinking water and other uses. Wells were located in a variety of land-use settings that included rangeland, agriculture, and urban; well types included domestic, public, and observation. Perchlorate was detected in 98 percent of the samples, and concentrations ranged from less than 0.05 to 3 micrograms per liter (μg/L). Five samples contained concentrations greater than 1 μg/L and were from wells in the urban northern San Antonio area. The results from three samples that contained perchlorate at concentrations greater than 2 μg/L are anomalous. Chloride concentration ranged from 5.6 to 69 milligrams per liter, typical for freshwater in the Edwards aquifer. No significant (r2 greater than 0.7) correlations were observed when perchlorate concentrations were correlated with depth to water, total depth of well, or concentrations of bicarbonate, nitrate, phosphate, sulfate, bromide, chloride, fluoride, calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, strontium, and dissolved solids. Tritium concentrations ranged from 1.2 to 2.9 tritium units in 31 of the 99 samples and indicate at least some fraction of modern water (post-atmospheric nuclear tests). No correlation between apparent tritium age and perchlorate concentration was observed, a possible indication that anthropogenic influences are not affecting observed perchlorate concentrations. The molar ratio of chloride to perchlorate ranged from 17,000 to 320

  6. Possible Detection of Perchlorates by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument: Comparison with Previous Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro-Gonzalex, Rafael; Sutter, Brad; Archer, Doug; Ming, Doug; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; Franz, Heather; Glavin, Daniel; McAdam, Amy; Stern, Jennifer; McKay, Christopher; Coll, Patrice; Cabane, Michel; Mahaffy, Paul; Conrad, Pamela; Martin-Torres, Francisco; Zorzano-Mier, Maria; Grotzinger, John

    2013-01-01

    The first chemical analysis of soluble salts in the soil was carried out by the Phoenix Lander in the Martian Arctic [1]. Surprisingly, chlorine was present as magnesium or calcium perchlorate at 0.4 to 0.6 percent. Additional support for the identification of perchlorate came from the evolved gas analysis which detected the release of molecular oxygen at 350-550C [1]. When Mars-like soils from the Atacama Desert were spiked with magnesium perchlorate (1 percent) and heated using the Viking GC-MS protocol, nearly all the organics were combusted but a small amount was chlorinated, forming chloromethane and dichloromethane [2]. These chlorohydrocarbons were detected by the Viking GC-MS experiments when the Martian soil was analyzed but they were considered to be terrestrial contaminants [3]. Reinterpretation of the Viking results suggests <0.1 percent perchlorate and ppm levels of organic carbon at landing site 1 and 2 [2]. The suggestion of perchlorate in the Viking sites [2] has been challenged on the grounds that the detected compounds (CH3Cl and CH2Cl2) were carried from Earth [4]. Recently the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument on board the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) ran four samples from an aeolian bedform named Rocknest. The samples analyzed were portioned from the fifth scoop at this location. The samples were heated to 835C at 35C/min with a He flow. The SAM QMS detected a major oxygen release (300-500C) [5], coupled with the release of chlorinated hydrocarbons (chloromethane, dichloromethane, trichloromethane, and chloromethylpropene) detected both by SAM QMS and GC-MS derived from known Earth organic contaminants in the instrument [6]. Calcium perchlorate appears to be the best candidate for evolved O2 in the Rocknest samples at this time but other Cl species (e.g., chlorates) are possible and must be evaluated. The potential detection of perchlorates in Rocknest material adds weight to the argument that both Viking Landers measured signatures of

  7. The Radar Effects of Perchlorate-Doped Ice in the Martian Polar Layered Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stillman, D.; Winebrenner, D. P.; Grimm, R. E.; Pathare, A.

    2010-12-01

    The presence of perchlorate in soil at near-polar latitudes on Mars suggests that dust in the ice of the North Polar Layered Deposits (NPLD) may introduce perchlorate impurities to that ice. Because eutectic temperatures of perchlorate salts range as low as 206 K (for magnesium perchlorate), perchlorate doping of NPLD ice may result in grain-scale liquid veins and softening of ice rheology at temperatures comparable to those computed for the base of the NPLD in the present climate. Any such softening would be important for understanding how processes including ice flow have shaped the NPLD. Observable consequences of such softening, or of the combination of perchlorate doping and temperatures that could cause softening, are thus similarly important. In particular, the dielectric properties of perchlorate-laden ice in a temperature gradient will change relatively rapidly at the point in the gradient near the eutectic temperature. Here we investigate the radar reflectivity of such a eutectic transition in ice with a model in which perchlorate concentration is constant and temperature varies linearly with depth in the ice. We have conducted measurements of the complex permittivity of Mg and Na perchlorate-doped ice over a range of temperatures (183 - 273 K) and concentrations. Below the eutectic temperature, the perchlorate-doped ice has electrical properties similar to that of choride-doped ice. However, above the eutectic temperature, some of the ice melts forming liquid at triple junctions. At concentrations above 3 mM, the liquid at triple junctions become connected forming brine channels, which greatly increase the dc conductivity and radar attenuation. At concentrations below 3 mM, the liquid at triple junctions are not connected and do not affect the dc conductivity. However, the liquid H2O molecules are able to rotate their permanent dipole at radar frequencies, thus causing an increase in radar attenuation. The MARSIS and SHARAD attenuation rates increase

  8. Concurrent microbial reduction of high concentrations of nitrate and perchlorate in an ion exchange membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Fox, Shalom; Bruner, Tali; Oren, Yoram; Gilron, Jack; Ronen, Zeev

    2016-09-01

    We investigated effective simultaneous removal of high loads of nitrate and perchlorate from synthetic groundwater using an ion exchange membrane bioreactor (IEMB). The aim of this research was to characterize both transport aspects and biodegradation mechanisms involved in the treatment process of high loads of the two anions. Biodegradation process was proven to be efficient with over 99% efficiency of both perchlorate and nitrate, regardless of their load. The maximum biodegradation rates were 18.3 (mmol m(-2)  h(-1) ) and 5.5 (mmol m(-2)  h(-1) ) for nitrate and perchlorate, respectively. The presence of a biofilm on the bio-side of the membrane only slightly increased the nitrate and perchlorate transmembrane flux as compared to the measured flux during a Donnan dialysis experiment where there is no biodegradation of perchlorate and nitrate in the bio-compartment. The nitrate flux in presence of a biofilm was 18.3 (±1.9) (mmole m(-2)  h(-1) ), while without the biofilm, the flux was 16.9 (±1.5) (mmole m(-2)  h(-1) ) for the same feed inlet nitrate concentration of 4 mM. The perchlorate transmembrane flux increased similarly by an average of 5%. Samples of membrane biofilm and suspended bacteria from the bio-reactor were analyzed for diversity and abundance of the perchlorate and nitrate reducing bacteria. Klebsiella oxytoca, known as a glycerol fermenter, accounted for 70% of the suspended bacteria. In contrast, perchlorate and nitrate reducing bacteria predominated in the biofilm present on the membrane. These results are consistent with our proposed two stage biodegradation mechanism where glycerol is first fermented in the suspended phase of the bio-reactor and the fermentation products drive perchlorate and nitrate bio-reduction in the biofilm attached to the membrane. These results suggest that the niche exclusion of microbial populations in between the reactor and membrane is controlled by the fluxes of the electron donors and

  9. Analysis of hydroponic fertilizer matrixes for perchlorate: comparison of analytical techniques.

    PubMed

    Collette, Timothy W; Williams, Ted L; Urbansky, Edward T; Magnuson, Matthew L; Hebert, Gretchen N; Strauss, Steven H

    2003-01-01

    Seven retail hydroponic nitrate fertilizer products, two liquid and five solid, were comparatively analyzed for the perchlorate anion (ClO4-) by ion chromatography (IC) with suppressed conductivity detection, complexation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (cESI-MS), normal Raman spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy using an attenuated total reflectance crystal (ATR-FTIR) coated with a thin film of an organometallic ion-exchange compound. Three of the five solid products were found by all techniques to contain perchlorate at the level of approximately 100-350 mg kg(-1). The remaining products did not contain perchlorate above the detection level of any of the techniques. Comparative analysis using several analytical techniques that depend on different properties of perchlorate allow for a high degree of certainty in both the qualitative and quantitative determinations. This proved particularly useful for these samples, due to the complexity of the matrix. Analyses of this type, including multiple spectroscopic confirmations, may also be useful for other complicated matrixes (e.g., biological samples) or in forensic/regulatory frameworks where data are likely to be challenged. While the source of perchlorate in these hydroponic products is not known, the perchlorate-to-nitrate concentration ratio (w/w) in the aqueous extracts is generally consistent with the historical weight percent of water soluble components in caliche, a nitrate-bearing ore found predominantly in Chile. This ore, which is the only well-established natural source of perchlorate, is mined and used, albeit minimally, as a nitrogen source in some fertilizer products.

  10. Effect of fireworks display on perchlorate in air aerosols during the Spring Festival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yali; Zhang, Ning; Gao, Jianmin; Li, Xin; Cai, Yaqi

    2011-02-01

    Perchlorate is regarded as a new emerging persistent inorganic environmental contaminant. It can result in important neurodevelopmental deficits and goiter in infants and children because of its inhibition of iodine uptake into the thyroid tissue. Furthermore, its presence in the human body can cause improper regulation of metabolism for adults. It is often used as ingredient in the production of fireworks. So fireworks display may influence the perchlorate levels in atmospheric particulate matter (PM). In this paper perchlorate was determined in air aerosol samples (Inhalable particulate matter (PM10) and larger particulate matter (PM10-100)) collected from two locations (Lanzhou City and Yuzhong County) in Gansu province over a month period (February 1rst to March 4th) during the Spring Festival (February 18th) in 2007 in order to study the effect of fireworks display on perchlorate in air aerosol. The results showed that different concentrations of perchlorate were detected in almost all samples, ranging from perchlorate were 91% (100%) and 50% (59%) for PM10-100 (PM10) in Lanzhou City and Yuzhong County, respectively. The highest concentrations were all found in the samples from two sites on New Year's Eve, which was 39.16 ng m -3 (PM10-100) and 9.89 ng m -3 (PM10) for Lanzhou city, 3.43 ng m -3 (PM10-100) and 4.97 ng m -3 (PM10) for Yuzhong County, 6.8-26.2 times as the mean concentrations during the period of no or limited fireworks display. This indicated that the fireworks display during the Spring Festival can result in the levels of perchlorate increase.

  11. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, H.; Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1990-01-09

    A composition of matter is described which is comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide. A method for making this composition of matter is also described. This invention relates to the art of powder metallurgy and, more particularly, it relates to dispersion strengthened metals.

  12. Microbial Community Structure during Nitrate and Perchlorate Reduction in Ion-exchange Brine Using the Hydrogen-based membrane Biofilm Reactor (MBIR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Detoxification of perchlorate by microbial communities under denitrifying conditions has been recently reported, although the identity of the mixed populations involved in perchlorate reduction is not well understood. In order to address this, the bacterial diversity of membrane ...

  13. Association between Perchlorate and indirect indicators of thyroid dysfunction in NHANES 2001-2002, a Cross-Sectional, Hypothesis-Generating Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: A previous study observed associations of urinary perchlorate with thyroid hormones based on the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001-2002. Increased levels of urinary perchlorate were associated with increased levels of thyroid stimulating h...

  14. NOVEL ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN URINARY PERCHLORATE AND POTENTIALLY RELEVANT EFFECTS ON RISK FACTORS FOR HEART DISEASE BASED ON NHANES 2001-2002

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate is a widespread environmental pollutant, and is a thyroid hormone disruptor. A previous population study based on the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001-2002 database showed that urinary perchlorate concentrations were associated with signi...

  15. Copper peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, L.

    1988-01-01

    A number of oxidizing agents, including chlorine, bromine, ozone and other peroxides, were allowed to act on copper solutions with the intention of forming copper peroxide. The only successful agent appears to be hydrogen peroxide. It must be used in a neutral 50 to 30 percent solution at a temperature near zero. Other methods described in the literature apparently do not work. The excess of hydrogen must be quickly sucked out of the brown precipitate, which it is best to wash with alcohol and ether. The product, crystalline under a microscope, can be analyzed only approximately. It approaches the formula CuO2H2O. In alkaline solution it appears to act catalytically in causing the decomposition of other peroxides, so that Na2O2 cannot be used to prepare it. On the addition of acids the H2O2 is regenerated. The dry substance decomposes much more slowly than the moist but is not very stable.

  16. Adaptive evolution of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 for developing resistance to perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta-Kolte, M. G.; Youngblut, M.; Redford, S.; Gregoire, P.; Carlson, H. K.; Coates, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Due to its toxic, explosive, and corrosive nature, inadvertent biological H2S production by sulfate reducing microorganisms (SRM) poses significant health and industrial operational risks. Anthropogenic sources are dominated by the oil industry where H2S in reservoir gases and fluids has an associated annual cost estimated at $90 billion globally. Our previous studies have identified perchlorate (ClO4-) as a selective and potent inhibitor of SRM in pure culture and complex microbial ecosystems. However, constant addition of inhibitors like perchlorate to natural ecosystems may result in a new adaptive selective pressure on SRM populations. With this in mind we investigated the ability of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20, a model oil reservoir SRM, to adapt to perchlorate and develop a resistance. Serial transfers of three parallel cultures with increasing concentrations of perchlorate up to 100 mM were generated and compared to wild-type strains that were transferred for same number of generations in absence of perchlorate. Genome sequencing revealed that all three adapted strains had single non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the same gene, Dde_2265, the sulfate adenylytransferase (ATP sulfurylase (ATPS)) (EC 2.7.7.4). ATPS catalyzes the first committed step in sulfate reduction and is essential in all SRM. IC50s against growth for these evolved strains demonstrated a three-fold increased resistance to perchlorate compared to wild-type controls. These evolved strains also had 5x higher transcriptional abundance of Dde_2265 compared to the wild-type strain. Biochemical characterization of the purified ATPS enzyme from both wild-type and the evolved strain showed that the mutant ATPS from the evolved strain was resistant to perchlorate inhibition of ATP turnover with a KI for perchlorate that was 3x greater relative to the wild-type ATPS. These results demonstrate that a single-base pair mutation in ATPS can have a significant impact on developing

  17. Trace Perchlorate in Background Ground Water and Local Precipitation, Northern Rio Grande Basin, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, M.; Longmire, P.; Granzow, K. P.; Englert, D.; Yanicak, S.; Larson, T.; Rearick, M.; Heikoop, J.; Perkins, G.

    2007-12-01

    Perchlorate occurs at detectable concentrations of 0.07 to 0.45 parts per billion (ppb) in ground water of background quality within the northern Rio Grande basin, New Mexico. Ground-water samples were collected from 47 wells and springs near Los Alamos, Santa Fe, and Taos, New Mexico. Analytical methods consisted of liquid and ion chromatography-mass spectrometry mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS and IC/MS/MS). An upper tolerance limit (mean plus two standard deviations) of 0.40 ppb was calculated from 184 analytical results for the background samples. Six distinguishable ground-water zones were sampled based on location, age, and hydrochemistry. In the Los Alamos area, ground water within the mountain-front and mountain-block region is mostly young or modern (less than 50 years). The regional aquifer including the White Rock Canyon springs are of sub-modern age (greater than 50 years). Tritium data from springs north of Taos indicate ground water of modern and sub-modern ages. Background perchlorate concentrations within the Los Alamos area were consistently higher than those measured in the Taos area. Ground water from the Taos area contains less perchlorate and has lower δ18O and δ2H values than ground water from the Los Alamos area. The elevation at which precipitation occurs with respect to recharge and/or the amount of evapotranspiration may play a role in perchlorate concentration in ground water. Natural variability, hydrogeology, and atmospheric inputs may also affect perchlorate concentration in ground water. A linear regression through perchlorate and chloride concentrations for all stations resulted in an r2 = 0. However, the r2 value of the Los Alamos regional aquifer for perchlorate versus chloride was 0.66. Thirteen precipitation samples were collected in the Los Alamos area. Results from eleven of these samples showed no perchlorate greater than 0.05 and 0.009 ppb, the method detection limit (MDL). Two precipitation samples analyzed using the IC

  18. Chlorine-36 as a tracer of perchlorate origin.

    PubMed

    Sturchio, Neil C; Caffee, Marc; Beloso, Abelardo D; Heraty, Linnea J; Böhlke, John Karl; Hatzinger, Paul B; Jackson, W Andrew; Gu, Baohua; Heikoop, Jeffrey M; Dale, Michael

    2009-09-15

    Perchlorate (ClO4(-)) is ubiquitous in the environment. It is produced naturally by atmospheric photochemical reactions, and also is synthesized in large quantities for military, aerospace, and industrial applications. Nitrate-enriched salt deposits of the Atacama Desert (Chile) contain high concentrations of natural ClO4(-), and have been exported worldwide since the mid-1800s for use in agriculture. The widespread introduction of synthetic and agricultural ClO4(-) into the environment has contaminated numerous municipal water supplies. Stable isotope ratio measurements of Cl and O have been applied for discrimination of different ClO4(-) sources in the environment. This study explores the potential of 36Cl measurements for further improving the discrimination of ClO4(-) sources. Groundwater and desert soil samples from the southwestern United States (U.S.) contain ClO4(-) having high 36Cl abundances (36Cl/Cl = 3100 x 10(-15) to 28,800 x 10(-15)), compared with those from the Atacama Desert (36Cl/Cl = 0.9 x 10(-15) to 590 x 10(-15)) and synthetic ClO4(-) reagents and products (36Cl/Cl = 0.0 x 10(-15) to 40 x 10(-15)). In conjunction with stable Cl and O isotope ratios, 36Cl data provide a clear distinction among three principal ClO4(-) source types in the environment of the southwestern U.S.

  19. Chlorine-36 as a tracer of perchlorate origin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sturchio, N.C.; Caffee, M.; Beloso, A.D.; Heraty, L.J.; Böhlke, J.K.; Hatzinger, P.B.; Jackson, W.A.; Gu, B.; Heikoop, J.M.; Dale, M.

    2009-01-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) is ubiquitous in the environment. It is produced naturally by atmospheric photochemical reactions, and also is synthesized in large quantities for military, aerospace, and industrial applications. Nitrate-enriched salt deposits of the Atacama Desert (Chile) contain high concentrations of natural ClO4-, and have been exported worldwide since the mid-1800s for use in agriculture. The widespread introduction of synthetic and agricultural ClO4- into the environment has contaminated numerous municipal water supplies. Stable isotope ratio measurements of Cl and O have been applied for discrimination of different ClO4- sources in the environment. This study explores the potential of 36Cl measurements for further improving the discrimination of ClO4- sources. Groundwater and desert soil samples from the southwestern United States (U.S.) contain ClO4- having high 36Cl abundances (36Cl/Cl = 3100 ?? 10-15 to 28,800 ?? 10 -15), compared with those from the Atacama Desert (36Cl/Cl = 0.9 ?? 10-15 to 590 ?? 10-15) and synthetic ClO4- reagents and products (36Cl/Cl = 0.0 ?? 10-15 to 40 ?? 1015). In conjunction with stable Cl and O isotope ratios, 36Cl data provide a clear distinction among three principal. ClO4- source types in the environment of the southwestern U.S. ?? 2009 American Chemical Society.

  20. Molecular and crystal structure of anhydrous zirconium perchlorate

    SciTech Connect

    Genkina, E.A.; Babaeva, V.P.; Rosolovskii, V.Ya.

    1985-08-01

    An x-ray diffraction investigation (diffractometer, Mo K..cap alpha.., graphite monochromator, omega scan technique, Theta less than or equal to 30/sup 0/, 1060 reflections, least-squares method in the anisotropic approximation to R = 0.058) of anhydrous zirconium perchlorate has been carried out. The crystals of Zr(Cl0/sub 4/)/sub 4/ are monoclinic: ..cap alpha.. = 12.899(3), b = 13.188(7), c = 7.937(3) A, ..gamma.. = 107.91/sup 0/, Z = 4, space group Bb. The structure has an island character and is built up from isolated Zr(ClO/sub 4/)/sub 4/ molecules. The Zr atom is surrounded by eight O atoms in four bidentate perchlorato groups. The Zr-O distances lie in the range from 2.13 to 2.23 A, averaging 2.19 A. The eight-vertex polyhedron around Zr is the mmmm steroisomer of a dodecahedron. The centers of the perchlorato groups are located at the vertices of flattened tetrahedron. The ClO/sub 4/ groups have a distorted tetrahedral structure, and the mean length of the Cl-O/sub b/ bonds (1.50 A) is 0.11 A greater than the mean length of the Cl-O/sub t/ bonds, pointing out the essentially covalent character of the bonds of the perchlorato groups with the central Zr atom.

  1. Chlorine-36 abundance in natural and synthetic perchlorate

    SciTech Connect

    Heikoop, Jeffrey M; Dale, M; Sturchio, Neil C; Caffee, M; Belosa, A D; Heraty, Jr., L J; Bohike, J K; Hatzinger, P B; Jackson, W A; Gu, B

    2009-01-01

    Perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) is ubiquitous in the environment. It occurs naturally as a product of atmospheric photochemical reactions, and is synthesized for military, aerospace, and industrial applications. Nitrate-enriched soils of the Atacama Desert (Chile) contain high concentrations of natural ClO{sub 4}{sup -}; nitrate produced from these soils has been exported worldwide since the mid-1800's for use in agriculture. The widespread introduction of synthetic and agricultural ClO{sub 4}{sup -} into the environment has complicated attempts to understand the geochemical cycle of ClO{sub 4}{sup -}. Natural ClO{sub 4}{sup -} samples from the southwestern United States have relatively high {sup 36}Cl abundances ({sup 36}Cl/Cl = 3,100 x 10{sup -15} to 28,800 x 10{sup -15}), compared with samples of synthetic ({sup 36}Cl/Cl = 0.0 x 10{sup -15} to 40 x 10{sup -15}) and Atacama Desert ({sup 36}Cl/Cl = 0.9 x 10{sup -15} to 590 x 10{sup -15}) ClO{sub 4}{sup -}. These data give a lower limit for the initial {sup 36}Cl abundance of natural ClO{sub 4}{sup -} and provide temporal and other constraints on its geochemical cycle.

  2. The origins of perchlorate in the Martian soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrier, Brandi L.; Kounaves, Samuel P.

    2015-05-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) has been detected on Mars, but its production and distribution are unclear. Mechanisms requiring atmospheric chlorine are insufficient for measured concentrations. We conducted studies under Mars conditions using halite (NaCl) alone, soil simulants consisting of silica (SiO2), Fe2O3, Al2O3, and TiO2. After 170 h irradiation, samples analyzed by ion chromatography (IC) showed ClO4- and ClO3- present in all samples. When SiO2 was added, yield increased from 2 to 42 nmol and 0.4 to 2.6 nmol, respectively. We attribute this to SiO2 and metal oxides acting as photocatalysts, generating O2- radicals from O2 which react with chloride. Results show ClO4- and ClO3- can be produced photochemically on Cl minerals without atmospheric chlorine or aqueous conditions, and explain high concentration of ClO4- and ClO4-/Cl- ratios detected by Phoenix. They provide evidence that its distribution on Mars is dictated by distribution of chlorine and provide insight into the oxidizing nature of the soil and its potential effects on organics.

  3. Widespread occurrence of (per)chlorate in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, W. Andrew; Davila, Alfonso F.; Sears, Derek W. G.; Coates, John D.; McKay, Christopher P.; Brundrett, Maeghan; Estrada, Nubia; Böhlke, J. K.

    2015-11-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) and chlorate (ClO3-) are ubiquitous on Earth and ClO4- has also been found on Mars. These species can play important roles in geochemical processes such as oxidation of organic matter and as biological electron acceptors, and are also indicators of important photochemical reactions involving oxyanions; on Mars they could be relevant for human habitability both in terms of in situ resource utilization and potential human health effects. For the first time, we extracted, detected and quantified ClO4- and ClO3- in extraterrestrial, non-planetary samples: regolith and rock samples from the Moon, and two chondrite meteorites (Murchison and Fayetteville). Lunar samples were collected by astronauts during the Apollo program, and meteorite samples were recovered immediately after their fall. This fact, together with the heterogeneous distribution of ClO4- and ClO3- within some of the samples, and their relative abundance with respect to other soluble species (e.g., NO3-) are consistent with an extraterrestrial origin of the oxychlorine species. Our results, combined with the previously reported widespread occurrence on Earth and Mars, indicate that ClO4- and ClO3- could be present throughout the Solar System.

  4. Surface modification of silver nanofilms for improved perchlorate detection by surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jumin; Han, Mei-Juan; Li, Jinwei; Meng, Xiaoguang

    2012-07-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), as one of the most sensitive spectroscopic analysis methods, has been investigated extensively for the detection of environmental contaminants in recent years. In this work, we reported the new development of robust SERS substrates for rapid and sensitive sensing of aqueous perchlorate, a widespread environmental contaminant. The fabrication of the substrates consisted of two simple steps: (a) formation of Ag nanofilms on Cu and surface-roughened Cu foils (Ag/Cu and Ag/rCu nanofilms) using a controllable and inexpensive one-step electroless plating process, and (b) surface modification of the Ag nanofilms with cysteamine (Cys) self-assembly monolayer (SAM) (Cys-Ag/Cu and Cys-Ag/rCu substrates). Due to the strong affinity of -NH(3)(+) groups of the Cys molecules for perchlorate ions, the rapid SERS detection of perchlorate has been realized with a limit of detection (LOD) down to 5 μg L(-1) (ppb) for aqueous samples without need for drying. Various calibration curves with good linear relationships were obtained, indicating the quantification potential of SERS analysis of perchlorate using these new substrates. It was found that the neutral pH yielded the maximum SERS signals, and 85% of original sensitivity was remained in 5 days of storage time in the air, indicating the substrates are fairly stable. Within 10 regeneration-reuse cycles, the SERS signals of perchlorate kept in the range of 85-105% of the original value, verifying its reusability.

  5. Developmental timing of sodium perchlorate exposure alters angiogenesis, thyroid follicle proliferation and sexual maturation in stickleback

    PubMed Central

    Furin, Christoff G.; von Hippel, Frank A.; Postlethwait, John H.; Buck, C. Loren; Cresko, William A.; O’Hara, Todd M.

    2015-01-01

    Perchlorate, a common aquatic contaminant, is well known to disrupt homeostasis of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis. This study utilizes the threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) fish to determine if perchlorate exposure during certain windows of development has morphological effects on thyroid and gonads. Fish were moved from untreated water to perchlorate-contaminated water (30 and 100 mg/L) starting at 0, 3, 7, 14, 21, 42, 154 and 305 days post fertilization until approximately one year old. A reciprocal treatment (fish in contaminated water switched to untreated water) was conducted on the same schedule. Perchlorate exposure increased angiogenesis and follicle proliferation in thyroid tissue, delayed gonadal maturity, and skewed sex ratios towards males; effects depended on concentration and timing of exposure. This study demonstrates that perchlorate exposure beginning during the first 42 days of development has profound effects on stickleback reproductive and thyroid tissues, and by implication can impact population dynamics. Long-term exposure studies that assess contaminant effects at various stages of development provide novel information to characterize risk to aquatic organisms, to facilitate management of resources, and to determine sensitive developmental windows for further study of underlying mechanisms. PMID:25865142

  6. [Determination of iodide, thiocyanate and perchlorate ions in environmental water by two-dimensional ion chromatography].

    PubMed

    Lin, Li; Wang, Haibo; Shi, Yali

    2013-03-01

    A procedure for the determination of iodide, thiocyanate and perchlorate ions in environmental water by two-dimensional ion chromatography has been developed. At first the iodide, thiocyanate and perchlorate ions were separated from interfering ions by a column (IonPac AS16, 250 mm x 4 mm). The iodide ion, thiocyanate and perchlorate ions were then enriched with an enrichment column (MAC-200, 80 mm x 0.75 mm). In the 2nd-dimensional chromatography, iodide thiocyanate and perchlorate ions were separated and quantified by a capillary column (IonPac AS20 Capillary, 250 mm x 0.4 mm). The linear ranges were 0.05 -100 pg/L with correlation coefficients of 0. 999 9, and the detection limits were 0. 02 - 0.05 micro gg/L. The spiked recoveries of iodide, thiocyanate and perchlorate ions were in the range of 85.1% to 100.1%. The relative standard deviations of the recoveries were 1.7% to 4.9%.

  7. Simultaneous removal of perchlorate and nitrate from drinking water using the ion exchange membrane bioreactor concept.

