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Sample records for copper sulfides

  1. Upper critical field of copper molybdenum sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, S. A.; Woollam, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    The upper critical field of sintered and sputtered copper molybdenum sulfide Cu(x)Mo6S8 was measured and found to exceed the Werthamer, Helfand, and Hohenberg (1966) value for a type II superconductor characterized by dirty limit, weak isotropic electron phonon coupling, and no paramagnetic limiting. It is suggested that the enhancement results from anisotropy or clean limit or both. Other ternary molybdenum sulfides appear to show similar anomalies.

  2. Copper-catalyzed asymmetric oxidation of sulfides.

    PubMed

    O'Mahony, Graham E; Ford, Alan; Maguire, Anita R

    2012-04-06

    Copper-catalyzed asymmetric sulfoxidation of aryl benzyl and aryl alkyl sulfides, using aqueous hydrogen peroxide as the oxidant, has been investigated. A relationship between the steric effects of the sulfide substituents and the enantioselectivity of the oxidation has been observed, with up to 93% ee for 2-naphthylmethyl phenyl sulfoxide, in modest yield in this instance (up to 30%). The influence of variation of solvent and ligand structure was examined, and the optimized conditions were then used to oxidize a number of aryl alkyl and aryl benzyl sulfides, producing sulfoxides in excellent yields in most cases (up to 92%), and good enantiopurities in certain cases (up to 84% ee).

  3. Reactively evaporated films of copper molybdenum sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi, K. C.; Dillon, R. O.; Bunshah, R. F.; Alterovitz, S.; Woollam, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    Films of superconducting Chevrel-phase copper molybdenum sulfide CuxMo6S8 were deposited on sapphire substrates by reactive evaporation using H2S as the reacting gas. Two superconducting temperatures (10.0 K and 5.0 K) of the films were found, corresponding to two different phases with different copper concentrations. All films were superconducting above 4.2 K and contained Chevrel-phase compound as well as free molybdenum. The critical current was measured as a function of applied field. One sample was found to deviate from the scaling law found for co-evaporated or sputtered samples, which possibly indicates a different pinning mechanism or inhomogeneity of the sample.

  4. A study of the stability of cadmium sulfide/copper sulfide and cadmium sulfide copper-indium-diselenide solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel, G.; Richard, N.; Gaines, G.

    1984-08-01

    Groups of high efficiency cadmium sulfide/copper sulfide solar cells were exposed to combinations of stresses designed to isolate and accelerate intrinsic degradation mechanisms. Stresses included elevated temperature, illumination intensity, and cell loading conditions. All stress exposures and tests were conducted in a benign (high purity argon) atmosphere. Two primary intrinsic modes of degradation were identified: degradation of the open circuit voltage under continuous illumination and nonzero loading was found to be self recovering upon interruption of illumination or upon shorting or reverse biasing the cells. It was attributed to traps in the depletion region. Recovery from decay of light generated current was not spontaneous but could be partially accomplished by annealing in a reducing (hydrogen) environment. It was attributed to changes in the stoichiometry of the copper sulfide under the influence of electric fields and currents.

  5. Superconducting properties of evaporated copper molybdenum sulfide films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollam, J. A.; Chi, K. C.; Dillon, R. O.; Bunshah, R. F.; Alterovitz, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    Films of copper molybdenum sulfide were produced by coevaporation. Those that were superconducting contained only the ternary compound and free molybdenum. The range of copper content in the ternary compound was as large as that in polycrystalline material, that is, it includes either phase alone, or a mixture of the two phases of this material. This is in contrast with sputtered materials where copper concentration has been limited to a narrower range. The upper critical field and the critical current were measured as functions of external magnetic field, and found to be similar to those of sputtered copper molybdenum sulfide, when the comparison was made for samples having the same amount of copper.

  6. Sulfidation treatment of copper-containing plating sludge towards copper resource recovery.

    PubMed

    Kuchar, D; Fukuta, T; Onyango, M S; Matsuda, H

    2006-11-02

    The present study is concerned with the sulfidation treatment of copper-containing plating sludge towards copper resource recovery by flotation of copper sulfide from treated sludge. The sulfidation treatment was carried out by contacting simulated or real copper plating sludge with Na(2)S solution for a period of 5 min to 24 h. The initial molar ratio of S(2-) to Cu(2+) (S(2-) to Me(2+) in the case of real sludge) was adjusted to 1.00, 1.25 or 1.50, while the solid to liquid ratio was set at 1:50. As a result, it was found that copper compounds were converted to various copper sulfides within the first 5 min. In the case of simulated copper sludge, CuS was identified as the main sulfidation product at the molar ratio of S(2-) to Cu(2+) of 1.00, while Cu(7)S(4) (Roxbyite) was mainly found at the molar ratios of S(2-) to Cu(2+) of 1.50 and 1.25. Based on the measurements of oxidation-reduction potential, the formation of either CuS or Cu(7)S(4) at different S(2-) to Cu(2+) molar ratios was attributed to the changes in the oxidation-reduction potential. By contrast, in the case of sulfidation treatment of real copper sludge, CuS was predominantly formed, irrespective of S(2-) to Me(2+) molar ratio.

  7. Removal of copper from carbon-saturated steel with an aluminum sulfide/iron sulfide slag

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, A.; Blander, M.

    1995-12-01

    Scrap iron and steel has long been considered a resource in the steel-making industry, and its value is largely determined by its impurity content. As the mini-mills, the major consumers of scrap iron and steel, expand into producing flat-rolled sheet, the demand for high-quality scrap will increase. Of the impurities present in scrap, copper is particularly troublesome because of its role in causing hot shortness. Therefore, the copper content of scrap should be kept below {approx} 0.1 wt%. A method for removing copper from steel could be used to improve the quality of scrap and make it more available for use by mini-mills. To determine the effectiveness of a binary slag consisting of aluminum sulfide and iron sulfide on the removal of copper from steel and iron, the distribution coefficient of copper between the slag and a carbon-saturated iron melt was investigated at 1,365 C. The composition of the slag was varied from nearly pure aluminum sulfide to pure iron sulfide. A maximum distribution coefficient of 30 was found, and the copper level in the iron melt was reduced to as low as 0.07 wt.% with a 4:1 ratio of iron to slag.

  8. Structural studies of copper sulfide films: effect of ambient atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Manisha; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Terabe, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Aono, Masakazu

    2008-01-01

    We examined the structural properties of copper sulfide films as a function of the sulfurization time of 70-nm-thick Cu films. Copper sulfide films with various phases such as mixed metallic Cu-chalcocite, chalcocite, roxbyite, and covellite phases were formed with increasing sulfurization time. To evaluate the structural stability of various films, all the films were exposed to the ambient atmosphere for the same amount of time. Although the phase structure and stoichiometry of the films were maintained at a greater depth, the near-surface region of the films was oxidized and covered with overlayers of oxide, hydroxide, and/or sulfate species due to the exposure and reaction with the ambient atmosphere. The oxygen uptake and its reactivity with the copper sulfide film surfaces were enhanced with increasing sulfur content of the films. In addition, the type of divalent state of copper formed on the film surfaces depended on the phase structure, composition, and stoichiometry of the films. PMID:27878008

  9. Interaction of copper and europium in zinc sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Arkhangel'skii, G.E.; Bukke, E.E.; Grigor'ev, N.N.; Lavrov, A.V.; Fok, M.V.

    1988-01-01

    Different ZnS-Eu, Cu crystals with a constant optimal Eu concentration equal to 6 x 10/sup -5/ g-atoms/g-mole and copper concentrations were studied to determine why ZnS-Eu and ZnS-Cu activators interfere with one another when introduced together. The luminescence spectra of the crystals is shown and the results of the interaction of impurities for powdered ZnS-Eu, Cu luminophores were checked. The copper impurity in the luminophore lowered the EPR intensity of europium but the concentration dependence was shifted toward higher copper concentration. The formation of copper-europium complexes was responsible for a drop in the efficiency of photoluminescence of Eu bands and the vanishing of the EPR signal of the EU/sup 2 +/ ion in the zinc sulfide lattice.

  10. Fabrication and applications of copper sulfide (CuS) nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamraiz, Umair; Hussain, Raja Azadar; Badshah, Amin

    2016-06-01

    This review article presents different fabrication procedures (under the headlines of solvothermal routes, aerosol methods, solution methods and thermolysis), and applications (photocatalytic degradation, ablation of cancer cells, electrode material in lithium ion batteries and in gas sensing, organic solar cells, field emission properties, super capacitor applications, photoelectrochemical performance of QDSCs, photocatalytic reduction of organic pollutants, electrochemical bio sensing, enhanced PEC characteristics of pre-annealed CuS film electrodes) of copper sulfide (Covellite).

  11. Chemical Precipitation Synthesis and Thermoelectric Properties of Copper Sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Sixin; Jiang, Jing; Liang, Yinglin; Yang, Ping; Niu, Yi; Chen, Yide; Xia, Junfeng; Wang, Chao

    2017-04-01

    Earth-abundant copper sulfide compounds have been intensively studied as potential thermoelectric materials due to their high dimensionless figure of merit ZT values. They have a unique phonon-liquid electron-crystal model that helps to achieve high thermoelectric performance. Many methods, such as melting and ball-milling, have been adopted to synthesize this copper sulfide compound, but they both use expensive starting materials with high purity. Here, we develop a simple chemical precipitation approach to synthesize copper sulfide materials through low-cost analytically pure compounds as the starting materials. A high ZT value of 0.93 at 800 K was obtained from the samples annealed at 1273 K. Its power factor is around 8.0 μW cm-1 K-2 that is comparable to the highest record reported by traditional methods. But, the synthesis here has been greatly simplified with reduced cost, which will be of great benefit to the potential mass production of thermoelectric devices. Furthermore, this method can be applied to the synthesis of other sulfur compound thermoelectric materials.

  12. The solubility of copper in sulfidic waters: Sulfide and polysulfide complexes in equilibrium with covellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, Damian; Helz, George R.

    1988-07-01

    The solubility of covellite has been measured in 0.5-2.0 M NaCl at 25°C. Solutions containing various concentrations of total sulfide and zerovalent sulfur have been studied over the pH range 6-11. The data are interpreted in terms of the following complexes, for which stability constants are presented: CuS(HS) 22-, CuS(HS) 33-, Cu(S 5) 23-, Cu(S 4)(S 5) 3-, and CuS(S 5) 2-. Three of these five species have not been reported before and are probably of importance in anoxic natural waters. The three complexes with the general formula, CuS( X) n, do not display optical absorption spectra characteristic of Cu(II) even though the oxidation state of copper, by convention, is divalent. When Cu 2+ and S 2- combine to form the CuS moiety in these complexes, internal electron transfer from S to Cu occurs. Because polysulfide complexes are extremely stable, the solubility of copper in sulfidic waters is strongly dependent on the activity of solid sulfur, as0. For natural waters, as0 can be calculated from measurements of pH, total zerovalent and total divalent sulfur. At as0 > 0.1, polysulfide complexes (especially CuS(S 5) 2-) are probably the predominant copper species in most sulfidic marine waters. Calculated total copper concentrations in equilibrium with covellite agree satisfactorily with published measurements for some Delaware salt marsh pore waters. This agreement is achieved by postulating that Cu-Fe-S phases, such as chalcopyrite, fail to nucleate at low temperatures in nature.

  13. Solvothermal synthesis of copper sulfide semiconductor micro/nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jun; Xue, Dongfeng

    2010-03-15

    Covellite copper sulfide (CuS) micro/nanometer crystals in the shape of hierarchical doughnut-shaped, superstructured spheric-shaped and flowerlike architectures congregated from those nanoplates with the thickness of 20-100 nm have been prepared by a solvothermal method. The as-obtained CuS products were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). A systematic investigation has been carried out to understand the factors influencing the evolution of CuS particle morphology which found to be predominant by solvent, surfactant, sulfur resource and copper salt. The possible formation mechanism for the nanostructure formation was also discussed. These CuS products show potential applications in solar cell, photothermal conversion and chemical sensor.

  14. Selective synthesis of ternary copper-antimony sulfide nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dongying; Shen, Shuling; Zhang, Yejun; Gu, Hongwei; Wang, Qiangbin

    2013-11-18

    Ternary copper-antimony sulfide nanocrystals (CAS NCs) have attracted increasing attention in photovoltaics and photoelectric nanodevices due to their tunable band gaps in the near-IR regime. Although much progress in the synthesis of CAS NCs has been achieved, the selective synthesis of CAS NCs with controllable morphologies and compositions is preliminary: in particular, a facile method is still in demand. In this work, we have successfully selectively synthesized high-quality CAS NCs with diverse morphologies, compositions, and band gaps, including rectangular CuSbS2 nanosheets (NSs), trigonal-pyramidal Cu12Sb4S13 NCs, and rhombic Cu3SbS3 NSs, by cothermodecomposition of copper diethyldithiocarbamate trihydrate (Cu(Ddtc)2) and antimony diethyldithiocarbamate trihydrate (Sb(Ddtc)3). The direct and indirect band gaps of the obtained CAS NCs were systematically studied by performing Kubelka-Munk transformations of their solid-state diffuse reflectance spectra.

  15. Effect of Sulfide Concentration on Copper Corrosion in Anoxic Chloride-Containing Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Decheng; Dong, Chaofang; Xu, Aoni; Man, Cheng; He, Chang; Li, Xiaogang

    2017-02-01

    The structure and property of passive film on copper are strongly dependent on the sulfide concentration; based on this, a series of electrochemical methods were applied to investigate the effect of sulfide concentration on copper corrosion in anaerobic chloride-containing solutions. The cyclic voltammetry and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis demonstrated that the corrosion products formed on copper in anaerobic sulfide solutions comprise Cu2S and CuS. And the corrosion resistance of copper decreased with increasing sulfide concentration and faster sulfide addition, owing to the various structures of the passive films observed by the atomic force microscope and scanning electron microscope. A p-type semiconductor character was obtained under all experimental conditions, and the defect concentration, which had a magnitude of 1022-1023 cm-3, increased with increasing sulfide concentration, resulting in a higher rate of both film growth and dissolution.

  16. Matrix Sputtering into Liquid Mercaptan: From Blue-Emitting Copper Nanoclusters to Red-Emitting Copper Sulfide Nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Porta, Matteo; Nguyen, Mai Thanh; Tokunaga, Tomoharu; Ishida, Yohei; Liu, Wei-Ren; Yonezawa, Tetsu

    2016-11-22

    A modified magnetron sputtering technique using pentaerythritol tetrakis(3-mercaptopropionate) (PEMP) as a stabilizing agent and liquid dispersion medium was developed to generate photoluminescent copper nanoclusters. The results reveal that, over time, the as-prepared blue-emitting copper nanoclusters were converted to red-emitting copper sulfide nanoclusters. The formation of copper oxide as an intermediate during the conversion of copper to copper sulfide nanoclusters was demonstrated. Furthermore, based on the mechanism of formation of copper sulfide, the kinetics of the conversion process could be controlled via ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of the as-synthesized dispersion. These findings shed light on the formation and conversion of nanoclusters obtained via sputtering into liquid, demonstrating that the method is highly versatile for producing metal nanoclusters and compounds with tailorable composition and optical properties.

  17. Multi-dimensional modeling of atmospheric copper-sulfidation corrosion on non-planar substrates.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ken Shuang

    2004-11-01

    This report documents the author's efforts in the deterministic modeling of copper-sulfidation corrosion on non-planar substrates such as diodes and electrical connectors. A new framework based on Goma was developed for multi-dimensional modeling of atmospheric copper-sulfidation corrosion on non-planar substrates. In this framework, the moving sulfidation front is explicitly tracked by treating the finite-element mesh as a pseudo solid with an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation and repeatedly performing re-meshing using CUBIT and re-mapping using MAPVAR. Three one-dimensional studies were performed for verifying the framework in asymptotic regimes. Limited model validation was also carried out by comparing computed copper-sulfide thickness with experimental data. The framework was first demonstrated in modeling one-dimensional copper sulfidation with charge separation. It was found that both the thickness of the space-charge layers and the electrical potential at the sulfidation surface decrease rapidly as the Cu{sub 2}S layer thickens initially but eventually reach equilibrium values as Cu{sub 2}S layer becomes sufficiently thick; it was also found that electroneutrality is a reasonable approximation and that the electro-migration flux may be estimated by using the equilibrium potential difference between the sulfidation and annihilation surfaces when the Cu{sub 2}S layer is sufficiently thick. The framework was then employed to model copper sulfidation in the solid-state-diffusion controlled regime (i.e. stage II sulfidation) on a prototypical diode until a continuous Cu{sub 2}S film was formed on the diode surface. The framework was also applied to model copper sulfidation on an intermittent electrical contact between a gold-plated copper pin and gold-plated copper pad; the presence of Cu{sub 2}S was found to raise the effective electrical resistance drastically. Lastly, future research needs in modeling atmospheric copper sulfidation are discussed.

  18. Electrically Conducting Polymer-Copper Sulphide Composite Films, Preparation by Treatment of Polymer-Copper (2) Acetate Composites with Hydrogen Sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, Takakazu; Kamigaki, Takahira; Kubota, Etsuo

    1988-01-01

    Polymer copper sulfide composite films were prepared by treatment of polymer poly(vinyl chloride), poly(acrylonitrile), copolymer of vinyl chloride and vinyl acetate (90:10), and ABS resin copper (2) acetate composites with hydrogen sulfide. The films showed electrical conductivity higher than 0.015 S/cm when they contained more than 20 wt percent of copper sulfide. A poly(acrylonitrile)-copper sulfide composite film containing 40 to 50 wt percent of copper sulfide showed electrical conductivity of 10 to 150.0 S/cm and had relatively high mechanical strength to be used in practical purposes.

  19. Beneficiation of flotation tailing from Polish copper sulfide ores

    SciTech Connect

    Luszczkiewicz, A.; Sztaba, K.S.

    1995-12-31

    Flotation tailing of Polish copper sulfide ores represents more than 90% of the mass of run-of-mine ore. The tailing contains mainly quartz, dolomite, clay minerals, traces of sulfides, and some accessory minerals. Almost all minerals of the tailing are well liberated and, therefore, any further beneficiation process applied to the tailing is expected to be inexpensive. In this work, results of investigations on utilization of flotation tailing using classification and gravity concentration are presented. It is shown that due to classification of flotation tailing in hydrocyclones, the coarse fraction becomes suitable material for gravity separation providing backfill material for underground mines as well as heavy minerals, a source of valuable rare elements. It was also found that heavy minerals separated by gravity methods contain a significant amount of rare elements such as zirconium, titanium, silver, rare earth metals, and uranium. The light fraction of the gravity separation contains well deslimed quartz particles and meets strict requirements for hydraulic filling material used for structural support in underground mines. Evaluation of the cost of the proposed technology indicated that investment to implement the method would provide a return within 2--4 years.

  20. Plasmonic copper sulfide nanocrystals exhibiting near-infrared photothermal and photodynamic therapeutic effects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shunhao; Riedinger, Andreas; Li, Hongbo; Fu, Changhui; Liu, Huiyu; Li, Linlin; Liu, Tianlong; Tan, Longfei; Barthel, Markus J; Pugliese, Giammarino; De Donato, Francesco; Scotto D'Abbusco, Marco; Meng, Xianwei; Manna, Liberato; Meng, Huan; Pellegrino, Teresa

    2015-02-24

    Recently, plasmonic copper sulfide (Cu2-xS) nanocrystals (NCs) have attracted much attention as materials for photothermal therapy (PTT). Previous reports have correlated photoinduced cell death to the photothermal heat mechanism of these NCs, and no evidence of their photodynamic properties has been reported yet. Herein we have prepared physiologically stable near-infrared (NIR) plasmonic copper sulfide NCs and analyzed their photothermal and photodynamic properties, including therapeutic potential in cultured melanoma cells and a murine melanoma model. Interestingly, we observe that, besides a high PTT efficacy, these copper sulfide NCs additionally possess intrinsic NIR induced photodynamic activity, whereupon they generate high levels of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, in vitro and in vivo acute toxic responses of copper sulfide NCs were also elicited. This study highlights a mechanism of NIR light induced cancer therapy, which could pave the way toward more effective nanotherapeutics.

  1. VAPOR PHASE MERCURY SORPTION BY ORGANIC SULFIDE MODIFIED BIMETALLIC IRON-COPPER NANOPARTICLE AGGREGATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Novel organic sulfide modified bimetallic iron-copper nanoparticle aggregate sorbent materials have been synthesized for removing elemental mercury from vapor streams at elevated temperatures (120-140 °C). Silane based (disulfide silane and tetrasulfide silane) and alkyl sulfide ...

  2. Aqueous synthesis of PEGylated copper sulfide nanoparticles for photoacoustic imaging of tumors.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ke; Zeng, Jianfeng; Jing, Lihong; Qiao, Ruirui; Liu, Chunyan; Jiao, Mingxia; Li, Zhen; Gao, Mingyuan

    2015-07-07

    By integrating high imaging sensitivity and high resolution in a single modality, photoacoustic (PA) imaging emerges as a promising diagnostic tool for clinical applications. Benefiting from the absorption in the near-infrared region (NIR), copper sulfide nanoparticles (NPs) as a contrast agent are potentially useful for increasing the sensitivity of PA imaging. However, the aqueous synthesis of size-tunable, biocompatible and colloidally stable copper sulfide NPs remains challenging due to the intrinsic dipole-dipole interactions among particles. In this work, aqueous synthesis of PEGylated copper sulfide NPs with controllable size between 3 and 7 nm was developed. The particle size-dependent contrast enhancement effect of the copper sulfide NPs for PA imaging was carefully studied both in vitro and in vivo. Although the contrast enhancement effect of the copper sulfide NPs is proportional to particle size, the in vivo studies revealed that copper sulfide NPs smaller than 5 nm presented higher tumor imaging performance, especially at the tumor boundary site, which was further discussed in combination with the pharmacokinetic behaviors of differently sized particles.

  3. The joint inhibitory effects of phenol, copper (II), oxytetracycline (OTC) and sulfide on Anammox activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang-Feng; Jin, Ren-Cun

    2012-12-01

    A batch test was employed to analyze the joint toxicity of copper (II) and oxytetracycline (OTC), OTC and sulfide, phenol and sulfide (S(2-)), phenol and copper (II), and OTC, copper (II) and substrate on an Anammox mixed culture. The joint toxicity of OTC and copper (II) on the Anammox mixed culture was antagonistic, whereas the interaction between OTC and S(2-) and between phenol and S(2-) was generally synergistic. The joint toxicity of phenol and copper (II) was dependent on the level of phenol: the joint toxicity was antagonistic at a high phenol level of 300 mg L(-1), whereas the joint toxicity was synergistic at a low phenol level of 75 mg L(-1). The joint toxic effect of OTC, copper (II) and NO(2)(-)-N on the Anammox activity can be ranked in the following order: NO(2)(-)-N>copper (II)>OTC.

  4. VAPOR PHASE MERCURY SORPTION BY ORGANIC-SULFIDE COATED BIMETALLIC IRON-COPPER NANOPARTICLE AGGREGATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tetra sulfide silane coated iron-copper nano-particle aggregates are found to be potentially very high capacity sorbents for vapor phase mercury capture. High equilibrium capacities were obtained for the silane coated iron copper nano-aggregate sorbent at 70 oC and 120 oC. Even a...

  5. Phage-directed synthesis of copper sulfide: structural and optical characterization.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Mohammed Shahriar; Moon, Chung Hee; Bozhilov, Krassimir N; Haberer, Elaine D

    2013-08-16

    The growth of crystalline copper sulfide using a viral template was investigated using sequential incubation in CuCl2 and Na2S precursors. Non-specific electrostatic attraction between a genetically-modified M13 bacteriophage and copper cations in the CuCl2 precursor caused phage agglomeration and bundle formation. Following the addition of Na2S, polydisperse nanocrystals 2-7 nm in size were found along the length of the viral scaffold. The structure of the copper sulfide material was identified as cubic anti-fluorite type Cu1.8S, space group Fm3[overline]m. Strong interband absorption was observed within the ultraviolet to visible range with an onset near 800 nm. Furthermore, free carrier absorption, associated with the localized surface plasmon resonance of the copper sulfide nanocrystals, was seen in the near infrared with absorbance maxima at 1060 nm and 3000 nm, respectively.

  6. From Ultrafine Thiolate-Capped Copper Nanoclusters toward Copper Sulfide Nanodiscs: A Thermally Activated Evolution Route

    SciTech Connect

    Mott, Derrick; Yin, Jun; Engelhard, Mark H.; Loukrakpam, Rameshwori; Chang, Paul; Miller, George; Bae, In-Tae; Das, N. C.; Wang, Chong M.; Luo, Jin; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2010-01-12

    In this report we show that the size, shape, and composition of pre-synthesized metal nanoparticles can be engineered through exploiting concurrent interparticle coalescence and interfacial copper-thiolate cleavage under a thermally-activated evolution process. This concept is demonstrated by thermally-activated processing of ultrafine (~0.5 nm) copper nanoparticles encapsulated with thiolate monolayer (Cun(SR)m) toward copper sulfide nanodiscs with controllable sizes and shapes. It involved a thermally-activated coalescence of Cun(SR)m nanoclusters accompanied by interfacial Cu-S cleavage towards the formation of Cu2S nanocrystals with well-defined nanodisc shapes with an average diameter and thickness ranging from 10.7 ±1.4 nm and 5.5 ±0.5 nm (aspect ratio ~2) to 31.2 ±4.3 nm and 3.9 ±0.4 nm (aspect ratio ~7) depending on the thermal processing parameters. These nanodiscs are stable and display remarkable ordering upon self-assembly. The abilities to create the ultrafine copper nanoclusters and to enable them to undergo a thermally-activated coalescence and a concurrent Cu-S bond cleavage toward the formation of Cu2S nanodiscs is entirely new. The viability of fine tuning the size and shape of the Cu2S nanocrystals by controlling the relative binding strength of thiolates, the C-S cleavage reactivity, and the interparticle coalescence activity, and their potential applications in electronic, sensing and photochemical devices are also discussed.

  7. Bioleaching of a low-grade nickel-copper sulfide by mixture of four thermophiles.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuzhen; Zhong, Hui; Hu, Yuehua; Zhao, Jiancun; He, Zhiguo; Gu, Guohua

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated thermophilic bioleaching of a low grade nickel-copper sulfide using mixture of four acidophilic thermophiles. Effects of 0.2g/L l-cysteine on the bioleaching process were further evaluated. It aimed at offering new alternatives for enhancing metal recoveries from nickel-copper sulfide. Results showed a recovery of 80.4% nickel and 68.2% copper in 16-day bioleaching without l-cysteine; while 83.7% nickel and 81.4% copper were recovered in the presence of l-cysteine. Moreover, nickel recovery was always higher than copper recovery. l-Cysteine was found contributing to lower pH value, faster microbial growth, higher Oxidation-Reduction Potential (ORP), higher zeta potential and absorbing on the sulfide surfaces through amino, carboxyl and sulfhydryl groups. X-ray Diffraction (XRD) patterns of leached residues showed generation of S, jarosite and ammoniojarosite. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) results revealed that l-cysteine could have variant impacts on different microorganisms and changed the microbial community composition dramatically during nickel-copper sulfide bioleaching.

  8. Sulfide oxidation as a process for the formation of copper-rich magmatic sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlgemuth-Ueberwasser, Cora C.; Fonseca, Raúl O. C.; Ballhaus, Chris; Berndt, Jasper

    2013-01-01

    Typical magmatic sulfides are dominated by pyrrhotite and pentlandite with minor chalcopyrite, and the bulk atomic Cu/Fe ratio of these sulfides is typically less than unity. However, there are rare magmatic sulfide occurrences that are dominated by Cu-rich sulfides (e.g., bornite, digenite, and chalcopyrite, sometimes coexisting with metallic Cu) with atomic Cu/Fe as high as 5. Typically, these types of sulfide assemblages occur in the upper parts of moderately to highly fractionated layered mafic-ultramafic intrusions, a well-known example being the Pd/Au reef in the Upper Middle Zone of the Skaergaard intrusion. Processes proposed to explain why these sulfides are so unusually rich in Cu include fractional crystallization of Fe/(Ni) monosulfide and infiltration of postmagmatic Cu-rich fluids. In this contribution, we explore and experimentally evaluate a third possibility: that Cu-rich magmatic sulfides may be the result of magmatic oxidation. FeS-dominated Ni/Cu-bearing sulfides were equilibrated at variable oxygen fugacities in both open and closed system. Our results show that the Cu/Fe ratio of the sulfide melt increases as a function of oxygen fugacity due to the preferential conversion of FeS into FeO and FeO1.5, and the resistance of Cu2S to being converted into an oxide component even at oxygen fugacities characteristic of the sulfide/sulfate transition (above FMQ + 1). This phenomenon will lead to an increase in the metal/S ratio of a sulfide liquid and will also depress its liquidus temperature. As such, any modeling of the sulfide liquid line of descent in magmatic sulfide complexes needs to address this issue.

  9. Synthesis of vinyl sulfides by copper-catalyzed decarboxylative C-S cross-coupling.

    PubMed

    Ranjit, Sadananda; Duan, Zhongyu; Zhang, Pengfei; Liu, Xiaogang

    2010-09-17

    A novel method for the synthesis of vinyl sulfides by the decarboxylative cross-coupling of arylpropiolic acids with thiols using copper(I) salts as catalysts has been developed. In the presence of CuI and Cs(2)CO(3), a variety of thiols reacted with arylpropiolic acids to afford the corresponding vinyl sulfides in good to excellent yields with high stereoselectivity for Z-isomers.

  10. Sonochemical preparation of copper sulfides with different phases in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kristl, Matjaž; Hojnik, Nuša; Gyergyek, Sašo; Drofenik, Miha

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Sonochemical preparation of copper sulfides in aqueous solutions is reported. ► CuS and Cu{sub 2}S nanoparticles with crystallite sizes between 7 and 18 nm were obtained. ► Crystallite size can be changed using different complexing agents. ► Thermal behavior was studied by TG and XRD measurements. - Abstract: There is a growing interest in the synthesis of nanostructured copper sulfides due to their ability to form compounds with various stoichiometries. We report a sonochemical route for the preparation of copper sulfides with different compositions in aqueous solutions, using different, general and convenient copper sources such as copper acetate, copper hydroxide or basic copper carbonate and thiourea or thioacetamide as sulfur precursors under ambient air. Phase analysis, purity and morphology of the products were studied by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results revealed that nanoparticles of covellite, CuS, with crystallite sizes between 7 and 18 nm can be obtained by using different precursors and complexing agents and that chalcocite, Cu{sub 2}S, can also be prepared sonochemically.

  11. Analytical modeling of localized surface plasmon resonance in heterostructure copper sulfide nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, Andrew H.; Ha, Don-Hyung; Robinson, Richard D.; Ding, Xiaoyue

    2014-10-28

    Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in semiconductor nanocrystals is a relatively new field of investigation that promises greater tunability of plasmonic properties compared to metal nanoparticles. A novel process by which the LSPR in semiconductor nanocrystals can be altered is through heterostructure formation arising from solution-based cation exchange. Herein, we describe the development of an analytical model of LSPR in heterostructure copper sulfide-zinc sulfide nanocrystals synthesized via a cation exchange reaction between copper sulfide (Cu{sub 1.81}S) nanocrystals and Zn ions. The cation exchange reaction produces dual-interface, heterostructure nanocrystals in which the geometry of the copper sulfide phase can be tuned from a sphere to a thin disk separating symmetrically-grown sulfide (ZnS) grains. Drude model electronic conduction and Mie-Gans theory are applied to describe how the LSPR wavelength changes during cation exchange, taking into account the morphology evolution and changes to the local permittivity. The results of the modeling indicate that the presence of the ZnS grains has a significant effect on the out-of-plane LSPR mode. By comparing the results of the model to previous studies on solid-solid phase transformations of copper sulfide in these nanocrystals during cation exchange, we show that the carrier concentration is independent of the copper vacancy concentration dictated by its atomic phase. The evolution of the effective carrier concentration calculated from the model suggests that the out-of-plane resonance mode is dominant. The classical model was compared to a simplified quantum mechanical model which suggested that quantum mechanical effects become significant when the characteristic size is less than ∼8 nm. Overall, we find that the analytical models are not accurate for these heterostructured semiconductor nanocrystals, indicating the need for new model development for this emerging field.

  12. Identification of SLF1 as a new copper homeostasis gene involved in copper sulfide mineralization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, W; Farrell, R A; Stillman, D J; Winge, D R

    1996-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, at least 12 genes are important for cells to propagate in medium containing elevated concentrations of copper salts (J. Welch, S. Fogel, C. Buchman, and M. Karin, EMBO J. 8:255-260, 1989). Complementation studies were carried out on a copper-sensitive mutation (cup14) from this group. A new yeast gene, designated SLF1, was identified as a multicopy suppressor of the cup14 mutation. Slf1 is important for the physiological process of copper sulfide (CuS) mineralization on the surface of cells cultured in medium containing copper salts. CuS mineralization causes the cells to turn brown. Disruption of SLF1, which is located close to the telomere region of chromosome IV, leads to limited copper sensitivity, and the resulting cells lack the normal brownish coloration when grown in CuSO4-containing medium. Overproduction of Slf1 in wild-type cells confers superresistance to CuSO4 and enhances the coloration of cells cultured in the presence of CuSO4. Upon addition of KCN to Cu-grown cells, the brownish coloration was bleached instantly, and copper ions were solubilized. These data are consistent with Slf1-dependent accumulation of CuS complexes on the cell surface. Disruption of SFL1 also results in loss of the ability of yeast cells to deplete Cu but not Cd ions from the growth medium, whereas overexpression enhances Ca depletion ability and the resulting deposition of CuS particles. It is proposed that Slfl participates in a copper homeostasis pathway, distinct from the Cup1 detoxification system, that leads to sulfide generation and CuS biomineralization on the cell surface. This process may coordinate with the Cup1 pathway at different copper concentrations to prevent copper-induced toxicity. PMID:8628314

  13. Solid-solid phase transformations induced through cation exchange and strain in 2D heterostructured copper sulfide nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Ha, Don-Hyung; Caldwell, Andrew H; Ward, Matthew J; Honrao, Shreyas; Mathew, Kiran; Hovden, Robert; Koker, Margaret K A; Muller, David A; Hennig, Richard G; Robinson, Richard D

    2014-12-10

    We demonstrate dual interface formation in nanocrystals (NCs) through cation exchange, creating epitaxial heterostructures within spherical NCs. The thickness of the inner-disk layer can be tuned to form two-dimensional (2D), single atomic layers (<1 nm). During the cation exchange reaction from copper sulfide to zinc sulfide (ZnS), we observe a solid-solid phase transformation of the copper sulfide phase in heterostructured NCs. As the cation exchange reaction is initiated, Cu ions replaced by Zn ions at the interfaces are accommodated in intrinsic Cu vacancy sites present in the initial roxbyite (Cu1.81S) phase of copper sulfide, inducing a full phase transition to djurleite (Cu1.94S)/low chalcocite (Cu2S), a more thermodynamically stable phase than roxbyite. As the reaction proceeds and reduces the size of the copper sulfide layer, the epitaxial strain at the interfaces between copper sulfide and ZnS increases and is maximized for a copper sulfide disk ∼ 5 nm thick. To minimize this strain energy, a second phase transformation occurs back to the roxbyite phase, which shares a similar sulfur sublattice to wurtzite ZnS. The observation of a solid-solid phase transformation in our unique heterostructured NCs provides a new pathway to control desired phases and an insight into the influence of cation exchange on nanoscale phase transitions in heterostructured materials.

