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Sample records for copper sulfides

  1. Upper critical field of copper molybdenum sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, S. A.; Woollam, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    The upper critical field of sintered and sputtered copper molybdenum sulfide Cu(x)Mo6S8 was measured and found to exceed the Werthamer, Helfand, and Hohenberg (1966) value for a type II superconductor characterized by dirty limit, weak isotropic electron phonon coupling, and no paramagnetic limiting. It is suggested that the enhancement results from anisotropy or clean limit or both. Other ternary molybdenum sulfides appear to show similar anomalies.

  2. Reactively evaporated films of copper molybdenum sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi, K. C.; Dillon, R. O.; Bunshah, R. F.; Alterovitz, S.; Woollam, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    Films of superconducting Chevrel-phase copper molybdenum sulfide CuxMo6S8 were deposited on sapphire substrates by reactive evaporation using H2S as the reacting gas. Two superconducting temperatures (10.0 K and 5.0 K) of the films were found, corresponding to two different phases with different copper concentrations. All films were superconducting above 4.2 K and contained Chevrel-phase compound as well as free molybdenum. The critical current was measured as a function of applied field. One sample was found to deviate from the scaling law found for co-evaporated or sputtered samples, which possibly indicates a different pinning mechanism or inhomogeneity of the sample.

  3. Superconducting properties of evaporated copper molybdenum sulfide films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollam, J. A.; Chi, K. C.; Dillon, R. O.; Bunshah, R. F.; Alterovitz, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    Films of copper molybdenum sulfide were produced by coevaporation. Those that were superconducting contained only the ternary compound and free molybdenum. The range of copper content in the ternary compound was as large as that in polycrystalline material, that is, it includes either phase alone, or a mixture of the two phases of this material. This is in contrast with sputtered materials where copper concentration has been limited to a narrower range. The upper critical field and the critical current were measured as functions of external magnetic field, and found to be similar to those of sputtered copper molybdenum sulfide, when the comparison was made for samples having the same amount of copper.

  4. A Combinatorial Approach to Determine Mechanisms of Atmospheric Copper Sulfidation

    SciTech Connect

    BARBOUR,J. CHARLES; BRAITHWAITE,JEFFREY W.; COPELAND,ROBERT GUILD; DUNN,ROBERTO G.; MINOR,KENNETH G.; MISSERT,NANCY A.; NELSON,JEFFREY S.; SULLIVAN,JOHN P.

    1999-10-07

    Parallel microscopic experimentation (the combinatorial approach often used in solid-state science) was applied to characterize atmospheric copper corrosion behavior. Specifically, this technique permitted relative sulfidation rates to be determined for copper containing different levels of point defects and impurities (In, Al, O, and D). Corrosion studies are inherently difficult because of complex interactions between material interfaces and the environment. The combinatorial approach was demonstrated using micron-scale Cu lines that were exposed to a humid air environment containing sub-ppm levels of H{sub 2}S. The relative rate of Cu{sub 2}S growth was determined by measuring the change in resistance of the line. The data suggest that vacancy trapping by In and Al impurities slow the sulfidation rate. Increased sulfidation rates were found for samples containing excess point defects or deuterium. Furthermore, the sulfidation rate of 14 {micro}m wide Cu lines was increased above that for planar films.

  5. Removal of copper from carbon-saturated steel with an aluminum sulfide/iron sulfide slag

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, A.; Blander, M.

    1995-12-01

    Scrap iron and steel has long been considered a resource in the steel-making industry, and its value is largely determined by its impurity content. As the mini-mills, the major consumers of scrap iron and steel, expand into producing flat-rolled sheet, the demand for high-quality scrap will increase. Of the impurities present in scrap, copper is particularly troublesome because of its role in causing hot shortness. Therefore, the copper content of scrap should be kept below {approx} 0.1 wt%. A method for removing copper from steel could be used to improve the quality of scrap and make it more available for use by mini-mills. To determine the effectiveness of a binary slag consisting of aluminum sulfide and iron sulfide on the removal of copper from steel and iron, the distribution coefficient of copper between the slag and a carbon-saturated iron melt was investigated at 1,365 C. The composition of the slag was varied from nearly pure aluminum sulfide to pure iron sulfide. A maximum distribution coefficient of 30 was found, and the copper level in the iron melt was reduced to as low as 0.07 wt.% with a 4:1 ratio of iron to slag.

  6. Fabrication and applications of copper sulfide (CuS) nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamraiz, Umair; Hussain, Raja Azadar; Badshah, Amin

    2016-06-01

    This review article presents different fabrication procedures (under the headlines of solvothermal routes, aerosol methods, solution methods and thermolysis), and applications (photocatalytic degradation, ablation of cancer cells, electrode material in lithium ion batteries and in gas sensing, organic solar cells, field emission properties, super capacitor applications, photoelectrochemical performance of QDSCs, photocatalytic reduction of organic pollutants, electrochemical bio sensing, enhanced PEC characteristics of pre-annealed CuS film electrodes) of copper sulfide (Covellite).

  7. Initial Stages of Copper Sulfide Film Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campin, M. J.; Zhu, J. G.; Barbour, J. C.; Braithwaite, J. W.; Provencio, P. P.

    2001-11-01

    Cu corrosion is a significant problem in electrical systems. We've used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and ion beam scattering to study the surface instability and Cu-S surface alloying when Cu is exposed to a dilute H_2S atmosphere at 0.5% to 80% relative humidity (RH). Initially, Cu and S react and form the low chalcocite phase, Cu_2S. Cu then diffuses through the Cu_2S layer leaving Kirkendall voids at the Cu/Cu_2S interface; also, other Cu and S phases including sulfates and/or hydroxide hydrates appear. For long times, the Cu_2S growth rate is higher for sulfides formed at low RH compared to high RH. TEM revealed that the Cu_2S grains at both low and high RH are 10 nm to 50 nm with no apparent preferred orientation. However, the high RH samples exhibit many bar or plate-like structures (25x75 nm) which are numerous at higher temperatures and have some grains that span the entire Cu_2S layer. The connection between Cu_2S grain morphology and the solid-state diffusivity of Cu will be discussed. Sandia is operated under DOE contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  8. Adherence of sulfide mineral layers produced by corrosion of copper alloys

    SciTech Connect

    McNeil, M.B. . Office of Research); Amos, A.L.; Woods, T.L. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-09-01

    Sulfiding corrosion of copper alloys can occur from microbiologically induced corrosion (MIC) mechanisms involving sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) or from exposure to bulk waters containing reduced sulfur (S) species of microbiological, industrial, or geologic origin. The sulfide minerals produced generally are nonadherent. Under some circumstances, adherent sulfide layers can form and offer a degree of protection against further attack. Test were conducted in sterile synthetic seawater with various levels of dissolved sulfide, and the structure of the corrosion products was examined. Results, combined with MIC observations from literature and geochemical studies of copper sulfide paragenesis, revealed the nature of the reactions that produce dense, relatively protective sulfides.

  9. A facile synthesis of copper sulfides composite with lithium-storage properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuxiang; Wang, Yunhui; Li, Xue; Liu, Bo; Zhao, Jinbao

    2015-05-01

    Copper sulfides are synthesized by heating a mixture of copper and sulfur powders in different stoichiometries in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP) solvent. All the electrodes show excellent electrochemical performance, especially 'copper excess' copper sulfides electrodes. These electrodes can be charged and discharged at high rate, with good capacity retention. The electrochemical reaction mechanism of copper sulfides during discharge-charge process is investigated. It is most likely that all of S element in the copper excess electrode would transfer into a crystal of Cu2S during charge-discharge cycles, which corresponded to a single electrochemical reaction and showed excellent cycling and rate performance. These encouraging results indicate that copper-excess copper sulfides could be a promising anode material for lithium batteries with high rate capability.

  10. Bias dependent photocurrent characteristics of copper sulfide single nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungdong; Oh, Eunsoon; Yang, Yiming; Yu, Dong

    2016-07-01

    We studied the photocurrent characteristics of copper sulfide nanowire devices under bias voltages. Under global illumination by a laser beam on the nanowire devices, the magnitude of the photocurrent was often found to be asymmetric with respect to the bias, and in some cases, even the direction of the photocurrent remained unchanged for a bias in the opposite direction. Such an unusual bias dependence can be explained by the asymmetry of the Schottky contacts near the electrodes and by the bias dependent electric field at the contacts, as was confirmed by using scanning photocurrent microscopy.

  11. Influence of sulfide concentration on the corrosion behavior of pure copper in synthetic seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Naoki; Kawasaki, Manabu

    2008-09-01

    Corrosion rate and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of pure copper under anaerobic conditions were studied by immersion tests and slow strain rate tests (SSRT) in synthetic seawater containing Na 2S. The corrosion rate was increased with sulfide concentration both in simple saline solution and in bentnite-sand mixture. The results of SSRT showed that copper was susceptible to intergranular attack; selective dissolution at lower sulfide concentration (less than 0.005 M) and SCC at higher sulfide concentration (0.01 M). It was expected that if the sulfide concentration in groundwater is less than 0.001 M, pure copper is possible to exhibit superior corrosion resistance under anaerobic condition evident by very low corrosion rates and immunity to SCC. In such a low sulfide environment, copper overpack has the potential to achieve super-long lifetimes exceeding several tens of thousands years according to long-term simulations of corrosion based on diffusion of sulfide in buffer material.

  12. Multi-dimensional modeling of atmospheric copper-sulfidation corrosion on non-planar substrates.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ken Shuang

    2004-11-01

    This report documents the author's efforts in the deterministic modeling of copper-sulfidation corrosion on non-planar substrates such as diodes and electrical connectors. A new framework based on Goma was developed for multi-dimensional modeling of atmospheric copper-sulfidation corrosion on non-planar substrates. In this framework, the moving sulfidation front is explicitly tracked by treating the finite-element mesh as a pseudo solid with an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation and repeatedly performing re-meshing using CUBIT and re-mapping using MAPVAR. Three one-dimensional studies were performed for verifying the framework in asymptotic regimes. Limited model validation was also carried out by comparing computed copper-sulfide thickness with experimental data. The framework was first demonstrated in modeling one-dimensional copper sulfidation with charge separation. It was found that both the thickness of the space-charge layers and the electrical potential at the sulfidation surface decrease rapidly as the Cu{sub 2}S layer thickens initially but eventually reach equilibrium values as Cu{sub 2}S layer becomes sufficiently thick; it was also found that electroneutrality is a reasonable approximation and that the electro-migration flux may be estimated by using the equilibrium potential difference between the sulfidation and annihilation surfaces when the Cu{sub 2}S layer is sufficiently thick. The framework was then employed to model copper sulfidation in the solid-state-diffusion controlled regime (i.e. stage II sulfidation) on a prototypical diode until a continuous Cu{sub 2}S film was formed on the diode surface. The framework was also applied to model copper sulfidation on an intermittent electrical contact between a gold-plated copper pin and gold-plated copper pad; the presence of Cu{sub 2}S was found to raise the effective electrical resistance drastically. Lastly, future research needs in modeling atmospheric copper sulfidation are discussed.

  13. Electrically Conducting Polymer-Copper Sulphide Composite Films, Preparation by Treatment of Polymer-Copper (2) Acetate Composites with Hydrogen Sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, Takakazu; Kamigaki, Takahira; Kubota, Etsuo

    1988-01-01

    Polymer copper sulfide composite films were prepared by treatment of polymer poly(vinyl chloride), poly(acrylonitrile), copolymer of vinyl chloride and vinyl acetate (90:10), and ABS resin copper (2) acetate composites with hydrogen sulfide. The films showed electrical conductivity higher than 0.015 S/cm when they contained more than 20 wt percent of copper sulfide. A poly(acrylonitrile)-copper sulfide composite film containing 40 to 50 wt percent of copper sulfide showed electrical conductivity of 10 to 150.0 S/cm and had relatively high mechanical strength to be used in practical purposes.

  14. Beneficiation of flotation tailing from Polish copper sulfide ores

    SciTech Connect

    Luszczkiewicz, A.; Sztaba, K.S.

    1995-12-31

    Flotation tailing of Polish copper sulfide ores represents more than 90% of the mass of run-of-mine ore. The tailing contains mainly quartz, dolomite, clay minerals, traces of sulfides, and some accessory minerals. Almost all minerals of the tailing are well liberated and, therefore, any further beneficiation process applied to the tailing is expected to be inexpensive. In this work, results of investigations on utilization of flotation tailing using classification and gravity concentration are presented. It is shown that due to classification of flotation tailing in hydrocyclones, the coarse fraction becomes suitable material for gravity separation providing backfill material for underground mines as well as heavy minerals, a source of valuable rare elements. It was also found that heavy minerals separated by gravity methods contain a significant amount of rare elements such as zirconium, titanium, silver, rare earth metals, and uranium. The light fraction of the gravity separation contains well deslimed quartz particles and meets strict requirements for hydraulic filling material used for structural support in underground mines. Evaluation of the cost of the proposed technology indicated that investment to implement the method would provide a return within 2--4 years.

  15. Plasmonic copper sulfide nanocrystals exhibiting near-infrared photothermal and photodynamic therapeutic effects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shunhao; Riedinger, Andreas; Li, Hongbo; Fu, Changhui; Liu, Huiyu; Li, Linlin; Liu, Tianlong; Tan, Longfei; Barthel, Markus J; Pugliese, Giammarino; De Donato, Francesco; Scotto D'Abbusco, Marco; Meng, Xianwei; Manna, Liberato; Meng, Huan; Pellegrino, Teresa

    2015-02-24

    Recently, plasmonic copper sulfide (Cu2-xS) nanocrystals (NCs) have attracted much attention as materials for photothermal therapy (PTT). Previous reports have correlated photoinduced cell death to the photothermal heat mechanism of these NCs, and no evidence of their photodynamic properties has been reported yet. Herein we have prepared physiologically stable near-infrared (NIR) plasmonic copper sulfide NCs and analyzed their photothermal and photodynamic properties, including therapeutic potential in cultured melanoma cells and a murine melanoma model. Interestingly, we observe that, besides a high PTT efficacy, these copper sulfide NCs additionally possess intrinsic NIR induced photodynamic activity, whereupon they generate high levels of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, in vitro and in vivo acute toxic responses of copper sulfide NCs were also elicited. This study highlights a mechanism of NIR light induced cancer therapy, which could pave the way toward more effective nanotherapeutics.

  16. VAPOR PHASE MERCURY SORPTION BY ORGANIC SULFIDE MODIFIED BIMETALLIC IRON-COPPER NANOPARTICLE AGGREGATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Novel organic sulfide modified bimetallic iron-copper nanoparticle aggregate sorbent materials have been synthesized for removing elemental mercury from vapor streams at elevated temperatures (120-140 °C). Silane based (disulfide silane and tetrasulfide silane) and alkyl sulfide ...

  17. Effect of anions on selective solubilization of zinc and copper in bacterial leaching of sulfide ores.

    PubMed

    Harahuc, L; Lizama, H M; Suzuki, I

    2000-07-20

    Bacterial leaching of sulfide ores using Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, Thiobacillus thiooxidans, or a combination of the two was studied at various concentrations of specific anions. Selective zinc and copper solubilization was obtained by inhibiting iron oxidation without affecting sulfur/sulfide oxidation. Phosphate reduced iron solubilization from a pyrite (FeS(2))-sphalerite (ZnS) mixture without significantly affecting zinc solubilization. Copper leaching from a chalcopyrite (CuFeS(2))-sphalerite mixture was stimulated by phosphate, whereas chloride accelerated zinc extraction. In a complex sulfide ore containing pyrite, chalcopyrite, and sphalerite, both phosphate and chloride reduced iron solubilization and increased copper extraction, whereas only chloride stimulated zinc extraction. Maximum leaching obtained was 100% zinc and 50% copper. Time-course studies of copper and zinc solubilization suggest the possibility of selective metal recovery following treatment with specific anions. PMID:10861398

  18. Crystal structure controlled synthesis and characterization of copper sulfide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthilkumar, M.; Babu, S. Moorthy

    2016-05-01

    Phase pure, controlled crystal structure of digenite (Cu9S5) copper sulfide nanoparticles were synthesized by hot injection method at the temperature of 180°C. The mixture of Oleylamine, 1-Octadecene and 1-Dodecanethiol were taken as solvent as well as capping agents. The effect of the mixture of solvents on the phase formation and morphology of the synthesized nanoparticles were analysed. The nanocrystals were characterized using X-Ray diffraction (XRD) which confirms the presence of single phase rhombohedral digenite Cu9S5 NPs, Morphological analysis clearly depicts the formation of hexagonal faceted Cu9S5 NPs, Energy dispersive X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EDS) reveals the stoichiometric ratio of 1.8:1 for synthesized NPs. From the UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy the bandgap value of Cu1.8S is found to be 1.71 eV. The presence of capping agents along the surface of the Cu9S5 NPs was confirmed from FTIR analysis.

  19. Effect of sulfide pollution on the stability of the protective film of benzotriazole on copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Kharafi, F. M.; Abdullah, A. M.; Ghayad, I. M.; Ateya, B. G.

    2007-09-01

    Benzotriazole (BTAH) is an excellent inhibitor for the corrosion of copper and many of its alloys in unpolluted media. Protection is attributed to the formation of a film of Cu(I)BTA. Injection of sulfide ions into a benzotriazole inhibited salt water damages the protective Cu(I)BTA film very rapidly, increases the corrosion rate and leads to the formation of copper sulfide. This effect is quite marked at a sulfide concentration as low as 10 -5 M (about 0.3 ppm sulfur) in the presence of 10 -2 M BTAH, which is 1000-fold greater than that of the sulfide ion. The intensity of sulfide attack increases with its concentration. Prolonged pre-passivation of copper in the BTAH protected medium even at high concentration does not markedly improve the resistance of the protective film to sulfide attack. This finding is contrary to a well-documented phenomenon in unpolluted media where the inhibiting efficiency of BTAH increases with the time of immersion and the concentration of the inhibitor. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveals the presence of both sulfide and BTAH on the corroded surface indicating that sulfide attack is localized.

  20. VAPOR PHASE MERCURY SORPTION BY ORGANIC-SULFIDE COATED BIMETALLIC IRON-COPPER NANOPARTICLE AGGREGATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tetra sulfide silane coated iron-copper nano-particle aggregates are found to be potentially very high capacity sorbents for vapor phase mercury capture. High equilibrium capacities were obtained for the silane coated iron copper nano-aggregate sorbent at 70 oC and 120 oC. Even a...

  1. Phage-directed synthesis of copper sulfide: structural and optical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahriar Zaman, Mohammed; Moon, Chung Hee; Bozhilov, Krassimir N.; Haberer, Elaine D.

    2013-08-01

    The growth of crystalline copper sulfide using a viral template was investigated using sequential incubation in CuCl2 and Na2S precursors. Non-specific electrostatic attraction between a genetically-modified M13 bacteriophage and copper cations in the CuCl2 precursor caused phage agglomeration and bundle formation. Following the addition of Na2S, polydisperse nanocrystals 2-7 nm in size were found along the length of the viral scaffold. The structure of the copper sulfide material was identified as cubic anti-fluorite type Cu1.8S, space group F m\\bar {3}m. Strong interband absorption was observed within the ultraviolet to visible range with an onset near 800 nm. Furthermore, free carrier absorption, associated with the localized surface plasmon resonance of the copper sulfide nanocrystals, was seen in the near infrared with absorbance maxima at 1060 nm and 3000 nm, respectively.

  2. From Ultrafine Thiolate-Capped Copper Nanoclusters toward Copper Sulfide Nanodiscs: A Thermally Activated Evolution Route

    SciTech Connect

    Mott, Derrick; Yin, Jun; Engelhard, Mark H.; Loukrakpam, Rameshwori; Chang, Paul; Miller, George; Bae, In-Tae; Das, N. C.; Wang, Chong M.; Luo, Jin; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2010-01-12

    In this report we show that the size, shape, and composition of pre-synthesized metal nanoparticles can be engineered through exploiting concurrent interparticle coalescence and interfacial copper-thiolate cleavage under a thermally-activated evolution process. This concept is demonstrated by thermally-activated processing of ultrafine (~0.5 nm) copper nanoparticles encapsulated with thiolate monolayer (Cun(SR)m) toward copper sulfide nanodiscs with controllable sizes and shapes. It involved a thermally-activated coalescence of Cun(SR)m nanoclusters accompanied by interfacial Cu-S cleavage towards the formation of Cu2S nanocrystals with well-defined nanodisc shapes with an average diameter and thickness ranging from 10.7 ±1.4 nm and 5.5 ±0.5 nm (aspect ratio ~2) to 31.2 ±4.3 nm and 3.9 ±0.4 nm (aspect ratio ~7) depending on the thermal processing parameters. These nanodiscs are stable and display remarkable ordering upon self-assembly. The abilities to create the ultrafine copper nanoclusters and to enable them to undergo a thermally-activated coalescence and a concurrent Cu-S bond cleavage toward the formation of Cu2S nanodiscs is entirely new. The viability of fine tuning the size and shape of the Cu2S nanocrystals by controlling the relative binding strength of thiolates, the C-S cleavage reactivity, and the interparticle coalescence activity, and their potential applications in electronic, sensing and photochemical devices are also discussed.

  3. Bioleaching of a low-grade nickel-copper sulfide by mixture of four thermophiles.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuzhen; Zhong, Hui; Hu, Yuehua; Zhao, Jiancun; He, Zhiguo; Gu, Guohua

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated thermophilic bioleaching of a low grade nickel-copper sulfide using mixture of four acidophilic thermophiles. Effects of 0.2g/L l-cysteine on the bioleaching process were further evaluated. It aimed at offering new alternatives for enhancing metal recoveries from nickel-copper sulfide. Results showed a recovery of 80.4% nickel and 68.2% copper in 16-day bioleaching without l-cysteine; while 83.7% nickel and 81.4% copper were recovered in the presence of l-cysteine. Moreover, nickel recovery was always higher than copper recovery. l-Cysteine was found contributing to lower pH value, faster microbial growth, higher Oxidation-Reduction Potential (ORP), higher zeta potential and absorbing on the sulfide surfaces through amino, carboxyl and sulfhydryl groups. X-ray Diffraction (XRD) patterns of leached residues showed generation of S, jarosite and ammoniojarosite. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) results revealed that l-cysteine could have variant impacts on different microorganisms and changed the microbial community composition dramatically during nickel-copper sulfide bioleaching.

  4. Bioleaching of a low-grade nickel-copper sulfide by mixture of four thermophiles.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuzhen; Zhong, Hui; Hu, Yuehua; Zhao, Jiancun; He, Zhiguo; Gu, Guohua

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated thermophilic bioleaching of a low grade nickel-copper sulfide using mixture of four acidophilic thermophiles. Effects of 0.2g/L l-cysteine on the bioleaching process were further evaluated. It aimed at offering new alternatives for enhancing metal recoveries from nickel-copper sulfide. Results showed a recovery of 80.4% nickel and 68.2% copper in 16-day bioleaching without l-cysteine; while 83.7% nickel and 81.4% copper were recovered in the presence of l-cysteine. Moreover, nickel recovery was always higher than copper recovery. l-Cysteine was found contributing to lower pH value, faster microbial growth, higher Oxidation-Reduction Potential (ORP), higher zeta potential and absorbing on the sulfide surfaces through amino, carboxyl and sulfhydryl groups. X-ray Diffraction (XRD) patterns of leached residues showed generation of S, jarosite and ammoniojarosite. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) results revealed that l-cysteine could have variant impacts on different microorganisms and changed the microbial community composition dramatically during nickel-copper sulfide bioleaching. PMID:24374030

  5. Sonochemical preparation of copper sulfides with different phases in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kristl, Matjaž; Hojnik, Nuša; Gyergyek, Sašo; Drofenik, Miha

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Sonochemical preparation of copper sulfides in aqueous solutions is reported. ► CuS and Cu{sub 2}S nanoparticles with crystallite sizes between 7 and 18 nm were obtained. ► Crystallite size can be changed using different complexing agents. ► Thermal behavior was studied by TG and XRD measurements. - Abstract: There is a growing interest in the synthesis of nanostructured copper sulfides due to their ability to form compounds with various stoichiometries. We report a sonochemical route for the preparation of copper sulfides with different compositions in aqueous solutions, using different, general and convenient copper sources such as copper acetate, copper hydroxide or basic copper carbonate and thiourea or thioacetamide as sulfur precursors under ambient air. Phase analysis, purity and morphology of the products were studied by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results revealed that nanoparticles of covellite, CuS, with crystallite sizes between 7 and 18 nm can be obtained by using different precursors and complexing agents and that chalcocite, Cu{sub 2}S, can also be prepared sonochemically.

  6. Analytical modeling of localized surface plasmon resonance in heterostructure copper sulfide nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, Andrew H.; Ha, Don-Hyung; Robinson, Richard D.; Ding, Xiaoyue

    2014-10-28

    Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in semiconductor nanocrystals is a relatively new field of investigation that promises greater tunability of plasmonic properties compared to metal nanoparticles. A novel process by which the LSPR in semiconductor nanocrystals can be altered is through heterostructure formation arising from solution-based cation exchange. Herein, we describe the development of an analytical model of LSPR in heterostructure copper sulfide-zinc sulfide nanocrystals synthesized via a cation exchange reaction between copper sulfide (Cu{sub 1.81}S) nanocrystals and Zn ions. The cation exchange reaction produces dual-interface, heterostructure nanocrystals in which the geometry of the copper sulfide phase can be tuned from a sphere to a thin disk separating symmetrically-grown sulfide (ZnS) grains. Drude model electronic conduction and Mie-Gans theory are applied to describe how the LSPR wavelength changes during cation exchange, taking into account the morphology evolution and changes to the local permittivity. The results of the modeling indicate that the presence of the ZnS grains has a significant effect on the out-of-plane LSPR mode. By comparing the results of the model to previous studies on solid-solid phase transformations of copper sulfide in these nanocrystals during cation exchange, we show that the carrier concentration is independent of the copper vacancy concentration dictated by its atomic phase. The evolution of the effective carrier concentration calculated from the model suggests that the out-of-plane resonance mode is dominant. The classical model was compared to a simplified quantum mechanical model which suggested that quantum mechanical effects become significant when the characteristic size is less than ∼8 nm. Overall, we find that the analytical models are not accurate for these heterostructured semiconductor nanocrystals, indicating the need for new model development for this emerging field.

  7. The effects of varying humidity on copper sulfide film formation.

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Thomas Michael; Missert, Nancy A.; Barbour, John Charles; Sullivan, John Patrick; Copeland, Robert Guild; Campin, Michael J.

    2004-02-01

    Detailed experiments involving extensive high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed significant microstructural differences between Cu sulfides formed at low and high relative humidity (RH). It was known from prior experiments that the sulfide grows linearly with time at low RH up to a sulfide thickness approaching or exceeding one micron, while the sulfide initially grows linearly with time at high RH then becomes sub-linear at a sulfide thickness less than about 0.2 microns, with the sulfidation rate eventually approaching zero. TEM measurements of the Cu2S morphology revealed that the Cu2S formed at low RH has large sized grains (75 to greater than 150 nm) that are columnar in structure with sharp, abrupt grain boundaries. In contrast, the Cu2S formed at high RH has small equiaxed grains of 20 to 50 nm in size. Importantly, the small grains formed at high RH have highly disordered grain boundaries with a high concentration of nano-voids. Two-dimensional diffusion modeling was performed to determine whether the existence of localized source terms at the Cu/Cu2S interface could be responsible for the suppression of Cu sulfidation at long times at high RH. The models indicated that the existence of static localized source terms would not predict the complete suppression of growth that was observed. Instead, the models suggest that the diffusion of Cu through Cu2S becomes restricted during Cu2S formation at high RH. The leading speculation is that the extensive voiding that exists at grain boundaries in this material greatly reduces the flux of Cu between grains, leading to a reduction in the rate of sulfide film formation. These experiments provide an approach for adding microstructural information to Cu sulfidation rate computer models. In addition to the microstructural studies, new micro-patterned test structures were developed in this LDRD to offer insight into the point defect structure of Cu2S and to permit measurement of surface reaction

  8. Environmental, health, safety, and regulatory review of selected photovoltaic options: Copper sulfide/cadmium sulfide and polycrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, K.; Morgan, S.; Schaller, D.; Wilczak, T.

    1981-06-01

    Emissions, effluents and solid wastes from the fabrication of both polycrystalline silicon and front-wall copper sulfide/cadmium sulfide photovoltaic cells are summarized. Environmental, health, and safety characteristics of cell fabrication material inputs and by products are listed. Candidate waste stream treatment methods and resultant effluents are reviewed. Environmental, health, and safety effects of photovoltaic cell/module/array installation, operation, maintenance, and decommission are summarized. Federal legislation is addressed and future regulatory trends under these laws as they may affect each cell process are discussed. Water quality, solid waste disposal, and occupational health and safety regulations will likely be those most applicable to commercial scale PV production. Currently available control technology appears sufficient to treat cell fabrication wastes.

  9. Kinetics of Copper Removal from Sulfidized Molybdenite Concentrates by Pressure Leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, Rafael; Opazo, Cristian; Ruiz, Maria C.

    2015-02-01

    Molybdenite concentrates produced from porphyry copper deposits contain copper as an impurity in variable quantities. To produce a high-grade molybdenite concentrate, a chemical purification method is normally practiced. In this paper, a new alternative for the copper elimination from molybdenite concentrates containing chalcopyrite by sulfidation of the molybdenite concentrate and subsequent pressure leaching in sulfuric acid-oxygen media is discussed. The results indicated that copper contained in sulfidized molybdenite concentrates can be dissolved effectively by pressure leaching at low temperature ranging from 373 K to 423 K (100 °C to 150 °C) and low oxygen pressure (303.98 to 1013.25 kPa) with negligible dissolution of molybdenum. The final molybdenite contained less than 0.2 pct Cu which is appropriate for marketing. Temperature and oxygen partial pressure have both significant influence on the copper dissolution. The kinetics of the copper dissolution was analyzed using the shrinking core model with surface chemical control. The calculated activation energy was 51 kJ/mol in the range of 373 K to 423 K (100 °C to 150 °C). The copper dissolution rate is of zero order with respect to hydrogen ion concentration, and first order with respect to oxygen partial pressure.

  10. Recovery of cobalt and copper from complex sulfide concentrates

    SciTech Connect

    Dannenberg, R.O.; Gardner, P.C.; Crane, S.R.; Seidel, D.C.

    1987-01-01

    The Bureau conducted bench-scale research on a process for treating cobaltite concentrates, comprising (1) oxidative pressure leaching, (2) jarosite precipitation followed by H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ oxidation and pH control to remove iron and arsenic, (3) copper solvent extraction with a mixed hydroxyoxime-amine extractant, (4) copper electrowinning from recirculating acidic strip liquor, (5) selective cobalt extraction from copper solvent extraction raffinate with a phosphinic and extractant, and (6) electrowinning of cobalt from a recirculating weak acid strip liquor. Overall cobalt and copper recoveries were 91.7 and 84.1 pct, respectively. Electrowon products assayed 99.8 pct Co and 99.89 ct Cu.

  11. Thermochemical chlorination of carbon indirectly driven by an unexpected sulfide of copper with inorganic chloride.

    PubMed

    Fujimori, Takashi; Takaoka, Masaki

    2011-12-15

    Unintentional anthropogenic thermal chlorination of carbon is known to be a contributor to global environmental pollution of organochlorine compounds. We found unexpected, serious chlorination of carbon promoted by a "sulfide" of copper, which has been generally thought of and studied as an inactive metal catalyst. Our quantitative and X-ray spectroscopic results show that a fraction of cupric sulfide indirectly promoted thermochemical solid-phase formation of a large quantity of organochlorine compounds such as polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans, biphenyls, and benzenes that used inactive inorganic chloride as chlorine storage, which partly caused environmental pollution by organochlorine compounds. PMID:22004834

  12. Thermochemical chlorination of carbon indirectly driven by an unexpected sulfide of copper with inorganic chloride.

    PubMed

    Fujimori, Takashi; Takaoka, Masaki

    2011-12-15

    Unintentional anthropogenic thermal chlorination of carbon is known to be a contributor to global environmental pollution of organochlorine compounds. We found unexpected, serious chlorination of carbon promoted by a "sulfide" of copper, which has been generally thought of and studied as an inactive metal catalyst. Our quantitative and X-ray spectroscopic results show that a fraction of cupric sulfide indirectly promoted thermochemical solid-phase formation of a large quantity of organochlorine compounds such as polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans, biphenyls, and benzenes that used inactive inorganic chloride as chlorine storage, which partly caused environmental pollution by organochlorine compounds.

  13. Banded sulfide-magnetite ores of Mauk copper massive sulfide deposit, Central Urals: Composition and genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safina, N. P.; Maslennikov, V. V.; Maslennikova, S. P.; Kotlyarov, V. A.; Danyushevsky, L. V.; Large, R. R.; Blinov, I. A.

    2015-05-01

    The results of investigation of metamorphosed sulfide-magnetite ores from the Mauk deposit located within the Main Ural Fault at the junction of Tagil and Magnitogorsk massive sulfide zones are discussed. The ore-hosting sequence comprises metamorphic rocks formed from basalt, carbonaceous and carbonaceous-cherty siltstone, and lenticular serpentinized ultramafic bodies. The ores of the deposit are represented by banded varieties and less frequent breccia. The clastic origin of the banded ore is indicated by load casts at the bottom of sulfide beds, alternation of sulfide and barren beds, and the truncation of the growth zones of pyrite crystals. Pyrite, pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite, and magnetite are the major minerals of the banded ores. The internal structure of the listed minerals testifies to the deep metamorphic recrystallization of primary hydrothermal-sedimentary ores accompanied with deformation. Cubanite, pyrrhotite, mackinawite, greigite, and gold are enclosed in metacrysts of pyrite, magnetite, and chalcopyrite. The accessory minerals of the Pb-Bi-Te, Bi-Te, and Ag-Te systems as well as uraninite have been found at the Mauk deposit for the first time. Magnetite predominantly replaces pyrite and less frequently chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite, and gangue minerals. It was established that the major carriers of As and Co are crystals of metamorphic pyrite. Chalcopyrite is the major carrier of Zn, Sn, Te, Pb, Bi, and Ag. Admixture of Fe and Cu is typical of sphalerite, and Se and Ni are characteristic of pyrrhotite. Ti, V, Mn, Sb, As, Ba, and U are concentrated in magnetite. The banded ores of the Mauk deposit are suggested as having been transformed in several stages: diagenesis, anadiagenesis, epidiagenesis ( t < 300°C), and amphibolite facies metamorphism ( t > 500°C).

  14. Copper isotopic signature of the Tiegelongnan high-sulfidation copper deposit, Tibet: implications for its origin and mineral exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Jilin; Tang, Juxing; Li, Yubin; Liu, Sheng-Ao; Wang, Qin; Yang, Chao; Wang, Yiyun

    2016-06-01

    We report the copper isotopic composition of Cu sulfides in the Tiegelongnan high-sulfidation (HS) copper deposit, Tibet, and investigate the possible application of Cu isotopes to mineral exploration. The copper isotopic values of samples from four drill holes display consistent progressive increase with depth to 400 m below surface, with an overall variation of δ65Cu of up to 7.60‰ (-4.76 to 2.84‰). Such a large range is very different from that observed in Cu porphyry deposits which commonly exhibit a small δ65Cu range (<1‰), with decreasing values with depth. The large δ65Cu variation is likely of supergene origin and reflects strong leaching under oxidized conditions. The systematic increase of δ65Cu with depth can be explained by the release of isotopically heavy Cu at the top and its transport downward, which is supported by the coupling of positive δ65Cu values with high Cu grade and the occurrence of both negative and positive δ65Cu values in two drill holes. Mass-balance consideration on the basis of Cu isotopes can indicate mineralized zones which have been eroded or have not been found yet. Such mineralized targets, if buried at depth, could be located using Cu isotopes.

  15. Grain-to-Grain Compositional Variations and Phase Segregation in Copper-Zinc-Tin-Sulfide Films.

    PubMed

    Alvarez Barragan, Alejandro; Malekpour, Hoda; Exarhos, Stephen; Balandin, Alexander A; Mangolini, Lorenzo

    2016-09-01

    We have performed a rigorous investigation of the structure and composition of individual grains in copper-zinc-tin-sulfide (CZTS) films realized by sulfurization of a sputtered metal stack. Although on average close to the ideal CZTS stoichiometry, elemental analysis shows significant grain-to-grain variations in composition. High-resolution Raman spectroscopy indicates that this is accompanied by grain-to-grain structural variations as well. The intensity from the 337 cm(-1) Raman peak, generally assigned to the kesterite phase of CZTS, remains constant over a large area of the sample. On the other hand, signals from secondary phases at 376 cm(-1) (copper-tin-sulfide) and 351 cm(-1) (zinc-sulfide) show significant variation over the same area. These results confirm the great complexity inherent to this material system. Moreover, structural and compositional variations are recognized in the literature as a factor limiting the efficiency of CZTS photovoltaic devices. This study demonstrates how a seemingly homogeneous CZTS thin film can actually have considerable structural and compositional variations at the microscale, and highlights the need for routine microscale characterization in this material system. PMID:27538122

  16. Fabrication of a Functionally Graded Copper-Zinc Sulfide Phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jehong; Park, Kwangwon; Kim, Jongsu; Jeong, Yongseok; Kawasaki, Akira; Kwon, Hansang

    2016-03-01

    Functionally graded materials (FGMs) are compositionally gradient materials. They can achieve the controlled distribution of the desired characteristics within the same bulk material. We describe a functionally graded (FG) metal-phosphor adapting the concept of the FGM; copper (Cu) is selected as a metal and Cu- and Cl-doped ZnS (ZnS:Cu,Cl) is selected as a phosphor and FG [Cu]-[ZnS:Cu,Cl] is fabricated by a very simple powder process. The FG [Cu]-[ZnS:Cu,Cl] reveals a dual-structured functional material composed of dense Cu and porous ZnS:Cu,Cl, which is completely combined through six graded mediating layers. The photoluminescence (PL) of FG [Cu]-[ZnS:Cu,Cl] is insensitive to temperature change. FG [Cu]-[ZnS:Cu,Cl] also exhibits diode characteristics and photo reactivity for 365 nm -UV light. Our FG metal-phosphor concept can pave the way to simplified manufacturing of low-cost and can be applied to various electronic devices.

  17. Fabrication of a Functionally Graded Copper-Zinc Sulfide Phosphor

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jehong; Park, Kwangwon; Kim, Jongsu; Jeong, Yongseok; Kawasaki, Akira; Kwon, Hansang

    2016-01-01

    Functionally graded materials (FGMs) are compositionally gradient materials. They can achieve the controlled distribution of the desired characteristics within the same bulk material. We describe a functionally graded (FG) metal-phosphor adapting the concept of the FGM; copper (Cu) is selected as a metal and Cu- and Cl-doped ZnS (ZnS:Cu,Cl) is selected as a phosphor and FG [Cu]-[ZnS:Cu,Cl] is fabricated by a very simple powder process. The FG [Cu]-[ZnS:Cu,Cl] reveals a dual-structured functional material composed of dense Cu and porous ZnS:Cu,Cl, which is completely combined through six graded mediating layers. The photoluminescence (PL) of FG [Cu]-[ZnS:Cu,Cl] is insensitive to temperature change. FG [Cu]-[ZnS:Cu,Cl] also exhibits diode characteristics and photo reactivity for 365 nm -UV light. Our FG metal-phosphor concept can pave the way to simplified manufacturing of low-cost and can be applied to various electronic devices. PMID:26972313

  18. Fabrication of a Functionally Graded Copper-Zinc Sulfide Phosphor.

    PubMed

    Park, Jehong; Park, Kwangwon; Kim, Jongsu; Jeong, Yongseok; Kawasaki, Akira; Kwon, Hansang

    2016-03-14

    Functionally graded materials (FGMs) are compositionally gradient materials. They can achieve the controlled distribution of the desired characteristics within the same bulk material. We describe a functionally graded (FG) metal-phosphor adapting the concept of the FGM; copper (Cu) is selected as a metal and Cu- and Cl-doped ZnS (ZnS:Cu,Cl) is selected as a phosphor and FG [Cu]-[ZnS:Cu,Cl] is fabricated by a very simple powder process. The FG [Cu]-[ZnS:Cu,Cl] reveals a dual-structured functional material composed of dense Cu and porous ZnS:Cu,Cl, which is completely combined through six graded mediating layers. The photoluminescence (PL) of FG [Cu]-[ZnS:Cu,Cl] is insensitive to temperature change. FG [Cu]-[ZnS:Cu,Cl] also exhibits diode characteristics and photo reactivity for 365 nm -UV light. Our FG metal-phosphor concept can pave the way to simplified manufacturing of low-cost and can be applied to various electronic devices.

  19. Microbial Ecology Assessment of Mixed Copper Oxide/Sulfide Dump Leach Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhn, D F; Thompson, D N; Noah, K S

    1999-06-01

    Microbial consortia composed of complex mixtures of autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria are responsible for the dissolution of metals from sulfide minerals. Thus, an efficient copper bioleaching operation depends on the microbial ecology of the system. A microbial ecology study of a mixed oxide/sulfide copper leaching operation was conducted using an "overlay" plating technique to differentiate and identify various bacterial consortium members of the genera Thiobacillus, Leptospirillum, Ferromicrobium, and Acidiphilium. Two temperatures (30C and 45C) were used to select for mesophilic and moderately thermophilic bacteria. Cell numbers varied from 0-106 cells/g dry ore, depending on the sample location and depth. After acid curing for oxide leaching, no viable bacteria were recovered, although inoculation of cells from raffinate re-established a microbial population after three months. Due to the low pH of the operation, very few non-iron-oxidizing acidophilic heterotrophs were recovered. Moderate thermophiles were isolated from the ore samples. Pregnant liquor solutions (PLS) and raffinate both contained a diversity of bacteria. In addition, an intermittently applied waste stream that contained high levels of arsenic and fluoride was tested for toxicity. Twenty vol% waste stream in PLS killed 100% of the cells in 48 hours, indicating substantial toxicity and/or growth inhibition. The data indicate that bacteria populations can recover after acid curing, and that application of the waste stream to the dump should be avoided. Monitoring the microbial ecology of the leaching operation provided significant information that improved copper recovery.

  20. Thin films of copper antimony sulfide: A photovoltaic absorber material

    SciTech Connect

    Ornelas-Acosta, R.E.; Shaji, S.; Avellaneda, D.; Castillo, G.A.; Das Roy, T.K.; Krishnan, B.

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • CuSbS{sub 2} thin films were prepared by heating Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}/Cu layers. • Analyzed the structure, composition, optical, and electrical properties. • PV structures: glass/SnO{sub 2}:F/n-CdS/p-CuSbS{sub 2}/C/Ag were formed at different conditions. • The PV parameters (J{sub sc}, V{sub oc}, and FF) were evaluated from the J–V characteristics. • J{sub sc}: 0.52–3.20 mA/cm{sup 2}, V{sub oc}:187–323 mV, FF: 0.27–0.48 were obtained. - Abstract: In this work, we report preparation and characterization of CuSbS{sub 2} thin films by heating glass/Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}/Cu layers and their use as absorber material in photovoltaic structures: glass/SnO{sub 2}:F/n-CdS/p-CuSbS{sub 2}/C/Ag. The Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films of 600 nm were prepared by chemical bath deposition on which copper thin films of 50 nm were thermally evaporated, and the glass/Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}/Cu multilayers were heated in vacuum at different temperatures. X-ray diffraction analysis showed the formation of orthorhombic CuSbS{sub 2} after heating the precursor layers. Studies on identification and chemical state of the elements were done using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The optical band gap of the CuSbS{sub 2} thin films was 1.55 eV and the thin films were photoconductive. The photovoltaic parameters of the devices using CuSbS{sub 2} as absorber and CdS as window layer were evaluated from the J–V curves, yielding J{sub sc}, V{sub oc}, and FF values in the range of 0.52–3.20 mA/cm{sup 2}, 187–323 mV, and 0.27–0.48, respectively, under illumination of AM1.5 radiation.

  1. Structure in multilayer films of zinc sulfide and copper sulfide via atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Short, Andrew; Jewell, Leila; Bielecki, Anthony; Keiber, Trevor; Bridges, Frank; Carter, Sue; Alers, Glenn

    2014-01-15

    Multilayer film stacks of ZnS and Cu{sub x}S (x ∼ 2) were made via atomic layer deposition. The precursors were bis(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionato)zinc, bis(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionato)copper, and H{sub 2}S generated in situ for sulfur. Samples were deposited at 200 °C, in layers ranging from approximately 2 to 20 nm thick, based on binary growth rates. The properties of the film stacks were studied with atomic force microscopy, ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy, and extended x-ray absorption fine structure. The results demonstrate that the structure of films with the thinnest layers is dominated by Cu{sub x}S, whereas in the thicker films, the structure is determined by whichever material is first deposited. This can be attributed to the crystal structure mismatch of ZnS and Cu{sub x}S.

  2. Observation of compositional domains within individual copper indium sulfide quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Harvie, Andrew J; Booth, Matthew; Chantry, Ruth L; Hondow, Nicole; Kepaptsoglou, Demie M; Ramasse, Quentin M; Evans, Stephen D; Critchley, Kevin

    2016-09-28

    The origin of photoluminescence in copper indium sulfide (CIS) quantum dots (Qdots) has previously been ascribed to a donor-acceptor pair (DAP) recombination, with a crystal lattice defect implicated as the origin of the donor state. In this study, electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) was used to observe defect-rich compositional domains within individual CIS Qdots, supporting a model of defect-state-mediated photoluminescence for these particles, and identifying them as an ideal model system for future study of lattice defects on Qdot properties. PMID:27465708

  3. Development of copper sulfide/cadmium sulfide thin-film solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Szedon, J.R.; Biter, W.J.; Abel, J.A.; Dickey, H.C.; Shirland, F.A.

    1981-02-27

    The purpose of this work has been to identify aspects of cell fabrication and treatment which are critical for achieving high efficiency Cu/sub 2/S/CdS solar cells. In approaching the problem several comparisons were made of the effects of specific steps in two methods of cell fabrication. These methods had previously given cells of about 6% and a maximum of 9% efficiency. Three areas requiring special attention and specific means to achieve acceptable results were identified. (1) The Cu/sub 2/S/CdS heterojunction area must be minimized. If single source evaporations of CdS are made on substrates whose temperatures (approx. 220/sup 0/C) are monitored and controlled using welded thermocouples, the CdS films will have adequately large grains (grain diameter greater than or equal to 2 ..mu..m) and will not develop significant etch pits during texturing in a mild etchant solution. (2) The termination of the wet barrier processing steps must be done carefully. An acceptable termination involves minimizing the amount of cuprous chloride retained on the cell surface during transfer to a rinsing stage while providing adequate exclusion of air from the space above the surface of the cuprous chloride solution. (3) Once formed, the Cu/sub 2/S layer should not be exposed to high temperatures (>100/sup 0/C) for long periods of time (> 5 min) if surface adsorbed moisture or oxygen are present. Heat treatments in ampoules under flowing hydrogen atmospheres should be preceded and followed by periods of at least 30 minutes at room temperature in the reducing ambient. If all these precautions are taken, wet chemical barrier processing of thermally evaporated CdS films on zinc-plated copper foil substrates yields cells of nearly 8% conversion efficiency without AR coating.

  4. Development of copper sulfide/cadmium sulfide thin-film solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Szedon, J. R.; Biter, W. J.; Dickey, H. C.

    1982-03-08

    The most important accomplishments during this period were to demonstrate and to elucidate further the complex effects that occur during the aging of Cu/sub 2/S/CdS thin-film solar cells in flowing wet oxygen. There are two distinct effects. At constant illumination, the short-circuit current of cells aged at room temperature consistently decreases with time. The second effect, related to diode opposing current, is more involved and may result from several competing mechanisms. Over the short term (approx. 4 to 5 hours), the magnitude of diode opposing current decreases. After approx. 20 hours of aging, opposing current generally returns to the level achieved after hydrogen annealing which immediately preceded the aging sequence. Optical measurements of the spectral transmission of the Cu/sub 2/S layers in a cell content have been made using a silicon detector epoxied to the back of a CdS cell after the copper foil substrate was removed. There is no significant change in Cu/sub 2/S transmission behavior for wavelengths ranging from 525 to 1000 nm during wet-oxygen aging for periods of 2 to 36 hours. This suggests that the decrease in J/sub SC/ at constant illumination, for the aging experiments in a flowing wet-oxygen ambient, arises because of changes in minority-carrier transport properties of the Cu/sub 2/S. Before developing a method for using an epoxied silicon detector to measure optical behavior of the Cu/sub 2/S layer, we explored the possibility of using a junction-containing wafer of silicon as a substrate for deposited CdS films. Some monolithic structures were successfully fabricated. Comparisons were made of CdS grain structure details in the junction detector area and in an adjacent metallized area.

  5. Nontoxic and abundant copper zinc tin sulfide nanocrystals for potential high-temperature thermoelectric energy harvesting.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haoran; Jauregui, Luis A; Zhang, Genqiang; Chen, Yong P; Wu, Yue

    2012-02-01

    Improving energy/fuel efficiency by converting waste heat into electricity using thermoelectric materials is of great interest due to its simplicity and reliability. However, many thermoelectric materials are composed of either toxic or scarce elements. Here, we report the experimental realization of using nontoxic and abundant copper zinc tin sulfide (CZTS) nanocrystals for potential thermoelectric applications. The CZTS nanocrystals can be synthesized in large quantities from solution phase reaction and compressed into robust bulk pellets through spark plasma sintering and hot press while still maintaining nanoscale grain size inside. Electrical and thermal measurements have been performed from 300 to 700 K to understand the electron and phonon transports. Extra copper doping during the nanocrystal synthesis introduces a significant improvement in the performance.

  6. Bioflotation of sulfide minerals with Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans in relation to copper activation and surface oxidation.

    PubMed

    Pecina-Treviño, E T; Ramos-Escobedo, G T; Gallegos-Acevedo, P M; López-Saucedo, F J; Orrantia-Borunda, E

    2012-08-24

    Surface oxidation of sulfides and copper (Cu) activation are 2 of the main processes that determine the efficiency of flotation. The present study was developed with the intention to ascertain the role of the phenomena in the biomodification of sulfides by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans culture (cells and growth media) and their impact in bioflotation. Surface characteristics of chalcopyrite, sphalerite, and pyrrhotite, alone and in mixtures, after interaction with A. ferrooxidans were evaluated. Chalcopyrite floatability was increased substantially by biomodification, while bacteria depressed pyrrhotite floatability, favoring separation. The results showed that elemental sulfur concentration increased because of the oxidation generated by bacterial cells, the effect is intensified by the Fe(III) left in the culture and by galvanic contact. Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans culture affects the Cu activation of sphalerite. The implications of elemental sulfur concentration and Cu activation of sphalerite are key factors that must be considered for the future development of sulfide bioflotation processes, since the depressive effect of cells could be counteracted by elemental sulfur generation.

  7. Copper sulfides for rechargeable lithium batteries: Linking cycling stability to electrolyte composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jache, Birte; Mogwitz, Boris; Klein, Franziska; Adelhelm, Philipp

    2014-02-01

    Copper sulfides are attractive electrode materials as their reaction with lithium offers high capacity and energy density. However, the reversibility is poor and (nano)structuring is considered necessary to achieve moderate improvements. In contrast, we show in this study that the electrolyte is a major factor that governs the reversibility of the cell reaction. All our experiments were done with commercially available copper sulfides (CuS and Cu2S) without any special nanostructure. Different electrolyte compositions were tested among LiPF6 in EC/DMC and LiTFSI in DOL/DME. While rapid capacity fading is found in cells containing carbonate-based electrolytes, cells with ether-based electrolytes show a much better electrochemical performance. For a mixture of 1 M LiTFSI in DOL/DME, Cu2S can be cycled with capacities of around 200 mAh g-1 for more than 150 cycles with coulombic efficiencies >98.4%, for example. The improved stability in the ether-based electrolyte further allowed us to study how the discharge and charge voltage change during prolonged cycling. Our study underlines that improvements in the Li/CuS and Li/Cu2S system are still possible by very simple measures, but further studies on the complex Li-Cu-S phase behavior are necessary to understand the discharging and especially the charging mechanisms.

  8. Synthesis, Deposition, and Microstructure Development of Thin Films Formed by Sulfidation and Selenization of Copper Zinc Tin Sulfide Nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernomordik, Boris David

    Significant reduction in greenhouse gas emission and pollution associated with the global power demand can be accomplished by supplying tens-of-terawatts of power with solar cell technologies. No one solar cell material currently on the market is poised to meet this challenge due to issues such as manufacturing cost, material shortage, or material toxicity. For this reason, there is increasing interest in efficient light-absorbing materials that are comprised of abundant and non-toxic elements for thin film solar cell. Among these materials are copper zinc tin sulfide (Cu2ZnSnS4, or CZTS), copper zinc tin selenide (Cu2ZnSnSe4, or CZTSe), and copper zinc tin sulfoselenide alloys [Cu2ZnSn(SxSe1-x )4, or CZTSSe]. Laboratory power conversion efficiencies of CZTSSe-based solar cells have risen to almost 13% in less than three decades of research. Meeting the terawatt challenge will also require low cost fabrication. CZTSSe thin films from annealed colloidal nanocrystal coatings is an example of solution-based methods that can reduce manufacturing costs through advantages such as high throughput, high material utilization, and low capital expenses. The film microstructure and grain size affects the solar cell performance. To realize low cost commercial production and high efficiencies of CZTSSe-based solar cells, it is necessary to understand the fundamental factors that affect crystal growth and microstructure evolution during CZTSSe annealing. Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) nanocrystals were synthesized via thermolysis of single-source cation and sulfur precursors copper, zinc and tin diethyldithiocarbamates. The average nanocrystal size could be tuned between 2 nm and 40 nm, by varying the synthesis temperature between 150 °C and 340 °C. The synthesis is rapid and is completed in less than 10 minutes. Characterization by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirm that the nanocrystals are nominally

  9. Microbial Ecology Assessment of Mixed Copper Oxide/Sulfide Dump Leach Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhn, Debby Fox; Thompson, David Neal; Noah, Karl Scott

    1999-06-01

    Microbial consortia composed of complex mixtures of autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria are responsible for the dissolution of metals from sulfide minerals. Thus, an efficient copper bioleaching operation depends on the microbial ecology of the system. A microbial ecology study of a mixed oxide/sulfide copper leaching operation was conducted using an "overlay" plating technique to differentiate and identify various bacterial consortium members of the genera Thiobacillus, “Leptospirillum”, “Ferromicrobium”, and Acidiphilium. Two temperatures (30°C and 45°C) were used to select for mesophilic and moderately thermophilic bacteria. Cell numbers varied from 0-106 cells/g dry ore, depending on the sample location and depth. After acid curing for oxide leaching, no viable bacteria were recovered, although inoculation of cells from raffinate re-established a microbial population after three months. Due to low the pH of the operation, very few non-iron-oxidizing acidophilic heterotrophs were recovered. Moderate thermophiles were isolated from the ore samples. Pregnant liquor solutions (PLS) and raffinate both contained a diversity of bacteria. In addition, an intermittently applied waste stream that contained high levels of arsenic and fluoride was tested for toxicity. Twenty vol% waste stream in PLS killed 100% of the cells in 48 hours, indicating substantial toxicity and/or growth inhibition. The data indicate that bacteria populations can recover after acid curing, and that application of the waste stream to the dump should be avoided. Monitoring the microbial ecology of the leaching operation provided significant information that improved copper recovery.

  10. Relationship between acid volatile sulfide and the toxicity of zinc, lead and copper in marine sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Casas, A.M. . School of Fisheries); Crecelius, E.A. )

    1994-03-01

    It has been proposed that acid volatile sulfide (AVS) is an important sediment phase for determining the toxicity of certain trace metals. By evaluating the ratio of the molar quantities of simultaneously extracted metal (SEM) to AVS, the toxicity of metals to organisms in contact with sediment can be predicted. This study examines the role of AVS in prediction the toxicity of zinc, lead, and copper in marine sediments. Sediment samples were titrated with zinc, lead, and copper and subsequently analyzed for SEM, pore-water (PW) metal, and AVS retention. In most cases, metal was not detected in the pore waters until the AVS was exceeded, suggesting that AVS is an adequate measure of the metal-blinding capacity of a sediment. The [SEM]-to-[AVS] ratios were calculated and toxicities predicted for each spiking concentration where [SEM]/[AVS] > 1. A 10-d, flow-though, acute bioassay using the marine polychaete Capitella capita was conducted to examine the prediction of toxicity from the metal titrations and the bioassay sediment chemistry data. In most cases, mortalities occurred as predicted. AVS and the [SEM]-to-[AVS] ratio proved useful as predictors of toxicity for zinc, lead, and perhaps copper. Another tool for predicting metal toxicity in sediments may be the [PW]/LC50 value; in every case where this ratio was > 1, mortalities occurred.

  11. A mild and facile synthesis of aryl and alkenyl sulfides via copper-catalyzed deborylthiolation of organoborons with thiosulfonates.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Suguru; Sugimura, Yasuyuki; Hazama, Yuki; Nishiyama, Yoshitake; Yano, Takahisa; Shimizu, Shigeomi; Hosoya, Takamitsu

    2015-12-01

    An efficient deborylthiolation of aryl- and alkenylborons with thiosulfonates has been achieved under mild conditions using a copper catalyst. All steps of the experimental process were free from unpleasant odors. The mild reaction conditions as well as ready availability of boron compounds and thiosulfonates enabled easy access to an array of sulfides, including those bearing sensitive functional groups. PMID:26447905

  12. Synthesis of unsymmetrical sulfides using ethyl potassium xanthogenate and recyclable copper catalyst under ligand-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Akkilagunta, Vijay Kumar; Kakulapati, Rama Rao

    2011-08-19

    The synthesis of unsymmetrical sulfides has been achieved in good to excellent yields with inexpensive ethyl potassium xanthogenate via cross-coupling reaction using recyclable CuO nanoparticles under ligand-free conditions.The copper oxide nanoparticles can be recovered and reused up to five cycles without loss of activity. PMID:21732640

  13. Synthesis, Deposition, and Microstructure Development of Thin Films Formed by Sulfidation and Selenization of Copper Zinc Tin Sulfide Nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernomordik, Boris David

    Significant reduction in greenhouse gas emission and pollution associated with the global power demand can be accomplished by supplying tens-of-terawatts of power with solar cell technologies. No one solar cell material currently on the market is poised to meet this challenge due to issues such as manufacturing cost, material shortage, or material toxicity. For this reason, there is increasing interest in efficient light-absorbing materials that are comprised of abundant and non-toxic elements for thin film solar cell. Among these materials are copper zinc tin sulfide (Cu2ZnSnS4, or CZTS), copper zinc tin selenide (Cu2ZnSnSe4, or CZTSe), and copper zinc tin sulfoselenide alloys [Cu2ZnSn(SxSe1-x )4, or CZTSSe]. Laboratory power conversion efficiencies of CZTSSe-based solar cells have risen to almost 13% in less than three decades of research. Meeting the terawatt challenge will also require low cost fabrication. CZTSSe thin films from annealed colloidal nanocrystal coatings is an example of solution-based methods that can reduce manufacturing costs through advantages such as high throughput, high material utilization, and low capital expenses. The film microstructure and grain size affects the solar cell performance. To realize low cost commercial production and high efficiencies of CZTSSe-based solar cells, it is necessary to understand the fundamental factors that affect crystal growth and microstructure evolution during CZTSSe annealing. Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) nanocrystals were synthesized via thermolysis of single-source cation and sulfur precursors copper, zinc and tin diethyldithiocarbamates. The average nanocrystal size could be tuned between 2 nm and 40 nm, by varying the synthesis temperature between 150 °C and 340 °C. The synthesis is rapid and is completed in less than 10 minutes. Characterization by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirm that the nanocrystals are nominally

  14. Determination of (210)Po in drinking water and urine samples using copper sulfide microprecipitation.

    PubMed

    Guérin, Nicolas; Dai, Xiongxin

    2014-06-17

    Polonium-210 ((210)Po) can be rapidly determined in drinking water and urine samples by alpha spectrometry using copper sulfide (CuS) microprecipitation. For drinking water, Po in 10 mL samples was directly coprecipitated onto the filter for alpha counting without any purification. For urine, 10 mL of sample was heated, oxidized with KBrO3 for a short time (∼5 min), and subsequently centrifuged to remove the suspended organic matter. The CuS microprecipitation was then applied to the supernatant. Large batches of samples can be prepared using this technique with high recoveries (∼85%). The figures of merit of the methods were determined, and the developed methods fulfill the requirements for emergency and routine radioassays. The efficiency and reliability of the procedures were confirmed using spiked samples.

  15. Optical and thermal response of single-walled carbon nanotube-copper sulfide nanoparticle hybrid nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yi-Hsuan; He, Yuan; Lakshmanan, Santana; Yang, Chang; Chen, Wei; Que, Long

    2012-11-16

    This paper reports the optical and thermal response of a single-walled carbon nanotube-copper sulfide nanoparticle (SWNT-CuS NP) hybrid nanomaterial and its application as a thermoelectric generator. The hybrid nanomaterial was synthesized using oleylamine molecules as the linker molecules between SWNTs and CuS NPs. Measurements found that the hybrid nanomaterial has significantly increased light absorption (up to 80%) compared to the pure SWNT. Measurements also found that the hybrid nanomaterial thin-film devices exhibit a clear optical and thermal switching effect, which can be further enhanced up to 10 ×  by asymmetric illumination of light and thermal radiation on the thin-film devices instead of symmetric illumination. A simple prototype thermoelectric generator enabled by the hybrid nanomaterials is demonstrated, indicating a new route for achieving thermoelectricity. PMID:23089651

  16. Water soluble sodium sulfate nanorods as a versatile template for the designing of copper sulfide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Das, Gautam; Kakati, Nitul; Lee, Seok Hee; Karak, Niranjan; Yoon, Young Soo

    2014-06-01

    The present study reports the use of water soluble sodium sulfate (Na2SO4) nanorods as a versatile template for generation of tubular copper sulfide (CuS) nanostructures. The Na2SO4 nanorods were synthesized from ammonium sulfate (NH4)2SO4 and sodium hydroxide (NaOH), under refluxing condition. The shape and morphology control of the Na2SO4 nanorods were studied with respect to nature of surfactant used and reactant mole ratio. While, PVP mole ratio was important to obtain homogeneous nanorods. Uniform and stable nanotubes of CuS were than obtained by the dissolution of the nanorods in water. The use of simple chemicals for synthesis of such nanotube templates opens the prospect for wide scale downstream applications. PMID:24738412

  17. Microfluidic Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Photothermal Biodegradable Copper Sulfide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The continuous synthesis of biodegradable photothermal copper sulfide nanoparticles has been carried out with the aid of a microfluidic platform. A comparative physicochemical characterization of the resulting products from the microreactor and from a conventional batch reactor has been performed. The microreactor is able to operate in a continuous manner and with a 4-fold reduction in the synthesis times compared to that of the conventional batch reactor producing nanoparticles with the same physicochemical requirements. Biodegradation subproducts obtained under simulated physiological conditions have been identified, and a complete cytotoxicological analysis on different cell lines was performed. The photothermal effect of those nanomaterials has been demonstrated in vitro as well as their ability to generate reactive oxygen species. PMID:27486785

  18. Determination of (210)Po in drinking water and urine samples using copper sulfide microprecipitation.

    PubMed

    Guérin, Nicolas; Dai, Xiongxin

    2014-06-17

    Polonium-210 ((210)Po) can be rapidly determined in drinking water and urine samples by alpha spectrometry using copper sulfide (CuS) microprecipitation. For drinking water, Po in 10 mL samples was directly coprecipitated onto the filter for alpha counting without any purification. For urine, 10 mL of sample was heated, oxidized with KBrO3 for a short time (∼5 min), and subsequently centrifuged to remove the suspended organic matter. The CuS microprecipitation was then applied to the supernatant. Large batches of samples can be prepared using this technique with high recoveries (∼85%). The figures of merit of the methods were determined, and the developed methods fulfill the requirements for emergency and routine radioassays. The efficiency and reliability of the procedures were confirmed using spiked samples. PMID:24906041

  19. Synthesis of Copper-Antimony-Sulfide Nanocrystals for Solution-Processed Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Suehiro, Satoshi; Horita, Keisuke; Yuasa, Masayoshi; Tanaka, Tooru; Fujita, Katsuhiko; Ishiwata, Yoichi; Shimanoe, Kengo; Kida, Tetsuya

    2015-08-17

    The p-type nanocrystals (NCs) of copper-based chalcogenides, such as CuInSe2 and Cu2ZnSnS4, have attracted increasing attention in photovoltaic applications due to their potential to produce cheap solution-processed solar cells. Herein, we report the synthesis of copper-antimony-sulfide (CAS) NCs with different crystal phases including CuSbS2, Cu3SbS4, and Cu12Sb4S13. In addition, their morphology, crystal phase, and optical properties were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, UV-vis-near-IR spectroscopy, and photoemission yield spectroscopy. The morphology, crystal phase, and electronic structure were significantly dependent on the chemical composition in the CAS system. Devices were fabricated using particulate films consisting of CAS NCs prepared by spin coating without a high-temperature treatment. The CAS NC-based devices exhibited a diode-like current-voltage characteristic when coupled with an n-type CdS layer. In particular, the CuSbS2 NC devices exhibited photovoltaic responses under simulated sunlight, demonstrating its applicability for use in solution-processed solar cells.