    PubMed

    Matos, Cristina T; Velizarov, Svetlozar; Crespo, João G; Reis, Maria A M

    2006-01-01

    This work evaluates the feasibility of the ion exchange membrane bioreactor (IEMB) concept for the simultaneous removal of perchlorate and nitrate from drinking water, when nitrate is present in the ppm range and perchlorate in the ppb range. The IEMB concept combines Donnan dialysis and simultaneous biological degradation of both pollutants. Membrane transport studies showed that Donnan dialysis is suitable for obtaining water with concentrations of perchlorate and nitrate below the recommended levels. However, the pollutants were accumulated in a receiving stream, thus requiring additional treatment before disposal. On the other hand, the IEMB process operated with hydraulic retention times ranging from 1.4 to 8.3h in the water compartment, proved to remove effectively perchlorate and nitrate while preserving the water composition with respect to other ions, thus avoiding secondary contamination of the treated water. For a polluted water stream containing 100 ppb of ClO(4)(-) and 60 ppm of NO(3)(-), the concentrations of both ions in the treated stream were kept below the recommended levels of 4 ppb for ClO(4)(-) and 25 ppm for NO(3)(-). The IEMB system was operated under ethanol limitation, but even under these conditions, an increase of the perchlorate and nitrate concentrations in the treated water was not observed for up to 6 days.

  8. Ion exchange membrane bioreactor for treating groundwater contaminated with high perchlorate concentrations.

    PubMed

    Fox, Shalom; Oren, Yoram; Ronen, Zeev; Gilron, Jack

    2014-01-15

    Perchlorate contamination of groundwater is a worldwide concern. The most cost efficient treatment for high concentrations is biological treatment. In order to improve and increase the acceptance of this treatment, there is a need to reduce the contact between micro organisms in the treatment unit and the final effluent. An ion exchange membrane bioreactor (IEMB), in which treated water is separated from the bioreactor, was suggested for this purpose. In this study, the IEMB's performance was studied at a concentration as high as 250mgL(-1) that were never studied before. In the bioreactor, glycerol was used as a low cost and nontoxic carbon and energy source for the reduction of perchlorate to chloride. We found that high perchlorate concentrations in the feed rendered the anion exchange membrane significantly less permeable to perchlorate. However, the presence of bacteria in the bio-compartment significantly increased the flux through the membrane by more than 25% in comparison to pure Donnan dialysis. In addition, the results suggested minimal secondary contamination (<3mgCL(-1)) of the treated water with the optimum feed of carbon substrate. Our results show that IEMB can efficiently treat groundwater contaminated with perchlorate as high as 250mgL(-1).

  9. Possible Calcite and Magnesium Perchlorate Interaction in the Mars Phoenix Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, K. M.; Sutter, B.; Ming, D. W.; Boynton, W. V.; Quinn, R. C.

    2012-01-01

    The Mars Phoenix Lander's TEGA instrument detected a calcium carbonate phase decomposing at high temperatures (approx.700 C) from the Wicked Witch soil sample [1]. TEGA also detected a lower temperature CO2 release between 400 C and 680 C [1]. Possible explanations given for this lower temperature CO2 release include thermal decomposition of Mg or Fe carbonates, a zeolitictype desorption reaction, or combustion of organic compounds in the soil [2]. The detection of 0.6 wt % soluble perchlorate by the Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) on Phoenix [3] has implications for the possibility of organic molecules in the soil. Ming et al. [4] demonstrated that perchlorates could have oxidized organic compounds to CO2 in TEGA, preventing detection of their characteristic mass fragments. Here, we propose that a perchlorate salt and calcium carbonate present in martian soil reacted to produce the 400 C - 680 C TEGA CO2 release. The parent salts of the perchlorate on Mars are unknown, but geochemical models using WCL data support the possible dominance of Mg-perchlorate salts [5]. Mg(ClO4)2 6H2O is the stable phase at ambient martian conditions [6], and breaks down at lower temperatures than carbonates giving off Cl2 and HCl gas [7,8]. Devlin and Herley [7] report two exotherms at 410-478 C and 473-533 C which correspond to the decomposition of Mg(ClO4)2.

  10. Perchlorate and Nitrate Remediation Efficiency and Microbial Diversity in a Containerized Wetland Bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jr., B D; Dibley, V; Pinkart, H; Legler, T

    2004-06-09

    We have developed a method to remove perchlorate (14 to 27 {micro}g/L) and nitrate (48 mg/L) from contaminated groundwater using a wetland bioreactor. The bioreactor has operated continuously in a remote field location for more than two years with a stable ecosystem of indigenous organisms. This study assesses the bioreactor for long-term perchlorate and nitrate remediation by evaluating influent and effluent groundwater for reduction-oxidation conditions and nitrate and perchlorate concentrations. Total community DNA was extracted and purified from 10-g sediment samples retrieved from vertical coring of the bioreactor during winter. Analysis by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of short, 16S rDNA, polymerase-chain-reaction products was used to identify dominant microorganisms. Bacteria genera identified were closely affiliated with bacteria widely distributed in soils, mud layers, and fresh water. Of the 17 dominant bands sequenced, most were gram negative and capable of aerobic or anaerobic respiration with nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor (Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Halomonas, and Nitrospira). Several identified genera (Rhizobium, Acinetobactor, and Xanthomonas) are capable of fixing atmospheric nitrogen into a combined form (ammonia) usable by host plants. Isolates were identified from the Proteobacteria class, known for the ability to reduce perchlorate. Initial bacterial assessments of sediments confirm the prevalence of facultative anaerobic bacteria capable of reducing perchlorate and nitrate in situ.

  11. Martian Chlorine Chemistry: A Study of Perchlorate on the Martian Surface, Evidence of an Ongoing Formation Mechanism and Implications of a Complex Chlorine Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrier, Brandi L.

    2015-10-01

    The research presented herein addresses the detection of perchlorate on Mars, evidence of perchlorate in Mars meteorite EETA 79001, determination of the perchlorate parent salts at the Phoenix landing site, and the ongoing formation of perchlorate from chloride minerals as well as from other oxychlorine species. The detection of perchlorate in three samples by the Phoenix Wet Chemistry Laboratory and the implication of these results are discussed. The further detection of perchlorate in Mars meteorite EETA 79001 by ion chromatography and the determination of the parent salts of the perchlorate detected at the Phoenix landing site by electrochemical analyses and ion chromatography are detailed and the implications of the identity of the parent salts are discussed. The possible formation pathways for martian perchlorate are then explored and a possible mechanism for ongoing perchlorate formation on the martian surface is detailed. Perchlorate is shown to be formed upon exposure of chloride minerals, as well as of chlorite and chlorate salts, to current Mars relevant conditions including temperature, pressure, ultraviolet radiation and atmospheric composition. The implications of this ongoing perchlorate formation for the survival and detection of organics, the oxidizing nature of the soil, formation of liquid brines and recurring slope lineae are discussed. Further preliminary experiments have been conducted to investigate the effects of perchlorate formation on the survival and degradation of organic compounds.

  12. DETERMINATION OF PERCHLORATE AT TRACE LEVELS IN DRINKING WATER BY ION-PAIR EXTRACTION WITH ELECTROSPRAY IONIZATION MASS SPECTROMETRY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate has been added to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency,s Drinking Water Contaminant Candidate List (CCL). The present work describes the analysis of perchlorate in water by liquid-liquid extraction followed by flow injection electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI/MS...

  13. SURVEY OF BOTTLED WATERS FOR PERCHLORATE BY ELECTROSPRAY IONIZATION MASS SPECTROMETRY (ESI-MS) AND ION CHROMATOGRAPHY (IC)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate has been identified in ground and surface waters around the US, including some that serve as supplies for drinking water. Because perchlorate salts are used as solid oxidants in rockets and ordnance, water contamination may occur near military or aerospace installatio...

  14. Urinary perchlorate exposure and risk in women of reproductive age in a fireworks production area of China.

    PubMed

    Li, Qin; Yu, Yun-jiang; Wang, Fei-fei; Chen, Shi-wu; Yin, Yan; Lin, Hai-peng; Che, Fei; Sun, Peng; Qin, Juan; Liu, Jie; Wang, Hong-mei

    2014-07-01

    Perchlorate is used widely in fireworks, and, if ingested, it has the potential to disrupt thyroid function. The concentrations of perchlorate in water and soil samples and in urine samples of women of reproductive age from Liuyang, the largest fireworks production area in China, were investigated. The results showed that the average perchlorate concentrations in groundwater, surface water, farmland soil, and urine samples of women from the fireworks production area were significantly greater than those from the control area. The health risk of perchlorate ingested through drinking water was assessed based on the mode recommended by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. The values of hazard quotient of river water and groundwater in the fireworks production area were much greater than the safe level (=1), which indicates that adverse health effects may result from perchlorate when these sources of water are used as drinking water. These results indicated that the environment of the fireworks production area has been polluted by perchlorate and that residents were and are facing greater exposure doses of perchlorate. Fireworks production enterprises may be a major source of perchlorate contamination.

  15. Kinetics of nitrate and perchlorate reduction in ion exchange brine using the membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several sources of bacterial inocula were tested for their ability to reduce nitrate and perchlorate in synthetic ion-exchange spent brine (3-4.5% salinity) using a hydrogen-based membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR). Nitrate and perchlorate removal fluxes reached as high as 5.4 g N ...

  16. Feasibility and kinetics study on the direct bio-regeneration of perchlorate laden anion-exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Lippincott, Lee; Meng, Xiaoguang

    2008-11-01

    Anion exchange is one of the most promising treatment technologies for the removal of low levels of perchlorate. The spent anion-exchange resins, however, need to be disposed of or regenerated because they contain high contents of perchlorate. This study investigated the feasibility and kinetics of a direct bio-regeneration method. The method accomplished resin regeneration and biological perchlorate destruction concurrently, by directly contacting the spent resin with the perchlorate-reducing bacteria (PRB). The results indicated that the method was effective in regeneration of perchlorate and nitrate loaded resin and the resin could be repeatedly regenerated with the method. The regenerated resin was effective, stable, and durable in the filtration treatment of perchlorate in well water from the Saddle River area, NJ. Moreover, the method was also effective in regeneration of the spent A-530E resin, which had high perchlorate affinity and was yet very difficult for regeneration with the conventional brine desorption technique. Besides, the results further suggested that the perchlorate and nitrate desorption from the loaded resin coupling with their subsequent biological reduction could be the direct bio-regeneration mechanism. No biofilm was formed on the regenerated resin surface according to a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis.

  17. Perchlorate exposure and association with iron homeostasis and other biological functions among NHANES 2005-2008 subjects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate exposure and association with iron homeostasis and other biological functions among NHANES 2005-2008 subjects Schreinemachers DM, Ghio AJ, Cascio WE, Sobus JR. U.S. EPA, RTP, NC, USA Perchlorate (ClO4-), an environmental pollutant, is a known thyroid toxicant and...

  18. Capture and accumulation of perchlorate in lettuce. Effect of genotype, temperature, perchlorate concentration, and competition with anions.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Raúl; Palma, Paulina; Parker, David; Escudey, Mauricio

    2014-09-01

    Various studies have evaluated the accumulation of ClO4(-) in lettuce (Lactuca sativa), but very few have dealt with the variables that can interfere with its capture. The present study evaluates the transfer of ClO4(-) in two L. sativa varieties: butter head (L. sativa var. capitata) and cos lettuce (L. sativa var. crispa) under hydroponic conditions. The ClO4(-) concentrations used correspond to levels (1 and 2mgL(-1)), measured in irrigation water in the Iquique region in the north of Chile. Results indicate that the capture of ClO4(-) is dependent on its concentration, lettuce genotype, and temperature. The butter head variety accumulates the highest perchlorate concentrations. Anion competition involving NO3(-) (16 and 48mM), Cl(-) (23 and 56mM), and SO4(2-) (10 and 20mM) was evaluated, being NO3(-) (48mM), the most significant competition reducing the concentration of ClO4(-) in tissues of L. sativa varieties.

  19. Possible detection of perchlorates by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument: Comparison with previous missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; Sutter, Brad; Archer, Doug; Ming, Doug; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; Franz, Heather; Glavin, Daniel; McAdam, Amy; Stern, Jennifer; McKay, Christopher; Coll, Patrice; Cabane, Michel; Conrad, Pamela; Mahaffy, Paul; Martín-Torres, Francisco; Zorzano-Mier, Maria; Grotzinger, John; MSL Science Team

    2013-04-01

    The first chemical analysis of soluble salts in the soil was carried out by the Phoenix Lander in the Martian Arctic [1]. Surprisingly, chlorine was present as magnesium or calcium perchlorate at 0.4 to 0.6 percent. Additional support for the identification of perchlorate came from the evolved gas analysis which detected the release of molecular oxygen at 350-550C [1]. When Mars-like soils from the Atacama Desert were spiked with magnesium perchlorate (1 precent) and heated using the Viking GC-MS protocol, nearly all the organics were combusted but a small amount was chlorinated, forming chloromethane and dichloromethane [2]. These chlorohydrocarbons were detected by the Viking GC-MS experiments when the Martian soil was analyzed but they were considered to be terrestrial contaminants [3]. Reinterpretation of the Viking results suggests

  20. Perchlorate radiolysis on Mars and the origin of martian soil reactivity.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Richard C; Martucci, Hana F H; Miller, Stephanie R; Bryson, Charles E; Grunthaner, Frank J; Grunthaner, Paula J

    2013-06-01

    Results from the Viking biology experiments indicate the presence of reactive oxidants in martian soils that have previously been attributed to peroxide and superoxide. Instruments on the Mars Phoenix Lander and the Mars Science Laboratory detected perchlorate in martian soil, which is nonreactive under the conditions of the Viking biology experiments. We show that calcium perchlorate exposed to gamma rays decomposes in a CO2 atmosphere to form hypochlorite (ClO(-)), trapped oxygen (O2), and chlorine dioxide (ClO2). Our results show that the release of trapped O2 (g) from radiation-damaged perchlorate salts and the reaction of ClO(-) with amino acids that were added to the martian soils can explain the results of the Viking biology experiments. We conclude that neither hydrogen peroxide nor superoxide is required to explain the results of the Viking biology experiments.

  1. Methods for the stable isotopic analysis of chlorine in chlorate and perchlorate compounds.

    PubMed

    Ader, M; Coleman, M L; Doyle, S P; Stroud, M; Wakelin, D

    2001-10-15

    Chlorate and perchlorate compounds, used as herbicides, solid fuel propellants, and explosives, are increasingly recognized as pollutants in groundwater. Stable isotope characterization would permit both environmental monitoring of extent of remediation and forensic characterization. Stoichiometric reduction to chloride (greater than 98% yield), by Fe(II) for chlorate and alkaline fusion-decomposition for perchlorate, allows analysis by standard methods to give highly reproducible and accurate delta37Cl results (0.05/1000, 2 x standard error). Analysis of various compounds from different suppliers yielded delta37Cl values for chlorate samples near to +0.2/1000 (SMOC), but one has within-sample heterogeneity of 0.5/1000, possibly due to crystallization processes during manufacture. Results for perchlorate samples also are generally near +0.2/1000, but one is +2.3/1000 (SMOC). The initial results suggest that both forensic and environmental applications might be feasible.

  2. A simplified method for obtaining high-purity perchlorate from groundwater for isotope analyses.

    SciTech Connect

    vonKiparski, G; Hillegonds, D

    2011-04-04

    Investigations into the occurrence and origin of perchlorate (ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) found in groundwater from across North America have been sparse until recent years, and there is mounting evidence that natural formation mechanisms are important. New opportunities for identifying groundwater perchlorate and its origin have arisen with the utilization of improved detection methods and sampling techniques. Additionally, application of the forensic potential of isotopic measurements has begun to elucidate sources, potential formation mechanisms and natural attenuation processes. Procedures developed appear to be amenable to enable high precision stable isotopic analyses, as well as lower precision AMS analyses of {sup 36}Cl. Immediate work is in analyzing perchlorate isotope standards and developing full analytical accuracy and uncertainty expectations. Field samples have also been collected, and will be analyzed when final qa/qc samples are deemed acceptable.

  3. Identification of an anaerobic bacterium which reduces perchlorate and chlorate as Wolinella succinogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, W.; Attaway, H. |

    1995-12-31

    Perchlorate and chlorate salts are widely used by the chemical, aerospace and defense industries as oxidizers in propellant, explosives and pyrotechnics. The authors have isolated a anaerobic bacterium which is capable of the dissimilatory reduction of both perchlorate and chlorate for energy and growth. Strain HAP-1 is a gram negative, thin rod, non-sporeforming, highly motile strict anaerobe. Antibiotic resistance profiles, utilization of carbon substrates and electron acceptors demonstrated similar physiological characteristics to Wolinella succinogenes. Pairwise comparisons of 16S RNA sequences showed only a 0.75% divergence between strain HAP-1 and W. succinogenes. Physiological, morphological and 16S RRNA sequence data indicate strain HAP-1 is a subspecies of W. succinogenes that can utilize perchlorate and chlorate as terminal electron acceptors.

  4. Effects of larval-juvenile treatment with perchlorate and co-treatment with thyroxine on zebrafish sex ratios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mukhi, S.; Torres, L.; Patino, R.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of larval-juvenile exposure to perchlorate, a thyroid hormone synthesis inhibitor, on the establishment of gonadal sex ratios in zebrafish. Zebrafish were exposed to untreated water or water containing perchlorate at 100 or 250 ppm for a period of 30 days starting at 3 days postfertilization (dpf). Recovery treatments consisted of a combination of perchlorate and exogenous thyroxine (T4; 10 nM). Thyroid histology was assessed at the end of the treatment period (33 dpf), and gonadal histology and sex ratios were determined in fish that were allowed an additional 10-day period of growth in untreated water. As expected, exposure to perchlorate caused changes in thyroid histology consistent with hypothyroidism and these effects were reversed by co-treatment with exogenous T4. Perchlorate did not affect fish survival but co-treatment with T4 induced higher mortality. However, relative to the corresponding perchlorate concentration, co-treatment with T4 caused increased mortality only at a perchlorate concentration of 100 ppm. Perchlorate alone or in the presence of T4 suppressed body length at 43 dpf relative to control values. Perchlorate exposure skewed the sex ratio toward female in a concentration-dependent manner, and co-treatment with T4 not only blocked the feminizing effect of perchlorate but also overcompensated by skewing the sex ratio towards male. Moreover, co-treatment with T4 advanced the onset of spermatogenesis in males. There was no clear association between sex ratios and larval survival or growth. We conclude that endogenous thyroid hormone plays a role in the establishment of gonadal sex phenotype during early development in zebrafish. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Urinary Perchlorate and Thyroid Hormone Levels in Adolescent and Adult Men and Women Living in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Blount, Benjamin C.; Pirkle, James L.; Osterloh, John D.; Valentin-Blasini, Liza; Caldwell, Kathleen L.

    2006-01-01

    Background Perchlorate is commonly found in the environment and known to inhibit thyroid function at high doses. Assessing the potential effect of low-level exposure to perchlorate on thyroid function is an area of ongoing research. Objectives We evaluated the potential relationship between urinary levels of perchlorate and serum levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and total thyroxine (T4) in 2,299 men and women, ≥ 12 years of age, participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) during 2001–2002. Methods We used multiple regression models of T4 and TSH that included perchlorate and covariates known to be or likely to be associated with T4 or TSH levels: age, race/ethnicity, body mass index, estrogen use, menopausal status, pregnancy status, premenarche status, serum C-reactive protein, serum albumin, serum cotinine, hours of fasting, urinary thiocyanate, urinary nitrate, and selected medication groups. Results Perchlorate was not a significant predictor of T4 or TSH levels in men. For women overall, perchlorate was a significant predictor of both T4 and TSH. For women with urinary iodine < 100 μg/L, perchlorate was a significant negative predictor of T4 (p < 0.0001) and a positive predictor of TSH (p = 0.001). For women with urinary iodine ≥ 100 μg/L, perchlorate was a significant positive predictor of TSH (p = 0.025) but not T4 (p = 0.550). Conclusions These associations of perchlorate with T4 and TSH are coherent in direction and independent of other variables known to affect thyroid function, but are present at perchlorate exposure levels that were unanticipated based on previous studies. PMID:17185277

  6. Fractionation of stable isotopes in perchlorate and nitrate during in situ biodegradation in a sandy aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Hatzinger, Paul B.; Bohlke, J. K.; Sturchio, N. C.; Gu, Baohua

    2009-01-01

    An in situ experiment was performed in a shallow alluvial aquifer in Maryland to quantify the fractionation of stable isotopes in perchlorate (Cl and O) and nitrate (N and O) during biodegradation. An emulsified soybean oil substrate that was previously injected into this aquifer provided the electron donor necessary for biological perchlorate reduction and denitrification. During the field experiment, groundwater extracted from an upgradient well was pumped into an injection well located within the in situ oil barrier, and then groundwater samples were withdrawn for the next 30 h. After correction for dilution (using Br-as a conservative tracer of the injectate), perchlorate concentrations decreased by 78 % and nitrate concentrations decreased by 87 %, during the initial 8.6 h after the injection. The observed ratio of fractionation effects of O and Cl isotopes in perchlorate (ε18O/ε37Cl) was 2.6, which is similar to that observed in the laboratory using pure cultures (2.5). Denitrification by indigenous bacteria fractionated O and N isotopes in nitrate at a ratio of approximately 0.8 (ε18O/ε15N), which is within the range of values reported previously for denitrification. However, the magnitudes of the individual apparent in situ isotope fractionation effects for perchlorate and nitrate were appreciably smaller than those reported in homogeneous closed systems (0.2 to 0.6 times), even after adjustment for dilution. These results indicate that (1) isotope fractionation factor ratios (ε18O/ε37Cl, ε18O/ε15N) derived from homogeneous laboratory systems (e.g., pure culture studies) can be used qualitatively to confirm the occurrence of in situ biodegradation of both perchlorate and nitrate, but (2) the magnitudes of the individual apparent  values cannot be used quantitatively to estimate the in situ extent of biodegradation of either anion.

  7. Fractionation of stable isotopes in perchlorate and nitrate during in situ biodegradation in a sandy aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohlke, Johnkarl F.; Hatzinger, P.B.; Sturchio, N.C.; Gu, B.; Heraty, L.J.; Borden, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    An in situ experiment was performed in a shallow alluvial aquifer in Maryland to quantify the fractionation of stable isotopes in perchlorate (Cl and O) and nitrate (N and O) during biodegradation. An emulsified soybean oil substrate that was previously injected into this aquifer provided the electron donor necessary for biological perchlorate reduction and denitrification. During the field experiment, groundwater extracted from an upgradient well was pumped into an injection well located within the in situ oil barrier, and then groundwater samples were withdrawn for the next 30 h. After correction for dilution (using Br– as a conservative tracer of the injectate), perchlorate concentrations decreased by 78% and nitrate concentrations decreased by 82% during the initial 8.6 h after the injection. The observed ratio of fractionation effects of O and Cl isotopes in perchlorate (e18O/e37Cl) was 2.6, which is similar to that observed in the laboratory using pure cultures (2.5). Denitrification by indigenous bacteria fractionated O and N isotopes in nitrate at a ratio of ~0.8 (e18O/e15N), which is within the range of values reported previously for denitrification. However, the magnitudes of the individual apparent in situ isotope fractionation effects for perchlorate and nitrate were appreciably smaller than those reported in homogeneous closed systems (0.2 to 0.6 times), even after adjustment for dilution. These results indicate that (1) isotope fractionation factor ratios (e18O/e37Cl, e18O/e15N) derived from homogeneous laboratory systems (e.g. pure culture studies) can be used qualitatively to confirm the occurrence of in situ biodegradation of both perchlorate and nitrate, but (2) the magnitudes of the individual apparent e values cannot be used quantitatively to estimate the in situ extent of biodegradation of either anion.

  8. Effects of prolonged exposure to perchlorate on thyroid and reproductive function in zebrafish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mukhi, S.; Patino, R.

    2007-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of prolonged exposure to perchlorate on (1) thyroid status and reproductive performance of adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) and (2) F1 embryo survival and early larval development. Using a static-renewal procedure, mixed sex populations of adult zebrafish were exposed to 0, 10, and 100 mg/l nominal concentrations of waterborne perchlorate for 10 weeks. Thyroid histology was qualitatively assessed, and females and males were separated and further exposed to their respective treatments for six additional weeks. Eight females in each tank replicate (n = 3) were paired weekly with four males from the same respective treatment, and packed-egg (spawn) volume (PEV) was measured each of the last five weeks. At least once during weeks 14-16 of exposure, other end points measured included fertilization rate, fertilized egg diameter, hatching rate, standard length, and craniofacial development of 4-day-postfertilization larvae and thyroid hormone content of 3.5-h embryos and of exposed mothers. At 10 weeks of exposure, perchlorate at both concentrations caused thyroidal hypertrophy and colloid depletion. A marked reduction in PEV was observed toward the end of the 6-week spawning period, but fertilization and embryo hatching rates were unaffected. Fertilized egg diameter and larval length were increased by parental exposure to perchlorate. Larval head depth was unaffected but the forward protrusion of the lower jaw-associated cartilage complexes, Meckel's and ceratohyal, was decreased. Exposure to both concentrations of perchlorate inhibited whole-body thyroxine content in mothers and embryos, but triiodothyronine content was unchanged. In conclusion, prolonged exposure of adult zebrafish to perchlorate not only disrupts their thyroid endocrine system but also impairs reproduction and influences early F1 development. ?? 2007 Oxford University Press.

  9. Perchlorate Data for Streams and Groundwater in Selected Areas of the United States, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalkhoff, Stephen J.; Stetson, Sarah J.; Lund, Kris D.; Wanty, Richard B.; Linder, Gregory L.

    2010-01-01

    This report presents data collected as part of a reconnaissance study to evaluate the occurrence of perchlorate in rivers and streams and in shallow aquifers in selected areas of the United States. Perchlorate, a component in rocket fuels, fireworks, and some explosives is soluble in water and persists in soils and water for long periods. It is biologically active at relatively low-levels in the environment, and has been identified as an endocrine-disrupting chemical. The purpose of this reconnaissance was to determine the occurrence of perchlorate in agricultural areas of the Midwestern and North-Central United States and in arid Central and Western parts of the United States. Samples were collected from 171 sites on rivers and streams and 146 sites from wells during the summer and early fall of 2004. Samples were collected from surface-water sites in 19 states and from wells in 5 states. Perchlorate was detected in samples collected in 15 states and was detected in 34 of 182 samples from rivers and streams and in 64 of 148 groundwater samples at concentrations equal to or greater than 0.4 micrograms per liter. Perchlorate concentrations were 1.0 micrograms per liter or greater in surface-water samples from seven states and in groundwater samples in four states. Only one surface-water and one groundwater sample had concentrations greater than 5.0 micrograms per liter. Perchlorate concentrations in followup samples collected from 1 to 3 months after the initial sample were unchanged at four of five stream sites.

  10. Occurrence of perchlorate in drinking water and seawater in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Her, Namguk; Jeong, Hyunchan; Kim, Jongsung; Yoon, Yeomin

    2011-08-01

    Concentrations of perchlorate were determined by both liquid-chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and ion chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (IC-MS/MS) in 520 tap-water, 48 bottled-water, and 9 seawater samples obtained or purchased from >100 different locations in South Korea. The method detection limits were 0.013 μg/L for LC-MS and 0.005 μg/L for IC-MS/MS, and the limits of quantification (LOQs) were 0.10 μg/L for LC-MS and 0.032 μg/L for IC-MS/MS. Perchlorate was detected in most (80%) of the tap-water samples, with concentrations higher than the LOQ; the concentrations ranged from <1.0 to 6.1 μg/L (mean 0.56). Perchlorate was detected by IC-MS/MS in many (n = 23) of the bottled-water samples, with concentrations higher then the LOQ, ranging from 0.04 to 0.29 μg/L (mean 0.07 ± 0.01). The concentrations of perchlorate in all seawater samples collected from the various locations were higher than the LOQ, with a mean concentration of 1.15 ± 0.01 μg/L (maximum 6.11 and minimum 0.11). This study provides further evidence that drinking-water sources have been contaminated by perchlorate. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive study on perchlorate assessment in drinking water and seawater in South Korea.