  14. Copper Zinc Thiolate Complexes as Potential Molecular Precursors for Copper Zinc Tin Sulfide (CZTS).

    PubMed

    Fuhrmann, Daniel; Dietrich, Stefan; Krautscheid, Harald

    2017-03-08

    Five copper zinc thiolate complexes [(iPr3 PCu)2 (ZnEt2 )(edt)]2 (1-Et), [(iPr3 PCu)2 (Zn(iPr)2 )(edt)]2 (1-iPr), [(iPr3 PCu)4 (edt)2 (ZnMe2 )]2 (2), [(iPr3 PCu)3 (ZnPh2 )(ZnPh)(edt)2 ]2 (3), and [(iPr3 PCu)2 Zn2 (edt)3 ]6 (4) were prepared by the reaction of [(iPr3 PCu)2 (edt)]2 with ZnR2 (R=Me, Et, Ph, iPr) with or without addition of ethanedithiol (edt(2-) =ethane-1,2-dithiolate). The molecular structures of these complexes were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The ethanedithiolate ligands coordinate in μ3 -η(1) :η(2) :η(1) (2, 4), μ4 -η(1) :η(1) :η(2) :η(1) (1-R, 3), and μ5 -η(1) :η(1) :η(2) :η(1) :η(1) (2) bridging modes, each sulfur atom binds to two or three metal atoms. Evidence for the presence of the weak Zn-S bonds in solution was provided by NMR spectroscopy. Mixtures of 1-Et, 1-iPr, or 3 with Sn(edt)2 were examined by thermogravimetry up to 600 °C, whereupon volatile thermolysis products were identified by mass spectrometry. In all thermolysis experiments, the formation of Cu2 ZnSnS4 as main product, besides small amounts of binary metal sulfides, was confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction (PXRD) and EDX (energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy) analysis.

  15. Porous copper zinc tin sulfide thin film as photocathode for double junction photoelectrochemical solar cells.

    PubMed

    Dai, Pengcheng; Zhang, Guan; Chen, Yuncheng; Jiang, Hechun; Feng, Zhenyu; Lin, Zhaojun; Zhan, Jinhua

    2012-03-21

    Porous copper zinc tin sulfide (CZTS) thin film was prepared via a solvothermal approach. Compared with conventional dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), double junction photoelectrochemical cells using dye-sensitized n-type TiO(2) (DS-TiO(2)) as the photoanode and porous p-type CZTS film as the photocathode shows an increased short circuit current, external quantum efficiency and power conversion efficiency.

  16. Copper isotopic signature of the Tiegelongnan high-sulfidation copper deposit, Tibet: implications for its origin and mineral exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Jilin; Tang, Juxing; Li, Yubin; Liu, Sheng-Ao; Wang, Qin; Yang, Chao; Wang, Yiyun

    2016-06-01

    We report the copper isotopic composition of Cu sulfides in the Tiegelongnan high-sulfidation (HS) copper deposit, Tibet, and investigate the possible application of Cu isotopes to mineral exploration. The copper isotopic values of samples from four drill holes display consistent progressive increase with depth to 400 m below surface, with an overall variation of δ65Cu of up to 7.60‰ (-4.76 to 2.84‰). Such a large range is very different from that observed in Cu porphyry deposits which commonly exhibit a small δ65Cu range (<1‰), with decreasing values with depth. The large δ65Cu variation is likely of supergene origin and reflects strong leaching under oxidized conditions. The systematic increase of δ65Cu with depth can be explained by the release of isotopically heavy Cu at the top and its transport downward, which is supported by the coupling of positive δ65Cu values with high Cu grade and the occurrence of both negative and positive δ65Cu values in two drill holes. Mass-balance consideration on the basis of Cu isotopes can indicate mineralized zones which have been eroded or have not been found yet. Such mineralized targets, if buried at depth, could be located using Cu isotopes.

  17. Role of biogenic sulfide in attenuating zinc oxide and copper nanoparticle toxicity to acetoclastic methanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Estrella, Jorge; Puyol, Daniel; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2015-01-01

    Soluble ions released by zinc oxide (ZnO) and copper (Cu(0)) nanoparticles (NPs) have been associated with toxicity to methanogens. This study evaluated the role of biogenic sulfide in attenuating ZnO and Cu(0) NP toxicity to methanogens. Short- and long-term batch experiments were conducted to explore ZnO and Cu(0) NPs toxicity to acetoclastic methanogens in sulfate-containing (0.4mM) and sulfate-free conditions. ZnO and Cu(0) were respectively 14 and 7-fold less toxic in sulfate-containing than in sulfate-free assays as indicated by inhibitory constants (Ki). The Ki with respect to residual soluble metal indicated that soluble metal was well correlated with toxicity irrespective of the metal ion source or presence of biogenic sulfide. Long-term assays indicated that ZnO and Cu(0) NPs caused different effects on methanogens. ZnO NPs without protection of sulfide caused a chronic effect, whereas Cu(0) NPs caused an acute effect and recovered. This study confirms that biogenic sulfide effectively attenuates ZnO and Cu(0) NPs toxicity to methanogens by the formation of metal sulfides.

  18. Cadmium sulfide/copper ternary heterojunction cell research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devaney, W. E.; Mickelsen, R. A.; Chen, W. S.; Stanbery, B. J.; Stewart, J. M.; Lytle, F. W.; Burnett, A. F.

    1987-11-01

    This is the final technical progress report on a thirty-two month research program on CuInSe2 and CuInGaSe2 based thin-film polycrystalline heterojunction solar cells. CuInGaSe2 films incorporating Ga fractions (x in CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)Se2) from 0.04 to 1.0 have been prepared and characterized. CuInGaSe2/CdZnS heterojunction devices have been fabricated for a range of Ga contents and show the expected variations in Voc and spectral response with Ga content. An efficiency of 10.2 percent (SERI test, ASTM87) has been measured for a cell with Ga fraction of 0.23, the highest efficiency reported for this material. A CuInSe2/CdZnS monolithically interconnected four cell series string of 91 sq cm area has been fabricated with a total area efficiency of 9.5 percent (SERI test, ASTM87). Results are presented on Ion-Assisted Deposition of the selenide and sulfide, on a new design for the Se evaporation source, on ITO reactive sputter deposition, and on CdZnS films prepared from an E-Gun Evaporation source. Spectral response and I-V characteristic variations with selenide composition before and after heat-treatment are discussed for the CuInSe2/CdZnS devices. The highest AM1 total area efficiency for the CuInSe2/CdZnS cell is now 11.9 percent (Boeing test, AM1 spectrum) with five cells measured over the previously reported high of 10.9 percent. Room Temperature Photoluminescence, Voltage Contrast Imaging of junction cross sections, Raman spectroscopy, and EXAFS measurements on the CuInSe2/CdZnS devices are also presented and discussed.

  19. Fabrication of a Functionally Graded Copper-Zinc Sulfide Phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jehong; Park, Kwangwon; Kim, Jongsu; Jeong, Yongseok; Kawasaki, Akira; Kwon, Hansang

    2016-03-01

    Functionally graded materials (FGMs) are compositionally gradient materials. They can achieve the controlled distribution of the desired characteristics within the same bulk material. We describe a functionally graded (FG) metal-phosphor adapting the concept of the FGM; copper (Cu) is selected as a metal and Cu- and Cl-doped ZnS (ZnS:Cu,Cl) is selected as a phosphor and FG [Cu]-[ZnS:Cu,Cl] is fabricated by a very simple powder process. The FG [Cu]-[ZnS:Cu,Cl] reveals a dual-structured functional material composed of dense Cu and porous ZnS:Cu,Cl, which is completely combined through six graded mediating layers. The photoluminescence (PL) of FG [Cu]-[ZnS:Cu,Cl] is insensitive to temperature change. FG [Cu]-[ZnS:Cu,Cl] also exhibits diode characteristics and photo reactivity for 365 nm -UV light. Our FG metal-phosphor concept can pave the way to simplified manufacturing of low-cost and can be applied to various electronic devices.

  20. Fabrication of a Functionally Graded Copper-Zinc Sulfide Phosphor

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jehong; Park, Kwangwon; Kim, Jongsu; Jeong, Yongseok; Kawasaki, Akira; Kwon, Hansang

    2016-01-01

    Functionally graded materials (FGMs) are compositionally gradient materials. They can achieve the controlled distribution of the desired characteristics within the same bulk material. We describe a functionally graded (FG) metal-phosphor adapting the concept of the FGM; copper (Cu) is selected as a metal and Cu- and Cl-doped ZnS (ZnS:Cu,Cl) is selected as a phosphor and FG [Cu]-[ZnS:Cu,Cl] is fabricated by a very simple powder process. The FG [Cu]-[ZnS:Cu,Cl] reveals a dual-structured functional material composed of dense Cu and porous ZnS:Cu,Cl, which is completely combined through six graded mediating layers. The photoluminescence (PL) of FG [Cu]-[ZnS:Cu,Cl] is insensitive to temperature change. FG [Cu]-[ZnS:Cu,Cl] also exhibits diode characteristics and photo reactivity for 365 nm -UV light. Our FG metal-phosphor concept can pave the way to simplified manufacturing of low-cost and can be applied to various electronic devices. PMID:26972313

  1. Microbial Ecology Assessment of Mixed Copper Oxide/Sulfide Dump Leach Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhn, D F; Thompson, D N; Noah, K S

    1999-06-01

    Microbial consortia composed of complex mixtures of autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria are responsible for the dissolution of metals from sulfide minerals. Thus, an efficient copper bioleaching operation depends on the microbial ecology of the system. A microbial ecology study of a mixed oxide/sulfide copper leaching operation was conducted using an "overlay" plating technique to differentiate and identify various bacterial consortium members of the genera Thiobacillus, Leptospirillum, Ferromicrobium, and Acidiphilium. Two temperatures (30C and 45C) were used to select for mesophilic and moderately thermophilic bacteria. Cell numbers varied from 0-106 cells/g dry ore, depending on the sample location and depth. After acid curing for oxide leaching, no viable bacteria were recovered, although inoculation of cells from raffinate re-established a microbial population after three months. Due to the low pH of the operation, very few non-iron-oxidizing acidophilic heterotrophs were recovered. Moderate thermophiles were isolated from the ore samples. Pregnant liquor solutions (PLS) and raffinate both contained a diversity of bacteria. In addition, an intermittently applied waste stream that contained high levels of arsenic and fluoride was tested for toxicity. Twenty vol% waste stream in PLS killed 100% of the cells in 48 hours, indicating substantial toxicity and/or growth inhibition. The data indicate that bacteria populations can recover after acid curing, and that application of the waste stream to the dump should be avoided. Monitoring the microbial ecology of the leaching operation provided significant information that improved copper recovery.

  2. Thin films of copper antimony sulfide: A photovoltaic absorber material

    SciTech Connect

    Ornelas-Acosta, R.E.; Shaji, S.; Avellaneda, D.; Castillo, G.A.; Das Roy, T.K.; Krishnan, B.

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • CuSbS{sub 2} thin films were prepared by heating Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}/Cu layers. • Analyzed the structure, composition, optical, and electrical properties. • PV structures: glass/SnO{sub 2}:F/n-CdS/p-CuSbS{sub 2}/C/Ag were formed at different conditions. • The PV parameters (J{sub sc}, V{sub oc}, and FF) were evaluated from the J–V characteristics. • J{sub sc}: 0.52–3.20 mA/cm{sup 2}, V{sub oc}:187–323 mV, FF: 0.27–0.48 were obtained. - Abstract: In this work, we report preparation and characterization of CuSbS{sub 2} thin films by heating glass/Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}/Cu layers and their use as absorber material in photovoltaic structures: glass/SnO{sub 2}:F/n-CdS/p-CuSbS{sub 2}/C/Ag. The Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin films of 600 nm were prepared by chemical bath deposition on which copper thin films of 50 nm were thermally evaporated, and the glass/Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}/Cu multilayers were heated in vacuum at different temperatures. X-ray diffraction analysis showed the formation of orthorhombic CuSbS{sub 2} after heating the precursor layers. Studies on identification and chemical state of the elements were done using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The optical band gap of the CuSbS{sub 2} thin films was 1.55 eV and the thin films were photoconductive. The photovoltaic parameters of the devices using CuSbS{sub 2} as absorber and CdS as window layer were evaluated from the J–V curves, yielding J{sub sc}, V{sub oc}, and FF values in the range of 0.52–3.20 mA/cm{sup 2}, 187–323 mV, and 0.27–0.48, respectively, under illumination of AM1.5 radiation.

  3. Structure in multilayer films of zinc sulfide and copper sulfide via atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Short, Andrew; Jewell, Leila; Bielecki, Anthony; Keiber, Trevor; Bridges, Frank; Carter, Sue; Alers, Glenn

    2014-01-15

    Multilayer film stacks of ZnS and Cu{sub x}S (x ∼ 2) were made via atomic layer deposition. The precursors were bis(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionato)zinc, bis(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionato)copper, and H{sub 2}S generated in situ for sulfur. Samples were deposited at 200 °C, in layers ranging from approximately 2 to 20 nm thick, based on binary growth rates. The properties of the film stacks were studied with atomic force microscopy, ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy, and extended x-ray absorption fine structure. The results demonstrate that the structure of films with the thinnest layers is dominated by Cu{sub x}S, whereas in the thicker films, the structure is determined by whichever material is first deposited. This can be attributed to the crystal structure mismatch of ZnS and Cu{sub x}S.

  4. Enhancement in sensitivity of copper sulfide thin film ammonia gas sensor: Effect of swift heavy ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sagade, Abhay Abhimanyu; Sharma, Ramphal; Sulaniya, Indra

    2009-02-15

    The studies are carried out on the effect of swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation on surface morphology and electrical properties of copper sulfide (Cu{sub x}S) thin films with three different chemical compositions (x values). The irradiation experiments have been carried out on Cu{sub x}S films with x=1.4, 1.8, and 2 by 100 MeV gold heavy ions at room temperature. These as-deposited and irradiated thin films have been used to detect ammonia gas at room temperature (300 K). The SHI irradiation treatment on x=1.4 and 1.8 copper sulfide films enhances the sensitivity of the gas sensor. The results are discussed considering high electronic energy deposition by 100 MeV gold heavy ions in a matrix of copper sulfide.

  5. Development of copper sulfide/cadmium sulfide thin-film solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Szedon, J. R.; Biter, W. J.; Dickey, H. C.

    1982-03-08

    The most important accomplishments during this period were to demonstrate and to elucidate further the complex effects that occur during the aging of Cu/sub 2/S/CdS thin-film solar cells in flowing wet oxygen. There are two distinct effects. At constant illumination, the short-circuit current of cells aged at room temperature consistently decreases with time. The second effect, related to diode opposing current, is more involved and may result from several competing mechanisms. Over the short term (approx. 4 to 5 hours), the magnitude of diode opposing current decreases. After approx. 20 hours of aging, opposing current generally returns to the level achieved after hydrogen annealing which immediately preceded the aging sequence. Optical measurements of the spectral transmission of the Cu/sub 2/S layers in a cell content have been made using a silicon detector epoxied to the back of a CdS cell after the copper foil substrate was removed. There is no significant change in Cu/sub 2/S transmission behavior for wavelengths ranging from 525 to 1000 nm during wet-oxygen aging for periods of 2 to 36 hours. This suggests that the decrease in J/sub SC/ at constant illumination, for the aging experiments in a flowing wet-oxygen ambient, arises because of changes in minority-carrier transport properties of the Cu/sub 2/S. Before developing a method for using an epoxied silicon detector to measure optical behavior of the Cu/sub 2/S layer, we explored the possibility of using a junction-containing wafer of silicon as a substrate for deposited CdS films. Some monolithic structures were successfully fabricated. Comparisons were made of CdS grain structure details in the junction detector area and in an adjacent metallized area.

  6. Development of copper sulfide/cadmium sulfide thin-film solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Szedon, J.R.; Biter, W.J.; Abel, J.A.; Dickey, H.C.; Shirland, F.A.

    1981-02-27

    The purpose of this work has been to identify aspects of cell fabrication and treatment which are critical for achieving high efficiency Cu/sub 2/S/CdS solar cells. In approaching the problem several comparisons were made of the effects of specific steps in two methods of cell fabrication. These methods had previously given cells of about 6% and a maximum of 9% efficiency. Three areas requiring special attention and specific means to achieve acceptable results were identified. (1) The Cu/sub 2/S/CdS heterojunction area must be minimized. If single source evaporations of CdS are made on substrates whose temperatures (approx. 220/sup 0/C) are monitored and controlled using welded thermocouples, the CdS films will have adequately large grains (grain diameter greater than or equal to 2 ..mu..m) and will not develop significant etch pits during texturing in a mild etchant solution. (2) The termination of the wet barrier processing steps must be done carefully. An acceptable termination involves minimizing the amount of cuprous chloride retained on the cell surface during transfer to a rinsing stage while providing adequate exclusion of air from the space above the surface of the cuprous chloride solution. (3) Once formed, the Cu/sub 2/S layer should not be exposed to high temperatures (>100/sup 0/C) for long periods of time (> 5 min) if surface adsorbed moisture or oxygen are present. Heat treatments in ampoules under flowing hydrogen atmospheres should be preceded and followed by periods of at least 30 minutes at room temperature in the reducing ambient. If all these precautions are taken, wet chemical barrier processing of thermally evaporated CdS films on zinc-plated copper foil substrates yields cells of nearly 8% conversion efficiency without AR coating.

  7. Copper sulfides for rechargeable lithium batteries: Linking cycling stability to electrolyte composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jache, Birte; Mogwitz, Boris; Klein, Franziska; Adelhelm, Philipp

    2014-02-01

    Copper sulfides are attractive electrode materials as their reaction with lithium offers high capacity and energy density. However, the reversibility is poor and (nano)structuring is considered necessary to achieve moderate improvements. In contrast, we show in this study that the electrolyte is a major factor that governs the reversibility of the cell reaction. All our experiments were done with commercially available copper sulfides (CuS and Cu2S) without any special nanostructure. Different electrolyte compositions were tested among LiPF6 in EC/DMC and LiTFSI in DOL/DME. While rapid capacity fading is found in cells containing carbonate-based electrolytes, cells with ether-based electrolytes show a much better electrochemical performance. For a mixture of 1 M LiTFSI in DOL/DME, Cu2S can be cycled with capacities of around 200 mAh g-1 for more than 150 cycles with coulombic efficiencies >98.4%, for example. The improved stability in the ether-based electrolyte further allowed us to study how the discharge and charge voltage change during prolonged cycling. Our study underlines that improvements in the Li/CuS and Li/Cu2S system are still possible by very simple measures, but further studies on the complex Li-Cu-S phase behavior are necessary to understand the discharging and especially the charging mechanisms.

  8. Synthesis, Deposition, and Microstructure Development of Thin Films Formed by Sulfidation and Selenization of Copper Zinc Tin Sulfide Nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernomordik, Boris David

    Significant reduction in greenhouse gas emission and pollution associated with the global power demand can be accomplished by supplying tens-of-terawatts of power with solar cell technologies. No one solar cell material currently on the market is poised to meet this challenge due to issues such as manufacturing cost, material shortage, or material toxicity. For this reason, there is increasing interest in efficient light-absorbing materials that are comprised of abundant and non-toxic elements for thin film solar cell. Among these materials are copper zinc tin sulfide (Cu2ZnSnS4, or CZTS), copper zinc tin selenide (Cu2ZnSnSe4, or CZTSe), and copper zinc tin sulfoselenide alloys [Cu2ZnSn(SxSe1-x )4, or CZTSSe]. Laboratory power conversion efficiencies of CZTSSe-based solar cells have risen to almost 13% in less than three decades of research. Meeting the terawatt challenge will also require low cost fabrication. CZTSSe thin films from annealed colloidal nanocrystal coatings is an example of solution-based methods that can reduce manufacturing costs through advantages such as high throughput, high material utilization, and low capital expenses. The film microstructure and grain size affects the solar cell performance. To realize low cost commercial production and high efficiencies of CZTSSe-based solar cells, it is necessary to understand the fundamental factors that affect crystal growth and microstructure evolution during CZTSSe annealing. Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) nanocrystals were synthesized via thermolysis of single-source cation and sulfur precursors copper, zinc and tin diethyldithiocarbamates. The average nanocrystal size could be tuned between 2 nm and 40 nm, by varying the synthesis temperature between 150 °C and 340 °C. The synthesis is rapid and is completed in less than 10 minutes. Characterization by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirm that the nanocrystals are nominally

  9. Hydrothermal processes in partially serpentinized peridotites from Costa Rica: evidence from native copper and complex sulfide assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzenbach, Esther M.; Gazel, Esteban; Caddick, Mark J.

    2014-11-01

    Native metals and metal alloys are common in serpentinized ultramafic rocks, generally representing the redox and sulfur conditions during serpentinization. Variably serpentinized peridotites from the Santa Elena Ophiolite in Costa Rica contain an unusual assemblage of Cu-bearing sulfides and native copper. The opaque mineral assemblage consists of pentlandite, magnetite, awaruite, pyrrhotite, heazlewoodite, violarite, smythite and copper-bearing sulfides (Cu-pentlandite, sugakiite [Cu(Fe,Ni)8S8], samaniite [Cu2(Fe,Ni)7S8], chalcopyrite, chalcocite, bornite and cubanite), native copper and copper-iron-nickel alloys. Using detailed mineralogical examination, electron microprobe analyses, bulk rock major and trace element geochemistry, and thermodynamic calculations, we discuss two models to explain the formation of the Cu-bearing mineral assemblages: (1) they formed through desulfurization of primary sulfides due to highly reducing and sulfur-depleted conditions during serpentinization or (2) they formed through interaction with a Cu-bearing, higher temperature fluid (350-400 °C) postdating serpentinization, similar to processes in active high-temperature peridotite-hosted hydrothermal systems such as Rainbow and Logatchev. As mass balance calculations cannot entirely explain the extent of the native copper by desulfurization of primary sulfides, we propose that the native copper and Cu sulfides formed by local addition of a hydrothermal fluid that likely interacted with adjacent mafic sequences. We suggest that the peridotites today exposed on Santa Elena preserve the lower section of an ancient hydrothermal system, where conditions were highly reducing and water-rock ratios very low. Thus, the preserved mineral textures and assemblages give a unique insight into hydrothermal processes occurring at depth in peridotite-hosted hydrothermal systems.

  10. Microbial Ecology Assessment of Mixed Copper Oxide/Sulfide Dump Leach Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhn, Debby Fox; Thompson, David Neal; Noah, Karl Scott

    1999-06-01

    Microbial consortia composed of complex mixtures of autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria are responsible for the dissolution of metals from sulfide minerals. Thus, an efficient copper bioleaching operation depends on the microbial ecology of the system. A microbial ecology study of a mixed oxide/sulfide copper leaching operation was conducted using an "overlay" plating technique to differentiate and identify various bacterial consortium members of the genera Thiobacillus, “Leptospirillum”, “Ferromicrobium”, and Acidiphilium. Two temperatures (30°C and 45°C) were used to select for mesophilic and moderately thermophilic bacteria. Cell numbers varied from 0-106 cells/g dry ore, depending on the sample location and depth. After acid curing for oxide leaching, no viable bacteria were recovered, although inoculation of cells from raffinate re-established a microbial population after three months. Due to low the pH of the operation, very few non-iron-oxidizing acidophilic heterotrophs were recovered. Moderate thermophiles were isolated from the ore samples. Pregnant liquor solutions (PLS) and raffinate both contained a diversity of bacteria. In addition, an intermittently applied waste stream that contained high levels of arsenic and fluoride was tested for toxicity. Twenty vol% waste stream in PLS killed 100% of the cells in 48 hours, indicating substantial toxicity and/or growth inhibition. The data indicate that bacteria populations can recover after acid curing, and that application of the waste stream to the dump should be avoided. Monitoring the microbial ecology of the leaching operation provided significant information that improved copper recovery.

  11. A mild and facile synthesis of aryl and alkenyl sulfides via copper-catalyzed deborylthiolation of organoborons with thiosulfonates.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Suguru; Sugimura, Yasuyuki; Hazama, Yuki; Nishiyama, Yoshitake; Yano, Takahisa; Shimizu, Shigeomi; Hosoya, Takamitsu

    2015-12-04

    An efficient deborylthiolation of aryl- and alkenylborons with thiosulfonates has been achieved under mild conditions using a copper catalyst. All steps of the experimental process were free from unpleasant odors. The mild reaction conditions as well as ready availability of boron compounds and thiosulfonates enabled easy access to an array of sulfides, including those bearing sensitive functional groups.

  12. Synthesis of unsymmetrical sulfides using ethyl potassium xanthogenate and recyclable copper catalyst under ligand-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Akkilagunta, Vijay Kumar; Kakulapati, Rama Rao

    2011-08-19

    The synthesis of unsymmetrical sulfides has been achieved in good to excellent yields with inexpensive ethyl potassium xanthogenate via cross-coupling reaction using recyclable CuO nanoparticles under ligand-free conditions.The copper oxide nanoparticles can be recovered and reused up to five cycles without loss of activity.

  13. Predicting the acute toxicity of copper in freshwater sediments: Evaluation of the role of acid-volatile sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Ankley, G.T.; Mattson, V.R.; Leonard, E.N.; West, C.W. ); Bennett, J.L. )

    1993-02-01

    Acid-volatile sulfide (AVS) has been proposed as an important partitioning phase determining the bioavailability of cationic metals in sediments. The objective of this research was to evaluate the role of AVS in determining copper toxicity in sediments from two sites heavily contaminated with copper: Steilacoom Lake, Washington, and the Keweenaw Watershed, Michigan. Sediments from the two sites were used in 10-d toxicity tests with the amphipod Hyalella azteca, and results of the toxicity tests were compared to bioavailability predictions based on copper and AVS concentrations in the test sediments, as well as copper concentrations in the sediment interstitial (pore) water. Normalization of sediment copper concentrations to AVS accurately predicted sediments that were nontoxic when molar copper-to-AVS ratios were less than one; however, toxicity also was frequently not observed in samples with molar copper-to-AVS ratios significantly greater than one. In contrast, measurement of pore-water copper concentrations and subsequent comparison of these concentrations to water-only copper toxicity data for Hyalella azteca resulted in accurate predictions of the presence and extent of copper toxicity in the test sediments. These results indicate that AVS alone is not an appropriate partitioning phase for predicting copper bioavailability in freshwater sediments.

  14. Determination of (210)Po in drinking water and urine samples using copper sulfide microprecipitation.

    PubMed

    Guérin, Nicolas; Dai, Xiongxin

    2014-06-17

    Polonium-210 ((210)Po) can be rapidly determined in drinking water and urine samples by alpha spectrometry using copper sulfide (CuS) microprecipitation. For drinking water, Po in 10 mL samples was directly coprecipitated onto the filter for alpha counting without any purification. For urine, 10 mL of sample was heated, oxidized with KBrO3 for a short time (∼5 min), and subsequently centrifuged to remove the suspended organic matter. The CuS microprecipitation was then applied to the supernatant. Large batches of samples can be prepared using this technique with high recoveries (∼85%). The figures of merit of the methods were determined, and the developed methods fulfill the requirements for emergency and routine radioassays. The efficiency and reliability of the procedures were confirmed using spiked samples.

  15. Optical and thermal response of single-walled carbon nanotube-copper sulfide nanoparticle hybrid nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yi-Hsuan; He, Yuan; Lakshmanan, Santana; Yang, Chang; Chen, Wei; Que, Long

    2012-11-16

    This paper reports the optical and thermal response of a single-walled carbon nanotube-copper sulfide nanoparticle (SWNT-CuS NP) hybrid nanomaterial and its application as a thermoelectric generator. The hybrid nanomaterial was synthesized using oleylamine molecules as the linker molecules between SWNTs and CuS NPs. Measurements found that the hybrid nanomaterial has significantly increased light absorption (up to 80%) compared to the pure SWNT. Measurements also found that the hybrid nanomaterial thin-film devices exhibit a clear optical and thermal switching effect, which can be further enhanced up to 10 ×  by asymmetric illumination of light and thermal radiation on the thin-film devices instead of symmetric illumination. A simple prototype thermoelectric generator enabled by the hybrid nanomaterials is demonstrated, indicating a new route for achieving thermoelectricity.

  16. Microfluidic Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Photothermal Biodegradable Copper Sulfide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The continuous synthesis of biodegradable photothermal copper sulfide nanoparticles has been carried out with the aid of a microfluidic platform. A comparative physicochemical characterization of the resulting products from the microreactor and from a conventional batch reactor has been performed. The microreactor is able to operate in a continuous manner and with a 4-fold reduction in the synthesis times compared to that of the conventional batch reactor producing nanoparticles with the same physicochemical requirements. Biodegradation subproducts obtained under simulated physiological conditions have been identified, and a complete cytotoxicological analysis on different cell lines was performed. The photothermal effect of those nanomaterials has been demonstrated in vitro as well as their ability to generate reactive oxygen species. PMID:27486785

  17. Water soluble sodium sulfate nanorods as a versatile template for the designing of copper sulfide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Das, Gautam; Kakati, Nitul; Lee, Seok Hee; Karak, Niranjan; Yoon, Young Soo

    2014-06-01

    The present study reports the use of water soluble sodium sulfate (Na2SO4) nanorods as a versatile template for generation of tubular copper sulfide (CuS) nanostructures. The Na2SO4 nanorods were synthesized from ammonium sulfate (NH4)2SO4 and sodium hydroxide (NaOH), under refluxing condition. The shape and morphology control of the Na2SO4 nanorods were studied with respect to nature of surfactant used and reactant mole ratio. While, PVP mole ratio was important to obtain homogeneous nanorods. Uniform and stable nanotubes of CuS were than obtained by the dissolution of the nanorods in water. The use of simple chemicals for synthesis of such nanotube templates opens the prospect for wide scale downstream applications.

  18. An assessment of silver copper sulfides for photovoltaic applications: theoretical and experimental insights.

    PubMed

    Savory, Christopher N; Ganose, Alex M; Travis, Will; Atri, Ria S; Palgrave, Robert G; Scanlon, David O

    2016-08-28

    As the worldwide demand for energy increases, low-cost solar cells are being looked to as a solution for the future. To attain this, non-toxic earth-abundant materials are crucial, however cell efficiencies for current materials are limited in many cases. In this article, we examine the two silver copper sulfides AgCuS and Ag3CuS2 as possible solar absorbers using hybrid density functional theory, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, XPS and Hall effect measurements. We show that both compounds demonstrate promising electronic structures and band gaps for high theoretical efficiency solar cells, based on Shockley-Queisser limits. Detailed analysis of their optical properties, however, indicates that only AgCuS should be of interest for PV applications, with a high theoretical efficiency. From this, we also calculate the band alignment of AgCuS against various buffer layers to aid in future device construction.

  19. Microfluidic Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Photothermal Biodegradable Copper Sulfide Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ortiz de Solorzano, Isabel; Prieto, Martín; Mendoza, Gracia; Alejo, Teresa; Irusta, Silvia; Sebastian, Victor; Arruebo, Manuel

    2016-08-24

    The continuous synthesis of biodegradable photothermal copper sulfide nanoparticles has been carried out with the aid of a microfluidic platform. A comparative physicochemical characterization of the resulting products from the microreactor and from a conventional batch reactor has been performed. The microreactor is able to operate in a continuous manner and with a 4-fold reduction in the synthesis times compared to that of the conventional batch reactor producing nanoparticles with the same physicochemical requirements. Biodegradation subproducts obtained under simulated physiological conditions have been identified, and a complete cytotoxicological analysis on different cell lines was performed. The photothermal effect of those nanomaterials has been demonstrated in vitro as well as their ability to generate reactive oxygen species.

  20. Predicting the acute toxicity of copper in freshwater sediments: Evaluation of the role of acid-volatile sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Ankley, G.T.; Mattson, V.R.; Leonard, E.N.; West, C.W.; Bennett, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    Acid-volatile sulfide (AVS) has been proposed as an important partitioning phase determining the bioavailability of cationic metals in sediments. The objective of this research was to evaluate the role of AVS in determining copper toxicity in sediments from two sites heavily contaminated with copper: Steilacoom Lake, Washington, and the Keweenaw Watershed, Michigan. Sediments from the two sites were used in 10-d toxicity tests with the amphipod Hyalella azteca and results of the toxicity tests were compared to bioavailability predictions based on copper and AVS concentrations in the test sediments, as well as copper concentrations in the sediment interstitial (pore) water. These results indicate that AVS alone is not an appropriate partitioning phase for prediting copper bioavailability in freshwater sediments.

  1. Synthesis, Optical and Structural Properties of Copper Sulfide Nanocrystals from Single Molecule Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Ajibade, Peter A.; Botha, Nandipha L.

    2017-01-01

    We report the synthesis and structural studies of copper sulfide nanocrystals from copper (II) dithiocarbamate single molecule precursors. The precursors were thermolysed in hexadecylamine (HDA) to prepare HDA-capped CuS nanocrystals. The optical properties of the nanocrystals studied using UV–visible and photoluminescence spectroscopy showed absorption band edges at 287 nm that are blue shifted, and the photoluminescence spectra show emission curves that are red-shifted with respect to the absorption band edges. These shifts are as a result of the small crystallite sizes of the nanoparticles leading to quantum size effects. The structural studies were carried out using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and atomic force microscopy. The XRD patterns indicates that the CuS nanocrystals are in hexagonal covellite crystalline phases with estimated particles sizes of 17.3–18.6 nm. The TEM images showed particles with almost spherical or rod shapes, with average crystallite sizes of 3–9.8 nm. SEM images showed morphology with ball-like microspheres on the surfaces, and EDS spectra confirmed the presence of CuS nanoparticles. PMID:28336865

  2. Optical and electrical stability of viral-templated copper sulfide (Cu1.8S) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahriar Zaman, Mohammed; Bernard Grajeda, Gabriel; Haberer, Elaine D.

    2014-04-01

    The optical and electrical stabilities of viral-templated non-stoichiometric copper sulfide, digenite (Cu1.8S) films were investigated. The films were composed of large agglomerates of randomly aligned Cu1.8S-coated M13 filamentous phage. Free carrier optical absorption associated with localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) was observed in the near infrared spectral region, and the films were electrically active, displaying a linear current-voltage relationship. Under ambient conditions, the magnitude of the LSPR absorption increased, following a power law relationship with time, and the electrical resistance of viral-templated films decreased significantly. In contrast, the resistance of films stored under low oxygen, low humidity conditions experienced a smaller reduction in electrical resistance. Changes in optical and electrical film properties under ambient conditions were associated with an increase in free carrier concentration within the copper chalcogenide material due to oxygen exposure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to relate this increase in free carrier concentration to compositional changes on the viral-templated material surface.

  3. Synthesis of Copper-Antimony-Sulfide Nanocrystals for Solution-Processed Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Suehiro, Satoshi; Horita, Keisuke; Yuasa, Masayoshi; Tanaka, Tooru; Fujita, Katsuhiko; Ishiwata, Yoichi; Shimanoe, Kengo; Kida, Tetsuya

    2015-08-17

    The p-type nanocrystals (NCs) of copper-based chalcogenides, such as CuInSe2 and Cu2ZnSnS4, have attracted increasing attention in photovoltaic applications due to their potential to produce cheap solution-processed solar cells. Herein, we report the synthesis of copper-antimony-sulfide (CAS) NCs with different crystal phases including CuSbS2, Cu3SbS4, and Cu12Sb4S13. In addition, their morphology, crystal phase, and optical properties were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, UV-vis-near-IR spectroscopy, and photoemission yield spectroscopy. The morphology, crystal phase, and electronic structure were significantly dependent on the chemical composition in the CAS system. Devices were fabricated using particulate films consisting of CAS NCs prepared by spin coating without a high-temperature treatment. The CAS NC-based devices exhibited a diode-like current-voltage characteristic when coupled with an n-type CdS layer. In particular, the CuSbS2 NC devices exhibited photovoltaic responses under simulated sunlight, demonstrating its applicability for use in solution-processed solar cells.