  20. Nickel-cobalt-iron-copper sulfides and arsenides in solution-collapse breccia pipes, northwestern Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Wenrich, K.J. ); Hlava, P.F. )

    1993-04-01

    An extensive suite of Ni-Co-Fe-Cu sulfides and arsenides lies within the matrix of solution-collapse breccias buried deep within the plateaus of the Grand Canyon region. Ceilings over large caverns in the Redwall collapsed, brecciating the overlying sandstone and forming cylindrical breccia pipes up to 300 ft in diameter that extend vertically as much as 3,000 ft. These highly permeable breccias served as a host for the precipitation of a suite of over 100 minerals, including uraninite, sphalerite, galena and various copper phases, in addition to the Ni-Co-bearing-phase discussed here. Intricately zoned crystals of small (<1 mm), euhedral Ni-Co-Fe-As-S minerals were the first to form during the second major episode of mineralization in these pipes. Several of these phases replace minerals, such as barite and anhydrite, from the first episode. Extensive microprobe work has been done on samples from two breccia pipe mines, the Hack 2 and Orphan, which are about 50 miles apart. Mineral compositions are similar except that no copper is found in the Ni-Co-Fe phases from the Hack 2 mine, while pyrites containing 1 wt % Cu are common from the Orphan, which was mined for copper. In some of these pyrites', Cu is dominant and the mineral is actually villamaninite. Pyrites from both mines characteristically contain 0.5 to 3 wt % As. Metal contents in zones pyrite-bravoite-vaesite (M[sub 1]S[sub 2]) crystals at the Hack 2 mine range from Fe[sub 1] to Fe[sub .12], Ni[sub 0] to Ni[sub .86], and Co[sub 0] to Co[sub .10]. The metal content for polydymite-siegenite-violarite averages about (Ni[sub 2.33]Co[sub .39]Fe[sub .23])(S[sub 3.9]As[sub .1]). Orphan mine pyrite-bravoite-vaesite-villamaninite ranges in composition from pure FeS[sub 2] to (Ni[sub .6]Fe[sub .21]Co[sub .17])S[sub 2], and (Cu[sub .46]Ni[sub .27]Fe[sub .21]Co[sub .13])S[sub 2]. Of all the sulfides or arsenides found in these breccia pipes, only nickeline consistently occurs as the pure end member.

  1. Structural, chemical and optical properties of the polyethylene-copper sulfide composite thin films synthesized using polythionic acid as sulfur source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancutiene, Ingrida; Navea, Juan G.; Baltrusaitis, Jonas

    2015-08-01

    Synthesis and properties of thin copper sulfide films deposited on polyethylene were explored for the development of low cost hybrid organic-inorganic photovoltaic materials. Polyethylene was used as a model organic host material for thin copper sulfide film formation. Adsorption-diffusion method was used which utilized consecutive exposure of polyethylene to polythionic acid followed by aqueous Cu(II/I) solution. Several crystalline copper sulfide phases were obtained in synthesized samples and elucidated using X-ray diffraction. Surface chemical composition determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed the presence of copper sulfides in combination with copper hydroxide. Thickness of the composite material films ranged from several microns to ∼18 μm and depended on the Cu(II/I) exposure time. Bandgap of the materials obtained was measured and ranged from 1.88 to 1.17 eV. Importantly, heating these complex copper sulfide crystalline phase containing films at 100 °C in inert atmosphere invariably resulted in a single copper sulfide, anilite (Cu1.75S), phase. Anilite possesses a bandgap of 1.36 eV and has demonstrated excellent photovoltaic properties. Thus, the method described in this work can be used for a low cost large scale composite thin film photovoltaic material deposition based on anilite as photoactive material.

  2. Manganese (II) Chelate Functionalized Copper Sulfide Nanoparticles for Efficient Magnetic Resonance/Photoacoustic Dual-Modal Imaging Guided Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Renfa; Jing, Lijia; Peng, Dong; Li, Yong; Tian, Jie; Dai, Zhifei

    2015-01-01

    The integration of diagnostic and therapeutic functionalities into one nanoplatform shows great promise in cancer therapy. In this research, manganese (II) chelate functionalized copper sulfide nanoparticles were successfully prepared using a facile hydrothermal method. The obtained ultrasmall nanoparticles exhibit excellent photothermal effect and photoaoustic activity. Besides, the high loading content of Mn(II) chelates makes the nanoparticles attractive T1 contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In vivo photoacoustic imaging (PAI) results showed that the nanoparticles could be efficiently accumulated in tumor site in 24 h after systematic administration, which was further validated by MRI tests. The subsequent photothermal therapy of cancer in vivo was achieved without inducing any observed side effects. Therefore, the copper sulfide nanoparticles functionalized with Mn(II) chelate hold great promise as a theranostic nanomedicine for MR/PA dual-modal imaging guided photothermal therapy of cancer.

  3. Manganese (II) Chelate Functionalized Copper Sulfide Nanoparticles for Efficient Magnetic Resonance/Photoacoustic Dual-Modal Imaging Guided Photothermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Renfa; Jing, Lijia; Peng, Dong; Li, Yong; Tian, Jie; Dai, Zhifei

    2015-01-01

    The integration of diagnostic and therapeutic functionalities into one nanoplatform shows great promise in cancer therapy. In this research, manganese (II) chelate functionalized copper sulfide nanoparticles were successfully prepared using a facile hydrothermal method. The obtained ultrasmall nanoparticles exhibit excellent photothermal effect and photoaoustic activity. Besides, the high loading content of Mn(II) chelates makes the nanoparticles attractive T1 contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In vivo photoacoustic imaging (PAI) results showed that the nanoparticles could be efficiently accumulated in tumor site in 24 h after systematic administration, which was further validated by MRI tests. The subsequent photothermal therapy of cancer in vivo was achieved without inducing any observed side effects. Therefore, the copper sulfide nanoparticles functionalized with Mn(II) chelate hold great promise as a theranostic nanomedicine for MR/PA dual-modal imaging guided photothermal therapy of cancer. PMID:26284144

  4. On the effects of common pollutants on the corrosion of copper-nickel alloys in sulfide polluted seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Alhajji, J.N.; Reda, M.R.

    1995-09-01

    Various pollutants are often introduced in seawater by wet and dry deposition and by improper dumping of municipal wastewater. These pollutants often affect the corrosivity of seawater on copper-based alloys which might be thought to be resistant in this environment and do not receive sufficient research efforts. In the present investigation the effect was determined of some common pollutants such as urea, sodium sulfite, sodium nitrate, sodium phosphate, copper sulfate, lead acetate, ammonium sulfate, and ammonium chloride at a level of 10 ppm and of chlorine at 1 ppm concentration on the corrosion characteristics of the 90Cu-10Ni and the 70Cu-30Ni alloys in seawater, both in the presence and in the absence of 10 ppm sulfide. Both small amplitude cyclic voltammetry (SACV) and the Tafel extrapolation technique were employed as test procedures. All pollutants under investigation have led to an increase in corrosion rate and their effect was more pronounced when sulfide was also present. The effects of pollutants were more intense on 90Cu-10Ni as compared to 70Cu-30Ni alloys. In unpolluted seawater, the worst pollutant for 90Cu-10Ni alloy is sulfide followed by urea and chlorine while for the 70Cu-30Ni alloy, the worst pollutant was ammonium chloride followed by sulfide and sodium phosphate. In unpolluted seawater, the introduction of pollutants led to a corrosion reaction which was under cathodic control except for sulfide where the reaction was under anodic control and resulted in a sharp negative shift in the corrosion potential. In sulfide polluted seawater, the worst pollutant for 90Cu-10Ni alloy was ammonium sulfate followed by urea while for 70Cu-30Ni alloy, the worst pollutant was urea followed by ammonium chloride, ammonium sulfate, and sulfite ions.

  5. Auger electron spectroscopic study of mechanism of sulfide-accelerated corrosion of copper-nickel alloy in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, Malcolm E.

    The mechanism of sulfide-induced accelerated corrosion of 90-10 copper-nickel(iron) alloy is investigated. Samples of the alloy are exposed to flowing (2.4 m/s) seawater, with and without 0 01 mg/l sulfide, for various periods of time. The resulting surfaces are examined by means of Auger electron spectroscopy coupled with inert-ion-homoardment. A detailed depth profile is thereby obtained of concentrations in the surface region of a total of nine elements. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that iron hydroxide segregates at the surface to form a protective gelatinous layer against the normal chloride-induced corrosion process. Trace sulfide interferes with formation of a good protective layer and leaves the iron hydroxide vulnerable to ultimate partial or complete debonding. When the alloy is first exposed to "pure" seawater for a prolonged period of time, however, subsequent exposure to sulfide is no longer deleterious. This is apparently due to a layer of copper-nickel salt that slowly forms over the iron hydroxide.

  6. Electrochemical dissolution of copper sulfides using a fluidized bed electrochemical reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, D.L.

    1984-12-01

    A 2-stage process for the separation and recovery of the Cu, Fe and S from chalcopyrite (CuFeS/sub 2/) was investigated. The overall process dissolves and separates the Cu and Fe in CuFeS/sub 2/ into a Fe rich electrolyte and a Cu rich electrolyte. The S in CuFeS/sub 2/ reacts to form H/sub 2/S and S/sup 0/. A model was developed to explain the results of the chalcopyrite reduction experiments, based on the assumptions that the rate of chalcopyrite reduction is controlled by the H/sup +/ content at the reacting surface/electrolyte interface and the H/sup +/ content at the interface is controlled by the diffusion of H/sup +/ through the porous chalcopyrite reduction product layer. The model is in general agreement with the experimental results. Production of Cu (I) during the dissolution of the chalcopyrite reduction product layer occured only when using a 4 M HCl anolyte. The amount of Cu (I) produced fell sharply when the total cell current exceeded 19.5 A. Complete oxidation of the copper sulfide layer was easily accomplished. Oxidation of the chalcopyrite reduction product layer was possible in 4 M HC1O/sub 4/, 2 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and 2.7 M H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/, except that Cu (II) was the only dissolution product and dissolution of the copper sulfide was replaced by O/sub 2/ evolution when the solid phase stoichiometry reached CuS. Addition of Cl/sup -/ to the electrolyte prevented the production of O/sub 2/ and caused the CuS to react, forming Cu (II) and S/sup 0/. The presence of Cl/sup -/ also caused the evolution of Cl/sub 2/. The chalcopyrite reduction product layer produced in 4 M HCl was identified as Cu/sub 1.8/S. The rate of chalcopyrite reduction was severely limited by the thickness of the Cu/sub 1.8/S product layer. Removal of the chalcopyrite reduction product layer using

  7. Rapid preparation of polonium counting sources for alpha spectrometry using copper sulfide microprecipitation.

    PubMed

    Guérin, Nicolas; Dai, Xiongxin

    2013-07-01

    Thin-layer polonium (Po) sources for alpha spectrometry counting can be rapidly prepared using copper sulfide (CuS) microprecipitation. Polonium was coprecipitated with CuS, filtered onto Eichrom Resolve filters, and counted. This simple procedure is faster, cheaper, and more convenient than traditional spontaneous plating on metallic discs, and similar yields were obtained (80-90%). The experimental conditions for the microprecipitation technique were optimized (0.05 mg of Cu(2+) in 10 mL of 1 M HCl); these compare advantageously with conventional preparation and purification procedures for polonium samples (0.1 to 1 M HCl). The results showed that the most likely potential radionuclide interferences (Ra, Th, U, Np, Pu, and Am) for long-lived polonium isotopes ((208)Po, (209)Po, (210)Po) are effectively removed during processing. The effects of several transition metals (Cu(2+), Ag(+), Fe(3+), Fe(2+), Pb(2+), and Ni(2+)) on the yield and the resolution of the alpha peaks obtained were also assessed. Little interference was found, demonstrating the versatility of the present microprecipitation technique for environmental and biological matrices. The procedure has been successfully applied to different amounts of (210)Po using (209)Po as a yield tracer.

  8. Synthesis and biomedical applications of copper sulfide nanoparticles: from sensors to theranostics.

    PubMed

    Goel, Shreya; Chen, Feng; Cai, Weibo

    2014-02-26

    Copper sulfide (CuS) nanoparticles have attracted increasing attention from biomedical researchers across the globe, because of their intriguing properties which have been mainly explored for energy- and catalysis-related applications to date. This focused review article aims to summarize the recent progress made in the synthesis and biomedical applications of various CuS nanoparticles. After a brief introduction to CuS nanoparticles in the first section, we will provide a concise outline of the various synthetic routes to obtain different morphologies of CuS nanoparticles, which can influence their properties and potential applications. CuS nanoparticles have found broad applications in vitro, especially in the detection of biomolecules, chemicals, and pathogens which will be illustrated in detail. The in vivo uses of CuS nanoparticles have also been investigated in preclinical studies, including molecular imaging with various techniques, cancer therapy based on the photothermal properties of CuS, as well as drug delivery and theranostic applications. Research on CuS nanoparticles will continue to thrive over the next decade, and tremendous opportunities lie ahead for potential biomedical/clinical applications of CuS nanoparticles.

  9. Tunable White Fluorescent Copper Gallium Sulfide Quantum Dots Enabled by Mn Doping.

    PubMed

    Jo, Dae-Yeon; Kim, Daekyoung; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Chae, Heeyeop; Seo, Hyo Jin; Do, Young Rag; Yang, Heesun

    2016-05-18

    Fluorescence of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) can be tuned by engineering the band gap via size and composition control and further doping them with impurity ions. Targeting on highly bright white-emissive I-III-VI -type copper gallium sulfide (Cu-Ga-S, CGS) host QDs with the entire visible spectral coverage of blue to red, herein, Mn(2+) ion doping, through surface adsorption and lattice diffusion is fulfilled. Upon doping a distinct Mn emission from (4)T1-(6)A1 transition successfully appears in white photoluminescence (PL) of undoped CGS/ZnS core/shell QDs and with varying Mn concentration a systematic white spectral evolution of CGS:Mn/ZnS QDs is achievable with high PL quantum yield retained. The origins of white PL of CGS:Mn/ZnS QDs that is well decomposed into three emission bands are appropriately assigned. The resulting single-phased, doped QDs are then employed as near-UV-to-white down converters for the fabrication of white light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Electroluminescent properties of white QD-LEDs depending on Mn concentration of CGS:Mn/ZnS QDs and forward current are also discussed in detail. PMID:27120773

  10. Using Plasmonic Copper Sulfide Nanocrystals as Smart Light-Driven Sterilants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Liu, Xianjun; Du, Yingda; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2015-10-27

    As an efficient route to control pet overpopulation and develop neutered experimental animals, male sterilization via surgical techniques, chemical injections, and antifertility vaccines has brought particular attention recently. However, these traditional ways usually induce long-term adverse reactions, immune suppression, and serious infection and pain. To overcome the above limitations, we developed a platform in the present study by using plasmonic copper sulfide nanocrystals (Cu2-xS NCs) as intelligent light-driven sterilants with ideal outcomes. Upon NIR laser irradiation, these well-prepared Cu2-xS NCs can possess NIR-induced hyperthermia and generate high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Due to the cooperation of photothermal and photodynamic effects, these nanocrystals exhibited NIR-mediated toxicity toward Sertoli cells both in vitro and in vivo in a mild manner. We attribute the potential mechanism of cellular injury to the apoptosis-related death and denaturation of protein in the testicles. Furthermore, the possible metabolism route and long-term toxicity of these nanocrystals after testicular injection indicate their high biocompatibility. Taking together, our study on the NIR-induced toxicity of Cu2-xS NCs provides keen insights for the usage of plasmonic nanomaterials in biomedicine. PMID:26331394

  11. Effect of capping agent concentration on thermoluminescence and photoluminescence of copper-doped zinc sulfide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wanjari, Lata; Bisen, D P; Brahme, Namita; Sahu, Ishwar Prasad; Sharma, Ravi

    2015-08-01

    Copper-doped zinc sulfide (ZnS:Cu) nanoparticles with varying concentrations of capping agent were prepared using a chemical route technique. These particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Optical absorption studies showed that the absorption edge shifted towards the blue region as the concentration of the capping agent increased. Using effective mass approximation, calculation of the nanoparticle size indicated that effective band gap energy increases with decreasing particle size. The thermoluminescence (TL) properties of sodium hexameta phosphate (SHMP)-passivated ZnS:Cu nanoparticles were investigated after UV irradiation at room temperature. The TL glow curve of capped ZnS:Cu showed variations in TL peak position and intensity with the change in capping agent concentration. The photoluminescence (PL) spectra of ZnS:Cu nanoparticles excited at 254 nm exhibited a broad green emission band peaking around 510 nm, which confirmed the characteristic feature of Zn(2+) as well as Cu(2+) ions as the luminescent centres in the lattice. The PL spectra of ZnS:Cu nanoparticles with increasing capping agent concentrations revealed that the emission becomes more intense and shifted towards shorter wavelengths as the sizes of the samples were reduced.

  12. Tunable White Fluorescent Copper Gallium Sulfide Quantum Dots Enabled by Mn Doping.

    PubMed

    Jo, Dae-Yeon; Kim, Daekyoung; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Chae, Heeyeop; Seo, Hyo Jin; Do, Young Rag; Yang, Heesun

    2016-05-18

    Fluorescence of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) can be tuned by engineering the band gap via size and composition control and further doping them with impurity ions. Targeting on highly bright white-emissive I-III-VI -type copper gallium sulfide (Cu-Ga-S, CGS) host QDs with the entire visible spectral coverage of blue to red, herein, Mn(2+) ion doping, through surface adsorption and lattice diffusion is fulfilled. Upon doping a distinct Mn emission from (4)T1-(6)A1 transition successfully appears in white photoluminescence (PL) of undoped CGS/ZnS core/shell QDs and with varying Mn concentration a systematic white spectral evolution of CGS:Mn/ZnS QDs is achievable with high PL quantum yield retained. The origins of white PL of CGS:Mn/ZnS QDs that is well decomposed into three emission bands are appropriately assigned. The resulting single-phased, doped QDs are then employed as near-UV-to-white down converters for the fabrication of white light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Electroluminescent properties of white QD-LEDs depending on Mn concentration of CGS:Mn/ZnS QDs and forward current are also discussed in detail.

  13. Synthesis and Biomedical Applications of Copper Sulfide Nanoparticles: From Sensors to Theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Shreya; Chen, Feng; Cai, Weibo

    2013-01-01

    Copper sulfide (CuS) nanoparticles have attracted increasing attention from biomedical researchers across the globe, because of their intriguing properties which have been mainly explored for energy- and catalysis-related applications to date. This focused review article aims to summarize the recent progress made in the synthesis and biomedical applications of various CuS nanoparticles. After a brief introduction to CuS nanoparticles in the first section, we will provide a concise outline of the various synthetic routes to obtain different morphologies of CuS nanoparticles, which can influence their properties and potential applications. CuS nanoparticles have found broad applications in vitro, especially in the detection of biomolecules, chemicals, and pathogens which will be illustrated in detail. The in vivo uses of CuS nanoparticles have also been investigated in preclinical studies, including molecular imaging with various techniques, cancer therapy based on the photothermal properties of CuS, as well as drug delivery and theranostic applications. Research on CuS nanoparticles will continue to thrive over the next decade, and tremendous opportunities lie ahead for potential biomedical/clinical applications of CuS nanoparticles. PMID:24106015

  14. Seasonal distribution of organic matter and copper under stratified conditions in a karstic, marine, sulfide rich environment (Rogoznica Lake, Croatia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavšić, Marta; Ciglenečki, Irena; Strmečki, Slađana; Bura-Nakić, Elvira

    2011-04-01

    Closed, isolated small systems, as the representatives of a "unique-environmental feature", are valuable natural laboratories for studying different biogeochemical processes. The saline Rogoznica Lake ("Dragon Eye"), situated on the Eastern Adriatic coast is such a system (10 276 m 2, 15 m deep) typical of many stratified, sulfide rich water bodies. The depth of mixolimnion changes seasonally and it is greatly influenced by meteorological conditions, i.e. temperature and rainfall. Vertical mixing usually occurs during winter when cold, oxygen-rich water from the surface sinks downwards. In 2009 we monitored seasonal distribution and variation of copper complexing capacity (L T), related apparent stability constants (K app), concentration of Cu 2+ ions, surfactant activity (SAS), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and reduced sulfur species (RSS). Our results have shown that L T is increasing with depth up to 8 m depth, while the concentrations of copper ions decrease with the depth due to the higher amount of RSS species in deeper layers. The values of log K app are also decreasing with depth as a consequence of a competition of organic ligands and sulfide ions for binding Cu. Below 8 m depth the presence of high amounts of RSS (˜1 mM) influences the electrochemical measuring of copper ion and L T determination, contributing to the copper ion binding.

  15. Tin Ion Directed Morphology Evolution of Copper Sulfide Nanoparticles and Tuning of Their Plasmonic Properties via Phase Conversion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lihui; Sakamoto, Masanori; Haruta, Mitsutaka; Nemoto, Takashi; Sato, Ryota; Kurata, Hiroki; Teranishi, Toshiharu

    2016-08-01

    Copper-deficient copper sulfide (Cu2-xS) nanoparticles (NPs) have been investigated as important hole-based plasmonic materials because of their size, morphology, and carrier density-dependent localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) properties. Morphology and carrier density are two important parameters to determine their LSPR properties. Here, we demonstrate that the foreign metal ion, Sn(4+), directs the growth of djurleite Cu31S16 from nanodisk to tetradecahedron along the [100] direction. To control the LSPR properties by tuning the carrier density, the djurleite Cu31S16 nanoparticles were pseudomorphically converted into more copper-deficient (higher carrier density) roxbyite Cu7S4 NPs by heat treatment in the presence of amine. The roxbyite Cu7S4 NPs exhibited a shorter and stronger LSPR peak while retaining the morphology of the djurleite Cu31S16 NPs. PMID:27398864

  16. Synthesis of Mesostructured Copper Sulfide by Cation Exchange and Liquid Crystal Templating

    SciTech Connect

    Lubeck, C R; Doyle, F M; Gash, A E; Satcher, J H; Han, T Y

    2005-08-01

    describe for the first time, the successful synthesis of highly ordered, mesostructured Cu{sub x}S, by combining the templating of the supramolecular assemblies of non-ionic amphiphilic polymer method with the cation exchange method to transform mesostructured cadmium sulfide (CdS) into mesostructured copper sulfides (CuS, Cu{sub 2}S).

  17. Reaction Mechanisms of Metals with Hydrogen Sulfide and Thiols in Model Wine. Part 1: Copper-Catalyzed Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kreitman, Gal Y; Danilewicz, John C; Jeffery, David W; Elias, Ryan J

    2016-05-25

    Sulfidic off-odors as a result of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and low-molecular-weight thiols are commonly encountered in wine production. These odors are usually removed by the process of Cu(II) fining, a process that remains poorly understood. The present study aims to elucidate the underlying mechanisms by which Cu(II) interacts with H2S and thiol compounds (RSH) under wine-like conditions. Copper complex formation was monitored along with H2S, thiol, oxygen, and acetaldehyde concentrations after the addition of Cu(II) (50 or 100 μM) to air-saturated model wine solutions containing H2S, cysteine, 6-sulfanylhexan-1-ol, or 3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol (300 μM each). The presence of H2S and thiols in excess to Cu(II) led to the rapid formation of ∼1.4:1 H2S/Cu and ∼2:1 thiol/Cu complexes, resulting in the oxidation of H2S and thiols and reduction of Cu(II) to Cu(I), which reacted with oxygen. H2S was observed to initially oxidize rather than form insoluble copper sulfide. The proposed reaction mechanisms provide insight into the extent to which H2S can be selectively removed in the presence of thiols in wine. PMID:27133282

  18. Formation of Hydrogen Sulfide in Wine: Interactions between Copper and Sulfur Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Bekker, Marlize Z; Smith, Mark E; Smith, Paul A; Wilkes, Eric N

    2016-01-01

    The combined synergistic effects of copper (Cu(2+)) and sulfur dioxide (SO₂) on the formation of hydrogen sulfide (H₂S) in Verdelho and Shiraz wine samples post-bottling was studied over a 12-month period. The combined treatment of Cu(2+) and SO₂ significantly increased H₂S formation in Verdelho wines samples that were not previously treated with either Cu(2+) or SO₂. The formation of H₂S produced through Cu(2+) mediated reactions was likely either: (a) directly through the interaction of SO₂ with either Cu(2+) or H₂S; or (b) indirectly through the interaction of SO₂ with other wine matrix compounds. To gain better understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the significant increases in H₂S concentration in the Verdelho samples, the interaction between Cu(2+) and SO₂ was studied in a model wine matrix with and without the presence of a representative thiol quenching compound (4-methylbenzoquinone, 4MBQ). In these model studies, the importance of naturally occurring wine compounds and wine additives, such as quinones, SO₂, and metal ions, in modulating the formation of H₂S post-bottling was demonstrated. When present in equimolar concentrations a 1:1 ratio of H₂S- and SO₂-catechol adducts were produced. At wine relevant concentrations, however, only SO₂-adducts were produced, reinforcing that the competition reactions of sulfur nucleophiles, such as H₂S and SO₂, with wine matrix compounds play a critical role in modulating final H₂S concentrations in wines. PMID:27626394

  19. Enhanced reactive adsorption of hydrogen sulfide on the composites of graphene/graphite oxide with copper (hydr)oxychlorides.

    PubMed

    Mabayoje, Oluwaniyi; Seredych, Mykola; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2012-06-27

    Composites of copper (hydr)oxychlorides with graphite oxide or graphene were synthesized and used as adsorbents of hydrogen sulfide at dynamic conditions at ambient temperatures. The materials were extensively characterized before and after adsorption in order to link their performance to the surface features. X-ray diffraction, FTIR, thermal analysis, TEM, SEM/EDX, and adsorption of nitrogen were used. It was found that the composite with graphene has the most favorable surface features enhancing reactive adsorption of hydrogen sulfide. The presence of moisture in the H2S stream has a positive effect on the removal process owing to the dissociation process. H2S is retained on the surface via a direct replacement of OH groups and via acid-base reactions with the copper (hydr)oxide. Highly dispersed reduced copper species on the surface of the composite with graphene enhance activation of oxygen and cause formation of sulfites and sulfates. Higher conductivity of the graphene phase than that of graphite oxide helps in electron transfer in redox reactions.

  20. Growth evolution and phase transition from chalcocite to digenite in nanocrystalline copper sulfide: Morphological, optical and electrical properties.

    PubMed

    Quintana-Ramirez, Priscilla Vasthi; Arenas-Arrocena, Ma Concepción; Santos-Cruz, José; Vega-González, Marina; Martínez-Alvarez, Omar; Castaño-Meneses, Víctor Manuel; Acosta-Torres, Laura Susana; de la Fuente-Hernández, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Copper sulfide is a promising p-type inorganic semiconductor for optoelectronic devices such as solar cells, due its small band gap energy and its electrical properties. In this work nanocrystalline copper sulfide (Cu x S), with two stoichiometric ratios (x = 2, 1.8) was obtained by one-pot synthesis at 220, 230, 240 and 260 °C in an organic solvent and amorphous Cu x S was obtained in aqueous solution. Nanoparticle-like nucleation centers are formed at lower temperatures (220 °C), mixtures of morphologies (nanorods, nanodisks and nanoprisms) are seen at 230 and 240 °C, in which the nanodisks are predominant, while big hexagonal/prismatic crystals are obtained at 260 °C according to TEM results. A mixture of chalcocite and digenite phases was found at 230 and 240 °C, while a clear transition to a pure digenite phase was seen at 260 °C. The evolution of morphology and transition of phases is consistent to the electrical, optical, and morphological properties of the copper sulfide. In fact, digenite Cu1.8S is less resistive (346 Ω/sq) and has a lower energy band gap (1.6 eV) than chalcocite Cu2S (5.72 × 10(5) Ω/sq, 1.87 eV). Low resistivity was also obtained in Cu x S synthesized in aqueous solution, despite its amorphous structure. All Cu x S products could be promising for optoelectronic applications. PMID:25247136

  1. Growth evolution and phase transition from chalcocite to digenite in nanocrystalline copper sulfide: Morphological, optical and electrical properties

    PubMed Central

    Quintana-Ramirez, Priscilla Vasthi; Santos-Cruz, José; Vega-González, Marina; Martínez-Alvarez, Omar; Castaño-Meneses, Víctor Manuel; Acosta-Torres, Laura Susana; de la Fuente-Hernández, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Summary Copper sulfide is a promising p-type inorganic semiconductor for optoelectronic devices such as solar cells, due its small band gap energy and its electrical properties. In this work nanocrystalline copper sulfide (CuxS), with two stoichiometric ratios (x = 2, 1.8) was obtained by one-pot synthesis at 220, 230, 240 and 260 °C in an organic solvent and amorphous CuxS was obtained in aqueous solution. Nanoparticle-like nucleation centers are formed at lower temperatures (220 °C), mixtures of morphologies (nanorods, nanodisks and nanoprisms) are seen at 230 and 240 °C, in which the nanodisks are predominant, while big hexagonal/prismatic crystals are obtained at 260 °C according to TEM results. A mixture of chalcocite and digenite phases was found at 230 and 240 °C, while a clear transition to a pure digenite phase was seen at 260 °C. The evolution of morphology and transition of phases is consistent to the electrical, optical, and morphological properties of the copper sulfide. In fact, digenite Cu1.8S is less resistive (346 Ω/sq) and has a lower energy band gap (1.6 eV) than chalcocite Cu2S (5.72 × 105 Ω/sq, 1.87 eV). Low resistivity was also obtained in CuxS synthesized in aqueous solution, despite its amorphous structure. All CuxS products could be promising for optoelectronic applications. PMID:25247136

  2. Growth evolution and phase transition from chalcocite to digenite in nanocrystalline copper sulfide: Morphological, optical and electrical properties.

    PubMed

    Quintana-Ramirez, Priscilla Vasthi; Arenas-Arrocena, Ma Concepción; Santos-Cruz, José; Vega-González, Marina; Martínez-Alvarez, Omar; Castaño-Meneses, Víctor Manuel; Acosta-Torres, Laura Susana; de la Fuente-Hernández, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Copper sulfide is a promising p-type inorganic semiconductor for optoelectronic devices such as solar cells, due its small band gap energy and its electrical properties. In this work nanocrystalline copper sulfide (Cu x S), with two stoichiometric ratios (x = 2, 1.8) was obtained by one-pot synthesis at 220, 230, 240 and 260 °C in an organic solvent and amorphous Cu x S was obtained in aqueous solution. Nanoparticle-like nucleation centers are formed at lower temperatures (220 °C), mixtures of morphologies (nanorods, nanodisks and nanoprisms) are seen at 230 and 240 °C, in which the nanodisks are predominant, while big hexagonal/prismatic crystals are obtained at 260 °C according to TEM results. A mixture of chalcocite and digenite phases was found at 230 and 240 °C, while a clear transition to a pure digenite phase was seen at 260 °C. The evolution of morphology and transition of phases is consistent to the electrical, optical, and morphological properties of the copper sulfide. In fact, digenite Cu1.8S is less resistive (346 Ω/sq) and has a lower energy band gap (1.6 eV) than chalcocite Cu2S (5.72 × 10(5) Ω/sq, 1.87 eV). Low resistivity was also obtained in Cu x S synthesized in aqueous solution, despite its amorphous structure. All Cu x S products could be promising for optoelectronic applications.

  3. Separate recovery of copper and zinc from acid mine drainage using biogenic sulfide.

    PubMed

    Sahinkaya, Erkan; Gungor, Murat; Bayrakdar, Alper; Yucesoy, Zeynep; Uyanik, Sinan

    2009-11-15

    Precipitation of metals from acid mine drainage (AMD) using sulfide gives the possibility of selective recovery due to different solubility product of each metal. Using sulfate reducing bacteria to produce sulfide for that purpose is advantageous due to in situ and on-demand sulfide production. In this study, separate precipitation of Cu and Zn was studied using sulfide produced in anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR). ABR fed with ethanol (1340 mg/L chemical oxygen demand (COD)) and sulfate (2000 mg/L) gave a stable performance with 65% sulfate reduction, 85% COD removal and around 320 mg/L sulfide production. Cu was separately precipitated at low pH (pH<2) using sulfide transported from ABR effluent via N(2) gas. Cu precipitation was complete within 45-60 min and Zn did not precipitate during Cu removal. The Cu precipitation rate increased with initial Cu concentration. After selective Cu precipitation, Zn recovery was studied using ABR effluent containing sulfide and alkalinity. Depending on initial sulfide/Zn ratio, removal efficiency varied between 84 and 98%. The low pH of Zn bearing AMD was also increased to neutral values using alkalinity produced by sulfate reducing bacteria in ABR. The mode of particle size distribution of ZnS and CuS precipitates was around 17 and 46 microm, respectively.

  4. Utilising copper screen-printed electrodes (CuSPE) for the electroanalytical sensing of sulfide.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Bhawana; Bernalte, Elena; Smith, Jamie P; Foster, Christopher W; Linton, Patricia E; Sawant, Shilpa N; Banks, Craig E

    2016-02-21

    A mediatorless sulfide electrochemical sensing platform utilising a novel nanocopper-oxide screen-printed electrodes (CuSPE) is reported for the first time. The state-of-the-art screen-printed electrochemical sensors demonstrate their capability to quantify sulfide within both the presence and absence of an array of interferents with good levels of sensitivity and repeatability. The direct sensing (using linear sweep voltammetry) of sulfide utilising the CuSPEs provides a mediatorless approach for the detection of sulfide, yielding useful analytical signatures that can be successfully quantified. The proposed novel protocol using the CuSPEs is successfully applied to the sensing of sulfide within drinking water exhibiting a high level of recovery.

  5. The Copper Sulfide Coating on Polyacrylonitrile with Chelating Agents by an Electroless Deposition Method and its EMI Shielding Effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roan, Ming-Lih; Chen, Yen-Hung; Huang, Chi-Yuan

    2008-08-01

    In this study, a variety of concentrations of chelating agents were added to obtain the anchoring effect and chelating effect in the electroless plating bath. The mechanism of the Cux(x = 1,2)S growth and the electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness (EMI SE) of the composite were studied. It was found that the vinyl acetate residued in PAN substrate would be purged due to the swelling effect by chelating agents solution. And then, the anchoring effect occurred due to the hydrogen bonding between the pits of PAN substrate and the chelating agent. Consequently, the copper sulfide layer deposited by the electroless plating reaction with EDTA and TEA. The swelling degree (Sd) was proposed and evaluated from the FT-IR spectra. The relationship between swelling degree of the PAN films and EDTA (C) is expressed as: Sd = 0.13+0.90×e∧(-15.15C). And TEA series is expressed as: Sd = 0.07+1.00×e∧(-15.15C). On the other hand, the FESEM micrograph showed that the average thickness of copper sulfide increased from 76 nm to 383 nm when the concentration of EDTA increased from 0.00M to 0.20M. Consequently, the EMI SE of the composites increased from 10˜12 dB to 25˜27 dB. The GIA-XRD analyze indicated that the deposited layer consisted of CuS and Cu2S.

  6. Cadmium sulfide-copper sulfide heterojunction cell research. Quarterly progress report, December 1, 1979-February 29, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    1980-07-01

    Attempts have been continued to increase the short circuit current in cells of enhanced open circuit voltage. Both deposition of copper on the surface of the Cu/sub 2/S layer and hydrogen plasma treatments have been attempted. To date, no significant increase in ultimate current has been achieved. Various changes in cell production procedure have been made with significant improvements in reproducibility. Improvements in the structure of (CdZn)S layers and resulting cell properties have been achieved using modified substrates based on NiFe. Improvement have been made to the capacitance measuring systems with a consequent gain in resolution, accuracy and reproducibility. Structural studies of the electron beam deposited glass have revealed the presence of cracking and experiments have been carried out to determine the optimum deposition conditions for producing defect-free coatings.

  7. Weathering of sulfidic shale and copper mine waste: Secondary minerals and metal cycling in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee, and North Carolina, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammarstrom, J.M.; Seal, R.R.; Meier, A.L.; Jackson, J.C.

    2003-01-01

    Metal cycling via physical and chemical weathering of discrete sources (copper mines) and regional (non-point) sources (sulfide-rich shale) is evaluated by examining the mineralogy and chemistry of weathering products in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee, and North Carolina, USA. The elements in copper mine waste, secondary minerals, stream sediments, and waters that are most likely to have negative impacts on aquatic ecosystems are aluminum, copper, zinc, and arsenic because these elements locally exceed toxicity guidelines for surface waters or for stream sediments. Acid-mine drainage has not developed in streams draining inactive copper mines. Acid-rock drainage and chemical weathering processes that accompany debris flows or human disturbances of sulfidic rocks are comparable to processes that develop acid-mine drainage elsewhere. Despite the high rainfall in the mountain range, sheltered areas and intermittent dry spells provide local venues for development of secondary weathering products that can impact aquatic ecosystems.

  8. Size Dependence of a Temperature-Induced Solid-Solid Phase Transition in Copper(I) Sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Rivest, Jessy B; Fong, Lam-Kiu; Jain, Prashant K; Toney, Michael F; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2011-07-24

    Determination of the phase diagrams for the nanocrystalline forms of materials is crucial for our understanding of nanostructures and the design of functional materials using nanoscale building blocks. The ability to study such transformations in nanomaterials with controlled shape offers further insight into transition mechanisms and the influence of particular facets. Here we present an investigation of the size-dependent, temperature-induced solid-solid phase transition in copper sulfide nanorods from low- to high-chalcocite. We find the transition temperature to be substantially reduced, with the high chalcocite phase appearing in the smallest nanocrystals at temperatures so low that they are typical of photovoltaic operation. Size dependence in phase trans- formations suggests the possibility of accessing morphologies that are not found in bulk solids at ambient conditions. These other- wise-inaccessible crystal phases could enable higher-performing materials in a range of applications, including sensing, switching, lighting, and photovoltaics.

  9. Copper sulfide nanoparticle-decorated graphene as a catalytic amplification platform for electrochemical detection of alkaline phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Peng, Juan; Han, Xiao-Xia; Zhang, Qing-Chun; Yao, Hui-Qin; Gao, Zuo-Ning

    2015-06-01

    Copper sulfide nanoparticle-decorated graphene sheet (CuS/GR) was successfully synthesized and used as a signal amplification platform for electrochemical detection of alkaline phosphatase activity. First, CuS/GR was prepared through a microwave-assisted hydrothermal approach. The CuS/GR nanocomposites exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity toward the oxidation of ALP hydrolyzed products such as 1-naphthol, which produced a current response. Thus, a catalytic amplification platform based on CuS/GR nanocomposite for electrochemical detection of ALP activity was designed using 1-naphthyl phosphate as a model substrate. The current response increased linearly with ALP concentration from 0.1 to 100 U L(-1) with a detection limit of 0.02 U L(-1). The assay was applied to estimate ALP activity in human serum samples with satisfactory results. This strategy may find widespread and promising applications in other sensing systems that involves ALP.

  10. The Copper Sulfide Coating on Polyacrylonitrile with Chelating Agents by an Electroless Deposition Method and its EMI Shielding Effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Roan, M.-L.; Chen, Y.-H.; Huang, C.-Y.

    2008-08-28

    In this study, a variety of concentrations of chelating agents were added to obtain the anchoring effect and chelating effect in the electroless plating bath. The mechanism of the Cu{sub x(x=1,2)}S growth and the electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness (EMI SE) of the composite were studied. It was found that the vinyl acetate residued in PAN substrate would be purged due to the swelling effect by chelating agents solution. And then, the anchoring effect occurred due to the hydrogen bonding between the pits of PAN substrate and the chelating agent. Consequently, the copper sulfide layer deposited by the electroless plating reaction with EDTA and TEA. The swelling degree (S{sub d}) was proposed and evaluated from the FT-IR spectra. The relationship between swelling degree of the PAN films and EDTA (C) is expressed as: S{sub d} = 0.13+0.90xe and (-15.15C). And TEA series is expressed as: S{sub d} = 0.07+1.00xe and (-15.15C). On the other hand, the FESEM micrograph showed that the average thickness of copper sulfide increased from 76 nm to 383 nm when the concentration of EDTA increased from 0.00M to 0.20M. Consequently, the EMI SE of the composites increased from 10{approx}12 dB to 25{approx}27 dB. The GIA-XRD analyze indicated that the deposited layer consisted of CuS and Cu{sub 2}S.

  11. A green synthesis route for the phase and size tunability of copper antimony sulfide nanocrystals with high yield.

    PubMed

    Chen, Keqiang; Zhou, Jing; Chen, Wen; Chen, Qiao; Zhou, Peng; Liu, Yueli

    2016-03-01

    Until now, it is a great challenge for the controllable synthesis of copper antimony sulfide (CAS) nanocrystals (NCs), as the reactivity of precursors is quite difficult to be controlled during the synthesis process. In the present work, a novel solution-based method is proposed to synthesize CAS NCs by choosing N,N'-diphenylthiourea as the sulfide precursor, which is favorable for balancing the relative reactivity of Cu and Sb ions. It is found that three phases (CuSbS2, Cu12Sb4S13 and Cu3SbS4) of CAS NCs with size tunability were successfully synthesized for the first time. To the best of our knowledge, the lowest reaction temperature of 110 °C and the highest yield over 90% for CAS NCs were also achieved for the first time, which may be considered to be a green synthesis route compared with other conventional methods. Optical properties indicate that the as-prepared CAS NCs have strong optical absorption in the visible light region of the solar spectrum, and we also observed the band gap tunability of CuSbS2 and Cu3SbS4 materials for the first time. PMID:26875832

  12. The Effect of Desulfovibrio sp. Biofilms on Corrosion Behavior of Copper in Sulfide-Containing Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güngör, Nihal Doğruöz; Çotuk, Ayşın; Dışpınar, Derya

    2015-03-01

    This study aims to detect the effect of Desulfovibrio sp. on copper in terms of biofilm formation and corrosion in 722 h. In that way, appropriate strategies to inhibit microbiological corrosion in copper systems with Desulfovibrio sp. can be evaluated. For this purpose, experiments were performed in 1 L glass model system containing 28 copper coupons and pure culture of the sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) strain Desulfovibrio sp. in Postgate's medium C. Also, a control system with copper coupons but without Desulfovibrio sp. containing sterile Postgate's medium was studied concurrently with the test system. The test coupons were collected from systems at certain time intervals, namely 24, 168, 360, and 720 h. The samples were then subjected to several characterization analyses such as measurement of Desulfovibrio sp. numbers, corrosion resistance, EPS extraction, carbohydrate analysis, SEM, and EDS. During the experiments, the maximum Desulfovibrio sp. count in biofilm samples was found at 360 h. Carbohydrate and copper concentrations in biofilm were increased over time. EDS analysis revealed Cu, S, C, O, and Cl peaks on the surface of the samples. For the control coupons, only Cu peaks were observed. The results obtained from this study showed that copper was corroded by Desulfovibrio sp. in the model system under laboratory conditions.

  13. Synthesis And Characterization of Copper Zinc Tin Sulfide Nanoparticles And Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, Ankur

    Copper zinc tin sulfide (Cu2ZnSnS4, or CZTS) is emerging as an alternative material to the present thin film solar cell technologies such as Cu(In,Ga)Se2 and CdTe. All the elements in CZTS are abundant, environmentally benign, and inexpensive. In addition, CZTS has a band gap of ˜1.5 eV, the ideal value for converting the maximum amount of energy from the solar spectrum into electricity. CZTS has a high absorption coefficient (>104 cm-1 in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum) and only a few micron thick layer of CZTS can absorb all the photons with energies above its band gap. CZT(S,Se) solar cells have already reached power conversion efficiencies >10%. One of the ways to improve upon the CZTS power conversion efficiency is by using CZTS quantum dots as the photoactive material, which can potentially achieve efficiencies greater than the present thin film technologies at a fraction of the cost. However, two requirements for quantum-dot solar cells have yet to be demonstrated. First, no report has shown quantum confinement in CZTS nanocrystals. Second, the syntheses to date have not provided a range of nanocrystal sizes, which is necessary not only for fundamental studies but also for multijunction photovoltaic architectures. We resolved these two issues by demonstrating a simple synthesis of CZTS, Cu2SnS3, and alloyed (Cu2SnS3) x(ZnS)y nanocrystals with diameters ranging from 2 to 7 nm from diethyldithiocarbamate complexes. As-synthesized nanocrystals were characterized using high resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy to confirm their phase purity. Nanocrystals of diameter less than 5 nm were found to exhibit a shift in their optical absorption spectra towards higher energy consistent with quantum confinement and previous theoretical predictions. Thin films from CZTS nanocrystals deposited on Mo-coated quartz substrates using drop casting were found to be continuous

  14. Copper sulfide nanoparticles with phospholipid-PEG coating for in vivo near-infrared photothermal cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yizhuan; Lai, Yulian; Shi, Saige; Hao, Shufang; Wei, Jingping; Chen, Xiaolan

    2015-02-01

    In this work, small sizes of hydrophobic copper sulfide nanoparticles (CuS NPs, ∼3.8 nm in diameter) have been successfully prepared from the reaction of copper chloride with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (SDEDTC) inside a heated oleylamine solution. These CuS NPs displayed strong absorption in the 700-1100 nm near-infrared (NIR) region. By coating CuS NPs with DSPE-PEG2000 on the surface, the as-synthesized CuS@DSPE-PEG NPs exhibited good water solubility, significant stability and biocompatibility, as well as excellent photothermal conversion effects upon exposure to an 808 nm laser. After intravenous administration to mice, the CuS@DSPE-PEG NPs were found to passively target to the tumor site, and tumor tissues could be ablated efficiency under laser irradiation. In addition, CuS@DSPE-PEG NPs do not show significant toxicity by histological and blood chemistry analysis, and can be effectively excreted via metabolism. Our results indicated that CuS@DSPE-PEG NPs can act as an ideal photothermal agent for cancer photothermal therapy.

  15. Scanning electrochemical microscopy studies of micropatterned copper sulfide (CuxS) thin films fabricated by a wet chemistry method

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Miao; Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Xiaocui

    2011-01-01

    Patterned copper sulfide (CuxS) microstructures on Si (1 1 1) wafers were successfully fabricated by a relatively simple solution growth method using copper sulfate, ethylenediaminetetraacetate and sodium thiosulfate aqueous solutions as precursors. The CuxS particles were selectively deposited on a patterned self-assembled monolayer of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane regions created by photolithography. To obtain high quality CuxS films, preparative conditions such as concentration, proportion, pH and temperature of the precursor solutions were optimized. Various techniques such as optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction, optical absorption and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) were employed to examine the topography and properties of the micro-patterned CuxS films. Optical microscopy and AFM results indicated that the CuxS micro-pattern possessed high selectivity and clear edge resolution. From combined X-ray diffraction analysis and optical band gap calculations we conclude that Cu9S5 (digenite) was the main phase within the resultant CuxS film. Both SECM image and cyclic voltammograms confirmed that the CuxS film had good electrical conductivity. Moreover, from SECM approach curve analysis, the apparent electron-transfer rate constant (k) in the micro-pattern of CuxS dominated surface was estimated as 0.04 cm/s. The SECM current map showed high edge acuity of the micro-patterned CuxS. PMID:21785491

  16. Scanning electrochemical microscopy studies of micropatterned copper sulfide (Cu(x)S) thin films fabricated by a wet chemistry method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Miao; Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Xiaocui

    2011-05-30

    Patterned copper sulfide (Cu(x)S) microstructures on Si (1 1 1) wafers were successfully fabricated by a relatively simple solution growth method using copper sulfate, ethylenediaminetetraacetate and sodium thiosulfate aqueous solutions as precursors. The Cu(x)S particles were selectively deposited on a patterned self-assembled monolayer of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane regions created by photolithography. To obtain high quality Cu(x)S films, preparative conditions such as concentration, proportion, pH and temperature of the precursor solutions were optimized. Various techniques such as optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction, optical absorption and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) were employed to examine the topography and properties of the micro-patterned Cu(x)S films. Optical microscopy and AFM results indicated that the Cu(x)S micro-pattern possessed high selectivity and clear edge resolution. From combined X-ray diffraction analysis and optical band gap calculations we conclude that Cu(9)S(5) (digenite) was the main phase within the resultant Cu(x)S film. Both SECM image and cyclic voltammograms confirmed that the Cu(x)S film had good electrical conductivity. Moreover, from SECM approach curve analysis, the apparent electron-transfer rate constant (k) in the micro-pattern of Cu(x)S dominated surface was estimated as 0.04 cm/s. The SECM current map showed high edge acuity of the micro-patterned Cu(x)S.

  17. Optical and electrical stability of viral-templated copper sulfide (Cu{sub 1.8}S) films

    SciTech Connect

    Shahriar Zaman, Mohammed; Bernard Grajeda, Gabriel; Haberer, Elaine D.

    2014-04-14

    The optical and electrical stabilities of viral-templated non-stoichiometric copper sulfide, digenite (Cu{sub 1.8}S) films were investigated. The films were composed of large agglomerates of randomly aligned Cu{sub 1.8}S-coated M13 filamentous phage. Free carrier optical absorption associated with localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) was observed in the near infrared spectral region, and the films were electrically active, displaying a linear current-voltage relationship. Under ambient conditions, the magnitude of the LSPR absorption increased, following a power law relationship with time, and the electrical resistance of viral-templated films decreased significantly. In contrast, the resistance of films stored under low oxygen, low humidity conditions experienced a smaller reduction in electrical resistance. Changes in optical and electrical film properties under ambient conditions were associated with an increase in free carrier concentration within the copper chalcogenide material due to oxygen exposure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to relate this increase in free carrier concentration to compositional changes on the viral-templated material surface.

  18. Plasmonic Cu(2-x)S nanocrystals: optical and structural properties of copper-deficient copper(I) sulfides.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yixin; Pan, Hongcheng; Lou, Yongbing; Qiu, Xiaofeng; Zhu, JunJie; Burda, Clemens

    2009-04-01

    Cu(2-x)S (x = 1, 0.2, 0.03) nanocrystals were synthesized with three different chemical methods: sonoelectrochemical, hydrothermal, and solventless thermolysis methods in order to compare their common optical and structural properties. The compositions of the Cu(2-x)S nanocrystals were varied from CuS (covellite) to Cu(1.97)S (djurleite) through adjusting the reduction potential in the sonoelectrochemical method, adjusting the pH value in the hydrothermal method and by choosing different precursor pretreatments in the solventless thermolysis approach, respectively. The crystallinity and morphology of the products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which shows that most of them might be of pure stoichiometries but some of them are mixtures. The obtained XRDs were studied in comparison to the XRD patterns of previously reported Cu(2-x)S. We found consistently that under ambient conditions the copper deficient Cu(1.97)S (djurleite) is more stable than Cu(2)S (chalcocite). Corroborated by recent computational studies by Lambrecht et al. and experimental work by Alivisatos et al. This may be the reason behind the traditionally known instability of the bulk Cu(2)S/CdS interface. Both Cu(2)S and the copper-deficient Cu(1.97)S have very similar but distinguishable electronic and crystal structure. The optical properties of these Cu(2-x)S NCs were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy and NIR. All presented Cu(2-x)S NCs show a blue shift in the band gap absorption compared to bulk Cu(2-x)S. Moreover the spectra of these Cu(2-x)S NCs indicate direct band gap character based on their oscillator strengths, different from previously reported experimental results. The NIR spectra of these Cu(2-x)S NCs show a carrier concentration dependent plasmonic absorption. PMID:19267472

  19. Lead isotope compositions of Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary igneous rocks and sulfide minerals in Arizona: Implications for the sources of plutons and metals in porphyry copper deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bouse, R.M.; Ruiz, J.; Titley, S.R.; Tosdal, R.M.; Wooden, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    Porphyry copper deposits in Arizona are genetically associated with Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary igneous complexes that consist of older intermediate volcanic rocks and younger intermediate to felsic intrusions. The igneous complexes and their associated porphyry copper deposits were emplaced into an Early Proterozoic basement characterized by different rocks, geologic histories, and isotopic compositions. Lead isotope compositions of the Proterozoic basement rocks define, from northwest to southeast, the Mojave, central Arizona, and southeastern Arizona provinces. Porphyry copper deposits are present in each Pb isotope province. Lead isotope compositions of Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary plutons, together with those of sulfide minerals in porphyry copper deposits and of Proterozoic country rocks, place important constraints on genesis of the magmatic suites and the porphyry copper deposits themselves. The range of age-corrected Pb isotope compositions of plutons in 12 Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary igneous complexes is 206Pb/204Pb = 17.34 to 22.66, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.43 to 15.96, and 208Pb/204Pb = 37.19 to 40.33. These Pb isotope compositions and calculated model Th/U are similar to those of the Proterozoic rocks in which the plutons were emplaced, thereby indicating that Pb in the younger rocks and ore deposits was inherited from the basement rocks and their sources. No Pb isotope differences distinguish Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary igneous complexes that contain large economic porphyry copper deposits from less rich or smaller deposits that have not been considered economic for mining. Lead isotope compositions of Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary plutons and sulfide minerals from 30 metallic mineral districts, furthermore, require that the southeastern Arizona Pb province be divided into two subprovinces. The northern subprovince has generally lower 206Pb/204Pb and higher model Th/U, and the southern subprovince has higher 206Pb/204Pb and

  20. Study of copper sulfide counter electrode on the performances of CdS/CdSe/ZnS-sensitized hierarchical TiO2 spheres quantum dots solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buatong, Nattha; Tang, I.-Ming; Pon-On, Weeraphat

    2015-07-01

    The effects of using copper sulfide (CuS) counter electrodes on the performances of solar cells made with CdS/CdSe/ZnS quantum dots co-sensitized onto hierarchical TiO2 spheres (HTS) used as photoelectrode is reported. The HTS in the QDSSCs is composed of an assembly of numerous TiO2 spheres made by the solvolthermal method. The photoelectrical performance of HTS/CdS/CdSe/ZnS coupled to CuS counter electrode was compared to those coupled to Pt CE. The HTS/CdS/CdSe/ZnS coupled to the CuS CE showed the highest power conversion efficiency η (of 1.310 %.) which is significantly higher than those using a standard Pt CE (η = 0.374%) (3.50 fold). This higher efficiency is the results of the higher electrocatalytic activities when the copper sulfide CEs is used.

  1. Iron sulfide attenuates the methanogenic toxicity of elemental copper and zinc oxide nanoparticles and their soluble metal ion analogs.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Estrella, Jorge; Gallagher, Sara; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2016-04-01

    Elemental copper (Cu(0)) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticle (NP) toxicity to methanogens has been attributed to the release of soluble metal ions. Iron sulfide (FeS) partially controls the soluble concentration of heavy metals and their toxicity in aquatic environments. Heavy metals displace the Fe from FeS forming poorly soluble metal sulfides in the FeS matrix. Therefore, FeS may be expected to attenuate the NP toxicity. This work assessed FeS as an attenuator of the methanogenic toxicity of Cu(0) and ZnO NPs and their soluble salt analogs. The toxicity attenuation capacity of fine (25-75μm) and coarse (500 to 1200μm) preparations of FeS (FeS-f and FeS-c respectively) was tested in the presence of highly inhibitory concentrations of CuCl2, ZnCl2 Cu(0) and ZnO NPs. FeS-f attenuated methanogenic toxicity better than FeS-c. The results revealed that 2.5× less FeS-f than FeS-c was required to recover the methanogenic activity to 50% (activity normalized to uninhibited controls). The results also indicated that a molar FeS-f/Cu(0) NP, FeS-f/ZnO NP, FeS-f/ZnCl2, and FeS-f/CuCl2 ratio of 2.14, 2.14, 4.28, and 8.56 respectively, was necessary to recover the methanogenic activity to >75%. Displacement experiments demonstrated that CuCl2 and ZnCl2 partially displaced Fe from FeS. As a whole, the results indicate that not all the sulfide in FeS was readily available to react with the soluble Cu and Zn ions which may explain the need for a large stoichiometric excess of FeS to highly attenuate Cu and Zn toxicity. Overall, this study provides evidence that FeS attenuates the toxicity caused by Cu(0) and ZnO NPs and their soluble ion analogs to methanogens.

  2. Magmatic sulfide-rich nickel-copper deposits related to picrite and (or) tholeiitic basalt dike-sill complexes-A preliminary deposit model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulz, Klaus J.; Chandler, Val W.; Nicholson, Suzanne W.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Seal, Robert R., II; Woodruff, Laurel G.; Zientek, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Magmatic sulfide deposits containing nickel (Ni) and copper (Cu), with or without (?) platinum-group elements (PGEs), account for approximately 60 percent of the world's Ni production and are active exploration targets in the United States and elsewhere. On the basis of their principal metal production, magmatic sulfide deposits in mafic rocks can be divided into two major types: those that are sulfide-rich, typically with 10 to 90 percent sulfide minerals, and have economic value primarily because of their Ni and Cu contents; and those that are sulfide-poor, typically with 0.5 to 5 percent sulfide minerals, and are exploited principally for PGE. Because the purpose of this deposit model is to facilitate the assessment for undiscovered, potentially economic magmatic Ni-Cu?PGE sulfide deposits in the United States, it addresses only those deposits of economic significance that are likely to occur in the United States on the basis of known geology. Thus, this model focuses on deposits hosted by small- to medium-sized mafic and (or) ultramafic dikes and sills that are related to picrite and tholeiitic basalt magmatic systems generally emplaced in continental settings as a component of large igneous provinces (LIPs). World-class examples (those containing greater than 1 million tons Ni) of this deposit type include deposits at Noril'sk-Talnakh (Russia), Jinchuan (China), Pechenga (Russia), Voisey's Bay (Canada), and Kabanga (Tanzania). In the United States, this deposit type is represented by the Eagle deposit in northern Michigan, currently under development by Kennecott Minerals.

  3. Facile fabrication of novel porous graphitic carbon nitride/copper sulfide nanocomposites with enhanced visible light driven photocatalytic performance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Li, Huankun; Wu, Yuxin; Wu, Hanshuo; Wu, Laidi; Tan, Pengfei; Pan, Jun; Xiong, Xiang

    2016-08-15

    In this work, a novel organic-inorganic heterostructured photocatalyst: porous graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) hybrid with copper sulfide (CuS) had been synthesized via a precipitation-deposition method at low temperature for the first time. UV-vis spectroscopy revealed the porous g-C3N4/CuS nanocomposites showed a strong and broad visible light absorption. Furthermore, the g-C3N4/CuS nanocomposites showed higher photocatalytic activity in the photodegradation of various organic dyes than that of pure g-C3N4 and CuS, and the selected sample of g-C3N4/CuS-2 exhibited the best photocatalytic activity under visible light. The good photocatalytic activity could be ascribed to the matching of the g-C3N4 and CuS band gap energies. Besides, photoluminescent spectra and photoelectrochemical measurements also proved that the CuS/g-C3N4 could greatly enhance the charge generation and suppress the charge recombination of photogenerated carriers. According to the experimental result, a possible photocatalytic mechanism has been proposed. Due to the high stability, the porous g-C3N4/CuS could be applied in the field of environmental remediation. Our work highlights that coupling semiconductors with well-matched band energies provides a facile way to improve the photocatalytic activity. PMID:27209398

  4. Size-tunable copper nanocluster aggregates and their application in hydrogen sulfide sensing on paper-based devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Po-Cheng; Li, Yu-Chi; Ma, Jia-Yin; Huang, Jia-Yu; Chen, Chien-Fu; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2016-04-01

    Polystyrene sulfonate (PSS), a strong polyelectrolyte, was used to prepare red photoluminescent PSS-penicillamine (PA) copper (Cu) nanoclusters (NC) aggregates, which displayed high selectivity and sensitivity to the detection of hydrogen sulfide (H2S). The size of the PSS-PA-Cu NC aggregates could be readily controlled from 5.5 μm to 173 nm using different concentrations of PSS, which enabled better dispersity and higher sensitivity towards H2S. PSS-PA-Cu NC aggregates provided rapid H2S detection by using the strong Cu-S interaction to quench NC photoluminescence as a sensing mechanism. As a result, a detection limit of 650 nM, which is lower than the maximum level permitted in drinking water by the World Health Organization, was achieved for the analysis of H2S in spring-water samples. Moreover, highly dispersed PSS-PA-Cu NC aggregates could be incorporated into a plate-format paper-based analytical device which enables ultra-low sample volumes (5 μL) and feature shorter analysis times (30 min) compared to conventional solution-based methods. The advantages of low reagent consumption, rapid result readout, limited equipment, and long-term storage make this platform sensitive and simple enough to use without specialized training in resource constrained settings.

  5. Facile fabrication of novel porous graphitic carbon nitride/copper sulfide nanocomposites with enhanced visible light driven photocatalytic performance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Li, Huankun; Wu, Yuxin; Wu, Hanshuo; Wu, Laidi; Tan, Pengfei; Pan, Jun; Xiong, Xiang

    2016-08-15

    In this work, a novel organic-inorganic heterostructured photocatalyst: porous graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) hybrid with copper sulfide (CuS) had been synthesized via a precipitation-deposition method at low temperature for the first time. UV-vis spectroscopy revealed the porous g-C3N4/CuS nanocomposites showed a strong and broad visible light absorption. Furthermore, the g-C3N4/CuS nanocomposites showed higher photocatalytic activity in the photodegradation of various organic dyes than that of pure g-C3N4 and CuS, and the selected sample of g-C3N4/CuS-2 exhibited the best photocatalytic activity under visible light. The good photocatalytic activity could be ascribed to the matching of the g-C3N4 and CuS band gap energies. Besides, photoluminescent spectra and photoelectrochemical measurements also proved that the CuS/g-C3N4 could greatly enhance the charge generation and suppress the charge recombination of photogenerated carriers. According to the experimental result, a possible photocatalytic mechanism has been proposed. Due to the high stability, the porous g-C3N4/CuS could be applied in the field of environmental remediation. Our work highlights that coupling semiconductors with well-matched band energies provides a facile way to improve the photocatalytic activity.