  11. Characterization of an anaerobic marine microbial community exposed to combined fluxes of perchlorate and salinity.

    PubMed

    Carlström, Charlotte I; Lucas, Lauren N; Rohde, Robert A; Haratian, Aryan; Engelbrektson, Anna L; Coates, John D

    2016-11-01

    The recent recognition of the environmental prevalence of perchlorate and its discovery on Mars, Earth's moon, and in meteorites, in addition to its novel application to controlling oil reservoir sulfidogenesis, has resulted in a renewed interest in this exotic ion and its associated microbiology. However, while plentiful data exists on freshwater perchlorate respiring organisms, information on their halophilic counterparts and microbial communities is scarce. Here, we investigated the temporal evolving structure of perchlorate respiring communities under a range of NaCl concentrations (1, 3, 5, 7, and 10 % wt/vol) using marine sediment amended with acetate and perchlorate. In general, perchlorate consumption rates were inversely proportional to NaCl concentration with the most rapid rate observed at 1 % NaCl. At 10 % NaCl, no perchlorate removal was observed. Transcriptional analysis of the 16S rRNA gene indicated that salinity impacted microbial community structure and the most active members were in families Rhodocyclaceae (1 and 3 % NaCl), Pseudomonadaceae (1 NaCl), Campylobacteraceae (1, 5, and 7 % NaCl), Sedimenticolaceae (3 % NaCl), Desulfuromonadaceae (5 and 7 % NaCl), Pelobacteraceae (5 % NaCl), Helicobacteraceae (5 and 7 % NaCl), and V1B07b93 (7 %). Novel isolates of genera Sedimenticola, Marinobacter, Denitromonas, Azoarcus, and Pseudomonas were obtained and their perchlorate respiring capacity confirmed. Although the obligate anaerobic, sulfur-reducing Desulfuromonadaceae species were dominant at 5 and 7 % NaCl, their enrichment may result from biological sulfur cycling, ensuing from the innate ability of DPRB to oxidize sulfide. Additionally, our results demonstrated enrichment of an archaeon of phylum Parvarchaeota at 5 % NaCl. To date, this phylum has only been described in metagenomic experiments of acid mine drainage and is unexpected in a marine community. These studies identify the intrinsic capacity of marine systems to respire

  12. Low-temperature thermal decomposition of crystalline partly and completely deuterated ammonium perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majda, Dorota; Korobov, Alexander; Filek, Urszula; Sulikowski, Bogdan; Midgley, Paul; Nicol, David A.; Klinowski, Jacek

    2011-03-01

    Although ammonium perchlorate, widely used as a rocket propellant, has been extensively investigated for many years, the mechanism of its thermal decomposition at low temperatures remains controversial. Examination of the thermal behaviour of large crystals of partly and completely deuterated ammonium perchlorate by DSC, SEM, TG and QMS reveals that the rates of thermal decomposition depend on the degree of deuteration and decrease in the sequence N[H/D] 4ClO 4 > NH 4ClO 4 > ND 4ClO 4.

  13. A low cost igniter utilizing an SCB and titanium sub-hydride potassium perchlorate pyrotechnic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickes, R. W., Jr.; Grubelich, M. C.; Hartman, J. K.; McCampbell, C. B.; Churchill, J. K.

    1994-01-01

    A conventional NSI (NASA Standard Initiator) normally employs a hot-wire ignition element to ignite ZPP (zirconium potassium perchlorate). With minor modifications to the interior of a header similar to an NSI device to accommodate an SCB (semiconductor bridge), a low cost initiator was obtained. In addition, the ZPP was replaced with THKP (titanium sub-hydride potassium perchlorate) to obtain increased overall gas production and reduced static-charge sensitivity. This paper reports on the all-fire and no-fire levels obtained and on a dual mix device that uses THKP as the igniter mix and a thermite as the output mix.

  14. A low cost igniter utilizing an SCB and titanium sub-hydride potassium perchlorate pyrotechnic

    SciTech Connect

    Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Grubelich, M.C.; Hartman, J.K.; McCampbell, C.B.; Churchill, J.K.

    1993-12-31

    A conventional NSI (NASA standard initiator) normally employs a hot-wire ignition element to ignite ZPP (zirconium potassium perchlorate). With minor modifications to the interior of a header similar to an NSI device to accommodate an SCB (semiconductor bridge), a low cost initiator was obtained. In addition, the ZPP was replaced with THKP (titanium subhydride potassium perchlorate) to obtain increased overall gas production and reduced static-charge sensitivity. This paper reports on the all-fire and no-fire levels obtained and on a dual mix device that uses THKP as the igniter mix and a thermite as the output mix.

  15. Temporal Patterns in Perchlorate, Thiocyanate, and Iodide Excretion in Human Milk

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Andrea B.; Dyke, Jason V.; Martin, Clyde F.; Dasgupta, Purnendu K.

    2007-01-01

    Background Perchlorate and thiocyanate interfere with iodide uptake at the sodium–iodide symporter and are potential disruptors of thyroid hormone synthesis. Perchlorate is a common contaminant of water, food, and human milk. Although it is known that iodide undergoes significant diurnal variations in serum and urinary excretion, less is known about diurnal variations of milk iodide levels. Objectives Variability in perchlorate and thiocyanate excretion in human milk has not been examined. Our objective was to determine variability of perchlorate, thiocyanate, and iodide in serially collected samples of human milk. Methods Ten lactating women were asked to collect six milk samples on each of 3 days. As an alternative, subjects were asked to collect as many milk samples as comfortably possible over 3 days. Samples were analyzed for perchlorate, iodide, and thiocyanate by ion chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Results Individual perchlorate, iodide, and thiocyanate levels varied significantly over time; there was also considerable variation among individuals. The iodide range, mean ± SD, and median for all samples (n = 108) were 3.1–334 μg/L, 87.9 ± 80.9 μg/L, and 55.2 μg/L, respectively. The range, mean ± SD, and median of perchlorate in all samples (n = 147) were 0.5–39.5 μg/L, 5.8 ± 6.2 μg/L, and 4.0 μg/L. The range, mean ± SD, and median of thiocyanate in all samples (n = 117) were 0.4 –228.3 μg/L, 35.6 ± 57.9 μg/L, and 5.6 μg/L. The data are not symmetrically distributed; the mean is higher than the median in all cases. Conclusions Iodine intake may be inadequate in a significant fraction of this study population. Perchlorate and thiocyanate appear to be common in human milk. The role of these chemicals in reducing breast milk iodide is in need of further investigation. PMID:17384762

  16. Linking methane oxidation with perchlorate reduction: a microbial base for possible Martian life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, L. G.; Carlstrom, C.; Baesman, S. M.; Coates, J. D.; Oremland, R. S.

    2011-12-01

    Recent observations of methane (CH4) and perchlorate (ClO4-) within the atmosphere and surface of Mars, respectively, provide impetus for establishing a metabolic linkage between these compounds whereby CH4 acts as an electron donor and perchlorate acts as an electron acceptor. Direct linkage through anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) has not been observed. However, indirect syntrophic oxygenase-dependent oxidation of CH4 with an aerobic methane oxidizer is feasible. The pathway for anaerobic dissimilatory perchlorate reduction includes 3 steps. The first 2 are sequential reductions of (1) perchlorate to chlorate and (2) chlorate to chlorite, mediated by perchlorate reductase. The third step is disproportionation of chlorite to chloride and molecular oxygen, mediated by chlorite dismutase. Utilization of thusly derived oxygen by hydrocarbon-degrading organisms in anoxic environments was first demonstrated by Coates et. al. (1998)1, however the link to aerobic methane oxidation was not examined at that time. Here, we systematically explore the potential for several species of aerobic methanotrophs to couple with chlorite during dissimilatory perchlorate reduction. In one experiment, 0.5 kPa CH4 was completely removed in one day from the headspace of combined cell suspensions of Dechloromonas agitata strain CKB and Methylococcus capsulatus in the presence of 5 mM chlorite. Oxidation of labeled 14CH4 to 14CO2 under similar conditions was later confirmed. Another experiment demonstrated complete removal of 0.2 kPa CH4 over several days by Methylobacter albus strain BG8 with strain CKB in the presence of 5 mM chlorite. Finally, we observed complete removal of 0.2 kPa CH4 in bottles containing natural soil (enriched in methanotrophs by CH4 additions over several weeks) and strain CKB and in the presence of 10 mM chlorite. This soil, collected from a pristine lake shoreline, demonstrated endogenous methane, perchlorate, chlorate and chlorite uptake. Other soil and

  17. Trace analysis of bromate, chlorate, iodate, and perchlorate in natural and bottled waters.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Shane A; Vanderford, Brett J; Rexing, David J

    2005-06-15

    A simple and rapid method has been developed to simultaneously measure sub-microg/L quantities of the oxyhalide anions bromate, chlorate, iodate, and perchlorate in water samples. Water samples (10 mL) are passed through barium and hydronium cartridges to remove sulfate and carbonate, respectively. The method utilizes the direct injection of 10 microL volumes of water samples into a liquid chromatography-tandem triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) system. Ionization is accomplished using electrospray ionization in negative mode. The method detection limits were 0.021 microg/L for perchlorate, 0.045 microg/L for bromate, 0.070 microg/L for iodate, and 0.045 microg/L for chlorate anions in water. The LC-MS/MS method described here was compared to established EPA methods 300.1 and 317.1 for bromate analysis and EPA method 314.0 for perchlorate analysis. Samples collected from sites with known contamination were split and sent to certified laboratories utilizing EPA methods for bromate and perchlorate analysis. At concentrations above the reporting limits for EPA methods, the method described here was always within 20% of the established methods, and generally within 10%. Twenty-one commercially available bottled waters were analyzed for oxyhalides. The majority of bottled waters contained detectable levels of oxyhalides, with perchlorate < or = 0.74 microg/L, bromate < or = 76 microg/L, iodate < or = 25 microg/ L, and chlorate < or = 5.8 microg/L. Perchlorate, iodate, and chlorate were detectable in nearly all natural waters tested, while bromate was only detected in treated waters. Perchlorate was found in several rivers and reservoirs where itwas not found previously using EPA 314.0 (reporting limit of 4 microg/L). This method was also applied to common detergents used for cleaning laboratory glassware and equipmentto evaluate the potential for sample contamination. Only chlorate appeared as a major oxyhalide in the detergents evaluated, with

  18. Contact Electrification of Regolith Particles and Chloride Electrolysis: Synthesis of Perchlorates on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennakone, K.

    2016-10-01

    Contact electrification of chloride-impregnated martian regolith particles due to eolian agitation and moisture condensation on coalesced oppositely charged grains may lead to spontaneous electrolysis that generates hypochlorite, chlorite, chlorate, and perchlorate with a concomitant reduction of water to hydrogen. This process is not curtailed even if moisture condenses as ice because chloride ionizes on the surface of ice. Limitations dictated by potentials needed for electrolysis and breakdown electric fields enable estimation of the required regolith grain size. The estimated dimension turns out to be of the same order of magnitude as the expected median size of martian regolith, and a simple calculation yields the optimum rate of perchlorate production.

  19. Lab-on-a-Chip Sensor for Monitoring Perchlorate in Ground and Surface Water

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    18 Figure 9. Separation of 1 mM chloride, nitrate, sulfate, fluoride, chlorate , PDS, and 0.5 mM perchlorate via EIC. Conditions...TDAPS concentration in the mobile phase. Sample contains 1.0 mM chloride, nitrate, chlorate , iodide, and 0.5 mM perchlorate. Conditions: 20 μL injection...Protection Agency (USEPA) has not set regulatory levels of per- chlorate in drinking water, it issued an Interim Drinking Water Health Advisory in 2008

  20. Perchlorate in Lake Water from an Operating Diamond Mine.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lianna J D; Ptacek, Carol J; Blowes, David W; Groza, Laura G; Moncur, Michael C

    2015-07-07

    Mining-related perchlorate [ClO4(-)] in the receiving environment was investigated at the operating open-pit and underground Diavik diamond mine, Northwest Territories, Canada. Samples were collected over four years and ClO4(-) was measured in various mine waters, the 560 km(2) ultraoligotrophic receiving lake, background lake water and snow distal from the mine. Groundwaters from the underground mine had variable ClO4(-) concentrations, up to 157 μg L(-1), and were typically an order of magnitude higher than concentrations in combined mine waters prior to treatment and discharge to the lake. Snow core samples had a mean ClO4(-) concentration of 0.021 μg L(-1) (n=16). Snow and lake water Cl(-)/ClO4(-) ratios suggest evapoconcentration was not an important process affecting lake ClO4(-) concentrations. The multiyear mean ClO4(-) concentrations in the lake were 0.30 μg L(-1) (n = 114) in open water and 0.24 μg L(-1) (n = 107) under ice, much below the Canadian drinking water guideline of 6 μg L(-1). Receiving lake concentrations of ClO4(-) generally decreased year over year and ClO4(-) was not likely [biogeo]chemically attenuated within the receiving lake. The discharge of treated mine water was shown to contribute mining-related ClO4(-) to the lake and the low concentrations after 12 years of mining were attributed to the large volume of the receiving lake.

  1. Development of a Reference Dose for Perchlorate: Current Issues and Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pleus, R. C.; Goodman, G.; Mattie, D. R.

    2000-01-01

    The perchlorate anion (ClO4) is typically manufactured as the ammonium salt. The most common use of ammonium perchlorate is in the aerospace program as a component of solid rocket fuel. The perchlorate anion is exceedingly stable under environmental conditions and has been found in ground and surface waters in CA, NV, UT, AZ, TX, AK, NY, MD, WV and FL. The National Center for Environmental Assessment (NCEA) of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) is in the process of developing an oral reference dose (RfD) for perchlorate. An oral RfD is a body-weight-adjusted dose that can be consumed daily over an entire lifetime with the expectation of no adverse health effects. Once developed, the new RfD will be used by US EPA as the basis of a safe-drinking-water level (SDWL) guideline. US EPA and regional regulatory agencies will then jointly or separately propose clean-up action levels for ground and surface waters at contaminated sites. The toxicological database on CIO4- as of March 1997 was determined by an expert peer-review panel to be inadequate for the purpose of deriving an oral RfD. For example, little or no experimental data existed on the subchronic, reproductive, or developmental toxicity of perchlorate. To fill gaps in the toxicological database, eight animal studies were designed by a government-industry consortium that included US EPA and AFRL. These studies were performed in 1997-1998. It has been known for many years that in the thyroid, high doses of perchlorate block the function of iodide by competing for iodide binding sites. Perchlorate was used in the 1950s-60s as a treatment for Graves' disease (a hyperthyroid condition). Because of what was already known about the pharmacological mode of action of perchlorate, specific concerns addressed in the design of the recent animal studies included the potential for developmental toxicity, notably neurological development. Upon review of complete study reports from four of the studies and

  2. COPPER CORROSION RESEARCH UPDATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Copper release and corrosion related issues continue to be important to many water systems. The objective of this presentation is to discuss the current state of copper research at the USEPA. Specifically, the role of aging on copper release, use of phosphates for copper corrosio...

  3. Copper and copper proteins in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Montes, Sergio; Rivera-Mancia, Susana; Diaz-Ruiz, Araceli; Tristan-Lopez, Luis; Rios, Camilo

    2014-01-01

    Copper is a transition metal that has been linked to pathological and beneficial effects in neurodegenerative diseases. In Parkinson's disease, free copper is related to increased oxidative stress, alpha-synuclein oligomerization, and Lewy body formation. Decreased copper along with increased iron has been found in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus of Parkinson's disease patients. Copper influences iron content in the brain through ferroxidase ceruloplasmin activity; therefore decreased protein-bound copper in brain may enhance iron accumulation and the associated oxidative stress. The function of other copper-binding proteins such as Cu/Zn-SOD and metallothioneins is also beneficial to prevent neurodegeneration. Copper may regulate neurotransmission since it is released after neuronal stimulus and the metal is able to modulate the function of NMDA and GABA A receptors. Some of the proteins involved in copper transport are the transporters CTR1, ATP7A, and ATP7B and the chaperone ATOX1. There is limited information about the role of those biomolecules in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease; for instance, it is known that CTR1 is decreased in substantia nigra pars compacta in Parkinson's disease and that a mutation in ATP7B could be associated with Parkinson's disease. Regarding copper-related therapies, copper supplementation can represent a plausible alternative, while copper chelation may even aggravate the pathology.

  4. Copper and Copper Proteins in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Mancia, Susana; Diaz-Ruiz, Araceli; Tristan-Lopez, Luis; Rios, Camilo

    2014-01-01

    Copper is a transition metal that has been linked to pathological and beneficial effects in neurodegenerative diseases. In Parkinson's disease, free copper is related to increased oxidative stress, alpha-synuclein oligomerization, and Lewy body formation. Decreased copper along with increased iron has been found in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus of Parkinson's disease patients. Copper influences iron content in the brain through ferroxidase ceruloplasmin activity; therefore decreased protein-bound copper in brain may enhance iron accumulation and the associated oxidative stress. The function of other copper-binding proteins such as Cu/Zn-SOD and metallothioneins is also beneficial to prevent neurodegeneration. Copper may regulate neurotransmission since it is released after neuronal stimulus and the metal is able to modulate the function of NMDA and GABA A receptors. Some of the proteins involved in copper transport are the transporters CTR1, ATP7A, and ATP7B and the chaperone ATOX1. There is limited information about the role of those biomolecules in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease; for instance, it is known that CTR1 is decreased in substantia nigra pars compacta in Parkinson's disease and that a mutation in ATP7B could be associated with Parkinson's disease. Regarding copper-related therapies, copper supplementation can represent a plausible alternative, while copper chelation may even aggravate the pathology. PMID:24672633

  5. Probability of detecting perchlorate under natural conditions in deep groundwater in California and the Southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    We use data from 1626 groundwater samples collected in California, primarily from public drinking water supply wells, to investigate the distribution of perchlorate in deep groundwater under natural conditions. The wells were sampled for the California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment Priority Basin Project. We develop a logistic regression model for predicting probabilities of detecting perchlorate at concentrations greater than multiple threshold concentrations as a function of climate (represented by an aridity index) and potential anthropogenic contributions of perchlorate (quantified as an anthropogenic score, AS). AS is a composite categorical variable including terms for nitrate, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds. Incorporating water-quality parameters in AS permits identification of perturbation of natural occurrence patterns by flushing of natural perchlorate salts from unsaturated zones by irrigation recharge as well as addition of perchlorate from industrial and agricultural sources. The data and model results indicate low concentrations (0.1-0.5 μg/L) of perchlorate occur under natural conditions in groundwater across a wide range of climates, beyond the arid to semiarid climates in which they mostly have been previously reported. The probability of detecting perchlorate at concentrations greater than 0.1 μg/L under natural conditions ranges from 50-70% in semiarid to arid regions of California and the Southwestern United States to 5-15% in the wettest regions sampled (the Northern California coast). The probability of concentrations above 1 μg/L under natural conditions is low (generally <3%).

  6. Probability of detecting perchlorate under natural conditions in deep groundwater in California and the southwestern United States.

    PubMed

    Fram, Miranda S; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-02-15

    We use data from 1626 groundwater samples collected in California, primarily from public drinking water supply wells, to investigate the distribution of perchlorate in deep groundwater under natural conditions. The wells were sampled for the California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment Priority Basin Project. We develop a logistic regression model for predicting probabilities of detecting perchlorate at concentrations greater than multiple threshold concentrations as a function of climate (represented by an aridity index) and potential anthropogenic contributions of perchlorate (quantified as an anthropogenic score, AS). AS is a composite categorical variable including terms for nitrate, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds. Incorporating water-quality parameters in AS permits identification of perturbation of natural occurrence patterns by flushing of natural perchlorate salts from unsaturated zones by irrigation recharge as well as addition of perchlorate from industrial and agricultural sources. The data and model results indicate low concentrations (0.1-0.5 μg/L) of perchlorate occur under natural conditions in groundwater across a wide range of climates, beyond the arid to semiarid climates in which they mostly have been previously reported. The probability of detecting perchlorate at concentrations greater than 0.1 μg/L under natural conditions ranges from 50-70% in semiarid to arid regions of California and the Southwestern United States to 5-15% in the wettest regions sampled (the Northern California coast). The probability of concentrations above 1 μg/L under natural conditions is low (generally <3%).

  7. The colloidal thyroxine (T4) ring as a novel biomarker of perchlorate exposure in the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hu, F.; Sharma, Bibek; Mukhi, S.; Patino, R.; Carr, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if changes in colloidal thyroxine (T4) immunoreactivity can be used as a biomarker of perchlorate exposure in amphibian thyroid tissue. Larval African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis) were exposed to 0, 1, 8, 93, and 1131 ??g perchlorate/l for 38 and 69 days to cover the normal period of larval development and metamorphosis. The results of this study confirmed the presence of an immunoreactive colloidal T4 ring in thyroid follicles of X. laevis and demonstrated that the intensity of this ring is reduced in a concentration-dependent manner by perchlorate exposure. The smallest effective concentration of perchlorate capable of significantly reducing colloidal T4 ring intensity was 8 ??g perchlorate/l. The intensity of the immunoreactive colloidal T4 ring is a more sensitive biomarker of perchlorate exposure than changes in hind limb length, forelimb emergence, tail resorption, thyrocyte hypertrophy, or colloid depletion. We conclude that the colloidal T4 ring can be used as a sensitive biomarker of perchlorate-induced thyroid disruption in amphibians. ?? Copyright 2006 Oxford University Press.

  8. Mechanisms of direct inhibition of the respiratory sulfate-reduction pathway by (per)chlorate and nitrate

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Hans K; Kuehl, Jennifer V; Hazra, Amrita B; Justice, Nicholas B; Stoeva, Magdalena K; Sczesnak, Andrew; Mullan, Mark R; Iavarone, Anthony T; Engelbrektson, Anna; Price, Morgan N; Deutschbauer, Adam M; Arkin, Adam P; Coates, John D

    2015-01-01

    We investigated perchlorate (ClO4−) and chlorate (ClO3−) (collectively (per)chlorate) in comparison with nitrate as potential inhibitors of sulfide (H2S) production by mesophilic sulfate-reducing microorganisms (SRMs). We demonstrate the specificity and potency of (per)chlorate as direct SRM inhibitors in both pure cultures and undefined sulfidogenic communities. We demonstrate that (per)chlorate and nitrate are antagonistic inhibitors and resistance is cross-inducible implying that these compounds share at least one common mechanism of resistance. Using tagged-transposon pools we identified genes responsible for sensitivity and resistance in Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20. We found that mutants in Dde_2702 (Rex), a repressor of the central sulfate-reduction pathway were resistant to both (per)chlorate and nitrate. In general, Rex derepresses its regulon in response to increasing intracellular NADH:NAD+ ratios. In cells in which respiratory sulfate reduction is inhibited, NADH:NAD+ ratios should increase leading to derepression of the sulfate-reduction pathway. In support of this, in (per)chlorate or nitrate-stressed wild-type G20 we observed higher NADH:NAD+ ratios, increased transcripts and increased peptide counts for genes in the core Rex regulon. We conclude that one mode of (per)chlorate and nitrate toxicity is as direct inhibitors of the central sulfate-reduction pathway. Our results demonstrate that (per)chlorate are more potent inhibitors than nitrate in both pure cultures and communities, implying that they represent an attractive alternative for controlling sulfidogenesis in industrial ecosystems. Of these, perchlorate offers better application logistics because of its inhibitory potency, solubility, relative chemical stability, low affinity for mineral cations and high mobility in environmental systems. PMID:25405978

  9. Physiological and Genetic Description of Dissimilatory Perchlorate Reduction by the Novel Marine Bacterium Arcobacter sp. Strain CAB

    PubMed Central

    Carlström, Charlotte I.; Wang, Ouwei; Melnyk, Ryan A.; Bauer, Stefan; Lee, Joyce; Engelbrektson, Anna; Coates, John D.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT A novel dissimilatory perchlorate-reducing bacterium (DPRB), Arcobacter sp. strain CAB, was isolated from a marina in Berkeley, CA. Phylogenetically, this halophile was most closely related to Arcobacter defluvii strain SW30-2 and Arcobacter ellisii. With acetate as the electron donor, strain CAB completely reduced perchlorate (ClO4−) or chlorate (ClO3−) [collectively designated (per)chlorate] to innocuous chloride (Cl−), likely using the perchlorate reductase (Pcr) and chlorite dismutase (Cld) enzymes. When grown with perchlorate, optimum growth was observed at 25 to 30°C, pH 7, and 3% NaCl. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) preparations were dominated by free-swimming straight rods with 1 to 2 polar flagella per cell. Strain CAB utilized a variety of organic acids, fructose, and hydrogen as electron donors coupled to (per)chlorate reduction. Further, under anoxic growth conditions strain CAB utilized the biogenic oxygen produced as a result of chlorite dismutation to oxidize catechol via the meta-cleavage pathway of aerobic catechol degradation and the catechol 2,3-dioxygenase enzyme. In addition to (per)chlorate, oxygen and nitrate were alternatively used as electron acceptors. The 3.48-Mb draft genome encoded a distinct perchlorate reduction island (PRI) containing several transposases. The genome lacks the pcrC gene, which was previously thought to be essential for (per)chlorate reduction, and appears to use an unrelated Arcobacter c-type cytochrome to perform the same function. PMID:23695836

  10. Occurrence of perchlorate in indoor dust from the United States and eleven other countries: implications for human exposure.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yanjian; Wu, Qian; Abualnaja, Khalid O; Asimakopoulos, Alexandros G; Covaci, Adrian; Gevao, Bondi; Johnson-Restrepo, Boris; Kumosani, Taha A; Malarvannan, Govindan; Moon, Hyo-Bang; Nakata, Haruhiko; Sinha, Ravindra K; Minh, Tu Binh; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2015-02-01

    Perchlorate is a widespread environmental contaminant and potent thyroid hormone disrupting compound. Despite this, very little is known with regard to the occurrence of this compound in indoor dust and the exposure of humans to perchlorate through dust ingestion. In this study, 366 indoor dust samples were collected from 12 countries, the USA, Colombia, Greece, Romania, Japan, Korea, Pakistan, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, India, Vietnam, and China, during 2010-2014. Dust samples were extracted by 1% (v/v) methylamine in water. Analyte separation was achieved by an ion exchange (AS-21) column and analysis was performed by high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). The overall concentrations of perchlorate in dust were in the range of 0.02-104μg/g (geometric mean: 0.41μg/g). The indoor dust samples from China contained the highest concentrations (geometric mean: 5.38μg/g). No remarkable differences in perchlorate concentrations in dust were found among various microenvironments (i.e., car, home, office, and laboratory). The estimated median daily intake (EDI) of perchlorate for toddlers through dust ingestion in the USA, Colombia, Greece, Romania, Japan, Korea, Pakistan, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, India, Vietnam, and China was 1.89, 0.37, 1.71, 0.74, 4.90, 7.20, 0.60, 0.80, 1.55, 0.70, 2.15, and 21.3ng/kgbodyweight (bw)/day, respectively. Although high concentrations of perchlorate were measured in some dust samples, the contribution of dust to total perchlorate intake was <5% of the total perchlorate intake in humans. This is the first multinational survey on the occurrence of perchlorate in indoor dust.

  11. Mechanisms of direct inhibition of the respiratory sulfate-reduction pathway by (per)chlorate and nitrate.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Hans K; Kuehl, Jennifer V; Hazra, Amrita B; Justice, Nicholas B; Stoeva, Magdalena K; Sczesnak, Andrew; Mullan, Mark R; Iavarone, Anthony T; Engelbrektson, Anna; Price, Morgan N; Deutschbauer, Adam M; Arkin, Adam P; Coates, John D

    2015-06-01

    We investigated perchlorate (ClO(4)(-)) and chlorate (ClO(3)(-)) (collectively (per)chlorate) in comparison with nitrate as potential inhibitors of sulfide (H(2)S) production by mesophilic sulfate-reducing microorganisms (SRMs). We demonstrate the specificity and potency of (per)chlorate as direct SRM inhibitors in both pure cultures and undefined sulfidogenic communities. We demonstrate that (per)chlorate and nitrate are antagonistic inhibitors and resistance is cross-inducible implying that these compounds share at least one common mechanism of resistance. Using tagged-transposon pools we identified genes responsible for sensitivity and resistance in Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20. We found that mutants in Dde_2702 (Rex), a repressor of the central sulfate-reduction pathway were resistant to both (per)chlorate and nitrate. In general, Rex derepresses its regulon in response to increasing intracellular NADH:NAD(+) ratios. In cells in which respiratory sulfate reduction is inhibited, NADH:NAD(+) ratios should increase leading to derepression of the sulfate-reduction pathway. In support of this, in (per)chlorate or nitrate-stressed wild-type G20 we observed higher NADH:NAD(+) ratios, increased transcripts and increased peptide counts for genes in the core Rex regulon. We conclude that one mode of (per)chlorate and nitrate toxicity is as direct inhibitors of the central sulfate-reduction pathway. Our results demonstrate that (per)chlorate are more potent inhibitors than nitrate in both pure cultures and communities, implying that they represent an attractive alternative for controlling sulfidogenesis in industrial ecosystems. Of these, perchlorate offers better application logistics because of its inhibitory potency, solubility, relative chemical stability, low affinity for mineral cations and high mobility in environmental systems.

  12. Systematics of Natural Perchlorate in Precipitation, Soils, and Plants at the Amargosa Desert Research Site, Nye County, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andraski, B. J.; Stonestrom, D. A.; Jackson, W. A.; Rajagopalan, S.; Taylor, E. M.