  4. Oxygen-associated luminescence of copper and silver activated zinc sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Golubeva, N.P.; Fok, M.V.

    1988-01-01

    It was established that the cathodoluminescence centers of the most widely employed activators in ZnS, copper and silver, are localized in the regions of the solid solutions of the system ZnS-ZnO, in which the luminescence of the impurity-free ZnS is observed. It was determined by Alentsev's method that both ZnS-Cu and ZnS-Ag have blue bands which are common to the luminescence bands of the solid solution ZnS-xZnO. The luminescence band of the solid solution ZnS-xZnO belonged to the luminophor obtained by annealing ZnO in moistened hydrogen sulfide at 900 degrees C. Oxygen was present in the luminescence and absorption centers of ZnS activated both by rare-earth activators and by copper and silver. This turned out to be energetically favorable since the centers associated with oxygen were additionally excited by centers responsible for the edge luminescence of ZnS-ZnO.

  5. Investigation of nanocrystalline copper sulfide Cu 7S 4 fabricated by ultrasonic radiation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behboudnia, M.; Khanbabaee, B.

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, we reported the preparation of non-stoichiometric copper sulfide Cu 7S 4 nanocrystalline by ultrasonic irradiation in ethylenediamine solvent system mixed with a complexing agent of 1-decanthiol, using sulfur powder and copper nitrate as reactants under normal laboratory conditions. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern indicates that the products are nanocrystallites in monoclinic structure. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images display that the product consists of nanocrystallites of about 20 nm which aggregated in the form of polydispersive nanoclusters with sizes in the range of 150-300 nm. Energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) shows that the products are absolutely pure and atomic percentage ratio of Cu to S is about 60:40. UV-vis absorption spectroscopy of the as-prepared particles reveal an energy band gap of about 2.54 eV; compared to 2 eV corresponding to its bulk value; a blue shift of about 0.54 eV has been observed, which is understood as quantum size effect due to three-dimensional confinement of electrons and holes in a small volume.

  6. Nickel-cobalt-iron-copper sulfides and arsenides in solution-collapse breccia pipes, northwestern Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Wenrich, K.J. ); Hlava, P.F. )

    1993-04-01

    An extensive suite of Ni-Co-Fe-Cu sulfides and arsenides lies within the matrix of solution-collapse breccias buried deep within the plateaus of the Grand Canyon region. Ceilings over large caverns in the Redwall collapsed, brecciating the overlying sandstone and forming cylindrical breccia pipes up to 300 ft in diameter that extend vertically as much as 3,000 ft. These highly permeable breccias served as a host for the precipitation of a suite of over 100 minerals, including uraninite, sphalerite, galena and various copper phases, in addition to the Ni-Co-bearing-phase discussed here. Intricately zoned crystals of small (<1 mm), euhedral Ni-Co-Fe-As-S minerals were the first to form during the second major episode of mineralization in these pipes. Several of these phases replace minerals, such as barite and anhydrite, from the first episode. Extensive microprobe work has been done on samples from two breccia pipe mines, the Hack 2 and Orphan, which are about 50 miles apart. Mineral compositions are similar except that no copper is found in the Ni-Co-Fe phases from the Hack 2 mine, while pyrites containing 1 wt % Cu are common from the Orphan, which was mined for copper. In some of these pyrites', Cu is dominant and the mineral is actually villamaninite. Pyrites from both mines characteristically contain 0.5 to 3 wt % As. Metal contents in zones pyrite-bravoite-vaesite (M[sub 1]S[sub 2]) crystals at the Hack 2 mine range from Fe[sub 1] to Fe[sub .12], Ni[sub 0] to Ni[sub .86], and Co[sub 0] to Co[sub .10]. The metal content for polydymite-siegenite-violarite averages about (Ni[sub 2.33]Co[sub .39]Fe[sub .23])(S[sub 3.9]As[sub .1]). Orphan mine pyrite-bravoite-vaesite-villamaninite ranges in composition from pure FeS[sub 2] to (Ni[sub .6]Fe[sub .21]Co[sub .17])S[sub 2], and (Cu[sub .46]Ni[sub .27]Fe[sub .21]Co[sub .13])S[sub 2]. Of all the sulfides or arsenides found in these breccia pipes, only nickeline consistently occurs as the pure end member.

  7. Manganese (II) Chelate Functionalized Copper Sulfide Nanoparticles for Efficient Magnetic Resonance/Photoacoustic Dual-Modal Imaging Guided Photothermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Renfa; Jing, Lijia; Peng, Dong; Li, Yong; Tian, Jie; Dai, Zhifei

    2015-01-01

    The integration of diagnostic and therapeutic functionalities into one nanoplatform shows great promise in cancer therapy. In this research, manganese (II) chelate functionalized copper sulfide nanoparticles were successfully prepared using a facile hydrothermal method. The obtained ultrasmall nanoparticles exhibit excellent photothermal effect and photoaoustic activity. Besides, the high loading content of Mn(II) chelates makes the nanoparticles attractive T1 contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In vivo photoacoustic imaging (PAI) results showed that the nanoparticles could be efficiently accumulated in tumor site in 24 h after systematic administration, which was further validated by MRI tests. The subsequent photothermal therapy of cancer in vivo was achieved without inducing any observed side effects. Therefore, the copper sulfide nanoparticles functionalized with Mn(II) chelate hold great promise as a theranostic nanomedicine for MR/PA dual-modal imaging guided photothermal therapy of cancer. PMID:26284144

  8. Fabrication of copper sulfide hierarchical architectures with tunable morphologies and sizes by microwave-biomolecular assistance method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zeyun; Lou, Wenjing; Wang, Xiaobo; Liu, Weimin

    2011-03-01

    A facile microwave-biomolecular assistance method has been used to synthesize copper sulfide nanomaterials. In this process, the histidine as the directing and assembling agent plays an important role in the formation of the different hierarchical architectures. The morphologies and the sizes of the products can be tuned by adjusting the molar ratio of Cu2+/histidine and Cu2+/thiourea. The effect of other experiment parameters such as the reaction temperature, the power of microwave irradiation, and reaction time on the morphology and the size has been also discussed in detail. The possible reaction and growth mechanisms of the formation different hierarchical architectures are also discussed. In addition, the optical properties of these copper sulfides nanomaterials were investigated and the photocatalytic activity of different hierarchical architectures has been tested by the degradation of methyl orange (MO) under UV-light irradiation.

  9. Manganese (II) Chelate Functionalized Copper Sulfide Nanoparticles for Efficient Magnetic Resonance/Photoacoustic Dual-Modal Imaging Guided Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Renfa; Jing, Lijia; Peng, Dong; Li, Yong; Tian, Jie; Dai, Zhifei

    2015-01-01

    The integration of diagnostic and therapeutic functionalities into one nanoplatform shows great promise in cancer therapy. In this research, manganese (II) chelate functionalized copper sulfide nanoparticles were successfully prepared using a facile hydrothermal method. The obtained ultrasmall nanoparticles exhibit excellent photothermal effect and photoaoustic activity. Besides, the high loading content of Mn(II) chelates makes the nanoparticles attractive T1 contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In vivo photoacoustic imaging (PAI) results showed that the nanoparticles could be efficiently accumulated in tumor site in 24 h after systematic administration, which was further validated by MRI tests. The subsequent photothermal therapy of cancer in vivo was achieved without inducing any observed side effects. Therefore, the copper sulfide nanoparticles functionalized with Mn(II) chelate hold great promise as a theranostic nanomedicine for MR/PA dual-modal imaging guided photothermal therapy of cancer.

  10. Copper-catalyzed extended Pummerer reactions of ketene dithioacetal monoxides with alkynyl sulfides and ynamides with an accompanying oxygen rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Kei; Imoto, Junichi; Matsubara, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Suguru; Yorimitsu, Hideki; Oshima, Koichiro

    2013-04-26

    The first examples of metal-catalyzed extended Pummerer reactions through the activation of sulfoxides are described. The copper-catalyzed reactions of ketene dithioacetal monoxides with alkynyl sulfides and ynamides provided a wide variety of γ,γ-disulfanyl-β,γ-unsaturated carbonyl compounds with an accompanying oxygen rearrangement. The products can be easily converted into 1,4-dicarbonyl compounds and substituted heteroaromatics. DFT calculations and mechanistic experiments revealed a new interesting stepwise addition/oxygen rearrangement mechanism.

  11. Auger electron spectroscopic study of mechanism of sulfide-accelerated corrosion of copper-nickel alloy in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, Malcolm E.

    The mechanism of sulfide-induced accelerated corrosion of 90-10 copper-nickel(iron) alloy is investigated. Samples of the alloy are exposed to flowing (2.4 m/s) seawater, with and without 0 01 mg/l sulfide, for various periods of time. The resulting surfaces are examined by means of Auger electron spectroscopy coupled with inert-ion-homoardment. A detailed depth profile is thereby obtained of concentrations in the surface region of a total of nine elements. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that iron hydroxide segregates at the surface to form a protective gelatinous layer against the normal chloride-induced corrosion process. Trace sulfide interferes with formation of a good protective layer and leaves the iron hydroxide vulnerable to ultimate partial or complete debonding. When the alloy is first exposed to "pure" seawater for a prolonged period of time, however, subsequent exposure to sulfide is no longer deleterious. This is apparently due to a layer of copper-nickel salt that slowly forms over the iron hydroxide.

  12. Synthesis and Biomedical Applications of Copper Sulfide Nanoparticles: From Sensors to Theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Shreya; Chen, Feng; Cai, Weibo

    2013-01-01

    Copper sulfide (CuS) nanoparticles have attracted increasing attention from biomedical researchers across the globe, because of their intriguing properties which have been mainly explored for energy- and catalysis-related applications to date. This focused review article aims to summarize the recent progress made in the synthesis and biomedical applications of various CuS nanoparticles. After a brief introduction to CuS nanoparticles in the first section, we will provide a concise outline of the various synthetic routes to obtain different morphologies of CuS nanoparticles, which can influence their properties and potential applications. CuS nanoparticles have found broad applications in vitro, especially in the detection of biomolecules, chemicals, and pathogens which will be illustrated in detail. The in vivo uses of CuS nanoparticles have also been investigated in preclinical studies, including molecular imaging with various techniques, cancer therapy based on the photothermal properties of CuS, as well as drug delivery and theranostic applications. Research on CuS nanoparticles will continue to thrive over the next decade, and tremendous opportunities lie ahead for potential biomedical/clinical applications of CuS nanoparticles. PMID:24106015

  13. Rapid preparation of polonium counting sources for alpha spectrometry using copper sulfide microprecipitation.

    PubMed

    Guérin, Nicolas; Dai, Xiongxin

    2013-07-02

    Thin-layer polonium (Po) sources for alpha spectrometry counting can be rapidly prepared using copper sulfide (CuS) microprecipitation. Polonium was coprecipitated with CuS, filtered onto Eichrom Resolve filters, and counted. This simple procedure is faster, cheaper, and more convenient than traditional spontaneous plating on metallic discs, and similar yields were obtained (80-90%). The experimental conditions for the microprecipitation technique were optimized (0.05 mg of Cu(2+) in 10 mL of 1 M HCl); these compare advantageously with conventional preparation and purification procedures for polonium samples (0.1 to 1 M HCl). The results showed that the most likely potential radionuclide interferences (Ra, Th, U, Np, Pu, and Am) for long-lived polonium isotopes ((208)Po, (209)Po, (210)Po) are effectively removed during processing. The effects of several transition metals (Cu(2+), Ag(+), Fe(3+), Fe(2+), Pb(2+), and Ni(2+)) on the yield and the resolution of the alpha peaks obtained were also assessed. Little interference was found, demonstrating the versatility of the present microprecipitation technique for environmental and biological matrices. The procedure has been successfully applied to different amounts of (210)Po using (209)Po as a yield tracer.

  14. Synthesis, characterization, shape evolution, and optical properties of copper sulfide hexagonal bifrustum nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Baorui; Qin, Mingli; Jiang, Xuezhi; Zhang, Zili; Zhang, Lin; Liu, Ye; Qu, Xuanhui

    2013-03-01

    The hexagonal bifrustum-shaped copper sulfide (CuS) nanocrystals were selectively and facilely synthesized by a hydrothermal method for the first time at 120 °C. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The results showed that the CuS hexagonal bifrustum nanocrystal was bounded by two top hexagons with edge length of about 50-70 nm and twelve lateral trapezoids with a base of about 100 nm and that the length of each hexagonal bifrustum was about 250 nm. Tetradecylamine (TDA), as an effective capping agent, was found to be critical for this special shape. Using different amounts of TDA, two kinds of CuS hexagonal bifrustum nanocrystals were obtained: "lender hexagonal bifrustum" and "pancake hexagonal bifrustum." Furthermore, we studied the formation mechanism of hexagonal bifrustum, which is related to the intrinsic crystalline structure of CuS and Ostwald ripening. And, the results revealed that the CuS nanocrystal evolved from hexagonal plate to hexagonal bifrustum and finally to hexagonal bipyramid as the heating time increased. The UV-Vis absorption spectrum showed that these CuS hexagonal bifrustum nanocrystals exhibited strong absorption in the near-infrared region and had a potential application for photothermal therapy and photocatalysis.

  15. Detection of hydrogen sulfide through photoluminescence quenching of penicillamine-copper nanocluster aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jia-Ying; Chen, Po-Cheng; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a one-pot, inexpensive, simple and rapid method to synthesize photoluminescent copper nanocluster (Cu NC) aggregates from Cu2+ ions in 65% (v v-1) dimethylformamide aqueous solution containing penicillamine (PA) as a capping and reducing agent. As-prepared PA-Cu NC aggregates emit at 580 nm when excited at 326 nm, with a quantum yield of 2.0%. The photoluminescence of PA-Cu NC aggregates originate from ligand-to-metal charge transfer, which is supported by a long lifetime (126.5 ns) and a large Stokes shift (254 nm). As-prepared PA-Cu NC aggregates have different emission wavelengths with the same excitation wavelength in various organic-aqueous solutions. The PA-Cu NC aggregates are highly selective and sensitive to the detection of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), based on analyte-induced photoluminescence quenching through the formation of CuS nanoparticles. The probe allows the detection of H2S, with a linear range of 1-100 μM and a limit of detection (signal-to-noise ratio = 3) of 500 nM. The practicality of this probe has been validated through the analysis of hot spring water samples.

  16. Detection of hydrogen sulfide through photoluminescence quenching of penicillamine-copper nanocluster aggregates.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jia-Ying; Chen, Po-Cheng; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2014-05-16

    We have developed a one-pot, inexpensive, simple and rapid method to synthesize photoluminescent copper nanocluster (Cu NC) aggregates from Cu(2+) ions in 65% (v v(-1)) dimethylformamide aqueous solution containing penicillamine (PA) as a capping and reducing agent. As-prepared PA-Cu NC aggregates emit at 580 nm when excited at 326 nm, with a quantum yield of 2.0%. The photoluminescence of PA-Cu NC aggregates originate from ligand-to-metal charge transfer, which is supported by a long lifetime (126.5 ns) and a large Stokes shift (254 nm). As-prepared PA-Cu NC aggregates have different emission wavelengths with the same excitation wavelength in various organic-aqueous solutions. The PA-Cu NC aggregates are highly selective and sensitive to the detection of hydrogen sulfide (H₂S), based on analyte-induced photoluminescence quenching through the formation of CuS nanoparticles. The probe allows the detection of H₂S, with a linear range of 1-100 μM and a limit of detection (signal-to-noise ratio = 3) of 500 nM. The practicality of this probe has been validated through the analysis of hot spring water samples.

  17. Application of graphene-copper sulfide nanocomposite modified electrode for electrochemistry and electrocatalysis of hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Shi, Fan; Zheng, Weizhe; Wang, Wencheng; Hou, Fei; Lei, Bingxin; Sun, Zhenfan; Sun, Wei

    2015-02-15

    In this paper a graphene (GR) and copper sulfide (CuS) nanocomposite was synthesized by hydrothermal method and used for the electrode modification with a N-butylpyridinium hexafluorophosphate based carbon ionic liquid electrode (CILE) as the substrate electrode. Hemoglobin (Hb) was immobilized on the modified electrode to get a biocompatible sensing platform. UV-vis absorption spectroscopic results confirmed that Hb retained its native secondary structure in the composite. Direct electron transfer of Hb incorporated into the nanocomposite was investigated with a pair of well-defined redox waves appeared on cyclic voltammogram, indicating the realization of direct electrochemistry of Hb on the modified electrode. The results can be ascribed to the presence of GR-CuS nanocomposite on the electrode surface that facilitates the electron transfer rate between the electroactive center of Hb and the electrode. The Hb modified electrode showed excellent electrocatalytic activity to the reduction of trichloroacetic acid in the concentration range from 3.0 to 64.0 mmol L(-1) with the detection limit of 0.20 mmol L(-1) (3σ). The fabricated biosensor displayed the advantages such as high sensitivity, good reproducibility and long-term stability.

  18. Extracellular biosynthesis of copper sulfide nanoparticles by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as a photothermal agent.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Nan-Qing; Tian, Li-Jiao; Wang, Yu-Cai; Li, Dao-Bo; Li, Pan-Pan; Zhang, Xing; Yu, Han-Qing

    2016-12-01

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) is a minimally invasive and effective cancer treatment method and has a great potential for innovating the conventional chemotherapy approaches. Copper sulfide (CuS) exhibits photostability, low cost, and high absorption in near infrared region, and is recognized as an ideal candidate for PTT. However, CuS, as a photothermal agent, is usually synthesized with traditional chemical approaches, which require high temperature, additional stabilization and hydrophilic modification. Herein, we report, for the first time, the preparation of CuS nanoparticles as a photothermal agent by a dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium Shewanella. oneidensis MR-1. The prepared nanoparticles are homogenously shaped, hydrophilic, small-sized (∼5nm) and highly stable. Furthermore, the biosynthesized CuS nanoparticles display a high photothermal conversion efficiency of 27.2% because of their strong absorption at 1100nm. The CuS nanoparticles could be effectively used as a PTT agent under the irradiation of 1064nm. This work provides a simple, eco-friendly and cost-effective approach for fabricating PTT agents.

  19. Synthesis and biomedical applications of copper sulfide nanoparticles: from sensors to theranostics.

    PubMed

    Goel, Shreya; Chen, Feng; Cai, Weibo

    2014-02-26

    Copper sulfide (CuS) nanoparticles have attracted increasing attention from biomedical researchers across the globe, because of their intriguing properties which have been mainly explored for energy- and catalysis-related applications to date. This focused review article aims to summarize the recent progress made in the synthesis and biomedical applications of various CuS nanoparticles. After a brief introduction to CuS nanoparticles in the first section, we will provide a concise outline of the various synthetic routes to obtain different morphologies of CuS nanoparticles, which can influence their properties and potential applications. CuS nanoparticles have found broad applications in vitro, especially in the detection of biomolecules, chemicals, and pathogens which will be illustrated in detail. The in vivo uses of CuS nanoparticles have also been investigated in preclinical studies, including molecular imaging with various techniques, cancer therapy based on the photothermal properties of CuS, as well as drug delivery and theranostic applications. Research on CuS nanoparticles will continue to thrive over the next decade, and tremendous opportunities lie ahead for potential biomedical/clinical applications of CuS nanoparticles.

  20. Using Plasmonic Copper Sulfide Nanocrystals as Smart Light-Driven Sterilants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Liu, Xianjun; Du, Yingda; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2015-10-27

    As an efficient route to control pet overpopulation and develop neutered experimental animals, male sterilization via surgical techniques, chemical injections, and antifertility vaccines has brought particular attention recently. However, these traditional ways usually induce long-term adverse reactions, immune suppression, and serious infection and pain. To overcome the above limitations, we developed a platform in the present study by using plasmonic copper sulfide nanocrystals (Cu2-xS NCs) as intelligent light-driven sterilants with ideal outcomes. Upon NIR laser irradiation, these well-prepared Cu2-xS NCs can possess NIR-induced hyperthermia and generate high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Due to the cooperation of photothermal and photodynamic effects, these nanocrystals exhibited NIR-mediated toxicity toward Sertoli cells both in vitro and in vivo in a mild manner. We attribute the potential mechanism of cellular injury to the apoptosis-related death and denaturation of protein in the testicles. Furthermore, the possible metabolism route and long-term toxicity of these nanocrystals after testicular injection indicate their high biocompatibility. Taking together, our study on the NIR-induced toxicity of Cu2-xS NCs provides keen insights for the usage of plasmonic nanomaterials in biomedicine.

  1. Effect of capping agent concentration on thermoluminescence and photoluminescence of copper-doped zinc sulfide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wanjari, Lata; Bisen, D P; Brahme, Namita; Sahu, Ishwar Prasad; Sharma, Ravi

    2015-08-01

    Copper-doped zinc sulfide (ZnS:Cu) nanoparticles with varying concentrations of capping agent were prepared using a chemical route technique. These particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Optical absorption studies showed that the absorption edge shifted towards the blue region as the concentration of the capping agent increased. Using effective mass approximation, calculation of the nanoparticle size indicated that effective band gap energy increases with decreasing particle size. The thermoluminescence (TL) properties of sodium hexameta phosphate (SHMP)-passivated ZnS:Cu nanoparticles were investigated after UV irradiation at room temperature. The TL glow curve of capped ZnS:Cu showed variations in TL peak position and intensity with the change in capping agent concentration. The photoluminescence (PL) spectra of ZnS:Cu nanoparticles excited at 254 nm exhibited a broad green emission band peaking around 510 nm, which confirmed the characteristic feature of Zn(2+) as well as Cu(2+) ions as the luminescent centres in the lattice. The PL spectra of ZnS:Cu nanoparticles with increasing capping agent concentrations revealed that the emission becomes more intense and shifted towards shorter wavelengths as the sizes of the samples were reduced.

  2. Tunable White Fluorescent Copper Gallium Sulfide Quantum Dots Enabled by Mn Doping.

    PubMed

    Jo, Dae-Yeon; Kim, Daekyoung; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Chae, Heeyeop; Seo, Hyo Jin; Do, Young Rag; Yang, Heesun

    2016-05-18

    Fluorescence of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) can be tuned by engineering the band gap via size and composition control and further doping them with impurity ions. Targeting on highly bright white-emissive I-III-VI -type copper gallium sulfide (Cu-Ga-S, CGS) host QDs with the entire visible spectral coverage of blue to red, herein, Mn(2+) ion doping, through surface adsorption and lattice diffusion is fulfilled. Upon doping a distinct Mn emission from (4)T1-(6)A1 transition successfully appears in white photoluminescence (PL) of undoped CGS/ZnS core/shell QDs and with varying Mn concentration a systematic white spectral evolution of CGS:Mn/ZnS QDs is achievable with high PL quantum yield retained. The origins of white PL of CGS:Mn/ZnS QDs that is well decomposed into three emission bands are appropriately assigned. The resulting single-phased, doped QDs are then employed as near-UV-to-white down converters for the fabrication of white light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Electroluminescent properties of white QD-LEDs depending on Mn concentration of CGS:Mn/ZnS QDs and forward current are also discussed in detail.

  3. A pyrazolyl-based thiolato single-source precursor for the selective synthesis of isotropic copper-deficient copper(I) sulfide nanocrystals: synthesis, optical and photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Gopinath; Santra, Ananyakumari; Bera, Pradip; Acharjya, Moumita; Jana, Sumanta; Chattopadhyay, Dipankar; Mondal, Anup; Seok, Sang Il; Bera, Pulakesh

    2016-10-01

    Hexagonal copper-deficient copper(I) sulfide (Cu2- x S, x = 0.03, 0.2) nanocrystals (NCs) are synthesized from a newly prepared single-source precursor (SP), [Cu(bdpa)2][CuCl2], where bdpa is benzyl 3,5-dimethyl-pyrazole-1-carbodithioate. The SP is crystallized with space group Pī and possesses a distorted tetrahedron structure with a CuN2S2 chromophore where the central copper is in +1 oxidation state. Distortion in copper(I) structure and the low decomposition temperature of SP make it favorable for the low-temperature solvent-assisted selective growth of high-copper content sulfides. The nucleation and growth of Cu2- x S ( x = 0.03, 0.2) are effectively controlled by the SP and the solvent in the solvothermal decomposition process. During decomposition, fragment benzyl thiol (PhCH2SH) from SP effectively passivates the nucleus leading to spherical nanocrystals. Further, solvent plays an important role in the selective thermochemical transformation of CuI-complex to Cu2- x S ( x = 0.03, 0.2) NCs. The chelating binders (solvent) like ethylene diamine (EN) and ethylene glycol (EG) prefer to form spherical Cu1.97S nanoparticles (djurleite), whereas nonchelating hydrazine hydrate (HH) shows the tendency to furnish hexagonal platelets of copper-deficient Cu1.8S. The optical band gap values (2.25-2.50 eV) show quantum confinement effect in the structure. The synthesized NCs display excellent catalytic activity ( 87 %) toward photodegradation of organic dyes like Congo Red (CR) and Methylene Blue (MB).

  4. Reaction Mechanisms of Metals with Hydrogen Sulfide and Thiols in Model Wine. Part 1: Copper-Catalyzed Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kreitman, Gal Y; Danilewicz, John C; Jeffery, David W; Elias, Ryan J

    2016-05-25

    Sulfidic off-odors as a result of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and low-molecular-weight thiols are commonly encountered in wine production. These odors are usually removed by the process of Cu(II) fining, a process that remains poorly understood. The present study aims to elucidate the underlying mechanisms by which Cu(II) interacts with H2S and thiol compounds (RSH) under wine-like conditions. Copper complex formation was monitored along with H2S, thiol, oxygen, and acetaldehyde concentrations after the addition of Cu(II) (50 or 100 μM) to air-saturated model wine solutions containing H2S, cysteine, 6-sulfanylhexan-1-ol, or 3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol (300 μM each). The presence of H2S and thiols in excess to Cu(II) led to the rapid formation of ∼1.4:1 H2S/Cu and ∼2:1 thiol/Cu complexes, resulting in the oxidation of H2S and thiols and reduction of Cu(II) to Cu(I), which reacted with oxygen. H2S was observed to initially oxidize rather than form insoluble copper sulfide. The proposed reaction mechanisms provide insight into the extent to which H2S can be selectively removed in the presence of thiols in wine.

  5. Enhanced reactive adsorption of hydrogen sulfide on the composites of graphene/graphite oxide with copper (hydr)oxychlorides.

    PubMed

    Mabayoje, Oluwaniyi; Seredych, Mykola; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2012-06-27

    Composites of copper (hydr)oxychlorides with graphite oxide or graphene were synthesized and used as adsorbents of hydrogen sulfide at dynamic conditions at ambient temperatures. The materials were extensively characterized before and after adsorption in order to link their performance to the surface features. X-ray diffraction, FTIR, thermal analysis, TEM, SEM/EDX, and adsorption of nitrogen were used. It was found that the composite with graphene has the most favorable surface features enhancing reactive adsorption of hydrogen sulfide. The presence of moisture in the H2S stream has a positive effect on the removal process owing to the dissociation process. H2S is retained on the surface via a direct replacement of OH groups and via acid-base reactions with the copper (hydr)oxide. Highly dispersed reduced copper species on the surface of the composite with graphene enhance activation of oxygen and cause formation of sulfites and sulfates. Higher conductivity of the graphene phase than that of graphite oxide helps in electron transfer in redox reactions.

  6. Processing of Copper Zinc Tin Sulfide Nanocrystal Dispersions for Thin Film Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Bryce Arthur

    A scalable and inexpensive renewable energy source is needed to meet the expected increase in electricity demand throughout the developed and developing world in the next 15 years without contributing further to global warming through CO2 emissions. Photovoltaics may meet this need but current technologies are less than ideal requiring complex manufacturing processes and/or use of toxic, rare-earth materials. Copper zinc tin sulfide (Cu 2ZnSnS4, CZTS) solar cells offer a true "green" alternative based upon non-toxic and abundant elements. Solution-based processes utilizing CZTS nanocrystal dispersions followed by high temperature annealing have received significant research attention due to their compatibility with traditional roll-to-roll coating processes. In this work, CZTS nanocrystal (5-35 nm diameters) dispersions were utilized as a production pathway to form solar absorber layers. Aerosol-based coating methods (aerosol jet printing and ultrasonic spray coating) were optimized for formation of dense, crack-free CZTS nanocrystal coatings. The primary variables underlying determination of coating morphology within the aerosol-coating parameter space were investigated. It was found that the liquid content of the aerosol droplets at the time of substrate impingement play a critical role. Evaporation of the liquid from the aerosol droplets during coating was altered through changes to coating parameters as well as to the CZTS nanocrystal dispersions. In addition, factors influencing conversion of CZTS nanocrystal coatings into dense, large-grained polycrystalline films suitable for solar cell development during thermal annealing were studied. The roles nanocrystal size, carbon content, sodium uptake, and sulfur pressure were found to have pivotal roles in film microstructure evolution. The effects of these parameters on film morphology, grain growth rates, and chemical makeup were analyzed from electron microscopy images as well as compositional analysis

  7. Growth evolution and phase transition from chalcocite to digenite in nanocrystalline copper sulfide: Morphological, optical and electrical properties

    PubMed Central

    Quintana-Ramirez, Priscilla Vasthi; Santos-Cruz, José; Vega-González, Marina; Martínez-Alvarez, Omar; Castaño-Meneses, Víctor Manuel; Acosta-Torres, Laura Susana; de la Fuente-Hernández, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Summary Copper sulfide is a promising p-type inorganic semiconductor for optoelectronic devices such as solar cells, due its small band gap energy and its electrical properties. In this work nanocrystalline copper sulfide (CuxS), with two stoichiometric ratios (x = 2, 1.8) was obtained by one-pot synthesis at 220, 230, 240 and 260 °C in an organic solvent and amorphous CuxS was obtained in aqueous solution. Nanoparticle-like nucleation centers are formed at lower temperatures (220 °C), mixtures of morphologies (nanorods, nanodisks and nanoprisms) are seen at 230 and 240 °C, in which the nanodisks are predominant, while big hexagonal/prismatic crystals are obtained at 260 °C according to TEM results. A mixture of chalcocite and digenite phases was found at 230 and 240 °C, while a clear transition to a pure digenite phase was seen at 260 °C. The evolution of morphology and transition of phases is consistent to the electrical, optical, and morphological properties of the copper sulfide. In fact, digenite Cu1.8S is less resistive (346 Ω/sq) and has a lower energy band gap (1.6 eV) than chalcocite Cu2S (5.72 × 105 Ω/sq, 1.87 eV). Low resistivity was also obtained in CuxS synthesized in aqueous solution, despite its amorphous structure. All CuxS products could be promising for optoelectronic applications. PMID:25247136

  8. Growth evolution and phase transition from chalcocite to digenite in nanocrystalline copper sulfide: Morphological, optical and electrical properties.

    PubMed

    Quintana-Ramirez, Priscilla Vasthi; Arenas-Arrocena, Ma Concepción; Santos-Cruz, José; Vega-González, Marina; Martínez-Alvarez, Omar; Castaño-Meneses, Víctor Manuel; Acosta-Torres, Laura Susana; de la Fuente-Hernández, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Copper sulfide is a promising p-type inorganic semiconductor for optoelectronic devices such as solar cells, due its small band gap energy and its electrical properties. In this work nanocrystalline copper sulfide (Cu x S), with two stoichiometric ratios (x = 2, 1.8) was obtained by one-pot synthesis at 220, 230, 240 and 260 °C in an organic solvent and amorphous Cu x S was obtained in aqueous solution. Nanoparticle-like nucleation centers are formed at lower temperatures (220 °C), mixtures of morphologies (nanorods, nanodisks and nanoprisms) are seen at 230 and 240 °C, in which the nanodisks are predominant, while big hexagonal/prismatic crystals are obtained at 260 °C according to TEM results. A mixture of chalcocite and digenite phases was found at 230 and 240 °C, while a clear transition to a pure digenite phase was seen at 260 °C. The evolution of morphology and transition of phases is consistent to the electrical, optical, and morphological properties of the copper sulfide. In fact, digenite Cu1.8S is less resistive (346 Ω/sq) and has a lower energy band gap (1.6 eV) than chalcocite Cu2S (5.72 × 10(5) Ω/sq, 1.87 eV). Low resistivity was also obtained in Cu x S synthesized in aqueous solution, despite its amorphous structure. All Cu x S products could be promising for optoelectronic applications.

  9. Copper-catalyzed thiolation annulations of 1,4-dihalides with sulfides leading to 2-trifluoromethyl benzothiophenes and benzothiazoles.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Lin; Zhang, Xing-Guo; Tang, Ri-Yuan; Zhong, Ping; Li, Jin-Heng

    2010-10-15

    Copper-catalyzed double thiolation reaction of 1,4-dihalides with sulfides has been developed for selectively synthesizing 2-trifluoromethyl benzothiophenes and benzothiazoles. In the presence of CuI, a variety of 2-halo-1-(2-haloaryl)-3,3,3-trifluoropropylenes smoothly underwent the thiolation annulation with Na(2)S to afford 2-trifluoromethyl benzothiophenes in moderate to good yields. Moreover, the conditions are compatible with N-(2-haloaryl)trifluoroacetimidoyl chlorides in the presence of NaHS and K(3)PO(4), leading to 2-trifluoromethyl benzothiazoles.

  10. Three approaches to economical photovoltaics: Conformal copper sulfide , organic luminescent films, and lead selenide nanocrystal superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, Ian A.

    Three routes to more efficient photovoltaics using conformal Cu2S, organic luminescent films, and nanocrystalline PbSe films are outlined below. Properties of these materials are investigated experimentally and numerically in separate studies. In the first study, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes were used to fabricate Cu2S using hydrogen sulfide and the metal-organic precursor, KI5. The alternating exposure of mesoporous TiO2 and planar ZnO to the two precursors resulted in films that penetrated porous structures and deposited at a constant rate of 0.08nm/cycle over the temperature range 150C-400°C. Sheet resistance and optical absorption measurements suggest the presence of a metallic copper-poor phase of less than 100nm thick forming at the Cu2S/substrate boundary. In a separate study, organic films doped with luminescent dyes were placed above CdTe/CdS solar cells to convert high energy photons to lower energies, better matched to the CdTe/CdS quantum efficiency peak. Efficiency improvements of up to 8.5% were obtained after optimizing dye concentration, dye chemistry, and the host material. Long-term stability tests show that the organic films are stable for at least 5000 hours under 1 sun illumination provided that the dye is encapsulated in an oxygen and water free environment. Finally, a Monte Carlo model was developed to simulate electron and hole transport in nanocrystalline PbSe films. Transport is carried out as a series of thermally activated tunneling events between neighboring sites on a cubic lattice. Each site, representing an individual nanocrystal, is assigned a size-dependent electronic structure, and the effects of crystal size, charging, inter-crystal coupling, and energetic disorder on electron and hole mobilities/conductivities are investigated. Results of simulated field effect measurements confirm that electron mobilities and conductivities increase by an order of magnitude when the average nanocrystal diameter is increased in the

  11. Weathering of sulfidic shale and copper mine waste: Secondary minerals and metal cycling in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee, and North Carolina, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammarstrom, J.M.; Seal, R.R.; Meier, A.L.; Jackson, J.C.