  6. Effect of Copper Sulfide Nanoparticles on the Optical and Electrical Behavior of Poly(vinyl alcohol) Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Omed Gh.; Saleem, Salwan A.

    2016-11-01

    Polymer nanocomposite films based on poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) containing copper sulfide nanoparticles (CuS) were prepared using in situ chemical reduction and casting techniques. The synthesized nanocomposites were analyzed using x-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscope, and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. The XRD pattern reveals that the CuS nanoparticles incorporated in the PVA showed a crystalline nature. The observed FTIR band shifts indicate the intermolecular interaction between the CuS nanoparticles and the PVA matrix. The absorbance of nanocomposite samples increased with increasing CuS concentration. The optical band gap energy was estimated using Tauc's formula and it decreased with increasing dopant concentration. The conductivity and dielectric behavior of the samples were studied over the frequency range of 300 Hz to 1 MHz in the temperature range of 30-110°C. The ac conductivity was found to increase with the increase of dopant concentration as well as frequency. Moreover, the variation of frequency exponent ( s) indicated that the conduction mechanism was the correlated barrier hopping model. The experimental results reveal that the optical and electrical performance of PVA can be enhanced dramatically by the addition of a small amount of CuS nanoparticles. This improved properties of the PVA/CuS nanocomposite suggest uses in optoelectronic devices.

  7. Effect of Copper Sulfide Nanoparticles on the Optical and Electrical Behavior of Poly(vinyl alcohol) Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Omed Gh.; Saleem, Salwan A.

    2016-07-01

    Polymer nanocomposite films based on poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) containing copper sulfide nanoparticles (CuS) were prepared using in situ chemical reduction and casting techniques. The synthesized nanocomposites were analyzed using x-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscope, and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. The XRD pattern reveals that the CuS nanoparticles incorporated in the PVA showed a crystalline nature. The observed FTIR band shifts indicate the intermolecular interaction between the CuS nanoparticles and the PVA matrix. The absorbance of nanocomposite samples increased with increasing CuS concentration. The optical band gap energy was estimated using Tauc's formula and it decreased with increasing dopant concentration. The conductivity and dielectric behavior of the samples were studied over the frequency range of 300 Hz to 1 MHz in the temperature range of 30-110°C. The ac conductivity was found to increase with the increase of dopant concentration as well as frequency. Moreover, the variation of frequency exponent (s) indicated that the conduction mechanism was the correlated barrier hopping model. The experimental results reveal that the optical and electrical performance of PVA can be enhanced dramatically by the addition of a small amount of CuS nanoparticles. This improved properties of the PVA/CuS nanocomposite suggest uses in optoelectronic devices.

  8. Formation of Copper Zinc Tin Sulfide Thin Films from Colloidal Nanocrystal Dispersions via Aerosol-Jet Printing and Compaction.

    PubMed

    Williams, Bryce A; Mahajan, Ankit; Smeaton, Michelle A; Holgate, Collin S; Aydil, Eray S; Francis, Lorraine F

    2015-06-01

    A three-step method to create dense polycrystalline semiconductor thin films from nanocrystal liquid dispersions is described. First, suitable substrates are coated with nanocrystals using aerosol-jet printing. Second, the porous nanocrystal coatings are compacted using a weighted roller or a hydraulic press to increase the coating density. Finally, the resulting coating is annealed for grain growth. The approach is demonstrated for making polycrystalline films of copper zinc tin sulfide (CZTS), a new solar absorber composed of earth-abundant elements. The range of coating morphologies accessible through aerosol-jet printing is examined and their formation mechanisms are revealed. Crack-free albeit porous films are obtained if most of the solvent in the aerosolized dispersion droplets containing the nanocrystals evaporates before they impinge on the substrate. In this case, nanocrystals agglomerate in flight and arrive at the substrate as solid spherical agglomerates. These porous coatings are mechanically compacted, and the density of the coating increases with compaction pressure. Dense coatings annealed in sulfur produce large-grain (>1 μm) polycrystalline CZTS films with microstructure suitable for thin-film solar cells. PMID:25989610

  9. Size-tunable copper nanocluster aggregates and their application in hydrogen sulfide sensing on paper-based devices

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Po-Cheng; Li, Yu-Chi; Ma, Jia-Yin; Huang, Jia-Yu; Chen, Chien-Fu; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2016-01-01

    Polystyrene sulfonate (PSS), a strong polyelectrolyte, was used to prepare red photoluminescent PSS-penicillamine (PA) copper (Cu) nanoclusters (NC) aggregates, which displayed high selectivity and sensitivity to the detection of hydrogen sulfide (H2S). The size of the PSS-PA-Cu NC aggregates could be readily controlled from 5.5 μm to 173 nm using different concentrations of PSS, which enabled better dispersity and higher sensitivity towards H2S. PSS-PA-Cu NC aggregates provided rapid H2S detection by using the strong Cu-S interaction to quench NC photoluminescence as a sensing mechanism. As a result, a detection limit of 650 nM, which is lower than the maximum level permitted in drinking water by the World Health Organization, was achieved for the analysis of H2S in spring-water samples. Moreover, highly dispersed PSS-PA-Cu NC aggregates could be incorporated into a plate-format paper-based analytical device which enables ultra-low sample volumes (5 μL) and feature shorter analysis times (30 min) compared to conventional solution-based methods. The advantages of low reagent consumption, rapid result readout, limited equipment, and long-term storage make this platform sensitive and simple enough to use without specialized training in resource constrained settings. PMID:27113330

  10. Optical properties of copper oxide thin films as selective sensing principle for hydrogen sulfide detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneer, Janosch; Boxberg, Manuel; Wöllenstein, Jürgen

    2013-05-01

    Semiconducting cuprous (Cu2O) and cupric oxide (CuO) have been subject to intense research efforts, mainly because of the materials' potential for photovoltaic applications and as doping material. In this work, the impact of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) exposure on thin film samples of CuO and Cu2O has been investigated, focusing on alterations in the optical properties. The materials composition was verified using Raman spectroscopy. The samples were exposed to well-defined dosages of H2S and the transmission and reflection characteristics in the expanded UV/Vis regime (350-1100 nm) were recorded. Cu2O films showed an explicit increase in transmissivity for the wavelength region l = 550-900 nm, besides a general decrease in reflectivity of all samples within the considered spectral range. Optical band gaps were determined using Tauc's plotting, revealing a shift in the slope of a2 of CuO after gas exposure. The observed effects can be exploited as sensing effect, which was examined in a thin film total-internal-reflection (TIR) set-up to transiently monitor surface-gas interactions, yielding reproducible changes in response to 20 min exposure to5 ppm H2S.

  11. Changes in the composition of an acid mine drainage microbial community upon successive transfers in medium containing low-grade copper sulfide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Yin, Huaqun; Liang, Yili; Shen, Li; Liu, Yao; Fu, Xian; Baba, Ngom; Zeng, Weimin; Qiu, Guanzhou; Liu, Xueduan

    2011-10-01

    A consortium of microorganisms from acid mine drainage samples was cultured in modified 9 K medium containing low-grade copper sulfide. The culture was maintained for sixty days and then transferred to fresh medium. This process was repeated three more times and a final consortium exhibiting a copper extraction rate of 89.3% was obtained. RFLP and microarrays analysis of 16S rRNA sequences retrieved from the consortia showed that Acidithiobacilluscaldus, Leptospirillumferriphilum, Sulfobacillus sp., Acidiphilium sp., and Sulfolobus spp. were represented in higher numbers in the consortia obtained in the copper-containing medium than in the original consortium. In contrast, a decrease in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Alicyclobacillus sp., Pseudomonas sp., and Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans was observed. The abundance of genes related to sulfur metabolism from At. caldus and Sulfolobus spp., iron oxidation from Leptospirillum sp. and metal resistance from most of the detected microorganisms increased as the consortium was successively transferred into fresh medium. PMID:21862325

  12. Reaction Mechanisms of Metals with Hydrogen Sulfide and Thiols in Model Wine. Part 2: Iron- and Copper-Catalyzed Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kreitman, Gal Y; Danilewicz, John C; Jeffery, David W; Elias, Ryan J

    2016-05-25

    Sulfidic off-odors arising during wine production are frequently removed by Cu(II) fining. In part 1 of this study ( 10.1021/acs.jafc.6b00641 ), the reaction of H2S and thiols with Cu(II) was examined; however, the interaction of iron and copper is also known to play an important synergistic role in mediating non-enzymatic wine oxidation. The interaction of these two metals in the oxidation of H2S and thiols (cysteine, 3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol, and 6-sulfanylhexan-1-ol) was therefore examined under wine-like conditions. H2S and thiols (300 μM) were reacted with Fe(III) (100 or 200 μM) alone and in combination with Cu(II) (25 or 50 μM), and concentrations of H2S and thiols, oxygen, and acetaldehyde were monitored over time. H2S and thiols were shown to be slowly oxidized in the presence of Fe(III) alone and were not bound to Fe(III) under model wine conditions. However, Cu(II) added to model wine containing Fe(III) was quickly reduced by H2S and thiols to form Cu(I) complexes, which then rapidly reduced Fe(III) to Fe(II). Oxidation of Fe(II) in the presence of oxygen regenerated Fe(III) and completed the iron redox cycle. In addition, sulfur-derived oxidation products were observed, and the formation of organic polysulfanes was demonstrated. PMID:27133088

  13. Synthesis of ultrastable copper sulfide nanoclusters via trapping the reaction intermediate: potential anticancer and antibacterial applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Yin; Hua, Xian-Wu; Wu, Fu-Gen; Li, Bolin; Liu, Peidang; Gu, Ning; Wang, Zhifei; Chen, Zhan

    2015-04-01

    Copper-based nanomaterials have broad applications in electronics, catalysts, solar energy conversion, antibiotics, tissue imaging, and photothermal cancer therapy. However, it is challenging to prepare ultrasmall and ultrastable CuS nanoclusters (NCs) at room temperature. In this article, a simple method to synthesize water-soluble, monodispersed CuS NCs is reported based on the strategy of trapping the reaction intermediate using thiol-terminated, alkyl-containing short-chain poly(ethylene glycol)s (HS-(CH2)11-(OCH2CH2)6-OH, abbreviated as MUH). The MUH-coated CuS NCs have superior stability in solutions with varied pH values and are stable in pure water for at least 10 months. The as-prepared CuS NCs were highly toxic to A549 cancer cells at a concentration of higher than 100 μM (9.6 μg/mL), making them be potentially applicable as anticancer drugs via intravenous administration by liposomal encapsulation or by direct intratumoral injection. Besides, for the first time, CuS NCs were used for antibacterial application, and 800 μM (76.8 μg/mL) CuS NCs could completely kill the E. coli cells through damaging the cell walls. Moreover, the NCs synthesized here have strong near-infrared (NIR) absorption and can be used as a candidate reagent for photothermal therapy and photoacoustic imaging. The method of trapping the reaction intermediate for simple and controlled synthesis of nanoclusters is generally applicable and can be widely used to synthesize many metal-based (such as Pt, Pd, Au, and Ag) nanoclusters and nanocrystals.

  14. A comparative study of hollow copper sulfide nanoparticles and hollow gold nanospheres on degradability and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liangran; Panderi, Irene; Yan, Daisy D; Szulak, Kevin; Li, Yajuan; Chen, Yi-Tzai; Ma, Hang; Niesen, Daniel B; Seeram, Navindra; Ahmed, Aftab; Yan, Bingfang; Pantazatos, Dionysios; Lu, Wei

    2013-10-22

    Gold and copper nanoparticles have been widely investigated for photothermal therapy of cancer. However, degradability and toxicity of these nanoparticles remain concerns. Here, we compare hollow CuS nanoparticles (HCuSNPs) with hollow gold nanospheres (HAuNS) in similar particle sizes and morphology following intravenous administration to mice. The injected pegylated HCuSNPs (PEG-HCuSNPs) are eliminated through both hepatobiliary (67 percentage of injected dose, %ID) and renal (23 %ID) excretion within one month postinjection. By contrast, 3.98 %ID of Au is excreted from liver and kidney within one month after iv injection of pegylated HAuNS (PEG-HAuNS). Comparatively, PEG-HAuNS are almost nonmetabolizable, while PEG-HCuSNPs are considered biodegradable nanoparticles. PEG-HCuSNPs do not show significant toxicity by histological or blood chemistry analysis. Principal component analysis and 2-D peak distribution plots of data from matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF IMS) of liver tissues demonstrated a reversible change in the proteomic profile in mice receiving PEG-HCuSNPs. This is attributed to slow dissociation of Cu ion from CuS nanoparticles along with effective Cu elimination for maintaining homeostasis. Nonetheless, an irreversible change in the proteomic profile is observed in the liver from mice receiving PEG-HAuNS by analysis of MALDI-TOF IMS data, probably due to the nonmetabolizability of Au. This finding correlates with the elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase at 3 months after PEG-HAuNS injection, indicating potential long-term toxicity. The comparative results between the two types of nanoparticles will advance the development of HCuSNPs as a new class of biodegradable inorganic nanomaterials for photothermal therapy.

  15. Growth and Characterization of the p-type Semiconductors Tin Sulfide and Bismuth Copper Oxy Selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Jason

    BiCuOSe and SnS are layered, moderate band gap (epsilon G ≈ 1 eV) semiconductors that exhibit intrinsic p type conductivity. Doping of BiCuOSe with Ca results in a slight expansion of the lattice and an increase of the hole concentration from 10 18 cm--3 to greater than 1020 cm --3. The large carrier density in undoped films is the result of copper vacancies. Mobility is unaffected by doping, remaining constant at 1.5 cm2V--1s--1 in both undoped and doped films, because the Bi-O layers serve as the source of carriers, while transport occurs within the Cu-Se layers. Bi possesses a 6s2 lone pair that was expected to hybridize with the oxygen p states at the top of the valence band, resulting in high hole mobility as compared to similar materials such as LaCuOSe, which lack this lone pair. However, both LaCuOSe and BiCuOSe have similar hole mobility. X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy, combined with density functional theory calculations, reveal that the Bi 6 s states contribute deep within the valence band, forming bonding and anti-bonding states with O 2p at 11 eV and 3 eV below the valence band maximum, respectively. Hence, the Bi lone pair does not contribute at the top of the valence band and does not enhance the hole mobility. The Bi 6p states contribute at the bottom of the conduction band, resulting in a smaller band gap for BiCuOSe than LaCuOSe (1 eV vs. 3 eV). SnS is a potential photovoltaic absorber composed of weakly coupled layers stacked along the long axis. This weak coupling results in the formation of strongly oriented films on amorphous substrates. The optical band gap is 1.2 eV, in agreement with GW calculations. Absorption reaches 105 cm--1 within 0.5 eV of the band gap. The p type conduction arises from energetically favorable tin vacancies. Variation of growth conditions yields carrier densities of 1014 -- 1016 cm--3 and hole mobility of 7 -- 15 cm2V--1s--1. SnS was alloyed with rocksalt CaS, which was predicted to form a rocksalt

  16. Study of the Susceptibility of Oxygen-Free Phosphorous Doped Copper to Corrosion in Simulated Groundwater in the Presence of Chloride and Sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Escobar, Ivan; Lamas, Claudia; Werme, Lars |; Oversby, Virginia

    2007-07-01

    Oxygen free high conductivity copper, doped with phosphorus (Cu OFP) has been chosen as the material for the fabrication of high level nuclear waste containers in Sweden. This material will be the corrosion barrier for spent fuel in the environment of a deep geological repository in granitic rock. The service life of this container is expected to exceed 1,000,000 years. During this time, which includes several glaciations, water of different compositions, including high concentration of chloride ions, will contact the copper surface. This work reports a study of the susceptibility of Cu OFP to corrosion when chloride ions are present, in deionized water (DW) and in synthetic groundwater (SGW). The techniques used were electrochemical methods such as corrosion potential evolution and Tafel curves. The system was studied with Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). We also used as characterization techniques Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). The main conclusions are that copper is more susceptible to corrosion at high chloride ion concentration. When the chloride concentration is low, it is possible to form copper chloride crystals, but at the highest concentration, copper chloride complexes are formed, leaving the copper surface without deposits. When the chloride concentration is low (<0.1 M) the corrosion process is mainly controlled by diffusion, while at higher concentrations (0.1 M to 1 M) corrosion is controlled by charge transfer processes. At low concentration of sulfide (<3 . 10{sup -5} M), copper corrosion in the presence of chloride is controlled by diffusional processes, while at higher concentrations corrosion is controlled by charge transfer processes. (authors)

  17. Petrography, sulfide mineral chemistry, and sulfur isotope evidence for a hydrothermal imprint on Musina copper deposits, Limpopo Province, South Africa: Evidence for a breccia pipe origin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaumba, Jeff B.; Mundalamo, Humbulani R.; Ogola, Jason S.; Cox, J. A.; Fleisher, C. J.

    2016-08-01

    The Musina copper deposits are located in the Central Zone of the Limpopo orogenic belt in Limpopo Province, South Africa. We carried out a petrographic, sulfide composition, and δ34S study on samples from Artonvilla and Campbell copper deposits and a country rock granitic gneiss to Artonvilla Mine to place some constrains on the origin of these deposits. The assemblages at both Artonvilla and Campbell Mines of brecciated quartz, potassium feldspar, muscovite, chlorite, calcite, and amphibole are consistent with sericitic alteration. Quartz, amphibole, feldspars, and micas often display angular textures which are consistent with breccias. Sulfur concentrations in pyrite from Artonvilla Mine plot in a narrow range, from 50.2 wt. % to 55.7 wt. %. With the exception of a positive correlation between Fe and Cu, no well defined correlations are shown by data from the Musina copper deposits. The occurrence of sulfides both as inclusions in, or as interstitial phases in silicates, suggests that hydrothermal alteration that affected these deposits most likely helped concentrate the mineralization at the Musina copper deposits. Sulfur concentrations in chalcopyrite samples investigated vary widely whereas the copper concentrations in chalcopyrite are not unusually higher compared to those from chalcopyrite from other tectonic settings, probably indicating that either the Cu in the Musina copper deposits occurs in native form, and/or that it is hosted by other phases. This observation lends support to the Cu having been concentrated during a later hydrothermal event. One sample from Artonvilla Mine (AtCal01) yielded pyrite δ34S values of 3.1and 3.6‰ and chalcopyrite from the same sample yielded a value of 3.9‰. A country rock granitic gneiss to Artonvilla Mine yielded a δ34Spyrite value of 8.2‰. For Campbell Mine samples, one quartz vein sample has a δ34Spyrite value of 0.5‰ whereas chalcopyrite samples drilled from different areas within the same sample yielded

  18. Petrography, sulfide mineral chemistry, and sulfur isotope evidence for a hydrothermal imprint on Musina copper deposits, Limpopo Province, South Africa: Evidence for a breccia pipe origin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaumba, Jeff B.; Mundalamo, Humbulani R.; Ogola, Jason S.; Cox, J. A.; Fleisher, C. J.

    2016-08-01

    The Musina copper deposits are located in the Central Zone of the Limpopo orogenic belt in Limpopo Province, South Africa. We carried out a petrographic, sulfide composition, and δ34S study on samples from Artonvilla and Campbell copper deposits and a country rock granitic gneiss to Artonvilla Mine to place some constrains on the origin of these deposits. The assemblages at both Artonvilla and Campbell Mines of brecciated quartz, potassium feldspar, muscovite, chlorite, calcite, and amphibole are consistent with sericitic alteration. Quartz, amphibole, feldspars, and micas often display angular textures which are consistent with breccias. Sulfur concentrations in pyrite from Artonvilla Mine plot in a narrow range, from 50.2 wt. % to 55.7 wt. %. With the exception of a positive correlation between Fe and Cu, no well defined correlations are shown by data from the Musina copper deposits. The occurrence of sulfides both as inclusions in, or as interstitial phases in silicates, suggests that hydrothermal alteration that affected these deposits most likely helped concentrate the mineralization at the Musina copper deposits. Sulfur concentrations in chalcopyrite samples investigated vary widely whereas the copper concentrations in chalcopyrite are not unusually higher compared to those from chalcopyrite from other tectonic settings, probably indicating that either the Cu in the Musina copper deposits occurs in native form, and/or that it is hosted by other phases. This observation lends support to the Cu having been concentrated during a later hydrothermal event. One sample from Artonvilla Mine (AtCal01) yielded pyrite δ34S values of 3.1and 3.6‰ and chalcopyrite from the same sample yielded a value of 3.9‰. A country rock granitic gneiss to Artonvilla Mine yielded a δ34Spyrite value of 8.2‰. For Campbell Mine samples, one quartz vein sample has a δ34Spyrite value of 0.5‰ whereas chalcopyrite samples drilled from different areas within the same sample

  19. Effect of inorganic sulfide and bacteria microfouling on corrosion of 70/30 copper/nickel alloy in seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Shalaby, H.M.; Hasan, A.A.; Al-Sabti, F.

    1998-12-31

    A laboratory investigation was carried out on the effect of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and 1 ppm inorganic sulfide on the corrosion behavior of 70/30 Cu-Ni alloy in seawater. Potential/time and linear polarization measurements showed that the presence of SRB makes the corrosion potential more active and increases the corrosion rate. On the other hand, the addition of sulfide caused significant ennoblement in the corrosion potential which was associated with a small decrease in the corrosion rate. SRB had a pronounced effect on the potentiodynamic polarization through shifting the corrosion potential to a more active value and eliminating the active/passive transition. However, the active/passive transition peak was retained when sulfide was added to seawater inoculated with bacteria. With the increase in exposure time to seawater inoculated with SRB, the impedance and phase angle peak decreased. In presence of 1 ppm sulfide, the impedance increased in the high frequency region and the frequency dependence of the phase angle showed two time constants. SEM examinations revealed the formation of a patchy layer of bacterial biofilm and corrosion products during exposure to SRB-containing seawater. The formation of this layer was associated with depletion of nickel from the alloy. In the presence of inorganic sulfide, micropits and intergranular attack were seen within crevices in an adherent corrosion product layer.

  20. Electrical and thermal transports of binary copper sulfides CuxS with x from 1.8 to 1.96

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Pengfei; Zhu, Yaqin; Qin, Yuting; Shi, Xun; Chen, Lidong

    2016-10-01

    In this study, a series of copper sulfides CuxS with x spanning from 1.8 to 1.96 was prepared and their crystal structures, elemental valence states, and thermoelectric properties were systematically studied. The valence state of Cu in CuxS is unchanged as the ratio of Cu/S varies, while the thermoelectric properties are very sensitive to the deficiency of Cu. In addition, the type of sulfur arrangement in the crystal structure also plays an important role on the electrical transports. Finally, the optimum Cu/S atomic ratios in the binary CuxS system were identified for high power factor and thermoelectric figure of merit.

  1. Removal of copper from ferrous scrap

    DOEpatents

    Blander, Milton; Sinha, Shome N.

    1990-01-01

    A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

  2. Removal of copper from ferrous scrap

    DOEpatents

    Blander, M.; Sinha, S.N.

    1990-05-15

    A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

  3. Removal of copper from ferrous scrap

    DOEpatents

    Blander, M.; Sinha, S.N.

    1987-07-30

    A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

  4. Facile room-temperature synthesis of carboxylated graphene oxide-copper sulfide nanocomposite with high photodegradation and disinfection activities under solar light irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shuyan; Liu, Jincheng; Zhu, Wenyu; Hu, Zhong-Ting; Lim, Teik-Thye; Yan, Xiaoli

    2015-11-01

    Carboxylic acid functionalized graphene oxide-copper (II) sulfide nanoparticle composite (GO-COOH-CuS) was prepared from carboxylated graphene oxide and copper precursor in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) by a facile synthesis process at room temperature. The high-effective combination, the interaction between GO-COOH sheets and CuS nanoparticles, and the enhanced visible light absorption were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS) and Photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The as-synthesized GO-COOH-CuS nanocomposite exhibited excellent photocatalytic degradation performance of phenol and rhodamine B, high antibacterial activity toward E. coli and B. subtilis, and good recovery and reusability. The influence of CuS content, the synergistic reaction between CuS and GO-COOH, and the charge-transfer mechanism were systematically investigated. The facile and low-energy synthesis process combined with the excellent degradation and antibacterial performance signify that the GO-COOH-CuS has a great potential for water treatment application.

  5. Facile room-temperature synthesis of carboxylated graphene oxide-copper sulfide nanocomposite with high photodegradation and disinfection activities under solar light irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shuyan; Liu, Jincheng; Zhu, Wenyu; Hu, Zhong-Ting; Lim, Teik-Thye; Yan, Xiaoli

    2015-01-01

    Carboxylic acid functionalized graphene oxide-copper (II) sulfide nanoparticle composite (GO-COOH-CuS) was prepared from carboxylated graphene oxide and copper precursor in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) by a facile synthesis process at room temperature. The high-effective combination, the interaction between GO-COOH sheets and CuS nanoparticles, and the enhanced visible light absorption were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS) and Photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The as-synthesized GO-COOH-CuS nanocomposite exhibited excellent photocatalytic degradation performance of phenol and rhodamine B, high antibacterial activity toward E. coli and B. subtilis, and good recovery and reusability. The influence of CuS content, the synergistic reaction between CuS and GO-COOH, and the charge-transfer mechanism were systematically investigated. The facile and low-energy synthesis process combined with the excellent degradation and antibacterial performance signify that the GO-COOH-CuS has a great potential for water treatment application. PMID:26553709

  6. Sulfide oxidation and distribution of metals near abandoned copper mines in coastal environments, Prince William Sound, Alaska, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koski, R.A.; Munk, L.; Foster, A.L.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Stillings, L.L.

    2008-01-01

    The oxidation of sulfide-rich rocks, mostly leftover debris from Cu mining in the early 20th century, is contributing to metal contamination of local coastal environments in Prince William Sound, Alaska. Analyses of sulfide, water, sediment, precipitate and biological samples from the Beatson, Ellamar, and Threeman mine sites show that acidic surface waters generated from sulfide weathering are pathways for redistribution of environmentally important elements into and beyond the intertidal zone at each site. Volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits composed of pyrrhotite and (or) pyrite + chalcopyrite + sphalerite with subordinate galena, arsenopyrite, and cobaltite represent potent sources of Cu, Zn, Pb, As, Co, Cd, and Hg. The resistance to oxidation among the major sulfides increases in the order pyrrhotite ??? sphalerite < chalcopyrite ??? pyrite; thus, pyrrhotite-rich rocks are typically more oxidized than those dominated by pyrite. The pervasive alteration of pyrrhotite begins with rim replacement by marcasite followed by replacement of the core by sulfur, Fe sulfate, and Fe-Al sulfate. The oxidation of chalcopyrite and pyrite involves an encroachment by colloform Fe oxyhydroxides at grain margins and along crosscutting cracks that gradually consumes the entire grain. The complete oxidation of sulfide-rich samples results in a porous aggregate of goethite, lepidocrocite and amorphous Fe-oxyhydroxide enclosing hydrothermal and sedimentary silicates. An inverse correlation between pH and metal concentrations is evident in water data from all three sites. Among all waters sampled, pore waters from Ellamar beach gravels have the lowest pH (???3) and highest concentrations of base metals (to ???25,000 ??g/L), which result from oxidation of abundant sulfide-rich debris in the sediment. High levels of dissolved Hg (to 4100 ng/L) in the pore waters probably result from oxidation of sphalerite-rich rocks. The low-pH and high concentrations of dissolved Fe, Al, and SO4

  7. Synthesis and Characterization of bis[(2-ethyl-5-methyl-imidazo-4-yl)methyl]Sulfide and Its Coordination Behavior toward Cu(II) as a Possible Approach of a Copper Site Type I

    PubMed Central

    Barrón-Garcés, Juan D.; Mendoza-Díaz, Guillermo; Vilchez-Aguado, Florina; Bernès, Sylvain

    2009-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of a novel ligand, bis[(2-ethyl-5-methyl-imidazo-4-yl)methyl]sulfide (bemims), as well as a bemims-containing copper(II) coordination complex are described. In this complex, [Cu(bemims)X2] with X = NO3−, bemims acts as a tridentate ligand and two monodentate nitrate ions complete the coordination sphere. Both imidazole N atoms and the thioether S atom of bemims participate in coordination. The Cu(II) ion is five-coordinated with a slightly distorted square-pyramidal geometry (τ = .09). Electrochemical studies and spectroscopic data for this complex are compared with some blue copper proteins in order to assess its ability to mimic the copper center of type I copper proteins. PMID:19587830

  8. Photocatalytic Activities of Copper Doped Cadmium Sulfide Microspheres Prepared by a Facile Ultrasonic Spray-Pyrolysis Method.

    PubMed

    Su, Jinzhan; Zhang, Tao; Li, Yufeng; Chen, Yubin; Liu, Maochang

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonic spray pyrolysis is a superior method for preparing and synthesizing spherical particles of metal oxide or sulfide semiconductors. Cadmium sulfide (CdS) photocatalysts with different sizes and doped-CdS with different dopants and doping levels have been synthesized to study their properties of photocatalytic hydrogen production from water. The CdS photocatalysts were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray fluorescence-spectrometry (XRF), UV-Vis absorption spectra and X-ray diffraction (XRD) to study their morphological and optical properties. The sizes of the prepared CdS particles were found to be proportional to the concentration of the metal nitrates in the solution. The CdS photocatalyst with smaller size showed a better photocatalytic activity. In addition, Cu doped CdS were also deposited and their photocatalytic activities were also investigated. Decreased bandgaps of CdS synthesized with this method were found and could be due to high density surface defects originated from Cd vacancies. Incorporating the Cu elements increased the bandgap by taking the position of Cd vacancies and reducing the surface defect states. The optimal Cu-doped level was found to be 0.5 mol % toward hydrogen evolution from aqueous media in the presence of sacrificial electron donors (Na₂S and Na₂SO₃) at a pH of 13.2. This study demonstrated that ultrasonic spray pyrolysis is a feasible approach for large-scale photocatalyst synthesis and corresponding doping modification. PMID:27314320

  9. Demonstration of EIC's copper sulfate process for removal of hydrogen sulfide and other trace contaminants from geothermal steam at turbine inlet temperatures and pressures. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The results obtained during the operation of an integrated, one-tenth commercial scale pilot plant using EIC's copper sulfate process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide and other contaminants from geothermal steam at turbine upstream conditions are discussed. The tests took place over a six month period at Pacific Gas and Electric Company's Unit No. 7 at The Geysers Power Plant. These tests were the final phase of a development effort which included the laboratory research and engineering design work which led to the design of the pilot plant. Broadly, the objectives of operating the pilot plant were to confirm the preliminary design criteria which had been developed, and provide data for their revisions, if appropriate, in a plant which contained all the elements of a commercial process using equipment of a size sufficient to provide valid scale-up data. The test campaign was carried out in four phases: water testing; open circuit, i.e., non integrated scrubbing, liquid-solid separation and regeneration testing; closed circuit short term; and closed circuit long term testing.

  10. One-step fabrication of copper sulfide nanoparticles decorated on graphene sheets as highly stable and efficient counter electrode for CdS-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessein, Amr; Wang, Feiju; Masai, Hirokazu; Matsuda, Kazunari; Abd El-Moneim, Ahmed

    2016-11-01

    Quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) are thin-film photovoltaics and highly promising as next-generation solar cells owing to their high theoretical efficiency, easy fabrication process, and low production cost. However, the practical photoconversion efficiencies (PCEs) of QDSSCs are still far below the theoretically estimated value owing to the lack of an applicable design of the materials and electrodes. In this work, we developed a highly stable and efficient counter electrode (CE) from copper sulfide nanocrystals and reduced graphene oxide (Cu x S@RGO) for QDSSC applications. The Cu x S@RGO electrocatalyst was successfully prepared by a facile one-pot hydrothermal method, then directly applied to a fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO)-coated glass substrate by the simple drop-casting technique. Owing to the synergistic effect between Cu x S nanocrystals and conductive RGO sheets, the Cu x S@RGO CE showed high electrocatalytic activity for polysulfide electrolyte reduction. A CdS QDSSC based on the Cu x S@RGO CE yielded a high and reproducible PCE of 2.36%, exceeding those of 1.57 and 1.33% obtained with the commonly used Cu2S/brass and Pt CEs, respectively. Moreover, the QDSSC with the Cu x S@RGO CE showed excellent photostability in a light-soaking test without any obvious decay in the photocurrent, whereas the cell based on the Cu2S/brass CE was severely degraded.

  11. An efficient dual-loaded multifunctional nanocarrier for combined photothermal and photodynamic therapy based on copper sulfide and chlorin e6.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaoxiao; Pang, Xiaojuan; Lei, Mingzhu; Ma, Man; Guo, Fang; Wang, Jinping; Yu, Meng; Tan, Fengping; Li, Nan

    2016-04-30

    The therapeutic effectiveness of photodynamic therapy (PDT) was hampered by the poor water solubility and instability in physiological conditions of the photosensitizers. Here, we designed folate conjugated thermosensitive liposomes (TSL) as the nanocarrier to improve the solubility, stability and biocompatibility of photosensitizer Chlorin e6 (Ce6). Based on the photothermal effect, we combined copper sulfide (CuS) as the photothermal agent to realize heat-triggered Ce6 release as well as synergistic effect of photothermal and photodynamic therapy. In vitro MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay showed that Ce6-CuS-TSL had low dark toxicity, while performed excellent phototoxicity under the combined 660 and 808 nm laser irradiation compared to any single laser irradiation alone. Moreover, in vivo combination therapy study revealed that Ce6-CuS-TSL inhibited tumor growth to a great extent without evident side effect under the laser irradiation. All detailed evidence demonstrated a considerable potential of Ce6-CuS-TSL for synergistic cancer treatment. PMID:26988376

  12. High color rendering index white light emitting diodes fabricated from a combination of carbon dots and zinc copper indium sulfide quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chun; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Yu; Liu, Wenyan; Kalytchuk, Sergii; Kershaw, Stephen V.; Zhang, Tieqiang; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Zhao, Jun; Yu, William W.; Rogach, Andrey L.

    2014-06-01

    In a line with most recent trends in developing non-toxic fluorescent nanomaterials, we combined blue emissive carbon dots with green and red emissive zinc copper indium sulfide (ZCIS) core/shell quantum dots (QDs) to achieve white light-emitting diodes (WLEDs) with a high color rendering index of 93. This indicates that ZCIS QDs, with their broad emission bands, can be employed to effectively make up the emission of carbon dots in the yellow and red regions to produce WLEDs in the wide region of color temperature by tuning the volume ratio of these constituting luminophores. Their electroluminescence characteristics including color rendering index, Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) color coordinates, and color temperatures were evaluated as a function of forward current. The CIE-1931 chromaticity coordinates of the as-prepared WLEDs, exhibiting good stability, were slightly shifted from (0.321, 0.312) at 10 mA to (0.351, 0.322) at 30 mA, which was mainly caused by the different thermal quenching coefficients of carbon dots and ZCIS QDs.

  13. One-Pot Synthesis of Copper Sulfide Nanowires/Reduced Graphene Oxide Nanocomposites with Excellent Lithium-Storage Properties as Anode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Feng, Caihong; Zhang, Le; Yang, Menghuan; Song, Xiangyun; Zhao, Hui; Jia, Zhe; Sun, Kening; Liu, Gao

    2015-07-29

    Copper sulfide nanowires/reduced graphene oxide (CuSNWs/rGO) nanocompsites are successfully synthesized via a facile one-pot and template-free solution method in a dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-ethyl glycol (EG) mixed solvent. It is noteworthy that the precursor plays a crucial role in the formation of the nanocomposites structure. SEM, TEM, XRD, IR and Raman spectroscopy are used to investigate the morphological and structural evolution of CuSNWs/rGO nanocomposites. The as-fabricated CuSNWs/rGO nanocompsites show remarkably improved Li-storage performance, excellent cycling stability as well as high-rate capability compared with pristine CuS nanowires. It obtains a reversible capacity of 620 mAh g(-1) at 0.5C (1C = 560 mA g(-1)) after 100 cycles and 320 mAh g(-1) at a high current rate of 4C even after 430 cycles. The excellent lithium storage performance is ascribed to the synergistic effect between CuS nanowires and rGO nanosheets. The as-formed CuSNWs/rGO nanocomposites can effectively accommodate large volume changes, supply a 2D conducting network and trap the polysulfides generated during the conversion reaction of CuS. PMID:26135049

  14. High color rendering index white light emitting diodes fabricated from a combination of carbon dots and zinc copper indium sulfide quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Chun; Liu, Wenyan; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Yu E-mail: wyu6000@gmail.com; Wang, Yu; Kalytchuk, Sergii; Kershaw, Stephen V.; Rogach, Andrey L.; Zhang, Tieqiang; Zhao, Jun; Yu, William W. E-mail: wyu6000@gmail.com

    2014-06-30

    In a line with most recent trends in developing non-toxic fluorescent nanomaterials, we combined blue emissive carbon dots with green and red emissive zinc copper indium sulfide (ZCIS) core/shell quantum dots (QDs) to achieve white light-emitting diodes (WLEDs) with a high color rendering index of 93. This indicates that ZCIS QDs, with their broad emission bands, can be employed to effectively make up the emission of carbon dots in the yellow and red regions to produce WLEDs in the wide region of color temperature by tuning the volume ratio of these constituting luminophores. Their electroluminescence characteristics including color rendering index, Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) color coordinates, and color temperatures were evaluated as a function of forward current. The CIE-1931 chromaticity coordinates of the as-prepared WLEDs, exhibiting good stability, were slightly shifted from (0.321, 0.312) at 10 mA to (0.351, 0.322) at 30 mA, which was mainly caused by the different thermal quenching coefficients of carbon dots and ZCIS QDs.

  15. One-Pot Synthesis of Copper Sulfide Nanowires/Reduced Graphene Oxide Nanocomposites with Excellent Lithium-Storage Properties as Anode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Feng, Caihong; Zhang, Le; Yang, Menghuan; Song, Xiangyun; Zhao, Hui; Jia, Zhe; Sun, Kening; Liu, Gao

    2015-07-29

    Copper sulfide nanowires/reduced graphene oxide (CuSNWs/rGO) nanocompsites are successfully synthesized via a facile one-pot and template-free solution method in a dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-ethyl glycol (EG) mixed solvent. It is noteworthy that the precursor plays a crucial role in the formation of the nanocomposites structure. SEM, TEM, XRD, IR and Raman spectroscopy are used to investigate the morphological and structural evolution of CuSNWs/rGO nanocomposites. The as-fabricated CuSNWs/rGO nanocompsites show remarkably improved Li-storage performance, excellent cycling stability as well as high-rate capability compared with pristine CuS nanowires. It obtains a reversible capacity of 620 mAh g(-1) at 0.5C (1C = 560 mA g(-1)) after 100 cycles and 320 mAh g(-1) at a high current rate of 4C even after 430 cycles. The excellent lithium storage performance is ascribed to the synergistic effect between CuS nanowires and rGO nanosheets. The as-formed CuSNWs/rGO nanocomposites can effectively accommodate large volume changes, supply a 2D conducting network and trap the polysulfides generated during the conversion reaction of CuS.

  16. 21 CFR 73.2995 - Luminescent zinc sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Luminescent zinc sulfide. 73.2995 Section 73.2995... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2995 Luminescent zinc sulfide. (a) Identity. The color additive luminescent zinc sulfide is zinc sulfide containing a copper activator....

  17. 21 CFR 73.2995 - Luminescent zinc sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Luminescent zinc sulfide. 73.2995 Section 73.2995... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2995 Luminescent zinc sulfide. (a) Identity. The color additive luminescent zinc sulfide is zinc sulfide containing a copper activator....

  18. 21 CFR 73.2995 - Luminescent zinc sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Luminescent zinc sulfide. 73.2995 Section 73.2995... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2995 Luminescent zinc sulfide. (a) Identity. The color additive luminescent zinc sulfide is zinc sulfide containing a copper activator....

  19. 21 CFR 73.2995 - Luminescent zinc sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Luminescent zinc sulfide. 73.2995 Section 73.2995... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2995 Luminescent zinc sulfide. (a) Identity. The color additive luminescent zinc sulfide is zinc sulfide containing a copper activator....

  20. Copper

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Copper ; CASRN 7440 - 50 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects )

  1. Simultaneous ultrasound-assisted ternary adsorption of dyes onto copper-doped zinc sulfide nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon: Optimization by response surface methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asfaram, Arash; Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Hajati, Shaaker; Goudarzi, Alireza; Bazrafshan, Ali Akbar

    2015-06-01

    The simultaneous and competitive ultrasound-assisted removal of Auramine-O (AO), Erythrosine (Er) and Methylene Blue (MB) from aqueous solutions were rapidly performed onto copper-doped zinc sulfide nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon (ZnS:Cu-NP-AC). ZnS:Cu nanoparticles were studied by FESEM, XRD and TEM. First, the effect of pH was optimized in a one-at-a-time procedure. Then the dependency of dyes removal percentage in their ternary solution on the level and magnitude of variables such as sonication time, initial dyes concentrations and adsorbent dosage was fully investigated and optimized by central composite design (CCD) under response surface methodology (RSM) as well as by regarding desirability function (DF) as a good and general criterion. The good agreement found between experimental and predicted values supports and confirms the suitability of the present model to predict adsorption state. The applied ultrasound strongly enhanced mass transfer process and subsequently performance. Hence, a small amount of the adsorbent (0.04 g) was capable to remove high percentage of dyes, i.e. 100%, 99.6% and 100% for MB, AO and Er, respectively, in very short time (2.5 min). The experimental equilibrium data fitting to Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich models showed that the Langmuir model applies well for the evaluation and description of the actual behavior of adsorption. The small amount of proposed adsorbent (0.015 g) was applicable for successful removal of dyes (RE > 99.0%) in short time (2.5 min) with high adsorption capacity in single component system (123.5 mg g-1 for MB, 123 mg g-1 for AO and 84.5 mg g-1 for Er). Kinetics evaluation of experiments at various time intervals reveals that adsorption processes can be well predicated and fitted by pseudo-second-order and Elovich models.

  2. Observation of compositional domains within individual copper indium sulfide quantum dots† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/C6NR03269A Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Harvie, Andrew J.; Booth, Matthew; Chantry, Ruth L.; Hondow, Nicole; Kepaptsoglou, Demie M.; Ramasse, Quentin M.; Evans, Stephen D.

    2016-01-01

    The origin of photoluminescence in copper indium sulfide (CIS) quantum dots (Qdots) has previously been ascribed to a donor–acceptor pair (DAP) recombination, with a crystal lattice defect implicated as the origin of the donor state. In this study, electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) was used to observe defect-rich compositional domains within individual CIS Qdots, supporting a model of defect-state-mediated photoluminescence for these particles, and identifying them as an ideal model system for future study of lattice defects on Qdot properties. PMID:27465708

  3. Structural, optical and charge generation properties of chalcostibite and tetrahedrite copper antimony sulfide thin films prepared from metal xanthates† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Chemical structures of the used metal xanthates, additional XRD, SEM-EDX and UV-vis data. See DOI: 10.1039/c5ta05777a Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    MacLachlan, Andrew J.; Brown, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report on a solution based approach for the preparation of thin films of copper antimony sulfide, an emerging absorber material for third generation solar cells. In this work, copper and antimony xanthates are used as precursor materials for the formation of two different copper antimony sulfide phases: chalcostibite (CuSbS2) and tetrahedrite (Cu12Sb4S13). Both phases were thoroughly investigated regarding their structural and optical properties. Moreover, thin films of chalcostibite and tetrahedrite were prepared on mesoporous TiO2 layers and photoinduced charge transfer in these metal sulfide/TiO2 heterojunctions was studied via transient absorption spectroscopy. Photoinduced charge transfer was detected in both the chalcostibite as well as the tetrahedrite sample, which is an essential property in view of applying these materials as light-harvesting agents in semiconductor sensitized solar cells. PMID:27019713

  4. Nanostructured metal sulfides for energy storage.

    PubMed

    Rui, Xianhong; Tan, Huiteng; Yan, Qingyu

    2014-09-01

    Advanced electrodes with a high energy density at high power are urgently needed for high-performance energy storage devices, including lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and supercapacitors (SCs), to fulfil the requirements of future electrochemical power sources for applications such as in hybrid electric/plug-in-hybrid (HEV/PHEV) vehicles. Metal sulfides with unique physical and chemical properties, as well as high specific capacity/capacitance, which are typically multiple times higher than that of the carbon/graphite-based materials, are currently studied as promising electrode materials. However, the implementation of these sulfide electrodes in practical applications is hindered by their inferior rate performance and cycling stability. Nanostructures offering the advantages of high surface-to-volume ratios, favourable transport properties, and high freedom for the volume change upon ion insertion/extraction and other reactions, present an opportunity to build next-generation LIBs and SCs. Thus, the development of novel concepts in material research to achieve new nanostructures paves the way for improved electrochemical performance. Herein, we summarize recent advances in nanostructured metal sulfides, such as iron sulfides, copper sulfides, cobalt sulfides, nickel sulfides, manganese sulfides, molybdenum sulfides, tin sulfides, with zero-, one-, two-, and three-dimensional morphologies for LIB and SC applications. In addition, the recently emerged concept of incorporating conductive matrices, especially graphene, with metal sulfide nanomaterials will also be highlighted. Finally, some remarks are made on the challenges and perspectives for the future development of metal sulfide-based LIB and SC devices. PMID:25073046

  5. Nanostructured metal sulfides for energy storage.

    PubMed

    Rui, Xianhong; Tan, Huiteng; Yan, Qingyu

    2014-09-01

    Advanced electrodes with a high energy density at high power are urgently needed for high-performance energy storage devices, including lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and supercapacitors (SCs), to fulfil the requirements of future electrochemical power sources for applications such as in hybrid electric/plug-in-hybrid (HEV/PHEV) vehicles. Metal sulfides with unique physical and chemical properties, as well as high specific capacity/capacitance, which are typically multiple times higher than that of the carbon/graphite-based materials, are currently studied as promising electrode materials. However, the implementation of these sulfide electrodes in practical applications is hindered by their inferior rate performance and cycling stability. Nanostructures offering the advantages of high surface-to-volume ratios, favourable transport properties, and high freedom for the volume change upon ion insertion/extraction and other reactions, present an opportunity to build next-generation LIBs and SCs. Thus, the development of novel concepts in material research to achieve new nanostructures paves the way for improved electrochemical performance. Herein, we summarize recent advances in nanostructured metal sulfides, such as iron sulfides, copper sulfides, cobalt sulfides, nickel sulfides, manganese sulfides, molybdenum sulfides, tin sulfides, with zero-, one-, two-, and three-dimensional morphologies for LIB and SC applications. In addition, the recently emerged concept of incorporating conductive matrices, especially graphene, with metal sulfide nanomaterials will also be highlighted. Finally, some remarks are made on the challenges and perspectives for the future development of metal sulfide-based LIB and SC devices.

  6. Nanostructured metal sulfides for energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rui, Xianhong; Tan, Huiteng; Yan, Qingyu

    2014-08-01

    Advanced electrodes with a high energy density at high power are urgently needed for high-performance energy storage devices, including lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and supercapacitors (SCs), to fulfil the requirements of future electrochemical power sources for applications such as in hybrid electric/plug-in-hybrid (HEV/PHEV) vehicles. Metal sulfides with unique physical and chemical properties, as well as high specific capacity/capacitance, which are typically multiple times higher than that of the carbon/graphite-based materials, are currently studied as promising electrode materials. However, the implementation of these sulfide electrodes in practical applications is hindered by their inferior rate performance and cycling stability. Nanostructures offering the advantages of high surface-to-volume ratios, favourable transport properties, and high freedom for the volume change upon ion insertion/extraction and other reactions, present an opportunity to build next-generation LIBs and SCs. Thus, the development of novel concepts in material research to achieve new nanostructures paves the way for improved electrochemical performance. Herein, we summarize recent advances in nanostructured metal sulfides, such as iron sulfides, copper sulfides, cobalt sulfides, nickel sulfides, manganese sulfides, molybdenum sulfides, tin sulfides, with zero-, one-, two-, and three-dimensional morphologies for LIB and SC applications. In addition, the recently emerged concept of incorporating conductive matrices, especially graphene, with metal sulfide nanomaterials will also be highlighted. Finally, some remarks are made on the challenges and perspectives for the future development of metal sulfide-based LIB and SC devices.

  7. Selenium Sulfide

    MedlinePlus

    Selenium sulfide comes in a lotion and is usually applied as a shampoo. As a shampoo, selenium sulfide usually is used twice a week for the first ... it is irritating. Rinse off all of the lotion.Do not use this medication on children younger ...

  8. Platinum metals magmatic sulfide ores.

    PubMed

    Naldrett, A J; Duke, J M

    1980-06-27

    Platinum-group elements (PGE) are mined predominantly from deposits that have formed by the segregation of molten iron-nickel-copper sulfides from silicate magmas. The absolute concentrations of PGE in sulfides from different deposits vary over a range of five orders of magnitude, whereas those of other chalcophile elements vary by factors of only 2 to 100. However, the relative proportions of the different PGE in a given deposit are systematically related to the nature of the parent magma. The absolute and relative concentrations of PGE in magmatic sulfides are explained in terms of the degree of partial melting of mantle peridotite required to produce the parent magma and the processes of batch equilibration and fractional segregation of sulfides. The Republic of South Africa and the U.S.S.R. together possess more than 97 percent of the world PGE reserves, but significant undeveloped resources occur in North America. The Stillwater complex in Montana is perhaps the most important example.

  9. New Measurements of the Densities of Copper- and Nickel-Sulfide Liquids and Preliminary Estimates of the Partial Molar Volumes of Cu, Ni, S and O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, V. C.; Ghiorso, M. S.

    2001-12-01

    We present the results of density measurements in Ni- and Cu-sulfide liquids. Density measurements were performed in-situ at 1250° C under controlled-atmosphere conditions using the modified single-bob (MSB) Archimedean method. The MSB consists of a ~2 mm diameter rod with a ~6 mm long ~7 mm diameter cylindrical bob attached ~7 mm from the base of the rod. The bob and crucible were constructed from Yt stabilized zirconia to minimize reaction with the corrosive sulfide liquid. Zirconia density at temperature was calibrated against the known density of molten Cu metal (Drotning 1981, High Temp-High Press 13: 441-458). Density was determined by measuring buoyancy as a function of immersed volume. Buoyancy was measured with a 0.1 mg resolution analytical balance interfaced with a computer. The crucible is mounted on a micrometer "elevator" allowing regulation of immersion with .005 mm resolution. Temperature was measured with an S-type thermocouple in contact with the bottom of the crucible. We explored log(fO2) from -8.2 to -12.6 and log(fS2) from -1.9 to -3.3. Five measurements have been made so far. Cu-sulfide densities range from 6.32 to 6.36 g/cc and were reproducible to +/-0.7%. Measured Ni-sulfide densities were lower, ranging from 5.27 to 5.79 g/cc. Wetting problems in Ni-sulfide compositions made these measurements more difficult. Reproducibility in Ni-sulfide melts was roughly +/-5%. Measured density values were used to regress preliminary partial molar volumes of sulfide liquids in the Cu-Ni-S-O system. A linear least squares fit was derived from the five density measurements along with the densities of pure molten Cu (Drotning 1981, ibid.) and Ni (Nasch 1995, Phys Chem Liq 29: 43-58) at 1250° C. Melt compositions under experimental conditions were estimated using the thermodynamic model of Kress (submitted). The molar volume of the system (V) can be expressed as: V = 8.18 XCu + 7.38 XNi + 30.33 XS where XI is the mole fraction of component i. Oxygen

  10. Hydrothermal ore-forming processes in the light of studies in rock- buffered systems: I. Iron-copper-zinc-lead sulfide solubility relations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hemley, J.J.; Cygan, G.L.; Fein, J.B.; Robinson, G.R.; d'Angelo, W. M.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental studies, using cold-seal and extraction vessel techniques, were conducted on Fe, Pb, Zn, and Cu sulfide solubilities in chloride soultions at temperatures from 300?? to 700??C and pressures from 0.5 to 2 kbars. The solutions were buffered in pH by quartz monzonite and the pure potassium feldspar-muscovite-quartz assemblage and in fS2-fO2 largely by the assemblage pyrite-pyrrhotite-magnetite. Solubilities increase with increasing temperature and total chloride, and decrease with increasing pressure. The effect of increasing chloride concentration on solubility reflects primarily a shift to lower pH via the silicate buffer reactions. Similarity in behaviour with respect to the temperature and pressure of Fe, Zn, and Pb sulfide solubilities points to similarity in chloride speciation, and the neutral species appear to be dominant in the high-temperature region. -from Authors

  11. Carbonyl sulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Carbonyl sulfide ; CASRN 463 - 58 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  12. Hydrogen sulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Hydrogen sulfide ; 7783 - 06 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effec

  13. Selenium sulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Selenium sulfide ; CASRN 7446 - 34 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  14. Sulfide smelting using Ausmelt technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mounsey, Edward N.; Robilliard, Ken R.

    1994-08-01

    Over the past decade, Ausmelt has been developing the top submerged lancing process for the smelting of sulfidic ores to recover such metals as copper, lead, silver, tin, antimony, and nickel as well as for separation of minor elements such as arsenic, antimony, and bismuth. Development has taken place in Ausmelt's pilot plant in Dandenong, near Melbourne, Australia. A number of projects have proceeded to commercial-scale operation. This paper reviews developments at both the pilot and commercial scales.

  15. Metallic sulfide additives for positive electrode material within a secondary electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, William J.; McPheeters, Charles C.; Yao, Neng-ping; Koura, Kobuyuki

    1976-01-01

    An improved active material for use within the positive electrode of a secondary electrochemical cell includes a mixture of iron disulfide and a sulfide of a polyvalent metal. Various metal sulfides, particularly sulfides of cobalt, nickel, copper, cerium and manganese, are added in minor weight proportion in respect to iron disulfide for improving the electrode performance and reducing current collector requirements.

  16. Effects of spatial and temporal variation of acid-volatile sulfide on the bioavailability of copper and zinc in freshwater sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Besser, J.M.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Giesy, J.P.

    1996-03-01

    Variation in concentrations of acid-volatile sulfide (AVS) in sediments from the upper Clark Fork River of Montana, USA, was associated with differences in bioaccumulation of Cu and Zn and growth of larvae of the midge, Chironomus tentans. Growth of midge larvae was significantly greater and bioaccumulation of Cu was significantly less in surface sections (0--3 cm depth) of sediment cores, which had greater concentrations of AVS and lesser ratios of simultaneously extracted metals to AVS (SEM:AVS ratios) than in subsurface sediments (6--9 cm). Concentrations of AVS were significantly less in sediments incubated with oxic overlying water for 9 weeks than in the same sediments incubated under anoxic conditions. Bioaccumulation of Cu differed significantly between incubation treatments, corresponding to differences in concentrations of AVS and SEM:AVS ratios, although midge growth did not. Bioaccumulation of Zn did not differ significantly between depth strata of sediment cores or between incubation treatments. When results from the two sets of bioassays were combined, bioaccumulation of Cu and Zn, but not growth, was significantly correlated with SEM:AVS ratios and other estimates of bioavailable metal fractions in sediments. Growth of midge larvae was significantly correlated with bioaccumulation of Zn, but not Cu, suggesting that Zn was the greater contributor to the toxicity of these sediments. Assessments of the toxicity of metal-contaminated freshwater sediments should consider the effects of spatial and temporal variation in AVS concentrations on metal bioavailability.

  17. Scientific communications: Re-Os sulfide (bornite, chalcopyrite, and pyrite) systematics of the carbonate-hosted copper deposits at ruby creek, southern brooks range, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Selby, D.; Kelley, K.D.; Hitzman, M.W.; Zieg, J.

    2009-01-01

    New Re-Os data for chalcopyrite, bornite, and pyrite from the carbonate-hosted Cu deposit at Ruby Creek (Bornite), Alaska, show extremely high Re abundances (hundreds of ppb, low ppm) and contain essentially no common Os. The Re-Os data provide the first absolute ages of ore formation for the carbonate-hosted Ruby Creek Cu-(Co) deposit and demonstrate that the Re-Os systematics of pyrite, chalcopyrite, and bornite are unaffected by greenschist metamorphism. The Re-Os data show that the main phase of Cu mineralization pre dominantly occurred at 384 ?? 4.2 Ma, with an earlier phase possibly at ???400 Ma. The Re-Os data are consistent with the observed paragenetic sequence and coincide with zircon U-Pb ages from igneous rocks within the Ambler metallogenic belt, some of which are spatially and genetically associated with regional volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits. The latter may suggest a temporal link between regional magmatism and hydrothermal mineralization in the Ambler district. The utility of bornite and chalcopyrite, in addition to pyrite, contributes to a new understanding of Re-Os geochronology and permits a refinement of the genetic model for the Ruby Creek deposit. ?? 2009 Society of Economices Geologists, Inc.

  18. Dynamic of active microorganisms inhabiting a bioleaching industrial heap of low‐grade copper sulfide ore monitored by real‐time PCR and oligonucleotide prokaryotic acidophile microarray

    PubMed Central

    Remonsellez, Francisco; Galleguillos, Felipe; Moreno‐Paz, Mercedes; Parro, Víctor; Acosta, Mauricio; Demergasso, Cecilia

    2009-01-01

    Summary The bioleaching of metal sulfide has developed into a very important industrial process and understanding the microbial dynamic is key to advancing commercial bioleaching operations. Here we report the first quantitative description of the dynamic of active communities in an industrial bioleaching heap. Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was the most abundant during the first part of the leaching cycle, while the abundance of Leptospirillum ferriphilum and Ferroplasma acidiphilum increased with age of the heap. Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans kept constant throughout the leaching cycle, and Firmicutes group showed a low and a patchy distribution in the heap. The Acidiphilium‐like bacteria reached their highest abundance corresponding to the amount of autotrophs. The active microorganisms in the leaching system were determined using two RNA‐based sensitive techniques. In most cases, the 16S rRNA copy numbers of At. ferrooxidans, L. ferriphilum, At. thiooxidans and F. acidiphilum, was concomitant with the DNA copy numbers, whereas Acidiphilium‐like bacteria and some Firmicutes members did not show a clear correlation between 16S rRNA accumulation and DNA copy numbers. However, the prokaryotic acidophile microarray (PAM) analysis showed active members of Alphaproteobacteria in all samples and of Sulfobacillus genus in older ones. Also, new active groups such as Actinobacteria and Acidobacterium genus were detected by PAM. The results suggest that changes during the leaching cycle in chemical and physical conditions, such as pH and Fe3+/Fe2+ ion rate, are primary factors shaping the microbial dynamic in the heap. PMID:21255296

  19. Formation of selenide, sulfide or mixed selenide-sulfide films on metal or metal coated substrates

    DOEpatents

    Eser, Erten; Fields, Shannon

    2012-05-01

    A process and composition for preventing cracking in composite structures comprising a metal coated substrate and a selenide, sulfide or mixed selenide sulfide film. Specifically, cracking is prevented in the coating of molybdenum coated substrates upon which a copper, indium-gallium diselenide (CIGS) film is deposited. Cracking is inhibited by adding a Se passivating amount of oxygen to the Mo and limiting the amount of Se deposited on the Mo coating.

  20. Utilization of reduced graphene oxide/cadmium sulfide-modified carbon cloth for visible-light-prompt photoelectrochemical sensor for copper (II) ions.

    PubMed

    Foo, C Y; Lim, H N; Pandikumar, A; Huang, N M; Ng, Y H

    2016-03-01

    A newly developed CdS/rGO/CC electrode was prepared based on a flexible carbon cloth (CC) substrate with cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles and reduced graphene oxide (rGO). The CdS was synthesized using an aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) method, and the graphene oxide was thermally reduced on the modified electrode surface. The existence of rGO in the CdS-modified electrode increased the photocurrent intensity of the CdS/rGO/CC-modified electrode by three orders of magnitude, compared to that of the CdS/ITO electrode and two orders of magnitude higher than the CdS/CC electrode. A new visible-light-prompt photoelectrochemical sensor was developed based on the competitive binding reaction of Cu(2+) and CdS on the electrode surface. The results showed that the effect of the Cu(2+) on the photocurrent response was concentration-dependent over the linear ranges of 0.1-1.0 μM and 1.0-40.0 μM with a detection limit of 0.05 μM. The results of a selectivity test showed that this modified electrode has a high response toward Cu(2+) compared to other heavy metal ions. The proposed CdS/rGO/CC electrode provided a significantly high potential current compared to other reported values, and could be a practical tool for the fast, sensitive, and selective determination of Cu(2+). PMID:26595899

  1. Temporal and spatial distribution of alteration, mineralization and fluid inclusions in the transitional high-sulfidation epithermal-porphyry copper system at Red Mountain, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lecumberri-Sanchez, Pilar; Newton, M. Claiborne; Westman, Erik C.; Kamilli, Robert J.; Canby, Vertrees M.; Bodnar, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Red Mountain, Arizona, is a Laramide porphyry Cu system (PCD) that has experienced only a modest level of erosion compared to most other similar deposits in the southwestern United States. As a result, the upper portion of the magmatic–hydrothermal system, which represents the transition from shallower high-sulfidation epithermal mineralization to deeper porphyry Cu mineralization, is well preserved. Within the Red Mountain system, alteration, mineralization and fluid inclusion assemblages show a systematic distribution in both time and space. Early-potassic alteration (characterized by the minerals biotite and magnetite) is paragenetically earlier than late-potassic alteration (K-feldspar–anhydrite) and both are followed by later phyllic (sericite–pyrite) alteration. Advanced argillic alteration (pyrophyllite–alunite–other clay minerals) is thought to be coeval with or postdate phyllic alteration. Minerals characteristic of advanced argillic alteration are present in the near surface. Phyllic alteration extends to greater depths compared to advanced argillic alteration. Early-potassic and late-potassic alteration are only observed in the deepest part of the system. Considerable overlap of phyllic alteration with both early-potassic and late-potassic alteration zones is observed. The hypogene mineralization contains 0.4–1.2% Cu and is spatially and temporally related to the late-potassic alteration event. Molybdenum concentration is typically In the deepest part of the system, an early generation of low-to-moderate density and salinity liquid + vapor inclusions with opaque daughter minerals is followed in time by halite-bearing inclusions that also contain opaque daughter minerals indicating that an early intermediate-density magmatic fluid evolved to a high-density, high-salinity mineralizing fluid. The increase in density and salinity of fluids with time observed in the deeper parts of the system may be the result of immiscibility (“boiling”) of

  2. Platinum metals magmatic sulfide ores.

    PubMed

    Naldrett, A J; Duke, J M

    1980-06-27

    Platinum-group elements (PGE) are mined predominantly from deposits that have formed by the segregation of molten iron-nickel-copper sulfides from silicate magmas. The absolute concentrations of PGE in sulfides from different deposits vary over a range of five orders of magnitude, whereas those of other chalcophile elements vary by factors of only 2 to 100. However, the relative proportions of the different PGE in a given deposit are systematically related to the nature of the parent magma. The absolute and relative concentrations of PGE in magmatic sulfides are explained in terms of the degree of partial melting of mantle peridotite required to produce the parent magma and the processes of batch equilibration and fractional segregation of sulfides. The Republic of South Africa and the U.S.S.R. together possess more than 97 percent of the world PGE reserves, but significant undeveloped resources occur in North America. The Stillwater complex in Montana is perhaps the most important example. PMID:17796685

  3. Trace element distribution, with a focus on gold, in copper-rich and zinc-rich sulfide chimneys from Brothers submarine volcano, Kermadec arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkenbosch, H. A.; de Ronde, C. E.; McNeill, A.; Goemann, K.; Gemmell, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    Brothers volcano is a dacitic volcano located along the Kermadec arc, New Zealand, and hosts the NW Caldera hydrothermal vent field perched on part of the steep caldera walls. The field strikes for ~600 m between depths of 1550 and 1700 m and includes numerous, active, high-temperature (max 302°C) chimneys and even more dead, sulfide-rich spires. Chimney samples collected from Brothers show distinct mineralogical zonation reflecting gradients in oxidation state, temperature, and pH from the inner walls in contact with hydrothermal fluids through to the outer walls in contact with seawater. Minerals deposited from hotter fluids (e.g., chalcopyrite) are located in the interior of the chimneys and are surrounded by an external zone of minerals deposited by cooler fluids (e.g., sulfates, sphalerite). Four chimneys types are identified at Brothers volcano based on the relative proportions of chalcopyrite and sulfate layers, and the presence or absence of anhydrite. Two are Cu-rich, i.e., chalcopyrite-rich and chalcopyrite-bornite-rich chimneys, and two are Zn-rich, i.e., sphalerite-rich and sphalerite-chalcopyrite-rich. Barite and anhydrite are common to both Cu-rich chimney types whereas Zn-rich chimneys contain barite only. The main mineral phases in all the chimneys are anhydrite, barite, chalcopyrite, pyrite/marcasite, and sphalerite. Trace minerals include galena, covellite, tennantite, realgar, chalcocite, bornite, hematite, goethite, Pb-As sulfosalts, and Bi- or Au-tellurides. The vast majority of tellurides are <5 μm in size and they commonly form in bands, cluster in patches, or occur along internal grain boundaries within chalcopyrite. In sulfate layers adjacent to the chalcopyrite zones tellurides can occur as inclusions in anhydrite, barite or pyrite and/or occupy void space within the chimney. The occurrence of specular hematite and Bi- or Au-tellurides associated with chalcopyrite are consistent with magmatic contributions to the NW Caldera vent site

  4. Sulfide chemiluminescence detection

    DOEpatents

    Spurlin, Stanford R.; Yeung, Edward S.