    2007-12-01

    Naturally occurring perchlorate is known to be associated with nitrate deposits of the hyperarid Atacama Desert in Chile, and recent large-scale sampling has identified a substantial reservoir (up to 1 kg/ha) of natural perchlorate in diverse unsaturated zones of the arid and semiarid Southwestern United States (Rao et al., 2007, ES&T, DOI: 10.1021/es062853i). The objective of the Amargosa Desert work is to develop a better understanding of the deposition, accumulation, and biological cycling of perchlorate in arid environments. Occurrence of perchlorate was evaluated by sampling shallow soil profiles up to 3 m in depth at four different locations and at two different time periods, and by sampling dominant plant species growing near the subsurface profiles. Deposition of perchlorate was evaluated by analyzing both bulk deposition (precipitation plus dry fall, collected under oil) collected on site and wet deposition samples collected by the National Atmospheric Deposition program at a nearby site. Soil samples and atmospheric-deposition samples were tested for both perchlorate (ClO4- ) and major anions. Perchlorate concentrations (0.2-20 µg/kg) were variable with depth in soil profiles and generally correlated most highly with chloride (Cl-) and nitrate (NO3-), although the intensity of these relations differed among profiles. Plant concentrations were generally above 1 mg/kg, suggesting ClO4- accumulation. Concentrations of ClO4- were generally much greater in total deposition than wet deposition samples, indicating a substantial dryfall component of meteoric deposition. This presentation will present the mass distribution and variability of perchlorate in bulk deposition, soils, and plants. Reasons for observed relations between subsurface concentrations of perchlorate and other anions will be explored.

  13. NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES (NAS) REVIEW OF THE HEALTH IMPLICATIONS OF PERCHLORATE INGESTION (2005)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the interest of resolving scientific questions, the EPA, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration - members of a broader Interagency Working Group on Perchlorate led by the Office of Science and Technology Polic...

  14. QUANTITATION OF PERCHLORATE ION: PRACTICES AND ADVANCES APPLIED TO THE ANALYSIS OF COMMON MATRICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1997, low level perchlorate contamination (<50 ng mL-1 or parts per billion) was discovered in the western United States. Since that time, it has been found in sites scattered around the nation. Although the Environmental Protection Agency has not established a regulation fo...

  15. METHOD FOR THE DETERMINATION OF PERCHLORATE ANION IN PLANT AND SOLID MATRICES BY ION CHROMATOGRAPHY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A standardized method for the analysis of perchlorate in plants was developed, based on dry weight, and applied to the analysis of plant organs, foodstuffs, and plant products. The procedure greatly reduced the ionic interferences in water extracts of plant materials. Ion chro...

  16. RAMAN ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZER AND PLANT TISSUE EXTRACTS FOR PERCHLORATE CONTAMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently, we and others found perchlorate at high levels (approximately 500 - 8000 mg/kg) in ~ 90% of 25+ fertilizers products (primarily lawn-and-garden type) with no known link to mined nitrate-bearing Chilean ore. This ore is used, albeit in small scale, in fertilizer product...

  17. The Effects of Ammonium Perchlorate on Reproduction and Development of Amphibians

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    magnesium [Mg], potassium, and sodium) on early amphibian development have shown that they, and AP in particular, are embryotoxic and significantly...testing, a range-finding test for KI was conducted to determine its embryotoxicity . Task 3: Effects of Perchlorate Derived from Food Sources on

  18. COMPARISON AND EVALUATION OF LABORATORY PERFORMANCE ON A METHOD FOR THE DETERMINATION OF PERCHLORATE IN FERTILIZERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report details the interlaboratory validation of a method for the determination of perchlorate in fertilizers. In this method (EPA/600/R-01/026), a solid sample of fertilizer is first ground. subsequently, the ground material is either leached with deionized water to dissolv...

  19. Reactive Transport Model of Sulfur Cycling as Impacted by Perchlorate and Nitrate Treatments.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yiwei; Hubbard, Christopher G; Li, Li; Bouskill, Nicholas; Molins, Sergi; Zheng, Liange; Sonnenthal, Eric; Conrad, Mark E; Engelbrektson, Anna; Coates, John D; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B

    2016-07-05

    Microbial souring in oil reservoirs produces toxic, corrosive hydrogen sulfide through microbial sulfate reduction, often accompanying (sea)water flooding during secondary oil recovery. With data from column experiments as constraints, we developed the first reactive-transport model of a new candidate inhibitor, perchlorate, and compared it with the commonly used inhibitor, nitrate. Our model provided a good fit to the data, which suggest that perchlorate is more effective than nitrate on a per mole of inhibitor basis. Critically, we used our model to gain insight into the underlying competing mechanisms controlling the action of each inhibitor. This analysis suggested that competition by heterotrophic perchlorate reducers and direct inhibition by nitrite produced from heterotrophic nitrate reduction were the most important mechanisms for the perchlorate and nitrate treatments, respectively, in the modeled column experiments. This work demonstrates modeling to be a powerful tool for increasing and testing our understanding of reservoir-souring generation, prevention, and remediation processes, allowing us to incorporate insights derived from laboratory experiments into a framework that can potentially be used to assess risk and design optimal treatment schemes.

  20. Uptake of perchlorate from aqueous solutions by amine-crosslinked cotton stalk.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xing; Gao, Baoyu; Tan, Xin; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Yue, DongTing; Yue, Qinyan

    2013-10-15

    Virgin cotton stalk was produced into an effective biosorbent for perchlorate adsorption. Surface analysis including BET surface area and SEM illustrated the reduction of porous structure in amine-crosslinked cotton stalk (AC-CS). Elemental and zeta potential analysis validated the graft of some positively charged amine groups on surface of AC-CS. Spectra analysis (XPS, FTIR and Raman spectra) suggested that interaction between AC-CS and ClO4(-) should be based on electrostatic attraction. The maximum adsorption capacity (qmax) of AC-CS for perchlorate at different pHs (3.0, 6.0, 9.0 and 11.0) were calculated as 29.6, 42.6, 41.0 and 33.0 mg/g, respectively. The saturated perchlorate uptakes in column were in range of 25.0-38.1 mg/g at different pHs. In addition, the exhausted AC-CS column was regenerated by 0.5 mol/L of NaCl solution, which was adequate for almost complete desorption of the perchlorate.

  1. The Impact of Temperature on Anaerobic Biological Perchlorate Removal and Aerobic Polishing of the Effluent - paper

    EPA Science Inventory

    This abstract describes a pilot-scale evaluation of anaerobic biological perchlorate (C1O4) removal followed by aerobic effluent polishing. The anaerobic biological contactor operated for 3.5 years. During that period, two effluent polishing evaluations, lasting 311 an...

  2. The Impact of Temperature on Anaerobic Biological Perchlorate Removal and Aerobic Polishing of the Effluent

    EPA Science Inventory

    This abstract describes a pilot-scale evaluation of anaerobic biological perchlorate (C1O4) removal followed by aerobic effluent polishing. The anaerobic biological contactor operated for 3.5 years. During that period, two effluent polishing evaluations, lasting 311 an...

  3. Preparation and Analysis of Solid Solutions in the Potassium Perchlorate-Permanganate System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Garrett K.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an experiment, designed for and tested in an advanced inorganic laboratory methods course for college seniors and graduate students, that prepares and analyzes several samples in the nearly ideal potassium perchlorate-permanganate solid solution series. The results are accounted for by a theoretical treatment based upon aqueous…

  4. A Survey on the Temporal and Spatial Distribution of Perchlorate in the Potomac River

    EPA Science Inventory

    Samples of river water and treated drinking water were obtained from eight sites along the Potomac River between western Maryland and Washington DC. Samples were collected each month from October 2007 to September 2008 and analyzed for perchlorate by ion chromatography/mass spec...

  5. Feasibility Study for the Reduction of Perchlorate, Iodide, and Other Aqueous Anions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    Cyclic Voltammetry (CV) was used as a technique to determine the feasibility of the use of a coulometric detector in the determination of perchlorate, iodide, and various other anions commonly found in drinking water. Through the CV analysis, it was determined that only iodide could be accurately

  6. Periodate salts as pyrotechnic oxidizers: development of barium- and perchlorate-free incendiary formulations.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Jared D; Sabatini, Jesse J; Chen, Gary

    2012-07-09

    In a flash: pyrotechnic incendiary formulations with good stabilities toward various ignition stimuli have been developed without the need for barium or perchlorate oxidizers. KIO(4) and NaIO(4) were introduced as pyrotechnic oxidizers and exhibited excellent pyrotechnic performance. The periodate salts may garner widespread use in military and civilian fireworks because of their low hygroscopicities and high chemical reactivities.

  7. Occurrence of perchlorate in rice from different areas in the Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do-Hyung; Yoon, Yeomin; Baek, Kitae; Han, Jonghun; Her, Namguk

    2014-01-01

    Perchlorate concentrations in rice samples from many different provinces, and correlation with surface water contamination, were investigated in the Republic of Korea. Perchlorate levels in the 51 rice samples purchased from local markets ranged from below the detection limit to 1.79 ± 0.39 μg/kg with a mean level of 0.21 μg/kg and 7 samples collected from the Nakdong River watershed ranged from 0.38 ± 0.1 to 3.23 ± 0.47 μg/kg with a mean level of 0.9 μg/kg. The correlation coefficient between perchlorate levels in rice samples from the Nakdong river watershed and the levels in surface water was estimated to be approximately 0.904 in the 95% confidence interval. These results show that surface water contamination was highly related to the perchlorate pollution of rice in the Republic of Korea.

  8. (Per)chlorate reduction by an acetogenic bacterium, Sporomusa sp., isolated from an underground gas storage

    PubMed Central

    Mehboob, Farrakh; van Gelder, Antonie H.; Rijpstra, W. Irene C.; Damsté, Jaap S. Sinninghe; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    2010-01-01

    A mesophilic bacterium, strain An4, was isolated from an underground gas storage reservoir with methanol as substrate and perchlorate as electron acceptor. Cells were Gram-negative, spore-forming, straight to curved rods, 0.5–0.8 μm in diameter, and 2–8 μm in length, growing as single cells or in pairs. The cells grew optimally at 37°C, and the pH optimum was around 7. Strain An4 converted various alcohols, organic acids, fructose, acetoin, and H2/CO2 to acetate, usually as the only product. Succinate was decarboxylated to propionate. The isolate was able to respire with (per)chlorate, nitrate, and CO2. The G+C content of the DNA was 42.6 mol%. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain An4 was most closely related to Sporomusa ovata (98% similarity). The bacterium reduced perchlorate and chlorate completely to chloride. Key enzymes, perchlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase, were detected in cell-free extracts. PMID:20680263

  9. Developmental exposure to perchlorate alters synaptic transmission in hippocampus of the adult rat.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Food Quality Protection Act and Safe Drinking Water Act mandate the EPA to identify potential health risks associated with chemicals that act on the endocrine system. Perchlorate, a contaminant found in food and water supplies throughout the USA, blocks iodine uptake into the...

  10. DETERMINATION OF PERCHLORATE IN SOME FERTILIZERS AND PLANT TISSUE BY RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have successfully used Raman spectroscopy for the direct qualitative and quantitative analysis of perchlorate in fertilizer extracts without the need for chromatographic separation. This approach is attractive because Raman is not hindered by the presence of water or of high ...

  11. DETERMINATION OF PERCHLORATE AT PARTS-PER-BILLION LEVELS IN PLANTS BY ION CHROMATOGRAPHY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A standardized method for the analysis of perchlorate in plants was developed, based on dry weight, and applied to the analysis of plant organs, foodstuffs, and plant products. The procedure greatly reduced the ionic interferences in water extracts of plant materials. The high ba...

  12. Graphene-a promising material for removal of perchlorate (ClO4-) from water.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, Jothinathan; Vasudevan, Subramanyan

    2013-08-01

    A batch adsorption process was applied to investigate the removal of perchlorate (ClO4 (-)) from water by graphene. In doing so, the thermodynamic adsorption isotherm and kinetic studies were also carried out. Graphene was prepared by a facile liquid-phase exfoliation. Graphene was characterized by Raman spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, and zeta potential measurements. A systematic study of the adsorption process was performed by varying pH, ionic strength, and temperature. The adsorption efficiency of graphene was 99.2 %, suggesting that graphene is an excellent adsorbent for ClO4 (-) removal from water. The rate constants for all these kinetic models were calculated, and the results indicate that second-order kinetics model was well suitable to model the kinetic adsorption of ClO4 (-). Equilibrium data were well described by the typical Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The experimental results showed that graphene is an excellent perchlorate adsorbent with an adsorbent capacity of up to 0.024 mg/g at initial perchlorate concentration of 2 mg/L and temperature of 298 K. Thermodynamic studies revealed that the adsorption reaction was a spontaneous and endothermic process. Graphene removed the perchlorate present in the water and reduced it to a permissible level making it drinkable.

  13. ISSUES IN MANAGING THE RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH PERCHLORATE IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) contamination of ground and surface waters has placed drinking water supplies at risk in communities throughout the US, especially in the West. Several major assessment studies of that risk in terms of health and environmental impact are ...

  14. Heterotrophic-autotrophic sequential system for reductive nitrate and perchlorate removal.

    PubMed

    Ucar, Deniz; Cokgor, Emine Ubay; Sahinkaya, Erkan

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate and perchlorate were identified as significant water contaminants all over the world. This study aims at evaluating the performances of the heterotrophic-autotrophic sequential denitrification process for reductive nitrate and perchlorate removal from drinking water. The reduced nitrate concentration in the heterotrophic reactor increased with increasing methanol concentrations and the remaining nitrate/nitrite was further removed in the following autotrophic denitrifying process. The performances of the sequential process were studied under varying nitrate loads of [Formula: see text] at a fixed hydraulic retention time of 2 h. The C/N ratio in the heterotrophic reactor varied between 1.24 and 2.77 throughout the study. Nitrate and perchlorate reduced completely with maximum initial concentrations of [Formula: see text] and 1000 µg/L, respectively. The maximum denitrification rate for the heterotrophic reactor was [Formula: see text] when the bioreactor was fed with [Formula: see text] and 277 mg/L methanol. For the autotrophic reactor, the highest denitrification rate was [Formula: see text] in the first period when the heterotrophic reactor performance was low. Perchlorate reduction was initiated in the heterotrophic reactor, but completed in the following autotrophic process. Effluent sulphate concentration was below the drinking water standard level of 250 mg/L and pH was in the neutral level.

  15. PERCHLORATE LEVELS IN SAMPLES OF SODIUM NITRATE FERTILIZER DERIVED FROM CHILEAN CALICHE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Paleogeochemical deposits in northern Chile are a rich source of naturally occurring sodium nitrate. These caliche ores are mined and processed to isolate NaNO3 (16-0-0) for use in fertilizers. Coincidentally, these very same deposits are a natural soure of perchlorate anion (C...

  16. Groundwater movement, recharge, and perchlorate occurrence in a faulted alluvial aquifer in California (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izbicki, John A.; Teague, Nicholas F.; Hatzinger, Paul B.; Böhlke, John Karl; Sturchio, Neil C.

    2015-01-01

    Perchlorate from military, industrial, and legacy agricultural sources is present within an alluvial aquifer in the Rialto-Colton groundwater subbasin, 80 km east of Los Angeles, California (USA). The area is extensively faulted, with water-level differences exceeding 60 m across parts of the Rialto-Colton Fault separating the Rialto-Colton and Chino groundwater subbasins. Coupled well-bore flow and depth-dependent water-quality data show decreases in well yield and changes in water chemistry and isotopic composition, reflecting changing aquifer properties and groundwater recharge sources with depth. Perchlorate movement through some wells under unpumped conditions from shallower to deeper layers underlying mapped plumes was as high as 13 kg/year. Water-level maps suggest potential groundwater movement across the Rialto-Colton Fault through an overlying perched aquifer. Upward flow through a well in the Chino subbasin near the Rialto-Colton Fault suggests potential groundwater movement across the fault through permeable layers within partly consolidated deposits at depth. Although potentially important locally, movement of groundwater from the Rialto-Colton subbasin has not resulted in widespread occurrence of perchlorate within the Chino subbasin. Nitrate and perchlorate concentrations at the water table, associated with legacy agricultural fertilizer use, may be underestimated by data from long-screened wells that mix water from different depths within the aquifer.

  17. ION CHROMATOGRAPHIC DETERMINATION OF PERCHLORATE ION: ANALYSIS OF FERTILIZERS AND RELATED MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A solid fertilizer sample is dissolved or leached to solutilize the perchlorate as the aqueous anion. If needed, the liquid is filtered or centrifuged. The rsulting solution is subjected to ion chromatography using an adaptation of EPA Method 314.0. Preliminary screenng is requir...

  18. (Per)chlorate reduction by an acetogenic bacterium, Sporomusa sp., isolated from an underground gas storage.

    PubMed

    Balk, Melike; Mehboob, Farrakh; van Gelder, Antonie H; Rijpstra, W Irene C; Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe; Stams, Alfons J M

    2010-09-01

    A mesophilic bacterium, strain An4, was isolated from an underground gas storage reservoir with methanol as substrate and perchlorate as electron acceptor. Cells were Gram-negative, spore-forming, straight to curved rods, 0.5-0.8 microm in diameter, and 2-8 microm in length, growing as single cells or in pairs. The cells grew optimally at 37 degrees C, and the pH optimum was around 7. Strain An4 converted various alcohols, organic acids, fructose, acetoin, and H(2)/CO(2) to acetate, usually as the only product. Succinate was decarboxylated to propionate. The isolate was able to respire with (per)chlorate, nitrate, and CO(2). The G+C content of the DNA was 42.6 mol%. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain An4 was most closely related to Sporomusa ovata (98% similarity). The bacterium reduced perchlorate and chlorate completely to chloride. Key enzymes, perchlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase, were detected in cell-free extracts.

  19. DETERMINATION OF PERCHLORATE AT PARTS-PER-BILLION LEVELS IN PLANTS BY ION CHROMATOGRAPHY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method for the analysis of perchlorate in plants was developed, based on dry weight, and applied to the analysis of plant organs, foodstuffs, and plant products. The method reduced greatly the ionic interferences in water extracts of plant materials. The high background conduct...

  20. Double-Polymer-Modified Pencil Lead for Stripping Voltammetry of Perchlorate in Drinking Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izadyar, Anahita; Kim, Yushin; Ward, Michelle M.; Amemiya, Shigeru

    2012-01-01

    The inexpensive and disposable electrode based on a double-polymer-modified pencil lead is proposed for upper-division undergraduate instrumental laboratories to enable the highly sensitive detection of perchlorate. Students fabricate and utilize their own electrodes in the 3-4 h laboratory session to learn important concepts and methods of…

  1. A STUDY ON THE ACCUMULATION OF PERCHLORATE IN YOUNG HEAD LETTUCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The overall objective of this study was to demonstrate in a greenhouse study the potential for incorporation of perchlorate from aqueous solutions of 10, 50, 100, 500, 1,000, 5,000, and 10,000 ppb into an agricultural food crop (lettuce; Lactuca sativa), which is typically grown ...

  2. DISTRIBUTION OF PERCHLORATE IN SAMPLES OF SODIUM NITRATE (CHILE SALTPETER) FERTILIZER DERIVED FROM NATURAL CALICHE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two lots of sodium nitrate fertilizer derived from Chilean caliche were analyzed to determine the distribution of perchlorate throughout the material. Although our samples represent a limited amount, we found that distribution was essentially homogeneous in any 100-g portion. Whe...

  3. A SIMPLE MODEL FOR THE UPTAKE, TRANSLOCATION, AND ACCUMULATION OF PERCHLORATE IN TOBACCO PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple mathematical model is being developed to describe the uptake, translocation, and accumulation of perchlorate in tobacco plants. The model defines a plant as a set of compartments, consisting of mass balance differential equations and plant-specific physiological paramet...

  4. LOW-LEVEL DETERMINATION OF PERCHLORATE IN DRINKING WATER USING ION CHROMATOGRAPHY MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate is a drinking water contaminant originating from the dissolution of the salts of ammonium, potassium, magnesium, or sodium in water. It is used primarily as an oxidant in solid propellant for rockets, missiles, pyrotechnics, as a component in air bag inflators, and i...

  5. Perchlorate production by photodecomposition of aqueous chlorine solutions.

    PubMed

    Rao, Balaji; Estrada, Nubia; McGee, Shelly; Mangold, Jerry; Gu, Baohua; Jackson, W Andrew

    2012-11-06

    Aqueous chlorine solutions (defined as chlorine solutions (Cl(2,T)) containing solely or a combination of molecular chlorine (Cl(2)), hypochlorous acid (HOCl), and hypochlorite (OCl(-))) are known to produce toxic inorganic disinfection byproduct (e.g., chlorate and chlorite) through photoactivated transformations. Recent reports of perchlorate (ClO(4)(-)) production-a well-known thyroid hormone disruptor- from stored bleach solutions indicates the presence of unexplored transformation pathway(s). The evaluation of this potential ClO(4)(-) source is important given the widespread use of aqueous chlorine as a disinfectant. In this study, we perform detailed rate analysis of ClO(4)(-) generation from aqueous chlorine under varying environmental conditions including ultraviolet (UV) light sources, intensity, solution pH, and Cl(2,T) concentrations. Our results show that ClO(4)(-) is produced upon UV exposure of aqueous chlorine solutions with yields ranging from 0.09 × 10(-3) to 9.2 × 10(-3)% for all experimental conditions. The amount of ClO(4)(-) produced depends on the starting concentrations of Cl(2,T) and ClO(3)(-), UV source wavelength, and solution pH, but it is independent of light intensity. We hypothesize a mechanistic pathway derived from known reactions of Cl(2,T) photodecomposition that involves the reaction of Cl radicals with ClO(3)(-) to produce ClO(4)(-) with calculated rate coefficient (k(ClO4-)) of (4-40) × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) and (3-250) × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) for UV-B/C and UV-A, respectively. The measured ClO(4)(-) concentrations for both UV-B and UV-C experiments agreed well with our model (R(2) = 0.88-0.99), except under UV-A light exposure (R(2) = 0.52-0.93), suggesting the possible involvement of additional pathways at higher wavelengths. Based on our results, phototransformation of aqueous chlorine solutions at concentrations relevant to drinking water treatment would result in ClO(4)(-) concentrations (~0.1 μg L(-1)) much below the proposed

  6. High Pressure Burn Rate Measurements on an Ammonium Perchlorate Propellant

    SciTech Connect

    Glascoe, E A; Tan, N

    2010-04-21

    High pressure deflagration rate measurements of a unique ammonium perchlorate (AP) based propellant are required to design the base burn motor for a Raytheon weapon system. The results of these deflagration rate measurements will be key in assessing safety and performance of the system. In particular, the system may experience transient pressures on the order of 100's of MPa (10's kPSI). Previous studies on similar AP based materials demonstrate that low pressure (e.g. P < 10 MPa or 1500 PSI) burn rates can be quite different than the elevated pressure deflagration rate measurements (see References and HPP results discussed herein), hence elevated pressure measurements are necessary in order understand the deflagration behavior under relevant conditions. Previous work on explosives have shown that at 100's of MPa some explosives will transition from a laminar burn mechanism to a convective burn mechanism in a process termed deconsolidative burning. The resulting burn rates that are orders-of-magnitude faster than the laminar burn rates. Materials that transition to the deconsolidative-convective burn mechanism at elevated pressures have been shown to be considerably more violent in confined heating experiments (i.e. cook-off scenarios). The mechanisms of propellant and explosive deflagration are extremely complex and include both chemical, and mechanical processes, hence predicting the behavior and rate of a novel material or formulation is difficult if not impossible. In this work, the AP/HTPB based material, TAL-1503 (B-2049), was burned in a constant volume apparatus in argon up to 300 MPa (ca. 44 kPSI). The burn rate and pressure were measured in-situ and used to calculate a pressure dependent burn rate. In general, the material appears to burn in a laminar fashion at these elevated pressures. The experiment was reproduced multiple times and the burn rate law using the best data is B = (0.6 {+-} 0.1) x P{sup (1.05{+-}0.02)} where B is the burn rate in mm/s and

  7. Estimating perchlorate exposure from food and tap water based on US biomonitoring and occurrence data.

    PubMed

    Huber, David R; Blount, Benjamin C; Mage, David T; Letkiewicz, Frank J; Kumar, Amit; Allen, Ruth H

    2011-01-01

    Human biomonitoring data show that exposure to perchlorate is widespread in the United States. The predominant source of intake is food, whereas drinking water is a less frequent and far smaller contributor. We used spot urine samples for over 2700 subjects and estimated 24 h intake using new creatinine adjustment equations. Merging data from surveys of national health (NHANES) with drinking water monitoring (UCMR), we categorized survey participants according to their potential exposure through drinking water or food. By subtracting daily food doses of perchlorate from the oral reference dose (RfD), we derive an allowances for perchlorate in tap water for several populations. The calculated mean food perchlorate dose in the United States was 0.081 μg/kg/day compared to 0.101 μg/kg/day for those who also had a potential drinking water component. The calculated 95th percentile doses, typically falling between 0.2 and 0.4 μg/kg/day, were well below the RfD (0.7 μg/kg/day) in all populations analyzed. Children aged 6-11 years had the highest mean perchlorate doses in food (0.147 μg/kg/day), with an additional water contribution of only 0.003 μg/kg/day representing just 2% of exposure. Pregnant women had a mean food dose of 0.093 vs 0.071 μg/kg/day for all women of reproductive age. At the 95th percentile intake for both the total population and women of child-bearing age (15-44), the perchlorate contribution from food was 86% and from drinking water 14% (respectively, 30% and 5% of the RfD). At the mean for the same groups, the food to water contribution ratio is approximately 80:20. We calculate that an average 66 kg pregnant woman consuming a 90th percentile food dose (0.198 μg/kg/day) could also drink the 90th percentile of community water for pregnant women (0.033 l/kg/day) containing 15 μg/l perchlorate without exceeding the 0.7 μg/kg/day reference dose.

  8. Formation of aqueous solutions on Mars via deliquescence of chloride-perchlorate binary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, R. V.; Chevrier, V. F.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2014-05-01

    Perchlorate salts, known to exist on Mars, can readily absorb water vapor and deliquesce into aqueous solutions even at low temperatures. The multiple soluble ionic species, such as chloride salts, present in the Martian subsurface may affect this deliquescence. Here we study the deliquescence (solid to aqueous transition) and efflorescence (aqueous to solid transition) of three perchlorate/chloride mixtures: KClO4/KCl at 253 K, NaClO4/NaCl at 243 and 253 K, and Mg(ClO4)2/MgCl2 at 243 and 253 K. A Raman microscope with an environmental cell was used to monitor the phase transitions of internally mixed ClO-4/Cl- particles as a function of the perchlorate mole fraction. The eutonic relative humidity (where deliquescence begins to occur regardless of ClO-4 mole fraction), deliquescence relative humidity (DRH, where complete deliquescence occurs), and efflorescence relative humidity (ERH) were measured for several perchlorate mole ratios for each cation system. At the temperatures studied, the eutonic relative humidity was measured to be 28% RH for Mg(ClO4)2/MgCl2 mixtures, 38% RH for NaClO4/NaCl mixtures, and 82% RH for KClO4/KCl mixtures. The DRH depends on the perchlorate mole ratio, but is below the DRH of the least deliquescent (highest DRH) pure salt. When humidity is lowered around an aqueous salt mixture, we find that efflorescence occurs at an RH below the DRH due to the kinetic inhibition of crystallization. The ERH values of the salt solutions were as low as 5% RH for Mg(ClO4)2/MgCl2 mixtures, as low as 13% RH for NaClO4/NaCl mixtures, and as low as 66% RH for KClO4/KCl mixtures. The low eutonic RH values for the Na+ and Mg2+ perchlorate/chloride mixtures are important: wherever Mg(ClO4)2 and MgCl2 or NaClO4 and NaCl coexist at the temperatures studied, mixtures will contain a stable aqueous phase above 28 or 38% RH, respectively, regardless of the perchlorate mole fraction. This liquid water may persist until 5 or 13% RH, respectively.