    2003-01-01

    Metal cycling via physical and chemical weathering of discrete sources (copper mines) and regional (non-point) sources (sulfide-rich shale) is evaluated by examining the mineralogy and chemistry of weathering products in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee, and North Carolina, USA. The elements in copper mine waste, secondary minerals, stream sediments, and waters that are most likely to have negative impacts on aquatic ecosystems are aluminum, copper, zinc, and arsenic because these elements locally exceed toxicity guidelines for surface waters or for stream sediments. Acid-mine drainage has not developed in streams draining inactive copper mines. Acid-rock drainage and chemical weathering processes that accompany debris flows or human disturbances of sulfidic rocks are comparable to processes that develop acid-mine drainage elsewhere. Despite the high rainfall in the mountain range, sheltered areas and intermittent dry spells provide local venues for development of secondary weathering products that can impact aquatic ecosystems.

  12. Copper-catalyzed double C-S bonds formation via different paths: synthesis of benzothiazoles from N-benzyl-2-iodoaniline and potassium sulfide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyun; Zeng, Weilan; Yang, Yuan; Huang, Hui; Liang, Yun

    2014-02-07

    A new, highly efficient procedure for the synthesis of benzothiazoles from easily available N-benzyl-2-iodoaniline and potassium sulfide has been developed. The results show copper-catalyzed double C-S bond formation via a traditional cross-coupling reaction and an oxidative cross-coupling reaction.

  13. A green synthesis route for the phase and size tunability of copper antimony sulfide nanocrystals with high yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Keqiang; Zhou, Jing; Chen, Wen; Chen, Qiao; Zhou, Peng; Liu, Yueli

    2016-02-01

    Until now, it is a great challenge for the controllable synthesis of copper antimony sulfide (CAS) nanocrystals (NCs), as the reactivity of precursors is quite difficult to be controlled during the synthesis process. In the present work, a novel solution-based method is proposed to synthesize CAS NCs by choosing N,N'-diphenylthiourea as the sulfide precursor, which is favorable for balancing the relative reactivity of Cu and Sb ions. It is found that three phases (CuSbS2, Cu12Sb4S13 and Cu3SbS4) of CAS NCs with size tunability were successfully synthesized for the first time. To the best of our knowledge, the lowest reaction temperature of 110 °C and the highest yield over 90% for CAS NCs were also achieved for the first time, which may be considered to be a green synthesis route compared with other conventional methods. Optical properties indicate that the as-prepared CAS NCs have strong optical absorption in the visible light region of the solar spectrum, and we also observed the band gap tunability of CuSbS2 and Cu3SbS4 materials for the first time.Until now, it is a great challenge for the controllable synthesis of copper antimony sulfide (CAS) nanocrystals (NCs), as the reactivity of precursors is quite difficult to be controlled during the synthesis process. In the present work, a novel solution-based method is proposed to synthesize CAS NCs by choosing N,N'-diphenylthiourea as the sulfide precursor, which is favorable for balancing the relative reactivity of Cu and Sb ions. It is found that three phases (CuSbS2, Cu12Sb4S13 and Cu3SbS4) of CAS NCs with size tunability were successfully synthesized for the first time. To the best of our knowledge, the lowest reaction temperature of 110 °C and the highest yield over 90% for CAS NCs were also achieved for the first time, which may be considered to be a green synthesis route compared with other conventional methods. Optical properties indicate that the as-prepared CAS NCs have strong optical absorption in the

  14. Mechanism of Sulfide-Accelerated Corrosion of Copper-Nickel (90-10) Alloy in Seawater.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    there was considerable peeling of the corrosion layer to expose the copper colored surface underneath. Auger electron spectroscopy with ion -bombardment...2 CONCLUSIONS ............... ................................... RECO MENDAT IONS ...Elements in Surface Region as Determined by Auger Electron Spectroscopic Analysis During Ion -Bombardment: Copper-Nickel (Iron) Allov Exposed to Fresh

  15. Size Dependence of a Temperature-Induced Solid-Solid Phase Transition in Copper(I) Sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Rivest, Jessy B; Fong, Lam-Kiu; Jain, Prashant K; Toney, Michael F; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2011-07-24

    Determination of the phase diagrams for the nanocrystalline forms of materials is crucial for our understanding of nanostructures and the design of functional materials using nanoscale building blocks. The ability to study such transformations in nanomaterials with controlled shape offers further insight into transition mechanisms and the influence of particular facets. Here we present an investigation of the size-dependent, temperature-induced solid-solid phase transition in copper sulfide nanorods from low- to high-chalcocite. We find the transition temperature to be substantially reduced, with the high chalcocite phase appearing in the smallest nanocrystals at temperatures so low that they are typical of photovoltaic operation. Size dependence in phase trans- formations suggests the possibility of accessing morphologies that are not found in bulk solids at ambient conditions. These other- wise-inaccessible crystal phases could enable higher-performing materials in a range of applications, including sensing, switching, lighting, and photovoltaics.

  16. Highly sensitive photodetectors based on hybrid 2D-0D SnS{sub 2}-copper indium sulfide quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yun; Zhan, Xueying; Xu, Kai; Yin, Lei; Cheng, Zhongzhou; Jiang, Chao; Wang, Zhenxing E-mail: hej@nanoctr.cn; He, Jun E-mail: hej@nanoctr.cn

    2016-01-04

    Both high speed and efficiency of photoelectric conversion are essential for photodetectors. As an emerging layered metal dichalcogenide (LMD), tin disulfide owns intrinsic faster photodetection ability than most other LMDs but poor light absorption and low photoelectric conversion efficiency. We develop an efficient method to enhance its performance by constructing a SnS{sub 2}-copper indium sulfide hybrid structure. As a result, the responsivity reaches 630 A/W, six times stronger than pristine SnS{sub 2} and much higher than most other LMDs photodetectors. Additionally, the photocurrents are enhanced by more than 1 order of magnitude. Our work may open up a pathway to improve the performance of photodetectors based on LMDs.

  17. Copper sulfide nanoparticle-decorated graphene as a catalytic amplification platform for electrochemical detection of alkaline phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Peng, Juan; Han, Xiao-Xia; Zhang, Qing-Chun; Yao, Hui-Qin; Gao, Zuo-Ning

    2015-06-09

    Copper sulfide nanoparticle-decorated graphene sheet (CuS/GR) was successfully synthesized and used as a signal amplification platform for electrochemical detection of alkaline phosphatase activity. First, CuS/GR was prepared through a microwave-assisted hydrothermal approach. The CuS/GR nanocomposites exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity toward the oxidation of ALP hydrolyzed products such as 1-naphthol, which produced a current response. Thus, a catalytic amplification platform based on CuS/GR nanocomposite for electrochemical detection of ALP activity was designed using 1-naphthyl phosphate as a model substrate. The current response increased linearly with ALP concentration from 0.1 to 100 U L(-1) with a detection limit of 0.02 U L(-1). The assay was applied to estimate ALP activity in human serum samples with satisfactory results. This strategy may find widespread and promising applications in other sensing systems that involves ALP.

  18. The Copper Sulfide Coating on Polyacrylonitrile with Chelating Agents by an Electroless Deposition Method and its EMI Shielding Effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Roan, M.-L.; Chen, Y.-H.; Huang, C.-Y.

    2008-08-28

    In this study, a variety of concentrations of chelating agents were added to obtain the anchoring effect and chelating effect in the electroless plating bath. The mechanism of the Cu{sub x(x=1,2)}S growth and the electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness (EMI SE) of the composite were studied. It was found that the vinyl acetate residued in PAN substrate would be purged due to the swelling effect by chelating agents solution. And then, the anchoring effect occurred due to the hydrogen bonding between the pits of PAN substrate and the chelating agent. Consequently, the copper sulfide layer deposited by the electroless plating reaction with EDTA and TEA. The swelling degree (S{sub d}) was proposed and evaluated from the FT-IR spectra. The relationship between swelling degree of the PAN films and EDTA (C) is expressed as: S{sub d} = 0.13+0.90xe and (-15.15C). And TEA series is expressed as: S{sub d} = 0.07+1.00xe and (-15.15C). On the other hand, the FESEM micrograph showed that the average thickness of copper sulfide increased from 76 nm to 383 nm when the concentration of EDTA increased from 0.00M to 0.20M. Consequently, the EMI SE of the composites increased from 10{approx}12 dB to 25{approx}27 dB. The GIA-XRD analyze indicated that the deposited layer consisted of CuS and Cu{sub 2}S.

  19. The Effect of Desulfovibrio sp. Biofilms on Corrosion Behavior of Copper in Sulfide-Containing Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güngör, Nihal Doğruöz; Çotuk, Ayşın; Dışpınar, Derya

    2015-03-01

    This study aims to detect the effect of Desulfovibrio sp. on copper in terms of biofilm formation and corrosion in 722 h. In that way, appropriate strategies to inhibit microbiological corrosion in copper systems with Desulfovibrio sp. can be evaluated. For this purpose, experiments were performed in 1 L glass model system containing 28 copper coupons and pure culture of the sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) strain Desulfovibrio sp. in Postgate's medium C. Also, a control system with copper coupons but without Desulfovibrio sp. containing sterile Postgate's medium was studied concurrently with the test system. The test coupons were collected from systems at certain time intervals, namely 24, 168, 360, and 720 h. The samples were then subjected to several characterization analyses such as measurement of Desulfovibrio sp. numbers, corrosion resistance, EPS extraction, carbohydrate analysis, SEM, and EDS. During the experiments, the maximum Desulfovibrio sp. count in biofilm samples was found at 360 h. Carbohydrate and copper concentrations in biofilm were increased over time. EDS analysis revealed Cu, S, C, O, and Cl peaks on the surface of the samples. For the control coupons, only Cu peaks were observed. The results obtained from this study showed that copper was corroded by Desulfovibrio sp. in the model system under laboratory conditions.

  20. An efficient and transparent copper sulfide nanosheet film counter electrode for bifacial quantum dot-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Weijun; Fang, Guojia; Lei, Hongwei; Qin, Pingli; Tao, Hong; Zeng, Wei; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Xingzhong

    2014-02-01

    Copper sulfide (CuS) with nanosheet structure has been synthesized at a low temperature in situ on copper (Cu) film coated fluorine-doped tin oxide glass and bifacial quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) were herein developed by using these CuS as counter electrodes (CEs). CuS is an environmental compatible and low toxic material. The obtained two-dimensional CuS nanosheet film presents high carrier mobility and exhibits highly catalytic performance for the polysulfide-based electrolyte. The QDSSC based on a CuS CE presents a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.65% by optimizing the thickness of the Cu film under front illumination. The QDSSC based on a CuS CE prepared with a 200 nm thick Cu film shows a very close PCE under front and rear illuminations in which the values are as high as 2.70% and 2.40%, respectively. All the PCEs of the CuS CEs are much higher than that of the Pt CE (1.34%).

  1. Optical and electrical stability of viral-templated copper sulfide (Cu{sub 1.8}S) films

    SciTech Connect

    Shahriar Zaman, Mohammed; Bernard Grajeda, Gabriel; Haberer, Elaine D.

    2014-04-14

    The optical and electrical stabilities of viral-templated non-stoichiometric copper sulfide, digenite (Cu{sub 1.8}S) films were investigated. The films were composed of large agglomerates of randomly aligned Cu{sub 1.8}S-coated M13 filamentous phage. Free carrier optical absorption associated with localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) was observed in the near infrared spectral region, and the films were electrically active, displaying a linear current-voltage relationship. Under ambient conditions, the magnitude of the LSPR absorption increased, following a power law relationship with time, and the electrical resistance of viral-templated films decreased significantly. In contrast, the resistance of films stored under low oxygen, low humidity conditions experienced a smaller reduction in electrical resistance. Changes in optical and electrical film properties under ambient conditions were associated with an increase in free carrier concentration within the copper chalcogenide material due to oxygen exposure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to relate this increase in free carrier concentration to compositional changes on the viral-templated material surface.

  2. Scanning electrochemical microscopy studies of micropatterned copper sulfide (Cu(x)S) thin films fabricated by a wet chemistry method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Miao; Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Xiaocui

    2011-05-30

    Patterned copper sulfide (Cu(x)S) microstructures on Si (1 1 1) wafers were successfully fabricated by a relatively simple solution growth method using copper sulfate, ethylenediaminetetraacetate and sodium thiosulfate aqueous solutions as precursors. The Cu(x)S particles were selectively deposited on a patterned self-assembled monolayer of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane regions created by photolithography. To obtain high quality Cu(x)S films, preparative conditions such as concentration, proportion, pH and temperature of the precursor solutions were optimized. Various techniques such as optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction, optical absorption and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) were employed to examine the topography and properties of the micro-patterned Cu(x)S films. Optical microscopy and AFM results indicated that the Cu(x)S micro-pattern possessed high selectivity and clear edge resolution. From combined X-ray diffraction analysis and optical band gap calculations we conclude that Cu(9)S(5) (digenite) was the main phase within the resultant Cu(x)S film. Both SECM image and cyclic voltammograms confirmed that the Cu(x)S film had good electrical conductivity. Moreover, from SECM approach curve analysis, the apparent electron-transfer rate constant (k) in the micro-pattern of Cu(x)S dominated surface was estimated as 0.04 cm/s. The SECM current map showed high edge acuity of the micro-patterned Cu(x)S.

  3. Scanning electrochemical microscopy studies of micropatterned copper sulfide (CuxS) thin films fabricated by a wet chemistry method

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Miao; Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Xiaocui

    2011-01-01

    Patterned copper sulfide (CuxS) microstructures on Si (1 1 1) wafers were successfully fabricated by a relatively simple solution growth method using copper sulfate, ethylenediaminetetraacetate and sodium thiosulfate aqueous solutions as precursors. The CuxS particles were selectively deposited on a patterned self-assembled monolayer of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane regions created by photolithography. To obtain high quality CuxS films, preparative conditions such as concentration, proportion, pH and temperature of the precursor solutions were optimized. Various techniques such as optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction, optical absorption and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) were employed to examine the topography and properties of the micro-patterned CuxS films. Optical microscopy and AFM results indicated that the CuxS micro-pattern possessed high selectivity and clear edge resolution. From combined X-ray diffraction analysis and optical band gap calculations we conclude that Cu9S5 (digenite) was the main phase within the resultant CuxS film. Both SECM image and cyclic voltammograms confirmed that the CuxS film had good electrical conductivity. Moreover, from SECM approach curve analysis, the apparent electron-transfer rate constant (k) in the micro-pattern of CuxS dominated surface was estimated as 0.04 cm/s. The SECM current map showed high edge acuity of the micro-patterned CuxS. PMID:21785491

  4. Modeling biological copper clusters: synthesis of a tricopper complex, and its chloride- and sulfide-bridged congeners.

    PubMed

    Di Francesco, Gianna N; Gaillard, Aleth; Ghiviriga, Ion; Abboud, Khalil A; Murray, Leslie J

    2014-05-05

    The synthesis and characterization of a family of tricopper clusters housed within a tris(β-diketimine) cyclophane ligand (H3L) that bear structural similarities to biological copper clusters are reported. In all complexes, each Cu atom is held within the N2-chelate of a single β-diketiminate arm. Reaction of L(3-) with CuCl affords an anionic complex containing a μ3-chloride donor in the central cavity, whereas there is no evidence for bromide incorporation in the product of the reaction of L(3-) with CuBr (Cu3L). Cu3L reacts with elemental sulfur to generate the corresponding air-stable mixed-valent (μ3-sulfido)tricopper complex, Cu3(μ3-S)L, which represents the first example of a sulfide-bridged copper cluster in which each metal center is both coordinatively unsaturated and held within a N-rich environment. The calculated LUMO is predominantly Cu-S π* in character and delocalized over all three metal centers, which is consistent with the isotropic ten-line absorption (g ∼ 2.095, A ∼ 33 G) observed at room temperature in EPR spectra of the one-electron chemically reduced complex, [Cu3(μ3-S)L](-).

  5. Synthesis And Characterization of Copper Zinc Tin Sulfide Nanoparticles And Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, Ankur

    Copper zinc tin sulfide (Cu2ZnSnS4, or CZTS) is emerging as an alternative material to the present thin film solar cell technologies such as Cu(In,Ga)Se2 and CdTe. All the elements in CZTS are abundant, environmentally benign, and inexpensive. In addition, CZTS has a band gap of ˜1.5 eV, the ideal value for converting the maximum amount of energy from the solar spectrum into electricity. CZTS has a high absorption coefficient (>104 cm-1 in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum) and only a few micron thick layer of CZTS can absorb all the photons with energies above its band gap. CZT(S,Se) solar cells have already reached power conversion efficiencies >10%. One of the ways to improve upon the CZTS power conversion efficiency is by using CZTS quantum dots as the photoactive material, which can potentially achieve efficiencies greater than the present thin film technologies at a fraction of the cost. However, two requirements for quantum-dot solar cells have yet to be demonstrated. First, no report has shown quantum confinement in CZTS nanocrystals. Second, the syntheses to date have not provided a range of nanocrystal sizes, which is necessary not only for fundamental studies but also for multijunction photovoltaic architectures. We resolved these two issues by demonstrating a simple synthesis of CZTS, Cu2SnS3, and alloyed (Cu2SnS3) x(ZnS)y nanocrystals with diameters ranging from 2 to 7 nm from diethyldithiocarbamate complexes. As-synthesized nanocrystals were characterized using high resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy to confirm their phase purity. Nanocrystals of diameter less than 5 nm were found to exhibit a shift in their optical absorption spectra towards higher energy consistent with quantum confinement and previous theoretical predictions. Thin films from CZTS nanocrystals deposited on Mo-coated quartz substrates using drop casting were found to be continuous

  6. Lead isotope compositions of Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary igneous rocks and sulfide minerals in Arizona: Implications for the sources of plutons and metals in porphyry copper deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bouse, R.M.; Ruiz, J.; Titley, S.R.; Tosdal, R.M.; Wooden, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    Porphyry copper deposits in Arizona are genetically associated with Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary igneous complexes that consist of older intermediate volcanic rocks and younger intermediate to felsic intrusions. The igneous complexes and their associated porphyry copper deposits were emplaced into an Early Proterozoic basement characterized by different rocks, geologic histories, and isotopic compositions. Lead isotope compositions of the Proterozoic basement rocks define, from northwest to southeast, the Mojave, central Arizona, and southeastern Arizona provinces. Porphyry copper deposits are present in each Pb isotope province. Lead isotope compositions of Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary plutons, together with those of sulfide minerals in porphyry copper deposits and of Proterozoic country rocks, place important constraints on genesis of the magmatic suites and the porphyry copper deposits themselves. The range of age-corrected Pb isotope compositions of plutons in 12 Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary igneous complexes is 206Pb/204Pb = 17.34 to 22.66, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.43 to 15.96, and 208Pb/204Pb = 37.19 to 40.33. These Pb isotope compositions and calculated model Th/U are similar to those of the Proterozoic rocks in which the plutons were emplaced, thereby indicating that Pb in the younger rocks and ore deposits was inherited from the basement rocks and their sources. No Pb isotope differences distinguish Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary igneous complexes that contain large economic porphyry copper deposits from less rich or smaller deposits that have not been considered economic for mining. Lead isotope compositions of Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary plutons and sulfide minerals from 30 metallic mineral districts, furthermore, require that the southeastern Arizona Pb province be divided into two subprovinces. The northern subprovince has generally lower 206Pb/204Pb and higher model Th/U, and the southern subprovince has higher 206Pb/204Pb and

  7. Plasmonic Cu(2-x)S nanocrystals: optical and structural properties of copper-deficient copper(I) sulfides.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yixin; Pan, Hongcheng; Lou, Yongbing; Qiu, Xiaofeng; Zhu, JunJie; Burda, Clemens

    2009-04-01

    Cu(2-x)S (x = 1, 0.2, 0.03) nanocrystals were synthesized with three different chemical methods: sonoelectrochemical, hydrothermal, and solventless thermolysis methods in order to compare their common optical and structural properties. The compositions of the Cu(2-x)S nanocrystals were varied from CuS (covellite) to Cu(1.97)S (djurleite) through adjusting the reduction potential in the sonoelectrochemical method, adjusting the pH value in the hydrothermal method and by choosing different precursor pretreatments in the solventless thermolysis approach, respectively. The crystallinity and morphology of the products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which shows that most of them might be of pure stoichiometries but some of them are mixtures. The obtained XRDs were studied in comparison to the XRD patterns of previously reported Cu(2-x)S. We found consistently that under ambient conditions the copper deficient Cu(1.97)S (djurleite) is more stable than Cu(2)S (chalcocite). Corroborated by recent computational studies by Lambrecht et al. and experimental work by Alivisatos et al. This may be the reason behind the traditionally known instability of the bulk Cu(2)S/CdS interface. Both Cu(2)S and the copper-deficient Cu(1.97)S have very similar but distinguishable electronic and crystal structure. The optical properties of these Cu(2-x)S NCs were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy and NIR. All presented Cu(2-x)S NCs show a blue shift in the band gap absorption compared to bulk Cu(2-x)S. Moreover the spectra of these Cu(2-x)S NCs indicate direct band gap character based on their oscillator strengths, different from previously reported experimental results. The NIR spectra of these Cu(2-x)S NCs show a carrier concentration dependent plasmonic absorption.

  8. Study of copper sulfide counter electrode on the performances of CdS/CdSe/ZnS-sensitized hierarchical TiO2 spheres quantum dots solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buatong, Nattha; Tang, I.-Ming; Pon-On, Weeraphat

    2015-07-01

    The effects of using copper sulfide (CuS) counter electrodes on the performances of solar cells made with CdS/CdSe/ZnS quantum dots co-sensitized onto hierarchical TiO2 spheres (HTS) used as photoelectrode is reported. The HTS in the QDSSCs is composed of an assembly of numerous TiO2 spheres made by the solvolthermal method. The photoelectrical performance of HTS/CdS/CdSe/ZnS coupled to CuS counter electrode was compared to those coupled to Pt CE. The HTS/CdS/CdSe/ZnS coupled to the CuS CE showed the highest power conversion efficiency η (of 1.310 %.) which is significantly higher than those using a standard Pt CE (η = 0.374%) (3.50 fold). This higher efficiency is the results of the higher electrocatalytic activities when the copper sulfide CEs is used.

  9. In situ solvothermal growth of metal-organic framework-5 supported on porous copper foam for noninvasive sampling of plant volatile sulfides.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuling; Lian, Haixian; Zhou, Langjun; Li, Gongke

    2015-01-06

    The present study reported on an in situ solvothermal growth method for immobilization of metal-organic framework MOF-5 on porous copper foam support for enrichment of plant volatile sulfides. The porous copper support impregnated with mother liquor of MOF-5 anchors the nucleation and growth of MOF crystallites at its surface, and its architecture of the three-dimensional channel enables accommodation of the MOF-5 crystallite seed. A continuous and well-intergrown MOF-5 layer, evidenced from scanning electron microscope imaging and X-ray diffraction, was successfully immobilized on the porous metal bar with good adhesion and high stability. Results show that the resultant MOF-5 coating was thermally stable up to 420 °C and robust enough for replicate extraction for at least 200 times. The MOF-5 bar was then applied to the headspace sorptive extraction of the volatile organic sulfur compounds in Chinese chive and garlic sprout in combination with thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. It showed high extraction sensitivity and good selectivity to these plant volatile sulfides owing to the extraordinary porosity of the metal-organic framework as well as the interaction between the S-donor sites and the surface cations at the crystal edges. Several primary sulfur volatiles containing allyl methyl sulfide, dimethyl disulfide, diallyl sulfide, methyl allyl disulfide, and diallyl disulfide were quantified. Their limits of detection were found to be in the range of 0.2-1.7 μg/L. The organic sulfides were detected in the range of 6.0-23.8 μg/g with recoveries of 76.6-100.2% in Chinese chive and 11.4-54.6 μg/g with recoveries of 77.1-99.8% in garlic sprout. The results indicate the immobilization of MOF-5 on copper foam provides an efficient enrichment formats for noninvasive sampling of plant volatiles.

  10. Oxidation of acid-volatile sulfide in surface sediments increases the release and toxicity of copper to the benthic amphipod Melita plumulosa.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Stuart L; Ward, Daniel; Strom, David; Jolley, Dianne F

    2012-08-01

    Acid-volatile sulfides (AVS) are an important metal-binding phase in sediments. For sediments that contain an excess of AVS over simultaneously extracted metal (SEM) concentrations, acute or chronic effects should not result from the metals Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn. While AVS phases may exist in surface sediments, the exposure to dissolved oxygen may oxidize the AVS and release metals to more bioavailable forms. We investigated the role of oxidation of AVS, and specifically copper sulfide phases, in surface sediments, in the toxicity to juveniles of the epibenthic amphipod, Melita plumulosa. Sediments containing known amounts of copper sulfide were prepared either in situ by reacting dissolved copper with AVS that had formed in field sediments or created in sediments within the laboratory, or by addition of synthesised CuS to sediments. Regardless of the form of the copper sulfide, considerable oxidation of AVS occurred during the 10-d tests. Sediments that had a molar excess of AVS compared to SEM at the start of the tests, did not always have an excess at the end of the tests. Consistent with the AVS-SEM model, no toxicity was observed for sediments with an excess of AVS throughout the tests. However, the study highlights the need to carefully consider the changes in AVS concentrations during tests, and that measurements of AVS and SEM concentrations should carefully target the materials to which the organisms are being exposed throughout tests, which in the case of juvenile M. plumulosa is the top few mm of the sediments.

  11. Iron sulfide attenuates the methanogenic toxicity of elemental copper and zinc oxide nanoparticles and their soluble metal ion analogs.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Estrella, Jorge; Gallagher, Sara; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2016-04-01

    Elemental copper (Cu(0)) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticle (NP) toxicity to methanogens has been attributed to the release of soluble metal ions. Iron sulfide (FeS) partially controls the soluble concentration of heavy metals and their toxicity in aquatic environments. Heavy metals displace the Fe from FeS forming poorly soluble metal sulfides in the FeS matrix. Therefore, FeS may be expected to attenuate the NP toxicity. This work assessed FeS as an attenuator of the methanogenic toxicity of Cu(0) and ZnO NPs and their soluble salt analogs. The toxicity attenuation capacity of fine (25-75μm) and coarse (500 to 1200μm) preparations of FeS (FeS-f and FeS-c respectively) was tested in the presence of highly inhibitory concentrations of CuCl2, ZnCl2 Cu(0) and ZnO NPs. FeS-f attenuated methanogenic toxicity better than FeS-c. The results revealed that 2.5× less FeS-f than FeS-c was required to recover the methanogenic activity to 50% (activity normalized to uninhibited controls). The results also indicated that a molar FeS-f/Cu(0) NP, FeS-f/ZnO NP, FeS-f/ZnCl2, and FeS-f/CuCl2 ratio of 2.14, 2.14, 4.28, and 8.56 respectively, was necessary to recover the methanogenic activity to >75%. Displacement experiments demonstrated that CuCl2 and ZnCl2 partially displaced Fe from FeS. As a whole, the results indicate that not all the sulfide in FeS was readily available to react with the soluble Cu and Zn ions which may explain the need for a large stoichiometric excess of FeS to highly attenuate Cu and Zn toxicity. Overall, this study provides evidence that FeS attenuates the toxicity caused by Cu(0) and ZnO NPs and their soluble ion analogs to methanogens.

  12. Iron Sulfide Attenuates the Methanogenic Toxicity of Elemental Copper and Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles and their Soluble Metal Ion Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Estrella, Jorge; Gallagher, Sara; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A.

    2016-01-01

    Elemental copper (Cu0) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticle (NP) toxicity to methanogens has been attributed to the release of soluble metal ions. Iron sulfide (FeS) partially controls the soluble concentration of heavy metals and their toxicity in aquatic environments. Heavy metals displace the Fe from FeS forming poorly soluble metal sulfides in the FeS matrix. Therefore, FeS may be expected to attenuate the NP toxicity. This work assessed FeS as an attenuator of the methanogenic toxicity of Cu0 and ZnO NPs and their soluble salt analogs. The toxicity attenuation capacity of fine (25–75 µm) and coarse (500 to 1200 µm) preparations of FeS (FeS-f and FeS-c respectively) was tested in the presence of highly inhibitory concentrations of CuCl2, ZnCl2 Cu0 and ZnO NPs. FeS-f attenuated methanogenic toxicity better than FeS-c. The results revealed that 2.5× less FeS-f than FeS-c was required to recover the methanogenic activity to 50% (activity normalized to uninhibited controls). The results also indicated that a molar FeS-f/Cu0 NP, FeS-f/ZnO NP, FeS-f/ZnCl2, and FeS-f/CuCl2 ratio of 2.14, 2.14, 4.28, and 8.56 respectively, was necessary to recover the methanogenic activity to >75%. Displacement experiments demonstrated that CuCl2 and ZnCl2 partially displaced Fe from FeS. As a whole, the results indicate that not all the sulfide in FeS was readily available to react with the soluble Cu and Zn ions which may explain the need for a large stoichiometric excesses of FeS to highly attenuate Cu and Zn toxicity. Overall, this study provides evidence that FeS attenuates the toxicity caused by Cu0 and ZnO NPs and their soluble ion analogs to methanogens. PMID:26803736

  13. Sonochemical method for preparation of copper indium sulfide nanoparticles and their application for solar cell.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Omid; Salavati-Niasari, Masoud; Sabet, Mohammad; Ghanbari, Davood

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, CuInS2 (CIS) nanoparticles were synthesized successfully via a new copper precursor [bis(acetylacetonato)copper(II)], [Cu(acac)2]; at room temperature by ultrasonic method. The effect of sulfur source, solvent, and reaction time was investigated on product morphology and particle size. A series of analyses was performed to characterize the CuInS2 microsphere including X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. CuInS2 nanoparticles were prepared and coated on FTO. Later, the coated FTO was sintered so that a compact and dense CuInS2 film was produced and measured for photovoltaic characteristics such as Voc, Jsc and FF.

  14. Cadmium sulfide/copper ternary heterojunction cell research. Final report, April 1, 1980-August 25, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Mickelsen, R. A.; Chen, W. S.

    1982-08-01

    The properties of polycrystalline, thin-film CuInSe/sub 2//CdS and CuInSe/sub 2//Zn/sub x/Cd/sub 1-x/S solar cells prepared by vacuum-evaporation techniques onto metallized-alumina substrates are described. An efficiency of 10.6% for a 1 cm/sup 2/ area cell and 8.3% for an 8 cm/sup 2/ cell when tested under simulated AM1 illumination is reported. The mixed-sulfide cells are described as exhibiting increased open-circuit voltages, slightly higher short-circuit currents, and improved efficiencies. Mixed-sulfide film preparation by evaporation of CdS and ZnS powders from a single source and from two sources is discussed with preference given to the later technique. Selenide-film preparation in a planetary or rotating substrate vacuum-deposition apparatus is described. A 1 cm/sup 2/ area cell without AR-coating produced by the planetary approach is reported to demonstrate a 7.5% efficiency. The results of cell heat-treatment studies showing a strong environmental dependence are presented and indicate the desirability of an oxygen-containing atmosphere. An automatic, computer-controlled, cell-measurement system for I-V, C-V, and spectral-response analysis is described. The results of the cell-analysis and cell-modeling studies on both the plain CdS and mixed Zn/sub x/Cd/sub 1-x/S thin-film devices are presented. Finally, data obtained from constant illumination and elevated temperature life-tests on the thin-film cells showing little degradation after 9300 hours is reported.

  15. Magmatic sulfide-rich nickel-copper deposits related to picrite and (or) tholeiitic basalt dike-sill complexes-A preliminary deposit model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulz, Klaus J.; Chandler, Val W.; Nicholson, Suzanne W.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Seal, Robert R., II; Woodruff, Laurel G.; Zientek, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Magmatic sulfide deposits containing nickel (Ni) and copper (Cu), with or without (?) platinum-group elements (PGEs), account for approximately 60 percent of the world's Ni production and are active exploration targets in the United States and elsewhere. On the basis of their principal metal production, magmatic sulfide deposits in mafic rocks can be divided into two major types: those that are sulfide-rich, typically with 10 to 90 percent sulfide minerals, and have economic value primarily because of their Ni and Cu contents; and those that are sulfide-poor, typically with 0.5 to 5 percent sulfide minerals, and are exploited principally for PGE. Because the purpose of this deposit model is to facilitate the assessment for undiscovered, potentially economic magmatic Ni-Cu?PGE sulfide deposits in the United States, it addresses only those deposits of economic significance that are likely to occur in the United States on the basis of known geology. Thus, this model focuses on deposits hosted by small- to medium-sized mafic and (or) ultramafic dikes and sills that are related to picrite and tholeiitic basalt magmatic systems generally emplaced in continental settings as a component of large igneous provinces (LIPs). World-class examples (those containing greater than 1 million tons Ni) of this deposit type include deposits at Noril'sk-Talnakh (Russia), Jinchuan (China), Pechenga (Russia), Voisey's Bay (Canada), and Kabanga (Tanzania). In the United States, this deposit type is represented by the Eagle deposit in northern Michigan, currently under development by Kennecott Minerals.

  16. Size-tunable copper nanocluster aggregates and their application in hydrogen sulfide sensing on paper-based devices

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Po-Cheng; Li, Yu-Chi; Ma, Jia-Yin; Huang, Jia-Yu; Chen, Chien-Fu; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2016-01-01

    Polystyrene sulfonate (PSS), a strong polyelectrolyte, was used to prepare red photoluminescent PSS-penicillamine (PA) copper (Cu) nanoclusters (NC) aggregates, which displayed high selectivity and sensitivity to the detection of hydrogen sulfide (H2S). The size of the PSS-PA-Cu NC aggregates could be readily controlled from 5.5 μm to 173 nm using different concentrations of PSS, which enabled better dispersity and higher sensitivity towards H2S. PSS-PA-Cu NC aggregates provided rapid H2S detection by using the strong Cu-S interaction to quench NC photoluminescence as a sensing mechanism. As a result, a detection limit of 650 nM, which is lower than the maximum level permitted in drinking water by the World Health Organization, was achieved for the analysis of H2S in spring-water samples. Moreover, highly dispersed PSS-PA-Cu NC aggregates could be incorporated into a plate-format paper-based analytical device which enables ultra-low sample volumes (5 μL) and feature shorter analysis times (30 min) compared to conventional solution-based methods. The advantages of low reagent consumption, rapid result readout, limited equipment, and long-term storage make this platform sensitive and simple enough to use without specialized training in resource constrained settings. PMID:27113330

  17. Application of ultrasonic radiation for simultaneous removal of auramine O and safranine O by copper sulfide nanoparticles: experimental design.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Khodadoust, Saeid; Sadeghi, Hossein; Khodadoust, Mohammad Ali; Armand, Raham; Fatehi, Allahdad

    2015-02-05

    In this study, copper sulfide nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon (CuS-NP-AC) were synthesized by novel, low cost and green approach and characterized using SEM and XRD. The application of this material for the simulations removal of auramine O (AO) and safranine O (SO) from aqueous solutions was investigated. The dependency of removal percentages to variables such as pH, initial dyes concentration, adsorbent dosage, sonication time and sonication temperature were studied with response surface methodology (RSM) by considering the desirability function (DF). The quadratic model between the dependent and the independent variables was built. The proposed method showed good agreement between the experimental data and predictive value, and it has been successfully employed to removal of AO and SO in aqueous media. The studied adsorbent (0.06 g of CuS-NP-AC) was capable of high percentage removal (99.8% and 99.5%) of 18 mg mL(-1) AO and SO in short time (7.0 min).