    1985-01-01

    A method of chemiluminescently determining a sulfide which is either hydrogen sulfide or methyl mercaptan by reacting the sulfide with chlorine dioxide at low pressure and under conditions which allow a longer reaction time in emission of a single photon for every two sulfide containing species, and thereafter, chemiluminescently detecting and determining the sulfide. The invention also relates not only to the detection method, but the novel chemical reaction and a specifically designed chemiluminescence detection cell for the reaction.

  5. Sulfide chemiluminescence detection

    DOEpatents

    Spurlin, S.R.; Yeung, E.S.

    1985-11-26

    A method is described for chemiluminescently determining a sulfide which is either hydrogen sulfide or methyl mercaptan by reacting the sulfide with chlorine dioxide at low pressure and under conditions which allow a longer reaction time in emission of a single photon for every two sulfide containing species, and thereafter, chemiluminescently detecting and determining the sulfide. The invention also relates not only to the detection method, but the novel chemical reaction and a specifically designed chemiluminescence detection cell for the reaction. 4 figs.

  6. The solubility of copper in high-temperature magmatic vapors: A quest for the significance of various chloride and sulfide complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajacz, Zoltán; Seo, Jung Hun; Candela, Philip A.; Piccoli, Philip M.; Tossell, John A.

    2011-05-01

    We conducted experiments to determine the effect of various chemical components (NaCl, KCl, HCl, FeCl 2, H 2S, SO 2) on the solubility of Cu in single phase aqueous vapors at 1000 °C and 150 MPa. The experiments were conducted in Au 97Cu 3 alloy capsules buffering Cu activities at 0.01. The volatile phase was sampled at run conditions by the entrapment of synthetic fluid inclusions in quartz. To test if the volatile phase had reached equilibrium before the isolation of the inclusions by fracture healing, we trapped two inclusion generations, one in an initially prefractured chip and another in a quartz chip that was fractured in situ during the experiments. The synthetic fluid inclusions were subsequently analyzed by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. In pure water, the apparent solubility of Cu is below the limits of detection of 6 μg/g, showing the low stability of hydroxy Cu complexes at our experimental conditions. The presence of alkali chlorides supports modest Cu solubility likely in the form of NaCuCl 2 and KCuCl 2 complexes. In the H 2O-H 2S (+SiO 2 and Au 97Cu 3) system at an fH 2S of 10.4 MPa the apparent solubility of Cu is lower by a factor of ˜5 than that in a S-free 0.5 m NaCl solution, showing that copper hydrosulfide complexes are only moderately stable at these conditions. Addition of 4.7 mol% of sulfur to the H 2O-NaCl system at an fO 2 of 0.4 log units below the Ni-NiO buffer, yielding dominantly H 2S species, results in only a moderate increase in apparent Cu solubility, which diminishes in the presence of HCl. The addition of KCl results in a strong increase of apparent Cu solubility in the presence of H 2S. The solubility of Cu increases with the fugacity of oxygen in both the H 2O-NaCl and the H 2O-S-NaCl system following an approximately fourth root relationship as expected based on the stoichiometry of the involved redox reactions. Replacement of NaCl by FeCl 2 exerted only a minor effect on the Cu solubility

  7. Metal sulfide for battery applications

    SciTech Connect

    Guidotti, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    A number of metal sulfides can be used in batteries as a cathode (reducible) material as part of an electrochemical couple to provide energy. There are a number of physical and chemical characteristics that can be evaluated for screening potential candidates for use in batteries. These include: cell potential vs. Li, thermal and chemical stability, electrical conductivity, allotropic form (phase), reaction kinetics during discharge, type of discharge mechanism, and material rechargeability. These are reviewed in general, with emphasis on sulfides of copper, iron, and molybdenum which are currently being used as cathodes in Li and Li-alloy batteries. The presence of impurities can adversely impact performance when naturally occurring sulfide minerals are used for battery applications. Sandia National Laboratories uses natural pyrite (FeS2) for its high-temperature, thermally activated Li(Si)/FeS2 batteries. The purification and processing procedures for the FeS2 involves both chemical and physical methods. Flotation was found to yield comparable results as HF leaching for removal of silica, but without the negative health and environmental concerns associated with this technique. 11 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Cadmium sulfide membranes

    DOEpatents

    Spanhel, Lubomir; Anderson, Marc A.

    1992-07-07

    A method is described for the creation of novel q-effect cadmium sulfide membranes. The membranes are made by first creating a dilute cadmium sulfide colloid in aqueous suspension and then removing the water and excess salts therefrom. The cadmium sulfide membrane thus produced is luminescent at room temperature and may have application in laser fabrication.

  9. Cadmium sulfide membranes

    DOEpatents

    Spanhel, Lubomir; Anderson, Marc A.

    1991-10-22

    A method is described for the creation of novel q-effect cadmium sulfide membranes. The membranes are made by first creating a dilute cadmium sulfide colloid in aqueous suspension and then removing the water and excess salts therefrom. The cadmium sulfide membrane thus produced is luminescent at room temperature and may have application in laser fabrication.

  10. SULFIDE MINERALS IN SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The formation processes of metal sulfides in sediments, especially iron sulfides, have been the subjects of intense scientific research because of linkages to the global biogeochemical cycles of iron, sulfur, carbon, and oxygen. Transition metal sulfides (e.g., NiS, CuS, ZnS, Cd...

  11. Occurrence model for magmatic sulfide-rich nickel-copper-(platinum-group element) deposits related to mafic and ultramafic dike-sill complexes: Chapter I in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulz, Klaus J.; Woodruff, Laurel G.; Nicholson, Suzanne W.; Seal, Robert R., II; Piatak, Nadine M.; Chandler, Val W.; Mars, John L.

    2014-01-01

    The sulfides in magmatic Ni-Cu deposits generally constitute a small volume of the host rock(s) and tend to be concentrated in the lower parts of the mafic and/or ultramafic bodies, often in physical depressions or areas marking changes in the geometry of the footwall topography. In most deposits, the sulfide mineralization can be divided into disseminated, matrix or net, and massive sulfide, depending on a combination of the sulfide content of the rock and the silicate texture. The major Ni-Cu sulfide mineralogy typically consists of an intergrowth of pyrrhotite (Fe7S8), pentlandite ([Fe, Ni]9S8), and chalcopyrite (FeCuS2). Cobalt, PGE, and gold (Au) are extracted from most magmatic Ni-Cu ores as byproducts, although such elements can have a significant impact on the economics in some deposits, such as the Noril’sk-Talnakh deposits, which produce much of the world’s palladium. In addition, deposits may contain between 1 and 15 percent magnetite associated with the sulfides.

  12. Integrated thin film cadmium sulfide solar cell module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickelsen, R. A.; Abbott, D. D.

    1971-01-01

    The design, development, fabrication and tests of flexible integrated thin-film cadmium sulfide solar cells and modules are discussed. The development of low cost and high production rate methods for interconnecting cells into large solar arrays is described. Chromium thin films were applied extensively in the deposited cell structures as a means to: (1) achieve high adherence between the cadmium sulfide films and the vacuum-metallized copper substrates, (2) obtain an ohmic contact to the cadmium sulfide films, and (3) improve the adherence of gold films as grids or contact areas.

  13. Pressure leaching las cruces copper ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezowsky, R. M.; Xue, T.; Collins, M. J.; Makwana, M.; Barton-Jones, I.; Southgate, M.; Maclean, J. K.

    1999-12-01

    A hydrometallurgical process was developed for treating the Las Cruces massive sulfide-ore deposit located near Seville, Spain. A two-stage countercurrent leach process, consisting of an atmospheric leach and a pressure leach, was developed to effectively leach copper from the copper-bearing minerals and to generate a solution suitable for the subsequent solvent-extraction and copper-electrowinning operations. The results of batch and continuous miniplant tests are presented.

  14. An assessment of silver copper sulfides for photovoltaic applications: theoretical and experimental insights† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6ta03376h Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Savory, Christopher N.; Ganose, Alex M.; Travis, Will; Atri, Ria S.; Palgrave, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    As the worldwide demand for energy increases, low-cost solar cells are being looked to as a solution for the future. To attain this, non-toxic earth-abundant materials are crucial, however cell efficiencies for current materials are limited in many cases. In this article, we examine the two silver copper sulfides AgCuS and Ag3CuS2 as possible solar absorbers using hybrid density functional theory, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, XPS and Hall effect measurements. We show that both compounds demonstrate promising electronic structures and band gaps for high theoretical efficiency solar cells, based on Shockley–Queisser limits. Detailed analysis of their optical properties, however, indicates that only AgCuS should be of interest for PV applications, with a high theoretical efficiency. From this, we also calculate the band alignment of AgCuS against various buffer layers to aid in future device construction. PMID:27774149

  15. Synthesis and photovoltaic application of coper (I) sulfide nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yue; Wadia, Cyrus; Ma, Wanli; Sadtler, Bryce; Alivisatos, A.Paul

    2008-06-24

    We present the rational synthesis of colloidal copper(I) sulfide nanocrystals and demonstrate their application as an active light absorbing component in combination with CdS nanorods to make a solution-processed solar cell with 1.6percent power conversion efficiency on both conventional glass substrates and flexible plastic substrates with stability over a 4 month testing period.

  16. Modern processes of copper concentration from mineral raw materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekushin, V. S.; Oleinikova, N. V.; Shubakova, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The modern technologies of processing of sulfide copper raw materials using high-output autogenous and semiautogenous processes are analyzed and compared with the "dead" roasting-reduction smelting technology.

  17. Microstructural characterization of copper corrosion in aqueous and soil environments

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, A.; Balasubramaniam, R. . E-mail: bala@iitk.ac.in

    2005-08-15

    Scanning electron microscopy has been used to investigate the surface films on pure copper after exposure to different aqueous and soil environments, containing chloride, sulfide and ammonium salts. The morphology of the films formed on copper surface in aqueous and soil environments was different for the same amount of pollutants. The surface films formed in soil environments were not homogenous in contrast to the films formed in aqueous environments. The damaging effect of chloride ions and the benign role of sulfide ions were revealed in both the environments. Local compositional analysis confirmed that the surface films formed on copper consisted predominantly of copper and oxygen.

  18. Sulfide Mineralogy and Geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilles, John

    2007-02-01

    Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry Series, Volume 61 David J. Vaughan, Editor Geochemical Society and Mineralogical Society of America; ISBN 0-939950-73-1 xiii + 714 pp.; 2006; $40. Sulfide minerals as a class represent important minor rock-forming minerals, but they are generally known as the chief sources of many economic metallic ores. In the past two decades, sulfide research has been extended to include important roles in environmental geology of sulfide weathering and resultant acid mine drainage, as well as in geomicrobiology in which bacteria make use of sulfides for metabolic energy sources. In the latter respect, sulfides played an important role in early evolution of life on Earth and in geochemical cycling of elements in the Earth's crust and hydrosphere.

  19. Platinum metals in magmatic sulfide ores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naldrett, A.J.; Duke, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    Platinum-group elements (PGE) are mined predominantly from deposits that have formed by the segregation of molten iron-nickel-copper sulfides from silicate magmas. The absolute concentrations of PGE in sulfides from different deposits vary over a range of five orders of magnitude, whereas those of other chalcophile elements vary by factors of only 2 to 100. However, the relative proportions of the different PGE in a given deposit are systematically related to the nature of the parent magma. The absolute and relative concentrations of PGE in magmatic sulfides are explained in terms of the degree of partial melting of mantle peridotite required to produce the parent magma and the processes of batch equilibration and fractional segregation of sulfides. The Republic of South Africa and the U.S.S.R. together possess more than 97 percent of the world PGE reserves, but significant undeveloped resources occur in North America. The Stillwater complex in Montana is perhaps the most important example. Copyright ?? 1980 AAAS.

  20. Biological and environmental transformations of copper-based nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongying; von dem Bussche, Annette; Kabadi, Pranita K; Kane, Agnes B; Hurt, Robert H

    2013-10-22

    Copper-based nanoparticles are an important class of materials with applications as catalysts, conductive inks, and antimicrobial agents. Environmental and safety issues are particularly important for copper-based nanomaterials because of their potential large-scale use and their high redox activity and toxicity reported from in vitro studies. Elemental nanocopper oxidizes readily upon atmospheric exposure during storage and use, so copper oxides are highly relevant phases to consider in studies of environmental and health impacts. Here we show that copper oxide nanoparticles undergo profound chemical transformations under conditions relevant to living systems and the natural environment. Copper oxide nanoparticle (CuO-NP) dissolution occurs at lysosomal pH (4-5), but not at neutral pH in pure water. Despite the near-neutral pH of cell culture medium, CuO-NPs undergo significant dissolution in media over time scales relevant to toxicity testing because of ligand-assisted ion release, in which amino acid complexation is an important contributor. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy shows that dissolved copper in association with CuO-NPs are the primary redox-active species. CuO-NPs also undergo sulfidation by a dissolution-reprecipitation mechanism, and the new sulfide surfaces act as catalysts for sulfide oxidation. Copper sulfide NPs are found to be much less cytotoxic than CuO-NPs, which is consistent with the very low solubility of CuS. Despite this low solubility of CuS, EPR studies show that sulfidated CuO continues to generate some ROS activity due to the release of free copper by H2O2 oxidation during the Fenton-chemistry-based EPR assay. While sulfidation can serve as a natural detoxification process for nanosilver and other chalcophile metals, our results suggest that sulfidation may not fully and permanently detoxify copper in biological or environmental compartments that contain reactive oxygen species.

  1. Biological and Environmental Transformations of Copper-Based Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhongying; Von Dem Bussche, Annette; Kabadi, Pranita K.; Kane, Agnes B.; Hurt, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    Copper-based nanoparticles are an important class of materials with applications as catalysts, conductive inks, and antimicrobial agents. Environmental and safety issues are particularly important for copper-based nanomaterials because of their potential large-scale use and their high redox activity and toxicity reported from in vitro studies. Elemental nanocopper oxidizes readily upon atmospheric exposure during storage and use, so copper oxides are highly relevant phases to consider in studies of environmental and health impacts. Here we show that copper oxide nanoparticles undergo profound chemical transformations under conditions relevant to living systems and the natural environment. Copper oxide nanoparticle (CuO-NP) dissolution occurs at lysosomal pH (4-5), but not at neutral pH in pure water. Despite the near-neutral pH of cell culture medium, CuO-NPs undergo significant dissolution in media over time scales relevant to toxicity testing due to ligand-assisted ion release, in which amino acid complexation is an important contributor. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy shows that dissolved copper in association with CuO-NPs are the primary redox-active species. CuO-NPs also undergo sulfidation by a dissolution-reprecipitation mechanism, and the new sulfide surfaces act as catalysts for sulfide oxidation. Copper sulfide NPs are found to be much less cytotoxic than CuO NPs, which is consistent with the very low solubility of CuS. Despite this low solubility of CuS, EPR studies show that sulfidated CuO continues to generate some ROS activity due to the release of free copper by H2O2 oxidation during the Fenton-chemistry-based EPR assay. While sulfidation can serve as a natural detoxification process for nanosilver and other chalcophile metals, our results suggest that sulfidation may not fully and permanently detoxify copper in biological or environmental compartments that contain reactive oxygen species. PMID:24032665

  2. Nickeliferous sulfides in xenoliths, olivine megacrysts and basaltic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleet, Michael E.; Stone, William E.

    1990-11-01

    The composition of olivine and nickeliferous sulfide inclusions from a selection of mafic and ultramafre rocks, xenoliths and megacrysts, including picritic basalts from Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, kimberlite from Fayette County, Pennsylvania, and megacrysts from Mount Shasta, California are compared with the mean experimental value of the distribution coefficient for Ni/Fe exchange (KD3=32). Only nine of the forty five olivipe/bulk-sulfide pairs investigated have compositions consistent with equilibration at high temperature, yielding calculated KD3 values in the range 22 to 41. The remaining pairs have calculated KD3 values which range from 0 to 19. Bulk-sulfides in disequilibrated assem-blages are consistently depleted in nickel and within both indivudual associations and individual petrographic sections they exhibit a wide variation in NiS content. The bulk copper contents of olivine-and groundmass-hosted sulfides from Kilauea Volcano range from 0.5 to 43 at%, and samples from the Kilauea Iki lava lake are more Fe-and Cu-rich and generally have lower KD3 values than those from the eruption itself. As with magmatic Ni-Cu sulfide deposits, most nickeliferous sulfide inclusions in mantle-related rocks and xenoliths and in volcanic rocks do not have pristine early-magmatic bulk compositions, and it would seem to be premature to attribute these sulfides solely to either a mantle or an early-magnatic origin.

  3. The Terminal Oxidase Cytochrome bd Promotes Sulfide-resistant Bacterial Respiration and Growth.

    PubMed

    Forte, Elena; Borisov, Vitaliy B; Falabella, Micol; Colaço, Henrique G; Tinajero-Trejo, Mariana; Poole, Robert K; Vicente, João B; Sarti, Paolo; Giuffrè, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) impairs mitochondrial respiration by potently inhibiting the heme-copper cytochrome c oxidase. Since many prokaryotes, including Escherichia (E.) coli, generate H2S and encounter high H2S levels particularly in the human gut, herein we tested whether bacteria can sustain sulfide-resistant O2-dependent respiration. E. coli has three respiratory oxidases, the cyanide-sensitive heme-copper bo3 enzyme and two bd oxidases much less sensitive to cyanide. Working on the isolated enzymes, we found that, whereas the bo3 oxidase is inhibited by sulfide with half-maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 = 1.1 ± 0.1 μM, under identical experimental conditions both bd oxidases are insensitive to sulfide up to 58 μM. In E. coli respiratory mutants, both O2-consumption and aerobic growth proved to be severely impaired by sulfide when respiration was sustained by the bo3 oxidase alone, but unaffected by ≤200 μM sulfide when either bd enzyme acted as the only terminal oxidase. Accordingly, wild-type E. coli showed sulfide-insensitive respiration and growth under conditions favouring the expression of bd oxidases. In all tested conditions, cyanide mimicked the functional effect of sulfide on bacterial respiration. We conclude that bd oxidases promote sulfide-resistant O2-consumption and growth in E. coli and possibly other bacteria. The impact of this discovery is discussed. PMID:27030302

  4. The Terminal Oxidase Cytochrome bd Promotes Sulfide-resistant Bacterial Respiration and Growth

    PubMed Central

    Forte, Elena; Borisov, Vitaliy B.; Falabella, Micol; Colaço, Henrique G.; Tinajero-Trejo, Mariana; Poole, Robert K.; Vicente, João B.; Sarti, Paolo; Giuffrè, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) impairs mitochondrial respiration by potently inhibiting the heme-copper cytochrome c oxidase. Since many prokaryotes, including Escherichia (E.) coli, generate H2S and encounter high H2S levels particularly in the human gut, herein we tested whether bacteria can sustain sulfide-resistant O2-dependent respiration. E. coli has three respiratory oxidases, the cyanide-sensitive heme-copper bo3 enzyme and two bd oxidases much less sensitive to cyanide. Working on the isolated enzymes, we found that, whereas the bo3 oxidase is inhibited by sulfide with half-maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 = 1.1 ± 0.1 μM, under identical experimental conditions both bd oxidases are insensitive to sulfide up to 58 μM. In E. coli respiratory mutants, both O2-consumption and aerobic growth proved to be severely impaired by sulfide when respiration was sustained by the bo3 oxidase alone, but unaffected by ≤200 μM sulfide when either bd enzyme acted as the only terminal oxidase. Accordingly, wild-type E. coli showed sulfide-insensitive respiration and growth under conditions favouring the expression of bd oxidases. In all tested conditions, cyanide mimicked the functional effect of sulfide on bacterial respiration. We conclude that bd oxidases promote sulfide-resistant O2-consumption and growth in E. coli and possibly other bacteria. The impact of this discovery is discussed. PMID:27030302

  5. Direct Production of Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Victorovich, G. S.; Bell, M. C.; Diaz, C. M.; Bell, J. A. E.

    1987-09-01

    The use of commercially pure oxygen in flash smelting a typical chalcopyrite concentrate or a low grade comminuted matte directly to copper produces a large excess of heat. The heat balance is controlled by adjusting the calorific value of the solid feed. A portion of the sulfide material is roasted to produce a calcine which is blended with unroasted material, and the blend is then autogeneously smelted with oxygen and flux directly to copper. Either iron silicate or iron calcareous slags are produced, both being subject to a slag cleaning treatment. Practically all of the sulfur is contained in a continuous stream of SO2 gas, most of which is strong enough for liquefaction. A particularly attractive feature of these technologies is that no radically new metallurgical equipment needs to be developed. The oxygen smelting can be carried out not only in the Inco type flash furnace but in other suitable smelters such as cyclone furnaces. Another major advantage stems from abolishion of the ever-troublesome converter aisle, which is replaced with continuous roasting of a fraction of the copper sulfide feed.

  6. BIOLOGICAL RESPONSE TO VARIATION OF ACID-VOLATILE SULFIDES AND METALS IN FIELD-EXPOSED SPIKED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vertical and temporal variations of acid-volatile sulfides (AVS) and simultaneously extracted metals (SEM) in sediment can control biological impacts of metals. To assess the significance of these variations in field sediments, sediments spiked with cadmium, copper, lead, nickel ...

  7. Energy and materials flows in the copper industry

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, L.L.

    1980-12-01

    The copper industry comprises both the primary copper industry, which produces 99.9%-pure copper from copper ore, and the secondary copper industry, which salvages and recycles copper-containing scrap metal to extract pure copper or copper alloys. The United States uses about 2 million tons of copper annually, 60% of it for electrical applications. Demand is expected to increase less than 4% annually for the next 20 years. The primary copper industry is concentrated in the Southwest; Arizona produced 66% of the 1979 total ore output. Primary production uses about 170 x 10/sup 12/ Btu total energy annually (about 100 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton pure copper produced from ore). Mining and milling use about 60% of the total consumption, because low-grade ore (0.6% copper) is now being mined. Most copper is extracted by smelting sulfide ores, with concomitant production of sulfur dioxide. Clean air regulations will require smelters to reduce sulfur emissions, necessitating smelting process modifications that could also save 20 x 10/sup 12/ Btu (10 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton of copper) in smelting energy. Energy use in secondary copper production averages 20 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton of copper. If all copper products were recycled, instead of the 30% now salvaged, the energy conservation potential would be about one-half the total energy consumption of the primary copper industry.

  8. Iron sulfide deposits at Wadi Wassat, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, R.J.; Rossman, D.L.; Bagdady, A.Y.; Conway, C.M.; Helaby, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    Massive and disseminated iron sulfide deposits in Wadi Wassat form lenticular, stratabound deposits in cherty Precambrian sedimentary rocks interlayered with Precambrian calcareous sedimentary rocks, pyroclastic rocks, and andesitic flow rocks. These rocks have been cut by a wide variety of plutonic and dike rocks including gabbro, diorite, granodiorite, diabase, rhyolite, and granite. The zone containing the sulfide lenses is nearly 16 km long and is cut off by granitic rocks at both the northern and southern ends. The lenses are as much as 200 m thick; one can be traced along strike for more than 4 km. The lenses consist mostly of iron sulfides. Pyrite is the principal sulfide mineral; near intrusive bodies the pyrite has been partially converted to pyrrhotite and locally mobilized into fractures. The sulfides have been oxidized to a depth of about 25 m. Preliminary calculations indicate that about 107,500,000 tons of sulfides, averaging 40 percent iron and 35 percent sulfur, are available to a depth of i00 m. Small amounts of nickel, cobalt, zinc, and copper are also present, but at metal prices prevailing in early 1981, these do not constitute significant resources.

  9. Thioarsenates in sulfidic waters.

    PubMed

    Stauder, S; Raue, B; Sacher, F

    2005-08-15

    It has long been recognized that the formation of soluble arsenic sulfur complexes plays a key role for the mobility and toxicity of arsenic in sulfate-reducing environments. Knowledge of the exact arsenic species is essential to understand the behavior of arsenic in sulfidic aquifers and to develop remediation strategies. In the past, monomeric and trimeric thioarsenites were assumed to be the existing species in sulfidic systems. In this study, thioarsenates were identified by IC-ICP/MS in arsenite- and sulfide-containing solutions as well as in a reduced groundwater from a contaminated site. The unexpected finding of an oxidation of As(lll) to As(V) in thioarsenates in strongly reducing systems can be explained by the high affinity between As(Ill) and sulfur. In sulfide-containing solutions without oxidant, As(lll) therefore undergoes disproportionation to thioarsenates (As(V)) and elemental arsenic. It has previously been supposed that mobility as well as toxicity of arsenic increases if the redox state decreases. For sulfidic waters, the opposite is probably the case. Thus, the formation of thioarsenates could be used in connection with remediation strategies. Thioarsenates are highly sensitive to oxygen and pH. This is important for analytical procedures. A loss of soluble arsenic as well as a conversion to arsenite and arsenate may occur if water samples containing thioarsenates are analyzed with conventional methods.

  10. The Hyrkkoelae native copper mineralization: A natural analogue for copper canisters

    SciTech Connect

    Perea, N.M.

    1997-12-31

    The Hyrkkoelae U-Cu mineralization is located in south-western Finland, near the Palmottu analog site, in crystalline, metamorphic bedrock. The age of the mineralization is estimated to be between 1.8 and 1.7 Ga. The existence of native copper and copper sulfides in open fractures in the near-surface zone allows one to study the native copper corrosion process in conditions analogous to a nuclear fuel waste repository. From the study of mineral assemblages or paragenesis, it appears that the formation of copper sulfide (djurleite, Cu{sub 1.934}S) after native copper (Cu{sup 0}) under anoxic (reducing) conditions is enhanced by the availability of dissolved hydrogen sulfide (HS{sup {minus}}) in the groundwater circulating in open fractures in the near-surface zone. The minimum concentration of HS{sup {minus}} in the groundwater is estimated to be of the order of 10{sup {minus}5} M ({approximately}10{sup {minus}4} g/l) and the minimum pH value not lower than about 7.8 as indicated by the presence of calcite crystals in the same fracture. The present study is the first one performed on occurrences of native copper in reducing, neutral to slightly alkaline groundwaters. Thus, the data obtained is of most relevance in improving models of anoxic corrosion of copper canisters.

  11. Sulfidation of silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levard, C.; Michel, F. M.; Brown, G. E.

    2010-12-01

    Rapid development of nanotechnologies that exploit the properties of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) raises questions concerning the impact of Ag on the environment. Ag-NPs are currently among the most widely used in the nanotechnology industry and the amount released into the environment is expected to increase along with production (1). When present in geochemical systems, Ag-NPs may undergo a variety of changes due to varying redox, pH, and chemical conditions. Expected changes range from surface modification (e.g., oxidation, sulfidation, chloridation etc.) to complete dissolution and re-precipitation. In this context, the focus of our work is on understanding the behavior of synthetic Ag-NPs with different particle sizes under varying conditions relevant to the environment. Sulfidation of Ag-NPs is of particular interest since it among the processes most likely to occur in aqueous systems, in particular under reducing conditions. Three sizes of Ag-NPs coated with polyvinyl pyrrolidone were produced using the polyol process (2) (7 ±1; 20 ±4, and 40 ±9 nm). Batch solutions containing the different Ag-NPs were subsequently reacted with Na2S solutions of different concentrations. The sulfidation process was followed step-wise for 24 hours and the corrosion products formed were characterized by electron microscopy (TEM/SEM), diffraction (XRD), and photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS). Surface charge (pHPZC) of the products formed during this process was also measured, as were changes in solubility and reactivity. Based on experimental observations we infer that the sulfidation process is the result of dissolution-precipitation and find that: (i) acanthite (Ag2S) is formed as a corrosion product; (ii) Ag-NPs aggregation increased with sulfidation rate; (iii) pHPZC increases with the rate of sulfidation; and (iv) the solubility of the corrosion products formed from sulfidation appears lower than that of non-sulfidated Ag-NPs. We observe size-dependent differences in

  12. SULFIDE METHOD PLUTONIUM SEPARATION

    DOEpatents

    Duffield, R.B.

    1958-08-12

    A process is described for the recovery of plutonium from neutron irradiated uranium solutions. Such a solution is first treated with a soluble sullide, causing precipitation of the plutoniunn and uraniunn values present, along with those impurities which form insoluble sulfides. The precipitate is then treated with a solution of carbonate ions, which will dissolve the uranium and plutonium present while the fission product sulfides remain unaffected. After separation from the residue, this solution may then be treated by any of the usual methods, such as formation of a lanthanum fluoride precipitate, to effect separation of plutoniunn from uranium.

  13. Zinc sulfide liquefaction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Garg, Diwakar

    1984-01-01

    A process for the liquefaction of carbonaceous material, such as coal, is set forth wherein coal is liquefied in a catalytic solvent refining reaction wherein an activated zinc sulfide catalyst is utilized which is activated by hydrogenation in a coal derived process solvent in the absence of coal.

  14. Copper transport.

    PubMed

    Linder, M C; Wooten, L; Cerveza, P; Cotton, S; Shulze, R; Lomeli, N

    1998-05-01

    In adult humans, the net absorption of dietary copper is approximately 1 mg/d. Dietary copper joins some 4-5 mg of endogenous copper flowing into the gastrointestinal tract through various digestive juices. Most of this copper returns to the circulation and to the tissues (including liver) that formed them. Much lower amounts of copper flow into and out of other major parts of the body (including heart, skeletal muscle, and brain). Newly absorbed copper is transported to body tissues in two phases, borne primarily by plasma protein carriers (albumin, transcuprein, and ceruloplasmin). In the first phase, copper goes from the intestine to the liver and kidney; in the second phase, copper usually goes from the liver (and perhaps also the kidney) to other organs. Ceruloplasmin plays a role in this second phase. Alternatively, liver copper can also exit via the bile, and in a form that is less easily reabsorbed. Copper is also present in and transported by other body fluids, including those bathing the brain and central nervous system and surrounding the fetus in the amniotic sac. Ceruloplasmin is present in these fluids and may also be involved in copper transport there. The concentrations of copper and ceruloplasmin in milk vary with lactational stage. Parallel changes occur in ceruloplasmin messenger RNA expression in the mammary gland (as determined in pigs). Copper in milk ceruloplasmin appears to be particularly available for absorption, at least in rats. PMID:9587137

  15. Copper transport.

    PubMed

    Linder, M C; Wooten, L; Cerveza, P; Cotton, S; Shulze, R; Lomeli, N

    1998-05-01

    In adult humans, the net absorption of dietary copper is approximately 1 mg/d. Dietary copper joins some 4-5 mg of endogenous copper flowing into the gastrointestinal tract through various digestive juices. Most of this copper returns to the circulation and to the tissues (including liver) that formed them. Much lower amounts of copper flow into and out of other major parts of the body (including heart, skeletal muscle, and brain). Newly absorbed copper is transported to body tissues in two phases, borne primarily by plasma protein carriers (albumin, transcuprein, and ceruloplasmin). In the first phase, copper goes from the intestine to the liver and kidney; in the second phase, copper usually goes from the liver (and perhaps also the kidney) to other organs. Ceruloplasmin plays a role in this second phase. Alternatively, liver copper can also exit via the bile, and in a form that is less easily reabsorbed. Copper is also present in and transported by other body fluids, including those bathing the brain and central nervous system and surrounding the fetus in the amniotic sac. Ceruloplasmin is present in these fluids and may also be involved in copper transport there. The concentrations of copper and ceruloplasmin in milk vary with lactational stage. Parallel changes occur in ceruloplasmin messenger RNA expression in the mammary gland (as determined in pigs). Copper in milk ceruloplasmin appears to be particularly available for absorption, at least in rats.

  16. Electrochemical behavior of silver sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Drouven, B.U.E.

    1982-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of silver sulfide in sulfuric acid as well as in nitric acid was studied using electrodes made from synthetic silver sulfide. The primary techniques used were potentiostatic, potentiodynamic, galvanostatic and corrosion cell experiments. The cathodic reaction of silver sulfide produces silver and hydrogen sulfide. This reaction mechanism is a sequential two step charge transfer involving a single electron in each step. Silver ions are produced from silver sulfide upon applying an anodic potential. The dissolution rate of silver sulfide can be so high that the formation of silver sulfate occurs which partially covers the silver sulfide surface and inhibits a further rate increase. The sulfur from the silver sulfide will be oxidized at low overpotentials to elemental sulfur; at high overpotentials, the oxidation to sulfate or bisulfate is observed. The results suggest that the catalysis of chalcopyrite by the addition of silver ions is caused by the formation and subsequent dissolution of silver sulfide leaving a porous layer behind. The understanding of the reaction mechanism of silver sulfide dissolution and its optimization will significantly improve the economic evaluation of industrial processes using the catalyzed leaching of chalcopyrite. The present knowledge of the catalysis indicates that other ions may be substituted for silver ions which would increase the feasibility of hydrometallurgical processes.

  17. Sulfide detoxification in plant mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Birke, Hannah; Hildebrandt, Tatjana M; Wirtz, Markus; Hell, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to animals, which release the signal molecule sulfide in small amounts from cysteine and its derivates, phototrophic eukaryotes generate sulfide as an essential intermediate of the sulfur assimilation pathway. Additionally, iron-sulfur cluster turnover and cyanide detoxification might contribute to the release of sulfide in mitochondria. However, sulfide is a potent inhibitor of cytochrome c oxidase in mitochondria. Thus, efficient sulfide detoxification mechanisms are required in mitochondria to ensure adequate energy production and consequently survival of the plant cell. Two enzymes have been recently described to catalyze sulfide detoxification in mitochondria of Arabidopsis thaliana, O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase C (OAS-TL C), and the sulfur dioxygenase (SDO) ethylmalonic encephalopathy protein 1 (ETHE1). Biochemical characterization of sulfide producing and consuming enzymes in mitochondria of plants is fundamental to understand the regulatory network that enables mitochondrial sulfide homeostasis under nonstressed and stressed conditions. In this chapter, we provide established protocols to determine the activity of the sulfide releasing enzyme β-cyanoalanine synthase as well as sulfide-consuming enzymes OAS-TL and SDO. Additionally, we describe a reliable and efficient method to purify OAS-TL proteins from plant material.

  18. Alloyed Copper Chalcogenide Nanoplatelets via Partial Cation Exchange Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report the synthesis of alloyed quaternary and quinary nanocrystals based on copper chalcogenides, namely, copper zinc selenide–sulfide (CZSeS), copper tin selenide–sulfide (CTSeS), and copper zinc tin selenide–sulfide (CZTSeS) nanoplatelets (NPLs) (∼20 nm wide) with tunable chemical composition. Our synthesis scheme consisted of two facile steps: i.e., the preparation of copper selenide–sulfide (Cu2–xSeyS1–y) platelet shaped nanocrystals via the colloidal route, followed by an in situ cation exchange reaction. During the latter step, the cation exchange proceeded through a partial replacement of copper ions by zinc or/and tin cations, yielding homogeneously alloyed nanocrystals with platelet shape. Overall, the chemical composition of the alloyed nanocrystals can easily be controlled by the amount of precursors that contain cations of interest (e.g., Zn, Sn) to be incorporated/alloyed. We have also optimized the reaction conditions that allow a complete preservation of the size, morphology, and crystal structure as that of the starting Cu2–xSeyS1–y NPLs. The alloyed NPLs were characterized by optical spectroscopy (UV–vis–NIR) and cyclic voltammetry (CV), which demonstrated tunability of their light absorption characteristics as well as their electrochemical band gaps. PMID:25050455

  19. Geothermal hydrogen sulfide removal

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, P.

    1981-04-01

    UOP Sulfox technology successfully removed 500 ppM hydrogen sulfide from simulated mixed phase geothermal waters. The Sulfox process involves air oxidation of hydrogen sulfide using a fixed catalyst bed. The catalyst activity remained stable throughout the life of the program. The product stream composition was selected by controlling pH; low pH favored elemental sulfur, while high pH favored water soluble sulfate and thiosulfate. Operation with liquid water present assured full catalytic activity. Dissolved salts reduced catalyst activity somewhat. Application of Sulfox technology to geothermal waters resulted in a straightforward process. There were no requirements for auxiliary processes such as a chemical plant. Application of the process to various types of geothermal waters is discussed and plans for a field test pilot plant and a schedule for commercialization are outlined.

  20. The cytochrome bd oxidase of Escherichia coli prevents respiratory inhibition by endogenous and exogenous hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Korshunov, Sergey; Imlay, Karin R C; Imlay, James A

    2016-07-01

    When sulfur compounds are scarce or difficult to process, Escherichia coli adapts by inducing the high-level expression of sulfur-compound importers. If cystine then becomes available, the cystine is rapidly overimported and reduced, leading to a burgeoning pool of intracellular cysteine. Most of the excess cysteine is exported, but some is adventitiously degraded, with the consequent release of sulfide. Sulfide is a potent ligand of copper and heme moieties, raising the prospect that it interferes with enzymes. We observed that when cystine was provided and sulfide levels rose, E. coli became strictly dependent upon cytochrome bd oxidase for continued respiration. Inspection revealed that low-micromolar levels of sulfide inhibited the proton-pumping cytochrome bo oxidase that is regarded as the primary respiratory oxidase. In the absence of the back-up cytochrome bd oxidase, growth failed. Exogenous sulfide elicited the same effect. The potency of sulfide was enhanced when oxygen concentrations were low. Natural oxic-anoxic interfaces are often sulfidic, including the intestinal environment where E. coli dwells. We propose that the sulfide resistance of the cytochrome bd oxidase is a key trait that permits respiration in such habitats.

  1. Hydrogen sulfide intoxication.

    PubMed

    Guidotti, Tee L

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a hazard primarily in the oil and gas industry, agriculture, sewage and animal waste handling, construction (asphalt operations and disturbing marshy terrain), and other settings where organic material decomposes under reducing conditions, and in geothermal operations. It is an insoluble gas, heavier than air, with a very low odor threshold and high toxicity, driven by concentration more than duration of exposure. Toxicity presents in a unique, reliable, and characteristic toxidrome consisting, in ascending order of exposure, of mucosal irritation, especially of the eye ("gas eye"), olfactory paralysis (not to be confused with olfactory fatigue), sudden but reversible loss of consciousness ("knockdown"), pulmonary edema (with an unusually favorable prognosis), and death (probably with apnea contributing). The risk of chronic neurcognitive changes is controversial, with the best evidence at high exposure levels and after knockdowns, which are frequently accompanied by head injury or oxygen deprivation. Treatment cannot be initiated promptly in the prehospital phase, and currently rests primarily on supportive care, hyperbaric oxygen, and nitrite administration. The mechanism of action for sublethal neurotoxicity and knockdown is clearly not inhibition of cytochrome oxidase c, as generally assumed, although this may play a role in overwhelming exposures. High levels of endogenous sulfide are found in the brain, presumably relating to the function of hydrogen sulfide as a gaseous neurotransmitter and immunomodulator. Prevention requires control of exposure and rigorous training to stop doomed rescue attempts attempted without self-contained breathing apparatus, especially in confined spaces, and in sudden release in the oil and gas sector, which result in multiple avoidable deaths. PMID:26563786

  2. Application of Borehole SIP Technique to Sulfide Mineral Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Changryol; Park, Mi Kyung; Park, Samgyu; Sung, Nak Hoon; Shin, Seung Wook

    2016-04-01

    In the study, SIP (Spectral Induced Polarization) well logging probe system was developed to rapidly locate the metal ore bodies with sulfide minerals in the boreholes. The newly developed SIP logging probe employed the non-polarizable electrodes, consisting of zinc chloride (ZnCl2), sodium chloride (NaCl), gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O), and water (H2O), instead of existing copper electrodes, leading to eliminating the EM coupling effect in the IP surveys as much as possible. In addition, the SIP logging system is designed to make measurements down to maximum 500 meters in depth in the boreholes. The SIP well logging was conducted to examine the applicability of the SIP probe system to the boreholes at the ore mine in Jecheon area, Korea. The boreholes used in the SIP logging are known to have penetrated the metal ore bodies with sulfide minerals from the drilling investigations. The ore mine of the study area is the scarn deposits surrounded by the limestone or lime-silicate rocks in Ordovician period. The results of the SIP well logging have shown that the borehole segments with limestone or lime-silicate rocks yielded the insignificant SIP responses while the borehole segments with sulfide minerals (e.g. pyrite) provided the significant phase shifts of the SIP responses. The borehole segments penetrating the metal ore body, so-called cupola, have shown very high response of the phase shift, due to the high contents of the sulfide mineral pyrite. The phase shifts of the SIP response could be used to estimate the grade of the ore bodies since the higher contents of the sulfide minerals, the higher magnitudes of the phase shifts in the SIP responses. It is, therefore, believed that the borehole SIP technique can be applied to investigate the metal ore bodies with sulfide minerals, and that could be used to estimate the ore grades as a supplementary tool in the future.

  3. Selenium content in sulfide ores from the Chalkidiki peninsula, Greece.

    PubMed

    Nicolaidou, A E

    1998-01-01

    Selenium (Se) was assessed in galena, sphalerite, and pyrite samples. These are components of mixed sulfide ores from the Olympias and Madem Lakkos-Mavres Petres deposits and the Skouries porphyry-copper deposit. We used atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) with a hydride generator system. The highest concentration of Se (516 ppm) was found in the fine-grained galena at the -135 level of the Olympias deposits. In the Madem Lakkos-Mavres Petres deposit, the highest concentration of Se (33 ppm) was found in the pyrites of the level 30. The concentration of Se in the arsenopyrites and chalcopyrites is lower than the detection limit of the analytical method (< 100 ppb). The concentrated chalcopyrite from the porphyry copper deposit at Skouries exhibits a significant Se content (average 200 ppm) in contrast to the chalcopyrite from the Olympias and the Madem Lakkos-Mavres Petres. Variations in the Se content of the sulfide minerals studied could be caused by redox-pH and/or temperature conditions, as well as by the difference in crystal structure. The Se found in the areas studied may positively affect the environment. Sulfide minerals are oxidized by microorganisms, infiltrate in the soil-water in the form of selenate or selenite ion, and directly or indirectly influence the human organism. PMID:9726790

  4. Selective Facet Reactivity During Cation Exchange in Cadmium Sulfide Nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Sadtler, Bryce; Demchenko, Denis; Zheng, Haimei; Hughes, Steven; Merkle, Maxwell; Dahmen, Ulrich; Wang, Lin-Wang; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2008-12-18

    The partial transformation of ionic nanocrystals through cation exchange has been used to synthesize nanocrystal heterostructures. We demonstrate that the selectivity for cation exchange to take place at different facets of the nanocrystal plays an important role in determining the resulting morphology of the binary heterostructure. In the case of copper I (Cu+) cation exchange in cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanorods, the reaction starts preferentially at the ends of the nanorods such that copper sulfide (Cu2S) grows inwards from either end. The resulting morphology is very different from the striped pattern obtained in our previous studies of silver I (Ag+) exchange in CdS nanorods where non-selective nucleation of silver sulfide (Ag2S) occurs. From interface formation energies calculated for several models of epitaxialconnections between CdS and Cu2S or Ag2S, we infer the relative stability of each interface during the nucleation and growth of Cu2S or Ag2S within the CdS nanorods. The epitaxial connections of Cu2S to the end facets of CdS nanorods minimize the formation energy, making these interfaces stable throughout the exchange reaction. However, as the two end facets of wurtzite CdS nanorods are crystallographically nonequivalent, asymmetric heterostructures can be produced.

  5. Selenium content in sulfide ores from the Chalkidiki peninsula, Greece.

    PubMed

    Nicolaidou, A E

    1998-01-01

    Selenium (Se) was assessed in galena, sphalerite, and pyrite samples. These are components of mixed sulfide ores from the Olympias and Madem Lakkos-Mavres Petres deposits and the Skouries porphyry-copper deposit. We used atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) with a hydride generator system. The highest concentration of Se (516 ppm) was found in the fine-grained galena at the -135 level of the Olympias deposits. In the Madem Lakkos-Mavres Petres deposit, the highest concentration of Se (33 ppm) was found in the pyrites of the level 30. The concentration of Se in the arsenopyrites and chalcopyrites is lower than the detection limit of the analytical method (< 100 ppb). The concentrated chalcopyrite from the porphyry copper deposit at Skouries exhibits a significant Se content (average 200 ppm) in contrast to the chalcopyrite from the Olympias and the Madem Lakkos-Mavres Petres. Variations in the Se content of the sulfide minerals studied could be caused by redox-pH and/or temperature conditions, as well as by the difference in crystal structure. The Se found in the areas studied may positively affect the environment. Sulfide minerals are oxidized by microorganisms, infiltrate in the soil-water in the form of selenate or selenite ion, and directly or indirectly influence the human organism.

  6. Development of novel copper-based sorbents for hot-gas cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasian, J.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to evaluate several novel copper-based binary oxides for their suitability as regenerable sorbents for hot gas cleanup application in the temperature range of 650{degree} to 850{degree}C (1200{degree}--1550{degree}F). To achieve this objective, several novel copper-based binary oxide sorbents will be prepared. Experimental tests will be conducted at ambient pressure to determine the stability, sulfidation capacity, regenerability, and sulfidation kinetics of the novel sorbents. Tests will also be conducted at high pressure for the determination of the sulfidation reactivity, regenerability, and durability of the sorbents. The attrition characteristics of the sorbents will also be determined.

  7. Field method for sulfide determination

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B L; Schwarser, R R; Chukwuenye, C O

    1982-01-01

    A simple and rapid method was developed for determining the total sulfide concentration in water in the field. Direct measurements were made using a silver/sulfide ion selective electrode in conjunction with a double junction reference electrode connected to an Orion Model 407A/F Specific Ion Meter. The method also made use of a sulfide anti-oxidant buffer (SAOB II) which consists of ascorbic acid, sodium hydroxide, and disodium EDTA. Preweighed sodium sulfide crystals were sealed in air tight plastic volumetric flasks which were used in standardization process in the field. Field standards were prepared by adding SAOB II to the flask containing the sulfide crystals and diluting it to the mark with deionized deaerated water. Serial dilutions of the standards were used to prepare standards of lower concentrations. Concentrations as low as 6 ppB were obtained on lake samples with a reproducibility better than +- 10%.

  8. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1990-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  9. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1989-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  10. Copper Metallochaperones

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Nigel J.; Winge, Dennis R.

    2014-01-01

    The current state of knowledge on how copper metallochaperones support the maturation of cuproproteins is reviewed. Copper is needed within mitochondria to supply the CuA and intramembrane CuB sites of cytochrome oxidase, within the trans-Golgi network to supply secreted cuproproteins and within the cytosol to supply superoxide dismutase 1 (Sod1). Subpopulations of copper-zinc superoxide dismutase also localize to mitochondria, the secretory system, the nucleus and, in plants, the chloroplast, which also requires copper for plastocyanin. Prokaryotic cuproproteins are found in the cell membrane and in the periplasm of gram-negative bacteria. Cu(I) and Cu(II) form tight complexes with organic molecules and drive redox chemistry, which unrestrained would be destructive. Copper metallochaperones assist copper in reaching vital destinations without inflicting damage or becoming trapped in adventitious binding sites. Copper ions are specifically released from copper metallochaperones upon contact with their cognate cuproproteins and metal transfer is thought to proceed by ligand substitution. PMID:20205585

  11. Effect of hydrogen sulfide on aqueous corrosion of commercially pure Al 99.5

    SciTech Connect

    Bjoergum, A.; Sigurdsson, H.; Nisancioglu, K.

    1995-08-01

    Recently, there has been interest in the use of aluminum alloys as possible alternatives to carbon steel for handling oilfield products, such as brines with dissolved carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and H{sub 2}S. The effect of hydrogen sulfide on the corrosion behavior of commercially pure aluminum (DIN Al 99.5 [AA 1050A]) in chloride solutions containing carbon dioxide, bicarbonate, and copper ions at 30 C and 80 C was investigated using natural immersion corrosion tests, cathodic polarization, and scanning electron microscopy. The highest corrosion rates were observed in solutions containing Cu{sup 2+} but with no H{sub 2}S content because of copper deposition on the metal surface. Significant pitting occurred at 80 C. With H{sub 2}S in the solution, pitting corrosion was eliminated by removal of Cu{sup 2+} and other deleterious heavy-metal ion impurities form the solution in the form of insoluble sulfides. If H{sub 2}S was introduced after the copper deposited on the aluminum surface, no inhibiting effect was detected at 30 C, but a degree of inhibition still was observed at 80 C, presumably because the deposited copper was converted more effectively into copper sulfide at the higher temperature.

  12. Ultrafast electronic relaxation processes in semiconductor nanoparticles (silver iodide, silver iodide/silver sulfide, silver bromide/silver sulfide, silver sulfide, cupric sulfide, and copper sulfide) and carotenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brelle, Michael Chris

    2000-11-01

    This dissertation examines primarily the ultrafast dynamics of excited state charge carriers in semiconductor nanoparticles. The dissertation also briefly examines the excited state lifetimes of a few carotenoids. Understanding the dynamic properties of charge carriers in semiconductor nanoparticles is crucial for the further development of applications utilizing these systems. The dynamic properties including shallow and deep trapping as well as recombination have been studied in a variety of semiconductor nanoparticle systems. Kinetic modeling was utilized to assist in the assignment of all observed signals and the nature of the decays. The first observation of ultrafast trapping in silver halides was observed in AgI nanoparticles including the identification that interstitial silver ions may act as deep traps. Several interesting phenomena were observed in Ag2S and CuxS nanoparticles including dark shallow trap states and shallow trap state saturation leading to increased transient absorption over transient bleach with increasing excitation intensity. These observations have provided further insight into the relaxation pathways for charge carriers in semiconductor nanoparticle systems. Lifetimes of the S2 excited states of four carotenoids have also been determined. The S2 lifetime for beta-carotene was confirmed from previous fluorescence up-conversion experiments whereas the S2 lifetimes that were previously unknown for three carotenoids, violaxanthin, neaxanthin, and lutein were discovered. These experiments together demonstrate the capabilities of femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy to characterize and better understand the processes involved in the ultrafast relaxation events in both molecular and nanoparticle systems.

  13. Energy-conserving, pollution-free extraction process for the recovery of lead from lead sulfide concentrates. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Y.K.

    1981-09-01

    Research concerned with the development of a new process for the extraction of lead from lead sulfide concentrates is described. The process consists of smelting lead sulfide concentrates with lime and carbon to produce liquid lead. The sulfur in the concentrates is tied up as solid calcium sulfide residue which can be further processed to regenerate lime. No sulfur oxides are generated during the process. The off-gases consist of CO and CO/sub 2/. Coke, coal, coal-char or lignite-char may be used as reducing agents. The reduction process can be catalyzed to an appreciable degree by the addition of small concentrations of catalysts. For the most part, these catalytic substances are either pure or mixed alkali-metal salts. The present process can be applied for extracting zinc from zinc sulfide concentrates and also for the recovery of copper and nickel from their respective sulfide concentrates.

  14. Energy-conserving, pollution-free extraction process for the recovery of lead from lead sulfide concentrates. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Y.K.

    1981-09-01

    Research concerned with the development of a new process for the extraction of lead from lead sulfide concentrates is described. The process consists of smelting lead sulfide concentrates with lime and carbon to produce liquid lead. The sulfur in the concentrates is tied up as solid calcium sulfide residue which can be further processed to regenerate lime. No sulfur oxides are generated during the process. The off-gas consist of CO and CO/sub 2/. Coke, coal, coal-char or lignite-char may be used as reducing agents. The reduction process can be catalyzed to an appreciable degree by the addition of small concentrations of catalysts. For the most part, these catalytic substances are either pure or mixed alkali-metal salts. The present process can be applied for extracting zinc from zinc sulfide concentrates and also for the recovery of copper and nickel from their respective sulfide concentrates.

  15. Volcanogenic Massive Sulfide Deposit Density

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mosier, Dan L.; Singer, Donald A.; Berger, Vladimir I.

    2007-01-01

    A mineral-deposit density model for volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits was constructed from 38 well-explored control areas from around the world. Control areas contain at least one exposed volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit. The control areas used in this study contain 150 kuroko, 14 Urals, and 25 Cyprus massive sulfide subtypes of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits. For each control area, extent of permissive rock, number of exposed volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits, map scale, deposit age, and deposit density were determined. The frequency distribution of deposit densities in these 38 control areas provides probabilistic estimates of the number of deposits for tracts that are permissive for volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits-90 percent of the control areas have densities of 100 or more deposits per 100,000 square kilometers, 50 percent of the control areas have densities of 700 or more deposits per 100,000 square kilometers, and 10 percent of the control areas have densities of 3,700 or more deposits per 100,000 square kilometers. Both map scale and the size of the control area are shown to be predictors of deposit density. Probabilistic estimates of the number of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits can be made by conditioning the estimates on sizes of permissive area. The model constructed for this study provides a powerful tool for estimating the number of undiscovered volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits when conducting resource assessments. The value of these deposit densities is due to the consistency of these models with the grade and tonnage and the descriptive models. Mineral-deposit density models combined with grade and tonnage models allow reasonable estimates of the number, size, and grades of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits to be made.

  16. A novel method for improving cerussite sulfidization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Qi-cheng; Wen, Shu-ming; Zhao, Wen-juan; Cao, Qin-bo; Lü, Chao

    2016-06-01

    Evaluation of flotation behavior, solution measurements, and surface analyses were performed to investigate the effects of chloride ion addition on the sulfidization of cerussite in this study. Micro-flotation tests indicate that the addition of chloride ions prior to sulfidization can significantly increase the flotation recovery of cerussite, which is attributed to the formation of more lead sulfide species on the mineral surface. Solution measurement results suggest that the addition of chloride ions prior to sulfidization induces the transformation of more sulfide ions from pulp solution onto the mineral surface by the formation of more lead sulfide species. X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive spectroscopy indicate that more lead sulfide species form on the mineral surface when chloride ions are added prior to sulfidization. These results demonstrate that the addition of chloride ions prior to sulfidization can significantly improve the sulfidization of cerussite, thereby enhancing the flotation performance.

  17. Prevention of sulfide oxidation in sulfide-rich waste rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyström, Elsa; Alakangas, Lena

    2015-04-01

    The ability to reduce sulfide oxidation in waste rock after mine closure is a widely researched area, but to reduce and/or inhibit the oxidation during operation is less common. Sulfide-rich (ca 30 % sulfur) waste rock, partially oxidized, was leached during unsaturated laboratory condition. Trace elements such as As and Sb were relatively high in the waste rock while other sulfide-associated elements such as Cu, Pb and Zn were low compared to common sulfide-rich waste rock. Leaching of unsaturated waste rock lowered the pH, from around six down to two, resulting in continuously increasing element concentrations during the leaching period of 272 days. The concentrations of As (65 mg/L), Cu (6.9 mg/L), Sb (1.2 mg/L), Zn (149 mg/L) and S (43 g/L) were strongly elevated at the end of the leaching period. Different alkaline industrial residues such as slag, lime kiln dust and cement kiln dust were added as solid or as liquid to the waste rock in an attempt to inhibit sulfide oxidation through neo-formed phases on sulfide surfaces in order to decrease the mobility of metals and metalloids over longer time scale. This will result in a lower cost and efforts of measures after mine closure. Results from the experiments will be presented.

  18. Apparatus for use in sulfide chemiluminescence detection

    DOEpatents

    Spurlin, S.R.; Yeung, E.S.

    1987-01-06

    A method is described for chemiluminescently determining a sulfide which is either hydrogen sulfide or methyl mercaptan by reacting the sulfide with chlorine dioxide at low pressure and under conditions which allow a longer reaction time in emission of a single photon for every two sulfide containing species, and thereafter, chemiluminescently detecting and determining the sulfide. The invention also relates not only to the detection method, but the novel chemical reaction and a specifically designed chemiluminescence detection cell for the reaction. 4 figs.

  19. Apparatus for use in sulfide chemiluminescence detection

    DOEpatents

    Spurlin, Stanford R.; Yeung, Edward S.

    1987-01-01

    A method of chemiluminescently determining a sulfide which is either hydrogen sulfide or methyl mercaptan by reacting the sulfide with chlorine dioxide at low pressure and under conditions which allow a longer reaction time in emission of a single photon for every two sulfide containing species, and thereafter, chemiluminescently detecting and determining the sulfide. The invention also relates not only to the detection method, but the novel chemical reaction and a specifically designed chemiluminescence detection cell for the reaction.

  20. Sulfide-mediated dehydrative glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, H M; Chen, Y; Duron, S G; Gin, D Y

    2001-09-12

    The development of a new method for glycosylation with 1-hydroxy glycosyl donors employing dialkyl sulfonium reagents is described. The process employs the reagent combination of a dialkyl sulfide and triflic anhydride to effect anomeric bond constructions. This controlled dehydrative coupling of various C(1)-hemiacetal glycosyl donors and nucleophilic acceptors proceeds by way of a sulfide-to-sulfoxide oxidation process in which triflic anhydride serves as the oxidant.

  1. Chemical Bonding in Sulfide Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, David J.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2006-08-01

    An understanding of chemical bonding and electronic structure in sulfide minerals is central to any attempt at understanding their crystal structures, stabilities and physical properties. It is also an essential precursor to understanding reactivity through modeling surface structure at the molecular scale. In recent decades, there have been remarkable advances in first principles (ab initio) methods for the quantitative calculation of electronic structure. These advances have been made possible by the very rapid development of high performance computers. Several review volumes that chart the applications of these developments in mineralogy and geochemistry are available (Tossell and Vaughan, 1992; Cygan and Kubicki, 2001). An important feature of the sulfide minerals is the diversity of their electronic structures, as evidenced by their electrical and magnetic properties (see Pearce et al. 2006, this volume). Thus, sulfide minerals range from insulators through semiconductors to metals, and exhibit every type of magnetic behavior. This has presented problems for those attempting to develop bonding models for sulfides, and also led to certain misconceptions regarding the kinds of models that may be appropriate. In this chapter, chemical bonding and electronic structure models for sulfides are reviewed with emphasis on more recent developments. Although the fully ab initio quantitative methods are now capable of a remarkable degree of sophistication in terms of agreement with experiment and potential to interpret and predict behavior with varying conditions, both qualitative and more simplistic quantitative approaches will also be briefly discussed. This is because we believe that the insights which they provide are still helpful to those studying sulfide minerals. In addition to the application of electronic structure models and calculations to solid sulfides, work on sulfide mineral surfaces (Rosso and Vaughan 2006a,b) and solution complexes and clusters (Rickard

  2. Hydrogen Sulfide Oxidation by Myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Bostelaar, Trever; Vitvitsky, Victor; Kumutima, Jacques; Lewis, Brianne E; Yadav, Pramod K; Brunold, Thomas C; Filipovic, Milos; Lehnert, Nicolai; Stemmler, Timothy L; Banerjee, Ruma

    2016-07-13

    Enzymes in the sulfur network generate the signaling molecule, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), from the amino acids cysteine and homocysteine. Since it is toxic at elevated concentrations, cells are equipped to clear H2S. A canonical sulfide oxidation pathway operates in mitochondria, converting H2S to thiosulfate and sulfate. We have recently discovered the ability of ferric hemoglobin to oxidize sulfide to thiosulfate and iron-bound hydropolysulfides. In this study, we report that myoglobin exhibits a similar capacity for sulfide oxidation. We have trapped and characterized iron-bound sulfur intermediates using cryo-mass spectrometry and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Further support for the postulated intermediates in the chemically challenging conversion of H2S to thiosulfate and iron-bound catenated sulfur products is provided by EPR and resonance Raman spectroscopy in addition to density functional theory computational results. We speculate that the unusual sensitivity of skeletal muscle cytochrome c oxidase to sulfide poisoning in ethylmalonic encephalopathy, resulting from the deficiency in a mitochondrial sulfide oxidation enzyme, might be due to the concentration of H2S by myoglobin in this tissue. PMID:27310035

  3. Assaying the catalytic potential of transition metal sulfides for abiotic carbon fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cody, G. D.; Boctor, N. Z.; Brandes, J. A.; Filley, T. R.; Hazen, R. M.; Yoder, H. S.

    2004-05-01

    A suite of nickel, cobalt, iron, copper, and zinc containing sulfides are assayed for the promotion of a model carbon fixation reaction with relevance to local reducing environments of the early Earth. The assay tests the promotion of hydrocarboxylation (the Koch reaction) wherein a carboxylic acid is synthesized via carbonyl insertion at a metal-sulfide-bound alkyl group. The experimental conditions are chosen for optimal assay, i.e., high reactant concentrations and pressures (200 MPa) to enhance chemisorption, and high temperature (250°C) to enhance reaction kinetics. All of the metal sulfides studied, with the exception CuS, promote hydrocarboxylation. Two other significant reactions involve the catalytic reduction of CO to form a surface-bound methyl group, detected after nucleophilic attack by nonane thiol to form methyl nonyl sulfide, and the formation of dinonyl sulfide via a similar reaction. Estimation of the catalytic turnover frequencies for each of the metal sulfides with respect to each of the primary reactions reveals that NiS, Ni 3S 2, and CoS perform comparably to commonly employed industrial catalysts. A positive correlation between the yield of primary product to NiS and Ni 3S 2 surface areas provides strong evidence that the reactions are surface catalytic in these cases. The sulfides FeS and Fe (1-x)S are unique in that they exhibit evidence of extensive dissolution, thus, complicating interpretation regarding heterogeneous vs. homogeneous catalysis. With the exception of CuS, each of the metal sulfides promotes reactions that mimic key intermediate steps manifest in the mechanistic details of an important autotrophic enzyme, acetyl-CoA synthase. The relatively high temperatures chosen for assaying purposes, however, are incompatible with the accumulation of thioesters. The results of this study support the hypothesis that transition metal sulfides may have provided useful catalytic functionality for geochemical carbon fixation in a prebiotic

  4. Oxidation Potentials in Matte Smelting of Copper and Nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matousek, Jan W.