  9. Fractionation of stable isotopes in perchlorate and nitrate during in situ biodegradation in a sandy aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatzinger, P.B.; Böhlke, J.K.; Sturchio, N.C.; Gu, B.; Heraty, L.J.; Borden, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    Environmental context. Perchlorate (ClO4-) and nitrate (NO3-) are common co-contaminants in groundwater, with both natural and anthropogenic sources. Each of these compounds is biodegradable, so in situ enhanced bioremediation is one alternative for treating them in groundwater. Because bacteria typically fractionate isotopes during biodegradation, stable isotope analysis is increasingly used to distinguish this process from transport or mixing-related decreases in contaminant concentrations. However, for this technique to be useful in the field to monitor bioremediation progress, isotope fractionation must be quantified under relevant environmental conditions. In the present study, we quantify the apparent in situ fractionation effects for stable isotopes in ClO4- (Cl and O) and NO3- (N and O) resulting from biodegradation in an aquifer. Abstract. An in situ experiment was performed in a shallow alluvial aquifer in Maryland to quantify the fractionation of stable isotopes in perchlorate (Cl and O) and nitrate (N and O) during biodegradation. An emulsified soybean oil substrate that was previously injected into this aquifer provided the electron donor necessary for biological perchlorate reduction and denitrification. During the field experiment, groundwater extracted from an upgradient well was pumped into an injection well located within the in situ oil barrier, and then groundwater samples were withdrawn for the next 30 h. After correction for dilution (using Br- as a conservative tracer of the injectate), perchlorate concentrations decreased by 78% and nitrate concentrations decreased by 82% during the initial 8.6 h after the injection. The observed ratio of fractionation effects of O and Cl isotopes in perchlorate (18O/37Cl) was 2.6, which is similar to that observed in the laboratory using pure cultures (2.5). Denitrification by indigenous bacteria fractionated O and N isotopes in nitrate at a ratio of ???0.8 (18O/15N), which is within the range of values

  10. Accumulation of perchlorate in aquatic and terrestrial plants at a field scale.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kui; Anderson, Todd A; Jones, Matthew W; Smith, Philip N; Jackson, W Andrew

    2004-01-01

    Previous laboratory-scale studies have documented perchlorate ClO(-)(4) uptake by different plant species, but less information is available at field scale, where ClO(-)(4) uptake may be affected by environmental conditions, such as distance to streams or shallow water tables, exposure duration, and species. This study examined uptake of ClO(-)(4) in smartweed (Polygonum spp.) and watercress (Nasturtium spp.) as well as more than forty trees, including ash (Fraxinus greggii A. Gray), chinaberry (Melia azedarach L.), elm (Ulmus parvifolia Jacq.), willow (Salix nigra Marshall), mulberry [Broussonetia papyrifera (L.) Vent.], and hackberry (Celtis laevigata Willd.) from multiple streams surrounding a perchlorate-contaminated site. Results indicate a large potential for ClO(-)(4) accumulation in aquatic and terrestrial plants, with ClO(-)(4) concentration in plant tissues approximately 100 times higher than that in bulk water. Perchlorate accumulation in leaves of terrestrial plants was also dependent on species, with hackberry, willow, and elm having a strong potential to accumulate ClO(-)(4). Generally, trees located closer to the stream had a higher ClO(-)(4) accumulation than trees located farther away from the stream. Seasonal leaf sampling of terrestrial plants indicated that ClO(-)(4) accumulation also was affected by exposure duration, with highest accumulation observed in the late growing cycle, although leaf concentrations for a given tree were highly variable. Perchlorate may be re-released into the environment via leaching and rainfall as indicated by lower perchlorate concentrations in collected leaf litter. Information obtained from this study will be helpful to understand the fate of ClO(-)(4) in macrophytes and natural systems.

  11. Removing perchlorate from samples to facilitate organics detection by pyrolitic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Kiparski, Guntram R.; Parker, David R.; Tsapin, Alexandre I.

    2013-07-01

    Thermal volatilization or pyrolysis of solid samples followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TV-GC-MS) or other downstream analyses has proven robustness and has been adopted for the extraction of organic compounds for their detection in planetary lander science missions (e.g., Viking Lander GC-MS, Phoenix TEGA, MSL SAM, and the future ExoMars MOMA). Pyrolysis to extract organic compounds from soil has limitations when oxidants co-occur in the analyzed sample unless the desired end product is CO2. Pyrolysis of such soils may result in oxidation of organics to CO2 during heating, and thus make organics characterization difficult, if not impossible. Analytical investigations seeking to identify organics in martian soils containing oxidants could benefit from the deployment of technologies that remove known and putative oxidants prior to thermal volatilization. We conducted a series of experiments in order to determine if a polymeric anion exchange resin, commonly used for removing the perchlorate anion from contaminated municipal water supplies, could sustain its substantial perchlorate removal capability while keeping organic compounds intact for downstream detection. We demonstrated that this resin can strongly bind perchlorate from aqueous solution while simultaneously leaving amino acids substantially unaltered. The perchlorate-binding resin could be easily adopted as a pre-treatment for martian soil extracts to create analytical systems with improved organics characterization capabilities compatible with existing TV-GC-MS systems. We propose this strategy to aid detection and characterization of putative martian organics co-situated with perchlorate at sampling sites.

  12. The formation of sulfate, nitrate and perchlorate salts in the martian atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Megan L.; Claire, Mark W.; Catling, David C.; Zahnle, Kevin J.

    2014-03-01

    In extremely arid regions on Earth, such as the Atacama Desert, nitrate, sulfate and perchlorate salts form in the atmosphere and accumulate on the surface from dry deposition according to diagnostic evidence in their oxygen isotopes. Salts of similar oxyanions should have formed in the atmosphere of Mars because of comparable photochemical reactions. We use a 1-D photochemical model to calculate the deposition rates of sulfate, nitrogen oxyanions, and perchlorate from Mars' atmosphere, given a plausible range of volcanic fluxes of sulfur- and chlorine-containing gases in the past. To calculate integrated fluxes over time, we assume that throughout the last 3 byr (the Amazonian eon), the typical background atmosphere would have been similar to today's cold and dry environment. If the soil has been mixed by impact perturbations to a characteristic depth of ∼2 m during this time, given a time-average volcanic flux 0.1% of the modern terrestrial volcanic flux, the model suggests that the soil would have accumulated 1.0-1.7 wt.% SO42- and 0.2-0.4 wt.% N in the form of pernitrate (peroxynitrate) or nitrate. The calculated sulfate concentration is consistent with in situ observations of soils from rovers and landers and orbital gamma ray spectroscopy. However, nitrates or pernitrates are yet to be detected. The modeled formation of perchlorate via purely gas-phase oxidation of volcanically-derived chlorine is insufficient by orders of magnitude to explain 0.4-0.6 wt.% ClO4- measured by NASA's Phoenix Lander. The far smaller amount of ozone in the martian atmosphere compared to the terrestrial atmosphere and the colder, drier conditions are the cause of lower rates of gas phase oxidation of chlorine volatiles to perchloric acid. Our calculations imply that non-gas-phase processes not included in the photochemical model, such as heterogeneous reactions, are likely important for the formation of perchlorate and are yet to be identified.

  13. Co-occurring exposure to perchlorate, nitrate and thiocyanate alters thyroid function in healthy pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Megan K.; Blount, Benjamin C.; Valentin-Blasini, Liza; Wapner, Ronald; Whyatt, Robin; Gennings, Chris; Factor-Litvak, Pam

    2015-01-01

    Background Adequate maternal thyroid function during pregnancy is necessary for normal fetal brain development, making pregnancy a critical window of vulnerability to thyroid disrupting insults. Sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) inhibitors, namely perchlorate, nitrate, and thiocyanate, have been shown individually to competitively inhibit uptake of iodine by the thyroid. Several epidemiologic studies examined the association between these individual exposures and thyroid function. Few studies have examined the effect of this chemical mixture on thyroid function during pregnancy. Objectives We examined the cross sectional association between urinary perchlorate, thiocyanate and nitrate concentrations and thyroid function among healthy pregnant women living in New York City using weighted quantile sum (WQS) regression. Methods We measured thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and free thyroxine (FreeT4) in blood samples; perchlorate, thiocyanate, nitrate and iodide in urine samples collected from 284 pregnant women at 12 (± 2.8) weeks gestation. We examined associations between urinary analyte concentrations and TSH or FreeT4 using linear regression or WQS adjusting for gestational age, urinary iodide and creatinine. Results Individual analyte concentrations in urine were significantly correlated (Spearman’s r 0.4–0.5, p < 0.001). Linear regression analyses did not suggest associations between individual concentrations and thyroid function. The WQS revealed a significant positive association between the weighted sum of urinary concentrations of the three analytes and increased TSH. Perchlorate had the largest weight in the index, indicating the largest contribution to the WQS. Conclusions Co-exposure to perchlorate, nitrate and thiocyanate may alter maternal thyroid function, specifically TSH, during pregnancy. PMID:26408806

  14. An Ion-selective Electrode for Anion Perchlorate in Thick-film Technology

    PubMed Central

    Segui, María Jesús; Lizondo-Sabater, Josefa; Martínez-Máñez, Ramon; Sancenon, Félix; Soto, Juan; Garcia-Breijo, Eduardo; Gil, Luis

    2006-01-01

    The ionophore 1,4,7,10,13-penta(n-octyl)-1,4,7,10,13-pentaazacyclopentadecane (L1) was used for the development of miniaturised perchlorate-selective electrodes in thick-film technology. Different PVC membranes containing L1 and the plasticizers o-nitrophenyl octyl ether (NPOE), dibutyl phthalate (DBP), bis(2-ethylhexyl)sebacate (DOS) and dibutyl sebacate (DBS) were prepared and placed on a graphite working electrode manufactured by using thick film serigraphic technology. The perchlorate selective electrode containing DBS as plasticizer showed a potentiometric Nernstian response of -57 mV per decade in a range of perchlorate concentration from 1 × 10-4 to 1 × 10-1 M with a detection limit of 5 × 10-5 M. The ion selective electrodes containing DBP and NPOE as plasticizers exhibit a working range from 6.3 × 10-5 to 1 × 10-1 M and 7.4 × 10-5 to 1 × 10-1 M for perchlorate, respectively, with a detection limit of ca. 2.2 × 10-5 M. For all three electrodes a response time of ca. 5 s was found. The prepared electrodes do not show appreciable decay of the slope for at least 25 days. Potentiometric selectivity coefficients (log KpotClO4-,X-) with respect to the primary anion perchlorate were evaluated using the fixed interference method. These coefficients are of the order of 10-1.7 or smaller, indicating the relatively poor interference of the different anions studied.

  15. Contribution of tap water to chlorate and perchlorate intake: a market basket study.

    PubMed

    Asami, Mari; Yoshida, Nobue; Kosaka, Koji; Ohno, Koichi; Matsui, Yoshihiko

    2013-10-01

    The contributions of water to total levels of chlorate and perchlorate intake were determined using food and water samples from a market basket study from 10 locations in Japan between 2008 and 2009. Foods were categorized into 13 groups and analyzed along with tap water. The average total chlorate intake was 333 (min. 193-max. 486) μg/day for samples cooked with tap water. The contribution of tap water to total chlorate intake was as high as 47%-58%, although total chlorate intake was less than 32% of the tolerable daily intake, 1500 μg/day for body weight of 50 kg. For perchlorate, daily intake from water was 0.7 (0.1-4.4) μg/day, which is not high compared to the average total intake of 14 (2.5-84) μg/day, while the reference dose (RfD) is 35 μg/day and the provisional maximum tolerable daily intake (PMTDI) is 500 μg/day for body weight of 50 kg. The highest intake of perchlorate was 84 μg/day, where concentrations in foods were high, but not in water. The contribution of water to total perchlorate intake ranged from 0.5% to 22%, while the ratio of highest daily intake to RfD was 240% and that to PMTDI was 17%. Eight baby formulas were also tested--total chlorate and perchlorate intakes were 147 (42-332) μg/day and 1.11 (0.05-4.5) μg/day, respectively, for an ingestion volume of 1 L/day if prepared with tap water.

  16. Investigation of Perchlorate and Water at the Surface of Mars with Raman Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolakakos, G.; Whiteway, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    A major accomplishment of the NASA Phoenix Mars mission was the identification of perchlorate (ClO4-) in the regolith by the Wet Chemistry Laboratory instrument. More recently, the Sample Analysis at Mars instrument on the NASA Curiosity Rover detected the presence of perchlorate in Gale Crater, suggesting that it is globally distributed. Perchlorates are of great interest on Mars due to their high affinity for water vapor (deliquescence) as well as their ability to greatly depress the freezing point of water when in solution. This has intriguing biological implications as resulting brines could potentially provide a habitable environment for living organisms. Additionally, it has been speculated that these salts may play a significant role in the hydrological cycle on Mars. A sample of magnesium perchlorate was subjected to the water vapor pressure and temperatures found at the landing site of the Phoenix Mars mission. Laser Raman scattering was applied to detect the onset of deliquescence and provide a relative estimate of the quantity of water taken up and subsequently released by the sample. As the temperature of the sample decreased at the same rate as measured on Mars during the evening, significant uptake of water from the atmosphere was observed to occur prior to the frost point temperature being reached. As the temperature was lowered, water uptake continued as saturation was reached and frost formed on the surface surrounding the perchlorate sample. Freezing of the brine film was observed at the eutectic temperature of -67°C and thawing occurred at a temperature of -62°C.

  17. Adsorption of perchlorate and other oxyanions onto magnetic permanently confined micelle arrays (Mag-PCMAs).

    PubMed

    Clark, Kristin K; Keller, Arturo A

    2012-03-01

    The removal of oxyanions found in drinking water sources -perchlorate, nitrate, phosphate, and sulfate- onto magnetic permanently confined micelle arrays (Mag-PCMAs) was studied. We determined the removal efficiency in both competitive and non-competitive environments, as many of these anions are present in these sources. Mag-PCMA removed over 98% of the aqueous perchlorate anions across a concentration range of 60-500 μg/L. Nitrate was absorbed 100% over a concentration range of 10-35 mg/L as nitrate. Removal of phosphate was 95.7% for 0.2-2.45 mg/L as phosphate. Sulfate was 100% absorbed across a concentration range of 5-20 mg/L and an average 75.7% for 5-50 mg/L. The sorption isotherms followed a Freundlich relationship with K(f) values of 2.00, 2.05, 1.9, and 3.86 mg/g for nitrate, perchlorate, phosphate, and sulfate respectively. Perchlorate and nitrate did not compete significantly for binding on Mag-PCMAs, with almost equal sorption, greater than 90%, for both anions in elevated concentrations. This is a distinguishing feature from ion exchange resins or activated carbon with cationic surfactants, where these anions have been shown to compete for sorption sites. At the concentrations studied, phosphate and sulfate also do not exhibit significant competition. Desorption for reuse was successful at pH 10. This reusable magnetic sorbent can thus be used to rapidly remove target anions such as perchlorate from water in the presence or absence of other oxyanions.

  18. Modeling, rate-limiting step investigation, and enhancement of the direct bio-regeneration of perchlorate laden anion-exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Lippincott, Lee; Yoon, In-Ho; Meng, Xiaoguang

    2009-01-01

    Anion-exchange with high perchlorate affinity resins is one of the most promising technologies for removing low levels of perchlorate. However, the traditional brine desorption technique is difficult and costly for regeneration of this type of resin. Previously, a direct bio-regeneration method by contacting the spent high perchlorate affinity resin with the perchlorate-reducing bacteria was proved feasible. This research is a further study of that method. Firstly, a direct bio-regeneration process model, based on the physicochemical and biological fundamentals, was developed and calibrated with experimental data. Thereafter, the rate-limiting step in regeneration of the high perchlorate affinity resin was investigated. Methods to enhance the regeneration efficiency were developed. The results indicated that the calibrated model well described the regeneration process. It thus might provide useful insights into the regeneration system. The results also demonstrated that the perchlorate desorption from the loaded resin could be the rate-limiting step. Addition of proper amount of counter anions such as chloride and sulfate improved the regeneration efficiency because these anions could promote both the extent and rate of perchlorate desorption from the loaded resin. These findings aided us in achieving good and efficient regeneration of high perchlorate affinity resins like the A-530E and SR-7 resins. The findings also suggested that the application of bacteria that could efficiently reduce perchlorate in highly saline solution would make the method more promising for the regeneration of high perchlorate affinity resins.

  19. Bis(2,2′:6′,2′′-terpyridine)­ruthenium(II) bis­(perchlorate) hemihydrate

    PubMed Central

    Kozlowska, Mariana; Rodziewicz, Pawel; Brus, Diana Malgorzata; Breczko, Joanna; Brzezinski, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, [Ru(C15H11N3)2](ClO4)2·0.5H2O, contains one ruthenium–terpiridine complex cation, two perchlorate anions and one half-mol­ecule of water. Face-to-face and face-to-edge π-stacking inter­actions between terpyridine units [centroid–centroid distances = 3.793 (2) and 3.801 (2)  Å] stabilize the crystal lattice The partially occupied water mol­ecule inter­acts with two perchlorate ions via O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. In the crystal lattice, the complex cations, perchlorate ion-water pairs and the second perchlorate anions are arranged into columns along b direction. PMID:23284379

  20. Perchlorate exposure is associated with oxidative stress and indicators of serum iron homeostasis among NHANES 2005-2008 subjects

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT Perchlorate (ClO4-), an oxidizing agent, is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant. Several studies have investigated its thyroid hormone disrupting properties. Its associations with other biological measures are largely unknown. This study, combining 2005-2008 National H...

  1. Potential Influence of Perchlorate on Heavy Metals and Organic Carbon in Serpentine Soil; Implications for Martian Regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oze, C.; Kumarathilaka, P. R.; Indraratne, S.; Vithanage, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Prasanna Kumarathilaka Chemical and Environmental Systems Modeling Research Group, National Institute of Fundamental Studies, Kandy, Sri LankaPerchlorate (ClO4-) concentrations as high as 1 Wt.% have been reported in Martian regolith. Perchlorate is a strong oxidizer capable of accelerating heavy and/or trace metal release into regolith/soil and reacting with organic matter/compounds (if present). Here, we assess interactions between perchlorate and an analogous Martian regolith (i.e., serpentine soil) to simulate and understand the fate of Mn, Ni and Co and organic carbon. Pre-characterized serpentine soil collected from Sri Lanka was used for this study. Incubation experiments were performed with three perchlorate concentrations (1, 0.75 and 0.5 w/w) and sequential and single extractions assessed solid phase metal fractionation in serpentine sediments after 3 weeks and 1 year, respectively. Additionally, total organic carbon (TOC) of the residues were analyzed. These experiments demonstrate a high release of Mn compared to Ni and Co. Metal concentrations in exchangeable and bioavailable fractions increased with increasing perchlorate concentrations. Exchangeable Ni, Mn and Co increased 5.9, 69.6 and 44.6% and bioavailable Ni, Mn and Co increased 5.5, 92.3 and 72.8%, respectively, after 1 year compared to 3 weeks. Additionally, TOC decreased with increasing perchlorate concentration. For example, TOC decreased by 14.3% after 1 year compared to a 3 week incubation period. Overall, this study confirms the accelerated release of metals and the removal of organic carbon with increasing perchlorate concentrations. Furthermore, this study illustrates how perchlorate may present additional challenges to current Martian life studies and the future human habitation of Mars.Prasanna Kumarathilaka Chemical and Environmental Systems Modeling Research Group, National Institute of Fundamental Studies, Kandy, Sri LankaPerchlorate (ClO4-) concentrations as high as 1 Wt.% have

  2. Determination of trace level bromate and perchlorate in drinking water by ion chromatography with an evaporative preconcentration technique.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongjian; Mou, Shifen; Heberling, Shawn

    2002-05-17

    A simple sample preconcentration technique employing microwave-based evaporation for the determination of trace level bromate and perchlorate in drinking water with ion chromatography is presented. With a hydrophilic anion-exchange column and a sodium hydroxide eluent in linear gradient, bromate and perchlorate can be determined in one injection within 35 min. Prior to ion chromatographic analysis, the drinking water sample was treated with an OnGuard-Ag cartridge to remove the superfluous chloride and concentrated 20-fold using a PTFE beaker in a domestic microwave oven for 15 min. The recoveries of the anions ranged from 94.6% for NO2- to 105.2% for F-. The detection limits for bromate, perchlorate, iodate and chlorate were 0.1, 0.2, 0.1 and 0.2 microg/l, respectively. The developed method is applicable for the quantitation of bromate and perchlorate in drinking water samples.

  3. In situ bioremediation of nitrate and perchlorate in vadose zone soil for groundwater protection using gaseous electron donor injection technology.

    PubMed

    Evans, Patrick J; Trute, Mary M

    2006-12-01

    When present in the vadose zone, potentially toxic nitrate and perchlorate anions can be persistent sources of groundwater contamination. Gaseous electron donor injection technology (GEDIT), an anaerobic variation of petroleum hydrocarbon bioventing, involves injecting electron donor gases, such as hydrogen or ethyl acetate, into the vadose zone, to stimulate biodegradation of nitrate and perchlorate. Laboratory microcosm studies demonstrated that hydrogen and ethanol promoted nitrate and perchlorate reduction in vadose zone soil and that moisture content was an important factor. Column studies demonstrated that transport of particular electron donors varied significantly; ethyl acetate and butyraldehyde were transported more rapidly than butyl acetate and ethanol. Nitrate removal in the column studies, up to 100%, was best promoted by ethyl acetate. Up to 39% perchlorate removal was achieved with ethanol and was limited by insufficient incubation time. The results demonstrate that GEDIT is a promising remediation technology warranting further validation.

  4. Determination of nitrate, nitrite and perchlorate anions in meat, milk and their products consumed in Hatay region in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sungur, Şana; Atan, Muhammet Meriç

    2013-01-01

    Nitrates and nitrites added to food can cause formation of cancerous N-nitroso compounds, whereas exposure to perchlorate is especially emphasised as an important risk factor for newborns' health. In this study, nitrate, nitrite and perchlorate concentrations in meat and milk products consumed in the Hatay region of Turkey were determined. Nitrate and nitrite were analysed with a spectrophotometric method, and perchlorate analysed via ion chromatography. The detected sodium nitrate and nitrite amounts in meat consumed in the Hatay region are less than the maximum levels as declared in the Turkish Food Codex. The amount of perchlorate was considered not to pose a threat as well. However, in 50% of the cheese samples, sodium nitrate amounts were found to be more than the maximum acceptable level in the Turkish Food Codex.

  5. Dissimilatory perchlorate reduction linked to aerobic methane oxidation via chlorite dismutase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, R. S.; Baesman, S. M.; Miller, L. G.

    2013-12-01

    The presence of methane (CH4) in the atmosphere of Mars is controversial yet the evidence has aroused scientific interest, as CH4 could be a harbinger of extant or extinct microbial life. There are various oxidized compounds present on the surface of Mars that could serve as electron acceptors for the anaerobic oxidation of CH4, including perchlorate (ClO4-). We examined the role of perchlorate, chlorate (ClO3-) and chlorite (ClO2-) as oxidants linked to CH4 oxidation. Dissimilatory perchlorate reduction begins with reduction of ClO4- to ClO2- and ends with dismutation of chlorite to yield chloride (Cl-) and molecular oxygen (O2). We explored the potential for aerobic CH4 oxidizing bacteria to couple with oxygen derived from chlorite dismutation during dissimilatory perchlorate reduction. Methane (0.2 kPa) was completely removed within several days from the N2-flushed headspace above cell suspensions of methanotrophs (Methylobacter albus strain BG8) and perchlorate reducing bacteria (Dechloromonas agitata strain CKB) in the presence of 5 mM ClO2-. Similar rates of CH4 consumption were observed for these mixed cultures whether they were co-mingled or segregated under a common headspace, indicating that direct contact of cells was not required for methane consumption to occur. We also observed complete removal of 0.2 kPa CH4 in bottles containing dried soil (enriched in methanotrophs by CH4 additions over several weeks) and D. agitata CKB and in the presence of 10 mM ClO2-. This soil (seasonally exposed sediment) collected from the shoreline of a freshwater lake (Searsville Lake, CA) demonstrated endogenous CH4 uptake as well as perchlorate, chlorate and chlorite reduction/dismutation. However, these experiments required physical separation of soil from the aqueous bacterial culture to allow for the partitioning of O2 liberated from chlorite dismutation into the shared headspace. Although dissimilatory reduction of ClO4- and ClO3- could be inferred from the

  6. Effect of Plant Uptake on Perchlorate Isotopic Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, N. L.; Jackson, W. A.; Bohlke, J. K.; Sturchio, N. C.; Gu, B.; Rao, B.; Hatzinger, P. B.; Harvey, G.; Burkey, K.; McGrath, M. T.; Sevanthi, R.

    2013-12-01

    The occurrence of perchlorate (ClO4-) in the environment is attributed to both synthetic and natural sources. Unlike anthropogenic ClO4-, natural ClO4- exhibits a wide range in isotopic compositions, suggesting that natural ClO4- is formed through more than one pathway and/or undergoes post-depositional isotopic fractionation processes. One of these processes could be plant uptake and metabolism. Plants are known to reversibly accumulate ClO4-. However, there is little information available regarding the ability for plants to isotopically fractionate ClO4-. Plants could alter ClO4-isotopic composition either by mass dependent fractionation via transport carriers in the root, diffusion limitations through the root, translocation within the plant, reduction of ClO4- by plant enzymes, or non-specific exchange of oxygen in ClO4- catalyzed by plant compounds/processes. We examined the potential for plants to alter the isotopic composition of ClO4- (δ37Cl, δ18O, and Δ17O) in both hydroponic and field scale experiments. Hydroponically grown snap bean plants were exposed to variable ClO4-concentrations (2mg/L and 10mg/L) in solutions prepared from ClO4- with both normal and anomalous O isotopic abundances. At maturity, we evaluated the uptake of ClO4-relative to other anions and the isotopic compositions of ClO4- in both plants and growth solutions. Additional experiments involved field scale exposures of snap beans to irrigation water containing low levels (< 10 ug/L) of ClO4-. The majority of the initial mass of ClO4- for both the low and high exposure hydroponic treatments was recovered in the growth solutions (20-40%) or plant compartments (40-60%), while some mass was not recovered (~20%). ClO4- isotopic compositions were essentially identical between recovered ClO4- in the plant tissues and hydroponic solutions. Anion ratios indicate that ClO4-was accumulated similarly to NO3- but preferentially to Cl- (~4X). In field experiments, the isotopic composition of ClO4

  7. Large-Scale Demonstration of Perchlorate Removal Using Weak Base Anion Resin at Well No. 3 in Rialto, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    groundwater concentration , and treated water alkalinity. The amount of acid required to achieve operating pH is directly proportional to feed water...alkalinity. Perchlorate concentration directly affects the amount of scavenger resin required, which can also increase cost. The amount of acid used in...perchlorate concentration , sulfate concentration , and treated water alkalinity affect cost and performance. The amount of acid required to achieve

  8. Oxygen and chlorine isotopic fractionation during perchlorate biodegradation: Laboratory results and implications for forensics and natural attenuation studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sturchio, N.C.; Böhlke, J.K.; Beloso, A.D.; Streger, S.H.; Heraty, L.J.; Hatzinger, P.B.

    2007-01-01

    Perchlorate is a widespread environmental contaminant having both anthropogenic and natural sources. Stable isotope ratios of O and Cl in a given sample of perchlorate may be used to distinguish its source(s). Isotopic ratios may also be useful for identifying the extent of biodegradation of perchlorate, which is critical for assessing natural attenuation of this contaminant in groundwater. For this approach to be useful, however, the kinetic isotopic fractionations of O and Cl during perchlorate biodegradation must first be determined as a function of environmental variables such as temperature and bacterial species. A laboratory study was performed in which the O and Cl isotope ratios of perchlorate were monitored as a function of degradation by two separate bacterial strains (Azospira suillum JPLRND and Dechlorospirillum sp. FBR2) at both 10??C and 22??C with acetate as the electron donor. Perchlorate was completely reduced by both strains within 280 h at 22??C and 615 h at 10??C. Measured values of isotopic fractionation factors were ??18O = -36.6 to -29.0??? and ??37Cl = -14.5 to -11.5???, and these showed no apparent systematic variation with either temperature or bacterial strain. An experiment using 18O-enriched water (??18O = +198???) gave results indistinguishable from those observed in the isotopically normal water (??18O = -8.1???) used in the other experiments, indicating negligible isotope exchange between perchlorate and water during biodegradation. The fractionation factor ratio ??18O/??37Cl was nearly invariant in all experiments at 2.50 ?? 0.04. These data indicate that isotope ratio analysis will be useful for documenting perchlorate biodegradation in soils and groundwater. The establishment of a microbial fractionation factor ratio (??18O/??37Cl) also has significant implications for forensic studies. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  9. Determination of perchlorate in drinking water by ion chromatography using macrocycle-based concentration and separation methods.

    PubMed

    Lamb, John D; Simpson, David; Jensen, Bryce D; Gardner, Joseph S; Peterson, Quinn P

    2006-06-16

    Macrocycle-based ion chromatography provides a convenient, reliable method for the determination of perchlorate ion, which is currently of great interest to the environmental community. This study shows that effective perchlorate determinations can be made using standard conductimetric detection by combining an 18-crown-6-based mobile phase with an underivatized reversed-phase mobile phase ion chromatography (MPIC) column. One unique feature of this method is the flexibility in column capacity that is achieved through simple variations in eluent concentrations of 18-crown-6 and KOH, facilitating the separation of target analyte anions such as perchlorate. Using a standard anion exchange column as concentrator makes possible the determination of perchlorate as low as 0.2 ug/L in low ionic strength matrices. Determination of perchlorate at the sub-ug/L level in pure water and in spiked local city hard water samples with high background ion concentrations can be achieved this way. However, like other IC techniques, this method is challenged to achieve analyses at the ug/L level in the demanding high ionic strength matrix described by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (1,000 mg/L chloride, sulfate and carbonate). We approached this challenge by use of the Cryptand C1 concentrator column, provided by Dionex Corporation, to effectively preconcentrate perchlorate while reducing background ion concentrations in the high ionic strength matrix. The retention characteristics of the concentrator column were studied in order to maximize its effectiveness for perchlorate determinations. The method makes possible the determination of perchlorate at the 5 ug/L level in the highest ionic strength matrix described by the EPA.