  18. Growth of copper sulfide dendrites and nanowires from elemental sulfur on TEM Cu grids under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Han, Qiaofeng; Sun, Shanshan; Li, Jiansheng; Wang, Xin

    2011-04-15

    Copper sulfide dendrites and subsequent uniform nanowires up to tens of micrometers long can be grown on carbon-coated transmission electron microscopy (TEM) Cu grids from elemental sulfur at room temperature under ambient conditions without any solvent and surfactants. TEM and high-resolution TEM studies demonstrated the morphology evolution of Cu₂S from dendrites into ultra-long nanowires with increasing ageing time. The sulfur species influenced significantly the growth rate of Cu₂S dendrites and nanowires, but the final morphology remained the same. The native oxide on the surface of Cu grids played a critical role in the formation of Cu₂S dendrites and nanowires. The crystal structures and phase purity of Cu₂S samples were confirmed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). A solid-liquid-solid growth model may be considered a potential mechanism in Cu₂S morphology evolution on the basis of the experimental results. Most importantly, the present study provides a simple and environmentally friendly route for the growth of one-dimensional (1D) Cu₂S on Cu substrate.

  19. Formation of Copper Zinc Tin Sulfide Thin Films from Colloidal Nanocrystal Dispersions via Aerosol-Jet Printing and Compaction.

    PubMed

    Williams, Bryce A; Mahajan, Ankit; Smeaton, Michelle A; Holgate, Collin S; Aydil, Eray S; Francis, Lorraine F

    2015-06-03

    A three-step method to create dense polycrystalline semiconductor thin films from nanocrystal liquid dispersions is described. First, suitable substrates are coated with nanocrystals using aerosol-jet printing. Second, the porous nanocrystal coatings are compacted using a weighted roller or a hydraulic press to increase the coating density. Finally, the resulting coating is annealed for grain growth. The approach is demonstrated for making polycrystalline films of copper zinc tin sulfide (CZTS), a new solar absorber composed of earth-abundant elements. The range of coating morphologies accessible through aerosol-jet printing is examined and their formation mechanisms are revealed. Crack-free albeit porous films are obtained if most of the solvent in the aerosolized dispersion droplets containing the nanocrystals evaporates before they impinge on the substrate. In this case, nanocrystals agglomerate in flight and arrive at the substrate as solid spherical agglomerates. These porous coatings are mechanically compacted, and the density of the coating increases with compaction pressure. Dense coatings annealed in sulfur produce large-grain (>1 μm) polycrystalline CZTS films with microstructure suitable for thin-film solar cells.

  20. Activatable Multifunctional Persistent Luminescence Nanoparticle/Copper Sulfide Nanoprobe for in Vivo Luminescence Imaging-Guided Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Jian; Sun, Shao-Kai; Wang, Yong; Yang, Cheng-Xiong; Wu, Shu-Qi; Yan, Xiu-Ping

    2016-12-07

    Multifunctional nanoprobes that provide diagnosis and treatment features have attracted great interest in precision medicine. Near-infrared (NIR) persistent luminescence nanoparticles (PLNPs) are optimal materials due to no in situ excitation needed, deep tissue penetration, and high signal-to-noise ratio, while activatable optical probes can further enhance signal-to-noise ratio for the signal turn-on nature. Here, we show the design of an activatable multifunctional PLNP/copper sulfide (CuS)-based nanoprobe for luminescence imaging-guided photothermal therapy in vivo. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-specific peptide substrate (H2N-GPLGVRGC-SH) was used to connect PLNP and CuS to build a MMP activatable system. The nanoprobe not only possesses ultralow-background for in vivo luminescence imaging due to the absence of autofluorescence and optical activatable nature but also offers effective photothermal therapy from CuS nanoparticles. Further bioconjugation of c(RGDyK) enables the nanoprobe for cancer-targeted luminescence imaging-guided photothermal therapy. The good biocompatibility and the multiple functions of highly sensitive tumor-targeting luminescence imaging and effective photothermal therapy make the nanoprobe promising for theranostic application.

  1. Effect of Copper Sulfide Nanoparticles on the Optical and Electrical Behavior of Poly(vinyl alcohol) Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Omed Gh.; Saleem, Salwan A.

    2016-11-01

    Polymer nanocomposite films based on poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) containing copper sulfide nanoparticles (CuS) were prepared using in situ chemical reduction and casting techniques. The synthesized nanocomposites were analyzed using x-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscope, and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. The XRD pattern reveals that the CuS nanoparticles incorporated in the PVA showed a crystalline nature. The observed FTIR band shifts indicate the intermolecular interaction between the CuS nanoparticles and the PVA matrix. The absorbance of nanocomposite samples increased with increasing CuS concentration. The optical band gap energy was estimated using Tauc's formula and it decreased with increasing dopant concentration. The conductivity and dielectric behavior of the samples were studied over the frequency range of 300 Hz to 1 MHz in the temperature range of 30-110°C. The ac conductivity was found to increase with the increase of dopant concentration as well as frequency. Moreover, the variation of frequency exponent ( s) indicated that the conduction mechanism was the correlated barrier hopping model. The experimental results reveal that the optical and electrical performance of PVA can be enhanced dramatically by the addition of a small amount of CuS nanoparticles. This improved properties of the PVA/CuS nanocomposite suggest uses in optoelectronic devices.

  2. Application of ultrasonic radiation for simultaneous removal of auramine O and safranine O by copper sulfide nanoparticles: Experimental design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Khodadoust, Saeid; Sadeghi, Hossein; Khodadoust, Mohammad Ali; Armand, Raham; Fatehi, Allahdad

    2015-02-01

    In this study, copper sulfide nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon (CuS-NP-AC) were synthesized by novel, low cost and green approach and characterized using SEM and XRD. The application of this material for the simulations removal of auramine O (AO) and safranine O (SO) from aqueous solutions was investigated. The dependency of removal percentages to variables such as pH, initial dyes concentration, adsorbent dosage, sonication time and sonication temperature were studied with response surface methodology (RSM) by considering the desirability function (DF). The quadratic model between the dependent and the independent variables was built. The proposed method showed good agreement between the experimental data and predictive value, and it has been successfully employed to removal of AO and SO in aqueous media. The studied adsorbent (0.06 g of CuS-NP-AC) was capable of high percentage removal (99.8% and 99.5%) of 18 mg mL-1 AO and SO in short time (7.0 min).

  3. Size-tunable copper nanocluster aggregates and their application in hydrogen sulfide sensing on paper-based devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Po-Cheng; Li, Yu-Chi; Ma, Jia-Yin; Huang, Jia-Yu; Chen, Chien-Fu; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2016-04-01

    Polystyrene sulfonate (PSS), a strong polyelectrolyte, was used to prepare red photoluminescent PSS-penicillamine (PA) copper (Cu) nanoclusters (NC) aggregates, which displayed high selectivity and sensitivity to the detection of hydrogen sulfide (H2S). The size of the PSS-PA-Cu NC aggregates could be readily controlled from 5.5 μm to 173 nm using different concentrations of PSS, which enabled better dispersity and higher sensitivity towards H2S. PSS-PA-Cu NC aggregates provided rapid H2S detection by using the strong Cu-S interaction to quench NC photoluminescence as a sensing mechanism. As a result, a detection limit of 650 nM, which is lower than the maximum level permitted in drinking water by the World Health Organization, was achieved for the analysis of H2S in spring-water samples. Moreover, highly dispersed PSS-PA-Cu NC aggregates could be incorporated into a plate-format paper-based analytical device which enables ultra-low sample volumes (5 μL) and feature shorter analysis times (30 min) compared to conventional solution-based methods. The advantages of low reagent consumption, rapid result readout, limited equipment, and long-term storage make this platform sensitive and simple enough to use without specialized training in resource constrained settings.

  4. Mechanisms of Corrosion of Copper-Nickel Alloys in Sulfide-Polluted Seawater

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    aerated seawater, but the major constituent is thought to be Cu2.362 7 Also varying amounts of Cu2 (OH) 3 C1, Cu(OH) 2 , CuO, CuCl 2 , Cu3 (OH) 2...Recommended Practice Gl-72 for copper alloy:), rinsed with methyl alcohol, rinsed with deionized water , and then dried in warm air. The snecimens were...solution used in this study contained 500 ml HCl, 100 ml H12S04, and water to make I liter. The mass loss from corrosion can be determined to within an

  5. Copper speciation in sulfidic solutions at low sulfur activity: Further evidence for cluster complexes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Richard A.; Helz, George R.

    1994-07-01

    The solubility of two as0-buffering assemblages in the Cu-S system have been studied: chalcocite-djurleite (Cc-Dj) and anilite-covellite (An-Cv). Ion activity products, [Cu +]HS -] 1/2[H +] - 1/2 (25°C, I = 0) at equilibrium, derived from solubility measurements in penicillamine solutions, are 10 -17.01 ± 0.05 (Cc-Dj) and 10 -17.14 ± 0.10 (An-Cv), from which ΔG° f = -82.11 kJ/mol for Cc and -74.77 kJ/mol for An. In the An-Cv assemblage, aCu2S = 0.55 (2 σ = 0.2) vs. 1.00 in the Cc-containing assemblage. The difference in aCu2S between the two assemblages is used in a novel way to estimate stoichiometry of Cu-HS complexes. The solubility of both assemblages (0.7-0.01 M NaHS, pH 7-12.5, 25°C) can be fit with a model incorporating the same two chemical species, one containing an odd number of Cu atoms (Cu(HS) 2-3, CU 3S 4H 2-3, or a higher multimer) and the other containing an even number of Cu atoms (Cu 2S(HS) 22-, Cu 4S 4H 22-, etc.). The trimer-tetramer model fits the combined data for the two assemblages distinctly better than the monomer-dimer model, but this result is very sensitive to uncertainty in aCu2S. Along with EXAFS results, the weight of the evidence favors small cluster complexes (2-5 Cu atoms), but is inconclusive at the present level of resolution. Multimers can be rationalized because condensation of metal-centered monomers to clusters provides a means for soft acid/base elements to maintain favored coordination geometries at low ligand to metal ratios. Based on the fitting methods developed here, previous covellite solubility data from this laboratory are reinterpreted in terms of Cu 2S 2(HS) 33-, Cu 2S 3)(S 4) 2-, and Cu(S 9)S 10) 3-; the last of these could also be represented by the trimer, Cu 3(S 7) 33-, which is homologous with a known complex. With the measured equilibrium constants, the speciation of Cu in the sulfidic zone of the Black Sea is calculated. Covellite is the stable Cu-S mineral, but the sulfidic water column is vastly

  6. Sulfide geochemistry and genesis of Chouichia and Ain el Bey copper deposits in northwestern Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slim-Shimi, N.; Moëlo, Y.; Tlig, S.; Lévy, C.

    1996-03-01

    The Chouichia and Ain el Bey copper veins that occur in the Eastern Atlas fold belt in northwestern Tunisia, are hosted in Upper Cretaceous-Paleogene sedimentary sequences in a regional transcurrent shear zone. Paragenetic assemblages were formed during four distinct stages all of which are separated by fracturing and brecciation: Stage 1 consists of low temperature siderite (160 180 °C) formation in association with pyrite, including framboidal pyrite and marcasite. Stage 2 includes pseudomorphing of marcasite by As-rich pyrite and arsenopyrite, and formation of chalcopyrite at higher temperatures (200 300 °C) from S-rich, Fe-Cu-bearing fluids; As contents in individual pyrite and arsenopyrite crystals increase markedly in the rims relative to the centers, thus indicating non-equilibrium conditions. Stage 3 involves fracturing and brecciation predating deposition of enargite, luzonite and tennantite at Ain el Bey, and famatinite and tetrahedrite at Chouichia, from As-Sb-Bi-bearing ore-forming fluids; tennantite-tetrahedrite series exhibit iron and copper-excess replacements in tetrahedral sites inter-related with Cu-Fe interactions (electron transfer). In Stage 4 fracturing was followed by calcite formation in voids. Comprehensive data was obtained from scanning electron microprobe (SEM) and microprobe chemical analyses of minerals, geothermometry using sulfur isotopes, As contents in arsenopyrite crystals and fluid inclusions in siderite and calcite, support an input of magmatic hydrothermal ore-forming fluids, although contamination by sedimentary sulfur were also identified.

  7. Changes in the composition of an acid mine drainage microbial community upon successive transfers in medium containing low-grade copper sulfide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Yin, Huaqun; Liang, Yili; Shen, Li; Liu, Yao; Fu, Xian; Baba, Ngom; Zeng, Weimin; Qiu, Guanzhou; Liu, Xueduan

    2011-10-01

    A consortium of microorganisms from acid mine drainage samples was cultured in modified 9 K medium containing low-grade copper sulfide. The culture was maintained for sixty days and then transferred to fresh medium. This process was repeated three more times and a final consortium exhibiting a copper extraction rate of 89.3% was obtained. RFLP and microarrays analysis of 16S rRNA sequences retrieved from the consortia showed that Acidithiobacilluscaldus, Leptospirillumferriphilum, Sulfobacillus sp., Acidiphilium sp., and Sulfolobus spp. were represented in higher numbers in the consortia obtained in the copper-containing medium than in the original consortium. In contrast, a decrease in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Alicyclobacillus sp., Pseudomonas sp., and Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans was observed. The abundance of genes related to sulfur metabolism from At. caldus and Sulfolobus spp., iron oxidation from Leptospirillum sp. and metal resistance from most of the detected microorganisms increased as the consortium was successively transferred into fresh medium.

  8. Corrosion of copper and authigenic sulfide mineral growth in hydrothermal bentonite experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caporuscio, F. A.; Palaich, S. E. M.; Cheshire, M. C.; Jové Colón, C. F.

    2017-03-01

    The focus of this experimental work is to characterize interaction of bentonite with possible used-fuel waste container materials. Experiments were performed up to 300 °C at 150-160 bars for five to six weeks. Bentonite was saturated with a 1900 ppm K-Ca-Na-Cl-bearing water with Cu-foils. Copper rapidly degrades into chalcocite (CuS2) and minor covellite (CuS) in the presence of H2S. Chalcocite growth and corrosion pit depths were measured for four different experimental runs yielding corrosion rates between 8.8 and 116 μm/yr depending on duration of experiment, brine composition, and clay type (bentonite vs. Opalinus Clay). Results of this research show that although pit-corrosion is demonstrated on Cu substrates, experiments show that the reactions that ensue, and the formation of minerals that develop, are extraordinarily slow. This supports the use of Cu in nuclide-containment systems as a possible engineered barrier system material.

  9. Light-induced cation exchange for copper sulfide based CO2 reduction.

    PubMed

    Manzi, Aurora; Simon, Thomas; Sonnleitner, Clemens; Döblinger, Markus; Wyrwich, Regina; Stern, Omar; Stolarczyk, Jacek K; Feldmann, Jochen

    2015-11-11

    Copper(I)-based catalysts, such as Cu2S, are considered to be very promising materials for photocatalytic CO2 reduction. A common synthesis route for Cu2S via cation exchange from CdS nanocrystals requires Cu(I) precursors, organic solvents, and neutral atmosphere, but these conditions are not compatible with in situ applications in photocatalysis. Here we propose a novel cation exchange reaction that takes advantage of the reducing potential of photoexcited electrons in the conduction band of CdS and proceeds with Cu(II) precursors in an aqueous environment and under aerobic conditions. We show that the synthesized Cu2S photocatalyst can be efficiently used for the reduction of CO2 to carbon monoxide and methane, achieving formation rates of 3.02 and 0.13 μmol h(-1) g(-1), respectively, and suppressing competing water reduction. The process opens new pathways for the preparation of new efficient photocatalysts from readily available nanostructured templates.

  10. Photocatalytic, optical and electrical properties of copper-doped zinc sulfide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, S. H.

    2010-01-01

    Thin films of ZnS : Cu nanoparticles were prepared by electron beam evaporation on glass substrates. The Cu content was varied from 0 to 9 at%. XRD examination of the as-prepared films revealed the presence of polycrystalline hexagonal ZnS with preferred orientation depending on the Cu content. As annealing was carried out, grain growth was observed and a new orthorhombic copper sulfate phase emerged. The photocatalytic behaviour of ZnS : Cu was mainly evaluated by measuring the decomposition of methylene blue. The photocatalytic activities were found to decrease with increasing Cu content as well as with increasing annealing temperature. The optical transmittance and reflectance measurements were performed using a spectrophotometer. The spectral transmittance was decreased and the band gap energy was shifted from 3.45 to 3.20 eV with increasing Cu content. The refractive index was determined from transmittance using the Swanepoel method. The refractive index was found to depend on Cu content as well as annealing temperature. A strong decrease in room temperature resistivity was obtained with increasing Cu content. The obtained results are interesting and may find applications in photodegradation of pollutants and future display devices.

  11. Ferric iron uptake genes are differentially expressed in the presence of copper sulfides in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strain LR.

    PubMed

    Ferraz, Lúcio F C; Verde, Leandro C L; Vicentini, Renato; Felício, Ana P; Ribeiro, Marcelo L; Alexandrino, Fabiana; Novo, Maria T M; Garcia, Oswaldo; Rigden, Daniel J; Ottoboni, Laura M M

    2011-03-01

    Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is one of the most widely used microorganisms in bioleaching operations to recover copper from low-grade copper sulfide ores. This work aimed to investigate the relative expression of genes related to the iron uptake system when A. ferrooxidans LR was maintained in contact with chalcopyrite or bornite as the sole energy source. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed that the presence of bornite had no effect on the expression of seven genes related to the siderophore-mediated Fe(III) uptake system, while in the presence of chalcopyrite the expression of the genes was up-regulated. Bioinformatic analysis of the genomic region where these genes were found revealed the existence of three new putative DNA-binding sequences for the ferric iron uptake transcriptional regulator (Fur). Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that a purified A. ferrooxidans His-tagged Fur protein was able to bind in vitro to each of these putative Fur boxes, suggesting that Fur regulated the expression of these genes. The expression of fur and two known Fur-regulated genes, mntH and dsrK, was also investigated in the presence of chalcopyrite. While the expression of fur and mntH was up-regulated, the expression of dsrK was down-regulated. The low amount of ferrous iron in the medium was probably responsible for the up-regulation of fur and the genes related to the siderophore-mediated Fe(III) uptake system when A. ferrooxidans LR was kept in the presence of chalcopyrite. A homology model of the A. ferrooxidans Fur was constructed and revealed that the putative DNA-binding surface presents conserved positively charged residues, supporting a previously suggested mode of interaction with DNA. The up-regulation of fur and the siderophore-mediated Fe(III) uptake genes, and the down-regulation of dsrK suggest that in the presence of chalcopyrite Fur acts as a transcription inducer and repressor.

  12. Reaction Mechanisms of Metals with Hydrogen Sulfide and Thiols in Model Wine. Part 2: Iron- and Copper-Catalyzed Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kreitman, Gal Y; Danilewicz, John C; Jeffery, David W; Elias, Ryan J

    2016-05-25

    Sulfidic off-odors arising during wine production are frequently removed by Cu(II) fining. In part 1 of this study ( 10.1021/acs.jafc.6b00641 ), the reaction of H2S and thiols with Cu(II) was examined; however, the interaction of iron and copper is also known to play an important synergistic role in mediating non-enzymatic wine oxidation. The interaction of these two metals in the oxidation of H2S and thiols (cysteine, 3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol, and 6-sulfanylhexan-1-ol) was therefore examined under wine-like conditions. H2S and thiols (300 μM) were reacted with Fe(III) (100 or 200 μM) alone and in combination with Cu(II) (25 or 50 μM), and concentrations of H2S and thiols, oxygen, and acetaldehyde were monitored over time. H2S and thiols were shown to be slowly oxidized in the presence of Fe(III) alone and were not bound to Fe(III) under model wine conditions. However, Cu(II) added to model wine containing Fe(III) was quickly reduced by H2S and thiols to form Cu(I) complexes, which then rapidly reduced Fe(III) to Fe(II). Oxidation of Fe(II) in the presence of oxygen regenerated Fe(III) and completed the iron redox cycle. In addition, sulfur-derived oxidation products were observed, and the formation of organic polysulfanes was demonstrated.

  13. Low-temperature approach to highly emissive copper indium sulfide colloidal nanocrystals and their bioimaging applications.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kui; Ng, Peter; Ouyang, Jianying; Zaman, Md Badruz; Abulrob, Abedelnasser; Baral, Toya Nath; Fatehi, Dorothy; Jakubek, Zygmunt J; Kingston, David; Wu, Xiaohua; Liu, Xiangyang; Hebert, Charlie; Leek, Donald M; Whitfield, Dennis M

    2013-04-24

    We report our newly developed low-temperature synthesis of colloidal photoluminescent (PL) CuInS2 nanocrystals (NCs) and their in vitro and in vivo imaging applications. With diphenylphosphine sulphide (SDPP) as a S precursor made from elemental S and diphenylphosphine, this is a noninjection based approach in 1-dodecanethiol (DDT) with excellent synthetic reproducibility and large-scale capability. For a typical synthesis with copper iodide (CuI) as a Cu source and indium acetate (In(OAc)3) as an In source, the growth temperature was as low as 160 °C and the feed molar ratios were 1Cu-to-1In-to-4S. Amazingly, the resulting CuInS2 NCs in toluene exhibit quantum yield (QY) of ~23% with photoemission peaking at ~760 nm and full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ~140 nm. With a mean size of ~3.4 nm (measured from the vertices to the bases of the pyramids), they are pyramidal in shape with a crystal structure of tetragonal chalcopyrite. In situ (31)P NMR (monitored from 30 °C to 100 °C) and in situ absorption at 80 °C suggested that the Cu precursor should be less reactive toward SDPP than the In precursor. For our in vitro and in vivo imaging applications, CuInS2/ZnS core-shell QDs were synthesized; afterwards, dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA) or 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) were used for ligand exchange and then bio-conjugation was performed. Two single-domain antibodies (sdAbs) were used. One was 2A3 for in vitro imaging of BxPC3 pancreatic cancer cells. The other was EG2 for in vivo imaging of a Glioblastoma U87MG brain tumour model. The bioimaging data illustrate that the CuInS2 NCs from our SDPP-based low-temperature noninjection approach are good quality.

  14. A comparative study of hollow copper sulfide nanoparticles and hollow gold nanospheres on degradability and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liangran; Panderi, Irene; Yan, Daisy D; Szulak, Kevin; Li, Yajuan; Chen, Yi-Tzai; Ma, Hang; Niesen, Daniel B; Seeram, Navindra; Ahmed, Aftab; Yan, Bingfang; Pantazatos, Dionysios; Lu, Wei

    2013-10-22

    Gold and copper nanoparticles have been widely investigated for photothermal therapy of cancer. However, degradability and toxicity of these nanoparticles remain concerns. Here, we compare hollow CuS nanoparticles (HCuSNPs) with hollow gold nanospheres (HAuNS) in similar particle sizes and morphology following intravenous administration to mice. The injected pegylated HCuSNPs (PEG-HCuSNPs) are eliminated through both hepatobiliary (67 percentage of injected dose, %ID) and renal (23 %ID) excretion within one month postinjection. By contrast, 3.98 %ID of Au is excreted from liver and kidney within one month after iv injection of pegylated HAuNS (PEG-HAuNS). Comparatively, PEG-HAuNS are almost nonmetabolizable, while PEG-HCuSNPs are considered biodegradable nanoparticles. PEG-HCuSNPs do not show significant toxicity by histological or blood chemistry analysis. Principal component analysis and 2-D peak distribution plots of data from matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF IMS) of liver tissues demonstrated a reversible change in the proteomic profile in mice receiving PEG-HCuSNPs. This is attributed to slow dissociation of Cu ion from CuS nanoparticles along with effective Cu elimination for maintaining homeostasis. Nonetheless, an irreversible change in the proteomic profile is observed in the liver from mice receiving PEG-HAuNS by analysis of MALDI-TOF IMS data, probably due to the nonmetabolizability of Au. This finding correlates with the elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase at 3 months after PEG-HAuNS injection, indicating potential long-term toxicity. The comparative results between the two types of nanoparticles will advance the development of HCuSNPs as a new class of biodegradable inorganic nanomaterials for photothermal therapy.

  15. Growth and Characterization of the p-type Semiconductors Tin Sulfide and Bismuth Copper Oxy Selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Jason

    BiCuOSe and SnS are layered, moderate band gap (epsilon G ≈ 1 eV) semiconductors that exhibit intrinsic p type conductivity. Doping of BiCuOSe with Ca results in a slight expansion of the lattice and an increase of the hole concentration from 10 18 cm--3 to greater than 1020 cm --3. The large carrier density in undoped films is the result of copper vacancies. Mobility is unaffected by doping, remaining constant at 1.5 cm2V--1s--1 in both undoped and doped films, because the Bi-O layers serve as the source of carriers, while transport occurs within the Cu-Se layers. Bi possesses a 6s2 lone pair that was expected to hybridize with the oxygen p states at the top of the valence band, resulting in high hole mobility as compared to similar materials such as LaCuOSe, which lack this lone pair. However, both LaCuOSe and BiCuOSe have similar hole mobility. X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy, combined with density functional theory calculations, reveal that the Bi 6 s states contribute deep within the valence band, forming bonding and anti-bonding states with O 2p at 11 eV and 3 eV below the valence band maximum, respectively. Hence, the Bi lone pair does not contribute at the top of the valence band and does not enhance the hole mobility. The Bi 6p states contribute at the bottom of the conduction band, resulting in a smaller band gap for BiCuOSe than LaCuOSe (1 eV vs. 3 eV). SnS is a potential photovoltaic absorber composed of weakly coupled layers stacked along the long axis. This weak coupling results in the formation of strongly oriented films on amorphous substrates. The optical band gap is 1.2 eV, in agreement with GW calculations. Absorption reaches 105 cm--1 within 0.5 eV of the band gap. The p type conduction arises from energetically favorable tin vacancies. Variation of growth conditions yields carrier densities of 1014 -- 1016 cm--3 and hole mobility of 7 -- 15 cm2V--1s--1. SnS was alloyed with rocksalt CaS, which was predicted to form a rocksalt

  16. Efficient and economical access to substituted benzothiazoles: copper-catalyzed coupling of 2-haloanilides with metal sulfides and subsequent condensation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dawei; Xie, Siwei; Xue, Peng; Zhang, Xiaojing; Dong, Jinhua; Jiang, Yongwen

    2009-01-01

    Don't tell azole: The first metal-catalyzed direct coupling of metal sulfides with aryl halides and subsequent intramolecular condensation provided substituted benzothiazoles (see scheme). A wide range of functional groups are tolerated under the reaction conditions.

  17. Petrography, sulfide mineral chemistry, and sulfur isotope evidence for a hydrothermal imprint on Musina copper deposits, Limpopo Province, South Africa: Evidence for a breccia pipe origin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaumba, Jeff B.; Mundalamo, Humbulani R.; Ogola, Jason S.; Cox, J. A.; Fleisher, C. J.

    2016-08-01

    The Musina copper deposits are located in the Central Zone of the Limpopo orogenic belt in Limpopo Province, South Africa. We carried out a petrographic, sulfide composition, and δ34S study on samples from Artonvilla and Campbell copper deposits and a country rock granitic gneiss to Artonvilla Mine to place some constrains on the origin of these deposits. The assemblages at both Artonvilla and Campbell Mines of brecciated quartz, potassium feldspar, muscovite, chlorite, calcite, and amphibole are consistent with sericitic alteration. Quartz, amphibole, feldspars, and micas often display angular textures which are consistent with breccias. Sulfur concentrations in pyrite from Artonvilla Mine plot in a narrow range, from 50.2 wt. % to 55.7 wt. %. With the exception of a positive correlation between Fe and Cu, no well defined correlations are shown by data from the Musina copper deposits. The occurrence of sulfides both as inclusions in, or as interstitial phases in silicates, suggests that hydrothermal alteration that affected these deposits most likely helped concentrate the mineralization at the Musina copper deposits. Sulfur concentrations in chalcopyrite samples investigated vary widely whereas the copper concentrations in chalcopyrite are not unusually higher compared to those from chalcopyrite from other tectonic settings, probably indicating that either the Cu in the Musina copper deposits occurs in native form, and/or that it is hosted by other phases. This observation lends support to the Cu having been concentrated during a later hydrothermal event. One sample from Artonvilla Mine (AtCal01) yielded pyrite δ34S values of 3.1and 3.6‰ and chalcopyrite from the same sample yielded a value of 3.9‰. A country rock granitic gneiss to Artonvilla Mine yielded a δ34Spyrite value of 8.2‰. For Campbell Mine samples, one quartz vein sample has a δ34Spyrite value of 0.5‰ whereas chalcopyrite samples drilled from different areas within the same sample yielded

  18. Electrical and thermal transports of binary copper sulfides CuxS with x from 1.8 to 1.96

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Pengfei; Zhu, Yaqin; Qin, Yuting; Shi, Xun; Chen, Lidong

    2016-10-01

    In this study, a series of copper sulfides CuxS with x spanning from 1.8 to 1.96 was prepared and their crystal structures, elemental valence states, and thermoelectric properties were systematically studied. The valence state of Cu in CuxS is unchanged as the ratio of Cu/S varies, while the thermoelectric properties are very sensitive to the deficiency of Cu. In addition, the type of sulfur arrangement in the crystal structure also plays an important role on the electrical transports. Finally, the optimum Cu/S atomic ratios in the binary CuxS system were identified for high power factor and thermoelectric figure of merit.

  19. Ligand-free highly effective iron/copper co-catalyzed formation of dimeric aryl ethers or sulfides.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xiaoming; Li, Tingyi; Zhu, Yan; Sun, Peng; Yang, Hailong; Mao, Jincheng

    2011-07-21

    Highly selective coupling of diiodoarenes with phenols or phenthiols can be performed by using a low-cost, benign character and readily available Fe/Cu catalytic system in the absence of ligands. It is noteworthy that the desired dimeric aryl ethers or sulfides could be obtained in high yields by coupling between diiodoarenes and phenols, or diphenols with aryl iodides.

  20. Removal of copper from ferrous scrap

    DOEpatents

    Blander, M.; Sinha, S.N.

    1990-05-15

    A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

  1. Removal of copper from ferrous scrap

    DOEpatents

    Blander, M.; Sinha, S.N.

    1987-07-30

    A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

  2. Removal of copper from ferrous scrap

    DOEpatents

    Blander, Milton; Sinha, Shome N.

    1990-01-01

    A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

  3. Copper(II) mediated hydrogen sulfide and thiol oxidation to disulfides and organic polysulfanes, and their reductive cleavage in wine: Mechanistic elucidation and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Kreitman, Gal Y; Danilewicz, John C; Jeffery, David William; Elias, Ryan J

    2017-03-05

    Fermentation-derived volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) are undesirable in wine and are often remediated in a process known as copper fining. In the present study, the addition of Cu(II) to model and real wine systems containing hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and thiols provided evidence for the generation of disulfides (disulfanes) and organic polysulfanes. Cu(II) fining of a white wine spiked with glutathione, H2S, and methanethiol (MeSH) resulted in the generation of MeSH-glutathione disulfide and trisulfane. In the present study, the mechanisms underlying the interaction of H2S and thiols with Cu(II) is discussed, and a prospective diagnostic test for releasing volatile sulfur compounds from their non-volatile forms in wine is investigated. This test utilized a combination of reducing agents, metal chelators, and low oxygen conditions to promote the release of H2S and MeSH, at levels above their reported sensory thresholds, from red and white wines that were otherwise free of sulfidic off-odors at the time of addition.

  4. The Effect of Ferrous Sulfate on Sulfide-Induced Corrosion of Copper-Base Condenser Alloys in Aerated Seawater.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    been further 8-16 enhanced by the addition of iron to the seawater. This iron has been introduced either through addition of ferrous sulfate or by...direct oxidation of an iron "waster piece" using an externally applied current. 6 North and Pryor conducted experiments on copper in sodium chloride... iron -containing surface films on copper alloys. 15 Gasparini, et al, built upon the work of North and Pryor by investigating the colloidal chemistry

  5. Facile room-temperature synthesis of carboxylated graphene oxide-copper sulfide nanocomposite with high photodegradation and disinfection activities under solar light irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shuyan; Liu, Jincheng; Zhu, Wenyu; Hu, Zhong-Ting; Lim, Teik-Thye; Yan, Xiaoli

    2015-11-01

    Carboxylic acid functionalized graphene oxide-copper (II) sulfide nanoparticle composite (GO-COOH-CuS) was prepared from carboxylated graphene oxide and copper precursor in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) by a facile synthesis process at room temperature. The high-effective combination, the interaction between GO-COOH sheets and CuS nanoparticles, and the enhanced visible light absorption were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS) and Photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The as-synthesized GO-COOH-CuS nanocomposite exhibited excellent photocatalytic degradation performance of phenol and rhodamine B, high antibacterial activity toward E. coli and B. subtilis, and good recovery and reusability. The influence of CuS content, the synergistic reaction between CuS and GO-COOH, and the charge-transfer mechanism were systematically investigated. The facile and low-energy synthesis process combined with the excellent degradation and antibacterial performance signify that the GO-COOH-CuS has a great potential for water treatment application.

  6. Facile room-temperature synthesis of carboxylated graphene oxide-copper sulfide nanocomposite with high photodegradation and disinfection activities under solar light irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shuyan; Liu, Jincheng; Zhu, Wenyu; Hu, Zhong-Ting; Lim, Teik-Thye; Yan, Xiaoli

    2015-01-01

    Carboxylic acid functionalized graphene oxide-copper (II) sulfide nanoparticle composite (GO-COOH-CuS) was prepared from carboxylated graphene oxide and copper precursor in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) by a facile synthesis process at room temperature. The high-effective combination, the interaction between GO-COOH sheets and CuS nanoparticles, and the enhanced visible light absorption were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS) and Photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The as-synthesized GO-COOH-CuS nanocomposite exhibited excellent photocatalytic degradation performance of phenol and rhodamine B, high antibacterial activity toward E. coli and B. subtilis, and good recovery and reusability. The influence of CuS content, the synergistic reaction between CuS and GO-COOH, and the charge-transfer mechanism were systematically investigated. The facile and low-energy synthesis process combined with the excellent degradation and antibacterial performance signify that the GO-COOH-CuS has a great potential for water treatment application. PMID:26553709

  7. Sulfide oxidation and distribution of metals near abandoned copper mines in coastal environments, Prince William Sound, Alaska, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koski, R.A.; Munk, L.; Foster, A.L.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Stillings, L.L.