    2014-09-01

    The oxidation potential, given as the base-ten logarithm of the oxygen partial pressure in bars and the temperature [log pO2/ T, °C], defines the state of oxidation of pyrometallurgical extraction and refining processes. This property varies from copper making, [-6/1150]; to lead/zinc smelting, [-10/1200]; to iron smelting, [-13/1600]. The current article extends the analysis to the smelting of copper and nickel/copper sulfide concentrates to produce mattes of the type Cu(Ni)FeS(O) and iron silicate slags, FeOxSiO2—with oxidation potentials of [-7.5/1250].

  5. Ionization levels of doped copper indium sulfide chalcopyrites.

    PubMed

    Tablero, C

    2012-02-01

    The electronic structure of modified chalcopyrite CuInS(2) has been analyzed from first principles within the density functional theory. The host chalcopyrite has been modified by introducing atomic impurities M at substitutional sites in the lattice host with M = C, Si, Ge, Sn, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Rh, and Ir. Both substitutions M for In and M for Cu have been analyzed. The gap and ionization energies are obtained as a function of the M-S displacements. It is interesting for both spintronic and optoelectronic applications because it can provide significant information with respect to the pressure effect and the nonradiative recombination. PMID:22239718

  6. Amorphous molybdenum sulfides as hydrogen evolution catalysts.

    PubMed

    Morales-Guio, Carlos G; Hu, Xile

    2014-08-19

    from simple wet-chemical routes. Electron transport is sometimes slow in the particle catalysts, and an impedance model has been established to identify this slow electron transport. Finally, the amorphous molybdenum sulfide film catalyst has been integrated onto a copper(I) oxide photocathode for photoelectrochemical hydrogen evolution. The conformal catalyst efficiently extracts the excited electrons to give an impressive photocurrent density of -5.7 mA/cm(2) at 0 V vs RHE. The catalyst also confers good stability. PMID:25065612

  7. Development of novel copper-based sorbents for hot-gas cleanup. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasian, J.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this investigation is to evaluate several novel copper-based binary oxides for their suitability as regenerable sorbents for hot gas cleanup application in the temperature range of 650{degree} to 850{degree}C (1200{degree}--1550{degree}F). To achieve this objective, several novel copper-based binary oxide sorbents will be prepared. Experimental tests will be conducted at ambient pressure to determine the stability, sulfidation capacity, regenerability, and sulfidation kinetics of the novel sorbents. Tests will also be conducted at high pressure for the determination of the sulfidation reactivity, regenerability, and durability of the sorbents. The attrition characteristics of the sorbents will also be determined.

  8. Reactivity of Sulfide Mineral Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rosso, Kevin M.; Vaughan, David J.

    2006-08-01

    In the preceding chapter, the fundamental nature of sulfide mineral surfaces has been discussed, and the understanding we have of the ways in which the surface differs from a simple truncation of the bulk crystal structure reviewed. This naturally leads on to considering our understanding of sulfide surface chemistry, in the sense of how sulfide surfaces interact and react, particularly with gases and liquids. As noted elsewhere in this volume, research on sulfide mineral surfaces and surface reactivity is a relatively recent concern of mineralogists and geochemists, partly prompted by the availability of new imaging and spectroscopic methods, powerful computers and new computer algorithms. There has been a significantly longer history of sulfide mineral surface research associated with technologists working with, or within, the mining industry. Here, electrochemical methods, sometimes combined with analytical and spectroscopic techniques, have been used to probe surface chemistry. The motivation for this work has been to gain a better understanding of the controls of leaching reactions used to dissolve out metals from ores, or to understand the chemistry of the froth flotation systems used in concentrating the valuable (usually sulfide) minerals prior to metal extraction. The need for improved metal extraction technologies is still a major motivation for research on sulfide surfaces, but in the last couple of decades, new concerns have become important drivers for such work. In particular, much greater awareness of the negative environmental impact of acid and toxic metal-bearing waters derived from breakdown of sulfide minerals at former mining operations has prompted research on oxidation reactions, and on sorption of metals at sulfide surfaces. At the interface between fundamental geochemistry and industrial chemistry, the role of sulfide substrates in catalysis, and in the self-assembly and functionalization of organic molecules, has become an area of

  9. Sulfur and sulfides in chondrules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrocchi, Yves; Libourel, Guy

    2013-10-01

    The nature and distribution of sulfides within type I PO, POP and PP chondrules of the carbonaceous chondrite Vigarano (CV3) have been studied by secondary electron microscopy and electron microprobe. They occur predominantly as spheroidal blebs composed entirely of low-Ni iron sulfide (troilite, FeS) or troilite + magnetite but in less abundance in association with metallic Fe-Ni beads in opaque assemblages. Troilites are mainly located within the low-Ca pyroxene outer zone and their amounts increase with the abundance of low-Ca pyroxene within chondrules, suggesting co-crystallization of troilite and low-Ca pyroxene during high-temperature events. We show that sulfur concentration and sulfide occurrence in chondrules obey high temperature sulfur solubility and saturation laws. Depending on the fS2 and fO2 of the surrounding gas and on the melt composition, mainly the FeO content, sulfur dissolved in chondrule melts may eventually reach a concentration limit, the sulfur content at sulfide saturation (SCSS), at which an immiscible iron sulfide liquid separates from the silicate melt. The occurrence of both a silicate melt and an immiscible iron sulfide liquid is further supported by the non-wetting behavior of sulfides on silicate phases in chondrules due to the high interfacial tension between their precursor iron-sulfide liquid droplets and the surrounding silicate melt during the high temperature chondrule-forming event. The evolution of chondrule melts from PO to PP towards more silicic compositions, very likely due to high PSiO(g) of the surrounding nebular gas, induces saturation of FeS at much lower S content in PP than in PO chondrules, leading to the co-crystallization of iron sulfides and low-Ca pyroxenes. Conditions of co-saturation of low-Ca pyroxene and FeS are only achieved in non canonical environments characterized by high partial pressures of sulfur and SiO and redox conditions more oxidizing than IW-3. Fe and S mass balance calculations also

  10. Cadmium sulfide/copper sulfide heterojunction cell research. Technical progress report, September 1-November 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, W.W.; Jonath, A.D.

    1980-02-01

    Several all sputter deposited Cu/sub 2/S/CdS cells have been prepared to date with J/sub SC/ approx. = 3 mA/cm/sup 2/ under simulated AM1 illumination. The best AM1 conversion efficiency obtained is 0.6%. This is shown to be typical of sputtered CdS in Cu/sub 2/S/CdS cells investigated to date. The sputtered Cu/sub 2/S appears to be satisfactory for solar cell applications. Presented evidence indicates that the poor conversion efficiency is due to a low-junction electric field intensity on the CdS side of the heterojunction. A multilayer CdS structure has been developed which may allow the tailoring of the junction electric field intensity to a selected high value to obtain high-junction collection efficiency. Other areas of cell development advances included: (1) determination of effect of Cu cones in Cu/sub 2/S on Cu/sub 2/S/CdS cell performance; (2) solution of CdS pinhole problem; and (3) open circuit voltage improvement by heat treatment.

  11. Cadmium sulfide-copper sulfide heterojunction cell research. Quarterly report, September 1-November 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    1981-02-01

    Cell yield data for both Cu/sub 2/S/CdS and Cu/sub 2/S/(CdZn)S are reported. The presence of cracking in the n-type films is reported and the influence of composition and substrate material described. Design efforts for an analytical device that is basically a CdS cell on a transparent substrate, and a low cost gridding procedure are reported. A laser scanning system has been developed to detect incipient shorts and shunting in ungridded cells.

  12. Photoactive nanocrystals by low-temperature welding of copper sulfide nanoparticles and indium sulfide nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hui Min; Tan, Jia Yi; Batabyal, Sudip K; Magdassi, Shlomo; Mhaisalkar, Subodh G; Wong, Lydia H

    2014-12-01

    We successfully utilize the concept of coalescence and room-temperature sintering to prepare morphologically different nanoparticles. n-Type chalcogenide (CuIn5 S8 ) nanocrystals are synthesized at room temperature by simple mixing of oppositely charged precursor nanoparticles. The coalescence of polycation-coated CuS nanoparticles and negatively charged In2 S3 nanoplates is driven by close contact of the particles due to electrostatic interactions. Analysis by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging, and Raman spectroscopy confirms the formation of single-phase CuIn5 S8 without traceable secondary phase. In a photovoltaic device, the use of the coalesced particles yields a power conversion efficiency of 1.8%.

  13. Sulfide Capacity in Ladle Slag at Steelmaking Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allertz, Carl; Sichen, Du

    2015-12-01

    Sulfide capacity measurements were conducted at 1823 K and 1873 K (1550 °C and 1600 °C) for the quaternary Al2O3-CaO-MgO-SiO2 system, for typical compositions used in the ladle in steelmaking. A copper-slag equilibrium was used under controlled oxygen and sulfur potentials. The sulfide capacity is strongly dependent on the composition and it was found to increase with the basic oxides, while it decreases with increase of the acidic components. It was found that CaO is more effective in holding sulfur in the slag compared to MgO when replacing SiO2. For the present slag compositions, Al2O3 and SiO2 behaved similar with respect to sulfur, and no considerable effect could be recorded when replacing one for the other. The sulfide capacity was also found to be strongly dependent on the temperature, increasing with temperature. The present results were compared with industrial data from the ladle, after vacuum treatment, and they were in good agreement.

  14. New data on the Hyrkkoelae native copper mineralization: A natural analogue for the long-term corrosion of copper canisters

    SciTech Connect

    Marcos, N.; Ahonen, L.; Bros, R.; Roos, P.; Suksi, J.; Oversby, V.

    1999-07-01

    The Hyrkkoelae U-Cu mineralization located in southwestern Finland is reassessed with reference to the corrosion mechanisms affecting the stability of native copper and the time-scales of corrosion processes. The mineral assemblage native copper--copper sulfide occurs in open fractures at several depth intervals within granite pegmatites (GP). The surfaces of these open fractures have accumulations of uranophane crystals and other unidentified uranyl compounds. The secondary uranium minerals are mainly distributed around copper sulfide grains. Microscopic intergrowths of copper sulfides and uranyl compounds also have been observed. Groundwater samples were collected from the vicinity of the Cu samples. The hydrogeochemical features of these samples indicate that the present conditions are oxidizing. The minimum age of U(VI) transport and deposition is about 200,000 years. This age is indicated by {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U and {sup 230}Th/{sup 234}U activity ratios of uranophane. The age of the hexavalent uranium precipitation may be somewhat later than the last influxes and/or demobilization of sulfur. The mineral assemblage native copper--copper oxide (cuprite) occurs only at one depth interval within altered granite pegmatite. The fracture surface was coated by smectite. The content of uranium in smectite was 69--75 ppm U. The {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U and {sup 230}Th/{sup 234}U activity ratios of smectite showed that it has been exposed to recent groundwaters (e.g., during the last million years). The pH of the groundwater at this interval was near neutral (6.9). The copper grains present at this fracture surface were as large as 1 mm in diameter and had rims of cuprite of 0.01 to 0.1 mm thick. The smallest grains were totally oxidized.

  15. Sulfide Stability of Planetary Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caiazza, C. M.; Righter, K.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Chesley, J. T.; Ruiz, J.

    2004-01-01

    The isotopic system, 187Re 187Os, can be used to determine the role of crust and mantle in magma genesis. In order to apply the system to natural samples, we must understand variations in Re/Os concentrations. It is thought that low [Os] and [Re] in basalts can be attributed to sulfide (FeS) saturation, as Re behaves incompatibly to high degrees of evolution until sulfide saturation occurs [1]. Previous work has shown that lunar basalts are sulfide under-saturated, and mid-ocean ridge, ocean-island and Martian (shergottites) basalts are saturated [2,3]. However, little is known about arc basalts. In this study, basaltic rocks were analyzed across the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt.

  16. A Reaction Involving Oxygen and Metal Sulfides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, William D. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a procedure for oxygen generation by thermal decomposition of potassium chlorate in presence of manganese dioxide, reacted with various sulfides. Provides a table of sample product yields for various sulfides. (JM)

  17. Seasonal and spatial patterns of metals at a restored copper mine site. I. Stream copper and zinc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bambic, D.G.; Alpers, C.N.; Green, P.G.; Fanelli, E.; Silk, W.K.

    2006-01-01

    Seasonal and spatial variations in metal concentrations and pH were found in a stream at a restored copper mine site located near a massive sulfide deposit in the Foothill copper-zinc belt of the Sierra Nevada, California. At the mouth of the stream, copper concentrations increased and pH decreased with increased streamflow after the onset of winter rain and, unexpectedly, reached extreme values 1 or 2 months after peaks in the seasonal hydrographs. In contrast, aqueous zinc and sulfate concentrations were highest during low-flow periods. Spatial variation was assessed in 400 m of reach encompassing an acidic, metal-laden seep. At this seep, pH remained low (2-3) throughout the year, and copper concentrations were highest. In contrast, the zinc concentrations increased with downstream distance. These spatial patterns were caused by immobilization of copper by hydrous ferric oxides in benthic sediments, coupled with increasing downstream supply of zinc from groundwater seepage.

  18. Mechanism of Mineral Phase Reconstruction for Improving the Beneficiation of Copper and Iron from Copper Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhengqi; Zhu, Deqing; Pan, Jan; Zhang, Feng

    2016-08-01

    To maximize the recovery of iron and copper from copper slag, the modification process by adding a compound additive (a mixture of hematite, pyrite and manganous oxide) and optimizing the cooling of the slag was studied. The phase reconstruction mechanism of the slag modification process was revealed by thermodynamic calculations, x-ray diffraction, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the synergy between the burnt lime and the compound additive promotes the generation of target minerals, such as magnetite and copper matte. In addition, the multifunctional compound additive is able to improve the fluidity of the molten slag, which facilitates the coalescence and growth of fine particles of the target minerals. As a result, the percentage of iron distributed in the form of magnetite increased from 32.9% to 65.1%, and that of the copper exiting in the form of metallic copper and copper sulfide simultaneously increased from 80.0% to 90.3%. Meanwhile, the grains of the target minerals in the modified slag grew markedly to a mean size of over 50 μm after slow cooling. Ultimately, the beneficiation efficiency of copper and iron was improved because of the ease with which the target minerals could be liberated.

  19. Mechanism of Mineral Phase Reconstruction for Improving the Beneficiation of Copper and Iron from Copper Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhengqi; Zhu, Deqing; Pan, Jan; Zhang, Feng

    2016-09-01

    To maximize the recovery of iron and copper from copper slag, the modification process by adding a compound additive (a mixture of hematite, pyrite and manganous oxide) and optimizing the cooling of the slag was studied. The phase reconstruction mechanism of the slag modification process was revealed by thermodynamic calculations, x-ray diffraction, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the synergy between the burnt lime and the compound additive promotes the generation of target minerals, such as magnetite and copper matte. In addition, the multifunctional compound additive is able to improve the fluidity of the molten slag, which facilitates the coalescence and growth of fine particles of the target minerals. As a result, the percentage of iron distributed in the form of magnetite increased from 32.9% to 65.1%, and that of the copper exiting in the form of metallic copper and copper sulfide simultaneously increased from 80.0% to 90.3%. Meanwhile, the grains of the target minerals in the modified slag grew markedly to a mean size of over 50 μm after slow cooling. Ultimately, the beneficiation efficiency of copper and iron was improved because of the ease with which the target minerals could be liberated.

  20. Nickel sulfide hollow whisker formation

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Cramer, S.D.

    1997-02-01

    Hollow, high-aspect-ratio nickel sulfide whiskers were formed during aqueous corrosion experiments at 250 C by the US Department of Energy. The whiskers grew radially from Teflon thread at the waterline in acidic sodium sulfate solutions containing chloride additions. The hollow morphology is consistent with that reported for the mineral millerite found in nature in hematite cavities. The data suggest that iron and chloride impurities are necessary for the observed whisker structure. Hollow nickel sulfide whiskers were observed only in high-temperature corrosion experiments conducted on stainless steels; they were not observed in similar experiments on nickel-base alloys.

  1. Copper cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Copper cyanide ; CASRN 544 - 92 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  2. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Workover Operations § 250.604 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-workover operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or...

  3. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Completion Operations § 250.504 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-completion operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or...

  4. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Production Safety Systems § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of...

  5. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL... § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or...

  6. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604...-Workover Operations § 250.604 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-workover operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined...

  7. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504...-Completion Operations § 250.504 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-completion operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined...

  8. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL... § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or...

  9. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL... § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or...

  10. The Effect of Oxygen Potential on the Sulfide Capacity for Slags Containing Multivalent Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allertz, Carl; Selleby, Malin; Sichen, Du

    2016-10-01

    The dependence of sulfide capacity on the oxygen partial pressure for slags containing multivalent species was investigated experimentally using a slag containing vanadium oxide. Copper-slag equilibration experiments were carried out at 1873 K (1600 °C) in the approximate oxygen partial pressure range 10-15.4 to 10-9 atm. The sulfide capacity was found to be strongly dependent on the oxygen potential in this slag system, increasing with the oxygen partial pressure. The sulfide capacity changed by more than two orders of magnitude over the oxygen partial pressure range. The effect of changing oxygen partial pressure was found to be much greater than the effect of changing slag composition at a fixed oxygen partial pressure.

  11. High-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of sulfidation of brass at the rubber/brass interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Kenichi; Kakubo, Takashi; Shimizu, Katsunori; Amino, Naoya; Mase, Kazuhiko; Komatsu, Takayuki

    2013-01-01

    High resolution photoelectron spectroscopy is utilized to investigate the chemical composition at the rubber/brass interface to elucidate the origin of strong adhesion as well as the degradation between rubber and brass. Special attention has been given to copper sulfides formed at the interface during the vulcanization reaction at 170 °C. At least five sulfur-containing species are identified in the adhesive interlayer including crystalline CuS and amorphous CuxS (x ≃ 2). These copper sulfide species are not uniformly distributed within the layer, but there exits the concentration gradation; the concentration of CuxS is high in the region on the rubber side and is diminished in the deeper region, while vice versa for that of CuS. Degradation of the interface adhesive strength by prolonged vulcanization arises from the decrease in the CuxS/CuS ratio accompanying desulfurization of the adhesive layer.

  12. p-Chlorophenyl methyl sulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    p - Chlorophenyl methyl sulfide ; CASRN 123 - 09 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for N

  13. Transition metal sulfide loaded catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, V.A.; Iton, L.E.; Pasterczyk, J.W.; Winterer, M.; Krause, T.R.

    1994-04-26

    A zeolite-based catalyst is described for activation and conversion of methane. A zeolite support includes a transition metal (Mo, Cr or W) sulfide disposed within the micropores of the zeolite. The catalyst allows activation and conversion of methane to C[sub 2]+ hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere, thereby avoiding formation of oxides of carbon.

  14. Transition metal sulfide loaded catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, Victor A.; Iton, Lennox E.; Pasterczyk, James W.; Winterer, Markus; Krause, Theodore R.

    1994-01-01

    A zeolite based catalyst for activation and conversion of methane. A zeolite support includes a transition metal (Mo, Cr or W) sulfide disposed within the micropores of the zeolite. The catalyst allows activation and conversion of methane to C.sub.2 + hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere, thereby avoiding formation of oxides of carbon.

  15. Elevated corrosion rates and hydrogen sulfide in homes with 'Chinese Drywall'.

    PubMed

    Allen, Joseph G; MacIntosh, David L; Saltzman, Lori E; Baker, Brian J; Matheson, Joanna M; Recht, Joel R; Minegishi, Taeko; Fragala, Matt A; Myatt, Theodore A; Spengler, John D; Stewart, James H; McCarthy, John F

    2012-06-01

    In December 2008, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) began receiving reports about odors, corrosion, and health concerns related to drywall originating from China. In response, a detailed environmental health and engineering evaluation was conducted of 41 complaint and 10 non-complaint homes in the Southeast U.S. Each home investigation included characterization of: 1) drywall composition; 2) indoor and outdoor air quality; 3) temperature, moisture, and building ventilation; and 4) copper and silver corrosion rates. Complaint homes had significantly higher hydrogen sulfide concentrations (mean 0.82 vs. copper sulfide and silver sulfide corrosion compared to non-complaint homes (Cu(2)S: 476 vs. <32 Å/30 d, p<0.01; Ag(2)S: 1472 vs. 389 Å/30 d, p<0.01). The abundance of carbonate and strontium in drywall was also elevated in complaint homes, and appears to be useful objective marker of problematic drywall in homes that meet other screening criteria (e.g., constructed or renovated in 2006-2007, reports of malodor and accelerated corrosion). This research provides empirical evidence of the direct association between homes constructed with 'Chinese Drywall' in 2006-2007 and elevated corrosion rates and hydrogen sulfide concentrations in indoor air.

  16. Current Energy Requirements in the Copper Producing Industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitt, Charles H.; Wadsworth, Milton E.

    1981-06-01

    An analysis of energy usage in the production of refined cathode copper was made from mining ore to cathode copper. In mining copper ore the greatest energy consumers are ore hauling and blasting. Another important factor is the "recovery efficiency" of the metallurgical processes used to extract the copper. The mining and mineral concentrating energies are directly proportional to the "recovery efficiency," with a typical mining operation requiring about 20 million Btu/ton of cathode copper produced. Mineral concentrating was also found to be a large energy consumer, requiring about 43 million Btu/ton of cathode copper. Some possibilities for energy savings in the mineral processing area include use of autogenous grinding and computer control for optimizing grinding operations, improved classifier efficiency, and optimizing the entire concentrator plant performance by interrelating all plant operations. In acid plants, optimization of input SO2 concentration can make the plant a net producer rather than a net user of energy. The conventional smelting process utilizes very little of the energy from the combustion of sulfides in the charge. Several of the newer copper pyrometallurgical processes which utilize more of the combustion energy of the sulfides as heat show a significant improvement over conventional smelting. Generally, increased use of oxygen decreases Level 1 energies but proportionately increases Level 2 energies. Hydrometallurgical processes are, in general, more energy intensive than smelting processes, mainly because of the inability to utilize the heat of reaction of the sulfides. Electrowinning used in most hydrometallurgy processes is also energy intensive, and research in these areas could produce significant energy savings. Combination pyrometallurgical processes are generally less energy intensive than entirely hydrometallurgical processes. Significant improvements may be made in energy use in hydrometallurgical processes by more effective

  17. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, H.; Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1990-01-09

    A composition of matter is described which is comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide. A method for making this composition of matter is also described. This invention relates to the art of powder metallurgy and, more particularly, it relates to dispersion strengthened metals.

  18. Production of sulfur gases and carbon dioxide by synthetic weathering of crushed drill cores from the Santa Cruz porphyry copper deposit near Casa Grande, Pinal County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinkle, M.E.; Ryder, J.L.; Sutley, S.J.; Botinelly, T.

    1990-01-01

    Samples of ground drill cores from the southern part of the Santa Cruz porphyry copper deposit, Casa Grande, Arizona, were oxidized in simulated weathering experiments. The samples were also separated into various mineral fractions and analyzed for contents of metals and sulfide minerals. The principal sulfide mineral present was pyrite. Gases produced in the weathering experiments were measured by gas chromatography. Carbon dioxide, oxygen, carbonyl sulfide, sulfur dioxide and carbon disulfide were found in the gases; no hydrogen sulfide, organic sulfides, or mercaptans were detected. Oxygen concentration was very important for production of the volatiles measured; in general, oxygen concentration was more important to gas production than were metallic element content, sulfide mineral content, or mineral fraction (oxide or sulfide) of the sample. The various volatile species also appeared to be interactive; some of the volatiles measured may have been formed through gas reactions. ?? 1990.

  19. Ore microscopy of the Paoli silver-copper deposit, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, C.A.; Hagni, R.D.; Berendsen, P.

    1991-01-01

    The Paoli silver-copper deposit is located in south-central Oklahoma, 56 km south-southeast from Norman, Oklahoma. It was mined for high-grade silver-copper near the beginning of this century, and intensive exploratory drilling during the early 1970's delineated unmined portions of the deposit. A collaborative study between the U.S.G.S., the Kansas Geological Survey, and the University of Missouri-Rolla was undertaken to provide new information on the character of red bed copper deposits of the Midcontinent region. The Paoli deposit has been interpreted to occur as a roll-front type of deposit. The silver and copper mineralization occurs within paleochannels in the Permian Wellington Formation. The silver-copper interfaces appear to be controlled by oxidation-reduction interfaces that are marked by grey to red color changes in the host sandstone. Ore microscopic examinations of polished thin sections show that unoxidized ore consists of chalcocite, digenite, chalcopyrite, covellite and pyrite; and oxidized ores are characterized by covellite, bornite, hematite and goethite. In sandstone-hosted ores, chalcocite and digenite replace dolomite and border clastic quartz grains. In siltstone-hosted ores, the copper sulfide grains have varied shapes; most are irregular in shape and 5-25 ??m across, others have euhedral shapes suggestive of pyrite crystal replacements, and some are crudely spherical and are 120-200 ??m across. Chalcopyrite is the predominant copper sulfide at depth. Covellite and malachite replace chalcocite and digenite near the surface. Silver only occurs as native silver; most as irregularly shaped grains 40-80 ??m across, but some as cruciform crystals that are up to 3.5 mm across. The native silver has been deposited after copper sulfides, and locally replaces chalcocite. Surficial nodules of pyrite, malachite and hematite locally are present in outcrops at the oxidation-reduction fronts. Polished sections of the nodules show that malachite forms a

  20. Development of novel copper-based sorbents for hot-gas cleanup. [Quarterly] technical report, September 1--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasian, J.; Hill, A.H.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Li Li

    1994-03-01

    The objective of this investigation is to evaluate two novel copper-based sorbents, namely copper-chromium and copper-cerium, for their effectiveness in removing hydrogen sulfide from fuel gas in the temperature range of 650{degree} to 850{degree}C. Such high temperatures will be required for the new generation of gas turbines (inlet >750{degree}C) in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. The effect of pre-reduction on the performance of the sorbents as well as the rate of different reactions occurring in cyclic sulfidation/regeneration, were studied in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). Sulfidation was conducted with and without H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, and with and without pre-reduction in H{sub 2} or H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O. The results of these tests indicate that reduction and regeneration of both sorbents occurs rapidly. Sulfidation of CuCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}, in H{sub 2}O-free and H{sub 2}-/H{sub 2}O-free gas indicates the possible sulfidation of both copper and chromium. Small quantities of SO{sub 2}, were released during sulfidation suggesting the possible oxidation of H{sub 2}S by the sorbent. Regeneration of the CuCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} was complete while regeneration of the CuO-CeO{sub 2} indicated possible limited sulfate formation.

  1. Copper urine test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The copper urine test is performed by collecting urine at specific times for a 24-hour period. The urine is tested for the amount of copper present. The copper urine test is used to determine the presence of Wilson ...

  2. Marine diagenesis of hydrothermal sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Moammar, M.O.

    1985-01-01

    An attempt is made to discuss the artificial and natural oxidation and hydrolysis of hydrothermal sulfide upon interaction with normal seawater. Synthetic and natural ferrosphalerite particles used in kinetic oxidation and hydrolysis studies in seawater develop dense, crystalline coatings consisting of ordered and ferrimagnetic delta-(Fe, Zn)OOH. Due to the formation of this reactive diffusion barrier, the release of Zn into solution decreases rapidly, and sulfide oxidation is reduced to a low rate determined by the diffusion of oxygen through the oxyhydroxide film. This also acts as an efficient solvent for ions such as Zn/sup 2 +/, Ca/sup 2 +/, and possibly Cd/sup 2 +/, which contribute to the stabilization of the delta-FeOOH structure. The oxidation of sulfide occurs in many seafloor spreading areas, such as 21/sup 0/N on the East Pacific Ridge. In these areas the old surface of the sulfide chimneys are found to be covered by an orange stain, and sediment near the base of nonactive vents is also found to consist of what has been referred to as amorphous iron oxide and hydroxide. This thesis also discusses the exceedingly low solubility of zinc in seawater, from delta-(Fe, Zn)OOH and the analogous phase (zinc-ferrihydroxide) and the zinc exchange minerals, 10-A manganate and montmorillonite. The concentrations of all four are of the same magnitude (16, 36.4, and 12 nM, respectively) as the zinc concentration in deep ocean water (approx. 10 nM), which suggests that manganates and montmorillonite with iron oxyhydroxides control zinc concentration in the deep ocean.

  3. Chemical dissolution of sulfide minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chao, T.T.; Sanzolone, R.F.

    1977-01-01

    Chemical dissolution treatments involving the use of aqua regia, 4 N HNO3, H2O2-ascorbic acid, oxalic acid, KClO3+HCl, and KClO3+HCl followed by 4 N HNO3 were applied to specimens of nine common sulfide minerals (galena, chalcopyrite, cinnabar, molybdenite, orpiment, pyrite, stibnite, sphalerite, and tetrahedrite) mixed individually with a clay loam soil. The resultant decrease in the total sulfur content of the mixture, as determined by using the Leco induction furnace, was used to evaluate the effectiveness of each chemical treatment. A combination of KClO3+HCl followed by 4 N HNO3 boiling gently for 20 min has been shown to be very effective in dissolving all the sulfide minerals. This treatment is recommended to dissolve metals residing in sulfide minerals admixed with secondary weathering products, as one step in a fractionation scheme whereby metals in soluble and adsorbed forms, and those associated with organic materials and secondary oxides, are first removed by other chemical extractants.

  4. Sulfide-Driven Microbial Electrosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, YM; Ebrahim, A; Feist, AM; Embree, M; Zhang, T; Lovley, D; Zengler, K

    2013-01-01

    Microbial electrosynthesis, the conversion of carbon dioxide to organic molecules using electricity, has recently been demonstrated for acetogenic microorganisms, such as Sporomusa ovata. The energy for reduction of carbon dioxide originates from the hydrolysis of water on the anode, requiring a sufficiently low potential. Here we evaluate the use of sulfide as an electron source for microbial electrosynthesis. Abiotically oxidation of sulfide on the anode yields two electrons. The oxidation product, elemental sulfur, can be further oxidized to sulfate by Desulfobulbus propionicus, generating six additional electrons in the process. The eight electrons generated from the combined abiotic and biotic steps were used to reduce carbon dioxide to acetate on a graphite cathode by Sporomusa ovata at a rate of 24.8 mmol/day.m(2). Using a strain of Desulfuromonas as biocatalyst on the anode resulted in an acetate production rate of 49.9 mmol/day.m(2), with a Coulombic efficiency of over 90%. These results demonstrate that sulfide can serve effectively as an alternative electron donor for microbial electrosynthesis.

  5. Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity of sulfided hexanuclear molybdenum cluster compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Spink, D.

    1990-09-21

    Hexanuclear molybdenum clusters with mixed chloride and sulfide bridging ligands were prepared by reacting {alpha}-MoCl{sub 2} with sodium hydrosulfide in the presence of sodium butoxide. The resulting species, Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub (8-x)}S{sub x}{center dot}npy(x {congruent} 3.6, n {congruent} 4, py = pyridine), was pyrophoric and insoluble. The mixed sulfide chloride cluster species Mo{sub 6}S{sub 4}Cl{sub 4}{center dot}6OPEt{sub 3} and Mo{sub 6}S{sub {approximately}5}Cl{sub {approximately}3}{center dot}6PEt{sub 3} and Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}6PEt{sub 3} were isolated and characterized. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance, electron paramagnetic resonance, and UV/visible spectra were obtained for each fraction. The completely sulfided cluster, Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}6PEt{sub 3}, was prepared similarly and used in various experiments as a possible precursor to Chevrel phase materials of the type Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}or M{sub n}Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}. With the goal of removing all of the triethylphosphine ligands, Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}6PEt{sub 3} was reacted with the transition metal carbonyls molybdenum hexacarbonyl and dicobalt octacarbonyl. Reaction on the molecular sulfide cluster with copper(I) chloride in toluene gave a completely insoluble product. The reaction of Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}6PEt{sub 3} with propylene sulfide gave a product whose infrared spectra showed only very weak peaks associated with coordinated triethylphosphine. The elemental analysis of this product fit the formula Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}5SPEt{sub 3}. Reactivity of the outer ligands of the Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}npy and Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}(6{minus}x)PrNH{sub x} clusters were investigated. Crystalline Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}6THT was recovered from the reaction of the n-propylamine derivative with THT. A crystal structure determination was done. 87 refs., 12 fig., 15 tabs.

  6. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604... § 250.604 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-workover operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined in § 250.490 of...

  7. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504... § 250.504 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-completion operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined in § 250.490 of...

  8. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604... § 250.604 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-workover operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined in § 250.490 of...

  9. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504... § 250.504 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-completion operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined in § 250.490 of...

  10. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604... § 250.604 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-workover operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined in § 250.490 of...

  11. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504... § 250.504 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-completion operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined in § 250.490 of...

  12. Settling of copper drops in molten slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warczok, A.; Utigard, T. A.

    1995-02-01

    The settling of suspended metal and sulfide droplets in liquid metallurgical, slags can be affected by electric fields. The migration of droplets due to electrocapillary motion phenomena may be used to enhance the recovery of suspended matte/metal droplets and thereby to increase the recovery of pay metals. An experimental technique was developed for the purpose of measuring the effect of electric fields on the settling rate of metallic drops in liquid slags. Copper drops suspended in CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-Cu2O slags were found to migrate toward the cathode. Electric fields can increase the settling rate of 5-mm-diameter copper drops 3 times or decrease the settling until levitation by reversal of the electric field. The enhanced settling due to electric fields decreases with increasing Cu2O contents in the slag.

  13. Formation and phase separation during the smelting of sulfide raw materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, A. V.; Paretsky, V. M.

    2009-10-01

    This paper discusses the most recent developments made at the Gintsvetmet Institute in technologies and equipment for single-stage autogenous smelting of copper sulfide raw materials to produce white metal and blister copper. In particular, the oxygen-flame smelting process and separation of highly basic calcium-containing slags are considered. This technology includes the oxygen-flame smelting process (KFP Process) to produce highly basic self-disintegrating ferrite-calcium slags with their subsequent flotation to recover copper. Also included is a sparging smelting process (FBP Process) to produce combined slags subjected to decopperizing inside the same furnace. Results of special investigations of the slag structure obtained in the KFP and FBP processes and substantiating selection of their chemical and phase composition are presented. These processes meet stringent requirements for advanced technologies with respect to energy conservation and environmental safety with different scales of production and within a wide range of specific conditions of particular operations.

  14. Cross-Comparison of Leaching Strains Isolated from Two Different Regions: Chambishi and Dexing Copper Mines

    PubMed Central

    Ngom, Baba; Liang, Yili; Liu, Xueduan

    2014-01-01

    A cross-comparison of six strains isolated from two different regions, Chambishi copper mine (Zambia, Africa) and Dexing copper mine (China, Asia), was conducted to study the leaching efficiency of low grade copper ores. The strains belong to the three major species often encountered in bioleaching of copper sulfide ores under mesophilic conditions: Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, and Leptospirillum ferriphilum. Prior to their study in bioleaching, the different strains were characterized and compared at physiological level. The results revealed that, except for copper tolerance, strains within species presented almost similar physiological traits with slight advantages of Chambishi strains. However, in terms of leaching efficiency, native strains always achieved higher cell density and greater iron and copper extraction rates than the foreign microorganisms. In addition, microbial community analysis revealed that the different mixed cultures shared almost the same profile, and At. ferrooxidans strains always outcompeted the other strains. PMID:25478575

  15. Cross-comparison of leaching strains isolated from two different regions: Chambishi and Dexing copper mines.

    PubMed

    Ngom, Baba; Liang, Yili; Liu, Xueduan

    2014-01-01

    A cross-comparison of six strains isolated from two different regions, Chambishi copper mine (Zambia, Africa) and Dexing copper mine (China, Asia), was conducted to study the leaching efficiency of low grade copper ores. The strains belong to the three major species often encountered in bioleaching of copper sulfide ores under mesophilic conditions: Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, and Leptospirillum ferriphilum. Prior to their study in bioleaching, the different strains were characterized and compared at physiological level. The results revealed that, except for copper tolerance, strains within species presented almost similar physiological traits with slight advantages of Chambishi strains. However, in terms of leaching efficiency, native strains always achieved higher cell density and greater iron and copper extraction rates than the foreign microorganisms. In addition, microbial community analysis revealed that the different mixed cultures shared almost the same profile, and At. ferrooxidans strains always outcompeted the other strains.

  16. Measurement of labile copper in wine by medium exchange stripping potentiometry utilising screen printed carbon electrodes.

    PubMed

    Clark, Andrew C; Kontoudakis, Nikolaos; Barril, Celia; Schmidtke, Leigh M; Scollary, Geoffrey R

    2016-07-01

    The presence of copper in wine is known to impact the reductive, oxidative and colloidal stability of wine, and techniques enabling measurement of different forms of copper in wine are of particular interest in understanding these spoilage processes. Electrochemical stripping techniques developed to date require significant pretreatment of wine, potentially disturbing the copper binding equilibria. A thin mercury film on a screen printed carbon electrode was utilised in a flow system for the direct analysis of labile copper in red and white wine by constant current stripping potentiometry with medium exchange. Under the optimised conditions, including an enrichment time of 500s and constant current of 1.0μA, the response range was linear from 0.015 to 0.200mg/L. The analysis of 52 red and white wines showed that this technique generally provided lower labile copper concentrations than reported for batch measurement by related techniques. Studies in a model system and in finished wines showed that the copper sulfide was not measured as labile copper, and that loss of hydrogen sulfide via volatilisation induced an increase in labile copper within the model wine system.

  17. [Copper and copper alloys. Technology updates].

    PubMed

    Loconsolo, V; Crespi, M

    2012-01-01

    The correlations between copper and copper alloys and human health have been the subject of some recent and extensive scientific researches. The voluntary risks evaluation, which anticipated the EU REACH Directive application, has shown that copper is a "safe" product for human health and for environment. In addition, it could be of great help thanks to its antibacterial properties. Copper tube can contribute in a relevant way to the prevention of water systems pollution by Legionella. Also the spreading of nosocomial infections is significantly contrasted by the use of copper and copper alloys for the production of articles intended for being frequently touched by people. The Environmental Protection Agency of the United States has in fact "registered" as antibacterial over 350 of copper alloys. PMID:23213799

  18. Lithium-cupric sulfide cell

    SciTech Connect

    Cuesta, A.J.; Bump, D.D.

    1980-01-01

    Lithium cells have become the primary power source for cardiac pacemakers due to their reliability and longevity at low current drain rates. A lithium-cupric sulfide cell was developed which makes maximum use of the shape of a pacemaker's battery compartment. The cell has a stable voltage throughout 90% of its lifetime. It then drops to a second stable voltage before depletion. The voltage drop creates a small decrease in pacemaker rate, which alerts the physician to replace the pacemaker. No loss of capacity due to self-discharge as been seen to date, and cells have proven to be safe under extreme conditions. 2 refs.

  19. Molybdenum sulfide/carbide catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Alonso, Gabriel; Chianelli, Russell R.; Fuentes, Sergio; Torres, Brenda

    2007-05-29

    The present invention provides methods of synthesizing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2) and carbon-containing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2-xC.sub.x) catalysts that exhibit improved catalytic activity for hydrotreating reactions involving hydrodesulfurization, hydrodenitrogenation, and hydrogenation. The present invention also concerns the resulting catalysts. Furthermore, the invention concerns the promotion of these catalysts with Co, Ni, Fe, and/or Ru sulfides to create catalysts with greater activity, for hydrotreating reactions, than conventional catalysts such as cobalt molybdate on alumina support.

  20. Preparation of amorphous sulfide sieves

    DOEpatents

    Siadati, Mohammad H.; Alonso, Gabriel; Chianelli, Russell R.

    2006-11-07

    The present invention involves methods and compositions for synthesizing catalysts/porous materials. In some embodiments, the resulting materials are amorphous sulfide sieves that can be mass-produced for a variety of uses. In some embodiments, methods of the invention concern any suitable precursor (such as thiomolybdate salt) that is exposed to a high pressure pre-compaction, if need be. For instance, in some cases the final bulk shape (but highly porous) may be same as the original bulk shape. The compacted/uncompacted precursor is then subjected to an open-flow hot isostatic pressing, which causes the precursor to decompose and convert to a highly porous material/catalyst.

  1. Alternative Anode Reaction for Copper Electrowinning

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2005-07-01

    This report describes a project funded by the Department of Energy, with additional funding from Bechtel National, to develop a copper electrowinning process with lower costs and lower emissions than the current process. This new process also includes more energy efficient production by using catalytic-surfaced anodes and a different electrochemical couple in the electrolyte, providing an alternative oxidation reaction that requires up to 50% less energy than is currently required to electrowin the same quantity of copper. This alternative anode reaction, which oxidizes ferric ions to ferrous, with subsequent reduction back to ferric using sulfur dioxide, was demonstrated to be technically and operationally feasible. However, pure sulfur dioxide was determined to be prohibitively expensive and use of a sulfur burner, producing 12% SO{sub 2}, was deemed a viable alternative. This alternate, sulfur-burning process requires a sulfur burner, waste heat boiler, quench tower, and reaction towers. The electrolyte containing absorbed SO{sub 2} passes through activated carbon to regenerate the ferrous ion. Because this reaction produces sulfuric acid, excess acid removal by ion exchange is necessary and produces a low concentration acid suitable for leaching oxide copper minerals. If sulfide minerals are to be leached or the acid unneeded on site, hydrogen was demonstrated to be a potential reductant. Preliminary economics indicate that the process would only be viable if significant credits could be realized for electrical power produced by the sulfur burner and for acid if used for leaching of oxidized copper minerals on site.

  2. Copper Speciation in Variably Toxic Sediments at the Ely Copper Mine, Vermont, United States.

    PubMed

    Kimball, Bryn E; Foster, Andrea L; Seal, Robert R; Piatak, Nadine M; Webb, Samuel M; Hammarstrom, Jane M

    2016-02-01

    At the Ely Copper Mine Superfund site, Cu concentrations exceed background values in both streamwater (160-1200 times) and sediments (15-79 times). Previously, these sediment samples were incubated with laboratory test organisms, and they exhibited variable toxicity for different stream sites. In this study we combined bulk- and microscale techniques to determine Cu speciation and distribution in these contaminated sediments on the basis of evidence from previous work that Cu was the most important stressor in this environment and that variable observed toxicity could have resulted from differences in Cu speciation. Copper speciation results were similar at microscopic and bulk scales. The major Cu species in the more toxic samples were sorbed or coprecipitated with secondary Mn (birnessite) and Fe minerals (jarosite and goethite), which together accounted for nearly 80% of the total Cu. The major Cu species in the less toxic samples were Cu sulfides (chalcopyrite and a covellite-like phase), making up about 80-95% of the total Cu, with minor amounts of Cu associated with jarosite or goethite. These Cu speciation results are consistent with the toxicity results, considering that Cu sorbed or coprecipitated with secondary phases at near-neutral pH is relatively less stable than Cu bound to sulfide at lower pH. The more toxic stream sediment sites were those that contained fewer detrital sulfides and were upstream of the major mine waste pile, suggesting that removal and consolidation of sulfide-bearing waste piles on site may not eliminate all sources of bioaccessible Cu.

  3. Copper Speciation in Variably Toxic Sediments at the Ely Copper Mine, Vermont, United States.

    PubMed

    Kimball, Bryn E; Foster, Andrea L; Seal, Robert R; Piatak, Nadine M; Webb, Samuel M; Hammarstrom, Jane M

    2016-02-01

    At the Ely Copper Mine Superfund site, Cu concentrations exceed background values in both streamwater (160-1200 times) and sediments (15-79 times). Previously, these sediment samples were incubated with laboratory test organisms, and they exhibited variable toxicity for different stream sites. In this study we combined bulk- and microscale techniques to determine Cu speciation and distribution in these contaminated sediments on the basis of evidence from previous work that Cu was the most important stressor in this environment and that variable observed toxicity could have resulted from differences in Cu speciation. Copper speciation results were similar at microscopic and bulk scales. The major Cu species in the more toxic samples were sorbed or coprecipitated with secondary Mn (birnessite) and Fe minerals (jarosite and goethite), which together accounted for nearly 80% of the total Cu. The major Cu species in the less toxic samples were Cu sulfides (chalcopyrite and a covellite-like phase), making up about 80-95% of the total Cu, with minor amounts of Cu associated with jarosite or goethite. These Cu speciation results are consistent with the toxicity results, considering that Cu sorbed or coprecipitated with secondary phases at near-neutral pH is relatively less stable than Cu bound to sulfide at lower pH. The more toxic stream sediment sites were those that contained fewer detrital sulfides and were upstream of the major mine waste pile, suggesting that removal and consolidation of sulfide-bearing waste piles on site may not eliminate all sources of bioaccessible Cu. PMID:26734712

  4. Copper speciation in variably toxic sediments at the Ely Copper Mine, Vermont, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimball, Bryn E.; Foster, Andrea L.; Seal, Robert; Piatak, Nadine; Webb, Samuel M.; Hammarstrom, Jane M.

    2016-01-01

    At the Ely Copper Mine Superfund site, Cu concentrations exceed background values in both streamwater (160–1200 times) and sediments (15–79 times). Previously, these sediment samples were incubated with laboratory test organisms, and they exhibited variable toxicity for different stream sites. In this study we combined bulk- and microscale techniques to determine Cu speciation and distribution in these contaminated sediments on the basis of evidence from previous work that Cu was the most important stressor in this environment and that variable observed toxicity could have resulted from differences in Cu speciation. Copper speciation results were similar at microscopic and bulk scales. The major Cu species in the more toxic samples were sorbed or coprecipitated with secondary Mn (birnessite) and Fe minerals (jarosite and goethite), which together accounted for nearly 80% of the total Cu. The major Cu species in the less toxic samples were Cu sulfides (chalcopyrite and a covellite-like phase), making up about 80–95% of the total Cu, with minor amounts of Cu associated with jarosite or goethite. These Cu speciation results are consistent with the toxicity results, considering that Cu sorbed or coprecipitated with secondary phases at near-neutral pH is relatively less stable than Cu bound to sulfide at lower pH. The more toxic stream sediment sites were those that contained fewer detrital sulfides and were upstream of the major mine waste pile, suggesting that removal and consolidation of sulfide-bearing waste piles on site may not eliminate all sources of bioaccessible Cu.

  5. Synthesis and optical properties of sulfide nanoparticles prepared in dimethylsulfoxide.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuebin; Ma, Lun; Zhang, Xing; Joly, Alan G; Liu, Zuli; Chen, Wei

    2008-11-01

    Many methods have been reported for the formation of sulfide nanoparticles by the reaction of metallic salts with sulfide chemical sources in aqueous solutions or organic solvents. Here, we report the formation of sulfide nanoparticles in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) by boiling metallic salts without sulfide sources. The sulfide sources are generated from the boiling of DMSO and react with metallic salts to form sulfide nanoparticles. In this method DMSO functions as a solvent and a sulfide source as well as a stabilizer for the formation of the nanoparticles. The recipe is simple and economical making sulfide nanoparticles formed in this way readily available for many potential applications.

  6. 40 CFR 425.03 - Sulfide analytical methods and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Provisions § 425.03 Sulfide analytical methods and applicability. (a) The potassium ferricyanide titration... the potassium ferricyanide titration method for the determination of sulfide in wastewaters...

  7. 40 CFR 425.03 - Sulfide analytical methods and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Provisions § 425.03 Sulfide analytical methods and applicability. (a) The potassium ferricyanide titration... the potassium ferricyanide titration method for the determination of sulfide in wastewaters...

  8. 40 CFR 425.03 - Sulfide analytical methods and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Provisions § 425.03 Sulfide analytical methods and applicability. (a) The potassium ferricyanide titration... the potassium ferricyanide titration method for the determination of sulfide in wastewaters...

  9. Synthesis and Optical Properties of Sulfide Nanoparticles Prepared in Dimethylsulfoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuebin; Ma, Lun; Zhang, Xing; Joly, Alan G.; Liu, Zuli; Chen, Wei

    2008-11-01

    Many methods have been reported for the formation of sulfide nanoparticles by the reaction of metallic salts with sulfide chemical sources in aqueous solutions or organic solvents. Here, we report the formation of sulfide nanoparticles in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) by boiling metallic salts without sulfide sources. The sulfide sources are generated from the boiling of DMSO and react with metallic salts to form sulfide nanoparticles. In this method DMSO functions as a solvent and a sulfide source as well as a stabilizer for the formation of the nanoparticles. The recipe is simple and economical making sulfide nanoparticles formed in this way readily available for many potential applications.

  10. A field investigation of the relationship between zinc and acid volatile sulfide concentrations in freshwater sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ankley, Gerald T.; Liber, Karsten; Call, Daniel J.; Markee, Thomas P.; Canfield, Timothy J.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    1996-01-01

    Understanding relationships between cationic metals such as cadmium, copper, nickel, lead and zinc, and amorphous iron sulfides, measured as acid volatile sulfide (AVS), is key to predicting metal bioavailability and toxicity insediments. The objective of the present study was to assess seasonal and spatial variations of AVS in freshwater sediments contaminated with zinc. Sediments were sampled from three streams with varying levels of zinc contamination at two different times, March and June of 1995, representing cold- and warm-weather situations. Interstitial (pore) water concentrations of zinc, and solid phase concentrations of AVS and zinc were measured in surficial and deep sediment horizons. Toxicity tests (10-d) with the amphipodHyalella azteca were conducted using intact cores. Sediment zinc concentrations from six sites within the primary test stream differed by about five-fold, and also varied seasonally. Acid volatile sulfide concentrations were generally lower than those of zinc, and pore water zinc concentrations typically were elevated. There was a positive correlation between solid-phase AVS and zinc concentrations, suggesting that the system was dominated by zinc, as opposed to iron sulfides. In contrast to expectations arising from some studies of seasonal variations of AVS in iron-dominated systems, AVS concentrations were smaller in June than in March. However, this was likely due to a major storm event and associated sediment scouring before the June sampling, rather than to seasonal processes related to variations in temperature and dissolved oxygen. Based upon an indirect analysis of depth variations in AVS, there was some indication that zinc sulfide might be less prone to oxidation than iron sulfide. There was a strong correlation between toxicity of the sediment samples toH. azteca and interstitial water concentrations of zinc; however, the possible contribution of other contaminants to sediment toxicity cannot be dismissed.

  11. Variation in sulfide tolerance of photosystem II in phylogenetically diverse cyanobacteria from sulfidic habitats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Scott R.; Bebout, Brad M.

    2004-01-01

    Physiological and molecular phylogenetic approaches were used to investigate variation among 12 cyanobacterial strains in their tolerance of sulfide, an inhibitor of oxygenic photosynthesis. Cyanobacteria from sulfidic habitats were found to be phylogenetically diverse and exhibited an approximately 50-fold variation in photosystem II performance in the presence of sulfide. Whereas the degree of tolerance was positively correlated with sulfide levels in the environment, a strain's phenotype could not be predicted from the tolerance of its closest relatives. These observations suggest that sulfide tolerance is a dynamic trait primarily shaped by environmental variation. Despite differences in absolute tolerance, similarities among strains in the effects of sulfide on chlorophyll fluorescence induction indicated a common mode of toxicity. Based on similarities with treatments known to disrupt the oxygen-evolving complex, it was concluded that sulfide toxicity resulted from inhibition of the donor side of photosystem II.

  12. Experimental Investigation and Modeling of Copper Smelting Slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starodub, Konstantin; Kuminova, Yaroslava; Dinsdale, Alan; Cheverikin, Vladimir; Filichkina, Vera; Saynazarov, Abdukahhar; Khvan, Alexandra; Kondratiev, Alex

    2016-07-01

    Effective extraction of copper from sulfide ores requires careful operation of a copper smelter, which in turn depends very much on chemistry of the feed and resulted slag and matte. For example, chemical composition of copper smelting slags has to be in a certain range to ensure that their properties are within specific limits. Disobeying these rules may lead to complications in smelting operation, poor quality of the copper products, and premature shutdown of the copper smelter. In the present paper the microstructure and phase composition of slags from the Almalyk copper flash smelter were investigated experimentally and then modeled thermodynamically to evaluate potential ways of improvement and optimization of the copper smelting process and its products. The slag samples were taken at different stages of the copper smelting process: on slag tapping, after slag transportation to a deposition site, and at the site. Experimental investigation included the XRD, XRF, and SEM techniques, which were also confirmed by the traditional wet chemistry analysis. Thermodynamic modeling was carried out using thermochemical software package MTDATA, which enables thermodynamic and physical properties of the matte, slag, and gas phases to be calculated in a wide range of temperatures, pressures, and chemical compositions. In addition, slag viscosities and corresponding matte settling rates were estimated using the modified Urbain and Utigard-Warczok models, and the Hadamard-Rybczynski equation, respectively. It was found that the copper content in the slags may vary significantly depending on the location of slag sampling. Cu was found to be present as sulfide particles, almost no Cu was found to be dissolved in the slag. Analysis of microstructure and phase composition showed that major phase found in the samples is fayalite, while other phases are complex spinels (based on magnetite), different sulfides, and a glass-like phase. Thermodynamic calculations demonstrated the

  13. Experimental Investigation and Modeling of Copper Smelting Slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starodub, Konstantin; Kuminova, Yaroslava; Dinsdale, Alan; Cheverikin, Vladimir; Filichkina, Vera; Saynazarov, Abdukahhar; Khvan, Alexandra; Kondratiev, Alex

    2016-10-01

    Effective extraction of copper from sulfide ores requires careful operation of a copper smelter, which in turn depends very much on chemistry of the feed and resulted slag and matte. For example, chemical composition of copper smelting slags has to be in a certain range to ensure that their properties are within specific limits. Disobeying these rules may lead to complications in smelting operation, poor quality of the copper products, and premature shutdown of the copper smelter. In the present paper the microstructure and phase composition of slags from the Almalyk copper flash smelter were investigated experimentally and then modeled thermodynamically to evaluate potential ways of improvement and optimization of the copper smelting process and its products. The slag samples were taken at different stages of the copper smelting process: on slag tapping, after slag transportation to a deposition site, and at the site. Experimental investigation included the XRD, XRF, and SEM techniques, which were also confirmed by the traditional wet chemistry analysis. Thermodynamic modeling was carried out using thermochemical software package MTDATA, which enables thermodynamic and physical properties of the matte, slag, and gas phases to be calculated in a wide range of temperatures, pressures, and chemical compositions. In addition, slag viscosities and corresponding matte settling rates were estimated using the modified Urbain and Utigard-Warczok models, and the Hadamard-Rybczynski equation, respectively. It was found that the copper content in the slags may vary significantly depending on the location of slag sampling. Cu was found to be present as sulfide particles, almost no Cu was found to be dissolved in the slag. Analysis of microstructure and phase composition showed that major phase found in the samples is fayalite, while other phases are complex spinels (based on magnetite), different sulfides, and a glass-like phase. Thermodynamic calculations demonstrated the

  14. Phase analytical studies of industrial copper smelting slags. Part I: Silicate slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüffler, R.; Dávalos, J.

    1998-12-01

    The pyrometallurgical extraction of copper from sulfide ore concentrates is determined by the behaviour of the associated iron during smelting. Hence, 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy is an attractive tool for studying the phases in silicate slags from German and Chilean smelting plants. Other methods used were ore microscopy, electron microprobe analysis, and X-ray powder diffraction.

  15. Ammonia and hydrogen sulfide removal using biochar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reducing ammonia and hydrogen sulfide emissions from livestock facilities is an important issue for many communities and livestock producers. Ammonia has been regarded as odorous, precursor for particulate matter (PM), and contributed to livestock mortality. Hydrogen sulfide is highly toxic at elev...

  16. Sulfide oxidation under chemolithoautotrophic denitrifying conditions.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Ricardo Beristain; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Rowlette, Pieter; Flores, Elias Razo; Gómez, Jorge; Field, Jim A

    2006-12-20

    Chemolithoautotrophic denitrifying microorganisms oxidize reduced inorganic sulfur compounds coupled to the reduction of nitrate as an electron acceptor. These denitrifiers can be applied to the removal of nitrogen and/or sulfur contamination from wastewater, groundwater, and gaseous streams. This study investigated the physiology and kinetics of chemolithotrophic denitrification by an enrichment culture utilizing hydrogen sulfide, elemental sulfur, or thiosulfate as electron donor. Complete oxidation of sulfide to sulfate was observed when nitrate was supplemented at concentrations equal or exceeding the stoichiometric requirement. In contrast, sulfide was only partially oxidized to elemental sulfur when nitrate concentrations were limiting. Sulfide was found to inhibit chemolithotrophic sulfoxidation, decreasing rates by approximately 21-fold when the sulfide concentration increased from 2.5 to 10.0 mM, respectively. Addition of low levels of acetate (0.5 mM) enhanced denitrification and sulfate formation, suggesting that acetate was utilized as a carbon source by chemolithotrophic denitrifiers. The results of this study indicate the potential of chemolithotrophic denitrification for the removal of hydrogen sulfide. The sulfide/nitrate ratio can be used to control the fate of sulfide oxidation to either elemental sulfur or sulfate.

  17. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Safety Systems § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain...

  18. Weathering of sulfides on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Roger G.; Fisher, Duncan S.

    1987-01-01

    Pyrrhotite-pentlandite assemblages in mafic and ultramafic igneous rocks may have contributed significantly to the chemical weathering reactions that produce degradation products in the Martian regolith. By analogy and terrestrial processes, a model is proposed whereby supergene alteration of these primary Fe-Ni sulfides on Mars has generated secondary sulfides (e.g., pyrite) below the water table and produced acidic groundwater containing high concentrations of dissolved Fe, Ni, and sulfate ions. The low pH solutions also initiated weathering reactions of igneous feldspars and ferromagnesian silicates to form clay silicate and ferric oxyhydroxide phases. Near-surface oxidation and hydrolysis of ferric sulfato-and hydroxo-complex ions and sols formed gossan above the water table consisting of poorly crystalline hydrated ferric sulfates (e.g., jarosite), oxides (ferrihydrite, goethite), and silica (opal). Underlying groundwater, now permafrost contains hydroxo sulfato complexes of Fe, Al, Mg, Ni, which may be stabilized in frozen acidic solutions beneath the surface of Mars. Sublimation of permafrost may replenish colloidal ferric oxides, sulfates, and phyllosilicates during dust storms on Mars.

  19. Percutaneous absorption of selenium sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Farley, J.; Skelly, E.M.; Weber, C.B.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine selenium levels in the urine of Tinea patients before and after overnight application of a 2.5% selenium sulfide lotion. Selenium was measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Hydride generation and carbon rod atomization were studied. It was concluded from this study that selenium is absorbed through intact skin. Selenium is then excreted, at least partially, in urine, for at least a week following treatment. The data show that absorption and excretion of selenium vary on an individual basis. Selenium levels in urine following a single application of selenium sulfide lotion do not indicate that toxic amounts of selenium are being absorbed. Repeated treatments with SeS/sub 2/ result in selenium concentrations in urine which are significantly higher than normal. Significant matrix effects are observed in the carbon rod atomization of urine samples for selenium determinations, even in the presence of a matrix modifier such as nickel. The method of standard additions is required to obtain accurate results in the direct determination of selenium in urine by carbon rod AAS.

  20. Hydrogen sulfide pollution in wastewater treatment facilities

    SciTech Connect

    AlDhowalia, K.H. )

    1987-01-01

    The hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) found in wastewater collection systems and wastewater treatment facilities results from the bacterial reduction of the sulfate ion (SO{sub 4}). Hydrogen sulfide is a gas that occurs both in the sewer atmosphere and as a dissolved gas in the wastewater. When raw wastewater first enters the wastewater treatment facility by gravity most of the hydrogen sulfide is in the gaseous phase and will escape into the atmosphere at the inlet structures. Also some of the dissolved hydrogen sulfide will be released at points of turbulance such as at drops in flow, flumes, or aeration chambers. Several factors can cause excessive hydrogen sulfide concentrations in a sewerage system. These include septic sewage, long flow times in the sewerage system, high temperatures, flat sewer grades, and poor ventilation. These factors are discussed in this paper.

  1. A computational study of adhesion between rubber and metal sulfides at rubber-brass interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Chian Ye; Hirvi, Janne T.; Suvanto, Mika; Bazhenov, Andrey S.; Ajoviita, Tommi; Markkula, Katriina; Pakkanen, Tapani A.

    2015-05-01

    Computational study at level of density functional theory has been carried out in order to investigate the adhesion between rubber and brass plated steel cord, which has high importance in tire manufacturing. Adsorption of natural rubber based adsorbate models has been studied on zinc sulfide, ZnS(1 1 0), and copper sulfide, Cu2S(1 1 1) and CuS(0 0 1), surfaces as the corresponding phases are formed in adhesive interlayer during rubber vulcanization. Saturated hydrocarbons exhibited weak interactions, whereas unsaturated hydrocarbons and sulfur-containing adsorbates interacted with the metal atoms of sulfide surfaces more strongly. Sulfur-containing adsorbates interacted with ZnS(1 1 0) surface stronger than unsaturated hydrocarbons, whereras both Cu2S(1 1 1) and CuS(0 0 1) surfaces showed opposite adsorption preference as unsaturated hydrocarbons adsorbed stronger than sulfur-containing adsorbates. The different interaction strength order can play role in rubber-brass adhesion with different relative sulfide concentrations. Moreover, Cu2S(1 1 1) surface exhibits higher adsorption energies than CuS(0 0 1) surface, possibly indicating dominant role of Cu2S in the adhesion between rubber and brass.

  2. Dissolved sulfides in the oxic water column of San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuwabara, J.S.; Luther, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Trace contaminants enter major estuaries such as San Francisco Bay from a variety of point and nonpoint sources and may then be repartitioned between solid and aqueous phases or altered in chemical speciation. Chemical speciation affects the bioavailability of metals as well as organic ligands to planktonic and benthic organisms, and the partitioning of these solutes between phases. Our previous, work in south San Francisco Bay indicated that sulfide complexation with metals may be of particular importance because of the thermodynamic stability of these complexes. Although the water column of the bay is consistently well-oxygenated and typically unstratified with respect to dissolved oxygen, the kinetics of sulfide oxidation could exert at least transient controls on metal speciation. Our initial data on dissolved sulfides in the main channel of both the northern and southern components of the bay consistently indicate submicromolar concenrations (from <1 nM to 162 nM), as one would expect in an oxidizing environment. However, chemical speciation calculations over the range of observed sulfide concentrations indicate that these trace concentrations in the bay water column can markedly affect chemical speciation of ecologically significant trace metals such as cadmium, copper, and zinc.

  3. [Copper transport and metabolism].

    PubMed

    Kurasaki, Masaaki; Saito, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    In this review, copper metabolism and transport in mammalian tissues are introduced and discussed. Firstly, the copper required amounts and LD50 levels are shown to explain the difficult balances of copper in the cells between necessity and toxicity. Furthermore, on the basis of literatures published, relationship between copper-binding metallothioneins and mechanisms for the absorption and excretion of copper or hereditary copper metabolic disorders metabolism abnormality symptom are explained. Finally it has been indicated that apoptosis induced by heavy metals, especially copper was initiated by production of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress in the cells. To understand precise mechanism for copper homeostasis in mammalian cells, further investigation will be needed to clarify the copper behaviors in normal and abnormal situations. PMID:27455798

  4. Using XAS and SXRF to Study Copper in Wilson Disease at the Molecular and Tissue Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralle, Martina; Blackburn, Ninian J.; Lutsenko, Svetlana

    2007-02-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is a genetic disorder of copper metabolism associated with severe hepatic, neurological, and psychiatric abnormalities. In WD, the billiary copper excretion is impaired and copper accumulates in tissues, particularly in the liver and the brain. The affected gene, ATP7B, encodes the copper transporting ATPase, Wilson disease protein (WNDP). WNDP has six copper binding sites in the N-terminal portion of the molecule. Each site includes the conserved amino acid sequence MXCXXC, and binds 1 Cu(I) through its 2 cysteine residues. We performed X-ray absorption studies at the Cu Kα-edge on the recombinant N-terminal domain of WNDP (N-WNDP). Copper was bound to N-WNDP either in vivo or in vitro in the presence of different reducing agents. We found that in N-WNDP copper is predominantly coordinated in a linear fashion by two cysteines, with the appearance of a Cu-Cu interaction when all metal binding sites are filled. Increasing amounts of reducing agents containing sulfide or phosphine groups led to binding of the exogenous ligands to copper thereby increasing the coordination number of copper from two to three. To better understand the role of copper in WD, we utilized livers of the 6-weeks-old Atp7b-/- mice (an animal model for WD) in which the copper concentration was 10-20-fold higher compared to that of the control mice. The distribution of copper in hepatocytes was evaluated by synchrotron based X-ray fluorescence microprobe (SXRF). We demonstrate that we can prepare liver slices that retain copper and can detect copper with subcellular resolution. On the same sections μ-XANES (spot size: 5 micron) was used to determine the oxidation state of copper.