  10. The Nitrate/Perchlorate Ratio on Mars As an Indicator for Habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, J. C.; Sutter, B.; McKay, C. P.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Freissinet, C.; Conrad, P. G.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Ming, D. W.; Martín-Torres, J.; Zorzano, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Discovery of indigenous martian nitrogen in Mars surface materials has important implications for habitability and the potential development of a nitrogen cycle at some point in martian history. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity Rover detected evolved nitric oxide (NO) gas during pyrolysis of scooped aeolian sediments and drilled mudstone acquired in Gale Crater. The detection of NO suggests an indigenous source of fixed nitrogen, and may indicate a mineralogical sink for atmospheric N2 in the form of nitrate. The ratio of nitrate to oxychlorine species (e.g. perchlorate) may provide insight into the extent of development of a nitrogen cycle on Mars. Nitrate and perchlorate on Earth are geochemically related in arid environments such as the Atacama Desert and the Dry Valleys of Antarctica due to their similar mobilities and deposition mechanisms [1,2]. Here, low NO3-/ClO4- molar ratios (~1000) dominate, in comparison to other places on Earth, where the main nitrate source is biological fixation of N2 to NO3-, and there is no corresponding biological source of perchlorate, resulting in much higher NO3-/ClO4- molar ratios (~10,000). The NO3-/ClO4- molar ratio is estimated to be ~ 0.05 on Mars based on SAM measurements at Gale Crater [3]. The possibility exists that perchlorate brines could leach and increase nitrate concentrations at depth, increasing the martian NO3-/ClO4- ratio in the subsurface. However, it is unknown whether terrestrial NO3-/ClO4- molar ratios could be achieved by this mechanism. Nevertheless, the low NO3-/ClO4- the ratio detected by SAM suggests that N fixation to nitrate on Mars, whether biologically mediated or abiotic, was extremely limited compared to the potentially ongoing abiotic formation and deposition of oxychlorine species on the martian surface. [1] Kounaves, S.P. et al. "Discovery of natural perchlorate in the Antarctic dry valleys and its global implications." ES&T44

  11. Combined Hydrous Ferric Oxide and Quaternary Ammonium Surfactant Tailoring of Granular Activated Carbon for Concurrent Arsenate and Perchlorate Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, M.; Cannon, F; Parette, R; Yoon, S; Chen, W

    2009-01-01

    Activated carbon was tailored with both iron and quaternary ammonium surfactants so as to concurrently remove both arsenate and perchlorate from groundwater. The iron (hydr)oxide preferentially removed the arsenate oxyanion but not perchlorate; while the quaternary ammonium preferentially removed the perchlorate oxyanion, but not the arsenate. The co-sorption of two anionic oxyanions via distinct mechanisms has yielded intriguing phenomena. Rapid small-scale column tests (RSSCTs) with these dually prepared media employed synthetic waters that were concurrently spiked with arsenate and perchlorate; and these trial results showed that the quaternary ammonium surfactants enhanced arsenate removal bed life by 25-50% when compared to activated carbon media that had been preloaded merely with iron (hydr)oxide; and the surfactant also enhanced the diffusion rate of arsenate per the Donnan effect. The authors also employed natural groundwater from Rutland, MA which contained 60 microg/L As and traces of silica, and sulfate; and the authors spiked this with 40 microg/L perchlorate. When processing this water, activated carbon that had been tailored with iron and cationic surfactant could treat 12,500 bed volumes before 10 microg/L arsenic breakthrough, and 4500 bed volumes before 6 microg/L perchlorate breakthrough. Although the quaternary ammonium surfactants exhibited only a slight capacity for removing arsenate, these surfactants did facilitate a more favorably positively charged avenue for the arsenate to diffuse through the media to the iron sorption site (i.e. via the Donnan effect).

  12. Microbial redox processes in deep subsurface environments and the potential application of (per)chlorate in oil reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Liebensteiner, Martin G; Tsesmetzis, Nicolas; Stams, Alfons J M; Lomans, Bartholomeus P

    2014-01-01

    The ability of microorganisms to thrive under oxygen-free conditions in subsurface environments relies on the enzymatic reduction of oxidized elements, such as sulfate, ferric iron, or CO2, coupled to the oxidation of inorganic or organic compounds. A broad phylogenetic and functional diversity of microorganisms from subsurface environments has been described using isolation-based and advanced molecular ecological techniques. The physiological groups reviewed here comprise iron-, manganese-, and nitrate-reducing microorganisms. In the context of recent findings also the potential of chlorate and perchlorate [jointly termed (per)chlorate] reduction in oil reservoirs will be discussed. Special attention is given to elevated temperatures that are predominant in the deep subsurface. Microbial reduction of (per)chlorate is a thermodynamically favorable redox process, also at high temperature. However, knowledge about (per)chlorate reduction at elevated temperatures is still scarce and restricted to members of the Firmicutes and the archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus. By analyzing the diversity and phylogenetic distribution of functional genes in (meta)genome databases and combining this knowledge with extrapolations to earlier-made physiological observations we speculate on the potential of (per)chlorate reduction in the subsurface and more precisely oil fields. In addition, the application of (per)chlorate for bioremediation, souring control, and microbial enhanced oil recovery are addressed.

  13. Investigation of influence of alpha irradiation on valence states of actinides. VIII. Reduction of berkelium (IV) in perchloric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Frolova, L.M.; Vasilev, V.Y.; Vitynutnev, V.M.

    1986-09-01

    A spectrophotometric method has been used in studying the radiation-chemical behavior of berkelium (IV) in perchloric acid solutions with intense internal alpha-irradiation by curium244. It has been shown that the reduction of berkelium (IV) in perchloric acid solutions with a concentration up to 3 M follows a zero-order reaction rate law relative to the berkelium (IV) concentration. In more concentrated solutions of perchloric acid, the equation for the rate of the berkelium (IV) reduction reaction has the form d (Bk(IV))/dt=k/sub 0/ + k/sub 1/(BK(IV)). In all of the perchloric acid solutions that were investigate (1-7 M), K /SUP '/ /sub 0/ is weakly dependent on the acid concentration; k'/sub 1/ depends on the acid concentration to a greater degree. Both k'/sub 0/ and k'/sub 1/ depend on the dose rate in irradiation of the solution. With high concentrations of perchloric acid, products of radiolytic decomposition of perchlorate ions play a major role.

  14. Microbial redox processes in deep subsurface environments and the potential application of (per)chlorate in oil reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Liebensteiner, Martin G.; Tsesmetzis, Nicolas; Stams, Alfons J. M.; Lomans, Bartholomeus P.

    2014-01-01

    The ability of microorganisms to thrive under oxygen-free conditions in subsurface environments relies on the enzymatic reduction of oxidized elements, such as sulfate, ferric iron, or CO2, coupled to the oxidation of inorganic or organic compounds. A broad phylogenetic and functional diversity of microorganisms from subsurface environments has been described using isolation-based and advanced molecular ecological techniques. The physiological groups reviewed here comprise iron-, manganese-, and nitrate-reducing microorganisms. In the context of recent findings also the potential of chlorate and perchlorate [jointly termed (per)chlorate] reduction in oil reservoirs will be discussed. Special attention is given to elevated temperatures that are predominant in the deep subsurface. Microbial reduction of (per)chlorate is a thermodynamically favorable redox process, also at high temperature. However, knowledge about (per)chlorate reduction at elevated temperatures is still scarce and restricted to members of the Firmicutes and the archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus. By analyzing the diversity and phylogenetic distribution of functional genes in (meta)genome databases and combining this knowledge with extrapolations to earlier-made physiological observations we speculate on the potential of (per)chlorate reduction in the subsurface and more precisely oil fields. In addition, the application of (per)chlorate for bioremediation, souring control, and microbial enhanced oil recovery are addressed. PMID:25225493

  15. Copper-tantalum alloy

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.

    1986-07-15

    A tantalum-copper alloy can be made by preparing a consumable electrode consisting of an elongated copper billet containing at least two spaced apart tantalum rods extending longitudinally the length of the billet. The electrode is placed in a dc arc furnace and melted under conditions which co-melt the copper and tantalum to form the alloy.

  16. Demystifying Controlling Copper Corrosion

    EPA Science Inventory

    The LCR systematically misses the highest health and corrosion risk sites for copper. Additionally, there are growing concerns for WWTP copper in sludges and discharge levels. There are many corrosion control differences between copper and lead. This talk explains the sometimes c...

  17. [Copper IUDs (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Thiery, M

    1983-10-01

    Following initial development of the Grafenberg ring in the 1920's, IUDs fell into disuse until the late 1950s, when plastic devices inserted using new technology began to gain worldwide acceptance. Further research indicated that copper had a significant antifertility effect which increased with increasing surface area, and several copper IUDs were developed and adapted, including the Copper T 200, the Copper T 220C, and the Copper T 380 A, probably the most effective yet. The Gravigard and Multiload are 2 other copper devices developed according to somewhat different principles. Copper devices are widely used not so much because of their great effectiveness as because of their suitability for nulliparous patients and their ease of insertion, which minimizes risk of uterine perforation. Records of 2584 women using Copper IUDs for 7190 women-years and 956 women using devices without copper for 6059 women-years suggest that the copper devices were associated with greater effectiveness and fewer removals for complications. Research suggests that the advantages of copper IUDs become more significant with increased duration of use. Contraindications to copper devices include allergy to copper and hepatolenticular degeneration. No carcinogenic or teratogenic effect of copper devices has been found, but further studies are needed to rule out other undesirable effects. Significant modifications of copper devices in recent years have been developed to increase their effectiveness, prolong their duration of usefulness, facilitate insertion and permit insertion during abortion or delivery. The upper limit of the surface area of copper associated with increased effectiveness appears to be between 200-300 sq mm, and at some point increases in copper exposure may provoke expulsion of the IUD. The duration of fertility inhibition of copper IUDs is usually estimated at 2-3 years, but recent research indicates that it may be 6-8 years, and some devices may retain copper surface

  18. Perchlorate transport and inhibition of the sodium iodide symporter measured with the yellow fluorescent protein variant YFP-H148Q/I152L

    SciTech Connect

    Cianchetta, Stefano; Bernardo, Julie di; Romeo, Giovanni; Rhoden, Kerry J.

    2010-03-15

    Perchlorate is an environmental contaminant that impairs thyroid function by interacting with the sodium iodide symporter (NIS), the transporter responsible for iodide uptake in the thyroid gland. Perchlorate is well known as a competitive inhibitor of iodide transport by NIS, and recent evidence demonstrates that NIS can also transport perchlorate. In this study, we evaluated the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) variant YFP-H148Q/I152L, as a genetically encodable biosensor of intracellular perchlorate concentration monitored by real-time fluorescence microscopy. Fluorescence of recombinant YFP-H148Q/I152L was suppressed by perchlorate and iodide with similar affinities of 1.2 mM and 1.6 mM, respectively. Perchlorate suppressed YFP-H148Q/I152L fluorescence in FRTL-5 thyroid cells and NIS-expressing COS-7 cells, but had no effect on COS-7 cells lacking NIS. Fluorescence changes in FRTL-5 cells were Na{sup +}-dependent, consistent with the Na{sup +}-dependence of NIS activity. Perchlorate uptake in FRTL-5 cells resulted in 10-fold lower intracellular concentrations than iodide uptake, and was characterized by a higher affinity (K{sub m} 4.6 muM for perchlorate and 34.8 muM for iodide) and lower maximal velocity (V{sub max} 6.8 muM/s for perchlorate and 39.5 muM/s for iodide). Perchlorate also prevented iodide-induced changes in YFP-H148Q/I152L fluorescence in FRTL-5 cells, with half-maximal inhibition occurring at 1.1-1.6 muM. In conclusion, YFP-H148Q/I152L detects perchlorate accumulation by thyroid and other NIS-expressing cells, and reveals differences in the kinetics of perchlorate versus iodide transport by NIS.

  19. The Investigation of Perchlorate/Iron Phase Mixtures as A Possible Source of Oxygen Detected by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument in Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Heil, E.; Morris, R. V.; Archer, P. D.; Ming, D. W.; Niles, P. B.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Franz, H.; Freissinet C.; Glavin, D. P.; McAdam, A. C.; Mahaffy, P.; Martin-Torres, F. Javier; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Paz-Zorzano, Maria; Stern, J. C.; McKay, C. P.

    2015-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument onboard the Curiosity rover detected O2 and HCl gas releases from the Rocknest (RN) eolian bedform and the John Klein (JK) and Cumberland (CB) drill hole materials in Gale Crater. Chlorinated hydrocarbons have also been detected by the SAM quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometer (GCMS). These detections along with the detection of perchlorate (ClO4-) by the Mars Phoenix Lander's Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) suggesting perchlorate is a possible candidate for evolved O2 and chlorine species. Laboratory thermal analysis of individual per-chlorates has yet to provide an unequivocal temperature match to the SAM O2 and HCl release data. These detections along with the detection of perchlorate (ClO4-) by the Mars Phoenix Lander's Wet Chemistry Laboratory suggested perchlorate is a possible candidate for evolved O2 and chlorine species. Laboratory thermal analysis of pure perchlorates has yet to provide an unequivocal temperature match to the SAM O2 and HCl release data. Analog laboratory analysis of iron mineralogy detected in Gale materials that was physically mixed with Ca- and Mg-perchlorate has been shown to catalyze lower O2 release temperatures and approach some SAM O2 release data. Instead of physical mixtures used in previous work, the work presented here utilized perchlorate solutions added to Fe phases. This technique allowed for perchlorate to come in closer contact with the Fe-phase and may more closely mimic Mars conditions where humidity can increase enough to cause deliquescence of the highly hygroscopic perchlorate phases. The objective of this work is to: 1) Utilize a laboratory SAM analog instrument to evaluate the O2 release temperatures from Mg- and Ca-perchlorates solutions applied to Fephases detetected in Gale Crate; and 2) Determine if perchlorate solutions can provide improved matches with the SAM O2 temperature release profiles.

  20. The processing, properties and use of the pyrotechnic mixture titanium subhydride/potassium perchlorate

    SciTech Connect

    Massis, T.M.

    1996-07-01

    Development of this pyrotechnic occurred because of the need for a static insensitive material to meet personnel safety requirements and related system safety issues in nuclear weapon energetic material component designs. Ti subhydride materials are made by the thermal dehydrding of commercial Ti hydride powder to the desired equivalent hydrogen composition in the Ti lattice. These Ti subhydrides, when blended with K perchlorate, meet the static insensitivity requirement of not being initiated from an equivalent human body electrostatic discharge. Individual material and blend qualification requirements provide a reproducible material from lot to lot. These pyrotechnic formulations meet the high reliability requirements (0.9995) for initiation and performance parameters and have the necessary stability and compatibility to meet long lived requirements of more than 25 years. Various experiences and problems are also discussed that have led to a mature technology for Ti subhydride/K perchlorate during its use in energetic material component designs.

  1. Removal of an acid fume system contaminated with perchlorates located within hot cell

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, K.E.; Henslee, S.P.; Vroman, W.R.; Krsul, J.R.; Michelbacher, J.A.; Knighton, G.C.

    1992-09-01

    An add scrubbing system located within the confines of a highly radioactive hot cell at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) was remotely removed. The acid scrubbing system was routinely used for the dissolution of irradiated reactor fuel samples and structural materials. Perchloric acid was one of the acids used in the dissolution process and remained in the system with its inherent risks. Personnel could not enter the hot cell to perform the dismantling of the acid scabbing system due to the high radiation field and the explosion potential associated with the perchlorates. A robot was designed and built at ANL-W and used to dismantle the system without the need for personnel entry into the hot cell. The robot was also used for size reduction of removed components and loading of the removed components into waste containers.

  2. [Adsorption of perchlorate by calcined Mg/Zn/Al layered double hydroxides].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Yu; Liu, Yan

    2014-07-01

    The adsorption capacity of perchlorate by Mg/Zn/Al layered double hydroxides was investigated. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the adsorption isothermal model and dynamic model were discussed. The effect of calcination temperature, Mg/Zn/Al molar ratio, pH value of solution, adsorption time and dosage on the adsorption capacity of samples were studied. The experiment results showed that the removal ratio and adsorption capacity reached the highest and the pH value had good applicability when the molar ratio was Mg/Zn/Al = 2: 1 : 1. The adsorption of perchlorate basically conformed to the pseudo-second kinetics and Langmuir, Freundlich isotherm model.

  3. Research Advances: Perchlorate in Dairy and Breast Milk Samples; NO Glow on Mars; Physical Chemistry to the Rescue: Differentiating Nicotinic and Cholinergic Agonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Angela G.

    2005-07-01

    Perchlorate levels in milk suggest widespread presence of the chemical. NO emissions indicate circulation in Martian atmosphere. Modeling reveals subtle differences in drug membrane receptor interactions.

  4. Laboratory studies of humidity-driven phase transitions of perchlorate/chloride mixtures: Relevance to aqueous phases on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, R. V.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Perchlorate salts, known to exist on Mars, can readily absorb water vapor and deliquesce into aqueous solution. We have previously studied pure perchlorate and found that the deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) is <60% regardless of cation, hydration state or temperature (223 to 273 K). We have also shown that efflorescence (recrystallization) of perchlorate solutions is kinetically hindered, allowing supersaturation to occur at RH values below the DRH. In addition to perchlorate, Phoenix instruments found chloride, sulfate, carbonate, magnesium, sodium, potassium and calcium in the Martian regolith. The vertical and spatial distributions of these ions are unknown, but all were present in a single 1 g sample. It is therefore likely that these ions coexist with perchlorate. Many salts likely present in the regolith are less deliquescent than perchlorates, and it is important to understand how these additional species will affect perchlorate deliquescence. Here we study deliquescence (solid to aqueous transition) and efflorescence (aqueous to solid transition) of 3 perchlorate/chloride systems: KClO4/KCl at 253 K and NaClO4/NaCl and Mg(ClO4)2/MgCl2 at 243 and 253 K. A Raman microscope and environmental cell were used to monitor phase transitions of internally mixed perchlorate/chloride particles. The eutonic RH, where an aqueous phase first forms, is 30% RH for Mg(ClO4)2/MgCl2, 38% RH for NaClO4/NaCl and 82% RH for KClO4/KCl mixtures regardless of initial composition. We observed complete deliquescence of all salt mixtures at RH values below the DRH of the least deliquescent pure salt. When humidity is lowered, efflorescence of all solutions occurred below the DRH suggesting supersaturated solutions can exist. The low eutonic RH values of the sodium and magnesium perchlorate/chloride mixtures are significant for Mars, as these humidities can be reached at the Martian surface. It is likely that some salts in the regolith may exist as stable or metastable solutions

  5. Widespread occurrence of perchlorate in water, foodstuffs and human urine collected from Kuwait and its contribution to human exposure.

    PubMed

    Alomirah, Husam F; Al-Zenki, Sameer F; Alaswad, Marivi C; Alruwaih, Noor A; Wu, Qian; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2016-06-01

    Perchlorate is a thyroid hormone-disrupting compound and is reported to occur widely in the environment. Little is known on human exposure to perchlorate in Kuwait. In this study, 218 water samples, 618 commonly consumed foodstuffs and 532 urine samples collected from Kuwait were analysed to assess the exposure of the Kuwaiti population to perchlorate. For the estimation of daily intake of perchlorate, food consumption rates were obtained from the National Nutrition Survey in the State of Kuwait (NNSSK). The results showed that leafy vegetables accounted for a major share of perchlorate exposure among the Kuwaiti population at 0.062 µg kg(-)(1) bw day(-)(1) (36.2%), followed by fruits at 0.026 µg kg(-)(1) bw day(-)(1) (15.3%) and non-leafy vegetables at 0.017 µg kg(-)(1) bw day(-)(1) (10.1%). The urinary perchlorate geometric mean (GM) concentrations ranged from 8.51 to 17.1 µg l(-)(1) for the five age groups, which were higher than those reported in other countries. The estimated urinary perchlorate exposure for the Kuwaiti general population was 0.42 µg kg(-)(1) bw day(-)(1), which was higher than that reported for the United States. The dietary intake of perchlorate for the Kuwaiti population ranged from 0.14 to 0.67 µg kg(-)(1) bw day(-)(1) for the five age groups, with a mean total daily intake of 0.17 µg kg(-)(1) bw day(-)(1) for the general population. The highest estimated dietary mean daily intake of perchlorate (0.67 µg kg(-)(1) bw day(-)(1)) was found for children at 3-5 years. The estimated dietary perchlorate exposure in Kuwait is higher than the recommended mean reference dose (RfD) but lower than that of provisional maximum tolerable daily intake (PMTDI) set by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA).

  6. An Investigation into Palladium-Catalyzed Reduction of Perchlorate in Water

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    this effect may need to be considered in the experimental design for future palladium catalysis studies (for other contaminants) where formic acid is...catalyst, and formic acid was used as the reductant. Reactor performance was evaluated under a variety of operating conditions (influent pH, reductant...dissociation of formic acid (pKa ~ 3.75). It is possible that perchlorate reduction was limited by the amount and speciation of formic acid in the

  7. Uptake and Transformation of the Propellants 2,4-DNT, Perchlorate and Nitroglycerin by Grasses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-31

    by performing hydroponic and soil experiments. The propellants 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT), perchlorate and nitroglycerin (GTN) often contaminate...firing ranges due to partially detonated ordnances and incomplete combustion of munitions. In hydroponic experiments, sorption of 2,4-DNT to roots was...and big bluestem (Andropogon gerardii) in the clean-up of propellant contaminated soil was assessed by performing hydroponic and soil experiments. The

  8. 1-Benzyl­piperazine-1,4-diium bis­(perchlorate) monohydrate

    PubMed Central

    Kaabi, Kamel; El Glaoui, Meher; Jeanneau, Erwann; Rzaigui, Mohamed; Ben Nasr, Cherif

    2010-01-01

    In the title compound, C11H18N2 2+·2ClO4 −·H2O, one perchlor­ate anion is disordered over two orientations in a 0.66 (3):0.34 (3) ratio. Inter­molecular O—H⋯O, N—H⋯O and C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the cations, anions and water mol­ecules into ribbons extending along [100]. PMID:21587939

  9. Mechanism of H2S Oxidation by the Dissimilatory Perchlorate-Reducing Microorganism Azospira suillum PS

    PubMed Central

    Mehta-Kolte, Misha G.; Loutey, Dana; Wang, Ouwei; Youngblut, Matthew D.; Hubbard, Christopher G.; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Conrad, Mark E.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genetic and biochemical basis of perchlorate-dependent H2S oxidation (PSOX) was investigated in the dissimilatory perchlorate-reducing microorganism (DPRM) Azospira suillum PS (PS). Previously, it was shown that all known DPRMs innately oxidize H2S, producing elemental sulfur (So). Although the process involving PSOX is thermodynamically favorable (ΔG°′ = −206 kJ ⋅ mol−1 H2S), the underlying biochemical and genetic mechanisms are currently unknown. Interestingly, H2S is preferentially utilized over physiological electron donors such as lactate or acetate although no growth benefit is obtained from the metabolism. Here, we determined that PSOX is due to a combination of enzymatic and abiotic interactions involving reactive intermediates of perchlorate respiration. Using various approaches, including barcode analysis by sequencing (Bar-seq), transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq), and proteomics, along with targeted mutagenesis and biochemical characterization, we identified all facets of PSOX in PS. In support of our proposed model, deletion of identified upregulated PS genes traditionally known to be involved in sulfur redox cycling (e.g., Sox, sulfide:quinone reductase [SQR]) showed no defect in PSOX activity. Proteomic analysis revealed differential abundances of a variety of stress response metal efflux pumps and divalent heavy-metal transporter proteins, suggesting a general toxicity response. Furthermore, in vitro biochemical studies demonstrated direct PSOX mediated by purified perchlorate reductase (PcrAB) in the absence of other electron transfer proteins. The results of these studies support a model in which H2S oxidation is mediated by electron transport chain short-circuiting in the periplasmic space where the PcrAB directly oxidizes H2S to So. The biogenically formed reactive intermediates (ClO2− and O2) subsequently react with additional H2S, producing polysulfide and So as end products. PMID:28223460

  10. Effects of Ammonium Perchlorate on the Thyroid Hormone Levels of the Sprague-Dawley Rat.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-12-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine the threshold dose for ammonium perchlorate (AP) in the Sprague-Dawley rat. No dose response data exist...consortium of DoD and industry representatives, believes this provisional reference dose is too conservative. This experiment was executed to provide dose ... response data on which to base a more accurate reference dose. The study consisted of eight groups of 12 Sprague-Dawley rats, six male and six female

  11. LOW-COST, HIGH-ENERGY CATHODES FOR MAGNESIUM PERCHLORATE BATTERIES.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Mercuric oxide cathodes on expanded silver grids have proven their effectiveness in magnesium/magnesium perchlorate reserve type batteries. However...an inexpensive grid to replace the mercuric oxide on silver cathode. The report presents findings and preliminary room temperature discharge data at... halide depolarizers which did not prove to be nearly as promising. It appears that especially m-dinitrobenzene and manganese dioxide can be developed

  12. Tailored Granular Activated Carbon Treatment of Perchlorate in Drinking Water. ESTCP Cost and Performance Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    created by thermally and chemically treating carbon-based solids, such as bituminous coal, anthracite coal, lignite coal, coconut shells, or wood. The...cationic surfactants onto graphite, cellulose, clay, quartz, titanium dioxide, zeolites , soils, and membranes. However, the project team is not aware...and F.S. Cannon. 2005. Thermal reactivation of ammonia-tailored granular activated carbon exhausted with perchlorate. Carbon. October 2005 Vol 43

  13. The Charge and Discharge Behavior of Molybdenum Trioxide Electrodes in Lithium Perchlorate-Propylene Carbonate Electrolyte.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    AMM/§ Diet. specialAK f* I, THE CHARGE AND DISCHARGE BEHAVIOR OF MOLYBDENUM TRIOXIDE ELECTRODES IN LITHIUM PERCHLORATE-PROPYLENE CARBONATE ELECTROLYTE...SHE). Thus, the propylene carbonate oxidation potential is +3.145 V versus SHE or since the potential of the reversible lithium electrode in propylene... carbonate is -3.265 V versus the SHE potential, the solvent oxidation potential should be +6.4 V versus lithium . Thus, another anodic process must be

  14. The use of chlorate, nitrate, and perchlorate to promote crude oil mineralization in salt marsh sediments.

    PubMed

    Brundrett, Maeghan; Horita, Juske; Anderson, Todd; Pardue, John; Reible, Danny; Jackson, W Andrew

    2015-10-01

    Due to the high volume of crude oil released by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the salt marshes along the gulf coast were contaminated with crude oil. Biodegradation of crude oil in salt marshes is primarily limited by oxygen availability due to the high organic carbon content of the soil, high flux rate of S(2-), and saturated conditions. Chlorate, nitrate, and perchlorate were evaluated for use as electron acceptors in comparison to oxygen by comparing oil transformation and mineralization in mesocosms consisting of oiled salt marsh sediment from an area impacted by the BP Horizon oil spill. Mineralization rates were determined by measuring CO2 production and δ (13)C of the produced CO2 and compared to transformation evaluated by measuring the alkane/hopane ratios over a 4-month period. Total alkane/hopane ratios decreased (~55-70 %) for all treatments in the following relative order: aerated ≈ chlorate > nitrate > perchlorate. Total CO2 produced was similar between treatments ranging from 550-700 mg CO2-C. The δ (13)C-CO2 values generally ranged between the indigenous carbon and oil values (-17 and -27‰, respectively). Oil mineralization was greatest for the aerated treatments and least for the perchlorate amended. Our results indicate that chlorate has a similar potential as oxygen to support oil mineralization in contaminated salt marshes, but nitrate and perchlorate were less effective. The use of chlorate as a means to promote oil mineralization in situ may be a promising means to remediate contaminated salt marshes while preventing unwanted secondary impacts related to nutrient management as in the case of nitrate amendments.

  15. Sweet and Sour: Attenuating Sulfidogenesis in an Advective Flow Column System with Perchlorate or Nitrate Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelbrektson, A. L.; Hubbard, C. G.; Piceno, Y.; Boussina, A.; Jin, Y.; Dubinsky, E. A.; Tom, L.; Hu, P.; Conrad, M. E.; Anderson, G. L.; Coates, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) biogenesis in oil reservoirs is a primary cause of souring and of associated costs in reservoir and pipeline maintenance. In addition to the corrosive effects of the H2S itself, abiotic and biological oxidation also generates sulfuric acid, further degrading metallic surfaces. Amending these environments with perchlorate (ClO4-) resolves these problems by inhibition of biological sulfate reduction and re-oxidation of H2S to elemental sulfur by dissimilatory (per)chlorate reducing bacteria (DPRB). Triplicate flow through columns packed with San Francisco bay sediment were flushed with bay water ([SO4=] = 25-30 mM) containing yeast extract with 50 mM inhibitor concentrations (NO3-or ClO4-) decreasing to 25 mM and finally 12.5 mM. Influent and effluent geochemistry was monitored and DNA was prepared from the sediment bed for microbial community analysis. Souring was reversed by both treatments (at 50 mM) compared to the control columns that had no ion addition. Nitrate began to re-sour when treatment concentration was decreased to 25 mM but treatment had to be decreased to 12.5 mM before the perchlorate treated columns began to re-sour. However, the treated columns re-soured to a lesser extent than the control columns. Phylochip microbial community analyses indicated microbial community shifts and phylogenetic clustering by treatment. Isotopic analysis of sulfate showed trends that broadly agreed with the geochemistry but also suggested further sulfur cycling was occurring. This study indicates that perchlorate shows great promise as an inhibitor of sulfidogenesis in natural communities and provides insight into which organisms are involved in this process.