    2008-01-01

    The oxidation of sulfide-rich rocks, mostly leftover debris from Cu mining in the early 20th century, is contributing to metal contamination of local coastal environments in Prince William Sound, Alaska. Analyses of sulfide, water, sediment, precipitate and biological samples from the Beatson, Ellamar, and Threeman mine sites show that acidic surface waters generated from sulfide weathering are pathways for redistribution of environmentally important elements into and beyond the intertidal zone at each site. Volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits composed of pyrrhotite and (or) pyrite + chalcopyrite + sphalerite with subordinate galena, arsenopyrite, and cobaltite represent potent sources of Cu, Zn, Pb, As, Co, Cd, and Hg. The resistance to oxidation among the major sulfides increases in the order pyrrhotite ??? sphalerite < chalcopyrite ??? pyrite; thus, pyrrhotite-rich rocks are typically more oxidized than those dominated by pyrite. The pervasive alteration of pyrrhotite begins with rim replacement by marcasite followed by replacement of the core by sulfur, Fe sulfate, and Fe-Al sulfate. The oxidation of chalcopyrite and pyrite involves an encroachment by colloform Fe oxyhydroxides at grain margins and along crosscutting cracks that gradually consumes the entire grain. The complete oxidation of sulfide-rich samples results in a porous aggregate of goethite, lepidocrocite and amorphous Fe-oxyhydroxide enclosing hydrothermal and sedimentary silicates. An inverse correlation between pH and metal concentrations is evident in water data from all three sites. Among all waters sampled, pore waters from Ellamar beach gravels have the lowest pH (???3) and highest concentrations of base metals (to ???25,000 ??g/L), which result from oxidation of abundant sulfide-rich debris in the sediment. High levels of dissolved Hg (to 4100 ng/L) in the pore waters probably result from oxidation of sphalerite-rich rocks. The low-pH and high concentrations of dissolved Fe, Al, and SO4

  8. Lead-Sulfide-Selenide Quantum Dots and Gold-Copper Alloy Nanoparticles Augment the Light-Harvesting Ability of Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Das, Aparajita; Deepa, Melepurath; Ghosal, Partha

    2017-01-10

    Lead-sulfide-selenide (PbSSe) quantum dots (QDs) and gold-copper (AuCu) alloy nanoparticles (NPs) were incorporated into a cadmium sulfide (CdS)/titanium oxide (TiO2 ) photoanode for the first time to achieve enhanced conversion of solar energy into electricity. PbSSe QDs with a band gap of 1.02 eV extend the light-harvesting range of the photoanode from the visible region to the near-infrared region. The conduction band (CB) edge of the PbSSe QDs is wedged between the CBs of TiO2 and CdS; this additional level coupled with the good electrical conductivity of the dots facilitate charge transport and collection, and a high power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 4.44 % is achieved for the champion cell with the TiO2 /PbSSe/CdS electrode. Upon including AuCu alloy NPs in the QD-sensitized electrodes, light absorption is enhance by plasmonic and light-scattering effects and also by the injection of hot electrons to the CBs of the QDs. Comparison of the incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency enhancement factors in addition to fluorescence decay and impedance studies reveal that the PbSSe QDs and AuCu alloy NPs promote charge injection to the current collector and increase the photogenerated charges produced, which thus enables the TiO2 /PbSSe/CdS/AuCu cell to deliver the highest PCE of 5.26 % among all the various photoanode compositions used.

  9. Photocatalytic Activities of Copper Doped Cadmium Sulfide Microspheres Prepared by a Facile Ultrasonic Spray-Pyrolysis Method.

    PubMed

    Su, Jinzhan; Zhang, Tao; Li, Yufeng; Chen, Yubin; Liu, Maochang

    2016-06-15

    Ultrasonic spray pyrolysis is a superior method for preparing and synthesizing spherical particles of metal oxide or sulfide semiconductors. Cadmium sulfide (CdS) photocatalysts with different sizes and doped-CdS with different dopants and doping levels have been synthesized to study their properties of photocatalytic hydrogen production from water. The CdS photocatalysts were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray fluorescence-spectrometry (XRF), UV-Vis absorption spectra and X-ray diffraction (XRD) to study their morphological and optical properties. The sizes of the prepared CdS particles were found to be proportional to the concentration of the metal nitrates in the solution. The CdS photocatalyst with smaller size showed a better photocatalytic activity. In addition, Cu doped CdS were also deposited and their photocatalytic activities were also investigated. Decreased bandgaps of CdS synthesized with this method were found and could be due to high density surface defects originated from Cd vacancies. Incorporating the Cu elements increased the bandgap by taking the position of Cd vacancies and reducing the surface defect states. The optimal Cu-doped level was found to be 0.5 mol % toward hydrogen evolution from aqueous media in the presence of sacrificial electron donors (Na₂S and Na₂SO₃) at a pH of 13.2. This study demonstrated that ultrasonic spray pyrolysis is a feasible approach for large-scale photocatalyst synthesis and corresponding doping modification.

  10. Copper-catalyzed three-component synthesis of benzothiazolethiones from o-iodoanilines, isocyanide, and potassium sulfide.

    PubMed

    Dang, Pan; Zeng, Weilan; Liang, Yun

    2015-01-02

    An efficient copper catalyzed strategy for the synthesis of a variety of benzothiazolethione derivatives has been developed. In the presence of CuCl, the three-component reaction of o-iodoanilines and K2S with p-toluenesulfonylmethyl isocyanide proceeded smoothly to obtain the corresponding benzothiazolethiones in good to excellent isolated yields. Notably, isocyanide functioned as a carbon source and K2S functioned as a sulfur source in this reaction.

  11. 21 CFR 73.2995 - Luminescent zinc sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Luminescent zinc sulfide. 73.2995 Section 73.2995... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2995 Luminescent zinc sulfide. (a) Identity. The color additive luminescent zinc sulfide is zinc sulfide containing a copper activator....

  12. 21 CFR 73.2995 - Luminescent zinc sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Luminescent zinc sulfide. 73.2995 Section 73.2995... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2995 Luminescent zinc sulfide. (a) Identity. The color additive luminescent zinc sulfide is zinc sulfide containing a copper activator....

  13. 21 CFR 73.2995 - Luminescent zinc sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Luminescent zinc sulfide. 73.2995 Section 73.2995... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2995 Luminescent zinc sulfide. (a) Identity. The color additive luminescent zinc sulfide is zinc sulfide containing a copper activator....

  14. 21 CFR 73.2995 - Luminescent zinc sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Luminescent zinc sulfide. 73.2995 Section 73.2995... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2995 Luminescent zinc sulfide. (a) Identity. The color additive luminescent zinc sulfide is zinc sulfide containing a copper activator....

  15. 21 CFR 73.2995 - Luminescent zinc sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Luminescent zinc sulfide. 73.2995 Section 73.2995... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2995 Luminescent zinc sulfide. (a) Identity. The color additive luminescent zinc sulfide is zinc sulfide containing a copper activator....

  16. High color rendering index white light emitting diodes fabricated from a combination of carbon dots and zinc copper indium sulfide quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Chun; Liu, Wenyan; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Yu E-mail: wyu6000@gmail.com; Wang, Yu; Kalytchuk, Sergii; Kershaw, Stephen V.; Rogach, Andrey L.; Zhang, Tieqiang; Zhao, Jun; Yu, William W. E-mail: wyu6000@gmail.com

    2014-06-30

    In a line with most recent trends in developing non-toxic fluorescent nanomaterials, we combined blue emissive carbon dots with green and red emissive zinc copper indium sulfide (ZCIS) core/shell quantum dots (QDs) to achieve white light-emitting diodes (WLEDs) with a high color rendering index of 93. This indicates that ZCIS QDs, with their broad emission bands, can be employed to effectively make up the emission of carbon dots in the yellow and red regions to produce WLEDs in the wide region of color temperature by tuning the volume ratio of these constituting luminophores. Their electroluminescence characteristics including color rendering index, Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) color coordinates, and color temperatures were evaluated as a function of forward current. The CIE-1931 chromaticity coordinates of the as-prepared WLEDs, exhibiting good stability, were slightly shifted from (0.321, 0.312) at 10 mA to (0.351, 0.322) at 30 mA, which was mainly caused by the different thermal quenching coefficients of carbon dots and ZCIS QDs.

  17. One-pot fabrication of FRET-based fluorescent probe for detecting copper ion and sulfide anion in 100% aqueous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Kun; Chen, Jian; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Peisheng; Yu, Maolin; Long, Yunfei; Yi, Pinggui

    2017-04-01

    The design of effective tools for detecting copper ion (Cu2 +) and sulfide anion (S2 -) is of great importance due to the abnormal level of Cu2 + and S2 - has been associated with an increase in risk of many diseases. Herein, we report on the fabrication of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) based fluorescent probe PF (PEI-FITC) for detecting Cu2 + and S2 - in 100% aqueous media via a facile one-pot method by covalent linking fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) with branched-polyethylenimine (b-PEI). PF could selectively coordinate with Cu2 + among 10 metal ions to form PF-Cu2 + complex, resulting in fluorescence quenching through FRET mechanism. Furthermore, the in situ generated PF-Cu2 + complex can be used to selectively detect S2 - based on the displacement approach, resulting in an off-on type sensing. There is no obvious interference from other anions, such as Cl-, NO3-, ClO4-, SO42 -, HCO3-, CO32 -, Br-, HPO42 -, F- and S2O32 -. In addition, PF was successfully used to determine Cu2 + and S2 - in human serum and tap water samples. Therefore, the FRET-based probe PF may provide a new method for selective detection of multifarious analysts in biological and environmental applications, and even hold promise for application in more complicated systems.

  18. An ultrasensitive electrochemiluminescence sensor based on reduced graphene oxide-copper sulfide composite coupled with capillary electrophoresis for determination of amlodipine besylate in mice plasma.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yanfen; Wang, Hao; Sun, Shuangjiao; Tang, Lifu; Cao, Yupin; Deng, Biyang

    2016-12-15

    A new electrochemiluminescence (ECL) sensor based on reduced graphene oxide-copper sulfide (rGO-CuS) composite coupled with capillary electrophoresis (CE) was constructed for the ultrasensitive detection of amlodipine besylate (AML) for the first time. In this work, rGO-CuS composite was synthesized by one-pot hydrothermal method and used for electrode modification. The electrochemical and ECL behaviors of the sensor were investigated. More than 5-fold enhance in ECL intensity was observed after modified with rGO-CuS composite. The results can be ascribed to the presence of rGO-CuS composite on the electrode surface that facilitates the electron transfer rate between the electroactive center of Ru(bpy)3(2+) and the electrode. The ECL sensor was coupled with CE to improve the selectivity and the CE-ECL parameters that affect separation and detection were optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the linear ranges for AML was 0.008-5.0μg/mL with a detection limit of 2.8ng/mL (S/N=3). The method displayed the advantages of high sensitivity, good selectivity, wide linear range, low detection limit and fine reproducibility, and was used to analyze AML in mice plasma with a satisfactory result, which holds a great potential in the field of pharmaceutical analysis.

  19. An efficient dual-loaded multifunctional nanocarrier for combined photothermal and photodynamic therapy based on copper sulfide and chlorin e6.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaoxiao; Pang, Xiaojuan; Lei, Mingzhu; Ma, Man; Guo, Fang; Wang, Jinping; Yu, Meng; Tan, Fengping; Li, Nan

    2016-04-30

    The therapeutic effectiveness of photodynamic therapy (PDT) was hampered by the poor water solubility and instability in physiological conditions of the photosensitizers. Here, we designed folate conjugated thermosensitive liposomes (TSL) as the nanocarrier to improve the solubility, stability and biocompatibility of photosensitizer Chlorin e6 (Ce6). Based on the photothermal effect, we combined copper sulfide (CuS) as the photothermal agent to realize heat-triggered Ce6 release as well as synergistic effect of photothermal and photodynamic therapy. In vitro MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay showed that Ce6-CuS-TSL had low dark toxicity, while performed excellent phototoxicity under the combined 660 and 808 nm laser irradiation compared to any single laser irradiation alone. Moreover, in vivo combination therapy study revealed that Ce6-CuS-TSL inhibited tumor growth to a great extent without evident side effect under the laser irradiation. All detailed evidence demonstrated a considerable potential of Ce6-CuS-TSL for synergistic cancer treatment.

  20. One-step fabrication of copper sulfide nanoparticles decorated on graphene sheets as highly stable and efficient counter electrode for CdS-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessein, Amr; Wang, Feiju; Masai, Hirokazu; Matsuda, Kazunari; Abd El-Moneim, Ahmed

    2016-11-01

    Quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) are thin-film photovoltaics and highly promising as next-generation solar cells owing to their high theoretical efficiency, easy fabrication process, and low production cost. However, the practical photoconversion efficiencies (PCEs) of QDSSCs are still far below the theoretically estimated value owing to the lack of an applicable design of the materials and electrodes. In this work, we developed a highly stable and efficient counter electrode (CE) from copper sulfide nanocrystals and reduced graphene oxide (Cu x S@RGO) for QDSSC applications. The Cu x S@RGO electrocatalyst was successfully prepared by a facile one-pot hydrothermal method, then directly applied to a fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO)-coated glass substrate by the simple drop-casting technique. Owing to the synergistic effect between Cu x S nanocrystals and conductive RGO sheets, the Cu x S@RGO CE showed high electrocatalytic activity for polysulfide electrolyte reduction. A CdS QDSSC based on the Cu x S@RGO CE yielded a high and reproducible PCE of 2.36%, exceeding those of 1.57 and 1.33% obtained with the commonly used Cu2S/brass and Pt CEs, respectively. Moreover, the QDSSC with the Cu x S@RGO CE showed excellent photostability in a light-soaking test without any obvious decay in the photocurrent, whereas the cell based on the Cu2S/brass CE was severely degraded.

  1. High color rendering index white light emitting diodes fabricated from a combination of carbon dots and zinc copper indium sulfide quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chun; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Yu; Liu, Wenyan; Kalytchuk, Sergii; Kershaw, Stephen V.; Zhang, Tieqiang; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Zhao, Jun; Yu, William W.; Rogach, Andrey L.

    2014-06-01

    In a line with most recent trends in developing non-toxic fluorescent nanomaterials, we combined blue emissive carbon dots with green and red emissive zinc copper indium sulfide (ZCIS) core/shell quantum dots (QDs) to achieve white light-emitting diodes (WLEDs) with a high color rendering index of 93. This indicates that ZCIS QDs, with their broad emission bands, can be employed to effectively make up the emission of carbon dots in the yellow and red regions to produce WLEDs in the wide region of color temperature by tuning the volume ratio of these constituting luminophores. Their electroluminescence characteristics including color rendering index, Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) color coordinates, and color temperatures were evaluated as a function of forward current. The CIE-1931 chromaticity coordinates of the as-prepared WLEDs, exhibiting good stability, were slightly shifted from (0.321, 0.312) at 10 mA to (0.351, 0.322) at 30 mA, which was mainly caused by the different thermal quenching coefficients of carbon dots and ZCIS QDs.

  2. Copper

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Copper ; CASRN 7440 - 50 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects )

  3. Plasmid-encoded copper resistance and precipitation by Mycobacterium scrofulaceum.

    PubMed Central

    Erardi, F X; Failla, M L; Falkinham, J O

    1987-01-01

    A copper-tolerant Mycobacterium scrofulaceum strain was able to remove copper from culture medium by sulfate-dependent precipitation as copper sulfide. Such precipitation of copper sulfide was not observed in a derivative that lacks a 173-kilobase plasmid. In addition, the plasmid-carrying strain has a sulfate-independent copper resistance mechanism. PMID:3662522

  4. INVESTIGATION OF THIN FILM CADMIUM SULFIDE SOLAR CELLS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    SOLAR CELLS , *CADMIUM COMPOUNDS, FILMS, SULFIDES, VAPOR PLATING, VACUUM APPARATUS, SINGLE CRYSTALS, TITANIUM, COPPER COMPOUNDS, CHLORIDES, INDIUM, MOLYBDENUM, SILICON COMPOUNDS, MONOXIDES, SURFACE PROPERTIES, ENERGY CONVERSION.

  5. Efficacy of lime, biosolids, and mycorrhiza for the phytostabilization of sulfidic copper tailings in Chile: a greenhouse experiment.

    PubMed

    Verdugo, César; Sánchez, Pablo; Santibáñez, Claudia; Urrestarazu, Paola; Bustamante, Elena; Silva, Yasna; Gourdon, Denis; Ginocchio, Rosanna

    2011-02-01

    Inadequate abandonment of copper mine tailings under semiarid Mediterranean climate type conditions has posed important environmental risks in Chile due to wind and rain erosion. There are cost-effective technologies for tailings stabilization such as phytostabilization. However, this technology has not been used in Chile yet. This study evaluated in a greenhouse assay the efficacy of biosolids, lime, and a commercial mycorrhiza to improve adverse conditions of oxidized Cu mine tailings for adequate establishment and grow of Lolium perenne L. var nui. Chemical characterization of experimental substrates and pore water samples were performed; plant density, biomass production, chlorophyll content, and metal content in shoots was evaluated in rye grass plants after an eight-week growth period. Results showed that neutralization of tailings and superficial application of biosolids increased both aerial biomass production and chlorophyll content of rye grass. Increased Cu solubilization and translocation to shoots occurred after biosolids application (mixed), particularly on unlimed tailings, due to formation of soluble organometallic complexes with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) which can be readily absorbed by plant roots. Positive effects of mycorrhizal inoculation on rye grass growth were restricted to treatments with superficial application of biosolids, probably due to Cu toxicity effects on commercial mycorrhiza used (Glomulus intraradices).

  6. Simultaneous ultrasound-assisted ternary adsorption of dyes onto copper-doped zinc sulfide nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon: optimization by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Asfaram, Arash; Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Hajati, Shaaker; Goudarzi, Alireza; Bazrafshan, Ali Akbar

    2015-06-15

    The simultaneous and competitive ultrasound-assisted removal of Auramine-O (AO), Erythrosine (Er) and Methylene Blue (MB) from aqueous solutions were rapidly performed onto copper-doped zinc sulfide nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon (ZnS:Cu-NP-AC). ZnS:Cu nanoparticles were studied by FESEM, XRD and TEM. First, the effect of pH was optimized in a one-at-a-time procedure. Then the dependency of dyes removal percentage in their ternary solution on the level and magnitude of variables such as sonication time, initial dyes concentrations and adsorbent dosage was fully investigated and optimized by central composite design (CCD) under response surface methodology (RSM) as well as by regarding desirability function (DF) as a good and general criterion. The good agreement found between experimental and predicted values supports and confirms the suitability of the present model to predict adsorption state. The applied ultrasound strongly enhanced mass transfer process and subsequently performance. Hence, a small amount of the adsorbent (0.04 g) was capable to remove high percentage of dyes, i.e. 100%, 99.6% and 100% for MB, AO and Er, respectively, in very short time (2.5 min). The experimental equilibrium data fitting to Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich models showed that the Langmuir model applies well for the evaluation and description of the actual behavior of adsorption. The small amount of proposed adsorbent (0.015 g) was applicable for successful removal of dyes (RE>99.0%) in short time (2.5 min) with high adsorption capacity in single component system (123.5 mg g(-1) for MB, 123 mg g(-1) for AO and 84.5 mg g(-1) for Er). Kinetics evaluation of experiments at various time intervals reveals that adsorption processes can be well predicated and fitted by pseudo-second-order and Elovich models.

  7. Simultaneous ultrasound-assisted ternary adsorption of dyes onto copper-doped zinc sulfide nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon: Optimization by response surface methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asfaram, Arash; Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Hajati, Shaaker; Goudarzi, Alireza; Bazrafshan, Ali Akbar

    2015-06-01

    The simultaneous and competitive ultrasound-assisted removal of Auramine-O (AO), Erythrosine (Er) and Methylene Blue (MB) from aqueous solutions were rapidly performed onto copper-doped zinc sulfide nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon (ZnS:Cu-NP-AC). ZnS:Cu nanoparticles were studied by FESEM, XRD and TEM. First, the effect of pH was optimized in a one-at-a-time procedure. Then the dependency of dyes removal percentage in their ternary solution on the level and magnitude of variables such as sonication time, initial dyes concentrations and adsorbent dosage was fully investigated and optimized by central composite design (CCD) under response surface methodology (RSM) as well as by regarding desirability function (DF) as a good and general criterion. The good agreement found between experimental and predicted values supports and confirms the suitability of the present model to predict adsorption state. The applied ultrasound strongly enhanced mass transfer process and subsequently performance. Hence, a small amount of the adsorbent (0.04 g) was capable to remove high percentage of dyes, i.e. 100%, 99.6% and 100% for MB, AO and Er, respectively, in very short time (2.5 min). The experimental equilibrium data fitting to Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich models showed that the Langmuir model applies well for the evaluation and description of the actual behavior of adsorption. The small amount of proposed adsorbent (0.015 g) was applicable for successful removal of dyes (RE > 99.0%) in short time (2.5 min) with high adsorption capacity in single component system (123.5 mg g-1 for MB, 123 mg g-1 for AO and 84.5 mg g-1 for Er). Kinetics evaluation of experiments at various time intervals reveals that adsorption processes can be well predicated and fitted by pseudo-second-order and Elovich models.

  8. Selenium Sulfide

    MedlinePlus

    Selenium sulfide, an anti-infective agent, relieves itching and flaking of the scalp and removes the dry, ... Selenium sulfide comes in a lotion and is usually applied as a shampoo. As a shampoo, selenium ...

  9. Copper-doped silica materials silanized with bis-(triethoxy silyl propyl)-tetra sulfide for mercury vapor capture

    SciTech Connect

    D.E. Meyer; N. Meeks; S. Sikdar; N.D. Hutson; D. Hua; D. Bhattacharyya

    2008-07-15

    The use of Cu-S sites for Hg capture from the gas phase has been successfully applied to a silica-based platform using an S4 organic polysulfane and copper sulfate. The maximum fixed-bed equilibrium capacity achieved using these materials was 19 789 {mu}g Hg.g{sup -1} sorbent for a material with 2.5 wt % Cu and 6 wt % S. An optimal S level was determined to be around 3 wt % because enhancement of capacity was only 18% when increasing from this 3 to 6 wt %. The rate of adsorption in pure beds ranged from 0.6 to 1.6 {mu}g Hg.min{sup -1} depending on the inlet concentration. Differences in breakthrough times suggest that material deposition is not uniform. When compared to two other platforms, commercially available Darco HG-LH and previously tested Fe-Cu-S4 nanoaggregates, the Si-1 material performed the best in fixed-bed testing. During entrained-flow testing, a steady-state Hg removal of 82% was achieved using Si-1 at injection rates of both 6 x 10{sup -5} and 1.2 x 10{sup -4} g.L{sup -1}.h{sup -1}. The lack of increase in Hg removal when the injection rate is doubled suggests that pore accessibility is the rate-controlling step during dynamic Hg capture. A calculation of the approximate pore usage based on injection testing helped confirm this observation. During injection testing, the performance of Si-1 was only diminished 10% when exposed to 20 ppm SO{sub 3}. This is an encouraging result for flue-gas applications where SO{sub 3} levels range from 1 to 40 ppm. Testing demonstrated that Si-1 is stable when exposed to leaching conditions after concrete blending and cement impregnation. This is an important aspect to consider for injection because the sale of fly ash for concrete is a key cost-recovery tool for power plants. 27 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Structural, optical and charge generation properties of chalcostibite and tetrahedrite copper antimony sulfide thin films prepared from metal xanthates† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Chemical structures of the used metal xanthates, additional XRD, SEM-EDX and UV-vis data. See DOI: 10.1039/c5ta05777a Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    MacLachlan, Andrew J.; Brown, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report on a solution based approach for the preparation of thin films of copper antimony sulfide, an emerging absorber material for third generation solar cells. In this work, copper and antimony xanthates are used as precursor materials for the formation of two different copper antimony sulfide phases: chalcostibite (CuSbS2) and tetrahedrite (Cu12Sb4S13). Both phases were thoroughly investigated regarding their structural and optical properties. Moreover, thin films of chalcostibite and tetrahedrite were prepared on mesoporous TiO2 layers and photoinduced charge transfer in these metal sulfide/TiO2 heterojunctions was studied via transient absorption spectroscopy. Photoinduced charge transfer was detected in both the chalcostibite as well as the tetrahedrite sample, which is an essential property in view of applying these materials as light-harvesting agents in semiconductor sensitized solar cells. PMID:27019713

  11. Nanostructured metal sulfides for energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rui, Xianhong; Tan, Huiteng; Yan, Qingyu

    2014-08-01

    Advanced electrodes with a high energy density at high power are urgently needed for high-performance energy storage devices, including lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and supercapacitors (SCs), to fulfil the requirements of future electrochemical power sources for applications such as in hybrid electric/plug-in-hybrid (HEV/PHEV) vehicles. Metal sulfides with unique physical and chemical properties, as well as high specific capacity/capacitance, which are typically multiple times higher than that of the carbon/graphite-based materials, are currently studied as promising electrode materials. However, the implementation of these sulfide electrodes in practical applications is hindered by their inferior rate performance and cycling stability. Nanostructures offering the advantages of high surface-to-volume ratios, favourable transport properties, and high freedom for the volume change upon ion insertion/extraction and other reactions, present an opportunity to build next-generation LIBs and SCs. Thus, the development of novel concepts in material research to achieve new nanostructures paves the way for improved electrochemical performance. Herein, we summarize recent advances in nanostructured metal sulfides, such as iron sulfides, copper sulfides, cobalt sulfides, nickel sulfides, manganese sulfides, molybdenum sulfides, tin sulfides, with zero-, one-, two-, and three-dimensional morphologies for LIB and SC applications. In addition, the recently emerged concept of incorporating conductive matrices, especially graphene, with metal sulfide nanomaterials will also be highlighted. Finally, some remarks are made on the challenges and perspectives for the future development of metal sulfide-based LIB and SC devices.

  12. Nanostructured metal sulfides for energy storage.

    PubMed

    Rui, Xianhong; Tan, Huiteng; Yan, Qingyu

    2014-09-07

    Advanced electrodes with a high energy density at high power are urgently needed for high-performance energy storage devices, including lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and supercapacitors (SCs), to fulfil the requirements of future electrochemical power sources for applications such as in hybrid electric/plug-in-hybrid (HEV/PHEV) vehicles. Metal sulfides with unique physical and chemical properties, as well as high specific capacity/capacitance, which are typically multiple times higher than that of the carbon/graphite-based materials, are currently studied as promising electrode materials. However, the implementation of these sulfide electrodes in practical applications is hindered by their inferior rate performance and cycling stability. Nanostructures offering the advantages of high surface-to-volume ratios, favourable transport properties, and high freedom for the volume change upon ion insertion/extraction and other reactions, present an opportunity to build next-generation LIBs and SCs. Thus, the development of novel concepts in material research to achieve new nanostructures paves the way for improved electrochemical performance. Herein, we summarize recent advances in nanostructured metal sulfides, such as iron sulfides, copper sulfides, cobalt sulfides, nickel sulfides, manganese sulfides, molybdenum sulfides, tin sulfides, with zero-, one-, two-, and three-dimensional morphologies for LIB and SC applications. In addition, the recently emerged concept of incorporating conductive matrices, especially graphene, with metal sulfide nanomaterials will also be highlighted. Finally, some remarks are made on the challenges and perspectives for the future development of metal sulfide-based LIB and SC devices.

  13. Platinum metals magmatic sulfide ores.

    PubMed

    Naldrett, A J; Duke, J M

    1980-06-27

    Platinum-group elements (PGE) are mined predominantly from deposits that have formed by the segregation of molten iron-nickel-copper sulfides from silicate magmas. The absolute concentrations of PGE in sulfides from different deposits vary over a range of five orders of magnitude, whereas those of other chalcophile elements vary by factors of only 2 to 100. However, the relative proportions of the different PGE in a given deposit are systematically related to the nature of the parent magma. The absolute and relative concentrations of PGE in magmatic sulfides are explained in terms of the degree of partial melting of mantle peridotite required to produce the parent magma and the processes of batch equilibration and fractional segregation of sulfides. The Republic of South Africa and the U.S.S.R. together possess more than 97 percent of the world PGE reserves, but significant undeveloped resources occur in North America. The Stillwater complex in Montana is perhaps the most important example.

  14. Experimental Study of Copper Isotope Fractionation During the Formation of Cu and Cu-Fe Sulfides in Aqueous Solutions at 40-200 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekala, M.; Asael, D.; Butler, I. B.; Matthews, A.; Rickard, D.

    2009-12-01

    Natural Cu and Cu-Fe sulfides show significant Cu fractionation. In order to interpret these data an improved understanding of the major Cu isotope fractionation processes is required. Here we report laboratory experiments aimed at elucidating processes involved in Cu isotope distribution in Cu sulfides. Progressive replacement of Fe sulfides by Cu-Fe and Cu sulfides has been widely reported from a range of magmatic, hydrothermal and sedimentary deposits, and may sometimes lead to economically relevant Cu accumulations such as in the Kupferschiefer of SW Poland [1]. This replacement sequence is commonly observed in deep sea floor hydrothermal vents where massive Cu-Fe sulfide mineralisation is found [5,6]. Experimental investigations [2,3,4] have demonstrated that this type of mineral replacement is developed during the reaction of Fe sulfides (pyrrhotite and pyrite) with Cu(II)-rich aqueous solutions. Fractionation of Cu isotopes during the reaction of Fe sulfides (natural crystals of pyrrhotite and pyrite) with Cu(II) sulfate solutions was studied under anoxic conditions. It was observed that the original Fe sulfides were replaced by Cu-Fe and Cu sulfides. The effect of temperature (40-200 °C) and reaction extent (10-100 %) were investigated. Cu isotope ratios were determined in the Cu(II) solutions and in the corresponding mineral phases by sector field multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Measured Cu(II) solution-Cu sulfide fractionation factors (in excess of 2 ‰) show substantial Cu isotope fractionation accompanying the reaction of Fe sulfides with Cu(II) solutions. The data points to a kinetic fractionation process that favours the transfer of the lighter Cu isotope into the mineral phase. The extent of Cu isotope fractionation resulting from this alteration process is of a similar order to fractionation observed during direct CuS precipitation from Cu(II)aq and S(-II)aq [7]. This suggests that Cu(II)-Cu(I) reduction, that proceeds

  15. Experimental study of copper isotope fractionation during the formation of Cu and Cu-Fe sulfides in aqueous solutions at 40-200 °C.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekala, Marek; Asael, Dan; Butler, Ian B.; Matthews, Alan; Rickard, David

    2010-05-01

    Natural Cu and Cu-Fe sulfides show significant Cu fractionation. In order to interpret these data an improved understanding of the major Cu isotope fractionation processes is required. Here we report laboratory experiments aimed at elucidating processes involved in Cu isotope distribution in Cu sulfides. Progressive replacement of Fe sulfides by Cu-Fe and Cu sulfides has been widely reported from a range of magmatic, hydrothermal and sedimentary deposits, and may sometimes lead to economically relevant Cu accumulations such as in the Kupferschiefer of SW Poland [1]. This replacement sequence is commonly observed in deep sea floor hydrothermal vents where massive Cu-Fe sulfide mineralisation is found [2,3]. Experimental investigations [4,5,6] have demonstrated that this type of mineral replacement is developed during the reaction of Fe sulfides (pyrrhotite and pyrite) with Cu(II)-rich aqueous solutions. Fractionation of Cu isotopes during the reaction of Fe sulfides (natural crystals of pyrrhotite and pyrite) with Cu(II) sulfate solutions was studied under anoxic conditions. It was observed that the original Fe sulfides were replaced by Cu-Fe and Cu sulfides. The effect of temperature (40-200 °C) and reaction extent (10-100 %) were investigated. Cu isotope ratios were determined in the Cu(II) solutions and in the corresponding mineral phases by sector field multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Measured Cu(II) solution-Cu sulfide fractionation factors (in excess of 2 permil) show substantial Cu isotope fractionation accompanying the reaction of Fe sulfides with Cu(II) solutions. The data points to a kinetic fractionation process that favours the transfer of the lighter Cu isotope into the mineral phase. The extent of Cu isotope fractionation resulting from this alteration process is of a similar order to fractionation observed during direct CuS precipitation from Cu(II)aq and S(-II)aq [7]. This suggests that Cu(II)-Cu(I) reduction, that

  16. THE EFFECT OF ADSORBED SULFUR ON THE SURFACE SELF-DIFFUSION OF COPPER.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    SULFUR), * DIFFUSION ), (*ADSORPTION, (*COPPER, SURFACES, HYDROGEN, SINGLE CRYSTALS, ANNEALING, HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS, SULFIDES, GRAIN BOUNDARIES, HIGH TEMPERATURE, IMPURITIES, ENTHALPY, CHEMISORPTION, MOBILITY.

  17. Hydrothermal ore-forming processes in the light of studies in rock- buffered systems: I. Iron-copper-zinc-lead sulfide solubility relations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hemley, J.J.; Cygan, G.L.; Fein, J.B.; Robinson, G.R.; d'Angelo, W. M.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental studies, using cold-seal and extraction vessel techniques, were conducted on Fe, Pb, Zn, and Cu sulfide solubilities in chloride soultions at temperatures from 300?? to 700??C and pressures from 0.5 to 2 kbars. The solutions were buffered in pH by quartz monzonite and the pure potassium feldspar-muscovite-quartz assemblage and in fS2-fO2 largely by the assemblage pyrite-pyrrhotite-magnetite. Solubilities increase with increasing temperature and total chloride, and decrease with increasing pressure. The effect of increasing chloride concentration on solubility reflects primarily a shift to lower pH via the silicate buffer reactions. Similarity in behaviour with respect to the temperature and pressure of Fe, Zn, and Pb sulfide solubilities points to similarity in chloride speciation, and the neutral species appear to be dominant in the high-temperature region. -from Authors

  18. Carbonyl sulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Carbonyl sulfide ; CASRN 463 - 58 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  19. Selenium sulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Selenium sulfide ; CASRN 7446 - 34 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  20. Hydrogen sulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 03 / 005 www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE ( CAS No . 7783 - 06 - 4 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) June 2003 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC DISCLAIMER This document has been revie

  1. Metallic sulfide additives for positive electrode material within a secondary electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, William J.; McPheeters, Charles C.; Yao, Neng-ping; Koura, Kobuyuki

    1976-01-01

    An improved active material for use within the positive electrode of a secondary electrochemical cell includes a mixture of iron disulfide and a sulfide of a polyvalent metal. Various metal sulfides, particularly sulfides of cobalt, nickel, copper, cerium and manganese, are added in minor weight proportion in respect to iron disulfide for improving the electrode performance and reducing current collector requirements.

  2. Hydrosulfide/sulfide complexes of copper(I) - Experimental confirmation of the stoichiometry and stability of Cu(HS)2- to elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountain, B. W.; Seward, T. M.

    2003-08-01

    The solubility of chalcocite has been measured over the temperature range 35-95°C at pH 6.5-7.5 in aqueous hydrosulfide solutions in order to determine the stability constants of the Cu(HS) 2- complex. A heated flow-through system was used in which solutions are collected at temperature to avoid the problem of copper precipitation due to quenching. The quality of the data was sufficient to resolve a 0.1 log unit increase of the dissolution/complexation equilibrium constant with each 10°C increase in temperature. The equilibrium constants were fit using previously published methods to obtain the values of thermodynamic parameters for the Cu(HS) 2- complexation reaction. To compare results with predictive techniques, one-term and two-term isocoulombic extrapolation methods were applied to the stability constants measured below 100°C. The two-term extrapolation to 350°C showed excellent agreement with the derived constants proving its applicability to soft metal-soft ligand interactions. The one-term method gave a reasonable agreement but deviated about one logarithmic unit at 350°C. This is attributed to differences in energetic, volumetric, and structural properties of the reactants and products. Speciation calculations show that at low temperatures (<150°C), the hydrosulfide complexes of copper will dominate over chloride complexes at low salinites (<0.1 mol kg -1) while at higher temperatures, chloride complexes will be dominant under most geological conditions. Only in solutions with high reduced sulfur content and alkaline pH values will hydrosulfide complexes predominate and may play a role in the generation of economic copper mineralization.

  3. Excellent photocatalytic hydrogen production over CdS nanorods via using noble metal-free copper molybdenum sulfide (Cu2MoS4) nanosheets as co-catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sangyeob; Kumar, D. Praveen; Reddy, D. Amaranatha; Choi, Jiha; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2017-02-01

    Charge carrier recombination and durability issues are major problems in photocatalytic hydrogen (H2) evolution processes. Thus, there is a very important necessitate to extend an efficient photocatalyst to control charge-carrier dynamics in the photocatalytic system. We have developed copper molybdenum sulfide (Cu2MoS4) nanosheets as co-catalysts with CdS nanorods for controlling charge carriers without recombination for use in photocatalytic H2 evolution under simulated solar light irradiation. Effective control and utilization of charge carriers are possible by loading Cu2MoS4 nanosheets onto the CdS nanorods. The loading compensates for the restrictions of CdS, and stimulated synergistic effects, such as efficient photoexcited charge separation, lead to an improvement in photostability because of the layered structure of the Cu2MoS4nanosheets. These layered Cu2MoS4 nanosheets have emerged as novel and active replacements for precious noble metal co-catalysts in photocatalytic H2 production by water splitting. We have obtained superior H2 production rates by using Cu2MoS4 loaded CdS nanorods. The physicochemical properties of the composites are analyzed by diverse characterization techniques.