  5. Using Xas And Sxrf to Study Copper in Wilson Disease at the Molecular And Tissue Level

    SciTech Connect

    Ralle, M.; Blackburn, N.J.; Lutsenko, S.

    2009-06-05

    Wilson disease (WD) is a genetic disorder of copper metabolism associated with severe hepatic, neurological, and psychiatric abnormalities. In WD, the billiary copper excretion is impaired and copper accumulates in tissues, particularly in the liver and the brain. The affected gene, ATP7B, encodes the copper transporting ATPase, Wilson disease protein (WNDP). WNDP has six copper binding sites in the N-terminal portion of the molecule. Each site includes the conserved amino acid sequence MXCXXC, and binds 1 Cu(I) through its 2 cysteine residues. We performed X-ray absorption studies at the Cu K{sub {alpha}}-edge on the recombinant N-terminal domain of WNDP (N-WNDP). Copper was bound to N-WNDP either in vivo or in vitro in the presence of different reducing agents. We found that in N-WNDP copper is predominantly coordinated in a linear fashion by two cysteines, with the appearance of a Cu-Cu interaction when all metal binding sites are filled. Increasing amounts of reducing agents containing sulfide or phosphine groups led to binding of the exogenous ligands to copper thereby increasing the coordination number of copper from two to three. To better understand the role of copper in WD, we utilized livers of the 6-weeks-old Atp7b-/- mice (an animal model for WD) in which the copper concentration was 10--20-fold higher compared to that of the control mice. The distribution of copper in hepatocytes was evaluated by synchrotron based X-ray fluorescence microprobe (SXRF). We demonstrate that we can prepare liver slices that retain copper and can detect copper with subcellular resolution. On the same sections {mu}-XANES (spot size: 5 micron) was used to determine the oxidation state of copper.

  6. Integration of Semiconducting Sulfides for Full-Spectrum Solar Energy Absorption and Efficient Charge Separation.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Tao-Tao; Liu, Yan; Li, Yi; Zhao, Yuan; Wu, Liang; Jiang, Jun; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2016-05-23

    The full harvest of solar energy by semiconductors requires a material that simultaneously absorbs across the whole solar spectrum and collects photogenerated electrons and holes separately. The stepwise integration of three semiconducting sulfides, namely ZnS, CdS, and Cu2-x S, into a single nanocrystal, led to a unique ternary multi-node sheath ZnS-CdS-Cu2-x S heteronanorod for full-spectrum solar energy absorption. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in the nonstoichiometric copper sulfide nanostructures enables effective NIR absorption. More significantly, the construction of pn heterojunctions between Cu2-x S and CdS leads to staggered gaps, as confirmed by first-principles simulations. This band alignment causes effective electron-hole separation in the ternary system and hence enables efficient solar energy conversion.

  7. Sulfiding of hydrogel derived catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, R.A.

    1991-11-05

    This patent describes a process for hydrotreating hydrocarbon feeds. It comprises contacting the feeds at a temperature in the range of from about 400{degrees} F. to about 850{degrees} F. and a pressure in the range of from about 400 psig to about 2500 psig with a catalyst having improved desulfurization activity prepared by incorporating an element selected from the group consisting of nickel, cobalt and mixtures thereof, and a heavy metal selected from the group consisting of molybdenum, tungsten and mixtures thereof, into an alumina hydrogel containing a phosphorous-containing compound, and sulfiding the catalyst with a gaseous sulfur compound at a temperature of at least about 900{degrees} F. for at least one hour.

  8. Pelletizing of sulfide molybdenite concentrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palant, A. A.

    2007-04-01

    The results of a pelletizing investigation using various binding components (water, syrup, sulfite-alcohol distillery grains, and bentonite) of the flotation sulfide molybdenite concentrate (˜84% MoS2) from the Mongolian deposit are discussed. The use of syrup provides rather high-strength pellets (>3 N/pellet or >300 g/pellet) of the required size (2 3 mm) for the consumption of 1 kg binder per 100 kg concentrate. The main advantage of the use of syrup instead of bentonite is that the molybdenum cinder produced by oxidizing roasting of raw ore materials is not impoverished due to complete burning out of the syrup. This fact exerts a positive effect on the subsequent hydrometallurgical process, decreasing molybdenum losses related to dump cakes.

  9. [Hydrogen sulfide and penile erection].

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi-Ming; Cheng, Yong; Jiang, Rui

    2012-09-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is the third type of active endogenous gaseous signal molecule following nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO). In mammalians, H2S is mainly synthesized by two proteases, cystathionine-beta-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine-gamma-lyase (CSE). H2S plays an essential function of physiological regulation in vivo, and promotes penile erection by acting on the ATP-sensitive potassium channels to relax the vascular smooth muscle as well as by the synergistic effect with testosterone and NO to relax the corpus cavernosum smooth muscle (CCSM). At present, the selective phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitor is mainly used for the treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED), but some ED patients fail to respond. Therefore, further studies on the mechanism of H2S regulating penile erection may provide a new way for the management of erectile dysfunction.

  10. Structural studies in limestone sulfidation

    SciTech Connect

    Fenouil, L.A.; Lynn, S.

    1993-05-01

    This study investigates the sulfidation of limestone at high temperatures (700--900{degree}C) as the first step in the design of a High-Temperature Coal-Gas Clean-Up system using millimeter-size limestone particles. Several workers have found that the rate of this reaction significantly decreases after an initial 10 to 15% conversion of CaCO{sub 3} to CaS. The present work attempts to explain this feature. It is first established that millimeter-size limestone particles do not sinter at temperatures up to the CaCO{sub 3} calcination point (899{degree}C at 1.03 bar CO{sub 2} partial pressure). It is then shown that CaS sinters rapidly at 750 to 900{degree}C if CO{sub 2} is present in the gas phase. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) photographs and Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) data reveal that the CaS product layer sinters and forms a quasi-impermeable coating around the CaCO{sub 3} grains that greatly hinders more H{sub 2}S from reaching the still unreacted parts of the stone. Moreover, most of the pores initially present within the limestone structure begin to disappear or, at least, are significantly reduced in size. From then on, subsequent conversion is limited by diffusion of H{sub 2}S through the CaS layer, possibly by S{sup 2{minus}} ionic diffusion. The kinetics is then adequately described by a shrinking-core model, in which a sharp front of completely converted limestone is assumed to progress toward the center of the pellet. Finally, experimental evidence and computer simulations using simple sintering models suggest that the CaS sintering, responsible for the sharp decrease in the sulfidation rate, is surface-diffusion controlled.

  11. 21 CFR 177.2490 - Polyphenylene sulfide resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyphenylene sulfide resins. 177.2490 Section 177... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2490 Polyphenylene sulfide resins. Polyphenylene sulfide resins (poly(1,4-phenylene sulfide) resins) may be safely used as coatings or components...

  12. Nanostructured lead sulfide: synthesis, structure and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovnikov, S. I.; Gusev, A. I.; Rempel, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    The theoretical and experimental results of recent studies dealing with nanostructured lead sulfide are summarized and analyzed. The key methods for the synthesis of nanostructured lead sulfide are described. The crystal structure of PbS in nanopowders and nanofilms is discussed. The influence of the size of nanostructure elements on the optical and thermal properties of lead sulfide is considered. The dependence of the band gap of PbS on the nanoparticle (crystallite) size for powders and films is illustrated. The bibliography includes 222 references.

  13. Microbial control of hydrogen sulfide production

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, A.D.; Bhupathiraju, V.K.; Wofford, N.; McInerney, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    A sulfide-resistant strain of Thiobacillus denitrificans, strain F, prevented the accumulation of sulfide by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans when both organisms were grown in liquid medium. The wild-type strain of T. denitrificans did not prevent the accumulation of sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans. Strain F also prevented the accumulation of sulfide by a mixed population of sulfate-reducing bacteria enriched from an oil field brine. Fermentation balances showed that strain F stoichiometrically oxidized the sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans and the oil field brine enrichment to sulfate. The ability of a strain F to control sulfide production in an experimental system of cores and formation water from the Redfield, Iowa, natural gas storage facility was also investigated. A stable, sulfide-producing biofilm was established in two separate core systems, one of which was inoculated with strain F while the other core system (control) was treated in an identical manner, but was not inoculated with strain F. When formation water with 10 mM acetate and 5 mM nitrate was injected into both core systems, the effluent sulfide concentrations in the control core system ranged from 200 to 460 {mu}M. In the test core system inoculated with strain F, the effluent sulfide concentrations were lower, ranging from 70 to 110 {mu}M. In order to determine whether strain F could control sulfide production under optimal conditions for sulfate-reducing bacteria, the electron donor was changed to lactate and inorganic nutrients (nitrogen and phosphate sources) were added to the formation water. When nutrient-supplemented formation water with 3.1 mM lactate and 10 mM nitrate was used, the effluent sulfide concentrations of the control core system initially increased to about 3,800 {mu}M, and then decreased to about 1,100 {mu}M after 5 weeks. However, in the test core system inoculated with strain F, the effluent sulfide concentrations were much lower, 160 to 330 {mu}M.

  14. Investigation on laboratory and pilot-scale airlift sulfide oxidation reactor under varying sulfide loading rate.

    PubMed

    Pokasoowan, Chanya; Kanitchaidecha, Wilawan; K C, Bal Krishna; Annachhatre, Ajit P

    2009-01-01

    Airlift bioreactor was established for recovering sulfur from synthetic sulfide wastewater under controlled dissolved oxygen condition. The maximum recovered sulfur was 14.49 g/day when sulfide loading rate, dissolved oxygen (DO) and pH values were 2.97 kgHS(-)/m(3)-day, 0.2-1.0 mg/L and 7.2-7.8, respectively. On the other hand, the increase in recovered sulfur reduced the contact surface of sulfide oxidizing bacteria which affects the recovery process. This effect caused to reduce the conversion of sulfide to sulfur. More recovered sulfur was produced at high sulfide loading rate due to the change of metabolic pathway of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria which prevented the toxicity of sulfide in the culture. The maximum activity in this system was recorded to be about 3.28 kgS/kgVSS-day. The recovered sulfur contained organic compounds which were confirmed by the results from XRD and CHN analyzer. Afterwards, by annealing the recovered sulfur at 120 degrees C for 24 hrs under ambient Argon, the percentage of carbon reduced from 4.44% to 0.30%. Furthermore, the percentage of nitrogen and hydrogen decreased from 0.79% and 0.48% to 0.00% and 0.14%, respectively. This result showed the success in increasing the purity of recovered sulfur by using the annealing technique. The pilot-scale biological sulfide oxidation process was carried out using real wastewater from Thai Rayon Industry in Thailand. The airlift reactor successfully removed sulfide more than 90% of the influent sulfide at DO concentration of less than 0.1 mg/L, whereas the elementary sulfur production was 2.37 kgS/m(3)-day at sulfide loading rate of 2.14 kgHS(-)/m(3)-day. The sulfur production was still increasing as the reactor had not yet reached its maximum sulfide loading rate. PMID:19085599

  15. Copper-tantalum alloy

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.

    1986-07-15

    A tantalum-copper alloy can be made by preparing a consumable electrode consisting of an elongated copper billet containing at least two spaced apart tantalum rods extending longitudinally the length of the billet. The electrode is placed in a dc arc furnace and melted under conditions which co-melt the copper and tantalum to form the alloy.

  16. On copper peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, L.

    1988-01-01

    The action of hydrogen superoxide on copper salts in alcoholic solutions is studied. The action of hydrogen peroxide on copper hydroxide in alcoholic suspensions, and the action of ethereal hydrogen peroxide on copper hydroxide are discussed. It is concluded that using the procedure proposed excludes almost entirely the harmful effect of hydrolysis.

  17. Demystifying Controlling Copper Corrosion

    EPA Science Inventory

    The LCR systematically misses the highest health and corrosion risk sites for copper. Additionally, there are growing concerns for WWTP copper in sludges and discharge levels. There are many corrosion control differences between copper and lead. This talk explains the sometimes c...

  18. [Copper pathology (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Mallet, B; Romette, J; Di Costanzo, J D

    1982-01-30

    Copper is an essential dietary component, being the coenzyme of many enzymes with oxidase activity, e.g. ceruloplasmin, superoxide dismutase, monoamine oxidase, etc. The metabolism of copper is complex and imperfectly known. Active transport of copper through the intestinal epithelial cells involves metallothionein, a protein rich in sulfhydryl groups which also binds the copper in excess and probably prevents absorption in toxic amounts. In hepatocytes a metallothionein facilitates absorption by a similar mechanism and regulates copper distribution in the liver: incorporation in an apoceruloplasmin, storage and synthesis of copper-dependent enzymes. Metallothioneins and ceruloplasmin are essential to adequate copper homeostasis. Apart from genetic disorders, diseases involving copper usually result from hypercupraemia of varied origin. Wilson's disease and Menkes' disease, although clinically and pathogenetically different, are both marked by low ceruloplasmin and copper serum levels. The excessive liver retention of copper in Wilson's disease might be due to increased avidity of hepatic metallothioneins for copper and decreased biliary excretion through lysosomal dysfunction. Menkes' disease might be due to low avidity of intestinal and hepatic metallothioneins for copper. The basic biochemical defect responsible for these two hereditary conditions has not yet been fully elucidated.

  19. Sulfidation of iron at high temperatures and diffusion kinetics in ferrous sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Danielewski, M.; Mrowec, S.; Stoklosa, A.

    1982-02-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of iron sulfidation have been studied as a function of temperature (950-1200 K) and sulfur pressure (10/sup -3/ 0.065 atm). It has been stated that a compact Fe/sub 1-y/ S scale on iron grows according to the parabolic rate law as a result of outward lattice diffusion of metal ions through cation vacancies. The activation energy of sulfidation increases with sulfur pressure and the 1/n exponent increases with temperature. This nontypical dependence of iron sulfidation kinetics on temperature and pressure results from the analogous effect of both these parameters on defect concentration in ferrous sulfide. The chemical diffusion coefficients, D/sub FeS/ , and diffusion coefficients of defects, D/sub d/ , in ferrous sulfide have been calculated on the basis of parabolic rate contacts of iron sulfidation and deviations from stoichiometry in ferrous sulfide. It has been shown that D/sub FeS/ is practically independent of cation vacancy concentration whereas the diffusion coefficient of defects depends strongly on that parameter. A comparison of self-diffusion coefficients of iron in Fe/sub 1-y/ S calculated from the kinetics of iron sulfidation to those obtained from radioisotopic studies indicates that within the range studied of temperatures and sulfur vapor pressures the outward diffusion of iron across the scale occurs preferentially along the c axis of columnar ferrous sulfide crystals.

  20. Ridding Groundwater of Hydrogen Sulfide. Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lochrane, Thomas G.

    1979-01-01

    This article is the first in a series reviewing the problems associated with hydrogen sulfide in drinking water sources. Discussion centers on identification of a cost-effective balance between aeration and chlorination treatment operations. (AS)

  1. Selenium sulfide: adjunctive therapy for tinea capitis.

    PubMed

    Allen, H B; Honig, P J; Leyden, J J; McGinley, K J

    1982-01-01

    Selenium sulfide lotion used as a shampoo has been shown to be an effective adjunctive agent to griseofulvin in the treatment of tinea capitis. Of 16 children with Trichophyton tonsurans infections 15 had negative fungal cultures at two weeks following a regimen of daily oral griseofulvin and selenium sulfide shampooing twice weekly. All patients treated with griseofulvin alone or in combination with either a bland shampoo or topical clotrimazole had positive cultures not only at the two-week interval but also as long as eight weeks later. In vitro analysis shows selenium sulfide to be sporicidal, correlating well with the in vivo observations. It is postulated that selenium sulfide usage may lessen the chances for spreading of infectious spores to other individuals.

  2. The Search for Interstellar Sulfide Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Messenger, Scott

    2010-01-01

    The lifecycle of sulfur in the galaxy is poorly understood. Fe-sulfide grains are abundant in early solar system materials (e.g. meteorites and comets) and S is highly depleted from the gas phase in cold, dense molecular cloud environments. In stark contrast, sulfur is essentially undepleted from the gas phase in the diffuse interstellar medium, indicating that little sulfur is incorporated into solid grains in this environment. It is widely believed that sulfur is not a component of interstellar dust grains. This is a rather puzzling observation unless Fe-sulfides are not produced in significant quantities in stellar outflows, or their lifetime in the ISM is very short due to rapid destruction. Fe sulfide grains are ubiquitous in cometary samples where they are the dominant host of sulfur. The Fe-sulfides (primarily pyrrhotite; Fe(1-x)S) are common, both as discrete 0.5-10 micron-sized grains and as fine (5-10 nm) nanophase inclusions within amorphous silicate grains. Cometary dust particles contain high abundances of well-preserved presolar silicates and organic matter and we have suggested that they should contain presolar sulfides as well. This hypothesis is supported by the observation of abundant Fe-sulfides grains in dust around pre- and post-main sequence stars inferred from astronomical spectra showing a broad 23 micron IR feature due to FeS. Fe-sulfide grains also occur as inclusions in bona fide circumstellar amorphous silicate grains and as inclusions within deuterium-rich organic matter in cometary dust samples. Our irradiation experiments show that FeS is far more resistant to radiation damage than silicates. Consequently, we expect that Fe sulfide stardust should be as abundant as silicate stardust in solar system materials.

  3. Sulfides from Martian and Lunar Basalts: Comparative Chemistry for Ni Co Cu and Se

    SciTech Connect

    J Papike; P Burger; C Shearer; S Sutton; M Newville; Y Choi; A Lanzirotti

    2011-12-31

    Here Mars and Moon are used as 'natural laboratories' with Moon displaying lower oxygen fugacities ({approx}IW-1) than Mars ({approx}IW to FMQ). Moon has lower concentrations of Ni and Co in basaltic melts than does Mars. The major sulfides are troilite (FeS) in lunar basalts and pyrrhotite (Fe{sub 1-x}S) in martian basalts. This study focuses on the concentrations of Ni, Co, Cu, and Se. We chose these elements because of their geochemical importance and the feasibility of analyzing them with a combination of synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) and electron microprobe (EPMA) techniques. The selenium concentrations could only be analyzed, at high precision, with SXRF techniques as they are <150 ppm, similar to concentrations seen in carbonaceous chondrites and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Nickel and Co are in higher concentrations in martian sulfides than lunar and are higher in martian olivine-bearing lithologies than olivine-free varieties. The sulfides in individual samples show very large ranges in concentration (e.g., Ni ranges from 50 000 ppm to <5 ppm). These large ranges are mainly due to compositional heterogeneities within individual grains due to diffusion and phase separation. Electron microprobe wavelength-dispersive (WDS) mapping of Ni, Co, and Cu show the diffusion trajectories. Nickel and Co have almost identical diffusion trajectories leading to the likely nucleation of pentlandite (Ni,Co,Fe){sub 9}S{sub 8}, and copper diffuses along separate pathways likely toward chalcopyrite nucleation sites (CuFeS{sub 2}). The systematics of Ni and Co in lunar and martian sulfides clearly distinguish the two parent bodies, with martian sulfides displaced to higher Ni and Co values.

  4. Hydrogen sulfide and translational medicine

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei; Cheng, Ze-yu; Zhu, Yi-zhun

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) along with carbon monoxide and nitric oxide is an important signaling molecule that has undergone large numbers of fundamental investigations. H2S is involved in various physiological activities associated with the regulation of homeostasis, vascular contractility, pro- and anti-inflammatory activities, as well as pro- and anti-apoptotic activities etc. However, the actions of H2S are influenced by its concentration, reaction time, and cell/disease types. Therefore, H2S is a signaling molecule without definite effect. The use of existing H2S donors is limited because of the instant release and short lifetime of H2S. Thus, translational medicine involving the sustained and controlled release of H2S is of great value for both scientific and clinical uses. H2S donation can be manipulated by different ways, including where H2S is given, how H2S is donated, or the specific structures of H2S-releasing drugs and H2S donor molecules. This review briefly summarizes recent progress in research on the physiological and pathological functions of H2S and H2S-releasing drugs, and suggests hope for future investigations. PMID:24096643

  5. Hydrogen Sulfide as a Gasotransmitter

    PubMed Central

    Gadalla, Moataz M.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) are well established as messenger molecules throughout the body, gasotransmitters, based on striking alterations in mice lacking the appropriate biosynthetic enzymes. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is even more chemically reactive, but till recently there was little definitive evidence for its physiologic formation. Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS, EC 4.2.1.22), and Cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE; EC 4.4.1.1), also known as cytathionase, can generate H2S from cyst(e)ine. Very recent studies with mice lacking these enzymes have established that CSE is responsible for H2S formation in the periphery, while in the brain CBS is the biosynthetic enzyme. Endothelial-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) activity is reduced 80% in the mesenteric artery of mice with deletion of CSE, establishing H2S as a major physiologic EDRF. H2S appears to signal predominantly by S-sulfhydrating cysteines in its target proteins, analogous to S-nitrosylation by NO. Whereas S-nitrosylation typically inhibits enzymes, S-sulfhydration activates them. S-nitrosylation basally affects 1–2% of its target proteins, while 10–25% of H2S target proteins are S-sulfhydrated. In summary, H2S appears to be a physiologic gasotransmitter of comparable importance to NO and CO. PMID:20067586

  6. NEAR-CONTINUOUS MEASUREMENT OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE AND CARBONYL SULFIDE BY AN AUTOMATIC GAS CHROMATOGRAPH

    EPA Science Inventory

    An automatic gas chromatograph with a flame photometric detector that samples and analyzes hydrogen sulfide and carbonyl sulfide at 30-s intervals is described. Temperature programming was used to elute trace amounts of carbon disulfide present in each injection from a Supelpak-S...

  7. Stratiform copper deposit, northern anatolia, Turkey: evidence for early bronze I (2800 B.C.) mining activity.

    PubMed

    Giles, D L; Kuijpers, E P

    1974-11-29

    A stratiform, massive copper sulfide deposit with possible gold, silver, and cobalt credits was discovered by a United Nations reconnaissance team in Paleozoic (?) metamorphic terrain of north central Turkey. The deposit, which is of possible volcanigenic exhalative origin, contains evidence of extensive prehistoric underground mining and smelting activity that, based on radiocarbon data, may date to 2800 B.C. (Early Bronze I Age).

  8. Continuous measurement of dissolved sulfide in sewer systems.

    PubMed

    Sutherland-Stacey, L; Corrie, S; Neethling, A; Johnson, I; Gutierrez, O; Dexter, R; Yuan, Z; Keller, J; Hamilton, G

    2008-01-01

    Sulfides are particularly problematic in the sewage industry. Hydrogen sulfide causes corrosion of concrete infrastructure, is dangerous at high concentrations and is foul smelling at low concentrations. Despite the importance of sulfide monitoring there is no commercially available system to quantify sulfide in waste water. In this article we report on our use of an in situ spectrometer to quantify bisulfide in waste water and additional analysis with a pH probe to calculate total dissolved sulfide. Our results show it is possible to use existing commercially available and field proven sensors to measure sulfide to mg/l levels continuously with little operator intervention and no sample preparation. PMID:18309215

  9. Process for producing cadmium sulfide on a cadmium telluride surface

    DOEpatents

    Levi, Dean H.; Nelson, Art J.; Ahrenkiel, Richard K.

    1996-01-01

    A process for producing a layer of cadmium sulfide on a cadmium telluride surface to be employed in a photovoltaic device. The process comprises providing a cadmium telluride surface which is exposed to a hydrogen sulfide plasma at an exposure flow rate, an exposure time and an exposure temperature sufficient to permit reaction between the hydrogen sulfide and cadmium telluride to thereby form a cadmium sulfide layer on the cadmium telluride surface and accomplish passivation. In addition to passivation, a heterojunction at the interface of the cadmium sulfide and the cadmium telluride can be formed when the layer of cadmium sulfide formed on the cadmium telluride is of sufficient thickness.

  10. Animal adaptations for tolerance and exploitation of poisonous sulfide.

    PubMed

    Grieshaber, M K; Völkel, S

    1998-01-01

    Many aquatic animal species can survive sulfide exposure to some extent through oxidation of the sulfide, which results mainly in thiosulfate. In several species, sulfide oxidation is localized in the mitochondria and is accompanied by ATP synthesis. In addition, blood-based and intracellular compounds can augment sulfide oxidation. The formation of thiosulfate requires oxygen, which results in an increase in oxygen consumption of some species. If not all sulfide is detoxified, cytochrome C oxidase is inhibited. Under these conditions, a sulfide-dependent anaerobic energy metabolism commences. PMID:9558453

  11. Copper deposition during quartz dissolution by cooling magmatic hydrothermal fluids: The Bingham porphyry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landtwing, Marianne R.; Pettke, Thomas; Halter, Werner E.; Heinrich, Christoph A.; Redmond, Patrick B.; Einaudi, Marco T.; Kunze, Karsten

    2005-06-01

    Scanning electron microscope cathodoluminescence imaging is used to map successive generations of fluid inclusions in texturally complex quartz veinlets representing the main stage of ore metal introduction into the porphyry Cu-Au-Mo deposit at Bingham, Utah. Following conventional fluid inclusion microthermometry, laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) is applied to quantify copper and other major and trace-element concentrations in the evolving fluid, with the aim of identifying the ore-forming processes. Textures visible in cathodoluminescence consistently show that the bulk of vein quartz (Q1), characterized by bright luminescence, crystallized early in the vein history. Cu-Fe-sulfides are precipitated later in these veins, in a microfracture network finally filled with a second generation of dull-luminescing Q2 quartz. Mapping of brine and vapor inclusion assemblages in these successive quartz generations in combination with LA-ICPMS microanalysis shows that the fluids trapped before and after Cu-Fe-sulfide precipitation are very similar with respect to their major and minor-element composition, except for copper. Copper concentrations in inclusions associated with ore formation drop by two orders of magnitude, in a tight pressure-temperature interval between 21 and 14 MPa and 425-350 °C, several hundred degrees below the temperature of fluid exsolution from the magma. Copper deposition occurs within a limited P- T region, in which sulfide solubility shows strong normal temperature dependence while quartz solubility is retrograde. This permits copper sulfide deposition while secondary vein permeability is generated by quartz dissolution. The brittle-to-ductile transition of the quartz-feldspar-rich host rocks occurs in the same temperature range, which further enhances vein reactivation and promotes cooling and expansion of fluids ascending across the transition from lithostatic to hydrostatic conditions.

  12. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits Amyloid Formation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are large aggregates of misfolded proteins, which are often associated with various neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, and vascular dementia. The amount of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is known to be significantly reduced in the brain tissue of people diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease relative to that of healthy individuals. These findings prompted us to investigate the effects of H2S on the formation of amyloids in vitro using a model fibrillogenic protein hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL). HEWL forms typical β-sheet rich fibrils during the course of 70 min at low pH and high temperatures. The addition of H2S completely inhibits the formation of β-sheet and amyloid fibrils, as revealed by deep UV resonance Raman (DUVRR) spectroscopy and ThT fluorescence. Nonresonance Raman spectroscopy shows that disulfide bonds undergo significant rearrangements in the presence of H2S. Raman bands corresponding to disulfide (RSSR) vibrational modes in the 550–500 cm–1 spectral range decrease in intensity and are accompanied by the appearance of a new 490 cm–1 band assigned to the trisulfide group (RSSSR) based on the comparison with model compounds. The formation of RSSSR was proven further using a reaction with TCEP reduction agent and LC-MS analysis of the products. Intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence study shows a strong denaturation of HEWL containing trisulfide bonds. The presented evidence indicates that H2S causes the formation of trisulfide bridges, which destabilizes HEWL structure, preventing protein fibrillation. As a result, small spherical aggregates of unordered protein form, which exhibit no cytotoxicity by contrast with HEWL fibrils. PMID:25545790

  13. Hydrogen Sulfide and Urogenital Tract.

    PubMed

    di Villa Bianca, Roberta d'Emmanuele; Cirino, Giuseppe; Sorrentino, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter the role played by H2S in the physiopathology of urogenital tract revising animal and human data available in the current relevant literature is discussed. H2S pathway has been demonstrated to be involved in the mechanism underlying penile erection in human and experimental animal. Both cystathionine-β synthase (CBS) and cystathionine-γ lyase (CSE) are expressed in the human corpus cavernosum and exogenous H2S relaxes isolated human corpus cavernosum strips in an endothelium-independent manner. Hydrogen sulfide pathway also accounts for the direct vasodilatory effect operated by testosterone on isolated vessels. Convincing evidence suggests that H2S can influence the cGMP pathway by inhibiting the phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE-5) activity. All these findings taken together suggest an important role for the H2S pathway in human corpus cavernosum homeostasis. However, H2S effect is not confined to human corpus cavernosum but also plays an important role in human bladder. Human bladder expresses mainly CBS and generates in vitro detectable amount of H2S. In addition the bladder relaxant effect of the PDE-5 inhibitor sildenafil involves H2S as mediator. In conclusion the H2S pathway is not only involved in penile erection but also plays a role in bladder homeostasis. In addition the finding that it involved in the mechanism of action of PDE-5 inhibitors strongly suggests that modulation of this pathway can represent a therapeutic target for the treatment of erectile dysfunction and bladder diseases. PMID:26162831

  14. Critical currents in sputtered copper molybdenum sulphide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, S. A.; Woollam, J. A.; Kammerdiner, L.; Luo, H.-L.

    1977-01-01

    Critical currents in a sputtered Chevrel-phase copper molybdenum sulfide have been measured at 4.2 K as a function of applied magnetic field. Self-field critical-current values up to 10 to the 9th A/sq m were found, decreasing to 10 to the 8th A/sq m at 3 T. Graphs of pinning forces versus field were found to be independent of field direction, and the pinning mechanism is sample independent. Critical-current densities for sputtered lead molybdenum sulphide are estimated to be about 10 to the 8th A/sq m at 26 T based on a scaling law for pinning.

  15. Sulfide capacities of fayalite-base slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeonov, S. R.; Sridhar, R.; Toguri, J. M.

    1995-04-01

    The sulfide capacities of fayalite-base slags were measured by a gas-slag equilibration technique under controlled oxygen and sulfur potentials similar to those encountered in the pyrometallurgical processing of nonferrous metals. The oxygen pressure range was from 10-9.5 to 10-11 MPa and the sulfur pressure range from 10-3 to 10-4.5 MPa, over a temperature range of 1473 to 1623 K. The slags studied were FeO-SiO2 at silica saturation and those with addition of CaO, MgO, and Al2O3 to determine their effect on sulfide capacities. For these slags, the sulfide capacities were found to vary from 10-3.3 to 10-5. The sulfide capacities increased with increasing temperature from 1473 to 1623 K. A comparison of the reported plant data on sulfur content of industrial slags shows good agreement with the present experimental results. The present data will be useful in estimating metal losses in slag due to metal sulfide entrainment in nonferrous smelters.

  16. Phase Engineering of 2D Tin Sulfides.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Zafer; Wu, Ryan J; Wickramaratne, Darshana; Shahrezaei, Sina; Liu, Chueh; Temiz, Selcuk; Patalano, Andrew; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Lake, Roger K; Mkhoyan, K A; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2016-06-01

    Tin sulfides can exist in a variety of phases and polytypes due to the different oxidation states of Sn. A subset of these phases and polytypes take the form of layered 2D structures that give rise to a wide host of electronic and optical properties. Hence, achieving control over the phase, polytype, and thickness of tin sulfides is necessary to utilize this wide range of properties exhibited by the compound. This study reports on phase-selective growth of both hexagonal tin (IV) sulfide SnS2 and orthorhombic tin (II) sulfide SnS crystals with diameters of over tens of microns on SiO2 substrates through atmospheric pressure vapor-phase method in a conventional horizontal quartz tube furnace with SnO2 and S powders as the source materials. Detailed characterization of each phase of tin sulfide crystals is performed using various microscopy and spectroscopy methods, and the results are corroborated by ab initio density functional theory calculations. PMID:27099950

  17. Phase Engineering of 2D Tin Sulfides.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Zafer; Wu, Ryan J; Wickramaratne, Darshana; Shahrezaei, Sina; Liu, Chueh; Temiz, Selcuk; Patalano, Andrew; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Lake, Roger K; Mkhoyan, K A; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2016-06-01

    Tin sulfides can exist in a variety of phases and polytypes due to the different oxidation states of Sn. A subset of these phases and polytypes take the form of layered 2D structures that give rise to a wide host of electronic and optical properties. Hence, achieving control over the phase, polytype, and thickness of tin sulfides is necessary to utilize this wide range of properties exhibited by the compound. This study reports on phase-selective growth of both hexagonal tin (IV) sulfide SnS2 and orthorhombic tin (II) sulfide SnS crystals with diameters of over tens of microns on SiO2 substrates through atmospheric pressure vapor-phase method in a conventional horizontal quartz tube furnace with SnO2 and S powders as the source materials. Detailed characterization of each phase of tin sulfide crystals is performed using various microscopy and spectroscopy methods, and the results are corroborated by ab initio density functional theory calculations.

  18. State-of-the-art hydrogen sulfide control for geothermal energy systems: 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, F.B.; Hill, J.H.; Phelps, P.L. Jr.

    1980-03-01

    Existing state-of-the-art technologies for removal of hydrogen sulfide are discussed along with a comparative assessment of their efficiencies, reliabilities and costs. Other related topics include the characteristics of vapor-dominated and liquid-dominated resources, energy conversion systems, and the sources of hydrogen sulfide emissions. It is indicated that upstream control technologies are preferred over downsteam technologies primarily because upstream removal of hydrogen sulfide inherently controls all downstream emissions including steam-stacking. Two upstream processes for vapor-dominated resources appear promising; the copper sulfate (EIC) process, and the steam converter (Coury) process combined with an off-gas abatement system such as a Stretford unit. For liquid-dominated systems that produce steam, the process where the non-condensible gases are scrubbed with spent geothermal fluid appears to be promising. An efficient downstream technology is the Stretford process for non-condensible gas removal. In this case, partitioning in the surface condenser will determine the overall abatement efficiency. Recommendations for future environmental control technology programs are included.

  19. Reduction of acid rock drainage using steel slag in cover systems over sulfide rock waste piles.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Rodrigo Pereira; Leite, Adilson do Lago; Borghetti Soares, Anderson

    2015-04-01

    The extraction of gold, coal, nickel, uranium, copper and other earth-moving activities almost always leads to environmental damage. In metal and coal extraction, exposure of sulfide minerals to the atmosphere leads to generation of acid rock drainage (ARD) and in underground mining to acid mine drainage (AMD) due to contamination of infiltrating groundwater. This study proposes to develop a reactive cover system that inhibits infiltration of oxygen and also releases alkalinity to increase the pH of generated ARD and attenuate metal contaminants at the same time. The reactive cover system is constructed using steel slag, a waste product generated from steel industries. This study shows that this type of cover system has the potential to reduce some of the adverse effects of sulfide mine waste disposal on land. Geochemical and geotechnical characterization tests were carried out. Different proportions of sulfide mine waste and steel slag were studied in leachate extraction tests. The best proportion was 33% of steel slag in dry weight. Other tests were conducted as follows: soil consolidation, saturated permeability and soil water characteristic curve. The cover system was numerically modeled through unsaturated flux analysis using Vadose/w. The solution proposed is an oxygen transport barrier that allows rain water percolation to treat the ARD in the waste rock pile. The results showed that the waste pile slope is an important factor and the cover system must have 5 m thickness to achieve an acceptable effectiveness. PMID:25750056

  20. Reduction of acid rock drainage using steel slag in cover systems over sulfide rock waste piles.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Rodrigo Pereira; Leite, Adilson do Lago; Borghetti Soares, Anderson

    2015-04-01

    The extraction of gold, coal, nickel, uranium, copper and other earth-moving activities almost always leads to environmental damage. In metal and coal extraction, exposure of sulfide minerals to the atmosphere leads to generation of acid rock drainage (ARD) and in underground mining to acid mine drainage (AMD) due to contamination of infiltrating groundwater. This study proposes to develop a reactive cover system that inhibits infiltration of oxygen and also releases alkalinity to increase the pH of generated ARD and attenuate metal contaminants at the same time. The reactive cover system is constructed using steel slag, a waste product generated from steel industries. This study shows that this type of cover system has the potential to reduce some of the adverse effects of sulfide mine waste disposal on land. Geochemical and geotechnical characterization tests were carried out. Different proportions of sulfide mine waste and steel slag were studied in leachate extraction tests. The best proportion was 33% of steel slag in dry weight. Other tests were conducted as follows: soil consolidation, saturated permeability and soil water characteristic curve. The cover system was numerically modeled through unsaturated flux analysis using Vadose/w. The solution proposed is an oxygen transport barrier that allows rain water percolation to treat the ARD in the waste rock pile. The results showed that the waste pile slope is an important factor and the cover system must have 5 m thickness to achieve an acceptable effectiveness.

  1. What processes at mid-ocean ridges tell us about volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathles, Lawrence M.

    2011-07-01

    Episodic seafloor spreading, ridge topography, and fault movement at ridges find (more extreme) analogs in the arc and back-arc setting where the volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits that we mine today were formed. The factors affecting sulfide accumulation efficiency and the extent to which sulfides are concentrated spatially are the same in both settings, however. The processes occurring at mid-ocean ridges therefore provide a useful insight into those producing VMS deposits in arcs and back-arcs. The critical observation investigated here is that all the heat introduced by seafloor spreading at mid-ocean ridges is carried out of the crust within a few hundred meters of the ridge axis by ˜350°C hydrothermal fluids. The high-temperature ridge hydrothermal systems are tied to the presence of magma at the ridge axis and greatly reduce the size and control the shape of axial magma intrusions. The amount of heat introduced to each square kilometer of ocean crust during its formation can be calculated, and its removal by high-temperature convection allows calculation of the total base metal endowment of the ocean basins. Using reasonable metal deposition efficiencies, we conclude that the ocean floor is a giant VMS district with metal resources >600 times the total known VMS reserves on land and a copper resource which would last >6,000 years at current production rates.

  2. Mortality among sulfide ore miners

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlman, K.; Koskela, R.S.; Kuikka, P.; Koponen, M.; Annanmaeki, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Lung cancer mortality was studied during 1965-1985 in Outokumpu township in North Karelia, where an old copper mine was located. Age-specific lung cancer death rates (1968-1985) were higher among the male population of Outokumpu than among the North Karelian male population of the same age excluding the Outokumpu district (p less than .01). Of all 106 persons who died from lung cancer during 1965-1985 in Outokumpu township, 47 were miners of the old mine, 39 of whom had worked there for at least three years and been heavily exposed to radon daughters and silica dust. The study cohort consisted of 597 miners first employed between 1954 and 1973 by a new copper mine and a zinc mine, and employed there for at least 3 years. The period of follow-up was 1954-1986. The number of person-years was 14,782. The total number of deaths was 102; the expected number was 72.8 based on the general male population and 97.8 based on the mortality of the male population of North Karelia. The excess mortality among miners was due mainly to ischemic heart disease (IHD); 44 were observed, the expected number was 22.1, based on the general male population, and the North Karelian expected number was 31.2 (p less than .05). Of the 44 miners who died from IHD, 20 were drillers or chargers exposed to nitroglycerin in dynamite charges, but also to several simultaneous stress factors including PAHs, noise, vibration, heavy work, accident risk, and working alone. Altogether 16 tumors were observed in the cohort. Ten of these were lung cancers, the expected number being 4.3. Miners who had died from lung cancer were 35-64 years old, and had entered mining work between 1954 and 1960. Five of the ten lung cancer cases came from the zinc mine (1.7 expected). Three of them were conductors of diesel-powered ore trains.

  3. Labile sulfide and sulfite in phytochelatin complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Eannetta, N.T.; Steffens, J.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Heavy metals such as cadmium induce tomato cell cultures to synthesize the metal binding polypeptides ({gamma}-Glu-Cys){sub 3} and ({gamma}-Glu-Cys){sub 4}-Gly (phytochelatins). Tomato cells selected for growth on normally lethal concentrations of CdCl{sub 2} synthesize higher quantities of these polypeptides. Cd{sup r} cells are not cross-resistant to other heavy metals, and recent work suggests that metal detoxification by these peptides may be Cd-specific. The occurrence of labile sulfur as a component of the metal complex raises questions concerning possible functions of phytochelatins besides that of Cd binding. The presence of acid-labile sulfide ion in phytochelatin complexes has been reported by several groups. We report the additional finding that labile sulfite is also present in these complexes and in higher amounts than sulfide. Sulfide and sulfite are both released from the metal binding complex by acidification or by treatment with EDTA.

  4. Seasonal and spatial patterns of metals at a restored copper mine site. I. Stream copper and zinc.

    PubMed

    Bambic, Dustin G; Alpers, Charles N; Green, Peter G; Fanelli, Eileen; Silk, Wendy K

    2006-12-01

    Seasonal and spatial variations in metal concentrations and pH were found in a stream at a restored copper mine site located near a massive sulfide deposit in the Foothill copper-zinc belt of the Sierra Nevada, California. At the mouth of the stream, copper concentrations increased and pH decreased with increased streamflow after the onset of winter rain and, unexpectedly, reached extreme values 1 or 2 months after peaks in the seasonal hydrographs. In contrast, aqueous zinc and sulfate concentrations were highest during low-flow periods. Spatial variation was assessed in 400 m of reach encompassing an acidic, metal-laden seep. At this seep, pH remained low (2-3) throughout the year, and copper concentrations were highest. In contrast, the zinc concentrations increased with downstream distance. These spatial patterns were caused by immobilization of copper by hydrous ferric oxides in benthic sediments, coupled with increasing downstream supply of zinc from groundwater seepage. PMID:16678951

  5. Geology of the Copper King Mine area, Prairie Divide, Larimer County, Colorado (Part 1)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sims, Paul Kibler; Phair, George

    1952-01-01

    The Copper King mine, in Larimer County, Colo., in the northern part of the Front Range of Colorado, was operated for a short time prior to World War II for copper and zino, but since 1949, when pitchblende was discovered on the mine dump, it has been worked for uranium. The bedrock in the mine area consists predominantly of pre-Cambrian (Silver Plums) granite with minor migmatite and metasediments--biotite-quartz-plagioclase gneiss, biotite schist, quartzite, amphibolite, amphibole skarn, and biotite skols. The metasediments occur as inclusions that trend northeast in the granite. This trend is essentially parallel to the prevailing foliation in the granite. At places the metasediments are crosscut sharply by the granite to form angular, partly discordant, steep-walled bodies in the granite. Faults, confined to a narrow zone that extends through the mine, cut both the pre-Cambrian rocks and the contained sulfide deposits. The Copper King fault, a breccia zone, contains a deposit of pitchblende; the other faults are believed to be later than the ore. The two types of mineral deposits--massive sulfide and pitchblende deposits--in the mine area, are of widely different mineralogy, age, and origin. The massive sulfide deposits are small and consist of pyrite, sphalerite, chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite, and in places magnetite in amphibole skarn, mice skols, and quartzite. The deposit at the Copper King mine has yielded small quantities of high-grade sphalerite ore. The massive sulfides are pyrometasomatic deposits of pre-Cambrian age. The pitchblende at the Copper King mine is principally in the Copper King vein, a tight, hard breccia zone that cuts through both granite and the massive sulfide deposit. A small part of the pitchblende is in small fractures near the vein and in boxwork pyrite adjacent to the vein; the post-ore faults, close to their intersection with the Copper King vein, contain some radioactive material, but elsewhere, so far as is known, they are barren

  6. High adherence copper plating process

    DOEpatents

    Nignardot, Henry

    1993-01-01

    A process for applying copper to a substrate of aluminum or steel by electrodeposition and for preparing an aluminum or steel substrate for electrodeposition of copper. Practice of the invention provides good adhesion of the copper layer to the substrate.

  7. 40 CFR 425.03 - Sulfide analytical methods and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... § 425.03 Sulfide analytical methods and applicability. (a) The potassium ferricyanide titration method... ferricyanide titration method for the determination of sulfide in wastewaters discharged by plants operating...

  8. 40 CFR 425.03 - Sulfide analytical methods and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... § 425.03 Sulfide analytical methods and applicability. (a) The potassium ferricyanide titration method... ferricyanide titration method for the determination of sulfide in wastewaters discharged by plants operating...

  9. Preparation of silver-activated zinc sulfide thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, C.; Swindells, F. E.

    1968-01-01

    Silver improves luminescence and reduces contamination of zinc sulfide phosphors. The silver is added after the zinc sulfide phosphors are deposited in thin films by vapor evaporation, but before calcining, by immersion in a solution of silver salt.

  10. Mechanisms of hydrogen sulfide removal with steel making slag.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyunghoi; Asaoka, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Tamiji; Hayakawa, Shinjiro; Takeda, Kazuhiko; Katayama, Misaki; Onoue, Takasumi

    2012-09-18

    In the present study, we experimentally investigated the removal of hydrogen sulfide using steel-making slag (SMS) and clarified the mechanism of hydrogen sulfide removal with the SMS. The results proved that SMS is able to remove hydrogen sulfide dissolved in water, and the maximum removal amount of hydrogen sulfide per unit weight of the SMS for 8 days was estimated to be 37.5 mg S/g. The removal processes of hydrogen sulfide were not only adsorption onto the SMS, but oxidation and precipitation as sulfur. The chemical forms of sulfide adsorbed onto the SMS were estimated to be sulfur and manganese sulfide in the ratio of 81% and 19%, respectively. It is demonstrated here that the SMS is a promising material to remediate organically enriched coastal sediments in terms of removal of hydrogen sulfide. Furthermore, using SMS is expected to contribute to development of a recycling-oriented society.

  11. Sulfide and methane production in sewer sediments.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiwen; Ni, Bing-Jie; Ganigué, Ramon; Werner, Ursula; Sharma, Keshab R; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated significant sulfide and methane production by sewer biofilms, particularly in rising mains. Sewer sediments in gravity sewers are also biologically active; however, their contribution to biological transformations in sewers is poorly understood at present. In this study, sediments collected from a gravity sewer were cultivated in a laboratory reactor fed with real wastewater for more than one year to obtain intact sediments. Batch test results show significant sulfide production with an average rate of 9.20 ± 0.39 g S/m(2)·d from the sediments, which is significantly higher than the areal rate of sewer biofilms. In contrast, the average methane production rate is 1.56 ± 0.14 g CH4/m(2)·d at 20 °C, which is comparable to the areal rate of sewer biofilms. These results clearly show that the contributions of sewer sediments to sulfide and methane production cannot be ignored when evaluating sewer emissions. Microsensor and pore water measurements of sulfide, sulfate and methane in the sediments, microbial profiling along the depth of the sediments and mathematical modelling reveal that sulfide production takes place near the sediment surface due to the limited penetration of sulfate. In comparison, methane production occurs in a much deeper zone below the surface likely due to the better penetration of soluble organic carbon. Modelling results illustrate the dependency of sulfide and methane productions on the bulk sulfate and soluble organic carbon concentrations can be well described with half-order kinetics.

  12. The copper-nickel concentration log: A tool for stratigraphic interpretation within the ultramafic and basal zones of the stillwater complex, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drew, L.J.; Bawiec, W.J.; Page, N.J.; Schuenemeyer, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    An analogue to the electric well log was devised for copper-nickel concentration drill-hole data from the Basal and lower part of the Ultramafic zones of the Stillwater Complex using automated data processing. The copper-nickel concentration logs graphically represent intensity (concentration) values that reflect the distribution of the elements in sulfide and silicate minerals. Four major patterns are recognized by their characteristic variations in copper and nickel intensity: (1) relatively flat, low-level copper-intensity signatures associated with arcuate nickel-intensity patterns that correlate with rocks in the Peridotite member of the Ultramafic zone; (2) arcuate or bulb-like patterns of copper and nickel intensity that correlate closely with the Basal bronzite cumulate member of the Basal zone; (3) complex patterns consisting of intervals of low-intensity copper and moderate-intensity nickel, spikes of high nickel and copper intensity, and high copper intensity associated with low nickel intensity that correlate respectively with cordierite-pyroxene hornfels, massive sulfide, norites and mineralized diabase dikes in the Basal norite member; and (4) large intervals of extremely low copper and nickel intensity that correlate with quartz-orthopyroxene hornfels. The recognition and interpretation of these patterns allow two- and three-dimensional stratigraphic and lithologic reconstructions to be done by means of concentration-log correlations instead of variable quality lithologic logging. ?? 1985.

  13. Copper-containing zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Price, G.L.; Kanazirev, V.

    1996-12-10

    A catalyst useful in the conversion of nitrogen oxides or in the synthesis of nitriles or imines from amines, is formed by preparing an intimate mechanical mixture of a copper (II)-containing species, such as CuO or CuCl{sub 2}, or elemental copper, with a zeolite having a pore mouth comprising 10 oxygen atoms, such as ZSM-5, converting the elemental copper or copper (II) to copper (I), and driving the copper (I) into the zeolite.

  14. Copper-containing zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Price, Geoffrey L.; Kanazirev, Vladislav

    1996-01-01

    A catalyst useful in the conversion of nitrogen oxides or in the synthesis of nitriles or imines from amines, formed by preparing an intimate mechanical mixture of a copper (II)-containing species, such as CuO or CuCl.sub.2, or elemental copper, with a zeolite having a pore mouth comprising 10 oxygen atoms, such as ZSM-5, converting the elemental copper or copper (II) to copper (I), and driving the copper (I) into the zeolite.

  15. Classification of polytype structures of zinc sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Laptev, V.I.

    1994-12-31

    It is suggested that the existing classification of polytype structures of zinc sulfide be supplemented with an additional criterion: the characteristic of regular point systems (Wyckoff positions) including their type, number, and multiplicity. The consideration of the Wyckoff positions allowed the establishment of construction principles of known polytype series of different symmetries and the systematization (for the first time) of the polytypes with the same number of differently packed layers. the classification suggested for polytype structures of zinc sulfide is compact and provides a basis for creating search systems. The classification table obtained can also be used for numerous silicon carbide polytypes. 8 refs., 4 tabs.

  16. Modeling of Sulfide Microenvironments on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenzer, S. P.; Bridges, J. C.; McAdam, A.; Steer, E. D.; Conrad, P. G.; Kelley, S. P.; Wiens, R. C.; Mangold, N.; Grotzinger, J.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Franz, H. B.; Sutter, B.

    2016-01-01

    Yellowknife Bay (YKB; sol 124-198) is the second site that the Mars Science Laboratory Rover Curiosity investigated in detail on its mission in Gale Crater. YKB represents lake bed sediments from an overall neutral pH, low salinity environment, with a mineralogical composition which includes Ca-sulfates, Fe oxide/hydroxides, Fe-sulfides, amorphous material, and trioctahedral phyllosilicates. We investigate whether sulfide alteration could be associated with ancient habitable microenvironments in the Gale mudstones. Some textural evidence for such alteration may be pre-sent in the nodules present in the mudstone.

  17. Acute inhalation toxicity of carbonyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, J.M.; Hahn, F.F.; Barr, E.B.

    1995-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS), a colorless gas, is a side product of industrial procedures sure as coal hydrogenation and gasification. It is structurally related to and is a metabolite of carbon disulfide. COS is metabolized in the body by carbonic anhydrase to hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), which is thought to be responsible for COS toxicity. No threshold limit value for COS has been established. Results of these studies indicate COS (with an LC{sub 50} of 590 ppm) is slightly less acutely toxic than H{sub 2}S (LC{sub 50} of 440 ppm).

  18. Aromatic sulfide/sulfone polymer production

    SciTech Connect

    Scoggins, L.E.; Hoover, K.C.; Shang, W.W.

    1991-05-14

    This patent describes a process for the production of aromatic sulfide/sulfone polymer. It comprises: contacting at least one lactam, at least one alkali metal hydrosulfide, water, and at least one base selected from the group consisting of alkali metal hydroxides and mixtures of alkali metal hydroxides with alkali metal carbonates under reaction conditions of time and temperature sufficient to produce a mixture containing a complex which comprises the at least one alkali metal hydrosulfide and contacting the mixture produced with a least one dihaloaromatic sulfone under polymerization conditions for a period of time sufficient to form an aromatic sulfide/sulfone polymer.

  19. Evolution of sulfide mineralization on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Roger G.; Fisher, Duncan S.

    1990-01-01

    It has been previously suggested, on the basis of compositional and petrographic similarities noted between komatites, SNC meteorites, and the silicate portion of the Martian regolith fines, that iron-sulfide ore deposites may exist on Mars. This paper examines the possible locations of Archean-type sulfide and related ore deposits on Mars, their evolution, and the emplacement mechanisms for the ore deposit. The clues to these questions are deduced by applying to Mars the temporal patterns of ore distribution on earth and the experimental observations on sulfur solubility in basaltic melts.

  20. Membrane for hydrogen recovery from streams containing hydrogen sulfide

    DOEpatents

    Agarwal, Pradeep K.

    2007-01-16

    A membrane for hydrogen recovery from streams containing hydrogen sulfide is provided. The membrane comprises a substrate, a hydrogen permeable first membrane layer deposited on the substrate, and a second membrane layer deposited on the first layer. The second layer contains sulfides of transition metals and positioned on the on a feed side of the hydrogen sulfide stream. The present invention also includes a method for the direct decomposition of hydrogen sulfide to hydrogen and sulfur.

  1. Method for inhibiting oxidation of metal sulfide-containing material

    DOEpatents

    Elsetinow, Alicia; Borda, Michael J.; Schoonen, Martin A.; Strongin, Daniel R.

    2006-12-26

    The present invention provides means for inhibiting the oxidation of a metal sulfide-containing material, such as ore mine waste rock or metal sulfide taiulings, by coating the metal sulfide-containing material with an oxidation-inhibiting two-tail lipid coating (12) thereon, thereby inhibiting oxidation of the metal sulfide-containing material in acid mine drainage conditions. The lipids may be selected from phospholipids, sphingolipids, glycolipids and combinations thereof.

  2. Improved Electroformed Structural Copper and Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.; Hudson, W.; Babcock, B.; Edwards, R.

    1998-01-01

    Electroforming offers a superior means for fabricating internally cooled heat exchangers and structures subjected to thermal environments. Copper is deposited from many such applications because of the good thermal conductivity. It suffers from mediocre yield strength as a structural material and loses mechanical strength at intermediate temperatures. Mechanical properties similar to those of electroformed nickel are desired. Phase 1 examined innovative means to improve deposited copper structural performance. Yield strengths as high as 483 MPa (70 ksi) were obtained with useful ductility while retaining a high level of purity essential to good thermal conductivity. Phase 2 represents a program to explore new additive combinations in copper electrolytes to produce a more fine, equiaxed grain which can be thermally stabilized by other techniques such as alloying in modest degrees and dispersion strengthening. Evaluation of new technology - such as the codeposition of fullerness (diamond-like) particles were made to enhance thermal conductivity in low alloys. A test fire quality tube-bundle engine was fabricated using these copper property improvement concepts to show the superiority of the new coppers and fabrications methods over competitive technologies such as brazing and plasma deposition.

  3. Copper Delivery by Metallochaperone Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, A.C.

    2010-03-08

    Copper is an essential element in all living organisms, serving as a cofactor for many important proteins and enzymes. Metallochaperone proteins deliver copper ions to specific physiological partners by direct protein-protein interactions. The Atx1-like chaperones transfer copper to intracellular copper transporters, and the CCS chaperones shuttle copper to copper,zinc superoxide dismutase. Crystallographic studies of these two copper chaperone families have provided insights into metal binding and target recognition by metallochaperones and have led to detailed molecular models for the copper transfer mechanism.

  4. Development of novel copper-based sorbents for hot-gas cleanup. Technical report, 1 March--31 May 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasian, J.; Hill, A.H.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Li, Z.

    1994-09-01

    The objective of this investigation is to evaluate two novel copper-based sorbents, namely copper-chromium and copper-cerium, for their effectiveness in removing hydrogen sulfide from fuel gas in the temperature range of 650 to 850 C. Such high temperatures will be required for the new generation of gas turbines (inlet > 750 C) in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. Results of fixed-bed reactor tests conducted in this quarter, indicate that, at 750 C, pre-reduction with H{sub 2} in the presence of H{sub 2}O does not effect the performance of either sorbent for H{sub 2}S removal. For the pre-reduced CuCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} sorbent, copper utilization before the first H{sub 2}S breakthrough is substantially higher in synthesis feed gas mixture than in feed gas containing 30 Vol% H{sub 2}, and slightly lower than in 10 vol% H{sub 2}. In sulfidation-regeneration testing of copper- and additive-rich sorbents, chromium-rich CuO-3Cr{sub 2}O{sub 4} sorbent demonstrated very high H{sub 2}S removal efficiency and high copper conversion levels (comparable to that of the 1:1 molar composition sorbent). Similar results were obtained with the cerium-rich CuO-3CeO{sub 2} sorbent, but only for the first cycle. The H{sub 2}S removal performance of both copper-rich sorbents was inferior to that of the respective 1:1 molar compositions. CuO-CeO{sub 2} sorbent testing in a TGA indicates no appreciable decrease in the sulfidation rate over 5 1/2 cycles. However, weight changes during regeneration of the CuO-CeO{sub 2} suggest that some copper or cerium sulfates formed.

  5. Efficient Cu-catalyzed base-free C-S coupling under conventional and microwave heating. A simple access to S-heterocycles and sulfides.

    PubMed

    Soria-Castro, Silvia M; Peñéñory, Alicia B

    2013-01-01

    S-aryl thioacetates can be prepared by reaction of inexpensive potassium thioacetate with both electron-rich and electron-poor aryl iodides under a base-free copper/ligand catalytic system. CuI as copper source affords S-aryl thioacetates in good to excellent yields, by using 1,10-phenanthroline as a ligand in toluene at 100 °C after 24 h. Under microwave irradiation the time was drastically reduced to 2 h. Both procedures are simple and involve a low-cost catalytic system. This methodology was also applied to the "one-pot" synthesis of target heterocycles, such as 3H-benzo[c][1,2]dithiol-3-one and 2-methylbenzothiazole, alkyl aryl sulfides, diaryl disulfides and asymmetric diaryl sulfides in good yields.

  6. A study of the trace sulfide mineral assemblages in the Stillwater Complex, Montana, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aird, Hannah M.; Ferguson, Katherine M.; Lehrer, Malia L.; Boudreau, Alan E.

    2016-07-01

    The sulfide assemblages of the Stillwater Complex away from the well-studied ore zones are composed mainly of variable proportions of pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, pentlandite, and ±pyrite. Excluding vein assemblages and those affected by greenschist and lower temperature alteration, the majority can be classified into two broad assemblages, defined here as pristine (multiphase, often globular in shape) or volatile-bearing (multiphase, high-temperature, volatile-rich minerals such as biotite, hornblende, or an unmixed calcite-dolomite assemblage). The volatile-bearing assemblages are mainly found within and below the J-M reef, where native copper and sphalerite are also locally present. Pristine sulfides are found throughout the stratigraphy. Both groups can be affected by apparent S loss in the form of pyrite being converted to magnetite and chalcopyrite to a Cu-Fe-oxide (delafossite), with little to no silicate alteration. An upward trend from pentlandite-rich to pyrrhotite-rich to pyrite-rich assemblages is observed in the footwall rocks in upper GN-I, and the same trend repeats from just below the reef and continues into the overlying N-II and GN-II. Modeling suggests that the sulfide Ni in the Peridotite Zone is largely controlled by silicate Ni. When taken together, observations are most readily explained by the remobilization of selected elements by a high-temperature fluid with the apparent loss of S > Cu > Ni. This could concentrate ore metals by vapor refining, eventually producing a platinum group element-enriched sulfide ore zone, such as the J-M reef.

  7. Effect of the cooling rate on the phase composition and structure of copper matte converting slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selivanov, E. N.; Gulyaeva, R. I.; Udoeva, L. Yu.; Belyaev, V. V.; Pankratov, A. A.

    2009-08-01

    The effect of the cooling rate on the phase composition and microstructure of copper matte converting slags is studied by X-ray diffraction, combined thermogravimetry and calorimetry, mineragraphy, and electron-probe microanalysis. The compositions of oxide and sulfide phases are determined, and the forms of nonferrous metals in slags cooled at a rate of 0.3 and 900°C/s are revealed. At high cooling rates of the slags, iron silicate glass is shown to form apart from sulfide phases. Repeated heating of the slags leads to the development of devitrification, “cold” crystallization, and melting. A decrease in the cooling rate favors an increase in the grain sizes in oxides (magnetite, iron silicates) and sulfides (bornite-, sphalerite, and galena-based solid solutions).

  8. Uranium-bearing copper deposits in the Coyote district, Mora County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zeller, H.D.; Baltz, Elmer Harold

    1954-01-01

    Uranium-bearing copper deposits occur in steeply dipping beds of the Sangre de Cristo formation of Pennsylvanian and Permian(?) age south of Coyote, Mora County, N. Mex. Mapping and sampling of these deposits indicate that they are found in lenticular carbonaceous zones in shales and arkosic sandstones. Samples from these zones contain as much as 0.067 percent uranium and average 3 percent copper. Metatyuyamunite is dissemihatedin some of the arkosic sandstone beds, and uraninite is present in some of the copper sulfide nodules occurring in the shale. These sulfide nodules are composed principally of chalcocite but include some bornite, covellite, pyrite, and malachite. Most of the samples were collected near the surface from the weathered zone. The copper and uranium were probably deposited with the sediments and concentrated into zones during compaction and lithification. Carbonaceous material in the Sangre de Cristo formation provided the environment that precipitated uranium and copper from mineral-charged connate waters forced from the clayey sediments.

  9. New Sulfide Derivatives of Vegetable Oils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetable oils containing sulfide group were synthesized using a UV initiated thiol-ene reaction. The reaction involved addition of butyl thiol to the double bonds of the vegetable oil without the presence of a solvent. The effects of temperature, reaction time, type of vegetable oil, thiol to veg...

  10. 30 CFR 250.490 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... black lettering as follows: Letter height Wording 12 inches Danger. Poisonous Gas. Hydrogen Sulfide. 7... well-control techniques to prevent formation fracturing in an open hole within the pressure limits of... designed consistent with the anticipated depth, conditions of the hole, and reservoir environment to...

  11. 30 CFR 250.490 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... black lettering as follows: Letter height Wording 12 inches Danger. Poisonous Gas. Hydrogen Sulfide. 7... well-control techniques to prevent formation fracturing in an open hole within the pressure limits of... designed consistent with the anticipated depth, conditions of the hole, and reservoir environment to...