  16. Development and validation of a nonaqueous titration with perchloric acid to determine sparfloxacin in tablets.

    PubMed

    Marona, H R; Schapoval, E E

    2001-09-01

    A simple, rapid and inexpensive method for the determination of sparfloxacin in tablets is described. The procedure is based on the use of volumetric dosage in a nonaqueous medium in glacial acetic acid with 0.1 M perchloric acid. The method validation yielded good results and included precision and accuracy. It was also found that the excipients in the commercial tablet preparation did not interfere with the assay.

  17. Risk assessment, remedial decisions and the challenge to protect public health: the perchlorate case study.

    PubMed

    Baier-Anderson, Cal

    2006-05-10

    While scientists have a responsibility to defer judgment in the absence of conclusive data, public health and ecological protection require that government regulators make decisions based on available information. The risk assessment paradigm has evolved to help risk managers balance risks to public health with the cost of pollution control and remediation. Risk assessments are designed to be reasonably protective of public health, however the time and money required to develop and evaluate a robust scientific database can significantly delay regulatory action while exposures continue. The federal assessment of perchlorate, a component of rocket fuel and a thyroid toxicant, is presented here as a case study that demonstrates some of the limitations of risk assessment in protecting public health. Perchlorate was detected in a city well field that lies beneath a military training range at Aberdeen Proving Ground, a U.S. Army garrison in Maryland. Cleanup was put on hold, pending promulgation of a national drinking water standard for perchlorate. This case study (1) illustrates the challenge of preventing chemical exposures in the absence of promulgated standards, and (2) makes recommendations for approaches to preventing exposures to chemicals of unknown, or uncertain toxicity before they occur.

  18. Perchlorate contamination from the detonation of insensitive high-explosive rounds.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Michael R; Walsh, Marianne E; Ramsey, Charles A; Brochu, Sylvie; Thiboutot, Sonia; Ampleman, Guy

    2013-11-15

    The insensitive high-explosive PAX-21 was the first of its kind fielded in an artillery munition by the United States military. This formulation contains three main components: RDX, dinitroanisole, and ammonium perchlorate (AP). In March 2012, detonation tests were conducted on PAX-21 60mm mortar rounds to determine the energetic residues resulting from high-order and blow-in-place (BIP) detonations. Post-detonation residues were sampled and analyzed for the three main PAX-21 components. Concentrations of RDX and dinitroanisole in the samples were quite low, less than 0.1% of the munitions' original organic explosive filler mass, indicating high order or near high order detonations. However, disproportionately high concentrations of AP occurred in all residues. The residues averaged 15% of the original AP following high-order detonations and 38% of the original AP mass following the BIP operations. There was no correlation between AP residues and the RDX and dinitroanisole. Perchlorate readily leached from the detonation residues, with over 99% contained in the aqueous portion of the samples. Use of these rounds will result in billions of liters of water contaminated above drinking water perchlorate limits. As a result of this research, PAX-21 mortar rounds are currently restricted from use on US training ranges.

  19. Perchlorate Radiolysis on Mars and the Origin of Martian Soil Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Martucci, Hana F.H.; Miller, Stephanie R.; Bryson, Charles E.; Grunthaner, Frank J.; Grunthaner, Paula J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Results from the Viking biology experiments indicate the presence of reactive oxidants in martian soils that have previously been attributed to peroxide and superoxide. Instruments on the Mars Phoenix Lander and the Mars Science Laboratory detected perchlorate in martian soil, which is nonreactive under the conditions of the Viking biology experiments. We show that calcium perchlorate exposed to gamma rays decomposes in a CO2 atmosphere to form hypochlorite (ClO−), trapped oxygen (O2), and chlorine dioxide (ClO2). Our results show that the release of trapped O2 (g) from radiation-damaged perchlorate salts and the reaction of ClO− with amino acids that were added to the martian soils can explain the results of the Viking biology experiments. We conclude that neither hydrogen peroxide nor superoxide is required to explain the results of the Viking biology experiments. Key Words: Mars—Radiolysis—Organic degradation—in situ measurement—Planetary habitability and biosignatures. Astrobiology 13, 515–520. PMID:23746165

  20. The amide protonation of (-)-N-benzoylcytisine in its perchlorate salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybył, Anna K.; Kubicki, Maciej; Hoffmann, Marcin

    2014-08-01

    The 13C NMR spectrum of (-)-N-benzoylcytisine perchlorate does not show a double set of signals typical of amide compounds, although this effect has been observed for the other diamine derivatives of cytisine. This observation means that in solution there must be the state of equilibrium between two forms of the cation with the protonated amide groups. DFT calculations have indeed indicated two preferred tautomeric forms with protonated oxygen atoms of amide groups. In the solid state however, according to X-ray analysis of perchlorate and perchlorate hydrate of N-benzoylcytisine the oxygen atom of the amide group in the six-membered ring A is preferred protonation site as compared with the oxygen in benzoic moiety. (-)-N-benzoylcytisine salt is the first compound from among the known derivatives of quinolizidine alkaloids that are not N-oxides, in which in solid state only the oxygen atom at cyclic amide is protonated instead of nitrogen atom or oxygen in benzoic moiety.

  1. Perchlorate induced low temperature carbonate decomposition in the Mars Phoenix Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, K. M.; Sutter, B.; Ming, D. W.; Boynton, W. V.; Quinn, R.

    2012-07-01

    Simulated Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) analyses have shown that a CO2 release detected between 400°C and 680°C by the Phoenix Lander's TEGA instrument may have been caused by a reaction between calcium carbonate and hydrated magnesium perchlorate. In our experiments a CO2 release beginning at 385 ± 12°C was attributed to calcite reacting with water vapor and HCl gas from the dehydration and thermal decomposition of Mg-perchlorate. The release of CO2 is consistent with the TEGA detection of CO2 released between 400 and 680°C, with the amount of CO2 increasing linearly with added perchlorate. X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments confirmed CaCl2 formation from the reaction between calcite and HCl. These results have important implications for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover. Heating soils may cause inorganic release of CO2; therefore, detection of organic fragments, not CO2 alone, should be used as definitive evidence for organics in Martian soils.

  2. Comparative assessment of the environmental sustainability of existing and emerging perchlorate treatment technologies for drinking water.

    PubMed

    Choe, Jong Kwon; Mehnert, Michelle H; Guest, Jeremy S; Strathmann, Timothy J; Werth, Charles J

    2013-05-07

    Environmental impacts of conventional and emerging perchlorate drinking water treatment technologies were assessed using life cycle assessment (LCA). Comparison of two ion exchange (IX) technologies (i.e., nonselective IX with periodic regeneration using brines and perchlorate-selective IX without regeneration) at an existing plant shows that brine is the dominant contributor for nonselective IX, which shows higher impact than perchlorate-selective IX. Resource consumption during the operational phase comprises >80% of the total impacts. Having identified consumables as the driving force behind environmental impacts, the relative environmental sustainability of IX, biological treatment, and catalytic reduction technologies are compared more generally using consumable inputs. The analysis indicates that the environmental impacts of heterotrophic biological treatment are 2-5 times more sensitive to influent conditions (i.e., nitrate/oxygen concentration) and are 3-14 times higher compared to IX. However, autotrophic biological treatment is most environmentally beneficial among all. Catalytic treatment using carbon-supported Re-Pd has a higher (ca. 4600 times) impact than others, but is within 0.9-30 times the impact of IX with a newly developed ligand-complexed Re-Pd catalyst formulation. This suggests catalytic reduction can be competitive with increased activity. Our assessment shows that while IX is an environmentally competitive, emerging technologies also show great promise from an environmental sustainability perspective.

  3. Acute copper toxicity following copper glycinate injection.

    PubMed

    Oon, S; Yap, C-H; Ihle, B U

    2006-11-01

    We present a patient who developed multi-organ failure due to severe copper toxicity following attempted suicide by s.c. injection of copper glycinate. Acute copper toxicity is rare in the developed world, although it occurs more frequently in developing world countries, where it is a common mode of suicide. Acute toxicity usually results from oral ingestion and there are several local and systemic effects. Specific management can be difficult as there is little evidence regarding the efficacy of chelating agents in acute toxicity.

  4. Ion paired chromatography of iron (II,III), nickel (II) and copper (II) as their 4,7-Diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline chelates.

    PubMed

    Mudasir; Yoshioka, N; Inoue, H

    1997-07-01

    A reversed phase ion-paired chromatographic method that can be used to determine trace amounts of iron (II,III), nickel (II) and copper (II) was developed and applied to the determination of iron (II) and iron (III) levels in natural water. The separation of these metal ions as their 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (bathophenanthroline) chelates on an Inertsil ODS column was investigated by using acetonitrile-water (80/20, v/v) containing 0.06 M perchloric acid as mobile phase and diode array spectrophotometric detection at 250-650 nm. Chromatographic parameters such as composition of mobile phase and concentration of perchloric acid in mobile phase were optimized. The calibration graphs of iron (II), nickel (II) and copper (II) ions were linear (r > 0.991) in the concentration range 0-0.5, 0-2.0 and 0-4.0 mug ml(-1), respectively. The detection limit of iron (II), nickel (II) and copper (II) were 2.67, 5.42 and 18.2 ng ml(-1) with relative standard deviation (n = 5) of 3.11, 5.81 and 7.16% at a concentration level of 10 ng ml(-1) for iron (II) and nickel (II) and 25 ng ml(-1) for copper (II), respectively. The proposed method was applied to the determination of iron(II) and iron(III) in tap water and sea water samples without any interference from other common metal ions.

  5. Inhibition of microbial sulfate reduction in a flow-through column system by (per)chlorate treatment.

    PubMed

    Engelbrektson, Anna; Hubbard, Christopher G; Tom, Lauren M; Boussina, Aaron; Jin, Yong T; Wong, Hayden; Piceno, Yvette M; Carlson, Hans K; Conrad, Mark E; Anderson, Gary; Coates, John D

    2014-01-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction is a primary cause of oil reservoir souring. Here we show that amendment with chlorate or perchlorate [collectively (per)chlorate] potentially resolves this issue. Triplicate packed columns inoculated with marine sediment were flushed with coastal water amended with yeast extract and one of nitrate, chlorate, or perchlorate. Results showed that although sulfide production was dramatically reduced by all treatments, effluent sulfide was observed in the nitrate (10 mM) treatment after an initial inhibition period. In contrast, no effluent sulfide was observed with (per)chlorate (10 mM). Microbial community analyses indicated temporal community shifts and phylogenetic clustering by treatment. Nitrate addition stimulated Xanthomonadaceae and Rhizobiaceae growth, supporting their role in nitrate metabolism. (Per)chlorate showed distinct effects on microbial community structure compared with nitrate and resulted in a general suppression of the community relative to the untreated control combined with a significant decrease in sulfate reducing species abundance indicating specific toxicity. Furthermore, chlorate stimulated Pseudomonadaceae and Pseudoalteromonadaceae, members of which are known chlorate respirers, suggesting that chlorate may also control sulfidogenesis by biocompetitive exclusion of sulfate-reduction. Perchlorate addition stimulated Desulfobulbaceae and Desulfomonadaceae, which contain sulfide oxidizing and elemental sulfur-reducing species respectively, suggesting that effluent sulfide concentrations may be controlled through sulfur redox cycling in addition to toxicity and biocompetitive exclusion. Sulfur isotope analyses further support sulfur cycling in the columns, even when sulfide is not detected. This study indicates that (per)chlorate show great promise as inhibitors of sulfidogenesis in natural communities and provides insight into which organisms and respiratory processes are involved.

  6. Inhibition of microbial sulfate reduction in a flow-through column system by (per)chlorate treatment

    PubMed Central

    Engelbrektson, Anna; Hubbard, Christopher G.; Tom, Lauren M.; Boussina, Aaron; Jin, Yong T.; Wong, Hayden; Piceno, Yvette M.; Carlson, Hans K.; Conrad, Mark E.; Anderson, Gary; Coates, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction is a primary cause of oil reservoir souring. Here we show that amendment with chlorate or perchlorate [collectively (per)chlorate] potentially resolves this issue. Triplicate packed columns inoculated with marine sediment were flushed with coastal water amended with yeast extract and one of nitrate, chlorate, or perchlorate. Results showed that although sulfide production was dramatically reduced by all treatments, effluent sulfide was observed in the nitrate (10 mM) treatment after an initial inhibition period. In contrast, no effluent sulfide was observed with (per)chlorate (10 mM). Microbial community analyses indicated temporal community shifts and phylogenetic clustering by treatment. Nitrate addition stimulated Xanthomonadaceae and Rhizobiaceae growth, supporting their role in nitrate metabolism. (Per)chlorate showed distinct effects on microbial community structure compared with nitrate and resulted in a general suppression of the community relative to the untreated control combined with a significant decrease in sulfate reducing species abundance indicating specific toxicity. Furthermore, chlorate stimulated Pseudomonadaceae and Pseudoalteromonadaceae, members of which are known chlorate respirers, suggesting that chlorate may also control sulfidogenesis by biocompetitive exclusion of sulfate-reduction. Perchlorate addition stimulated Desulfobulbaceae and Desulfomonadaceae, which contain sulfide oxidizing and elemental sulfur-reducing species respectively, suggesting that effluent sulfide concentrations may be controlled through sulfur redox cycling in addition to toxicity and biocompetitive exclusion. Sulfur isotope analyses further support sulfur cycling in the columns, even when sulfide is not detected. This study indicates that (per)chlorate show great promise as inhibitors of sulfidogenesis in natural communities and provides insight into which organisms and respiratory processes are involved. PMID:25071731

  7. Copper in developmental stuttering.

    PubMed

    Alm, Per A

    2005-01-01

    It has previously been reported that men with developmental stuttering showed reduced concentration of copper in the blood, and a negative correlation between the copper level and the severity of stuttering. Disorders of copper metabolism may result in dysfunction of the basal ganglia system and dystonia, a motor disorder sharing some traits of stuttering. It has been shown that copper ions affect the dopamine and the GABA systems. With this background we investigated the plasma level of copper, the copper binding protein ceruloplasmin, and the estimated level of free copper in stuttering adults. Sixteen men with developmental stuttering were compared with 16 men without speech problems. The samples were assayed in one batch in a pseudorandom and counterbalanced order. No significant differences were found between stuttering men and the control group in any of the biological variables, and no negative correlation between copper and the general severity of stuttering was shown. On the contrary, an explorative analysis resulted in a positive correlation between high plasma copper and superfluous muscular activity during stuttering (r=0.51, p=0.04). This result indicates that there is no relation between developmental stuttering and low plasma copper in the main population of stuttering adults.

  8. Rapid measurement of perchlorate in polar ice cores down to sub-ng L(-1) levels without pre-concentration.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Kari; Cole-Dai, Jihong; Brandis, Derek; Cox, Thomas; Splett, Scott

    2015-10-01

    An ion chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (IC-ESI-MS/MS) method has been developed for rapid and accurate measurement of perchlorate in polar snow and ice core samples in which perchlorate concentrations are expected to be as low as 0.1 ng L(-1). Separation of perchlorate from major inorganic species in snow is achieved with an ion chromatography system interfaced to an AB SCIEX triple quadrupole mass spectrometer operating in multiple reaction monitoring mode. Under optimized conditions, the limit of detection and lower limit of quantification without pre-concentration have been determined to be 0.1 and 0.3 ng L(-1), respectively, with a linear dynamic range of 0.3-10.0 ng L(-1) in routine measurement. These represent improvements over previously reported methods using similar analytical techniques. The improved method allows fast, accurate, and reproducible perchlorate quantification down to the sub-ng L(-1) level and will facilitate perchlorate measurement in the study of natural perchlorate production with polar ice cores in which perchlorate concentrations are anticipated to vary in the low and sub-ng L(-1) range. Initial measurements of perchlorate in ice core samples from central Greenland show that typical perchlorate concentrations in snow dated prior to the Industrial Revolution are about 0.8 ng L(-1), while perchlorate concentrations are significantly higher in recent (post-1980) snow, suggesting that anthropogenic sources are a significant contributor to perchlorate in the current environment.

  9. Levels, indoor-outdoor relationships and exposure risks of airborne particle-associated perchlorate and chlorate in two urban areas in Eastern Asia.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lan; Yang, Lingxiao; Chen, Jianmin; Toda, Kei; Wang, Xinfeng; Zhang, Junmei; Yamasaki, Dai; Nakamura, Yukihide; Sui, Xiao; Zheng, Longfei; Wen, Liang; Xu, Caihong; Wang, Wenxing

    2015-09-01

    Indoor and outdoor concentrations of PM2.5-associated perchlorate (ClO4(-)) and chlorate (ClO3(-)) were investigated in Jinan, China, and size-resolved perchlorate and chlorate were studied in Kumamoto, Japan. The average outdoor PM2.5-associated concentrations of perchlorate and chlorate were 4.18 ng m(-3) and 2.82 ng m(-3), respectively, in Jinan. Perchlorate and chlorate were mainly distributed in fine particles, and their approximate PM2.5-associated concentrations were 0.04 ng m(-3) and 4.14 ng m(-3), respectively, in Kumamoto. The ratios of ClO3(-)/ClO4(-) ranged from 18.72 to 360.22 in Kumamoto and from 0.03 to 7.45 in Jinan. The highest concentration of perchlorate (173.76 ng m(-3)) was observed on Spring Festival Eve. This finding and the significant correlation between perchlorate and fireworks-related components (Cl(-) and K(+)) indicated that the fireworks display was a significant source of perchlorate in Jinan. The indoor concentrations of perchlorate and chlorate in Jinan were 3.54 ng m(-3) (range, 0.14-125.14 ng m(-3)) and 0.94 ng m(-3) (range, 0.10-1.80 ng m(-3)), respectively. In the absence of an indoor source of perchlorate, the occurrence of indoor concentrations higher than those found outdoors was a common effect of individual fireworks displays near the sampling sites, coupled with meteorological influences and poor indoor diffusion conditions. The exposure risks of perchlorate and chlorate indoors indicated that the potential risk of perchlorate exposure to children during fireworks displays is deserving of concern.

  10. Mechanism of H2S Oxidation by the Dissimilatory Perchlorate-Reducing Microorganism Azospira suillum PS.

    PubMed

    Mehta-Kolte, Misha G; Loutey, Dana; Wang, Ouwei; Youngblut, Matthew D; Hubbard, Christopher G; Wetmore, Kelly M; Conrad, Mark E; Coates, John D

    2017-02-21

    The genetic and biochemical basis of perchlorate-dependent H2S oxidation (PSOX) was investigated in the dissimilatory perchlorate-reducing microorganism (DPRM) Azospira suillum PS (PS). Previously, it was shown that all known DPRMs innately oxidize H2S, producing elemental sulfur (S(o)). Although the process involving PSOX is thermodynamically favorable (ΔG°' = -206 kJ ⋅ mol(-1) H2S), the underlying biochemical and genetic mechanisms are currently unknown. Interestingly, H2S is preferentially utilized over physiological electron donors such as lactate or acetate although no growth benefit is obtained from the metabolism. Here, we determined that PSOX is due to a combination of enzymatic and abiotic interactions involving reactive intermediates of perchlorate respiration. Using various approaches, including barcode analysis by sequencing (Bar-seq), transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq), and proteomics, along with targeted mutagenesis and biochemical characterization, we identified all facets of PSOX in PS. In support of our proposed model, deletion of identified upregulated PS genes traditionally known to be involved in sulfur redox cycling (e.g., Sox, sulfide:quinone reductase [SQR]) showed no defect in PSOX activity. Proteomic analysis revealed differential abundances of a variety of stress response metal efflux pumps and divalent heavy-metal transporter proteins, suggesting a general toxicity response. Furthermore, in vitro biochemical studies demonstrated direct PSOX mediated by purified perchlorate reductase (PcrAB) in the absence of other electron transfer proteins. The results of these studies support a model in which H2S oxidation is mediated by electron transport chain short-circuiting in the periplasmic space where the PcrAB directly oxidizes H2S to S(o) The biogenically formed reactive intermediates (ClO2(-) and O2) subsequently react with additional H2S, producing polysulfide and S(o) as end products.IMPORTANCE Inorganic sulfur compounds are

  11. Mesophilic, Circumneutral Anaerobic Iron Oxidation as a Remediation Mechanism for Radionuclides, Nitrate and Perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, S.; Thrash, J. C.; Coates, J. D.

    2008-12-01

    Iron oxidation is a novel anaerobic metabolism where microorganisms obtain reducing equivalents from the oxidization of Fe(II) and assimilate carbon from organic carbon compounds or CO2. Recent evidence indicates that in combination with the activity of dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, anaerobic microbial Fe(II) oxidation can also contribute to the global iron redox cycle. Studies have also proved that Fe(II)- oxidation is ubiquitous in diverse environments and produce a broad range of insoluble iron forms as end products. These biogenic Fe(III)-oxides and mixed valence Fe minerals have a very high adsorption capacity of heavy metals and radionuclides. Adsorption and immobilization by these biogenic Fe phases produced at circumneutral pH, is now considered a very effective mode of remediation of radionuclides like Uranium, especially under variable redox conditions. By coupling soluble and insoluble Fe(II) oxidation with nitrate and perchlorate as terminal electron acceptors in-situ, anaerobic Fe-oxidation can also be used for environmental cleanup of Fe through Fe-mineral precipitation, as well as nitrate and perchlorate through reduction. Coupling of Fe as the sole electron and energy source to the reduction of perchlorate or nitrate boosts the metabolism without building up biomass hence also taking care of biofouling. To understand the mechanisms by which microorganisms can grow at circumneutral pH by mesophilic, anaerobic iron oxidation and the ability of microorganisms to reduce nitrate and perchlorate coupled to iron oxidation recent work in our lab involved the physiological characterization of Dechlorospirillum strain VDY which was capable of anaerobic iron-oxidation with either nitrate or perchlorate serving as terminal electron acceptor. Under non-growth conditions, VDY oxidized 3mM Fe(II) coupled to nitrate reduction, and 2mM Fe(II) coupled to perchlorate reduction, in 24 hours. It contained a copy of the RuBisCO cbbM subunit gene which was

  12. Handling of Copper and Copper Oxide Nanoparticles by Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bulcke, Felix; Dringen, Ralf

    2016-02-01

    Copper is an essential trace element for many important cellular functions. However, excess of copper can impair cellular functions by copper-induced oxidative stress. In brain, astrocytes are considered to play a prominent role in the copper homeostasis. In this short review we summarise the current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms which are involved in the handling of copper by astrocytes. Cultured astrocytes efficiently take up copper ions predominantly by the copper transporter Ctr1 and the divalent metal transporter DMT1. In addition, copper oxide nanoparticles are rapidly accumulated by astrocytes via endocytosis. Cultured astrocytes tolerate moderate increases in intracellular copper contents very well. However, if a given threshold of cellular copper content is exceeded after exposure to copper, accelerated production of reactive oxygen species and compromised cell viability are observed. Upon exposure to sub-toxic concentrations of copper ions or copper oxide nanoparticles, astrocytes increase their copper storage capacity by upregulating the cellular contents of glutathione and metallothioneins. In addition, cultured astrocytes have the capacity to export copper ions which is likely to involve the copper ATPase 7A. The ability of astrocytes to efficiently accumulate, store and export copper ions suggests that astrocytes have a key role in the distribution of copper in brain. Impairment of this astrocytic function may be involved in diseases which are connected with disturbances in brain copper metabolism.

  13. catena-Poly[[[(2,2′-bipyrid­yl)copper(II)]-μ-l-alaninato] perchlorate monohydrate

    PubMed Central

    Braban, Mircea; Haiduc, Ionel; Lönnecke, Peter

    2009-01-01

    In the structure of the polymeric title complex, {[Cu(C3H6NO2)(C10H8N2)]ClO4·H2O}n, the carboxyl­ate group of the chelating amino acid is further linked to a neighbouring Cu centre, generating a supra­molecular single-stranded chain parallel to [010]. The structure displays inter­molecular N—H⋯O and O—H⋯O hydrogen bonding, which consolidates the crystal packing. PMID:21581521

  14. Impacts of nitrate and electron donor on perchlorate reduction and microbial community composition in a biologically activated carbon reactor.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanping; Wu, Min; Gao, Naiyun; Chu, Wenhai; Wang, Shuaifeng

    2016-12-01

    The sensitivity of perchlorate reduction and microbial composition to varied nitrate and acetate loadings was studied in a biologically activated carbon reactor with perchlorate loading and empty bed contact time fixed at 5 mg/L and 226 min, respectively. In stage 1, the sole electron acceptor ClO4(-) realized complete removal with ≥21.95 mg C/L of acetate supply. As nitrate loading gradually increased to 5 mg/L (stage 2), perchlorate reduction was slightly promoted and both ClO4(-) and NO3(-) were completely removed at an acetate loading of 29.7 mg C/L. When nitrate loading continued increasing to 10-60 mg/L (stage 3), perchlorate reduction converted to be inhibited, along with nondetectable NO3(-) and approximately exhausted DOC in effluent. When acetate loading increased to 43.9 mg C/L in stage 4, both ClO4(-) and NO3(-) were again removed, though lags still existed in perchlorate reduction. β-Proteobacteria accounted for about 60%, 55%, 58%, 61% and 12% in samples from the base and top of the filter in stage 1 and those from the base, middle and top in stage 4, respectively. These findings implied that ratio of NO3(-) to ClO4(-) loadings and acetate loading were two key factors impacting ClO4(-) reduction and microbial structure along the filter.

  15. (Per)chlorate reduction by the thermophilic bacterium Moorella perchloratireducens sp. nov., isolated from underground gas storage.

    PubMed

    Balk, Melike; van Gelder, Ton; Weelink, Sander A; Stams, Alfons J M

    2008-01-01

    A thermophilic bacterium, strain An10, was isolated from underground gas storage with methanol as a substrate and perchlorate as an electron acceptor. Cells were gram-positive straight rods, 0.4 to 0.6 mum in diameter and 2 to 8 mum in length, growing as single cells or in pairs. Spores were terminal with a bulged sporangium. The temperature range for growth was 40 to 70 degrees C, with an optimum at 55 to 60 degrees C. The pH optimum was around 7. The salinity range for growth was between 0 and 40 g NaCl liter(-1) with an optimum at 10 g liter(-1). Strain An10 was able to grow on CO, methanol, pyruvate, glucose, fructose, cellobiose, mannose, xylose, and pectin. The isolate was able to respire with (per)chlorate, nitrate, thiosulfate, neutralized Fe(III) complexes, and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate. The G+C content of the DNA was 57.6 mol%. On the basis of 16S rRNA analysis, strain An10 was most closely related to Moorella thermoacetica and Moorella thermoautotrophica. The bacterium reduced perchlorate and chlorate completely to chloride. Key enzymes, perchlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase, were detected in cell extracts. Strain An10 is the first thermophilic and gram-positive bacterium with the ability to use (per)chlorate as a terminal electron acceptor.

  16. Estimated dietary exposure of Canadians to perchlorate through the consumption of fruits and vegetables available in Ottawa markets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongwen; Forsyth, Don; Lau, Benjamin P-Y; Pelletier, Luc; Bronson, Roni; Gaertner, Dean

    2009-10-14

    There has been increasing concern over the contamination of drinking water and food with perchlorate. Studies have reported perchlorate in a variety of foods, including lettuce, milk, fruits, and juices. In this study, 150 food samples were analyzed by ion chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (IC-MS/MS) to determine the concentrations of perchlorate in imported and domestic fruits and vegetables available from retail outlets in Ottawa, Canada. Perchlorate was found in most of the tested food types with concentrations appearing to vary by commodity and country of origin. Levels ranged from nondetectable to 536 microg/kg, with Guatemalan cantaloupes (156 +/- 232 microg/kg), United States spinach (133 +/- 24.9 microg/kg), Chilean green grapes (45.5 +/- 13.3 microg/kg), and United States Romaine lettuce (29.1 +/- 10.5 microg/kg) having the highest concentrations. Dietary exposure to perchlorate from analyzed fruits and vegetables was estimated to be approximately 36.6 and 41.1 ng/kg bw/day for toddlers (1-4 yrs) and children (5-11yrs), respectively.