  4. Formation of selenide, sulfide or mixed selenide-sulfide films on metal or metal coated substrates

    DOEpatents

    Eser, Erten; Fields, Shannon

    2012-05-01

    A process and composition for preventing cracking in composite structures comprising a metal coated substrate and a selenide, sulfide or mixed selenide sulfide film. Specifically, cracking is prevented in the coating of molybdenum coated substrates upon which a copper, indium-gallium diselenide (CIGS) film is deposited. Cracking is inhibited by adding a Se passivating amount of oxygen to the Mo and limiting the amount of Se deposited on the Mo coating.

  5. Scientific communications: Re-Os sulfide (bornite, chalcopyrite, and pyrite) systematics of the carbonate-hosted copper deposits at ruby creek, southern brooks range, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Selby, D.; Kelley, K.D.; Hitzman, M.W.; Zieg, J.

    2009-01-01

    New Re-Os data for chalcopyrite, bornite, and pyrite from the carbonate-hosted Cu deposit at Ruby Creek (Bornite), Alaska, show extremely high Re abundances (hundreds of ppb, low ppm) and contain essentially no common Os. The Re-Os data provide the first absolute ages of ore formation for the carbonate-hosted Ruby Creek Cu-(Co) deposit and demonstrate that the Re-Os systematics of pyrite, chalcopyrite, and bornite are unaffected by greenschist metamorphism. The Re-Os data show that the main phase of Cu mineralization pre dominantly occurred at 384 ?? 4.2 Ma, with an earlier phase possibly at ???400 Ma. The Re-Os data are consistent with the observed paragenetic sequence and coincide with zircon U-Pb ages from igneous rocks within the Ambler metallogenic belt, some of which are spatially and genetically associated with regional volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits. The latter may suggest a temporal link between regional magmatism and hydrothermal mineralization in the Ambler district. The utility of bornite and chalcopyrite, in addition to pyrite, contributes to a new understanding of Re-Os geochronology and permits a refinement of the genetic model for the Ruby Creek deposit. ?? 2009 Society of Economices Geologists, Inc.

  6. Effects of spatial and temporal variation of acid-volatile sulfide on the bioavailability of copper and zinc in freshwater sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Besser, J.M.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Giesy, J.P.

    1996-03-01

    Variation in concentrations of acid-volatile sulfide (AVS) in sediments from the upper Clark Fork River of Montana, USA, was associated with differences in bioaccumulation of Cu and Zn and growth of larvae of the midge, Chironomus tentans. Growth of midge larvae was significantly greater and bioaccumulation of Cu was significantly less in surface sections (0--3 cm depth) of sediment cores, which had greater concentrations of AVS and lesser ratios of simultaneously extracted metals to AVS (SEM:AVS ratios) than in subsurface sediments (6--9 cm). Concentrations of AVS were significantly less in sediments incubated with oxic overlying water for 9 weeks than in the same sediments incubated under anoxic conditions. Bioaccumulation of Cu differed significantly between incubation treatments, corresponding to differences in concentrations of AVS and SEM:AVS ratios, although midge growth did not. Bioaccumulation of Zn did not differ significantly between depth strata of sediment cores or between incubation treatments. When results from the two sets of bioassays were combined, bioaccumulation of Cu and Zn, but not growth, was significantly correlated with SEM:AVS ratios and other estimates of bioavailable metal fractions in sediments. Growth of midge larvae was significantly correlated with bioaccumulation of Zn, but not Cu, suggesting that Zn was the greater contributor to the toxicity of these sediments. Assessments of the toxicity of metal-contaminated freshwater sediments should consider the effects of spatial and temporal variation in AVS concentrations on metal bioavailability.

  7. Dynamic of active microorganisms inhabiting a bioleaching industrial heap of low‐grade copper sulfide ore monitored by real‐time PCR and oligonucleotide prokaryotic acidophile microarray

    PubMed Central

    Remonsellez, Francisco; Galleguillos, Felipe; Moreno‐Paz, Mercedes; Parro, Víctor; Acosta, Mauricio; Demergasso, Cecilia

    2009-01-01

    Summary The bioleaching of metal sulfide has developed into a very important industrial process and understanding the microbial dynamic is key to advancing commercial bioleaching operations. Here we report the first quantitative description of the dynamic of active communities in an industrial bioleaching heap. Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was the most abundant during the first part of the leaching cycle, while the abundance of Leptospirillum ferriphilum and Ferroplasma acidiphilum increased with age of the heap. Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans kept constant throughout the leaching cycle, and Firmicutes group showed a low and a patchy distribution in the heap. The Acidiphilium‐like bacteria reached their highest abundance corresponding to the amount of autotrophs. The active microorganisms in the leaching system were determined using two RNA‐based sensitive techniques. In most cases, the 16S rRNA copy numbers of At. ferrooxidans, L. ferriphilum, At. thiooxidans and F. acidiphilum, was concomitant with the DNA copy numbers, whereas Acidiphilium‐like bacteria and some Firmicutes members did not show a clear correlation between 16S rRNA accumulation and DNA copy numbers. However, the prokaryotic acidophile microarray (PAM) analysis showed active members of Alphaproteobacteria in all samples and of Sulfobacillus genus in older ones. Also, new active groups such as Actinobacteria and Acidobacterium genus were detected by PAM. The results suggest that changes during the leaching cycle in chemical and physical conditions, such as pH and Fe3+/Fe2+ ion rate, are primary factors shaping the microbial dynamic in the heap. PMID:21255296

  8. Oxygen in activator centers of zinc sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Golobeva, N.P.; Fok, M.V.

    1986-05-01

    The authors observed the sensitized luminescence of Tm and Dy without addition of Cu and Ag in samples which had been obtained by the sulfonation of zinc sulfide in hydrogen sulfide; the zinc sulfide has a copper concentration below 5.10/sup -6/ mass %. In this case the excitation can be transmitted from the ZnS lattice to the rare-earth activators mainly through defects including oxygen. The following conclusions were made. In the case of activated ZnS, oxygen is present in formations accounting for the excitation and luminescence of a number of luminophors. When an activator is introduced in the region of ZnS layer faults, where also the oxygen must be located, the positioning of the faults in close vicinity is facilitated even when the oxygen concentration of the ZnS is low. All this must be considered when models of luminescence centers of zinc sulfide are developed.

  9. Nanoscale copper sulfide hollow spheres with phase-engineered composition: covellite (CuS), digenite (Cu1.8S), chalcocite (Cu2S).

    PubMed

    Leidinger, Peter; Popescu, Radian; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Feldmann, Claus

    2011-06-01

    Covellite (CuS), digenite (Cu(1.8)S) and chalcocite (Cu(2)S) are prepared as nanoscaled hollow spheres by reaction at the liquid-to-liquid phase boundary of a w/o-microemulsion. According to electron microscopy (SEM, STEM, TEM, HRTEM) the hollow spheres exhibit an outer diameter of 32-36 nm, a wall thickness of 8-12 nm and an inner cavity of 8-16 nm in diameter. The phase composition is determined based on HRTEM, electron-energy loss spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction and thermal analysis. In face of the advanced morphology of the hollow spheres, precise control of its phase composition is nevertheless possible by adjusting the experimental conditions (i.e. type and concentration of the copper precursor, concentration of ammonia inside of the micelle). Such phase-engineering of nanoscale hollow spheres is firstly observed and might allow adjusting even further compositions/structures as well as tailoring of phase-specific properties in the future.

  10. Temporal and spatial distribution of alteration, mineralization and fluid inclusions in the transitional high-sulfidation epithermal-porphyry copper system at Red Mountain, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lecumberri-Sanchez, Pilar; Newton, M. Claiborne; Westman, Erik C.; Kamilli, Robert J.; Canby, Vertrees M.; Bodnar, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Red Mountain, Arizona, is a Laramide porphyry Cu system (PCD) that has experienced only a modest level of erosion compared to most other similar deposits in the southwestern United States. As a result, the upper portion of the magmatic–hydrothermal system, which represents the transition from shallower high-sulfidation epithermal mineralization to deeper porphyry Cu mineralization, is well preserved. Within the Red Mountain system, alteration, mineralization and fluid inclusion assemblages show a systematic distribution in both time and space. Early-potassic alteration (characterized by the minerals biotite and magnetite) is paragenetically earlier than late-potassic alteration (K-feldspar–anhydrite) and both are followed by later phyllic (sericite–pyrite) alteration. Advanced argillic alteration (pyrophyllite–alunite–other clay minerals) is thought to be coeval with or postdate phyllic alteration. Minerals characteristic of advanced argillic alteration are present in the near surface. Phyllic alteration extends to greater depths compared to advanced argillic alteration. Early-potassic and late-potassic alteration are only observed in the deepest part of the system. Considerable overlap of phyllic alteration with both early-potassic and late-potassic alteration zones is observed. The hypogene mineralization contains 0.4–1.2% Cu and is spatially and temporally related to the late-potassic alteration event. Molybdenum concentration is typically In the deepest part of the system, an early generation of low-to-moderate density and salinity liquid + vapor inclusions with opaque daughter minerals is followed in time by halite-bearing inclusions that also contain opaque daughter minerals indicating that an early intermediate-density magmatic fluid evolved to a high-density, high-salinity mineralizing fluid. The increase in density and salinity of fluids with time observed in the deeper parts of the system may be the result of immiscibility (“boiling”) of

  11. Trace element distribution, with a focus on gold, in copper-rich and zinc-rich sulfide chimneys from Brothers submarine volcano, Kermadec arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkenbosch, H. A.; de Ronde, C. E.; McNeill, A.; Goemann, K.; Gemmell, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    Brothers volcano is a dacitic volcano located along the Kermadec arc, New Zealand, and hosts the NW Caldera hydrothermal vent field perched on part of the steep caldera walls. The field strikes for ~600 m between depths of 1550 and 1700 m and includes numerous, active, high-temperature (max 302°C) chimneys and even more dead, sulfide-rich spires. Chimney samples collected from Brothers show distinct mineralogical zonation reflecting gradients in oxidation state, temperature, and pH from the inner walls in contact with hydrothermal fluids through to the outer walls in contact with seawater. Minerals deposited from hotter fluids (e.g., chalcopyrite) are located in the interior of the chimneys and are surrounded by an external zone of minerals deposited by cooler fluids (e.g., sulfates, sphalerite). Four chimneys types are identified at Brothers volcano based on the relative proportions of chalcopyrite and sulfate layers, and the presence or absence of anhydrite. Two are Cu-rich, i.e., chalcopyrite-rich and chalcopyrite-bornite-rich chimneys, and two are Zn-rich, i.e., sphalerite-rich and sphalerite-chalcopyrite-rich. Barite and anhydrite are common to both Cu-rich chimney types whereas Zn-rich chimneys contain barite only. The main mineral phases in all the chimneys are anhydrite, barite, chalcopyrite, pyrite/marcasite, and sphalerite. Trace minerals include galena, covellite, tennantite, realgar, chalcocite, bornite, hematite, goethite, Pb-As sulfosalts, and Bi- or Au-tellurides. The vast majority of tellurides are <5 μm in size and they commonly form in bands, cluster in patches, or occur along internal grain boundaries within chalcopyrite. In sulfate layers adjacent to the chalcopyrite zones tellurides can occur as inclusions in anhydrite, barite or pyrite and/or occupy void space within the chimney. The occurrence of specular hematite and Bi- or Au-tellurides associated with chalcopyrite are consistent with magmatic contributions to the NW Caldera vent site

  12. Sulfide chemiluminescence detection

    DOEpatents

    Spurlin, S.R.; Yeung, E.S.

    1985-11-26

    A method is described for chemiluminescently determining a sulfide which is either hydrogen sulfide or methyl mercaptan by reacting the sulfide with chlorine dioxide at low pressure and under conditions which allow a longer reaction time in emission of a single photon for every two sulfide containing species, and thereafter, chemiluminescently detecting and determining the sulfide. The invention also relates not only to the detection method, but the novel chemical reaction and a specifically designed chemiluminescence detection cell for the reaction. 4 figs.

  13. Sulfide chemiluminescence detection

    DOEpatents

    Spurlin, Stanford R.; Yeung, Edward S.

    1985-01-01

    A method of chemiluminescently determining a sulfide which is either hydrogen sulfide or methyl mercaptan by reacting the sulfide with chlorine dioxide at low pressure and under conditions which allow a longer reaction time in emission of a single photon for every two sulfide containing species, and thereafter, chemiluminescently detecting and determining the sulfide. The invention also relates not only to the detection method, but the novel chemical reaction and a specifically designed chemiluminescence detection cell for the reaction.

  14. SULFIDE MINERALS IN SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The formation processes of metal sulfides in sediments, especially iron sulfides, have been the subjects of intense scientific research because of linkages to the global biogeochemical cycles of iron, sulfur, carbon, and oxygen. Transition metal sulfides (e.g., NiS, CuS, ZnS, Cd...

  15. Cadmium sulfide membranes

    DOEpatents

    Spanhel, Lubomir; Anderson, Marc A.

    1991-10-22

    A method is described for the creation of novel q-effect cadmium sulfide membranes. The membranes are made by first creating a dilute cadmium sulfide colloid in aqueous suspension and then removing the water and excess salts therefrom. The cadmium sulfide membrane thus produced is luminescent at room temperature and may have application in laser fabrication.

  16. Cadmium sulfide membranes

    DOEpatents

    Spanhel, Lubomir; Anderson, Marc A.

    1992-07-07

    A method is described for the creation of novel q-effect cadmium sulfide membranes. The membranes are made by first creating a dilute cadmium sulfide colloid in aqueous suspension and then removing the water and excess salts therefrom. The cadmium sulfide membrane thus produced is luminescent at room temperature and may have application in laser fabrication.

  17. Occurrence model for magmatic sulfide-rich nickel-copper-(platinum-group element) deposits related to mafic and ultramafic dike-sill complexes: Chapter I in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulz, Klaus J.; Woodruff, Laurel G.; Nicholson, Suzanne W.; Seal, Robert R., II; Piatak, Nadine M.; Chandler, Val W.; Mars, John L.

    2014-01-01

    The sulfides in magmatic Ni-Cu deposits generally constitute a small volume of the host rock(s) and tend to be concentrated in the lower parts of the mafic and/or ultramafic bodies, often in physical depressions or areas marking changes in the geometry of the footwall topography. In most deposits, the sulfide mineralization can be divided into disseminated, matrix or net, and massive sulfide, depending on a combination of the sulfide content of the rock and the silicate texture. The major Ni-Cu sulfide mineralogy typically consists of an intergrowth of pyrrhotite (Fe7S8), pentlandite ([Fe, Ni]9S8), and chalcopyrite (FeCuS2). Cobalt, PGE, and gold (Au) are extracted from most magmatic Ni-Cu ores as byproducts, although such elements can have a significant impact on the economics in some deposits, such as the Noril’sk-Talnakh deposits, which produce much of the world’s palladium. In addition, deposits may contain between 1 and 15 percent magnetite associated with the sulfides.

  18. Integrated thin film cadmium sulfide solar cell module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickelsen, R. A.; Abbott, D. D.

    1971-01-01

    The design, development, fabrication and tests of flexible integrated thin-film cadmium sulfide solar cells and modules are discussed. The development of low cost and high production rate methods for interconnecting cells into large solar arrays is described. Chromium thin films were applied extensively in the deposited cell structures as a means to: (1) achieve high adherence between the cadmium sulfide films and the vacuum-metallized copper substrates, (2) obtain an ohmic contact to the cadmium sulfide films, and (3) improve the adherence of gold films as grids or contact areas.

  19. An assessment of silver copper sulfides for photovoltaic applications: theoretical and experimental insights† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6ta03376h Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Savory, Christopher N.; Ganose, Alex M.; Travis, Will; Atri, Ria S.; Palgrave, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    As the worldwide demand for energy increases, low-cost solar cells are being looked to as a solution for the future. To attain this, non-toxic earth-abundant materials are crucial, however cell efficiencies for current materials are limited in many cases. In this article, we examine the two silver copper sulfides AgCuS and Ag3CuS2 as possible solar absorbers using hybrid density functional theory, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, XPS and Hall effect measurements. We show that both compounds demonstrate promising electronic structures and band gaps for high theoretical efficiency solar cells, based on Shockley–Queisser limits. Detailed analysis of their optical properties, however, indicates that only AgCuS should be of interest for PV applications, with a high theoretical efficiency. From this, we also calculate the band alignment of AgCuS against various buffer layers to aid in future device construction. PMID:27774149

  20. Synthesis and photovoltaic application of coper (I) sulfide nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yue; Wadia, Cyrus; Ma, Wanli; Sadtler, Bryce; Alivisatos, A.Paul

    2008-06-24

    We present the rational synthesis of colloidal copper(I) sulfide nanocrystals and demonstrate their application as an active light absorbing component in combination with CdS nanorods to make a solution-processed solar cell with 1.6percent power conversion efficiency on both conventional glass substrates and flexible plastic substrates with stability over a 4 month testing period.

  1. Sulfide Mineralogy and Geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilles, John

    2007-02-01

    Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry Series, Volume 61 David J. Vaughan, Editor Geochemical Society and Mineralogical Society of America; ISBN 0-939950-73-1 xiii + 714 pp.; 2006; $40. Sulfide minerals as a class represent important minor rock-forming minerals, but they are generally known as the chief sources of many economic metallic ores. In the past two decades, sulfide research has been extended to include important roles in environmental geology of sulfide weathering and resultant acid mine drainage, as well as in geomicrobiology in which bacteria make use of sulfides for metabolic energy sources. In the latter respect, sulfides played an important role in early evolution of life on Earth and in geochemical cycling of elements in the Earth's crust and hydrosphere.

  2. Platinum metals in magmatic sulfide ores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naldrett, A.J.; Duke, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    Platinum-group elements (PGE) are mined predominantly from deposits that have formed by the segregation of molten iron-nickel-copper sulfides from silicate magmas. The absolute concentrations of PGE in sulfides from different deposits vary over a range of five orders of magnitude, whereas those of other chalcophile elements vary by factors of only 2 to 100. However, the relative proportions of the different PGE in a given deposit are systematically related to the nature of the parent magma. The absolute and relative concentrations of PGE in magmatic sulfides are explained in terms of the degree of partial melting of mantle peridotite required to produce the parent magma and the processes of batch equilibration and fractional segregation of sulfides. The Republic of South Africa and the U.S.S.R. together possess more than 97 percent of the world PGE reserves, but significant undeveloped resources occur in North America. The Stillwater complex in Montana is perhaps the most important example. Copyright ?? 1980 AAAS.

  3. Nickeliferous sulfides in xenoliths, olivine megacrysts and basaltic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleet, Michael E.; Stone, William E.

    1990-11-01

    The composition of olivine and nickeliferous sulfide inclusions from a selection of mafic and ultramafre rocks, xenoliths and megacrysts, including picritic basalts from Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, kimberlite from Fayette County, Pennsylvania, and megacrysts from Mount Shasta, California are compared with the mean experimental value of the distribution coefficient for Ni/Fe exchange (KD3=32). Only nine of the forty five olivipe/bulk-sulfide pairs investigated have compositions consistent with equilibration at high temperature, yielding calculated KD3 values in the range 22 to 41. The remaining pairs have calculated KD3 values which range from 0 to 19. Bulk-sulfides in disequilibrated assem-blages are consistently depleted in nickel and within both indivudual associations and individual petrographic sections they exhibit a wide variation in NiS content. The bulk copper contents of olivine-and groundmass-hosted sulfides from Kilauea Volcano range from 0.5 to 43 at%, and samples from the Kilauea Iki lava lake are more Fe-and Cu-rich and generally have lower KD3 values than those from the eruption itself. As with magmatic Ni-Cu sulfide deposits, most nickeliferous sulfide inclusions in mantle-related rocks and xenoliths and in volcanic rocks do not have pristine early-magmatic bulk compositions, and it would seem to be premature to attribute these sulfides solely to either a mantle or an early-magnatic origin.

  4. Biological and environmental transformations of copper-based nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongying; von dem Bussche, Annette; Kabadi, Pranita K; Kane, Agnes B; Hurt, Robert H

    2013-10-22

    Copper-based nanoparticles are an important class of materials with applications as catalysts, conductive inks, and antimicrobial agents. Environmental and safety issues are particularly important for copper-based nanomaterials because of their potential large-scale use and their high redox activity and toxicity reported from in vitro studies. Elemental nanocopper oxidizes readily upon atmospheric exposure during storage and use, so copper oxides are highly relevant phases to consider in studies of environmental and health impacts. Here we show that copper oxide nanoparticles undergo profound chemical transformations under conditions relevant to living systems and the natural environment. Copper oxide nanoparticle (CuO-NP) dissolution occurs at lysosomal pH (4-5), but not at neutral pH in pure water. Despite the near-neutral pH of cell culture medium, CuO-NPs undergo significant dissolution in media over time scales relevant to toxicity testing because of ligand-assisted ion release, in which amino acid complexation is an important contributor. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy shows that dissolved copper in association with CuO-NPs are the primary redox-active species. CuO-NPs also undergo sulfidation by a dissolution-reprecipitation mechanism, and the new sulfide surfaces act as catalysts for sulfide oxidation. Copper sulfide NPs are found to be much less cytotoxic than CuO-NPs, which is consistent with the very low solubility of CuS. Despite this low solubility of CuS, EPR studies show that sulfidated CuO continues to generate some ROS activity due to the release of free copper by H2O2 oxidation during the Fenton-chemistry-based EPR assay. While sulfidation can serve as a natural detoxification process for nanosilver and other chalcophile metals, our results suggest that sulfidation may not fully and permanently detoxify copper in biological or environmental compartments that contain reactive oxygen species.

  5. Biological and Environmental Transformations of Copper-Based Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhongying; Von Dem Bussche, Annette; Kabadi, Pranita K.; Kane, Agnes B.; Hurt, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    Copper-based nanoparticles are an important class of materials with applications as catalysts, conductive inks, and antimicrobial agents. Environmental and safety issues are particularly important for copper-based nanomaterials because of their potential large-scale use and their high redox activity and toxicity reported from in vitro studies. Elemental nanocopper oxidizes readily upon atmospheric exposure during storage and use, so copper oxides are highly relevant phases to consider in studies of environmental and health impacts. Here we show that copper oxide nanoparticles undergo profound chemical transformations under conditions relevant to living systems and the natural environment. Copper oxide nanoparticle (CuO-NP) dissolution occurs at lysosomal pH (4-5), but not at neutral pH in pure water. Despite the near-neutral pH of cell culture medium, CuO-NPs undergo significant dissolution in media over time scales relevant to toxicity testing due to ligand-assisted ion release, in which amino acid complexation is an important contributor. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy shows that dissolved copper in association with CuO-NPs are the primary redox-active species. CuO-NPs also undergo sulfidation by a dissolution-reprecipitation mechanism, and the new sulfide surfaces act as catalysts for sulfide oxidation. Copper sulfide NPs are found to be much less cytotoxic than CuO NPs, which is consistent with the very low solubility of CuS. Despite this low solubility of CuS, EPR studies show that sulfidated CuO continues to generate some ROS activity due to the release of free copper by H2O2 oxidation during the Fenton-chemistry-based EPR assay. While sulfidation can serve as a natural detoxification process for nanosilver and other chalcophile metals, our results suggest that sulfidation may not fully and permanently detoxify copper in biological or environmental compartments that contain reactive oxygen species. PMID:24032665

  6. The Terminal Oxidase Cytochrome bd Promotes Sulfide-resistant Bacterial Respiration and Growth

    PubMed Central

    Forte, Elena; Borisov, Vitaliy B.; Falabella, Micol; Colaço, Henrique G.; Tinajero-Trejo, Mariana; Poole, Robert K.; Vicente, João B.; Sarti, Paolo; Giuffrè, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) impairs mitochondrial respiration by potently inhibiting the heme-copper cytochrome c oxidase. Since many prokaryotes, including Escherichia (E.) coli, generate H2S and encounter high H2S levels particularly in the human gut, herein we tested whether bacteria can sustain sulfide-resistant O2-dependent respiration. E. coli has three respiratory oxidases, the cyanide-sensitive heme-copper bo3 enzyme and two bd oxidases much less sensitive to cyanide. Working on the isolated enzymes, we found that, whereas the bo3 oxidase is inhibited by sulfide with half-maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 = 1.1 ± 0.1 μM, under identical experimental conditions both bd oxidases are insensitive to sulfide up to 58 μM. In E. coli respiratory mutants, both O2-consumption and aerobic growth proved to be severely impaired by sulfide when respiration was sustained by the bo3 oxidase alone, but unaffected by ≤200 μM sulfide when either bd enzyme acted as the only terminal oxidase. Accordingly, wild-type E. coli showed sulfide-insensitive respiration and growth under conditions favouring the expression of bd oxidases. In all tested conditions, cyanide mimicked the functional effect of sulfide on bacterial respiration. We conclude that bd oxidases promote sulfide-resistant O2-consumption and growth in E. coli and possibly other bacteria. The impact of this discovery is discussed. PMID:27030302

  7. The Terminal Oxidase Cytochrome bd Promotes Sulfide-resistant Bacterial Respiration and Growth.

    PubMed

    Forte, Elena; Borisov, Vitaliy B; Falabella, Micol; Colaço, Henrique G; Tinajero-Trejo, Mariana; Poole, Robert K; Vicente, João B; Sarti, Paolo; Giuffrè, Alessandro

    2016-03-31

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) impairs mitochondrial respiration by potently inhibiting the heme-copper cytochrome c oxidase. Since many prokaryotes, including Escherichia (E.) coli, generate H2S and encounter high H2S levels particularly in the human gut, herein we tested whether bacteria can sustain sulfide-resistant O2-dependent respiration. E. coli has three respiratory oxidases, the cyanide-sensitive heme-copper bo3 enzyme and two bd oxidases much less sensitive to cyanide. Working on the isolated enzymes, we found that, whereas the bo3 oxidase is inhibited by sulfide with half-maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 = 1.1 ± 0.1 μM, under identical experimental conditions both bd oxidases are insensitive to sulfide up to 58 μM. In E. coli respiratory mutants, both O2-consumption and aerobic growth proved to be severely impaired by sulfide when respiration was sustained by the bo3 oxidase alone, but unaffected by ≤200 μM sulfide when either bd enzyme acted as the only terminal oxidase. Accordingly, wild-type E. coli showed sulfide-insensitive respiration and growth under conditions favouring the expression of bd oxidases. In all tested conditions, cyanide mimicked the functional effect of sulfide on bacterial respiration. We conclude that bd oxidases promote sulfide-resistant O2-consumption and growth in E. coli and possibly other bacteria. The impact of this discovery is discussed.

  8. Energy and materials flows in the copper industry

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, L.L.

    1980-12-01

    The copper industry comprises both the primary copper industry, which produces 99.9%-pure copper from copper ore, and the secondary copper industry, which salvages and recycles copper-containing scrap metal to extract pure copper or copper alloys. The United States uses about 2 million tons of copper annually, 60% of it for electrical applications. Demand is expected to increase less than 4% annually for the next 20 years. The primary copper industry is concentrated in the Southwest; Arizona produced 66% of the 1979 total ore output. Primary production uses about 170 x 10/sup 12/ Btu total energy annually (about 100 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton pure copper produced from ore). Mining and milling use about 60% of the total consumption, because low-grade ore (0.6% copper) is now being mined. Most copper is extracted by smelting sulfide ores, with concomitant production of sulfur dioxide. Clean air regulations will require smelters to reduce sulfur emissions, necessitating smelting process modifications that could also save 20 x 10/sup 12/ Btu (10 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton of copper) in smelting energy. Energy use in secondary copper production averages 20 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton of copper. If all copper products were recycled, instead of the 30% now salvaged, the energy conservation potential would be about one-half the total energy consumption of the primary copper industry.

  9. Interstellar hydrogen sulfide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaddeus, P.; Kutner, M. L.; Penzias, A. A.; Wilson, R. W.; Jefferts, K. B.

    1972-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide has been detected in seven Galactic sources by observation of a single line corresponding to the rotational transition from the 1(sub 10) to the 1(sub 01) levels at 168.7 GHz. The observations show that hydrogen sulfide is only a moderately common interstellar molecule comparable in abundance to H2CO and CS, but somewhat less abundant than HCN and much less abundant than CO.

  10. Performance of a beryllium copper nonmagnetic drill collar alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlevey, F.

    1984-09-01

    Laboratory characterization and field testing show the advantages of beryllium copper Alloy 25 for use in non-magnetic drill collars, stabilizers, and subs. Beryllium copper is resistant to stress corrosion cracking failures at elevated temperature and pressure in the presence of hydrogen sulfide and dissolved chloride solutions. The alloy is more resistant than stainless steel to galling failure in threaded joints.

  11. Effect of solution chemistry on particle characteristics during metal sulfide precipitation.

    PubMed

    Mokone, T P; van Hille, R P; Lewis, A E

    2010-11-01

    Metal sulfide precipitation forms an important component of acid mine drainage remediation systems based on bacterial sulfate reduction. The precipitation reaction is thermodynamically favorable, but a number of technical issues remain. In this study the effect of metal to sulfide molar ratio and operating pH on the nature and settling characteristics of copper and zinc sulfide precipitates was studied in a CSTR. A large number of small copper sulfide particles, with highly negatively charged surfaces and poor settling characteristics, were formed in the presence of a stoichiometric excess of sulfide at pH 6. The size and the settling characteristics of the particles were significantly improved, while the number of particles and magnitude of their zeta potential decreased when experiments were conducted at pH values <6. By comparison, for zinc sulfide, a small change in the number and size of the particles was observed for all metal to sulfide molar ratios and tested operating pH values. Precipitates generated at pH 6 had the most negative zeta potential, while operating at pH values <6 reduced the magnitude of the negative surface charge and improved the settling and dewatering characteristics of the precipitate. The data indicated that the amount of reactive sulfide species (HS(-) and S(2-) ions) available in solution during the precipitation process was important in determining the nature and surface characteristics of the particles produced and this was mainly dependent on pH.

  12. Iron sulfide deposits at Wadi Wassat, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, R.J.; Rossman, D.L.; Bagdady, A.Y.; Conway, C.M.; Helaby, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    Massive and disseminated iron sulfide deposits in Wadi Wassat form lenticular, stratabound deposits in cherty Precambrian sedimentary rocks interlayered with Precambrian calcareous sedimentary rocks, pyroclastic rocks, and andesitic flow rocks. These rocks have been cut by a wide variety of plutonic and dike rocks including gabbro, diorite, granodiorite, diabase, rhyolite, and granite. The zone containing the sulfide lenses is nearly 16 km long and is cut off by granitic rocks at both the northern and southern ends. The lenses are as much as 200 m thick; one can be traced along strike for more than 4 km. The lenses consist mostly of iron sulfides. Pyrite is the principal sulfide mineral; near intrusive bodies the pyrite has been partially converted to pyrrhotite and locally mobilized into fractures. The sulfides have been oxidized to a depth of about 25 m. Preliminary calculations indicate that about 107,500,000 tons of sulfides, averaging 40 percent iron and 35 percent sulfur, are available to a depth of i00 m. Small amounts of nickel, cobalt, zinc, and copper are also present, but at metal prices prevailing in early 1981, these do not constitute significant resources.

  13. SULFIDE METHOD PLUTONIUM SEPARATION

    DOEpatents

    Duffield, R.B.

    1958-08-12

    A process is described for the recovery of plutonium from neutron irradiated uranium solutions. Such a solution is first treated with a soluble sullide, causing precipitation of the plutoniunn and uraniunn values present, along with those impurities which form insoluble sulfides. The precipitate is then treated with a solution of carbonate ions, which will dissolve the uranium and plutonium present while the fission product sulfides remain unaffected. After separation from the residue, this solution may then be treated by any of the usual methods, such as formation of a lanthanum fluoride precipitate, to effect separation of plutoniunn from uranium.

  14. Zinc sulfide liquefaction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Garg, Diwakar

    1984-01-01

    A process for the liquefaction of carbonaceous material, such as coal, is set forth wherein coal is liquefied in a catalytic solvent refining reaction wherein an activated zinc sulfide catalyst is utilized which is activated by hydrogenation in a coal derived process solvent in the absence of coal.

  15. Copper hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Fage, Simon W; Faurschou, Annesofie; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2014-10-01

    The world production of copper is steadily increasing. Although humans are widely exposed to copper-containing items on the skin and mucosa, allergic reactions to copper are only infrequently reported. To review the chemistry, biology and accessible data to clarify the implications of copper hypersensitivity, a database search of PubMed was performed with the following terms: copper, dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, contact hypersensitivity, contact sensitization, contact allergy, patch test, dental, IUD, epidemiology, clinical, and experimental. Human exposure to copper is relatively common. As a metal, it possesses many of the same qualities as nickel, which is a known strong sensitizer. Cumulative data on subjects with presumed related symptoms and/or suspected exposure showed that a weighted average of 3.8% had a positive patch test reaction to copper. We conclude that copper is a very weak sensitizer as compared with other metal compounds. However, in a few and selected cases, copper can result in clinically relevant allergic reactions.

  16. Copper transport.

    PubMed

    Linder, M C; Wooten, L; Cerveza, P; Cotton, S; Shulze, R; Lomeli, N

    1998-05-01

    In adult humans, the net absorption of dietary copper is approximately 1 mg/d. Dietary copper joins some 4-5 mg of endogenous copper flowing into the gastrointestinal tract through various digestive juices. Most of this copper returns to the circulation and to the tissues (including liver) that formed them. Much lower amounts of copper flow into and out of other major parts of the body (including heart, skeletal muscle, and brain). Newly absorbed copper is transported to body tissues in two phases, borne primarily by plasma protein carriers (albumin, transcuprein, and ceruloplasmin). In the first phase, copper goes from the intestine to the liver and kidney; in the second phase, copper usually goes from the liver (and perhaps also the kidney) to other organs. Ceruloplasmin plays a role in this second phase. Alternatively, liver copper can also exit via the bile, and in a form that is less easily reabsorbed. Copper is also present in and transported by other body fluids, including those bathing the brain and central nervous system and surrounding the fetus in the amniotic sac. Ceruloplasmin is present in these fluids and may also be involved in copper transport there. The concentrations of copper and ceruloplasmin in milk vary with lactational stage. Parallel changes occur in ceruloplasmin messenger RNA expression in the mammary gland (as determined in pigs). Copper in milk ceruloplasmin appears to be particularly available for absorption, at least in rats.