  12. Sulfide as a signaling molecule in autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Gotor, Cecilia; García, Irene; Crespo, José L.; Romero, Luis C.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is already recognized as an important signaling molecule in mammalian systems, and emerging data suggest that H2S is a signaling molecule just as important as nitric oxide (NO) and H2O2 in plants. Although sulfide is generated in chloroplasts and mitochondria, it is present predominantly in the charged HS- form due to the basic pH inside both organelles, thus requiring an active transporter, which is yet to be identified, to be released. In Arabidopsis, we found that the cytosolic L-cysteine desulfhydrase DES1 is involved in the degradation of cysteine, and therefore responsible for the generation of H2S in this cellular compartment. DES1 deficiency leads to the induction of autophagy. Moreover, we have demonstrated that sulfide in particular exerts a general effect on autophagy through negative regulation, in a way unrelated to nutrient deficiency. The mechanisms of H2S action and its molecular targets are largely unknown, although in animal systems, protein S-sulfhydration has been proposed as a mechanism for sulfide-mediated signaling. PMID:23328265

  13. Comparison of Hydrogen Sulfide Analysis Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bethea, Robert M.

    1973-01-01

    A summary and critique of common methods of hydrogen sulfide analysis is presented. Procedures described are: reflectance from silver plates and lead acetate-coated tiles, lead acetate and mercuric chloride paper tapes, sodium nitroprusside and methylene blue wet chemical methods, infrared spectrophotometry, and gas chromatography. (BL)

  14. REACTION PROCESSES OF ARSENIC IN SULFIDIC SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fate of arsenic in the environment is fundamentally linked to its speciation. Arsenic in aerobic environments is predominantly arsenate, however under reducing conditions arsenite species dominate. In anoxic or sulfidic environments thioarsenite ((As(OH)x(SH)yz-) species alon...

  15. Monitoring sulfide and sulfate-reducing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, R.S.

    1995-12-31

    Simple yet precise and accurate methods for monitoring sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfide remain useful for the study of bacterial souring and corrosion. Test kits are available to measure sulfide in field samples. A more precise methylene blue sulfide assay for both field and laboratory studies is described here. Improved media, compared to that in API RP-38, for enumeration of SRB have been formulated. One of these, API-RST, contained cysteine (1.1 mM) as a reducing agent, which may be a confounding source of sulfide. While cysteine was required for rapid enumeration of SRB from environmental samples, the concentration of cysteine in medium could be reduced to 0.4 mM. It was also determined that elevated levels of yeast extract (>1 g/liter) could interfere with enumeration of SRB from environmental samples. The API-RST medium was modified to a RST-11 medium. Other changes in medium composition, in addition to reduction of cysteine, included reduction of the concentration of phosphate from 3.4 mM to 2.2 mM, reduction of the concentration of ferrous iron from 0.8 mM to 0.5 mM and preparation of a stock mineral solution to ease medium preparation. SRB from environmental samples could be enumerated in a week in this medium.

  16. Atomic layer deposition of metal sulfide materials.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Neil P; Meng, Xiangbo; Elam, Jeffrey W; Martinson, Alex B F

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: The field of nanoscience is delivering increasingly intricate yet elegant geometric structures incorporating an ever-expanding palette of materials. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a powerful driver of this field, providing exceptionally conformal coatings spanning the periodic table and atomic-scale precision independent of substrate geometry. This versatility is intrinsic to ALD and results from sequential and self-limiting surface reactions. This characteristic facilitates digital synthesis, in which the film grows linearly with the number of reaction cycles. While the majority of ALD processes identified to date produce metal oxides, novel applications in areas such as energy storage, catalysis, and nanophotonics are motivating interest in sulfide materials. Recent progress in ALD of sulfides has expanded the diversity of accessible materials as well as a more complete understanding of the unique chalcogenide surface chemistry. ALD of sulfide materials typically uses metalorganic precursors and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). As in oxide ALD, the precursor chemistry is critical to controlling both the film growth and properties including roughness, crystallinity, and impurity levels. By modification of the precursor sequence, multicomponent sulfides have been deposited, although challenges remain because of the higher propensity for cation exchange reactions, greater diffusion rates, and unintentional annealing of this more labile class of materials. A deeper understanding of these surface chemical reactions has been achieved through a combination of in situ studies and quantum-chemical calculations. As this understanding matures, so does our ability to deterministically tailor film properties to new applications and more sophisticated devices. This Account highlights the attributes of ALD chemistry that are unique to metal sulfides and surveys recent applications of these materials in photovoltaics, energy storage, and photonics. Within each application

  17. Bioaccessibility and Solubility of Copper in Copper-Treated Lumber

    EPA Science Inventory

    Micronized copper (MC)-treated lumber is a recent replacement for Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCA) and Ammonium Copper (AC)-treated lumbers; though little is known about the potential risk of copper (Cu) exposure from incidental ingestion of MC-treated wood. The bioaccessibility o...

  18. Oxygen Demand of Fresh and Stored Sulfide Solutions and Sulfide-Rich Constructed Wetland Effluent.

    PubMed

    Chan, Carolyn; Farahbakhsh, Khosrow

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated the contribution of hydrogen sulfide to biological oxygen demand (BOD5) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) in wastewater effluents, and documented the effect of storage times and conditions on the BOD5 and COD of pH-adjusted sodium sulfide solutions as well as graywater wetland effluent. Initial COD measurements of sulfide solutions were 84-89% of the theoretical oxygen demand (ThOD), 1.996 mg O2/mg S, whereas unseeded BOD5 measurements were 55-77%. For sulfide solutions, all storage conditions led to declines of >15% (COD, BOD5), and >31% (sulfide). For wetland effluent, storage without headspace was effective in reducing COD losses (3.7%), compared to storage with headspace (17%), and affected changes in turbidity, UVA-254 and pH. The results suggest that storage times and conditions should be controlled and reported when reporting BOD5 and COD of sulfide-rich samples. Wetland models representing sulfate reduction as a method of COD removal may need to be reconsidered. PMID:26237688

  19. Sulfide-oxidizing bacteria: Their role during air-stripping

    SciTech Connect

    Dell`Orco, M.J.; Chadik, P.A.; Bitton, G.; Neumann, R.P.

    1998-10-01

    Air-stripping, used to remove hydrogen sulfide naturally present in many groundwater supplies, commonly causes sulfide-oxidizing bacteria to proliferate. The role of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria during air-stripping was investigated in a diffused-air pilot reactor modeled after an existing treatment facility. Visible bacterial filaments and biofilm developed within a few days and increased both the sulfide removed from and turbidity in the effluent. Total sulfide, dissolved oxygen, pH, and electrode potential were monitored at eight locations in the reactor to characterize the process.

  20. Investigation of Copper Ammonia Leaching from Smelter Slags: Characterization, Leaching and Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidari, Ehsan; Aghazadeh, Valeh

    2015-10-01

    Although ammonia leaching of copper from slags has been reported generally as a part of copper slag utilization methods, but no detailed studies have been reported in the literature. In this research, we tried to investigate the effect of different parameters on ammonia leaching of copper from copper smelting slag by identifying different copper-bearing phases and following them during leaching time. Mineralogical characterization of the smelting slag (1.7 pct Cu) was done using X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, diagnostic leaching tests, and scanning electron microscopy. The characterization studies indicated that main copper-bearing species are soluble copper oxides and chalcocite along with minor amount of covellite, bornite, blister copper particles, and chalcopyrite. It was also found that only approximately 0.2 pct Cu was present in the insoluble bulk silicate phases. These results suggest that approximately 88 pct of the total copper of slag could be extracted by ammonia sulfide leaching. Leaching tests were carried out and the effects of various parameters, namely pH, ammonia concentration, temperature, presence of oxygen, stirring speed, and pulp density were examined on copper leaching. The temperature and stirring speed had the most pronounced effect on the copper leaching, whereas ammonia affected the leaching yield at low concentrations of ammonia. It was found that 78 pct of Cu could be extracted within 4 hours and under optimum conditions: T = 343 K (70 °C), 2M ammonia, pH 10.5, stirring speed = 900 rpm, pulp density = 10 pct ( w s/ v). The kinetic data were analyzed with the shrinking core models, and it was found that the leaching process is controlled by both the interfacial transfer and diffusion across the product layer and the activation energy is calculated to be 49.4 kJ mol-1.

  1. Analog Experiments on Sulfide Foams in Magmatic Ore Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitch, A. M.; Dahn, D.; Zavala, K.

    2009-05-01

    Metal sulfides form as an immiscible phase from silicate magmas. Dynamic mingling and unmingling of the two phases is important for the development of economic deposits: mingling promotes enrichment of the sulfide in valuable metals, and subsequent unmingling generates massive sulfide. Analog experiments were carried out to investigate mingling processes in immiscible systems, using oil, water and small beads to represent magma, sulfide liquid and silicate crystals. Stirring or injection led to the formation of a foam of analog sulfide droplets within an analog silicate framework. We propose that the partial collapse of such a foam explains massive sulfide lenses at the Voisey's Bay magmatic sulfide deposit, and that crystallization of silicate crystals in the remaining foam walls generates 'net-textured' ores. In the experiments, solid particles had a profound effect on unmingling: analog sulfide droplets were stably contained within analog crystal-rich magma and did not coalesce. We therefore suggest that 'net' and 'leopard' textures in disseminated sulfides indicate mingling of sulfide with crystal-poor magma, whereas isolated disseminated patches of sulfide indicate mingling with a crystal-rich magma.

  2. Copper as a biocidal tool.

    PubMed

    Borkow, Gadi; Gabbay, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    Copper ions, either alone or in copper complexes, have been used to disinfect liquids, solids and human tissue for centuries. Today copper is used as a water purifier, algaecide, fungicide, nematocide, molluscicide as well as an anti-bacterial and anti-fouling agent. Copper also displays potent anti-viral activity. This article reviews (i) the biocidal properties of copper; (ii) the possible mechanisms by which copper is toxic to microorganisms; and (iii) the systems by which many microorganisms resist high concentrations of heavy metals, with an emphasis on copper. PMID:16101497

  3. Fabricating Copper Nanotubes by Electrodeposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, E. H.; Ramsey, Christopher; Bae, Youngsam; Choi, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Copper tubes having diameters between about 100 and about 200 nm have been fabricated by electrodeposition of copper into the pores of alumina nanopore membranes. Copper nanotubes are under consideration as alternatives to copper nanorods and nanowires for applications involving thermal and/or electrical contacts, wherein the greater specific areas of nanotubes could afford lower effective thermal and/or electrical resistivities. Heretofore, copper nanorods and nanowires have been fabricated by a combination of electrodeposition and a conventional expensive lithographic process. The present electrodeposition-based process for fabricating copper nanotubes costs less and enables production of copper nanotubes at greater rate.

  4. [Copper and the human body].

    PubMed

    Krízek, M; Senft, V; Motán, J

    1997-11-19

    Copper is one of the essential trace elements. It is part of a number of enzymes. Deficiency of the element is manifested by impaired haematopoesis, bone metabolism, disorders of the digestive, cardiovascular and nervous system. Deficiency occurs in particular in patients suffering from malnutrition, malabsorption, great copper losses during administration of penicillamine. Sporadically copper intoxications are described (suicidal intentions or accidental ingestion of beverages with a high copper content). Acute exposure to copper containing dust is manifested by metal fume fever. Copper salts can produce local inflammations. Wilson's disease is associated with inborn impaired copper metabolism. In dialyzed patients possible contaminations of the dialyzate with copper must be foreseen as well as the possible release of copper from some dialyzation membranes. With the increasing amount of copper in the environment it is essential to monitor the contamination of the environment.

  5. Competition for Dimethyl Sulfide and Hydrogen Sulfide by Methylophaga sulfidovorans and Thiobacillus thioparus T5 in Continuous Cultures

    PubMed Central

    De Zwart, J.; Sluis, J.; Kuenen, J. G.

    1997-01-01

    Pure and mixed cultures of Methylophaga sulfidovorans and Thiobacillus thioparus T5 were grown in continuous cultures on either dimethyl sulfide, dimethyl sulfide and H(inf2)S, or H(inf2)S and methanol. In pure cultures, M. sulfidovorans showed a lower affinity for sulfide than T. thioparus T5. Mixed cultures, grown on dimethyl sulfide, showed coexistence of both species. M. sulfidovorans fully converted dimethyl sulfide to thiosulfate, which was subsequently further oxidized to sulfate by T. thioparus T5. Mixed cultures supplied with sulfide and methanol showed that nearly all the sulfide was used by T. thioparus T5, as expected on the basis of the affinities for sulfide. The sulfide in mixed cultures supplied with dimethyl sulfide and H(inf2)S, however, was used by both bacteria. This result may be explained by the fact that the H(inf2)S-oxidizing capacity of M. sulfidovorans remains fully induced by intracellular H(inf2)S originating from dimethyl sulfide metabolism. PMID:16535680

  6. Selective chemical dissolution of sulfides: An evaluation of six methods applicable to assaying sulfide-bound nickel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klock, P.R.; Czamanske, G.K.; Foose, M.; Pesek, J.

    1986-01-01

    Six analytical techniques for the selective chemical dissolution of sulfides are compared with the purpose of defining the best method for accurately determining the concentration of sulfide-bound nickel. Synthesized sulfide phases of known elemental content, mixed with well-analyzed silicates, were used to determine the relative and absolute efficiency, based on Ni and Mg recovery, of the techniques. Tested leach-methods purported to dissolve sulfide from silicate phases include: brominated water, brominated water-carbon tetrachloride, nitric-hydrochloric acid, hydrogen peroxide-ammonium citrate, bromine-methanol and hydrogen peroxide-ascorbic acid. Only the hydrogen peroxide-ammonium citrate method did not prove adequate in dissolving the sulfide phases. The remaining five methods dissolved the sulfide phases, but the indicated amount of attack on the silicate portion ranged from 3% to 100%. The bromine-methanol method is recommended for assaying sulfide-Ni deposits when Ni is also present in silicate phases. ?? 1986.

  7. Targeting copper in cancer therapy: 'Copper That Cancer'.

    PubMed

    Denoyer, Delphine; Masaldan, Shashank; La Fontaine, Sharon; Cater, Michael A

    2015-11-01

    Copper is an essential micronutrient involved in fundamental life processes that are conserved throughout all forms of life. The ability of copper to catalyze oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions, which can inadvertently lead to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), necessitates the tight homeostatic regulation of copper within the body. Many cancer types exhibit increased intratumoral copper and/or altered systemic copper distribution. The realization that copper serves as a limiting factor for multiple aspects of tumor progression, including growth, angiogenesis and metastasis, has prompted the development of copper-specific chelators as therapies to inhibit these processes. Another therapeutic approach utilizes specific ionophores that deliver copper to cells to increase intracellular copper levels. The therapeutic window between normal and cancerous cells when intracellular copper is forcibly increased, is the premise for the development of copper-ionophores endowed with anticancer properties. Also under investigation is the use of copper to replace platinum in coordination complexes currently used as mainstream chemotherapies. In comparison to platinum-based drugs, these promising copper coordination complexes may be more potent anticancer agents, with reduced toxicity toward normal cells and they may potentially circumvent the chemoresistance associated with recurrent platinum treatment. In addition, cancerous cells can adapt their copper homeostatic mechanisms to acquire resistance to conventional platinum-based drugs and certain copper coordination complexes can re-sensitize cancer cells to these drugs. This review will outline the biological importance of copper and copper homeostasis in mammalian cells, followed by a discussion of our current understanding of copper dysregulation in cancer, and the recent therapeutic advances using copper coordination complexes as anticancer agents.

  8. Arsenic speciation in natural sulfidic geothermal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Nicole S.; Stefánsson, Andri; Sigfússon, Bergur

    2014-10-01

    The speciation of arsenic in natural sulfidic geothermal waters was studied using chemical analyses and thermodynamic aqueous speciation calculations. Samples were collected in three geothermal systems in Iceland, having contrasting H2S concentrations in the reservoir (high vs. low). The sampled waters contained 7-116 ppb As and <0.01-77.6 ppm H2S with pH of 8.56-9.60. The analytical setup used for the determination of arsenic species (Ion Chromatography-Hydride Generation Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry, IC-HG-AFS) was field-deployed and the samples analyzed within ∼5 min of sampling in order to prevent changes upon storage, which were shown to be considerable regardless of the sample storage method used. Nine aqueous arsenic species were detected, among others arsenite (HnAsO3n-3), thioarsenite (HnAsS3n-3), arsenate (HnAsO4n-3), monothioarsenate (HnAsSO3n-3), dithioarsenate (HnAsS2O2n-3), trithioarsenate (HnAsS3O) and tetrathioarsenate (HnAsS4n-3). The results of the measured aqueous arsenic speciation in the natural geothermal waters and comparison with thermodynamic calculations reveal that the predominant factors determining the species distribution are sulfide concentration and pH. In alkaline waters with low sulfide concentrations the predominant species are AsIII oxyanions. This can be seen in samples from a liquid-only well, tapping water that is H2S-poor and free of oxygen. At intermediate sulfide concentration AsIII and AsV thio species become important and predominate at high sulfide concentration, as seen in two-phase well waters, which have high H2S concentrations in the reservoir. Upon oxidation, for instance due to mixing of the reservoir fluid with oxygenated water upon ascent to the surface, AsV oxyanions form, as well as AsV thio complexes if the sulfide concentration is intermediate to high. This oxidation process can be seen in samples from hot springs in the Geysir geothermal area. While the thermodynamic modeling allows for a first

  9. The mineralogy and the isotopic composition of sulfur in hydrothermal sulfide/sulfate deposits on the East Pacific Rise, 21 deg N latitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Styrt, M. M.; Brackmann, A. J.; Holland, H. D.; Clark, B. C.; Pisutha-Arnond, V.; Eldridge, C. S.; Ohmoto, H.

    1981-01-01

    The mineralogy and isotopic composition of sulfur found in hydrothermal deposits associated with five groups of vents along the ridge axis of the East Pacific Rise near 21 deg N latitude are investigated. Solid samples of mixed sulfides and sulfates from mounds, chimneys and the surrounding sediment as well as fresh basaltic glass were examined with a portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer and by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, and electron microprobe analysis. For the three vents of exit temperature close to 350 C, the chimneys are found to be rich in copper sulfides, while for those of temperatures around 300 C, zinc sulfide is found to predominate. The major sulfides found in the chimneys include wurtzite, chalcopyrite, pyrite and cubanite, with anhydrite the dominant sulfate. Significant mineralogical differences are found between active and inactive vents. The isotopic composition of sulfur in anhydrites from active vents is observed to be close to that of sea water and consistent with a derivation from sea water sulfate. The isotopic composition of sulfur in the sulfide minerals is explained in terms of precipitation from solutions with reduced sulfur derived from basalts or basaltic magmas, and sea water sulfate. Finally, the deposits are interpreted as the results of the mixing of H2S-dominated hydrothermal fluids with cold sea water near the sea floor.

  10. Report on exploration of the Wadi Yiba copper prospect, Tihamat Ash Sham quadrangle, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Earhart, Robert L.

    1969-01-01

    The first phase of an exploration program at The Wadi Yiba copper prospect consisted of geologic mapping, prospecting, sampling, geophysical surveys, and diamond drilling. Copper mineralization is in a sedimentary rock sequence comprised mostly of siliceous, calcareous, and dolomitic rocks metamorphosed to the greenschist facies. The metasedimentary rocks are overlain and underlain by metavolcanic rocks. They are folded into a tight north-plunging syncline transected by two fault systems. Results from the exploration program indicate that a fault zone which sub-parallels the synclinal axis and cuts siliceous dolomite contains copper mineralization and small amounts of gold and silver. Copper and silver beaming pyroclastic rocks were found in the upper part of the metasedimentary rock sequence. Concentrations of copper mineralization seem to be restricted to particular rock units in the metasedimentary rock sequence. Primary sulfides have not been encountered in the drill holes to date and the results from one drill hole indicate secondary copper sulfide minerals to a vertical depth of 60 meters. Further exploration seems to be warranted and a program is proposed which includes the investigation of other mineral occurrences and geophysical anomalies in the region.

  11. Chemical composition, morphology and optical properties of zinc sulfide coatings deposited by low-energy electron beam evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragachev, A. V.; Yarmolenko, M. A.; Rogachev, A. A.; Gorbachev, D. L.; Zhou, Bing

    2014-06-01

    The research determines the features of formation, morphology, chemical composition and optical properties of the coatings deposited by the method, proposed for the first time, of the exposure of mechanical mixture of zinc and sulfur powders to low-energy electron beam evaporation. The findings show that the deposited coatings are characterized by high chemical and structural homogeneity in thickness. The study considers the influence of substrate temperature and thickness of the deposited layer on the morphology and the width of the formed ZnS thin layers band gap. Also was shown the possibility to form ZnS coatings with this method using the mixture of zinc and copper sulfide powders.

  12. Copper in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... at the Institute of Medicine recommends the following dietary intake for copper: Infants 0 to 6 months: 200 ... Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board. Dietary Reference ... and Zinc. National Academy Press . Washington, DC, 2001. ...

  13. Volatility of copper

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.A.; Simonson, J.M.; Joyce, D.B.

    1996-08-01

    The relevant aqueous thermodynamics of copper and its oxides are evaluated and summarized with emphasis on solubility, hydrolysis, and complexation. The solubilities of metallic copper, solid cuprous and cupric oxides in steam measured by Pocock and Stewart in 1963 are discussed and the latter data are fitted in the form of established empirical equations and compared to other existing results. No other sources of data were found for the solubility of copper and cupric oxide in steam and even these data are very limited. Discussion of corresponding available solubility data on both oxide phases in liquid water is given. The possible effects of complexing agents are considered. A brief discussion is provided of the role of surface adsorption in determining the fate of dissolved copper in the boiler. 37 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Uranium in the Copper King Mine, Black Hawk No. 1 Claim, Larimer County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granger, Harry Clifford; King, Robert Ugstad

    1951-01-01

    Radioactive rock was discovered on the dump of the Copper King mine, sec. 8, T. 10 N., R. 72 W., Larirrier County, Colo., in the summer of 1949. The mine had been prospected intermittently for copper and zinc since 1,916, but there is no record that ore was produced. The country rock is pre-Cambrian granite containing many schist inclusions and narrow pegmatite dikes. Pitchblende disseminated in chlorite and sulfides was deposited in an obscure vein system during an intermediate stage of mineralization. This stage was preceded by biotitic alteration of amphiboles and sulfide deposition. The latest stage of mineralization is represented-by the limonitic dense quartz vein followed during mining. The uranium-bearing vein is about 2-3 feet wide and the dense quartz vein is less than 6 inches wide. Both veins are bordered by 1-3 feet of biotite- and sulfide-bearing granite and arriphibole schist. The uranium content of 26 samples taken in the mine and on the dump ranges from 0.002 to 1.40 percent. These samples contained as much as 2.97 percent copper and 5.96 percent zinc. The general outlook for further prospecting near the Copper King shaft is not favorable, because much of the 'immediately surrounding area has been thoroughly investigated without finding abnormal radioactivity. The most favorable environment for concentration of uranium minerals appears to have been in or near schist inclusions in granite, and further exploration in nearby prospects may result in the discovery of other uranium-bearing deposits. In the Copper King mine, additional exploration would aid in determining the extent of the uranium-bearing material.

  15. Sulfide Intrusion and Detoxification in the Seagrass Zostera marina

    PubMed Central

    Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Holmer, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Gaseous sulfide intrusion into seagrasses growing in sulfidic sediments causes little or no harm to the plant, indicating the presence of an unknown sulfide tolerance or detoxification mechanism. We assessed such mechanism in the seagrass Zostera marina in the laboratory and in the field with scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, chromatographic and spectrophotometric methods, and stable isotope tracing coupled with a mass balance of sulfur compounds. We found that Z. marina detoxified gaseous sediment-derived sulfide through incorporation and that most of the detoxification occurred in underground tissues, where sulfide intrusion was greatest. Elemental sulfur was a major detoxification compound, precipitating on the inner wall of the aerenchyma of underground tissues. Sulfide was metabolized into thiols and entered the plant sulfur metabolism as well as being stored as sulfate throughout the plant. We conclude that avoidance of sulfide exposure by reoxidation of sulfide in the rhizosphere or aerenchyma and tolerance of sulfide intrusion by incorporation of sulfur in the plant are likely major survival strategies of seagrasses in sulfidic sediments. PMID:26030258

  16. The Evolution of Sulfide Tolerance in the Cyanobacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Scott R.; Bebout, Brad M.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Understanding how the function of extant microorganisms has recorded both their evolutionary histories and their past interactions with the environment is a stated goal of astrobiology. We are taking a multidisciplinary approach to investigate the diversification of sulfide tolerance mechanisms in the cyanobacteria, which vary both in their degree of exposure to sulfide and in their capacity to tolerate this inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport. Since conditions were very reducing during the first part of Earth's history and detrital sulfides have been found in Archean sediments, mechanisms conferring sulfide tolerance may have been important for the evolutionary success of the ancestors of extant cyanobacteria. Two tolerance mechanisms have been identified in this group: (1) resistance of photosystem II, the principal target of sulfide toxicity; and (2) maintenance of the ability to fix carbon despite photosystem II inhibition by utilizing sulfide as an electron donor in photosystem I - dependent, anoxygenic photosynthesis. We are presently collecting comparative data on aspects of sulfide physiology for laboratory clones isolated from a variety of habitats. These data will be analyzed within a phylogenetic framework inferred from molecular sequence data collected for these clones to test how frequently different mechanisms of tolerance have evolved and which tolerance mechanism evolved first. In addition, by analyzing these physiological data together with environmental sulfide data collected from our research sites using microelectrodes, we can also test whether the breadth of an organism's sulfide tolerance can be predicted from the magnitude of variation in environmental sulfide concentration it has experienced in its recent evolutionary past and whether greater average sulfide concentration and/or temporal variability in sulfide favors the evolution of a particular mechanism of sulfide tolerance.

  17. Enhanced reductive dechlorination of trichloroethylene by sulfidated nanoscale zerovalent iron.

    PubMed

    Rajajayavel, Sai Rajasekar C; Ghoshal, Subhasis

    2015-07-01

    Direct injection of reactive nanoscale zerovalent iron particles (NZVI) is considered to be a promising approach for remediation of aquifers contaminated by chlorinated organic pollutants. In this study we show that the extent of sulfidation of NZVI enhances the rate of dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) compared to that by unamended NZVI, and the enhancement depends on the Fe/S molar ratio. Experiments where TCE was reacted with NZVI sulfidated to different extents (Fe/S molar ratios 0.62-66) showed that the surface-area normalized first-order TCE degradation rate constant increased up to 40 folds compared to non-sulfidated NZVI. Fe/S ratios in the range of 12-25 provided the highest TCE dechlorination rates, and rates decreased at both higher and lower Fe/S. In contrast, sulfidated NZVI exposed to water in the absence of TCE showed significantly lower hydrogen evolution rate (2.75 μmol L(-1) h(-1)) compared to that by an unamended NZVI (6.92 μmol L(-1) h(-1)), indicating that sulfidation of NZVI suppressed corrosion reactions with water. Sulfide (HS(-)) ions reacted rapidly with NZVI and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses showed formation of a surface layer of FeS and FeS2. We propose that more electrons are preferentially conducted from sulfidated NZVI than from unamended NZVI to TCE, likely because of greater binding of TCE on the reactive sites of the iron sulfide outer layer. Resuspending sulfidated NZVI in sulfide-free or sulfide containing solutions altered the TCE degradation rate constants because of changes in the FeS layer thickness. Sulfidated NZVI maintained its high reactivity in the presence of multiple mono and divalent ions and with polyelectrolyte coatings. Thus, sulfide ions in groundwater can significantly alter NZVI reactivity.

  18. Cadmium zinc sulfide by solution growth

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Wen S.

    1992-05-12

    A process for depositing thin layers of a II-VI compound cadmium zinc sulfide (CdZnS) by an aqueous solution growth technique with quality suitable for high efficiency photovoltaic or other devices which can benefit from the band edge shift resulting from the inclusion of Zn in the sulfide. A first solution comprising CdCl.sub.2 2.5H.sub.2 O, NH.sub.4 Cl, NH.sub.4 OH and ZnCl.sub.2, and a second solution comprising thiourea ((NH.sub.2).sub.2 CS) are combined and placed in a deposition cell, along with a substrate to form a thin i.e. 10 nm film of CdZnS on the substrate. This process can be sequentially repeated with to achieve deposition of independent multiple layers having different Zn concentrations.

  19. Iron-sulfide redox flow batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Guan-Guang; Yang, Zhenguo; Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Liu, Jun; Graff, Gordon L

    2013-12-17

    Iron-sulfide redox flow battery (RFB) systems can be advantageous for energy storage, particularly when the electrolytes have pH values greater than 6. Such systems can exhibit excellent energy conversion efficiency and stability and can utilize low-cost materials that are relatively safer and more environmentally friendly. One example of an iron-sulfide RFB is characterized by a positive electrolyte that comprises Fe(III) and/or Fe(II) in a positive electrolyte supporting solution, a negative electrolyte that comprises S.sup.2- and/or S in a negative electrolyte supporting solution, and a membrane, or a separator, that separates the positive electrolyte and electrode from the negative electrolyte and electrode.

  20. Iron-sulfide redox flow batteries

    DOEpatents

    Xia, Guanguang; Yang, Zhenguo; Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Liu, Jun; Graff, Gordon L

    2016-06-14

    Iron-sulfide redox flow battery (RFB) systems can be advantageous for energy storage, particularly when the electrolytes have pH values greater than 6. Such systems can exhibit excellent energy conversion efficiency and stability and can utilize low-cost materials that are relatively safer and more environmentally friendly. One example of an iron-sulfide RFB is characterized by a positive electrolyte that comprises Fe(III) and/or Fe(II) in a positive electrolyte supporting solution, a negative electrolyte that comprises S.sup.2- and/or S in a negative electrolyte supporting solution, and a membrane, or a separator, that separates the positive electrolyte and electrode from the negative electrolyte and electrode.

  1. Subsurface heaters with low sulfidation rates

    SciTech Connect

    John, Randy Carl; Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-12-10

    A system for heating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes a heater having an elongated ferromagnetic metal heater section. The heater is located in an opening in a formation. The heater section is configured to heat the hydrocarbon containing formation. The exposed ferromagnetic metal has a sulfidation rate that goes down with increasing temperature of the heater, when the heater is in a selected temperature range.

  2. Hydrogen sulfide prodrugs—a review

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yueqin; Ji, Xingyue; Ji, Kaili; Wang, Binghe

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is recognized as one of three gasotransmitters together with nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO). As a signaling molecule, H2S plays an important role in physiology and shows great potential in pharmaceutical applications. Along this line, there is a need for the development of H2S prodrugs for various reasons. In this review, we summarize different H2S prodrugs, their chemical properties, and some of their potential therapeutic applications. PMID:26579468

  3. Single-layer transition metal sulfide catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Thoma, Steven G.

    2011-05-31

    Transition Metal Sulfides (TMS), such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2), are the petroleum industry's "workhorse" catalysts for upgrading heavy petroleum feedstocks and removing sulfur, nitrogen and other pollutants from fuels. We have developed an improved synthesis technique to produce SLTMS catalysts, such as molybdenum disulfide, with potentially greater activity and specificity than those currently available. Applications for this technology include heavy feed upgrading, in-situ catalysis, bio-fuel conversion and coal liquefaction.

  4. Redetermination of piperidinium hydrogen sulfide structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andras, Maria T.; Hepp, Aloysius F.; Fanwick, Phillip E.; Duraj, Stan A.; Gordon, Edward M.

    1994-01-01

    The presence of adventitious water in a reaction between dicyclopentamethylene thiuram-disulfide (C5H10NCS2)(sub 2) and a picoline solution of tricyclopentadienyl indium(III) (C5H5)(sub 3). It resulted in the formation of piperidinium hydrogen sulfide (C5H13NS). The piperidinium hydrogen sulfide produced in this way was unambiguously characterized by X-ray crystallography. The structure determination showed that the piperidinium hydrogen sulfide crystal (MW = 119.23 g/mol) has an orthorhombic (Pbcm) unit cell whose parameters are: a = 9.818(2), b = 7.3720(1), c = 9.754(1) A, V = 706.0(3) A(exp 3), Z=4. D(sub chi) = 1.122 g cm(exp -3), Mo K(alpha) (lamda = 0.71073), mu= 3.36 cm(exp -1), F(000) = 264.0, T =293 K, R = 0.036 for 343 reflections with F(sub O)(sup 2) greater than 3 sigma (F(sub O)(sup 2)) and 65 variables. The compound consists of (C5H10NH2)(+) cations and (SH)(-) anions with both species residing on crystallographic mirror planes. N-H -- S hydrogen bonding contributes to the interconnection of neighboring piperidinium components of the compound.

  5. Mineralogy and Geochemical Processes of Carbonate Mineral-rich Sulfide Mine Tailings, Zimapan, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClure, R. J.; Deng, Y.; Loeppert, R.; Herbert, B. E.; Carrillo, R.; Gonzalez, C.

    2009-12-01

    Mining for silver, lead, zinc, and copper in Zimapan, Hidalgo State, Mexico has been ongoing since 1576. High concentrations of heavy metals have been found in several mine tailing heaps in the Zimapan area, with concentrations of arsenic observed as high as 28,690 mg/kg and levels of Pb as high as 2772 mg/kg. Unsecured tailings heaps and associated acid mine drainage has presented tremendous problems to revegetation, water quality, and dust emission control in the Zimapan area. Although acid mine drainage problems related to weathering of sulfide minerals have been extensively studied and are well known, the weathering products of sulfides in areas with a significant presence of carbonate minerals and their effect on the mobility of heavy metals warrant further study. Carbonate minerals are expected to neutralize sulfuric acid produced from weathering of sulfide minerals, however, in the Zimapan area localized areas of pH as low as 1.8 were observed within carbonate mineral-rich tailing heaps. The objectives of this study are to characterize (1) the heavy metal-containing sulfide minerals in the initial tailing materials, (2) the intermediate oxidation products of sulfide minerals within the carbonate-rich tailings, (3) chemical species of heavy metals within pH gradients between 1.8 and 8.2, the approximate natural pH of limestone, and (4) the mobility of soluble and colloidal heavy metals and arsenic within the carbonate-rich tailings. Representative mine tailings and their intermediate oxidation products have been sampled from the Zimapan area. Mineralogical characterization will be conducted with X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, electron microscopes and microprobes, and chemical methods. Chemical species will be extracted by selective dissolution methods. Preliminary results have identified calcite as the dominant mineral in the tailing heaps with a pH of 7, suggesting non-equilibrium with the acidic weathering products. Other minerals identified in

  6. Hydrocracking of n-decane over zeolite-supported metal sulfide catalysts. 2: Zeolite Y-supported Ni and Ni-Mo sulfides

    SciTech Connect

    Welters, W.J.J.; Waerden, O.H. van der; Beer, V.H.J. de; Santen, R.A. van

    1995-04-01

    For zeolite Y-supported nickel sulfide catalysts the influence of the metal sulfide dispersion on the hydrocracking properties for n-decane is examined. In order to obtain different nickel sulfide distributions (inside or outside the zeolite structure) and dispersions, the preparation method (impregnation of CaY or ion exchange of NaY), sulfidation procedure (direct sulfidation or sulfidation after drying), and metal loading are varied. A higher nickel sulfide surface (as measured by dynamic oxygen chemisorption) results in a strong increase of the n-decane conversion, but this is not accompanied by an improvement of the catalytic properties toward ideal hydrocracking. Additionally, some zeolite Y-supported Ni-Mo sulfide catalysts (varying in preparation method and sulfidation procedure) are tested for the hydroconversion of it-decane. However, no promoter effect could be observed. The activity of the bimetallic sulfide catalysts is always almost equal to that of the most active monometallic sulfide constituent.

  7. Development of novel copper-based sorbents for hot-gas cleanup. [Quarterly] technical report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasian, J.; Hill, A.H.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Li, Zhijiang

    1994-06-01

    The objective of this investigation is to evaluate two novel copper-based sorbents, namely copper-chromium and copper-cerium, for their effectiveness in removing hydrogen sulfide from fuel gas in the temperature range of 650{degree} to 850{degree}. Such high temperatures will be required for the new generation of gas turbines (inlet >750{degree}C) in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. The effect of pre-reduction with H{sub 2}, in the presence of H{sub 2}O on the performance of the sorbents in cyclic sulfidation/regeneration, was studied in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and in a fixed-bed reactor at 750{degree}C. The results of the TGA tests indicate that pre-reduction of the sorbents is very fast in either 10% or 30% H{sub 2}. Without sorbent pre-reduction, sulfidation consists of two-stages, a reduction-dominating and a sulfidation-dominating stage. Sulfidation apparently takes place before reduction is complete. During regeneration some copper/cerium sulfates may have formed and Cu{sub 2}O may have formed in addition to CuO. The fixed-bed reactor tests show that at 750{degree}C: (1) prereducing the CuO-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} with H{sub 2} does not effect the reactivity of the sorbent towards H{sub 2}S at either the high or low H{sub 2} feed gas concentrations and (2) when 30% H{sub 2} was used during sulfidation of either sorbent, the first H{sub 2}S breakthrough occurs earlier than when 10% H{sub 2} was used.

  8. Microaeration for hydrogen sulfide removal in UASB reactor.

    PubMed

    Krayzelova, Lucie; Bartacek, Jan; Kolesarova, Nina; Jenicek, Pavel

    2014-11-01

    The removal of hydrogen sulfide from biogas by microaeration was studied in Up-flow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactors treating synthetic brewery wastewater. A fully anaerobic UASB reactor served as a control while air was dosed into a microaerobic UASB reactor (UMSB). After a year of operation, sulfur balance was described in both reactors. In UASB, sulfur was mainly presented in the effluent as sulfide (49%) and in biogas as hydrogen sulfide (34%). In UMSB, 74% of sulfur was detected in the effluent (41% being sulfide and 33% being elemental sulfur), 10% accumulated in headspace as elemental sulfur and 9% escaped in biogas as hydrogen sulfide. The efficiency of hydrogen sulfide removal in UMSB was on average 73%. Microaeration did not cause any decrease in COD removal or methanogenic activity in UMSB and the elemental sulfur produced by microaeration did not accumulate in granular sludge. PMID:25270045

  9. Metal sulfide initiators for metal oxide sorbent regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Turk, B.S.; Gupta, R.P.

    1999-06-22

    A process of regenerating a sulfided sorbent is provided. According to the process of the invention, a substantial portion of the energy necessary to initiate the regeneration reaction is provided by the combustion of a particulate metal sulfide additive. In using the particulate metal sulfide additive, the oxygen-containing gas used to regenerate the sulfided sorbent can be fed to the regeneration zone without heating or at a lower temperature than used in conventional processes wherein the regeneration reaction is initiated only by heating the oxygen-containing gas. The particulate metal sulfide additive is preferably an inexpensive mineral ore such as iron pyrite which does not adversely affect the regeneration or corresponding desulfurization reactions. The invention further includes a sorbent composition comprising the particulate metal sulfide additive in admixture with an active metal oxide sorbent capable of removing one or more sulfur compounds from a sulfur-containing gas stream. 1 fig.

  10. Sensitive sulfide sensor with a trypsin-stabilized gold nanocluster.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jun; Li, Ruiping; Xu, Pingping; Di, Junwei; Tu, Yifeng; Yan, Jilin

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we synthesized a trypsin-stabilized fluorescent gold nanocluster. It was found that sulfide interacted with the nanocluster, which could result in significant fluorescence quenching. With this quenching effect, a fluorescence sulfide sensor was developed. This sensor responded linearly to sulfide in the range of 50 nM to 8 μM, and was capable of detecting sulfide as low as 5.5 nM. This provided a facile and sensitive scheme for sulfide analysis; the mechanism of the sensor was also provided. The sensor was then tested for real sample analysis, and good recoveries were obtained. Furthermore, persulfate was found to be effective to remove the quenching of sulfide, and this interaction was adopted for an indirect analysis of persulfate.

  11. Process for producing cadmium sulfide on a cadmium telluride surface

    DOEpatents

    Levi, D.H.; Nelson, A.J.; Ahrenkiel, R.K.

    1996-07-30

    A process is described for producing a layer of cadmium sulfide on a cadmium telluride surface to be employed in a photovoltaic device. The process comprises providing a cadmium telluride surface which is exposed to a hydrogen sulfide plasma at an exposure flow rate, an exposure time and an exposure temperature sufficient to permit reaction between the hydrogen sulfide and cadmium telluride to thereby form a cadmium sulfide layer on the cadmium telluride surface and accomplish passivation. In addition to passivation, a heterojunction at the interface of the cadmium sulfide and the cadmium telluride can be formed when the layer of cadmium sulfide formed on the cadmium telluride is of sufficient thickness. 12 figs.

  12. Metal sulfide initiators for metal oxide sorbent regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Turk, Brian S.; Gupta, Raghubir P.

    1999-01-01

    A process of regenerating a sulfided sorbent is provided. According to the process of the invention, a substantial portion of the energy necessary to initiate the regeneration reaction is provided by the combustion of a particulate metal sulfide additive. In using the particulate metal sulfide additive, the oxygen-containing gas used to regenerate the sulfided sorbent can be fed to the regeneration zone without heating or at a lower temperature than used in conventional processes wherein the regeneration reaction is initiated only by heating the oxygen-containing. The particulate metal sulfide additive is preferably an inexpensive mineral ore such as iron pyrite which does not adversely affect the regeneration or corresponding desulfurization reactions. The invention further includes a sorbent composition comprising the particulate metal sulfide additive in admixture with an active metal oxide sorbent capable of removing one or more sulfur compounds from a sulfur-containing gas stream.

  13. Metal sulfide initiators for metal oxide sorbent regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Turk, Brian S.; Gupta, Raghubir P.

    2001-01-01

    A process of regenerating a sulfided sorbent is provided. According to the process of the invention, a substantial portion of the energy necessary to initiate the regeneration reaction is provided by the combustion of a particulate metal sulfide additive. In using the particulate metal sulfide additive, the oxygen-containing gas used to regenerate the sulfided sorbent can be fed to the regeneration zone without heating or at a lower temperature than used in conventional processes wherein the regeneration reaction is initiated only by heating the oxygen-containing gas. The particulate metal sulfide additive is preferably an inexpensive mineral ore such as iron pyrite which does not adversely affect the regeneration or corresponding desulfurization reactions. The invention further includes a sorbent composition comprising the particulate metal sulfide additive in admixture with an active metal oxide sorbent capable of removing one or more sulfur compounds from a sulfur-containing gas stream.

  14. Urinary copper excretion and hepatic copper concentrations in liver disease.

    PubMed

    Frommer, D J

    1981-01-01

    Urinary copper excretion was found to be increased in patients with cholestasis, hepatitis and cirrhosis, but the penicillamine-induced increment was normal. Wilson's disease patients had increased copper excretion before and after penicillamine, especially in untreated cases. Hepatic copper concentrations correlated with urinary copper excretion in cholestasis and treated Wilson's disease, but not in hepatitis or cirrhosis. In treated Wilson's disease, measurement of urinary copper excretion should be valuable in estimating the degree of removal of copper from the body during therapy. Urinary copper clearances were raised in various liver conditions, maximally in untreated Wilson's disease. It is suggested that only part of the serum non-caeruloplasmin copper is available for excretion into urine.

  15. Limitation of Sulfide Capacity Concept for Molten Slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, In-Ho; Moosavi-Khoonsari, Elmira

    2016-04-01

    The sulfide capacity concept has been widely used in pyrometallurgy to define sulfur removal capacities of slags. Typically, the sulfide capacity is considered to be a unique slag property depending only on temperature regardless of partial pressures of oxygen and sulfur. In the present study, it is demonstrated that sulfide capacities of slags in particular those of Na2O-containing slags can vary with partial pressures of oxygen and sulfur due to large solubility of sulfide in Na2O-containing slag systems.

  16. Influence of iron on sulfide inhibition in dark biohydrogen fermentation.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Bipro Ranjan; Elbeshbishy, Elsayed; Nakhla, George

    2012-12-01

    Sulfide impact on biohydrogen production using dark fermentation of glucose at 37 °C was investigated. Dissolved sulfide (S(2-)) at a low concentration (25mg/L) increased biohydrogen production by 54% relative to the control (without iron addition). Whereas on initial dissolved S(2-) concentration of 500 mg/L significantly inhibited the biohydrogen production with total cumulative biohydrogen decreasing by 90% compared to the control (without iron addition). At sulfide concentrations of 500 mg S(2-)/L, addition of Fe(2+) at 3-4 times the theoretical requirement to precipitate 100% of the dissolved S(2-) entirely eliminated the inhibitory effect of sulfide.

  17. Copper and copper-nickel alloys as zebra mussel antifoulants

    SciTech Connect

    Dormon, J.M.; Cottrell, C.M.; Allen, D.G.; Ackerman, J.D.; Spelt, J.K.

    1996-04-01

    Copper has been used in the marine environment for decades as cladding on ships and pipes to prevent biofouling by marine mussels (Mytilus edulis L.). This motivated the present investigation into the possibility of using copper to prevent biofouling in freshwater by both zebra mussels and quagga mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and D. bugensis collectively referred to as zebra mussels). Copper and copper alloy sheet proved to be highly effective in preventing biofouling by zebra mussels over a three-year period. Further studies were conducted with copper and copper-nickel mesh (lattice of expanded metal) and screen (woven wire with a smaller hole size), which reduced the amount of copper used. Copper screen was also found to be strongly biofouling-resistant with respect to zebra mussels, while copper mesh reduced zebra mussel biofouling in comparison to controls, but did not prevent it entirely. Preliminary investigations into the mechanism of copper antifouling, using galvanic couples, indicated that the release of copper ions from the surface of the exposed metal into the surrounding water is directly or indirectly responsible for the biofouling resistance of copper.

  18. Preparation of high purity copper fluoride by fluorinating copper hydroxyfluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. B.; Lundquist, J. R.

    1969-01-01

    Copper fluoride containing no more than 50 ppm of any contaminating element was prepared by the fluorination of copper hydroxyfluoride. The impurity content was obtained by spark source mass spectrometry. High purity copper fluoride is needed as a cathode material for high energy density batteries.

  19. Global emission and production of mercury during the pyrometallurgical extraction of nonferrous sulfide ores.

    PubMed

    Hylander, Lars D; Herbert, Roger B

    2008-08-15

    The contribution of the milling, smelting, and refining of sulfide ores to Hg emissions and to Hg byproduction is not adequately quantified in a global context. In this study, we estimate Hg emissions from the pyrometallurgical treatment of Cu, Pb, and Zn sulfide ores. We base our calculations on quantities processed and Hg content in Cu, Pb, and Zn concentrates, derived from unique global databases on smelter feed and production. In 2005, about 275 tons of Hg were emitted globally to the atmosphere from Cu, Pb, and Zn smelters. Nearly one-half was emitted from Zn smelters and the other half equally divided between Cu and Pb smelters. Most Hg was emitted in China, followed by the Russian Federation, India, and South Korea. Global emission factors were 5.81, 15.71, and 12.09 g of Hg ton(-1) of metal for Cu, Pb, and Zn smelters, respectively. Calculations indicate that Hg abatementtechnologies applied to flue gases may have recovered 8.8 tons and 228 tons Hg from Pb and Zn smelters, respectively, most of which was probably sold as a byproduct. In conclusion, Hg emitted from processing copper, lead, and zinc ores has been largely underestimated in Hg emission inventories. Reducing these emissions may be one of the most economical measures to reduce global Hg emissions. PMID:18767653

  20. Green synthesis of covellite nanocrystals using biologically generated sulfide: potential for bioremediation systems.

    PubMed

    da Costa, J P; Girão, Ana Violeta; Lourenço, João P; Monteiro, O C; Trindade, Tito; Costa, Maria Clara

    2013-10-15

    This work describes the synthesis of CuS powders in high yield and via an environmentally friendly and straightforward process, under ambient conditions (temperature and pressure), by adding to aqueous copper (II) a nutrient solution containing biologically generated sulfide from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The powders obtained were composed of CuS (covellite) nanoparticles (NPs) exhibiting a spheroid morphology (<5 nm). The relevance of this method to obtain CuS supported solid substrates has been demonstrated by performing the synthesis in the presence of TiO2 and SiO2 submicron particles. We further extended the work carried out, which substantiates the potential of using biogenic sulfide for the production of covellite nanocrystals and composites, using the effluent of a bioremediation column. Hence, such process results in the synthesis of added value products obtained from metal rich effluents, such as metallurgical and industrial ones, or Acid Mine Drainage (AMD), when associated with bioremediation processes. PMID:23747373

  1. Discovery and Characterization of Iron Sulfide and Polyphosphate Bodies Coexisting in Archaeoglobus fulgidus Cells

    DOE PAGES

    Toso, Daniel B.; Javed, Muhammad Mohsin; Czornyj, Elizabeth; Gunsalus, Robert P.; Zhou, Z. Hong

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic storage granules have long been recognized in bacterial and eukaryotic cells but were only recently identified in archaeal cells. Here, we report the cellular organization and chemical compositions of storage granules in the Euryarchaeon, Archaeoglobus fulgidusstrain VC16, a hyperthermophilic, anaerobic, and sulfate-reducing microorganism. Dense granules were apparent inA. fulgiduscells imaged by cryo electron microscopy (cryoEM) but not so by negative stain electron microscopy. Cryo electron tomography (cryoET) revealed that each cell contains one to several dense granules located near the cell membrane. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) show that, surprisingly, each cell containsmore » not just one but often two types of granules with different elemental compositions. One type, named iron sulfide body (ISB), is composed mainly of the elements iron and sulfur plus copper; and the other one, called polyphosphate body (PPB), is composed of phosphorus and oxygen plus magnesium, calcium, and aluminum. PPBs are likely used for energy storage and/or metal sequestration/detoxification. ISBs could result from the reduction of sulfate to sulfide via anaerobic energy harvesting pathways and may be associated with energy and/or metal storage or detoxification. The exceptional ability of these archaeal cells to sequester different elements may have novel bioengineering applications.« less

  2. Discovery and Characterization of Iron Sulfide and Polyphosphate Bodies Coexisting in Archaeoglobus fulgidus Cells

    PubMed Central

    Toso, Daniel B.; Javed, Muhammad Mohsin; Czornyj, Elizabeth; Zhou, Z. Hong

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic storage granules have long been recognized in bacterial and eukaryotic cells but were only recently identified in archaeal cells. Here, we report the cellular organization and chemical compositions of storage granules in the Euryarchaeon, Archaeoglobus fulgidus strain VC16, a hyperthermophilic, anaerobic, and sulfate-reducing microorganism. Dense granules were apparent in A. fulgidus cells imaged by cryo electron microscopy (cryoEM) but not so by negative stain electron microscopy. Cryo electron tomography (cryoET) revealed that each cell contains one to several dense granules located near the cell membrane. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) show that, surprisingly, each cell contains not just one but often two types of granules with different elemental compositions. One type, named iron sulfide body (ISB), is composed mainly of the elements iron and sulfur plus copper; and the other one, called polyphosphate body (PPB), is composed of phosphorus and oxygen plus magnesium, calcium, and aluminum. PPBs are likely used for energy storage and/or metal sequestration/detoxification. ISBs could result from the reduction of sulfate to sulfide via anaerobic energy harvesting pathways and may be associated with energy and/or metal storage or detoxification. The exceptional ability of these archaeal cells to sequester different elements may have novel bioengineering applications. PMID:27194953

  3. The application of remote sensing in geobotanical exploration for metal sulfides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masuoka, E. J.; Labovitz, M. L.; Bell, R.; Nelson, R. F.; Broderick, P. W.; Ludwig, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    A field study was conducted in Mineral, VA in 1980-82 to test the suitability of remote sensing techniques for geobotanical exploration. It was found that on trees growing over lead sulfide deposits, buds opened later and leaves were smaller than on trees growing on soils with background levels of lead and copper. This difference in leaf growth could be detected in remotely sensed data. In the spring, the smaller leaf size of metal-stressed trees resulted in a greater contribution from the soil and bark to the total reflectance imaged by the sensor. In the fall, the leaves of metal-stressed oaks sensed earlier than surrounding vegetation, which was also detected in remotely sensed data. It is concluded that vegetation growing on lead sulfide deposits has a shorter growing season than surrounding vegetation on unmineralized soil and that remotely sensed data collected at either end of the growing season can be used to locate geobotanical anomalies associated with these deposits.

  4. Discovery and Characterization of Iron Sulfide and Polyphosphate Bodies Coexisting in Archaeoglobus fulgidus Cells.

    PubMed

    Toso, Daniel B; Javed, Muhammad Mohsin; Czornyj, Elizabeth; Gunsalus, Robert P; Zhou, Z Hong

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic storage granules have long been recognized in bacterial and eukaryotic cells but were only recently identified in archaeal cells. Here, we report the cellular organization and chemical compositions of storage granules in the Euryarchaeon, Archaeoglobus fulgidus strain VC16, a hyperthermophilic, anaerobic, and sulfate-reducing microorganism. Dense granules were apparent in A. fulgidus cells imaged by cryo electron microscopy (cryoEM) but not so by negative stain electron microscopy. Cryo electron tomography (cryoET) revealed that each cell contains one to several dense granules located near the cell membrane. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) show that, surprisingly, each cell contains not just one but often two types of granules with different elemental compositions. One type, named iron sulfide body (ISB), is composed mainly of the elements iron and sulfur plus copper; and the other one, called polyphosphate body (PPB), is composed of phosphorus and oxygen plus magnesium, calcium, and aluminum. PPBs are likely used for energy storage and/or metal sequestration/detoxification. ISBs could result from the reduction of sulfate to sulfide via anaerobic energy harvesting pathways and may be associated with energy and/or metal storage or detoxification. The exceptional ability of these archaeal cells to sequester different elements may have novel bioengineering applications. PMID:27194953

  5. Phase-selective cation-exchange chemistry in sulfide nanowire systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dandan; Wong, Andrew B; Yu, Yi; Brittman, Sarah; Sun, Jianwei; Fu, Anthony; Beberwyck, Brandon; Alivisatos, A Paul; Yang, Peidong

    2014-12-17

    As a cation-deficient, p-type semiconductor, copper sulfide (Cu(2-x)S) shows promise for applications such as photovoltaics, memristors, and plasmonics. However, these applications demand precise tuning of the crystal phase as well as the stoichiometry of Cu(2-x)S, an ongoing challenge in the synthesis of Cu(2-x)S materials for a specific application. Here, a detailed transformation diagram of cation-exchange (CE) chemistry from cadmium sulfide (CdS) into Cu(2-x)S nanowires (NWs) is reported. By varying the reaction time and the reactants' concentration ratio, the progression of the CE process was captured, and tunable crystal phases of the Cu(2-x)S were achieved. It is proposed that the evolution of Cu(2-x)S phases in a NW system is dependent on both kinetic and thermodynamic factors. The reported data demonstrate that CE can be used to precisely control the structure, composition, and crystal phases of NWs, and such control may be generalized to other material systems for a variety of practical applications.

  6. Ceruloplasmin, copper ions, and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Raju, K S; Alessandri, G; Ziche, M; Gullino, P M

    1982-11-01

    The ability to induce new formation of capillaries in the cornea was tested for ceruloplasmin, the copper carrier of serum, for fragments of the ceruloplasmin molecule with and without copper, for heparin, and for glycyl-L-histidyl-L-lysine, bound or not bound to copper ions. Male or female 2- to 3-kg New Zealand White rabbits were used. These experiments were prompted by the previous observation of copper accumulation in the cornea during angiogenesis and by the inability of copper-deficient rabbits to mount an angiogenic response. The results showed that the three different molecules were all able to induce angiogenesis provided that they were bound to copper. Fragments of the ceruloplasmin molecule also induced angiogenesis but only when copper was bound to the peptides. The data are interpreted to indicate that copper ions are involved in the sequence of events leading to angiogenesis and that the carrier molecules may be of quite a different nature. PMID:6182332

  7. Evidence supporting biologically mediated sulfide oxidation in hot spring ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, A. D.; Shock, E.

    2011-12-01

    The sulfide concentration of fluids in hydrothermal ecosystems is one of several factors determining the transition to microbial photosynthesis (Cox et al., 2011, Chem. Geol. 280, 344-351). To investigate the loss of sulfide in Yellowstone hot spring systems, measurements of total dissolved sulfide with respect to time were made in incubation experiments conducted on 0.2-micron filtered (killed controls) vs. unfiltered hot spring water at locations with three different pH:sulfide combinations (pH 2.5 with 50 μM sulfide, 5.2 with 5.6 μM sulfide, and 8.3 with 86 μM sulfide). At the higher pH values, the experiments yielded similar rates of sulfide loss in filtered and unfiltered water of approximately 0.8 (pH 5.2) and 7.6 nmol sulfide L-1s-1 (pH 8.3). At the acidic spring, the unfiltered water lost sulfide at a rate 1.6 times that of the filtered water (8.2 vs. 5 nmol sulfide L-1s-1). These results suggest that the pelagic biomass at the pH 5.2 and 8.3 springs may not affect sulfide loss, whereas in the pH 2.5 spring there appears to be an effect. In addition, the incubation of filamentous biomass with unfiltered water increased the rate of sulfide loss by approximately two-fold at a pH of 2.5 (59 vs. 31 nmol L-1s-1; Cox et al., 2011), five-fold at a pH of 5.2 (3.9 vs. 0.8 nmol sulfide L-1s-1), and barely increased the rate of sulfide loss at a pH of 8.3 (9.1 vs. 8.4 nmol sulfide L-1s-1). Sulfide is predominately present as HS- at a pH of 8.3, which may not be taken up as easily by microorganisms as the H2S (aq) that dominates sulfide speciation at pH 2.5 and 5.2. That the loss of sulfide at acidic pH is due to biotic rather than abiotic factors is further supported by studies with whole mat samples that show greater sulfide consumption than killed controls (D'Imperio et al., 2008, AEM 74, 5802-5808). Taken together, the results of these experiments suggest that the majority of sulfide oxidation occurs in the filamentous biomass of hot spring ecosystems, although

  8. Agricultural soils spiked with copper mine wastes and copper concentrate: implications for copper bioavailability and bioaccumulation.

    PubMed

    Ginocchio, Rosanna; Sánchez, Pablo; de la Fuente, Luz María; Camus, Isabel; Bustamante, Elena; Silva, Yasna; Urrestarazu, Paola; Torres, Juan C; Rodríguez, Patricio H

    2006-03-01

    A better understanding of exposure to and effects of copper-rich pollutants in soils is required for accurate environmental risk assessment of copper. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to study copper bioavailability and bioaccumulation in agricultural soils spiked with different types of copper-rich mine solid wastes (copper ore, tailing sand, smelter dust, and smelter slag) and copper concentrate. A copper salt (copper sulfate, CuSO4) that frequently is used to assess soil copper bioavailability and phytotoxicity also was included for comparison. Results showed that smelter dust, tailing sand, and CuSO4 are more likely to be bioavailable and, thus, toxic to plants compared with smelter slag, concentrate, and ore at equivalent total copper concentrations. Differences may be explained by intrinsic differences in copper solubilization from the source materials, but also by their capability to decrease soil pH (confounding effect). The copper toxicity and bioaccumulation in plants also varied according to soil physicochemical characteristics (e.g., pH and total organic carbon) and the available levels of plant nutrients, such as nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium. Chemistry/mineralogy of mine materials, soil/pore-water chemistry, and plant physiological status thus should be integrated for building adequate models to predict phytotoxicity and environmental risk of copper. PMID:16566155

  9. Geology of the Fishtie deposit, Central Province, Zambia: iron oxide and copper mineralization in Nguba Group metasedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrickson, Michael D.; Hitzman, Murray W.; Wood, David; Humphrey, John D.; Wendlandt, Richard F.

    2015-08-01

    The Fishtie copper deposit, located in the Central Province of Zambia, contains approximately 55 Mt of 1.04 % Cu at a 0.5 % Cu cut-off in oxide, sulfide, and mixed oxide-sulfide ores. The deposit is hosted in Neoproterozoic diamictites and siltstones of the Grand Conglomérat Formation and overlying Kakontwe Limestone Formation of the lower Nguba Group. The Grand Conglomérat Formation at Fishtie directly overlies basement schists and quartzites. Mineralized zones are located adjacent to high-angle normal faults that appear to control thickness variations in the Grand Conglomérat Formation suggesting synsedimentary fault movement. Iron-rich rocks consisting of nearly monomineralic bands of magnetite and ankerite occur within the Grand Conglomérat Formation. The absence of magnetite-rich clasts in overlying diamictites and the presence of disseminated magnetite, ankerite, and apatite in adjacent diamictites suggest this iron-rich rock formed by replacement of siltstone beds. These magnetite-rich rocks thicken towards normal faults suggesting the faults formed conduits for oxidized hydrothermal solutions. The magnetite-ankerite-quartz rock was overprinted by later hydrothermal alteration and sulfide mineralization. Copper sulfide precipitation was associated with growth of both muscovite and chlorite, together with weak silicification. Sulfides are zoned relative to normal faults with bornite more common in proximity to faults and ore stage pyrite most common in an outer zone with chalcopyrite. Copper sulfides display generally heavy sulfur isotopic values, suggesting sulfide derivation from thermochemical reduction of Neoproterozoic seawater sulfate. Copper mineralized zones in the Grand Conglomérat at Fishtie are megascopically similar to those observed in the newly discovered Kamoa deposit in the southern Democratic Republic of Congo. Alteration and mineralization at Fishtie display lateral zoning relative to normal faults unlike the broad vertical zonation

  10. Mitochondrial adaptations to utilize hydrogen sulfide for energy and signaling.

    PubMed

    Olson, Kenneth R

    2012-10-01

    Sulfur is a versatile molecule with oxidation states ranging from -2 to +6. From the beginning, sulfur has been inexorably entwined with the evolution of organisms. Reduced sulfur, prevalent in the prebiotic Earth and supplied from interstellar sources, was an integral component of early life as it could provide energy through oxidization, even in a weakly oxidizing environment, and it spontaneously reacted with iron to form iron-sulfur clusters that became the earliest biological catalysts and structural components of cells. The ability to cycle sulfur between reduced and oxidized states may have been key in the great endosymbiotic event that incorporated a sulfide-oxidizing α-protobacteria into a host sulfide-reducing Archea, resulting in the eukaryotic cell. As eukaryotes slowly adapted from a sulfidic and anoxic (euxinic) world to one that was highly oxidizing, numerous mechanisms developed to deal with increasing oxidants; namely, oxygen, and decreasing sulfide. Because there is rarely any reduced sulfur in the present-day environment, sulfur was historically ignored by biologists, except for an occasional report of sulfide toxicity. Twenty-five years ago, it became evident that the organisms in sulfide-rich environments could synthesize ATP from sulfide, 10 years later came the realization that animals might use sulfide as a signaling molecule, and only within the last 4 years did it become apparent that even mammals could derive energy from sulfide generated in the gastrointestinal tract. It has also become evident that, even in the present-day oxic environment, cells can exploit the redox chemistry of sulfide, most notably as a physiological transducer of oxygen availability. This review will examine how the legacy of sulfide metabolism has shaped natural selection and how some of these ancient biochemical pathways are still employed by modern-day eukaryotes. PMID:22430869

  11. Effect of sulfide ions on complement factor C3.

    PubMed Central

    Granlund-Edstedt, M; Johansson, E; Claesson, R; Carlsson, J

    1991-01-01

    In infected sites such as the gingival pockets of patients with periodontal disease, sulfide levels up to 1 mmol/liter may be reached. There is little information, however, on how sulfide may interact with the host defense. In a previous study (R. Claesson, M. Granlund-Edstedt, S. Persson, and J. Carlsson, Infect. Immun. 57:2776-2781, 1989), it was shown that polymorphonuclear leukocytes were able to kill bacteria in the presence of 1 mM sulfide. However, sulfide seemed to interfere with the opsonization of the bacteria. It has been claimed that sulfide may be toxic by splitting disulfide bonds of proteins. In the present study, serum was exposed to 2 mM sulfide under anaerobic conditions, and the capacity of sulfide to split disulfide bonds of 10 serum proteins involved in opsonization was evaluated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunodetection of the proteins after blotting. Sulfide had a low capacity to split the disulfide bonds of most proteins. Sulfide had, however, a pronounced effect on the complement component C3 in the form of C3bi. Sulfide released the C-terminal region of the alpha chain from C3bi. When C3 opsonizes bacteria, it is this region of C3bi which binds to complement receptor 3 (CR3) of the polymorphonuclear leukocytes. If sulfide has the same effect on C3bi deposited on the bacterial surface as it has on C3bi in solution, it will annihilate the very important contribution of C3bi to opsonization. Images PMID:1987085

  12. Copper-phosphorus alloys offer advantages in brazing copper

    SciTech Connect

    Rupert, W.D.