  17. Copper-Silicon Bronzes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1933-05-11

    copper alloys which have good static properties are disa:cinting in their endurance properties. The silicide allo~rs that are given high tensile strength...notched endurance tests and on cast alloys of this type, are lacking. uowever, preliminary reports state that a copper beryllium alloy of about 2 1/2...properties re- main almost the same. Grain size increases with sil- icon. III A study of hardening copper by heat treating its alloys with silicides

  18. Hair copper in intrauterine copper device users.

    PubMed

    Thiery, M; Heyndrickx, A; Uyttersprot, C

    1984-03-01

    The antifertility effect of copper-bearing IUDs is based on continuous release of copper, which is a result of the reaction between the metal and the uterine secretions. Released cupric ions collect in the endometrium and in the uterine fluid but significant accumulation has not been found in the bloodstream or elsewhere. Following Laker's suggestion that hair be used for monitoring essential trace elements, e.g., copper, we checked the copper content of the hair of women wearing copper-bearing IUDs. Samples of untreated pubic hair removed by clipping before diagnostic curettage were obtained from 10 young (24-34 years old), white caucasian females who until then had been wearing an MLCu250 IUD for more than 1 year. Pubes from 10 comparable (sex, age, race) subjects who had never used a Cu-containing device served as controls. The unwashed material was submitted to the toxicology laboratory, where the copper content was assessed by flameless atomic absorption, a technique whose lower limit of measurement lies at a concentration of 0.05 mcg Cu/ml fluid (50 ppb). Hair samples were washed to remove extraneous traces of metal according to the prescriptions of the International Atomic Energy Agency, weighed, and mineralized, after which a small volume (10 mcl) of the diluted fluid was fed into the graphite furnace. Each sample (75-150 mg) was analyzed 4 times, both before and after washing. Since the cleaning procedure reduces the weight of the sample (mainly by the removal of fat, dust, etc.) this explains why the percentage copper content of washed hair is higher than that of unwashed hair belonging to the same subject. The results indicate that there was no significant difference (Mann-Whitney U test) between the mean copper levels of both unwashed and washed pubes from women who were using or had never used an MLCu250 IUD. We therefore conclude that the use of this copper-containing device is not associated with significant accumulation of copper in (pubic) hair.

  19. Biogenic nanoparticles: copper, copper oxides, copper sulphides, complex copper nanostructures and their applications.

    PubMed

    Rubilar, Olga; Rai, Mahendra; Tortella, Gonzalo; Diez, Maria Cristina; Seabra, Amedea B; Durán, Nelson

    2013-09-01

    Copper nanoparticles have been the focus of intensive study due to their potential applications in diverse fields including biomedicine, electronics, and optics. Copper-based nanostructured materials have been used in conductive films, lubrification, nanofluids, catalysis, and also as potent antimicrobial agent. The biogenic synthesis of metallic nanostructured nanoparticles is considered to be a green and eco-friendly technology since neither harmful chemicals nor high temperatures are involved in the process. The present review discusses the synthesis of copper nanostructured nanoparticles by bacteria, fungi, and plant extracts, showing that biogenic synthesis is an economically feasible, simple and non-polluting process. Applications for biogenic copper nanoparticles are also discussed.

  20. High adherence copper plating process

    DOEpatents

    Nignardot, Henry

    1993-01-01

    A process for applying copper to a substrate of aluminum or steel by electrodeposition and for preparing an aluminum or steel substrate for electrodeposition of copper. Practice of the invention provides good adhesion of the copper layer to the substrate.

  1. Perchlorate in soybean sprouts (Glycine max L. Merr.), water dropwort (Oenanthe stolonifera DC.), and lotus (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn.) root in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Yang, Minjune; Her, Namguk

    2011-07-13

    The occurrence of perchlorate in soybean sprouts (Glycine max L. Merr), water dropwort (Oenanthe stolonifera DC.), and lotus (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn.) root, which are commonly consumed by people in South Korea, was determined by using an ion chromatograph coupled with a tandem mass spectrometer. For soybean sprouts (11 samples), perchlorate was detected in most (91%) of the samples at various concentrations of up to 78.4 μg/kg dry weight (DW); the mean concentration was 35.2 μg/kg DW. For water dropwort, of the 13 samples examined, four showed concentrations that were above the limit of quantification (LOQ). The mean perchlorate concentration was 20.7 μg/kg DW, and the highest perchlorate value was 39.9 μg/kg DW. Of the six lotus root samples examined, only one exhibited a detectable perchlorate concentration (17.3 μg/kg DW). For the accumulation experiments with artificially contaminated solutions, the concentrations of perchlorate in soybean sprouts gradually increased with the increase of perchlorate concentration in the solution. However, there was a decrease in the bioconcentration factor as the perchlorate concentration in the solution increased.

  2. Copper-containing zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Price, Geoffrey L.; Kanazirev, Vladislav

    1996-01-01

    A catalyst useful in the conversion of nitrogen oxides or in the synthesis of nitriles or imines from amines, formed by preparing an intimate mechanical mixture of a copper (II)-containing species, such as CuO or CuCl.sub.2, or elemental copper, with a zeolite having a pore mouth comprising 10 oxygen atoms, such as ZSM-5, converting the elemental copper or copper (II) to copper (I), and driving the copper (I) into the zeolite.

  3. Copper-containing zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Price, G.L.; Kanazirev, V.

    1996-12-10

    A catalyst useful in the conversion of nitrogen oxides or in the synthesis of nitriles or imines from amines, is formed by preparing an intimate mechanical mixture of a copper (II)-containing species, such as CuO or CuCl{sub 2}, or elemental copper, with a zeolite having a pore mouth comprising 10 oxygen atoms, such as ZSM-5, converting the elemental copper or copper (II) to copper (I), and driving the copper (I) into the zeolite.

  4. Bis(2,2′-bipyridyl-κ2 N,N′)dichlorido­rhodium(III) perchlorate

    PubMed Central

    Dikhtiarenko, Alla; Torre-Fernández, Laura; García-Granda, Santiago; García, José R.; Gimeno, José

    2012-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, [RhCl2(C10H8N2)2]ClO4, consists of one unit of the cationic complex [RhCl2(bipy)2]+ and one uncoordinated perchlorate anion. The RhIII atom is coordinated by four N atoms from two bipyridyl ligands and two Cl atoms, forming a distorted octa­hedral environment. The Cl ligands are cis. Two intramolecular C—H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds occur in the cationic complex . In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked together by a hydrogen-bond network involving the H atoms of bipyridyl rings and perchlorate anions. An O atom of the perchlorate anion is disordered over two sites, with an occupancy-factor ratio of 0.78 (3):0.22 (3). PMID:22719282

  5. 3,12-Diaza-6,9-diazo-nia-2,13-dioxotetra-decane bis-(perchlorate).

    PubMed

    Söhnel, Tilo; Wichmann, Kathrin A; Doert, Thomas; Cooper, Garth J S

    2012-02-01

    The crystal structure of the title diprotonated diacetyl-triethyl-ene-tetra-mine (DAT) perchorate salt, C(10)H(24)N(4)O(2) (2+)·2ClO(4) (-), can be described as a three-dimensional assembly of alternating layers consisting of diprotonated diacetyl-triethyl-ene-tetra-mine (H(2)DAT)(2+) strands along [100] and the anionic species ClO(4) (-). The (H(2)DAT)(2+) cations in the strands are connected via N-H⋯O hydrogen bonding between the acetyl groups and the amine groups of neighbouring (H(2)DAT)(2+) cations. Layers of (H(2)DAT)(2+) strands and perchlorate anions are connected by a network of hydrogen bonds between the NH and NH(2) groups and the O atoms of the perchlorate anion. The asymmetric unit consits of one perchlorate anion in a general position, as well as of one cation that is located on a center of inversion.

  6. Light and variable 37Cl/35Cl ratios in rocks from Gale Crater, Mars: Possible signature of perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, K. A.; Martin, P.; Archer, P. D.; Atreya, S. K.; Conrad, P. G.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Fairén, A. G.; Franz, H. B.; Freissinet, C.; Glavin, D. P.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Malespin, C.; Ming, D. W.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Sutter, B.

    2016-03-01

    Cl isotope ratios measured on HCl thermally evolved from as-yet-unknown phases in sedimentary rocks and sand in Gale Crater provide unexpected insights to the Martian surficial Cl cycle. The seven samples yield δ37Cl values ranging from - 1 ± 25 ‰ to - 51 ± 5 ‰. Five analyses from two samples of the Sheepbed mudstone (Yellowknife Bay study area) are analytically indistinguishable with a mean δ37Cl of - 11 ± 7 ‰ (1 σ). In contrast, four mudstones/sandstones from the Kimberley and Pahrump study areas also yielded indistinguishable ratios, but with a mean δ37Cl of - 43 ± 6 ‰. The Rocknest sand deposit gave a highly uncertain δ37Cl value of - 7 ± 44 ‰. These light and highly variable δ37Cl values are unique among known solar system materials. Two endmember models are offered to account for these observations, and in both, perchlorate, with its extreme ability to fractionate Cl isotopes, is critical. In the first model, SAM is detecting HCl from an oxychlorine compound (e.g., perchlorate) produced from volcanic gas emissions by atmospheric chemical reactions. Similar reactions in Earth's atmosphere may be responsible for the isotopically lightest known Cl outside of this study, in perchlorate from the Atacama Desert. Some of the Gale Crater δ37Cl values are more negative than those in Atacama perchlorate, but because reaction mechanisms and associated fractionation factors are unknown, it is impossible to assess whether this difference is prohibitive. If the negative δ37Cl signal is produced in this fashion, the isotopic variability among samples could arise either from variations in the relative size of the reactant chloride and product perchlorate reservoirs, or from variations in the fraction of perchlorate reduced back to chloride after deposition. Such reduction strongly enriches 37Cl in the residual perchlorate. Perchlorate reduction alone offers an alternative endmember model that can explain the observed data if SAM measured HCl derived

  7. Managing the interactions between sulfate- and perchlorate-reducing bacteria when using hydrogen-fed biofilms to treat a groundwater with a high perchlorate concentration.

    PubMed

    Ontiveros-Valencia, Aura; Tang, Youneng; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2014-05-15

    A groundwater containing an unusually high concentration (∼4000 μg/L) of perchlorate (ClO4(-)) and significant (∼60 mg/L) sulfate (SO4(2-)) was treated with hydrogen (H2)-fed biofilms. The objective was to manage the interactions between sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and perchlorate-reducing bacteria (PRB) by controlling the H2-delivery capacity to achieve ClO4(-) reduction to below the detection limit (4 μg/L). Complete ClO4(-) reduction with minimized SO4(2-) reduction was achieved by using two membrane biofilm reactors (MBfRs) in series. The lead MBfR removed >96% ClO4(-), and the lag MBfR further reduced ClO4(-) to below the detection limit. SO4(2-) reduction ranged from 10 to 60%, and lower SO4(2-) reduction corresponded to lower H2 availability (i.e., lower H2 pressure or membranes with lower H2-delivery capacity). Minimizing SO4(2-) reduction improved ClO4(-) removal by increasing the fraction of PRB in the biofilm. High SO4(2-) flux correlated with enrichment of Desulfovibrionales, autotrophic SRB that can compete strongly with denitrifying bacteria (DB) and PRB. Increased SO4(2-) reduction also led to enrichment of: 1) Ignavibacteriales and Thiobacteriales, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria that allow sulfur cycling in the biofilm; 2) Bacteroidales, heterotrophic microorganisms likely using organic sources of carbon (e.g., acetate); and 3) Spirochaetales, which potentially utilize soluble microbial products (SMPs) from autotrophic SRB to produce acetate.

  8. Improved Electroformed Structural Copper and Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.; Hudson, W.; Babcock, B.; Edwards, R.

    1998-01-01

    Electroforming offers a superior means for fabricating internally cooled heat exchangers and structures subjected to thermal environments. Copper is deposited from many such applications because of the good thermal conductivity. It suffers from mediocre yield strength as a structural material and loses mechanical strength at intermediate temperatures. Mechanical properties similar to those of electroformed nickel are desired. Phase 1 examined innovative means to improve deposited copper structural performance. Yield strengths as high as 483 MPa (70 ksi) were obtained with useful ductility while retaining a high level of purity essential to good thermal conductivity. Phase 2 represents a program to explore new additive combinations in copper electrolytes to produce a more fine, equiaxed grain which can be thermally stabilized by other techniques such as alloying in modest degrees and dispersion strengthening. Evaluation of new technology - such as the codeposition of fullerness (diamond-like) particles were made to enhance thermal conductivity in low alloys. A test fire quality tube-bundle engine was fabricated using these copper property improvement concepts to show the superiority of the new coppers and fabrications methods over competitive technologies such as brazing and plasma deposition.

  9. A new copper(II) complex with 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone and 2,2-bipyridine: Crystal structure, spectral properties and cytotoxic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, P. S.; Paixão, D. A.; de Paula, F. C. S.; Ferreira, A. M. D. C.; Ellena, J.; Guilardi, S.; Pereira-Maia, E. C.; Guerra, W.

    2013-02-01

    This work reports the synthesis and characterization of a new copper(II) complex with 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone (HTTA) and 2,2-bipyridine (bipy). The complex was characterized by elemental analysis, UV-Vis, IR and EPR. The crystal structure was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The copper ion has a distorted square-pyramidal geometry and is coordinated to two bidentate ligands (HTTA and bipy) and a perchlorate ion weakly bonded in the apical position. The crystal packing is stabilized by non-classical hydrogen bonds and weak interactions π-π stacking. In the copper complex, the metal ion binds to HTTA via the oxygen atoms of the β-diketone group and to bipy via its two heterocyclic nitrogens. The title compound inhibits the growth of K562 cells with an IC50 value equal to 28.2 μmol L-1.

  10. Combined effects of perchlorate, thiocyanate, and iodine on thyroid function in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007–08

    SciTech Connect

    Steinmaus, Craig; Miller, Mark D.; Cushing, Lara; Blount, Benjamin C.; Smith, Allan H.

    2013-05-15

    Perchlorate, thiocyanate, and low iodine intake can all decrease iodide intake into the thyroid gland. This can reduce thyroid hormone production since iodide is a key component of thyroid hormone. Previous research has suggested that each of these factors alone may decrease thyroid hormone levels, but effect sizes are small. We hypothesized that people who have all three factors at the same time have substantially lower thyroid hormone levels than people who do not, and the effect of this combined exposure is substantially larger than the effects seen in analyses focused on only one factor at a time. Using data from the 2007–2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, subjects were categorized into exposure groups based on their urinary perchlorate, iodine, and thiocyanate concentrations, and mean serum thyroxine concentrations were compared between groups. Subjects with high perchlorate (n=1939) had thyroxine concentrations that were 5.0% lower (mean difference=0.40 μg/dl, 95% confidence interval=0.14–0.65) than subjects with low perchlorate (n=2084). The individual effects of iodine and thiocyanate were even smaller. Subjects with high perchlorate, high thiocyanate, and low iodine combined (n=62) had thyroxine concentrations 12.9% lower (mean difference=1.07 μg/dl, 95% confidence interval=0.55–1.59) than subjects with low perchlorate, low thiocyanate, and adequate iodine (n=376). Potential confounders had little impact on results. Overall, these results suggest that concomitant exposure to perchlorate, thiocyanate, and low iodine markedly reduces thyroxine production. This highlights the potential importance of examining the combined effects of multiple agents when evaluating the toxicity of thyroid-disrupting agents. -- Highlights: ► Recent data suggest that essentially everyone in the US is exposed to perchlorate. ► Perchlorate exposure may be associated with lower thyroid hormone levels. ► Some groups may be more susceptible to

  11. Formation of oxidizing species via irradiation of perchlorates using high-energy electrons and D 2 + ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crandall, Parker B.; Gillis-Davis, Jeffrey J.; Kaiser, Ralf-Ingo

    2016-10-01

    The perchlorate ion (ClO4-) has garnered particular interest in recent years following the discovery of perchlorate salts in the Martian regolith at levels of 0.4-0.6 wt% by the Phoenix lander in 2006 and Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover in 2013. Due to their oxidizing properties, perchlorates are suspected to play a contributing role to the surprising lack of organics on the Martian surface. In this study, magnesium perchlorate hexahydrate (Mg(ClO4)2●6H2O) samples were irradiated with monoenergetic beams of 5 keV electrons and D2+ ions separately, sequentially, and simultaneously to simulate the effects of galactic cosmic ray exposure of perchlorates. The irradiation experiments were carried out under ultra-high vacuum conditions at 50 K, after which the samples were slowly heated to 300 K (0.5 K min-1) while desorbing products were monitored by quadrupole mass spectrometry. In all cases, molecular oxygen (O2) was detected upon the onset of irradiation and again during the warmup phase. In the case of simultaneous irradiation, deuterated water (D2O) and deuterium peroxide (D2O2) were also detected as the sample was heated whereas in the D2+ experiment small amounts of D2O2 was found exclusively. When samples were irradiated sequentially, the production of D2O2 was dependent upon the sample being irradiated with D2+ ions prior to electrons. These experiments show that perchlorates are capable of producing multiple oxidizing agents (O2, D2O2) which may also account for the lack of organics on the Martian surface.

  12. Perchlorate exposure does not modulate temporal variation of whole-body thyroid and androgen hormone content in threespine stickleback

    PubMed Central

    Gardell, Alison M.; Dillon, Danielle M.; Smayda, Lauren C.; von Hippel, Frank A.; Cresko, William A.; Postlethwait, John H.; Buck, C. Loren

    2015-01-01

    Previously we showed that exposure of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) to the endocrine disruptor perchlorate results in pronounced structural changes in thyroid and gonad, while surprisingly, whole-body thyroid hormone concentrations remain unaffected. To test for hormone titer variations on a finer scale, we evaluated the interactive effects of time (diel and reproductive season) and perchlorate exposure on whole-body contents of triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4), and 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) in captive stickleback. Adult stickleback were exposed to 100 ppm perchlorate or control water and sampled at four-hour intervals across the 24-hour day and at one time-point (1100 h) weekly across the reproductive season (May-July). Neither whole-body T3 nor T4 concentration significantly differed across the day in control or perchlorate treated stickleback. Across the reproductive season, whole-body T3 concentration remained stable while T4 significantly increased. However, neither hormone concentration was significantly affected by perchlorate, verifying our previous studies. The concentration of whole-body 11-KT, a major fish androgen, displayed significant diel variation and also steadily declined across the reproductive season in untreated males; perchlorate exposure did not influence the concentration of 11-KT in either diel or reproductive season schedules. Diel and reproductive season variations in 11-KT content in male stickleback are likely related to reproductive physiology and behavior. The observed increase in T4 content across the reproductive season may be reflective of increased energy investment in reproduction near the end of the life cycle. PMID:25733204

  13. Perchlorate exposure induces hypothyroidism and affects thyroid-responsive genes in liver but not brain of quail chicks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; McNabb, F M Anne; Sible, Jill C

    2009-10-01

    Ground-dwelling birds in perchlorate-contaminated areas are exposed to perchlorate ion, a known thyroid disruptor, and might be vulnerable to the developmental effects of perchlorate-induced hypothyroidism. We hypothesized that perchlorate-induced hypothyroidism would alter the expression of thyroid-responsive genes involved in thyroid hormone (TH) regulation and in the development of target organ function. Japanese quail chicks were exposed to 2000 mg/L ammonium perchlorate in drinking water for 7.5 weeks beginning on day 5 posthatch. Hypothyroidism was evident after 2 weeks of exposure as lower plasma THs and lower TH content in exposed chicks than in controls. The degree of hypothyroidism was increased at 7.5 weeks, as indicated by significant thyroid gland hypertrophy and sustained changes in thyroid function. After 2 weeks of exposure, hypothyroidism increased type 2 5'-deiodinase (D2) mRNA level and decreased Spot 14 (SP14) mRNA level in the liver, whereas D2 mRNA and RC3 mRNA levels in brain were not affected. After 7.5 weeks of exposure, mRNA levels in the exposed group did not differ from those in controls in either the liver or brain, suggesting the responsiveness of these genes to THs decreased during development. These results suggest that the brain, but not the liver, was protected from the effects of hypothyroidism, probably by changes in D2 activity at the protein level and/or regulation of TH entry and exit from the brain. We concluded that perchlorate exposure caused hypothyroidism in young Japanese quail and affected the expression of thyroid-responsive genes during early posthatch development.

  14. Biodegradation of perchlorate from real and synthetic effluent by Proteobacterium ARJR SMBS in a stirred tank bioreactor system.

    PubMed

    Raj, J R Anoop; Muruganandam, L

    2013-01-01

    The present work is a laboratory-scale study of perchlorate degradation using Proteobacterium ARJR SMBS in a stirred tank bioreactor (STBR). Anaerobically grown cultures of ARJR SMBS exposed to a variety of ClO4(-) levels within the range 30 to 150 mg L(-1) under anoxic conditions have been studied. The chloride released was measured and the average value found to be 43.55 mg L(-1). The average daily value of perchlorate degradation rate in this system was 17.24 mg L(-1) at optimum pH 7.5 and 0.25% NaCl salinity. The mixed liquor suspension solids of the system gradually increased from 0.025-0.156 g L(-1) during the operating period of 55 days. Mass balance indicated that the chloride produced was 0.45 mole per mole of perchlorate. The salinity of the system varied from 2.50-18.46 g L(-1), dependent primarily upon the inlet perchlorate concentration. The degradation mechanism, which obeyed a first-order substrate-utilizing kinetic model, allowed the growth rates and the half-saturation constants to be determined. The maximum observed anoxic growth rates (0.83-1.2 h(-1)) for ARJR SMBS in a synthetic effluent (SE) were considerably higher than in real effluent (RE) (0.45-0.59 h(-1)). The biomass yield of ARJR SMBS in STBR was higher in SE (1 +/- 0.4 mg L(-1)) than in RE (1 +/- 0.1 mg L(-1)). From the experimental findings, the uptake of perchlorate by the bacterium is suggested to be a non-interfacially-based mechanism. Under steady state operating condition the performance of the reactor was comparatively lower for RE than for SE but still offers significant control over the degradation of perchlorate under full-scale conditions.

  15. Deliquescence Of Calcium Perchlorate: An Investigation Of Stable Aqueous Solutions Relevant To Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuding, Danielle; Rivera-Valentin, E. G.; Gough, R. V.; Chevrier, V. F.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2013-10-01

    Perchlorate has been found by the Phoenix and Viking landers, and potentially by the Mars Science Laboratory rover. Calcium perchlorate is known for its highly deliquescent properties and low eutectic point, potentially having an impact on the local water cycle. The deliquescence and efflorescence of this salt, though, have not yet been quantified. We used a Raman microscope equipped with an environmental cell to determine the deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) and efflorescence relative humidity (ERH) as a function of temperature and also hydration state. Under all temperature conditions, Ca(ClO4)2 efflorescence is found to occur at relative humidity values below where deliquescence occurs. DRH increases from an average 23% RH to 55% RH as you decrease the temperature from 263 K to 223 K, with ERH values averaging 16%. This result confirms that all perchlorate salts studied thus far exhibit a significant hysteresis effect during crystallization and thus Ca(ClO4)2 readily forms supersaturated, metastable solutions. Results were compared to a thermodynamic model for three hydration states of Ca(ClO4)2. As predicted, the higher hydration states were less deliquescent and the experimental results are in good agreement with the model. To better predict the stability of aqueous Ca(ClO4)2 solutions in the martian subsurface, we conducted a diurnal cycle experiment. Results showed that Ca(ClO4)2 can remain aqueous when exposed to the subsurface temperature and RH conditions expected at the Phoenix landing site. Present-day fluvial features, such as RSL, have been attributed to brine flows; thus, understanding RH-driven phase transitions for Ca(ClO4)2 aqueous solutions may be important for characterizing present-day water on Mars.

  16. The Effects of Perchlorates on the Permafrost Methanogens: Implication for Autotrophic Life on Mars

    PubMed Central

    Shcherbakova, Viktoria; Oshurkova, Viktoria; Yoshimura, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    The terrestrial permafrost represents a range of possible cryogenic extraterrestrial ecosystems on Earth-like planets without obvious surface ice, such as Mars. The autotrophic and chemolithotrophic psychrotolerant methanogens are more likely than aerobes to function as a model for life forms that may exist in frozen subsurface environments on Mars, which has no free oxygen, inaccessible organic matter, and extremely low amounts of unfrozen water. Our research on the genesis of methane, its content and distribution in permafrost horizons of different ages and origin demonstrated the presence of methane in permanently frozen fine-grained sediments. Earlier, we isolated and described four strains of methanogenic archaea of Methanobacterium and Methanosarcina genera from samples of Pliocene and Holocene permafrost from Eastern Siberia. In this paper we study the effect of sodium and magnesium perchlorates on growth of permafrost and nonpermafrost methanogens, and present evidence that permafrost hydogenotrophic methanogens are more resistant to the chaotropic agent found in Martian soil. In this paper we study the effect of sodium and magnesium perchlorates on the growth of permafrost and nonpermafrost methanogens, and present evidence that permafrost hydogenotrophic methanogens are more resistant to the chaotropic agent found in Martian soil. Furthermore, as shown in the studies strain M2T M. arcticum, probably can use perchlorate anion as an electron acceptor in anaerobic methane oxidation. Earth’s subzero subsurface environments are the best approximation of environments on Mars, which is most likely to harbor methanogens; thus, a biochemical understanding of these pathways is expected to provide a basis for designing experiments to detect autotrophic methane-producing life forms on Mars. PMID:27682103

  17. The Effects of Perchlorates on the Permafrost Methanogens: Implication for Autotrophic Life on Mars.

    PubMed

    Shcherbakova, Viktoria; Oshurkova, Viktoria; Yoshimura, Yoshitaka

    2015-09-09

    The terrestrial permafrost represents a range of possible cryogenic extraterrestrial ecosystems on Earth-like planets without obvious surface ice, such as Mars. The autotrophic and chemolithotrophic psychrotolerant methanogens are more likely than aerobes to function as a model for life forms that may exist in frozen subsurface environments on Mars, which has no free oxygen, inaccessible organic matter, and extremely low amounts of unfrozen water. Our research on the genesis of methane, its content and distribution in permafrost horizons of different ages and origin demonstrated the presence of methane in permanently frozen fine-grained sediments. Earlier, we isolated and described four strains of methanogenic archaea of Methanobacterium and Methanosarcina genera from samples of Pliocene and Holocene permafrost from Eastern Siberia. In this paper we study the effect of sodium and magnesium perchlorates on growth of permafrost and nonpermafrost methanogens, and present evidence that permafrost hydogenotrophic methanogens are more resistant to the chaotropic agent found in Martian soil. In this paper we study the effect of sodium and magnesium perchlorates on the growth of permafrost and nonpermafrost methanogens, and present evidence that permafrost hydogenotrophic methanogens are more resistant to the chaotropic agent found in Martian soil. Furthermore, as shown in the studies strain M2(T) M. arcticum, probably can use perchlorate anion as an electron acceptor in anaerobic methane oxidation. Earth's subzero subsurface environments are the best approximation of environments on Mars, which is most likely to harbor methanogens; thus, a biochemical understanding of these pathways is expected to provide a basis for designing experiments to detect autotrophic methane-producing life forms on Mars.

  18. Electrocatalytic reduction of nitrate in water with a palladium-modified copper electrode.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Qu, Jiuhui

    2006-07-01

    A highly active electrocatalytic electrode for nitrate reduction was prepared by the electro-deposition of palladium onto a copper electrode. The capacity of nitrate reduction by a palladium-modified copper electrode has been studied using cyclic voltammetry (CV). The existence of a reduction peak at -0.605 V versus saturated calomel electrode in 0.1-M sodium nitrate + 0.1-M perchloric acid solution (pH = 0.86) can be found in the CV measurement. The influence of solution properties, such as pH, nitrate concentration, and other anions in solution, on nitrate reduction was determined in detail. Results showed that nitrate reduction was suppressed in alkaline solution, while it was beneficial to nitrate reduction in acid or neutral solution. At low nitrate concentrations (0.01 to 0.5 M), nitrate reduction current increased with increasing nitrate concentration, but was hindered by sulfate. At high nitrate concentrations (1 to 5 M), no significant difference on nitrate reduction was observed. Compared with other different electrodes prepared in our work (copper, titanium, and palladium-modified titanium electrodes), the palladium-modified copper electrode showed the highest electrocatalytic capacity and stability in the nitrate-reduction process.

  19. COPPER RESEARCH UPDATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provides an update and overview of new research results and remaining research needs with respect to copper corrosion control issues. The topics to be covered include: occurrence of elevated copper release in systems that meet the Action Level; impact of water c...

  20. Structural and vibrational properties of betainium perchlorate monohydrate crystal and character of its hydrogen bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilczyszyn, Marek; Godzisz, Dorota; Ilczyszyn, Maria M.

    2002-06-01

    Betainium perchlorate monohydrate crystal ((CH 3) 3NCH 2COOH)(ClO 4)·H 2O) undergoes a continuous (second order) phase transition at ca. 180 K. X-ray data and vibrational spectroscopy studies at different temperatures are used for description of the phase transition mechanism, as well as of hydrogen bonds formed by water in this molecular system. Perturbation of monomer water by various surroundings (water vapour, low-temperature matrices, solvents, betaine-acid crystals) and properties of triple hydrogen bonds to water oxygen atom are discussed.