    1996-05-01

    Copper-phosphorus brazing alloys are used extensively for joining copper, especially refrigeration and air-conditioning copper tubing and electrical conductors. What is the effect of phosphorus when alloyed with copper? The following are some of the major effects: (1) It lowers the melt temperature of copper (a temperature depressant). (2) It increases the fluidity of the copper when in the liquid state. (3) It acts as a deoxidant or a fluxing agent with copper. (4) It lowers the ductility of copper (embrittles). There is a misconception that silver improves the ductility of the copper-phosphorus alloys. In reality, silver added to copper acts in a similar manner as phosphorus. The addition of silver to copper lowers the melt temperature (temperature depressant) and decreases the ductility. Fortunately, the rate and amount at which silver lowers copper ductility is significantly less than that of phosphorus. Therefore, taking advantage of the temperature depressant property of silver, a Ag-Cu-P alloy can be selected at approximately the same melt temperature as a Cu-P alloy, but at a lower phosphorus content. The lowering of the phosphorus content actually makes the alloy more ductile, not the silver addition. A major advantage of the copper-phosphorus alloys is the self-fluxing characteristic when joining copper to copper. They may also be used with the addition of a paste flux on brass, bronze, and specialized applications on silver, tungsten and molybdenum. Whether it is selection of the proper BCuP alloy or troubleshooting an existing problem, the suggested approach is a review of the desired phosphorus content in the liquid metal and how it is being altered during application. In torch brazing, a slight change in the oxygen-fuel ratio can affect the joint quality or leak tightness.

  13. The use of ERTS-1 images in the search for large sulfide deposits in the Chagai District, Pakistan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Visual examination of color composites was tested under relatively ideal conditions for direct detection of large hydrothermal sulfide deposits at the low-grade porphyry copper deposit at Saindak, western Chagai District, Pakistan. The Saindak deposit is characterized by an elongate zone of easily eroded sulfide-rich rock surrounded by a resistant rim of hornfels and propylitically altered rock. The geomorphic features related to the Saindak deposit are easily distinguished on ERTS-1 images. Attempts to detect a color anomaly using false-color composites were not successful. About 36,000 square km of the western Chagai District were examined on false-color composites for direct evidence of large sulfide deposits. New geologic information acquired from the images was used in conjunction with the known geology to evaluate two previously known proposed areas and to suggest seven additional targets for field checking, one of which is proposed on the basis of tonal anomaly alone. The study also showed that Saindak-type deposits are not likely to be present in some extensive areas of the Chagai District; and also that a rim like that at Saindak does not form if regional metamorphism has increased the resistance of the country rock to erosion.

  14. Theoretical investigation of the defect interactions in dilute copper alloys intended for nuclear waste containers

    SciTech Connect

    Korzhavyi, P.A.; Abrikosov, I.A.; Johansson, B.

    1999-07-01

    Application of pure, oxygen-free copper as a construction material having excellent corrosion resistance is limited because of the effect of intergranular embrittlement at temperatures above 100--150 C. Dilute copper alloys containing S, P, and Ag impurities and vacancies are studied theoretically on the basis of total energy calculations. The dissolution energies, volume misfits, and defect interaction energies are calculated and used to study the microscopic mechanism behind the effect of these impurities on the embrittlement of copper at intermediate temperatures. A large binding energy of a sulfur-vacancy defect pair ({minus}0.46 eV) is found. The sulfur-vacancy and sulfur-sulfur interactions in the copper matrix seem to favor precipitation of copper sulfide Cu{sub 2}S which is the most probable cause of the embrittlement. The effect of phosphorus and silver impurities on the embrittlement of sulfur-contaminated copper can be related to their competition with sulfur to attract to vacancies as well as to other lattice defects.

  15. Removal of copper in an integrated sulfate reducing bioreactor-crystallization reactor system.

    PubMed

    Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Hollingsworth, Jeremy; Zhou, Michael S

    2007-02-15

    Removal of copper was investigated using an innovative water treatment system integrating a sulfidogenic bioreactor with a fluidized-bed crystallization reactor containing fine sand to facilitate the recovery of copper as a purified copper-sulfide mineral. The performance of the system was tested using a simulated semiconductor manufacturing wastewater containing high levels of Cu2+ (4-66 mg/L), sulfate, and a mixture of citrate, isopropanol, and polyethylene glycol (Mn 300). Soluble copper removal efficiencies exceeding 99% and effluent copper concentrations averaging 89 micog/L were demonstrated in the two-stage system, with near complete metal removal occurring in the crystallizer. Copper crystals deposited on sand grains were identified as covellite (CuS). The removal of organic constituents did not exceed 70% of the initial chemical oxygen demand due to incomplete degradation of isopropanol and its breakdown product (acetone). Taken as a whole, these results indicate the potential of this novel reactor configuration for the simultaneous removal of heavy metals and organic constituents. The ability of this process to recover heavy metals in a purified form makes it particularly attractive for the treatment of contaminated aqueous streams, including industrial wastewaters and acid mine drainage. PMID:17593752

  16. High adherence copper plating process

    DOEpatents

    Nignardot, H.

    1993-09-21

    A process is described for applying copper to a substrate of aluminum or steel by electrodeposition and for preparing the surface of an aluminum or steel substrate for the electrodeposition of copper. Practice of the invention provides good adhesion of the copper layer to either substrate.

  17. Influence of various surface pretreatments on adherence of sputtered molybdenum disulfide to silver, gold, copper, and bronze

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1973-01-01

    Solid film lubricants of radio frequency sputtered molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) were applied to silver, gold, copper, and bronze surfaces that had various pretreatments (mechanical polishing, sputter etching, oxidation, and sulfurization). Optical and electron transmission micrographs and electron diffraction patterns were used to interpret the film formation characteristics and to evaluate the sputtering conditions in regard to the film and substrate compatibility. Sputtered MoS2 films flaked and peeled on silver, copper, and bronze surfaces except when the surfaces had been specially oxidized. The flaking and peeling was a result of sulfide compound formation and the corresponding grain growth of the sulfide film. Sputtered MoS2 films showed no peeling and flaking on gold surfaces regardless of surface pretreatment.

  18. High temperature regenerable hydrogen sulfide removal agents

    DOEpatents

    Copeland, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    A system for high temperature desulfurization of coal-derived gases using regenerable sorbents. One sorbent is stannic oxide (tin oxide, SnO.sub.2), the other sorbent is a metal oxide or mixed metal oxide such as zinc ferrite (ZnFe.sub.2 O.sub.4). Certain otherwise undesirable by-products, including hydrogen sulfide (H.sub.2 S) and sulfur dioxide (SO.sub.2) are reused by the system, and elemental sulfur is produced in the regeneration reaction. A system for refabricating the sorbent pellets is also described.

  19. Biogenic production of dimethyl sulfide: Krill grazing

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, K.L.; DiTullio, G.R. )

    1993-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfide (DMS), a dominant sulfur compound in sea water, is a possible precursor for cloud condensation nuclei in the atmosphere and may influence global climate. The primary source of DMS is phytoplankton, but the mechanisms remain uncertain, and concentrations of DMS in the ocean vary spatially and temporally. Laboratory studies suggest zooplankton grazing may be an important process leading to the formation of DMS in the ocean. This paper describes ocean studies which examine the suggestion that grazing by krill may be a significant source for DMS production in the antarctic coastal region. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Acid copper sulfate plating bath: Control of chloride and copper

    SciTech Connect

    Borhani, K.J.

    1992-08-01

    Plated-through holes in high-reliability printed wiring boards require a ductile copper plate of uniform consistency. The level of control of the chemical constituents in the electroplating solutions dictates the physical properties of the copper plate. To improve the control of the chemical bath constituents, in-situ methods for electrochemically determining copper and chloride in acid copper sulfate baths were developed. A solid-state ion-selective electrode was used for the chloride ion and proved to be more reproducible than conventional silver chloride turbidimetric methods. The use of a copper solid-state ion-selective electrode in-situ was also successful in this application.

  1. Brazing copper to dispersion-strengthened copper

    SciTech Connect

    Ryding, D.G.; Allen, D.; Lee, R.

    1996-08-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a state-of-the-art synchrotron light source that will produce intense x-ray beams, which will allow the study of smaller samples and faster reactions and processes at a greater level of detail that has been possible to date. The beam is produced by using third-generation insertion devices in a 7 GeV electron/positron storage ring that is 1100 meters in circumference. The heat load from these intense high power devices is very high and certain components must sustain total heat loads of 3 to 15 kW and heat fluxes of 30 W/mm{sup 2}. Because the beams will cycle on and off many times, thermal shock and fatigue will be a problem. High heat flux impinging on a small area causes a large thermal gradient that results in high stress. GlidCop{reg_sign}, a dispersion strengthened copper, is the desired material because of its high thermal conductivity and superior mechanical properties as compared to copper and its alloys. GlidCop is not amenable to joining by fusion welding, and brazing requires diligence because of high diffusivity. Brazing procedures were developed using optical and scanning electron microscopy.

  2. Formation of sulfide-calcite veinlets in the Kupferschiefer Cu-Ag deposits in Poland by natural hydrofracturing during basin subsidence

    SciTech Connect

    Jowett, E.C.

    1987-07-01

    Calcite and copper-(iron) sulfide veinlets in the Kupferschiefer ore deposits in southwestern Poland display many characteristics of antitaxial veinlets, including trails of wall-rock shards from wall to wall. Cross-cutting relationships demonstrate a change from sulfate to sulfide chemical stability and an evolution of stress orientation during ore-formation. Bedding-plane sulfate veinlets and later bedding-plane sulfide veinlets are superseded by vertical sulfide veinlets, suggesting tectonic extension during ore-formation. Thin bedding-plane calcite-(sulfide) veinlets record a return to pre-ore stress conditions after ore formation ceased. The vertical veinlets are thin and lens-shaped, typically 1-3 mm thick, 30-35 cm high, and 50-70 cm long, with orientations similar to Kimmerian-age (Triassic-Jurassic) directions. Sulfide replacement lenses cut across and are cut by vertical veinlets, suggesting contemporaneous formation after lithification. A mid-Triassic paleomagnetic age and cross-cutting Alpine-age faults and dikes suggest that the veinlets and other mineralization formed during rapid subsidence in the Triassic, and not during Alpine-age uplift. A genetic model is proposed whereby the fractures originated by natural hydrofracturing caused by (1) aquathermal pressuring and (2) generation of water, CO/sub 2/, and CH/sub 4/ from the coal organic matter in the Kupferschiefer, aided by over-pressured pore fluid. It is inferred that the mineralization was accompanied by natural-gas generation and by opening of the Tethys. 61 references.

  3. Modification of the EIC hydrogen sulfide abatement process to produce valuable by-products. Final report, May 4, 1981-May 4, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Offenhartz, P. O'D.

    1982-06-01

    A program of analytical and experimental studies has been carried out to develop modifications of the CUPROSUL process for the desulfurization of geothermal steam. The objective of the program was to devise practical means to manipulate the chemistry of the process so that the consumption of raw materials could be controlled and a variety of valuable by-products could be produced. The process had been demonstrated, at one-tenth commercial scale, for steam of the Geysers' average composition in a configuration which resulted in essentially complete oxidation of sulfide to sulfate. The ability to control the extent of oxidation would increase process flexibility and extend its range of applicability to steams of widely varying composition. Preliminary market surveys of raw materials required for the process and by-products which could be produced indicated that controlling the oxidation of sulfides to produce elemental sulfur would probably be the preferred process option. Use of lime to treat sulfate-containing purge streams to produce by-product gypsum and ammonia for recycle or sale could also be justified for certain steam compositions. Recovery of ammonium sulfate alone from the purge stream would not normally be justified unless corecovery of other valuable by-products, such as boric acid, was possible at incremental cost. It was found that ferric sulfate was a highly effective, selective oxidant for the controlled oxidation of copper sulfide solids to produce elemental sulfur for sale and copper sulfate for recycle.

  4. Corrosion of copper and lead containing materials by diesel lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Cusano, C.M.; Wang, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    Corrosion of bearings, bushings, and roller follower pins by lubricants is traditionally minor except when the lubricant is severely degraded or contaminated. However, it has been found recently that many diesel lubricants induce a slow corrosion process which eventually leads to engine failures at a mileage that is high but still within the warranty period. A corrosion bench test has been developed to correlate with an extensive fleet database. Mechanism studies have been performed using this corrosion test. It is found that the corrosion of copper is due to the formation of copper sulfide, which is a result of the interactions between the copper and the sulfur-containing materials in the lubricant. The corrosion of lead is caused by the residual chlorine compounds in some of the lubricants. Some corrosion of tin has also been observed from a specific additive. Reducing the chlorine content and inhibiting the sulfur reactivity in the lubricants are essential to achieve acceptable engine durability. 10 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs.

  5. Hydrogen sulfide: physiological properties and therapeutic potential in ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Bos, Eelke M; van Goor, Harry; Joles, Jaap A; Whiteman, Matthew; Leuvenink, Henri G D

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2 S) has become a molecule of high interest in recent years, and it is now recognized as the third gasotransmitter in addition to nitric oxide and carbon monoxide. In this review, we discuss the recent literature on the physiology of endogenous and exogenous H2 S, focusing upon the protective effects of hydrogen sulfide in models of hypoxia and ischaemia.

  6. Normal state properties of the ternary molybdenum sulfides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollam, J. A.; Alterovitz, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    By making a large number of normal state and superconducting properties measurements, all on the same ternary molybdenum sulfide samples, we obtain values for Fermi surface and superconducting parameters. From these we conclude that sputtered ternary molybdenum sulfides are not completely in the dirty superconductor limit, and that they are d-band metals with a high electron carrier density.

  7. 46 CFR 148.285 - Metal sulfide concentrates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Metal sulfide concentrates. 148.285 Section 148.285... MATERIALS THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Special Requirements for Certain Materials § 148.285 Metal sulfide concentrates. (a) When information given by the shipper under § 148.60 of this part indicates that the...

  8. 46 CFR 148.285 - Metal sulfide concentrates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Metal sulfide concentrates. 148.285 Section 148.285... MATERIALS THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Special Requirements for Certain Materials § 148.285 Metal sulfide concentrates. (a) When information given by the shipper under § 148.60 of this part indicates that the...

  9. 46 CFR 148.285 - Metal sulfide concentrates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Metal sulfide concentrates. 148.285 Section 148.285... MATERIALS THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Special Requirements for Certain Materials § 148.285 Metal sulfide concentrates. (a) When information given by the shipper under § 148.60 of this part indicates that the...

  10. Protection of steel from hydrogen sulfide corrosion by bactericides

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasov, V.M.; Mamedov, I.A.; Abdullaev, E.Sh.

    1995-03-01

    Modern effective inhibitors, Araz-1 and INFKh-4, are recommended for preventing the corrosion of oilfield equipment affected by hydrogen sulfide and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Both inhibitors have undergone full-scale field tests and have shown highly effective inhibition of corrosion in two-phase hydrocarbon-electrolyte media saturated with hydrogen sulfide.

  11. 21 CFR 872.1870 - Sulfide detection device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sulfide detection device. 872.1870 Section 872.1870 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1870 Sulfide detection device. (a)...

  12. 40 CFR 721.5075 - Mixed methyltin mercaptoester sulfides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mixed methyltin mercaptoester sulfides... Substances § 721.5075 Mixed methyltin mercaptoester sulfides. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as mixed methyltin...

  13. Temperature-programmed sulfiding of precursor cobalt oxide genesis of highly active sites on sulfided cobalt catalyst for hydrogenation and isomerization

    SciTech Connect

    Inamura, Kazuhiro; Takyu, Toshiyuki ); Okamoto, Yasuaki; Nagata, Kozo; Imanaka, Toshinobu )

    1992-02-01

    It was found that the method of sulfidation of cobalt oxide strongly affects the catalytic activities and selectivities of the resultant cobalt sulfide catalyst, as well as the calcination temperature of the cobalt oxide. When cobalt oxide was sulfided at 673 K by a temperature-programmed sulfiding method (a heating rate of 6 K/min), catalytic activities for the hydrogenation of butadiene and the isomerization of 1-butene were considerably enhanced compared with those for cobalt sulfide prepared by isothermal sulfidation at 673 K. Results of temperature-programmed sulfiding (TPS), temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) suggest that the catalysts showing high catalytic activities after sulfidation are partially sulfided at 673 K and consist of the unsulfided cobalt core phases (CoO or metallic Co). The sulfidation property of precursor cobalt oxides has been studied using TPS, simulating the sulfidation process of the cobalt sulfide catalysts. Two distinctly different kinds of sulfidation process are estimated by TPS measurements of the cobalt oxides. The calcination temperature of the precursor cobalt oxides strongly affects the sulfidation paths. They are differentiated in terms of the presence of a metallic Co intermediate. The relationship of the mechanism of sulfidation of the cobalt oxides to the generation of highly active sites is discussed.

  14. High-quality draft genome sequence of Kocuria marina SO9-6, an actinobacterium isolated from a copper mine.

    PubMed

    Castro, Daniel B A; Pereira, Letícia Bianca; Silva, Marcus Vinícius M E; Silva, Bárbara P da; Palermo, Bruna Rafaella Z; Carlos, Camila; Belgini, Daiane R B; Limache, Elmer Erasmo G; Lacerda, Gileno V Jr; Nery, Mariana B P; Gomes, Milene B; Souza, Salatiel S de; Silva, Thiago M da; Rodrigues, Viviane D; Paulino, Luciana C; Vicentini, Renato; Ferraz, Lúcio F C; Ottoboni, Laura M M

    2015-09-01

    An actinobacterial strain, designated SO9-6, was isolated from a copper iron sulfide mineral. The organism is Gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic, and coccoid. Chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic properties were consistent with its classification in the genus Kocuria. Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of Kocuria marina SO9-6 under accession JROM00000000 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nuccore/725823918), which provides insights for heavy metal bioremediation and production of compounds of biotechnological interest. PMID:26484219

  15. High-quality draft genome sequence of Kocuria marina SO9-6, an actinobacterium isolated from a copper mine

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Daniel B.A.; Pereira, Letícia Bianca; Silva, Marcus Vinícius M. e; Silva, Bárbara P. da; Palermo, Bruna Rafaella Z.; Carlos, Camila; Belgini, Daiane R.B.; Limache, Elmer Erasmo G.; Lacerda, Gileno V. Jr; Nery, Mariana B.P.; Gomes, Milene B.; Souza, Salatiel S. de; Silva, Thiago M. da; Rodrigues, Viviane D.; Paulino, Luciana C.; Vicentini, Renato; Ferraz, Lúcio F.C.; Ottoboni, Laura M.M.

    2015-01-01

    An actinobacterial strain, designated SO9-6, was isolated from a copper iron sulfide mineral. The organism is Gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic, and coccoid. Chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic properties were consistent with its classification in the genus Kocuria. Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of Kocuria marina SO9-6 under accession JROM00000000 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nuccore/725823918), which provides insights for heavy metal bioremediation and production of compounds of biotechnological interest. PMID:26484219

  16. Understanding Cu release into environment from Kure massive sulfide ore deposits, Kastamonu, NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirel, Cansu; Sonmez, Seref; Balci, Nurgul

    2014-05-01

    Covering a wide range on the earth's crust, oxidation of metal sulfide minerals have vital environmental impacts on the aquatic environment, causing one of the major environmental problems known as acid mine drainage (AMD). Located in the Kastamonu province of the Western Black Sea region, Kure district is one of the major copper mining sites in Turkey. Mining activities in the area heads back to ancient times, such that operation is thought to be started with the Roman Empire. Currently, only the underground mining tunnels of Bakibaba and Asikoy are being operated. Thus, mining heaps and ores of those pyritic deposits have been exposed to the oxidative conditions for so long. As a result of weathering processes of past and recent heaps of the Kure volcanic massive sulfide deposits in addition to the main ore mineral (chalcopyrite), significant amount of metals, especially Cu, are being released into the environment creating undesirable environmental conditions. In order to elucidate Cu release mechanisms from Kure pyritic ore deposits and mining wastes, field and laboratory approaches were used. Surface water and sediment samples from the streams around the mining and waste sites were collected. Groundwater samples from the active underground mining site were also collected. Physical parameters (pH, Eh, T°C, and EC) of water samples were determined in situ and in the laboratory using probes (WTW pH 3110, WTW Multi 9310 and CRISON CM 35). Metal and ion concentrations of the water samples were analysed using ICP-MS and DR 2800 spectrophotometer, respectively. High Cu, Co, Zn and Fe concentrations were determined in the water samples with pH values ranging from 2.9- 4. Cu concentrions ranges from 345 ppm to 36 ppm in the water samples. Consistent with the water samples, high Cu, Fe, Zn and Co were also determined in the sediment samples. Laboratory chalcopyrite oxidation experiments under the conditions representing the field site were set up as biological and

  17. Creative Copper Crests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knab, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how to create an art activity that would link the computer-created business cards of fourth-grade students with an upcoming school-wide medieval event. Creating family crests from copper foil would be a great connection, since they, like business cards, are an individual's way to identify themselves to others.…

  18. Precursors for formation of copper selenide, indium selenide, copper indium diselenide, and/or copper indium gallium diselenide films

    DOEpatents

    Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alexander; Van Hest, Maikel; Ginley, David S

    2014-11-04

    Liquid-based precursors for formation of Copper Selenide, Indium Selenide, Copper Indium Diselenide, and/or copper Indium Galium Diselenide include copper-organoselenides, particulate copper selenide suspensions, copper selenide ethylene diamine in liquid solvent, nanoparticulate indium selenide suspensions, and indium selenide ethylene diamine coordination compounds in solvent. These liquid-based precursors can be deposited in liquid form onto substrates and treated by rapid thermal processing to form crystalline copper selenide and indium selenide films.

  19. Copper leaching from chalcopyrite concentrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shijie

    2005-07-01

    Chalcopyrite (CuFeS2) is one of the most abundant copper-bearing minerals, which accounts for approximately 70 percent of the world’s known copper reserves. For more than 30 years, a significant number of processes have been developed to leach copper from chalcopyrite concentrates. These processes recover copper via hydrometallurgical leaching of the copper component of chalcopyrite concentrates, followed by solvent extraction and electrowinning. A number of demonstration plant operations have been conducted, but as of this writing none of the processes have become completely commercially operational.

  20. Calculation of sulfide capacities of multicomponent slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelton, Arthur D.; Eriksson, Gunnar; Romero-Serrano, Antonio

    1993-10-01

    The Reddy-Blander model for the sulfide capacities of slags has been modified for the case of acid slags and to include A12O3 and TiO2 as components. The model has been extended to calculate a priori sulfide capacities of multicomponent slags, from a knowledge of the thermodynamic activities of the component oxides, with no adjustable parameters. Agreement with measurements is obtained within experimental uncertainty for binary, ternary, and quinary slags involving the components SiO2-Al2O3-TiO2-CaO-MgO-FeO-MnO over wide ranges of composition. The oxide activities used in the computations are calculated from a database of model parameters obtained by optimizing thermodynamic and phase equilibrium data for oxide systems. Sulfur has now been included in this database. A computing system with automatic access to this and other databases has been developed to permit the calculation of the sulfur content of slags in multicomponent slag/metal/gas/solid equilibria.

  1. Effect of palladium on sulfide tarnishing of noble metal alloys.

    PubMed

    Suoninen, E; Herø, H; Minni, E

    1985-10-01

    Electron spectroscopic studies of Au-Ag-Cu alloys of the type used for dental castings show that small additions (less than or equal to 3 wt%) of palladium reduce essentially the thickness of the sulfide layer formed on surfaces of samples treated in aqueous Na2S solutions. Relative to silver, palladium does not enrich in the sulfide, but statistically significant enrichment is found immediately below the sulfide layer. This enrichment probably takes place during the exposure of the substrate surface to atmosphere before the sulfiding treatment. The mechanism of the impeding effect of palladium on sulfiding is assumed to be a decrease in diffusion from the bulk alloy to the surface due to the enriched layer. The effect cannot be explained by changes in the electronic structure of the alloy due to palladium alloying.

  2. Physical and microstructural aspects of iron sulfide degradation in concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Thomas; Gallucci, Emanuel; Scrivener, Karen

    2011-03-15

    The microstructural aspects of iron sulfide degradation in dam concrete were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) in both dam concrete samples and laboratory concrete. The results show that iron sulfide inclusions with a diameter of a few micrometers in the aggregates are reactive and appear to generate expansion first in the aggregates and consequently in the cement paste. The expansion from the iron sulfides is a consequence of the increase in volume of the reaction products formed. The types of iron sulfide present in the aggregate, mainly pyrrhotite (FeS) and pyrite (FeS{sub 2}), show similar reaction behavior in the aggregates. The released sulfate can lead to a secondary ettringite formation in the concrete matrix, but the degradation associated with this appears to be minor. The reaction of the iron sulfides was found to be very slow even when laboratory samples were exposed to elevated temperatures.

  3. The Hydrolysis of Carbonyl Sulfide at Low Temperature: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shunzheng; Yi, Honghong; Tang, Xiaolong; Jiang, Shanxue; Gao, Fengyu; Zhang, Bowen; Zuo, Yanran; Wang, Zhixiang

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic hydrolysis technology of carbonyl sulfide (COS) at low temperature was reviewed, including the development of catalysts, reaction kinetics, and reaction mechanism of COS hydrolysis. It was indicated that the catalysts are mainly involved metal oxide and activated carbon. The active ingredients which can load on COS hydrolysis catalyst include alkali metal, alkaline earth metal, transition metal oxides, rare earth metal oxides, mixed metal oxides, and nanometal oxides. The catalytic hydrolysis of COS is a first-order reaction with respect to carbonyl sulfide, while the reaction order of water changes as the reaction conditions change. The controlling steps are also different because the reaction conditions such as concentration of carbonyl sulfide, reaction temperature, water-air ratio, and reaction atmosphere are different. The hydrolysis of carbonyl sulfide is base-catalyzed reaction, and the force of the base site has an important effect on the hydrolysis of carbonyl sulfide. PMID:23956697

  4. Presenilin Promotes Dietary Copper Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Southon, Adam; Greenough, Mark A.; Ganio, George; Bush, Ashley I.; Burke, Richard; Camakaris, James

    2013-01-01

    Dietary copper is essential for multicellular organisms. Copper is redox active and required as a cofactor for enzymes such as the antioxidant Superoxide Dismutase 1 (SOD1). Copper dyshomeostasis has been implicated in Alzheimer’s disease. Mutations in the presenilin genes encoding PS1 and PS2 are major causes of early-onset familial Alzheimer’s disease. PS1 and PS2 are required for efficient copper uptake in mammalian systems. Here we demonstrate a conserved role for presenilin in dietary copper uptake in the fly Drosophila melanogaster. Ubiquitous RNA interference-mediated knockdown of the single Drosophila presenilin (PSN) gene is lethal. However, PSN knockdown in the midgut produces viable flies. These flies have reduced copper levels and are more tolerant to excess dietary copper. Expression of a copper-responsive EYFP construct was also lower in the midgut of these larvae, indicative of reduced dietary copper uptake. SOD activity was reduced by midgut PSN knockdown, and these flies were sensitive to the superoxide-inducing chemical paraquat. These data support presenilin being needed for dietary copper uptake in the gut and so impacting on SOD activity and tolerance to oxidative stress. These results are consistent with previous studies of mammalian presenilins, supporting a conserved role for these proteins in mediating copper uptake. PMID:23667524

  5. Luminal sulfide and large intestine mucosa: friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Blachier, François; Davila, Anne-Marie; Mimoun, Sabria; Benetti, Pierre-Henri; Atanasiu, Calina; Andriamihaja, Mireille; Benamouzig, Robert; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Tomé, Daniel

    2010-07-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is present in the lumen of the human large intestine at millimolar concentrations. However, the concentration of free (unbound) sulfide is in the micromolar range due to a large capacity of fecal components to bind the sulfide. H(2)S can be produced by the intestinal microbiota from alimentary and endogenous sulfur-containing compounds including amino acids. At excessive concentration, H(2)S is known to severely inhibit cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal oxidase of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, and thus mitochondrial oxygen (O(2)) consumption. However, the concept that sulfide is simply a metabolic troublemaker toward colonic epithelial cells has been challenged by the discovery that micromolar concentration of H(2)S is able to increase the cell respiration and to energize mitochondria allowing these cells to detoxify and to recover energy from luminal sulfide. The main product of H(2)S metabolism by the colonic mucosa is thiosulfate. The enzymatic activities involved in sulfide oxidation by the colonic epithelial cells appear to be sulfide quinone oxidoreductase considered as the first and rate-limiting step followed presumably by the action of sulfur dioxygenase and rhodanese. From clinical studies with human volunteers and experimental works with rodents, it appears that H(2)S can exert mostly pro- but also anti-inflammatory effects on the colonic mucosa. From the available data, it is tempting to propose that imbalance between the luminal concentration of free sulfide and the capacity of colonic epithelial cells to metabolize this compound will result in an impairment of the colonic epithelial cell O(2) consumption with consequences on the process of mucosal inflammation. In addition, endogenously produced sulfide is emerging as a prosecretory neuromodulator and as a relaxant agent toward the intestinal contractibility. Lastly, sulfide has been recently described as an agent involved in nociception in the large intestine

  6. Measurement and biological significance of the volatile sulfur compounds hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide in various biological matrices.

    PubMed

    Tangerman, Albert

    2009-10-15

    This review deals with the measurement of the volatile sulfur compounds hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide in various biological matrices of rats and humans (blood, serum, tissues, urine, breath, feces and flatus). Hydrogen sulfide and methanethiol both contain the active thiol (-SH) group and appear in the free gaseous form, in the acid-labile form and in the dithiothreitol-labile form. Dimethyl sulfide is a neutral molecule and exists only in the free form. The foul odor of these sulfur volatiles is a striking characteristic and plays a major role in bad breath, feces and flatus. Because sulfur is a biologically active element, the biological significance of the sulfur volatiles are also highlighted. Despite its highly toxic properties, hydrogen sulfide has been lately recommended to become the third gasotransmitter, next to nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, based on high concentration found in healthy tissues, such as blood and brain. However, there is much doubt about the reliability of the assay methods used. Many artifacts in the sulfide assays exist. The methods to detect the various forms of hydrogen sulfide are critically reviewed and compared with findings of our group. Recent findings that free gaseous hydrogen sulfide is absent in whole blood urged the need to revisit its role as a blood-borne signaling molecule.

  7. DISSOLUTION OF PLUTONIUM CONTAINING CARRIER PRECIPITATE BY CARBONATE METATHESIS AND SEPARATION OF SULFIDE IMPURITIES THEREFROM BY SULFIDE PRECIPITATION

    DOEpatents

    Duffield, R.B.

    1959-07-14

    A process is described for recovering plutonium from foreign products wherein a carrier precipitate of lanthanum fluoride containing plutonium is obtained and includes the steps of dissolving the carrier precipitate in an alkali metal carbonate solution, adding a soluble sulfide, separating the sulfide precipitate, adding an alkali metal hydroxide, separating the resulting precipitate, washing, and dissolving in a strong acid.

  8. Predicting the Location of Extinct Massive Sulfide Deposits on the Atlantic Seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devey, C. W.; Jamieson, J. W.; Petersen, S.; Yeo, I. A.; Walter, M.; Buss, A.; Collins, J.; Koehler, J.; Palgan, D.; Vishiti, A.

    2013-12-01

    More than 25% of heat-loss from the Earth's interior occurs via hydrothermal cooling of newly-formed oceanic lithosphere at mid-ocean ridges. In the process, elements (including economically-relevant base and precious metals) are re-distributed and concentrated in seafloor massive sulphide (SMS) deposits. A recent estimate1 suggested that the amount of metal being deposited at the presently-active ridges is not economically significant (with a total copper+zinc inventory equal to only one year of global copper+zinc consumption), but also highlighted the unknown potential of older seafloor, for which no viable exploration models existed. Here we present the results of hydrothermal exploration along 3000 km of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (representing almost 5% of the total length (64.000km) of the global mid-ocean ridge system and over 8% of the economically more interesting slow-spreading (<40mm/yr) ridges). We find significant correlations between axial morphology as determined by ship-mounted multibeam and the presence of high-temperature hydrothermal venting determined from water column studies. Using these relationships we can, for the first time, predict the location of extinct hydrothermal deposits within the plate interior solely based on ship-based multibeam surveys. 1 Hannington, M., Jamieson, J., Monecke, T., Petersen, S. & Beaulieu, S. The abundance of seafloor massive sulfide deposits. Geology 39, 1155-1158, doi:10.1130/G32468.1 (2011).

  9. An NIR-triggered and thermally responsive drug delivery platform through DNA/copper sulfide gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Li, Yecheng; Jin, Zexun; Yu, Jimmy C.; Chan, King Ming

    2015-07-01

    Nanomaterials for effective drug delivery require zero pre-release and on-demand release of therapeutic drugs. In this work we demonstrate a novel drug delivery system composed of a mesoporous silica platform conjugated to CuS nanoparticles with two complementary DNA sequences. CuS nanoparticles act as both gatekeepers preventing pre-release of drugs and photothermal agents for effective killing of cancer cells. This system exhibits temperature and NIR-responsive DOX release, with an additional accelerated release rate with GSH treatment. Therefore, it can act as an effective anticancer drug delivery carrier with triggered drug release and efficient anti-cancer effect in vitro after NIR irradiation.

  10. Behavior of noble metals upon fractional crystallization of copper-rich sulfide melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Distler, V. V.; Sinyakova, E. F.; Kosyakov, V. I.

    2016-08-01

    Joint behavior of Pt, Pd, Au, As, Bi, Te, and Sn upon fractional crystallization was studied in a melt of cubanite composition with the following admixtures (mol %): Fe, 33.20; Cu, 16.55; S, 50.03; Pt, 0.03; Pd, 0.02; Au, 0.02; As, 0.02; Bi, 0.03; Te, 0.02; Sn, 0.08. The crystallized sample consisted of three zones: (I) a pyrrhotite solid solution POSS; (II) an isocubanite ICB; (III) a multiphase mixture. The behavior of admixtures was studied in the first and second zones. It was shown that pyrrhotite did not contain admixtures of noble metals and accessory elements, whereas Sn was dissolved in cubanite. Other admixtures occurred in the second zone as multiphase inclusions. PdBi x Te1- x , PtBiS3-δ, CuPtBiS3, Bi2S3- x , Au, Pt(As,S)2, (Pt,Pd)S, (Pt,Pd)(Bi,Te)2- x , and PdBi2 were the most abundant phases.

  11. A reversible fluorescence chemosensor for sequentially quantitative monitoring copper and sulfide in living cells.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qingtao; Zhang, Run; Jia, Hongmin; Gao, Xue; Wang, Cuiping; Shi, Yu; Everest-Dass, Arun V; Zhang, Zhiqiang

    2015-10-01

    We report a novel, selective and sensitive strategy for the sequentially "ON-OFF-ON" fluorescent detection of Cu(2+) and S(2-) based on a fluorescein derivative, FL. The specific binding of FL towards Cu(2+) in aqueous and biological media led to the intensive green fluorescence quenching and a notable increase of the absorbance maximum at 480 nm. In the presence of S(2-), the intensity and overall pattern of the fluorescence emission and UV-vis spectra of FL-Cu(2+) ensemble were recovered since the abolishment of paramagnetic Cu(2+). This displacement approach exhibited highly specificity, and sensitivity with detection limits of 3 nM for Cu(2+) and 150 nM for S(2-). The fluorescence "ON-OFF-ON" circle can be repeated to a minimum of 5 times by the alternative addition of Cu(2+) and S(2-), implying that FL is a renewable dual-functional chemosensor. The biocompatibility of FL toward breast carcinoma cells, MDA-MB-231 was confirmed by MTT assay. The reversible "ON-OFF-ON" fluorescent response of FL to Cu(2+) and S(2-) in living system was further confirmed by confocal fluorescence imaging of living cells. The quantification of Cu(2+) and S(2-) in single intact cell was realized by the flow cytometry analysis.

  12. Combinatorial photothermal and immuno cancer therapy using chitosan-coated hollow copper sulfide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liangran; Yan, Daisy D; Yang, Dongfang; Li, Yajuan; Wang, Xiaodong; Zalewski, Olivia; Yan, Bingfang; Lu, Wei

    2014-06-24

    Near-infrared light-responsive inorganic nanoparticles have been shown to enhance the efficacy of cancer photothermal ablation therapy. However, current nanoparticle-mediated photothermal ablation is more effective in treating local cancer at the primary site than metastatic cancer. Here, we report the design of a near-infrared light-induced transformative nanoparticle platform that combines photothermal ablation with immunotherapy. The design is based on chitosan-coated hollow CuS nanoparticles that assemble the immunoadjuvants oligodeoxynucleotides containing the cytosine-guanine (CpG) motifs. Interestingly, these structures break down after laser excitation, reassemble, and transform into polymer complexes that improve tumor retention of the immunotherapy. In this "photothermal immunotherapy" approach, photothermal ablation-induced tumor cell death reduces tumor growth and releases tumor antigens into the surrounding milieu, while the immunoadjuvants potentiate host antitumor immunity. Our results indicated that combined photothermal immunotherapy is more effective than either immunotherapy or photothermal therapy alone against primary treated and distant untreated tumors in a mouse breast cancer model. These hollow CuS nanoparticles are biodegradable and can be eliminated from the body after laser excitation.

  13. Cadmium sulfide/copper ternary heterojunction cell research. Final report, January 8, 1979-June 7, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    Dual source, Se and CuInSe/sub 2/, coevaporation and flash evaporation of stoichiometric CuInSe/sub 2/ powder were investigated to develop a process of fabricating large area CdS/CuInSe/sub 2/ heterojunction solar cells. CuInSe/sub 2/ was seen to decompose upon evaporation, producing layered films in the dual source system. Annealing of these films and alternative dual sources have been considered. Single phase p type films have been produced but no devices have been made from such films. Flash evaporation circumvents the decomposition problem, and if one bakes the powder to obtain a small Cu excess as well as getting a Se excess in the film, p type CuInSe/sub 2/ films can be obtained. A 1% efficient device of 6 cm/sup 2/ area was made using a flash evaporated CuInSe/sub 2/ film. Annealing studies and measurements of spatial uniformity of this device are reported.

  14. Controlling surface defects of non-stoichiometric copper-indium-sulfide quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Chul; Nam, Yoon Sung

    2015-12-15

    Quantum dots (QDs) can be used for a wide range of practical applications including solar energy conversion, light-emitting display, bio-imaging, and sensing. However, toxic heavy metal elements of Pb- and Cd-based QDs cause potential environmental problems and limit their wide applicability. To overcome this limitation, CuInS2 (CIS) QDs, which have a bulk bandgap energy of 1.5eV and relatively high absorptivity, can be a good alternative. However the photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) of CIS QDs is too low for practical applications. Here we investigate the effects of experimental factors in the solution synthesis of CIS/ZnS QDs on intrinsic defects and surface defects from photoluminescence (PL) analysis. A heating-up method is used with dodecanethiol as a sulfur source, a ligand, and a medium. The Cu-to-In feeding ratio is changed to control the PL spectrum in the range of visible to near infrared (NIR) frequencies. The PLQY is increased above 40% in all of the ranges through ZnS shell passivation and additional process optimization (e.g., controlled cooling rate and additional feeding of In(3+) ion precursor). This work demonstrates the role of intrinsic defects in PL and the importance of suppressing the formation of the surface defects to increase the PLQY.

  15. Phase-dependent photocatalytic H2 evolution of copper zinc tin sulfide under visible light.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zhi-Xian; Zhou, Wen-Hui; Kou, Dong-Xing; Zhou, Zheng-Ji; Wu, Si-Xin

    2014-10-28

    CZTS exhibited apparently phase-dependent photocatalytic H2 evolution under visible light. Possible factors for the phase-dependent photocatalytic activity of CZTS were discussed in detail. PMID:25205452

  16. Green synthesis of wurtzite copper zinc tin sulfide nanocones for improved solar photovoltaic utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Leena; Gupta, Poonam; Chhikara, Nitu; Singh, Om Pal; Muhunthan, N.; Singh, V. N.; Singh, B. P.; Jain, Kiran; Chand, S.

    2015-02-01

    Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) is considered to be one of the most promising light absorbing materials for low-cost and high-efficiency thin-film solar cells. It is composed of earth abundant, non-toxic elements. In the present study, wurtzite CZTS nanocone has been synthesized by a green chemistry route. The nanocones have been characterized for its optical, structural and microstructural properties using UV-Vis spectrophotometer, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Optical absorption result shows a band gap of 1.42 eV. XRD and Raman results show wurtzite structure and TEM studies reveal the nanocone structure of the grown material. Growing vertically aligned nanocone structure having smaller diameter shall help in enhancing the light absorption in broader range which shall enhance the efficiency of solar cell. This study is a step in this direction.

  17. Controlling surface defects of non-stoichiometric copper-indium-sulfide quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Chul; Nam, Yoon Sung

    2015-12-15

    Quantum dots (QDs) can be used for a wide range of practical applications including solar energy conversion, light-emitting display, bio-imaging, and sensing. However, toxic heavy metal elements of Pb- and Cd-based QDs cause potential environmental problems and limit their wide applicability. To overcome this limitation, CuInS2 (CIS) QDs, which have a bulk bandgap energy of 1.5eV and relatively high absorptivity, can be a good alternative. However the photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) of CIS QDs is too low for practical applications. Here we investigate the effects of experimental factors in the solution synthesis of CIS/ZnS QDs on intrinsic defects and surface defects from photoluminescence (PL) analysis. A heating-up method is used with dodecanethiol as a sulfur source, a ligand, and a medium. The Cu-to-In feeding ratio is changed to control the PL spectrum in the range of visible to near infrared (NIR) frequencies. The PLQY is increased above 40% in all of the ranges through ZnS shell passivation and additional process optimization (e.g., controlled cooling rate and additional feeding of In(3+) ion precursor). This work demonstrates the role of intrinsic defects in PL and the importance of suppressing the formation of the surface defects to increase the PLQY. PMID:26319334

  18. High-yield room temperature route to copper sulfide hollow nanospheres and their electrochemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiying; Li, Qing; Nie, Ming; Li, Xuelian; Li, Yuan; Zhong, Xiaolin

    2011-07-01

    CuS hollow nanospheres have been successfully synthesized in high yield by reacting anhydrous cupric sulfate (CuSO4·5H2O) with thioacetamide (TAA) in ethylene glycol (EG) with the assistance of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). The products were characterized systematically by XRD, EDX, FESEM, TEM and BET measurement and size analysis, CV, LSV and CP. FESEM and TEM images revealed that the as-prepared CuS hollow nanospheres had a mean diameter of about 500 nm with a hollow cavity of about 340 nm and shell thickness of about 80 nm. The spheres were constructed by numerous nanoflakes. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of the as-synthesized products was measured to be 99.77 m2g - 1. The Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) model analysis showed that the as-prepared CuS materials had a main pore size distribution of around 25 nm. CV curves, LSV of CuS for oxygen electroreduction and CP curves showed that the as-prepared CuS nanospheres were potential candidates which can be used as cathode catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media.

  19. Copper Sulfides in the R Chondrites: Evidence of Hydrothermal Alteration in Low Petrologic Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, K. E.; Lauretta, D. S.; Berger, E. L.; Thompson, M. S.; Zega, T. J.

    2016-08-01

    Bornite in the R chondrites formed via pre-accretionary processes. Hydrothermal alteration on the parent body between ~200° and 300°C resulted in replacement by chalcopyrite and isocubanite. These phases are found in a range of petrologic types.

  20. PVD of copper sulfide (Cu2S) for PIN-structured solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siol, Sebastian; Sträter, Hendrik; Brüggemann, Rudolf; Brötz, Joachim; Bauer, Gottfried H.; Klein, Andreas; Jaegermann, Wolfram

    2013-12-01

    Thin layers of chalcocite (Cu2S) have been deposited via physical vapour deposition using various pre- and post-treatment parameters. The electrical and morphological properties have been investigated by in situ XPS, SEM and XRD measurements. Calibrated photoluminescence experiments were performed to investigate the material's suitability as an absorber layer in thin-film solar cells. Measurements of annealed Cu2S layers on glass without any surface passivation showed an optical band gap of 1.25 eV as well as a splitting of the quasi-Fermi levels of 710 meV. This value exceeds the highest reported open-circuit voltage for Cu2S-based devices so far, which leads to the assumption that Cu2S has not been brought to its full potential yet. The band alignments for ZnO/Cu2S as well as Cu2S/Cu2O interfaces have been determined using in situ XPS interface experiments to suggest a novel device structure according to the favourable PIN-layout. First devices have been built, but show no efficiency due to shunting caused by the inferior morphology of the absorber layers.

  1. Highly Luminescent Heterostructured Copper-Doped Zinc Sulfide Nanocrystals for Application in Cancer Cell Labeling.

    PubMed

    Ang, Huixiang; Bosman, Michel; Thamankar, Ramesh; Zulkifli, Muhammad Faizal B; Yen, Swee Kuan; Hariharan, Anushya; Sudhaharan, Thankiah; Selvan, Subramanian Tamil

    2016-08-18

    The structural characteristics of the seed-mediated synthesis of heterostructured CuS-ZnS nanocrystals (NCs) and Cu-doped ZnS (ZnS:Cu) NCs synthesized by two different protocols are compared and analyzed. At high Cu dopant concentrations, segregated subclusters of ZnS and CuS are observed. The photoluminescence quantum yield of ZnS:Cu NCs is about 50-80 %; a value much higher than that of ZnS NCs (6 %). Finally, these NCs are coated with a thin silica shell by using (3-mercaptopropyl)triethoxysilane in a reverse microemulsion to make them water soluble. Cytotoxicity experiments show that these silica-coated NCs have greatly reduced toxicity on both cancerous HeLa and noncancerous Chinese hamster ovary cells. The labeling of cancerous HeLa cells is also demonstrated. PMID:27146419

  2. Elucidating a twin-dependent chemical activity of hierarchical copper sulfide nanocages.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shaodong; Deng, Dongchu; Song, Xiaoping; Yang, Zhimao

    2013-10-14

    We have demonstrated significant evidence of a solvent-dependent synthesis of hierarchical Cu7S4 polycrystalline nanocage assemblies with controllable aggregation-based building blocks by a sacrificial Cu2O template approach. The formation of a hierarchical Cu7S4 polycrystalline nanocage is essentially determined by a Kirkendall effect, which is attributed to the tailored-aggregation behaviour of the nanoscale building blocks during the replacement/etching process in different polarities of solvent. The hierarchical Cu7S4 polycrystalline nanocage assembly of nanoparticle building blocks was prepared in pure water, while the hierarchical Cu7S4 polycrystalline nanocage assembly of twinned nanoplate building blocks was successfully synthesized in an anhydrous ethanol capping environment. Such a hierarchical Cu7S4 polycrystalline nanocage assembly of twinned nanoplate building blocks exhibits a higher photocatalytic activity than that of the common polycrystalline ones. A nanotwin-dependent photochemical mechanism has been proposed. Significantly, this study is of great importance in bottom-up assembly of controllable ordered architectures, and offers a good opportunity to understand the fundamental importance of the formation mechanism and growth process of hierarchical Cu7S4 polycrystalline nanocages with controllable aggregation-based building blocks.

  3. Sulfide synthesis through copper-catalyzed C-S bond formation under biomolecule-compatible conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yonghong; Li, Yiming; Zhang, Xiaomei; Jiang, Xuefeng

    2015-01-18

    We report here an efficient and mild method for constructing C-S bonds. The reactions were carried out with Na2S2O3 as a sulfurating reagent, CuSO4 as a catalyst, and water as solvent without any surfactant. The products were achieved in moderate to excellent yields at room temperature under air. Notably, this reaction is compatible with various biomolecules including amino acids, oligosaccharides, nucleosides, proteins, and cell lysates. PMID:25435202

  4. Sulfur incorporation into copper indium diselenide single crystals through annealing in hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Titus, Jochen; Birkmire, Robert W.; Hack, Christina; Mueller, Georg; McKeown, Patrick

    2006-02-15

    CuInSe{sub 2} crystals were sulfurized in a H{sub 2}S-Ar gas mixture at 575 deg. C. The focus was on the resulting mass transport, in particular, on the interdiffusion of Se and S. Experiments were done for various sulfurization times, and the resulting S distribution was measured by Auger electron spectroscopy sputter depth profiling and analyzed with the Boltzmann-Matano method. A one-dimensional diffusion process had shaped the S distribution in these crystals. The respective diffusion coefficient was on the order of 10{sup -16} cm{sup 2}/s, and it varied only slightly with the S content in CuIn(Se,S){sub 2}.

  5. Combinatorial Photothermal and Immuno Cancer Therapy Using Chitosan-Coated Hollow Copper Sulfide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Near-infrared light-responsive inorganic nanoparticles have been shown to enhance the efficacy of cancer photothermal ablation therapy. However, current nanoparticle-mediated photothermal ablation is more effective in treating local cancer at the primary site than metastatic cancer. Here, we report the design of a near-infrared light-induced transformative nanoparticle platform that combines photothermal ablation with immunotherapy. The design is based on chitosan-coated hollow CuS nanoparticles that assemble the immunoadjuvants oligodeoxynucleotides containing the cytosine-guanine (CpG) motifs. Interestingly, these structures break down after laser excitation, reassemble, and transform into polymer complexes that improve tumor retention of the immunotherapy. In this “photothermal immunotherapy” approach, photothermal ablation-induced tumor cell death reduces tumor growth and releases tumor antigens into the surrounding milieu, while the immunoadjuvants potentiate host antitumor immunity. Our results indicated that combined photothermal immunotherapy is more effective than either immunotherapy or photothermal therapy alone against primary treated and distant untreated tumors in a mouse breast cancer model. These hollow CuS nanoparticles are biodegradable and can be eliminated from the body after laser excitation. PMID:24801008

  6. Incorporating bioavailability into management limits for copper in sediments contaminated by antifouling paint used in aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Stuart L; Spadaro, David A; O'Brien, Dom

    2013-11-01

    Although now well embedded within many risk-based sediment quality guideline (SQG) frameworks, contaminant bioavailability is still often overlooked in assessment and management of contaminated sediments. To optimise management limits for metal contaminated sediments, we assess the appropriateness of a range methods for modifying SQGs based on bioavailability considerations. The impairment of reproduction of the amphipod, Melita plumulosa, and harpacticoid copepod, Nitocra spinipes, was assessed for sediments contaminated with copper from antifouling paint, located below aquaculture cages. The measurement of dilute acid-extractable copper (AE-Cu) was found to provide the most useful means for monitoring the risks posed by sediment copper and setting management limits. Acid-volatile sulfide was found to be ineffective as a SQG-modifying factor as these organisms live mostly at the more oxidised sediment water interface. SQGs normalised to %-silt/organic carbon were effective, but the benefits gained were too small to justify this approach. The effectiveness of SQGs based on AE-Cu was attributed to a small portion of the total copper being present in potentially bioavailable forms (typically<10% of the total). Much of the non-bioavailable form of copper was likely present as paint flakes in the form of copper (I) oxide, the active ingredient of the antifoulant formulation. While the concentrations of paint-associated copper are very high in some sediments, as the transformation of this form of copper to AE-Cu appears slow, monitoring and management limits should assess the more bioavailable AE-Cu forms, and further efforts be made to limit the release of paint particles into the environment.

  7. Atomic layer deposition of aluminum sulfide thin films using trimethylaluminum and hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Soumyadeep; Sarkar, Shaibal K.; Mahuli, Neha

    2015-01-15

    Sequential exposures of trimethylaluminum and hydrogen sulfide are used to deposit aluminum sulfide thin films by atomic layer deposition (ALD) in the temperature ranging from 100 to 200 °C. Growth rate of 1.3 Å per ALD cycle is achieved by in-situ quartz crystal microbalance measurements. It is found that the growth rate per ALD cycle is highly dependent on the purging time between the two precursors. Increased purge time results in higher growth rate. Surface limited chemistry during each ALD half cycle is studied by in-situ Fourier transformed infrared vibration spectroscopy. Time of flight secondary ion-mass spectroscopy measurement is used to confirm elemental composition of the deposited films.

  8. Production of ultrahigh purity copper using waste copper nitrate solution.

    PubMed

    Choi, J Y; Kim, D S

    2003-04-25

    The production of ultrahigh purity copper (99.9999%) by electrolysis in the presence of a cementation barrier has been attempted employing a waste nitric copper etching solution as the electrolyte. The amount of copper deposited on the cathode increased almost linearly with electrolysis time and the purity of copper was observed to increase as the electrolyte concentration was increased. At some point, however, as the electrolyte concentration increased, the purity of copper decreased slightly. As the total surface area of cementation barrier increased, the purity of product increased. The electrolyte temperature should be maintained below 35 degrees C in the range of investigated electrolysis conditions to obtain the ultrahigh purity copper. Considering that several industrial waste solutions contain valuable metallic components the result of present study may support a claim that electrowinning is a very desirable process for their treatment and recovery. PMID:12719148

  9. [Oxidation of sulfide minerals by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans].

    PubMed

    Malakhova, P T; Chebotarev, G M; Kovalenko, E V; Volkov, Iu A

    1981-01-01

    Samples of natural pyrites and sphalerites were subjected to the action of the mineral medium 9K with 1 g of Fe3+ per litre in the presence and in the absence of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, and incubated at 28 degrees C under the stationary conditions for 30 days. The chemical composition of the solutions was studied after leaching as well as changes of the surfaces of monoliths. The deepest etching of surfaces with the formation of crusts and films of jarosite, limonite and goslarite occurs upon the combined action of bacteria and Fe3+ in regions of a fine-zonal structure enriched with an isomorphous arsenic admixture which are characterized by a defective weak structure. The pyrite and sphalerite from Charmitan with a higher arsenic and iron content were leached more than the pyrite and sphalerite from Kurgashincan. This was also corroborated by chemical analyses of leaching solutions and by monometric studies of crushed sulfide samples. PMID:7219212

  10. Structure of 4-methylpyridinium Hydrogen Sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andras, Maria T.; Hepp, Aloysius F.; Fanwick, Phillip E.; Martuch, Robert A.; Duraj, Stan A.; Gordon, Edward M.

    1994-01-01

    4-Methylpyridinium hydrogen sulfide, (C6H7NH)HS, M(sub r) = 127.21, consists of C6H7NH(+) cations and HS(-) anions. Z = 2 for the crystal with monoclinic space group Cm (#8), dimensions of a = 8.679(2) A, b = 7.964(1) A, and c = 4.860(2) A, an angle beta of 101.10(2) degrees, and a volume of V = 329.6(3) A(exp 3). R = 0.039 and R(sub w) = 0.048 for 385 reflections with F(sub o)(exp 2) greater than 3 sigma(F(sub o)(exp 2)) and 59 variables. Both the C6H7NH(+) cation and the HS(-) anion lie on crystallographic mirror planes with the N,S, two carbon atoms, and two hydrogen atoms positioned in the planes. The hydrogen atom of the HS(-) anion was not located.

  11. Interactions among sulfide-oxidizing bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poplawski, R.

    1985-01-01

    The responses of different phototrophic bacteria in a competitive experimental system are studied, one in which primary factors such as H2S or light limited photometabolism. Two different types of bacteria shared one limited source of sulfide under specific conditions of light. The selection of a purple and a green sulfur bacteria and the cyanobacterium was based on their physiological similarity and also on the fact that they occur together in microbial mats. They all share anoxygenic photosynthesis, and are thus probably part of an evolutionary continuum of phototrophic organisms that runs from, strictly anaerobic physiology to the ability of some cyanobacteria to shift between anoxygenic bacterial style photosynthesis and the oxygenic kind typical of eukaryotes.

  12. Signaling of hydrogen sulfide and polysulfides.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hideo

    2015-02-10

    It has been almost two decades since the first demonstration of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) as a physiological mediator of cognitive function and vascular tone. H2S is physiologically important because it protects various organs from ischemia-reperfusion injury besides regulating inflammation, oxygen sensing, cell growth, and senescence. The production, metabolism, and regulation of H2S have been studied extensively. H2S modulates target proteins through sulfhydration (or sulfuration) or by the reduction of cysteine disulfide bonds. A large number of novel H2S-donating compounds are being developed owing to the therapeutic potential of H2S. Recently, polysulfides, rather than H2S, have been identified as molecules that sulfhydrate (or sulfurate) their target proteins.

  13. [Oxidation of sulfide minerals by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans].

    PubMed

    Malakhova, P T; Chebotarev, G M; Kovalenko, E V; Volkov, Iu A

    1981-01-01

    Samples of natural pyrites and sphalerites were subjected to the action of the mineral medium 9K with 1 g of Fe3+ per litre in the presence and in the absence of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, and incubated at 28 degrees C under the stationary conditions for 30 days. The chemical composition of the solutions was studied after leaching as well as changes of the surfaces of monoliths. The deepest etching of surfaces with the formation of crusts and films of jarosite, limonite and goslarite occurs upon the combined action of bacteria and Fe3+ in regions of a fine-zonal structure enriched with an isomorphous arsenic admixture which are characterized by a defective weak structure. The pyrite and sphalerite from Charmitan with a higher arsenic and iron content were leached more than the pyrite and sphalerite from Kurgashincan. This was also corroborated by chemical analyses of leaching solutions and by monometric studies of crushed sulfide samples.

  14. Bioextraction of cobalt from complex metal sulfides

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.L.; Noah, K.S.; Wichlacz, P.L.; Torma, A.E.

    1993-05-01

    The present study has investigated the bioleachability of naturally occurring cobaltite and synthetic cobalt sulfides using 29 pedigree and ``wild type`` strains of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. On the basis of a screening test, five strains of bacteria were selected for assessing the effects of leach parameters (pH, ferrous and ferric sulfates, ammonium sulfate, bipotassium hydrogen phosphate, and substrate concentrations) on cobalt extraction from Blackbird Mine ore and concentrate. The mechanisms of cobalt extraction were explained in terms of direct and indirect modes of bacterial activity, and the chemistry involved in these processes was identified. Using various size fractions of a high-grade cobaltite, the kinetic parameters of cobalt extraction were derived for the effect of specific surface area to be V{sub m} = 376 mg dm{sup {minus}3} h{sup {minus}1} and K 1.27 m{sup 2} g{sup {minus}1}.

  15. Bioextraction of cobalt from complex metal sulfides

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.L.; Noah, K.S.; Wichlacz, P.L.; Torma, A.E.

    1993-01-01

    The present study has investigated the bioleachability of naturally occurring cobaltite and synthetic cobalt sulfides using 29 pedigree and wild type'' strains of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. On the basis of a screening test, five strains of bacteria were selected for assessing the effects of leach parameters (pH, ferrous and ferric sulfates, ammonium sulfate, bipotassium hydrogen phosphate, and substrate concentrations) on cobalt extraction from Blackbird Mine ore and concentrate. The mechanisms of cobalt extraction were explained in terms of direct and indirect modes of bacterial activity, and the chemistry involved in these processes was identified. Using various size fractions of a high-grade cobaltite, the kinetic parameters of cobalt extraction were derived for the effect of specific surface area to be V[sub m] = 376 mg dm[sup [minus]3] h[sup [minus]1] and K 1.27 m[sup 2] g[sup [minus]1].

  16. Chemical Foundations of Hydrogen Sulfide Biology

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Lancaster, Jack R.

    2013-01-01

    Following nitric oxide (nitrogen monoxide) and carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide (or its newer systematic name sulfane, H2S) became the third small molecule that can be both toxic and beneficial depending on the concentration. In spite of its impressive therapeutic potential, the underlying mechanisms for its beneficial effects remain unclear. Any novel mechanism has to obey fundamental chemical principles. H2S chemistry was studied long before its biological relevance was discovered, however, with a few exceptions, these past works have received relatively little attention in the path of exploring the mechanistic conundrum of H2S biological functions. This review calls attention to the basic physical and chemical properties of H2S, focuses on the chemistry between H2S and its three potential biological targets: oxidants, metals and thiol derivatives, discusses the applications of these basics into H2S biology and methodology, and introduces the standard terminology to this youthful field. PMID:23850631

  17. Hydrogen sulfide and polysulfides as signaling molecules

    PubMed Central

    KIMURA, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a familiar toxic gas that smells of rotten eggs. After the identification of endogenous H2S in the mammalian brain two decades ago, studies of this molecule uncovered physiological roles in processes such as neuromodulation, vascular tone regulation, cytoprotection against oxidative stress, angiogenesis, anti-inflammation, and oxygen sensing. Enzymes that produce H2S, such as cystathionine β-synthase, cystathionine γ-lyase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase have been studied intensively and well characterized. Polysulfides, which have a higher number of inner sulfur atoms than that in H2S, were recently identified as potential signaling molecules that can activate ion channels, transcription factors, and tumor suppressors with greater potency than that of H2S. This article focuses on our contribution to the discovery of these molecules and their metabolic pathways and mechanisms of action. PMID:25864468

  18. Atmospheric carbonyl sulfide exchange in bog microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, A.; Klinger, L.F.; Erickson, D.J. III )

    1993-01-22

    Measurements of Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) fluxes were carried out on bog microcosms using chamber sampling and tunable diode laser analysis. Intact bog microcosms (vascular plants, mosses, and peat) removed ambient levels of OCS in the light and dark with rates from [minus]2.4 to [minus]8.1 ng S min[sup [minus]1] m[sup [minus]2]. Peat and peat plus mosses emitted OCS in the light with rates of 17.4 and 10.9 ng S min[sup [minus]1] m[sup [minus]2], respectively. In the dark, the mosses apparently removed OCS at a rate equivalent to the peat emissions. A 3-D numerical tracer model using this data indicated that boreal bog ecosystems remove at most 1% of ambient OCS, not sufficient to account for an observed OCS depletion in boreal air masses. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  19. Colloidal Synthesis of Hollow Cobalt Sulfide Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Yadong; Erdonmez, Can K.; Cabot, Andreu; Hughes, Steven; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2006-03-16

    Formation of cobalt sulfide hollow nanocrystals through amechanism similar to the Kirkendall Effect has been investigated indetail. It was found that performing the reaction at>120oC leads tofast formation of a single void ins ide each shell, whereas at roomtemperature multiple voids are formed within each shell, which can beattributed to strongly temperature-dependent diffusivities for vacancies.The void formation process is dominated by outward diffusion of cobaltcations; still, significant inward transport of sulfur anions can beinferred to occur as the final voids are smaller in diameter than theoriginal cobalt nanocrystals. Comparison of volume distributions forinitial and final nanostructures indicates excess apparent volume inshells implying significant porosity and/or a defective structure.Indirect evidence for shells to fracture during growth at lowertemperatures was observed in shell size statisticsand TEM of as-grownshells. An idealized model of the diffusional process imposes two minimalrequirements on material parameters for shell growth to be obtainablewithin a specific synthetic system.

  20. Copper@polypyrrole nanocables

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A simple hydrothermal redox reaction between microcrystalline CuOHCl and pyrrole leads to the isolation of striking nanostructures formed by polypyrrole-coated copper nanocables. These multicomponent cables that feature single-crystalline face-centered cubic Cu cores (ca. 300 nm wide and up to 200 μm long) are smoothly coated by conducting polypyrrole, which in addition to its functionality, offers protection against oxidation of the metal core. PMID:23009710