  17. Alloyed Copper Chalcogenide Nanoplatelets via Partial Cation Exchange Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report the synthesis of alloyed quaternary and quinary nanocrystals based on copper chalcogenides, namely, copper zinc selenide–sulfide (CZSeS), copper tin selenide–sulfide (CTSeS), and copper zinc tin selenide–sulfide (CZTSeS) nanoplatelets (NPLs) (∼20 nm wide) with tunable chemical composition. Our synthesis scheme consisted of two facile steps: i.e., the preparation of copper selenide–sulfide (Cu2–xSeyS1–y) platelet shaped nanocrystals via the colloidal route, followed by an in situ cation exchange reaction. During the latter step, the cation exchange proceeded through a partial replacement of copper ions by zinc or/and tin cations, yielding homogeneously alloyed nanocrystals with platelet shape. Overall, the chemical composition of the alloyed nanocrystals can easily be controlled by the amount of precursors that contain cations of interest (e.g., Zn, Sn) to be incorporated/alloyed. We have also optimized the reaction conditions that allow a complete preservation of the size, morphology, and crystal structure as that of the starting Cu2–xSeyS1–y NPLs. The alloyed NPLs were characterized by optical spectroscopy (UV–vis–NIR) and cyclic voltammetry (CV), which demonstrated tunability of their light absorption characteristics as well as their electrochemical band gaps. PMID:25050455

  18. Alloyed copper chalcogenide nanoplatelets via partial cation exchange reactions.

    PubMed

    Lesnyak, Vladimir; George, Chandramohan; Genovese, Alessandro; Prato, Mirko; Casu, Alberto; Ayyappan, S; Scarpellini, Alice; Manna, Liberato

    2014-08-26

    We report the synthesis of alloyed quaternary and quinary nanocrystals based on copper chalcogenides, namely, copper zinc selenide-sulfide (CZSeS), copper tin selenide-sulfide (CTSeS), and copper zinc tin selenide-sulfide (CZTSeS) nanoplatelets (NPLs) (∼20 nm wide) with tunable chemical composition. Our synthesis scheme consisted of two facile steps: i.e., the preparation of copper selenide-sulfide (Cu2-xSeyS1-y) platelet shaped nanocrystals via the colloidal route, followed by an in situ cation exchange reaction. During the latter step, the cation exchange proceeded through a partial replacement of copper ions by zinc or/and tin cations, yielding homogeneously alloyed nanocrystals with platelet shape. Overall, the chemical composition of the alloyed nanocrystals can easily be controlled by the amount of precursors that contain cations of interest (e.g., Zn, Sn) to be incorporated/alloyed. We have also optimized the reaction conditions that allow a complete preservation of the size, morphology, and crystal structure as that of the starting Cu2-xSeyS1-y NPLs. The alloyed NPLs were characterized by optical spectroscopy (UV-vis-NIR) and cyclic voltammetry (CV), which demonstrated tunability of their light absorption characteristics as well as their electrochemical band gaps.

  19. Geothermal hydrogen sulfide removal

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, P.

    1981-04-01

    UOP Sulfox technology successfully removed 500 ppM hydrogen sulfide from simulated mixed phase geothermal waters. The Sulfox process involves air oxidation of hydrogen sulfide using a fixed catalyst bed. The catalyst activity remained stable throughout the life of the program. The product stream composition was selected by controlling pH; low pH favored elemental sulfur, while high pH favored water soluble sulfate and thiosulfate. Operation with liquid water present assured full catalytic activity. Dissolved salts reduced catalyst activity somewhat. Application of Sulfox technology to geothermal waters resulted in a straightforward process. There were no requirements for auxiliary processes such as a chemical plant. Application of the process to various types of geothermal waters is discussed and plans for a field test pilot plant and a schedule for commercialization are outlined.

  20. Biotreatment of refinery spent sulfidic caustics

    SciTech Connect

    Sublette, K.L.; Rajganesh, B.; Woolsey, M.; Plato, A.

    1995-12-31

    Caustics are used in petroleum refinering to remove hydrogen sulfide from various hydrocarbon streams. Spent sulfidic caustics from two Conoco refineries have been successfully biotreated on bench and pilot scale, resulting in neutralization and removal of active sulfides. Sulfides were completely oxidized to sulfate by Thiobacillus denitrificans. Microbial oxidation of sulfide produced acid, which at least partially neutralized the caustic.

  1. Suicide with hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Sams, Ralph Newton; Carver, H Wayne; Catanese, Charles; Gilson, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    This presentation will address the recent rise of suicide deaths resulting from the asphyxiation by hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas.Hydrogen sulfide poisoning has been an infrequently encountered cause of death in medical examiner practice. Most H2S deaths that have been reported occurred in association with industrial exposure.More recently, H2S has been seen in the commission of suicide, particularly in Japan. Scattered reports of this phenomenon have also appeared in the United States.We have recently observed 2 intentional asphyxial deaths in association with H2S. In both cases, the decedents committed suicide in their automobiles. They generated H2S by combining a sulfide-containing tree spray with toilet bowl cleaner (with an active ingredient of hydrogen chloride acid). Both death scenes prompted hazardous materials team responses because of notes attached to the victims' car windows indicating the presence of toxic gas. Autopsy findings included discoloration of lividity and an accentuation of the gray matter of the brain. Toxicology testing confirmed H2S exposure with the demonstration of high levels of thiosulfate in blood.In summary, suicide with H2S appears to be increasing in the United States.

  2. The susceptibility of 90Cu-10Ni alloy to stress corrosion cracking in seawater polluted by sulfide ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domiaty, A. El; Alhajji, J. N.

    1997-08-01

    Electrochemical polarization measurements and slow strain rate tests (SSRT) of a 90Cu-10Ni alloy in highly sulfide polluted seawater were conducted to investigate stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior. The severity of the SCC depends on the sulfide concentration in the seawater. The severity increases as the concentration increases. Because the major time in SCC is spent in the initiation process of the propagating crack, the fracture toughness has only a minor effect in the component life failed by SCC. The SCC behavior of CDA706 is strictly linked to sulfide concentration in the range of 100 to 1000 ppm. The general corrosion of Cu-Ni alloys in low (<100 ppm) and high (>100 ppm) sulfide polluted seawater increases due to the selective copper dissolution. Cyclic polarization measurements confirmed that the corrosion rate decreases slightly as the sulfide concentration increases. Pitting tendency was high in the low concentration range of sulfide and low in the high concentration range. The presence of stresses in SCC removes the protective layer as it increases during testing of the specimen or during the actual service of a component. The authors propose that film rupture occurred, and two proposed SCC mechanisms were operational, namely sulfide stress cracking associated with the anodic dissolution in the low sulfide concentration range and hydrogen embrittlement, which was dominant in the high sulfide concentration range. It was found that a synergism exists between sulfide and stress that enhances the effect of the latter.

  3. Investigations of copper speciation and bioavailability

    SciTech Connect

    Deaver, E.; Rodgers, J.H. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    Speciation, or form in which copper occurs, can effect the bioavailability and therefore, the toxicity of that element. One needs to determine the bioavailable forms of copper in sediment/water effects on organisms. In both water and sediment experiments, physical/chemical factors influencing copper speciation were evaluated and related to organism responses. Ten day aqueous experiments encompassing a range of pH (6.5--8.1), alkalinity (10--70 mg/L as CaCO{sub 3}), hardness (10--70 mg/L as CaCO{sub 3}) and conductivity (30--300 umhos/cm) were conducted using Hyalella azteca. Amphipod survival was evaluated relative to changes in water characteristics and concomitant changes in copper speciation as measured using atomic adsorption spectroscopy (AA) for acid extractable copper, and differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV) for labile copper. Ten day LC50s based on AA measured copper concentrations ranged from 42 to 142 ug/L Cu, and LC50s based on DPASV measured copper concentrations ranged from 17.4--24.8 ug/L Cu. Ten day sediment experiments encompassing a range of sediment pH, organic carbon content, acid volatile sulfides and redox concentrations were also conducted using H. azteca. Overlying water (AA and DPASV) and sediment copper concentrations (AA) were measured and evaluated relative to organism survival. Ten day sediment test LC50s based on DPASV measured copper concentrations in overlying water were 18.5 and 18 ug/L Cu for experiments in sandy and silty sediments, respectively. Organism survival, used as a measure of bioavailable copper, was evaluated in relation to measured copper species concentrations and used to develop guidelines for predicting copper toxicity in freshwater systems.

  4. Method of epitaxially depositing cadmium sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawrylo, Frank Z. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A single crystal layer of either cadmium sulfide or an alloy of cadmium sulfide and indium phosphide is epitaxially deposited on a substrate of cadmium sulfide by liquid phase epitaxy using indium as the solvent.

  5. Application of Borehole SIP Technique to Sulfide Mineral Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Changryol; Park, Mi Kyung; Park, Samgyu; Sung, Nak Hoon; Shin, Seung Wook

    2016-04-01

    In the study, SIP (Spectral Induced Polarization) well logging probe system was developed to rapidly locate the metal ore bodies with sulfide minerals in the boreholes. The newly developed SIP logging probe employed the non-polarizable electrodes, consisting of zinc chloride (ZnCl2), sodium chloride (NaCl), gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O), and water (H2O), instead of existing copper electrodes, leading to eliminating the EM coupling effect in the IP surveys as much as possible. In addition, the SIP logging system is designed to make measurements down to maximum 500 meters in depth in the boreholes. The SIP well logging was conducted to examine the applicability of the SIP probe system to the boreholes at the ore mine in Jecheon area, Korea. The boreholes used in the SIP logging are known to have penetrated the metal ore bodies with sulfide minerals from the drilling investigations. The ore mine of the study area is the scarn deposits surrounded by the limestone or lime-silicate rocks in Ordovician period. The results of the SIP well logging have shown that the borehole segments with limestone or lime-silicate rocks yielded the insignificant SIP responses while the borehole segments with sulfide minerals (e.g. pyrite) provided the significant phase shifts of the SIP responses. The borehole segments penetrating the metal ore body, so-called cupola, have shown very high response of the phase shift, due to the high contents of the sulfide mineral pyrite. The phase shifts of the SIP response could be used to estimate the grade of the ore bodies since the higher contents of the sulfide minerals, the higher magnitudes of the phase shifts in the SIP responses. It is, therefore, believed that the borehole SIP technique can be applied to investigate the metal ore bodies with sulfide minerals, and that could be used to estimate the ore grades as a supplementary tool in the future.

  6. Selective Facet Reactivity During Cation Exchange in Cadmium Sulfide Nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Sadtler, Bryce; Demchenko, Denis; Zheng, Haimei; Hughes, Steven; Merkle, Maxwell; Dahmen, Ulrich; Wang, Lin-Wang; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2008-12-18

    The partial transformation of ionic nanocrystals through cation exchange has been used to synthesize nanocrystal heterostructures. We demonstrate that the selectivity for cation exchange to take place at different facets of the nanocrystal plays an important role in determining the resulting morphology of the binary heterostructure. In the case of copper I (Cu+) cation exchange in cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanorods, the reaction starts preferentially at the ends of the nanorods such that copper sulfide (Cu2S) grows inwards from either end. The resulting morphology is very different from the striped pattern obtained in our previous studies of silver I (Ag+) exchange in CdS nanorods where non-selective nucleation of silver sulfide (Ag2S) occurs. From interface formation energies calculated for several models of epitaxialconnections between CdS and Cu2S or Ag2S, we infer the relative stability of each interface during the nucleation and growth of Cu2S or Ag2S within the CdS nanorods. The epitaxial connections of Cu2S to the end facets of CdS nanorods minimize the formation energy, making these interfaces stable throughout the exchange reaction. However, as the two end facets of wurtzite CdS nanorods are crystallographically nonequivalent, asymmetric heterostructures can be produced.

  7. Selenium content in sulfide ores from the Chalkidiki peninsula, Greece.

    PubMed

    Nicolaidou, A E

    1998-01-01

    Selenium (Se) was assessed in galena, sphalerite, and pyrite samples. These are components of mixed sulfide ores from the Olympias and Madem Lakkos-Mavres Petres deposits and the Skouries porphyry-copper deposit. We used atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) with a hydride generator system. The highest concentration of Se (516 ppm) was found in the fine-grained galena at the -135 level of the Olympias deposits. In the Madem Lakkos-Mavres Petres deposit, the highest concentration of Se (33 ppm) was found in the pyrites of the level 30. The concentration of Se in the arsenopyrites and chalcopyrites is lower than the detection limit of the analytical method (< 100 ppb). The concentrated chalcopyrite from the porphyry copper deposit at Skouries exhibits a significant Se content (average 200 ppm) in contrast to the chalcopyrite from the Olympias and the Madem Lakkos-Mavres Petres. Variations in the Se content of the sulfide minerals studied could be caused by redox-pH and/or temperature conditions, as well as by the difference in crystal structure. The Se found in the areas studied may positively affect the environment. Sulfide minerals are oxidized by microorganisms, infiltrate in the soil-water in the form of selenate or selenite ion, and directly or indirectly influence the human organism.

  8. Sulfide bonded atomic radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, G. V.; Ross, N. L.; Cox, D. F.

    2017-03-01

    The bonded radius, r b(S), of the S atom, calculated for first- and second-row non-transition metal sulfide crystals and third-row transition metal sulfide molecules and crystals indicates that the radius of the sulfur atom is not fixed as traditionally assumed, but that it decreases systematically along the bond paths of the bonded atoms with decreasing bond length as observed in an earlier study of the bonded radius of the oxygen atom. When bonded to non-transition metal atoms, r b(S) decreases systematically with decreasing bond length from 1.68 Å when the S atom is bonded to the electropositive VINa atom to 1.25 Å when bonded to the more electronegative IVP atom. In the case of transition metal atoms, rb(S) likewise decreases with decreasing bond length from 1.82 Å when bonded to Cu and to 1.12 Å when bonded to Fe. As r b(S) is not fixed at a given value but varies substantially depending on the bond length and the field strength of the bonded atoms, it is apparent that sets of crystal and atomic sulfide atomic radii based on an assumed fixed radius for the sulfur atom are satisfactory in that they reproduce bond lengths, on the one hand, whereas on the other, they are unsatisfactory in that they fail to define the actual sizes of the bonded atoms determined in terms of the minima in the electron density between the atoms. As such, we urge that the crystal chemistry and the properties of sulfides be studied in terms of the bond lengths determined by adding the radii of either the atomic and crystal radii of the atoms but not in terms of existing sets of crystal and atomic radii. After all, the bond lengths were used to determine the radii that were experimentally determined, whereas the individual radii were determined on the basis of an assumed radius for the sulfur atom.

  9. Sewage sludge-derived materials as efficient adsorbents for removal of hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Bagreev, A; Bashkova, S; Locke, D C; Bandosz, T J

    2001-04-01

    Sewage sludge-derived materials were used as adsorbents of hydrogen sulfide from moist air. The adsorbent obtained by carbonization at 950 degrees C has a capacity twice of that of coconut-shell-based activated carbon. The capacity of the sludge-derived materials increases with increasing carbonization temperature. It is likelythatduring carbonization at 950 degrees C a mineral-like phase is formed that consists of such catalytically active metals as iron, zinc, and copper. The results obtained demonstrate that the presence of iron oxide significantly increases the capacity of commercial carbon and activated alumina. The sludge-derived adsorbents are efficient for hydrogen sulfide removal until the pore entrances are blocked with sulfur as the product of oxidation reaction. For materials in which the catalytic effect is predominant, hydrogen sulfide is adsorbed until all pores are filled with sulfur. There is also indication that chemisorption plays a significant role in the removal of hydrogen sulfide from moist air.

  10. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1990-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  11. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1989-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  12. Copper Metallochaperones

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Nigel J.; Winge, Dennis R.

    2014-01-01

    The current state of knowledge on how copper metallochaperones support the maturation of cuproproteins is reviewed. Copper is needed within mitochondria to supply the CuA and intramembrane CuB sites of cytochrome oxidase, within the trans-Golgi network to supply secreted cuproproteins and within the cytosol to supply superoxide dismutase 1 (Sod1). Subpopulations of copper-zinc superoxide dismutase also localize to mitochondria, the secretory system, the nucleus and, in plants, the chloroplast, which also requires copper for plastocyanin. Prokaryotic cuproproteins are found in the cell membrane and in the periplasm of gram-negative bacteria. Cu(I) and Cu(II) form tight complexes with organic molecules and drive redox chemistry, which unrestrained would be destructive. Copper metallochaperones assist copper in reaching vital destinations without inflicting damage or becoming trapped in adventitious binding sites. Copper ions are specifically released from copper metallochaperones upon contact with their cognate cuproproteins and metal transfer is thought to proceed by ligand substitution. PMID:20205585

  13. Volcanogenic Massive Sulfide Deposit Density

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mosier, Dan L.; Singer, Donald A.; Berger, Vladimir I.

    2007-01-01

    A mineral-deposit density model for volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits was constructed from 38 well-explored control areas from around the world. Control areas contain at least one exposed volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit. The control areas used in this study contain 150 kuroko, 14 Urals, and 25 Cyprus massive sulfide subtypes of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits. For each control area, extent of permissive rock, number of exposed volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits, map scale, deposit age, and deposit density were determined. The frequency distribution of deposit densities in these 38 control areas provides probabilistic estimates of the number of deposits for tracts that are permissive for volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits-90 percent of the control areas have densities of 100 or more deposits per 100,000 square kilometers, 50 percent of the control areas have densities of 700 or more deposits per 100,000 square kilometers, and 10 percent of the control areas have densities of 3,700 or more deposits per 100,000 square kilometers. Both map scale and the size of the control area are shown to be predictors of deposit density. Probabilistic estimates of the number of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits can be made by conditioning the estimates on sizes of permissive area. The model constructed for this study provides a powerful tool for estimating the number of undiscovered volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits when conducting resource assessments. The value of these deposit densities is due to the consistency of these models with the grade and tonnage and the descriptive models. Mineral-deposit density models combined with grade and tonnage models allow reasonable estimates of the number, size, and grades of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits to be made.

  14. Ultrafast electronic relaxation processes in semiconductor nanoparticles (silver iodide, silver iodide/silver sulfide, silver bromide/silver sulfide, silver sulfide, cupric sulfide, and copper sulfide) and carotenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brelle, Michael Chris

    2000-11-01

    This dissertation examines primarily the ultrafast dynamics of excited state charge carriers in semiconductor nanoparticles. The dissertation also briefly examines the excited state lifetimes of a few carotenoids. Understanding the dynamic properties of charge carriers in semiconductor nanoparticles is crucial for the further development of applications utilizing these systems. The dynamic properties including shallow and deep trapping as well as recombination have been studied in a variety of semiconductor nanoparticle systems. Kinetic modeling was utilized to assist in the assignment of all observed signals and the nature of the decays. The first observation of ultrafast trapping in silver halides was observed in AgI nanoparticles including the identification that interstitial silver ions may act as deep traps. Several interesting phenomena were observed in Ag2S and CuxS nanoparticles including dark shallow trap states and shallow trap state saturation leading to increased transient absorption over transient bleach with increasing excitation intensity. These observations have provided further insight into the relaxation pathways for charge carriers in semiconductor nanoparticle systems. Lifetimes of the S2 excited states of four carotenoids have also been determined. The S2 lifetime for beta-carotene was confirmed from previous fluorescence up-conversion experiments whereas the S2 lifetimes that were previously unknown for three carotenoids, violaxanthin, neaxanthin, and lutein were discovered. These experiments together demonstrate the capabilities of femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy to characterize and better understand the processes involved in the ultrafast relaxation events in both molecular and nanoparticle systems.

  15. Sulfides and oxides in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    1988-01-01

    Metal abundances associated with Sun-grazing P/comet Ikeya-Seki 1965f, the mineralogy of chrondritic interplanetary dust particles and cosmochemical affinities of Co, V, Cr, and Ni in extraterrestrial materials and probable vaporization data for nonsilicate minerals are used to evaluate the putative dearth of nonsilicates in short-period comets. It is concluded that sulfides and oxides are common, albeit minor, constituents of these comets. Sulfides and oxides can form in situ during perihelion passage in the nucleus of active short-period comets by sulfidation of Mg, Fe-silicates.

  16. Apparatus for use in sulfide chemiluminescence detection

    DOEpatents

    Spurlin, S.R.; Yeung, E.S.

    1987-01-06

    A method is described for chemiluminescently determining a sulfide which is either hydrogen sulfide or methyl mercaptan by reacting the sulfide with chlorine dioxide at low pressure and under conditions which allow a longer reaction time in emission of a single photon for every two sulfide containing species, and thereafter, chemiluminescently detecting and determining the sulfide. The invention also relates not only to the detection method, but the novel chemical reaction and a specifically designed chemiluminescence detection cell for the reaction. 4 figs.

  17. Apparatus for use in sulfide chemiluminescence detection

    DOEpatents

    Spurlin, Stanford R.; Yeung, Edward S.

    1987-01-01

    A method of chemiluminescently determining a sulfide which is either hydrogen sulfide or methyl mercaptan by reacting the sulfide with chlorine dioxide at low pressure and under conditions which allow a longer reaction time in emission of a single photon for every two sulfide containing species, and thereafter, chemiluminescently detecting and determining the sulfide. The invention also relates not only to the detection method, but the novel chemical reaction and a specifically designed chemiluminescence detection cell for the reaction.

  18. Prevention of sulfide oxidation in sulfide-rich waste rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyström, Elsa; Alakangas, Lena

    2015-04-01

    The ability to reduce sulfide oxidation in waste rock after mine closure is a widely researched area, but to reduce and/or inhibit the oxidation during operation is less common. Sulfide-rich (ca 30 % sulfur) waste rock, partially oxidized, was leached during unsaturated laboratory condition. Trace elements such as As and Sb were relatively high in the waste rock while other sulfide-associated elements such as Cu, Pb and Zn were low compared to common sulfide-rich waste rock. Leaching of unsaturated waste rock lowered the pH, from around six down to two, resulting in continuously increasing element concentrations during the leaching period of 272 days. The concentrations of As (65 mg/L), Cu (6.9 mg/L), Sb (1.2 mg/L), Zn (149 mg/L) and S (43 g/L) were strongly elevated at the end of the leaching period. Different alkaline industrial residues such as slag, lime kiln dust and cement kiln dust were added as solid or as liquid to the waste rock in an attempt to inhibit sulfide oxidation through neo-formed phases on sulfide surfaces in order to decrease the mobility of metals and metalloids over longer time scale. This will result in a lower cost and efforts of measures after mine closure. Results from the experiments will be presented.

  19. Hydrogen sulfide in signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata

    2015-01-15

    For a long time hydrogen sulfide (H₂S) was considered a toxic compound, but recently H₂S (at low concentrations) has been found to play an important function in physiological processes. Hydrogen sulfide, like other well-known compounds - nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) is a gaseous intracellular signal transducer. It regulates the cell cycle, apoptosis and the oxidative stress. Moreover, its functions include neuromodulation, regulation of cardiovascular system and inflammation. In this review, I focus on the metabolism of hydrogen sulfide (including enzymatic pathways of H₂S synthesis from l- and d-cysteine) and its signaling pathways in the cardiovascular system and the nervous system. I also describe how hydrogen sulfide may be used as therapeutic agent, i.e. in the cardiovascular diseases.

  20. Assaying the catalytic potential of transition metal sulfides for abiotic carbon fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cody, G. D.; Boctor, N. Z.; Brandes, J. A.; Filley, T. R.; Hazen, R. M.; Yoder, H. S.

    2004-05-01

    A suite of nickel, cobalt, iron, copper, and zinc containing sulfides are assayed for the promotion of a model carbon fixation reaction with relevance to local reducing environments of the early Earth. The assay tests the promotion of hydrocarboxylation (the Koch reaction) wherein a carboxylic acid is synthesized via carbonyl insertion at a metal-sulfide-bound alkyl group. The experimental conditions are chosen for optimal assay, i.e., high reactant concentrations and pressures (200 MPa) to enhance chemisorption, and high temperature (250°C) to enhance reaction kinetics. All of the metal sulfides studied, with the exception CuS, promote hydrocarboxylation. Two other significant reactions involve the catalytic reduction of CO to form a surface-bound methyl group, detected after nucleophilic attack by nonane thiol to form methyl nonyl sulfide, and the formation of dinonyl sulfide via a similar reaction. Estimation of the catalytic turnover frequencies for each of the metal sulfides with respect to each of the primary reactions reveals that NiS, Ni 3S 2, and CoS perform comparably to commonly employed industrial catalysts. A positive correlation between the yield of primary product to NiS and Ni 3S 2 surface areas provides strong evidence that the reactions are surface catalytic in these cases. The sulfides FeS and Fe (1-x)S are unique in that they exhibit evidence of extensive dissolution, thus, complicating interpretation regarding heterogeneous vs. homogeneous catalysis. With the exception of CuS, each of the metal sulfides promotes reactions that mimic key intermediate steps manifest in the mechanistic details of an important autotrophic enzyme, acetyl-CoA synthase. The relatively high temperatures chosen for assaying purposes, however, are incompatible with the accumulation of thioesters. The results of this study support the hypothesis that transition metal sulfides may have provided useful catalytic functionality for geochemical carbon fixation in a prebiotic

  1. Thermoelectric Properties of Lanthanum Sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C.; Lockwood, R.; Parker, J. B.; Zoltan, A.; Zoltan, L. D.; Danielson, L.; Raag, V.

    1987-01-01

    Report describes measurement of Seebeck coefficient, electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity, and Hall effect in gamma-phase lanthanum sulfide with composition of La3-x S4. Results of study, part of search for high-temperature thermoelectric energy-conversion materials, indicate this sulfide behaves like extrinsic semiconductor over temperature range of 300 to 1,400 K, with degenerate carrier concentration controlled by stoichiometric ratio of La to S.

  2. Sulfidation as a natural antidote to metallic nanoparticles is overestimated: CuO sulfidation yields CuS nanoparticles with increased toxicity in medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryos.

    PubMed

    Li, Lingxiangyu; Hu, Ligang; Zhou, Qunfang; Huang, Chunhua; Wang, Yawei; Sun, Cheng; Jiang, Guibin

    2015-02-17

    Sulfidation is considered as a natural antidote to toxicity of metallic nanoparticles (NPs). The detoxification contribution from sulfidation, however, may vary depending on sulfidation mechanisms. Here we present the dissolution-precipitation instead of direct solid-state-shell mechanism to illustrate the process of CuO-NPs conversion to CuS-NPs in aqueous solutions. Accordingly, the CuS-NPs at environmentally relevant concentrations showed much stronger interference on Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryo hatching than CuO-NPs, which was probably due to elevated free copper ions released from CuS-NPs, leading to significant increase in oxidative stress and causing toxicity in embryos. The larval length was significantly reduced by CuS-NPs, however, no other obviously abnormal morphological features were identified in the hatched larvae. Co-introduction of a metal ion chelator [ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA)] could abolish the hatching inhibition induced by CuS-NPs, indicating free copper ions released from CuS-NPs play an important role in hatching interference. This work documents for the first time that sulfidation as a natural antidote to metallic NPs is being overestimated, which has far reaching implications for risk assessment of metallic NPs in aquatic environment.

  3. Amorphous molybdenum sulfides as hydrogen evolution catalysts.

    PubMed

    Morales-Guio, Carlos G; Hu, Xile

    2014-08-19

    from simple wet-chemical routes. Electron transport is sometimes slow in the particle catalysts, and an impedance model has been established to identify this slow electron transport. Finally, the amorphous molybdenum sulfide film catalyst has been integrated onto a copper(I) oxide photocathode for photoelectrochemical hydrogen evolution. The conformal catalyst efficiently extracts the excited electrons to give an impressive photocurrent density of -5.7 mA/cm(2) at 0 V vs RHE. The catalyst also confers good stability.

  4. Inhibition of sulfate-reducing bacteria by metal sulfide formation in bioremediation of acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Utgikar, Vivek P; Harmon, Stephen M; Chaudhary, Navendu; Tabak, Henry H; Govind, Rakesh; Haines, John R

    2002-02-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) containing high concentrations of sulfate and heavy metal ions can be treated by biological sulfate reduction. It has been reported that the effect of heavy metals on sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) can be stimulatory at lower concentrations and toxic/inhibitory at higher concentrations. The quantification of the toxic/inhibitory effect of dissolved heavy metals is critical for the design and operation of an effective AMD bioremediation process. Serum bottle and batch reactor studies on metal toxicity to SRB indicate that insoluble metal sulfides can inhibit the SRB activity as well. The mechanism of inhibition is postulated to be external to the bacterial cell. The experimental data indicate that the metal sulfides formed due to the reaction between the dissolved metal and biogenic sulfide act as barriers preventing the access of the reactants (sulfate, organic matter) to the necessary enzymes. Scanning electron micrographs of the SRB cultures exposed to copper and zinc provide supporting evidence for this hypothesis. The SRB cultures retained their ability to effect sulfate reduction indicating that the metal sulfides were not lethally toxic to the SRB. This phenomenon of metal sulfide inhibition of the SRB has to be taken into account while designing a sulfate-reducing bioreator, and subsequently an efficient biotreatment strategy for AMD. Any metal sulfide formed in the bioreactor needs to be removed immediately from the system to maintain the efficiency of the process of sulfate reduction.

  5. Ionization levels of doped copper indium sulfide chalcopyrites.

    PubMed

    Tablero, C

    2012-02-09

    The electronic structure of modified chalcopyrite CuInS(2) has been analyzed from first principles within the density functional theory. The host chalcopyrite has been modified by introducing atomic impurities M at substitutional sites in the lattice host with M = C, Si, Ge, Sn, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Rh, and Ir. Both substitutions M for In and M for Cu have been analyzed. The gap and ionization energies are obtained as a function of the M-S displacements. It is interesting for both spintronic and optoelectronic applications because it can provide significant information with respect to the pressure effect and the nonradiative recombination.

  6. Syntheses of amorphous and crystalline cupric sulfide nanoparticles and study on the specific activities on different cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuming; Zhang, Jie; Yang, Lin; Wang, Huajie; Wang, Feifei; Zheng, Zhi

    2010-05-28

    Copper sulfide amorphous nanoparticles and nanocrystals were prepared successfully by a special process. These CuS nanoparticles could specifically and significantly induce the apoptosis and inhibit the proliferation of human cancer cells rather than normal cells. Moreover, the biological activities of these nanoparticles are related to their polymorphs.

  7. Copper isotope variations of copper-rich minerals in seafloor hydrothermal deposits and igneous rocks, measured by a femtosecond LA-MC-ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikehata, K.; Ishibashi, J.; Suzuki, R.; Hirata, T.

    2013-05-01

    In recent years, the copper isotope systematics has seen an increased interest as a potential tool for understanding copper sources and geochemical processes of copper transport and deposition in ore-forming systems. The copper isotope variations of primary and secondary copper-rich minerals from modern (Mariana Trough) and ancient (Besshi-type and Kuroko-type volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits, Japan) seafloor hydrothermal deposits have been analyzed by a femtosecond-pulsed laser ablation multiple collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (fs-LA-MC-ICP-MS). The δ65Cu (where δ65Cu = [(65Cu/63Cu)sample/ (65Cu/63Cu)NIST-SRM976-1] × 1000) values of copper-rich sulfide minerals of chimney samples from active seafloor hydrothermal deposits are significantly large (δ65Cu = -0.7 to 4.0‰) compared to those of copper-rich minerals in ancient submarine hydrothermal deposits (δ65Cu = -0.3 to 0.4‰; e.g., Ikehata et al., 2011) and in igneous rocks (δ65Cu = -0.3 to 0.3‰; e.g., Ikehata et al., 2012). These large copper isotopic variations in the chimney samples are most likely explained in terms of a redox-controlled isotope fractionation during hydrothermal reworking of copper sulfides below sea floor or alteration of primary hydrothermal copper sulfides by seawater, involving the preferential incorporation of heavy copper isotopes in secondary Cu(II) solutions. These results also suggest that sub-seafloor recrystallization and metamorphic reequilibration may have reduced the original range of copper isotopes. Secondary malachite (δ65Cu = 2.6 to 3.0‰) and native copper (δ65Cu = 1.4 to 1.7‰) in the Besshi-type deposits have heavier copper isotopic values compared to precursor copper-rich minerals. These variations are mainly due to isotope fractionations during redox reactions (weathering) at low temperatures involving the preferential incorporation of heavy copper isotopes in secondary Cu(II) solutions.

  8. Stratigraphic and petrographic comparison of the Creta and Kupferschiefer copper shale deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huyck, H. L. O.; Chorey, R. W.

    1991-04-01

    Stratigraphic and petrographic characteristics of the Creta copper shale deposit in the Flowerpot Shale of southwestern Oklahoma are compared with the betterknown Rudna deposit in the Kupferschiefer of south-western Poland. At Creta, early diagenetic mineralization is indicated by: (1) copper sulfide replacement of large spores and of pyrite, (2) lack of compaction of replaced spores relative to unreplaced spores, (3) enclosure of uncompacted mud and copper sulfides by early “matrix gypsum,” and (4) location of the ore bed within a thick sequence of fine-grained, low-permeability sediments. This contrasts sharply with evidence of late-diagenetic copper mineralization in the Kupferschiefer at Rudna. Mineralization of copper shales appears to occur over a wide time scale relative to diagenesis of the host sediments.

  9. Copper and trace element fractionation in electrokinetically treated methanogenic anaerobic granular sludge.

    PubMed

    Virkutyte, Jurate; van Hullebusch, Eric; Sillanpää, Mika; Lens, Piet

    2005-12-01

    The effect of electrokinetic treatment (0.15 mA cm(-2)) on the metal fractionation in anaerobic granular sludge artificially contaminated with copper (initial copper concentration 1000 mg kg(-1) wet sludge) was studied. Acidification of the sludge (final pH 4.2 in the sludge bed) with the intention to desorb the copper species bound to the organic/sulfides and residual fractions did not result in an increased mobility, despite the fact that a higher quantity of copper was measured in the more mobile (i.e. exchangeable/carbonate) fractions at final pH 4.2 compared to circum-neutral pH conditions. Also addition of the chelating agent EDTA (Cu2+:EDTA4- ratio 1.2:1) did not enhance the mobility of copper from the organic/sulfides and residual fractions, despite the fact that it induced a reduction of the total copper content of the sludge. The presence of sulfide precipitates likely influences the copper mobilisation from these less mobile fractions, and thus makes EDTA addition ineffective to solubilise copper from the granules.

  10. New data on the Hyrkkoelae native copper mineralization: A natural analogue for the long-term corrosion of copper canisters

    SciTech Connect

    Marcos, N.; Ahonen, L.; Bros, R.; Roos, P.; Suksi, J.; Oversby, V.

    1999-07-01

    The Hyrkkoelae U-Cu mineralization located in southwestern Finland is reassessed with reference to the corrosion mechanisms affecting the stability of native copper and the time-scales of corrosion processes. The mineral assemblage native copper--copper sulfide occurs in open fractures at several depth intervals within granite pegmatites (GP). The surfaces of these open fractures have accumulations of uranophane crystals and other unidentified uranyl compounds. The secondary uranium minerals are mainly distributed around copper sulfide grains. Microscopic intergrowths of copper sulfides and uranyl compounds also have been observed. Groundwater samples were collected from the vicinity of the Cu samples. The hydrogeochemical features of these samples indicate that the present conditions are oxidizing. The minimum age of U(VI) transport and deposition is about 200,000 years. This age is indicated by {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U and {sup 230}Th/{sup 234}U activity ratios of uranophane. The age of the hexavalent uranium precipitation may be somewhat later than the last influxes and/or demobilization of sulfur. The mineral assemblage native copper--copper oxide (cuprite) occurs only at one depth interval within altered granite pegmatite. The fracture surface was coated by smectite. The content of uranium in smectite was 69--75 ppm U. The {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U and {sup 230}Th/{sup 234}U activity ratios of smectite showed that it has been exposed to recent groundwaters (e.g., during the last million years). The pH of the groundwater at this interval was near neutral (6.9). The copper grains present at this fracture surface were as large as 1 mm in diameter and had rims of cuprite of 0.01 to 0.1 mm thick. The smallest grains were totally oxidized.

  11. Synthesis and shape-tailoring of copper sulfide/indium sulfide-based nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Han, Wei; Yi, Luoxin; Zhao, Nan; Tang, Aiwei; Gao, Mingyuan; Tang, Zhiyong

    2008-10-01

    Heterostructured Cu2S-In2S3 nanocrystals with various shapes and compositions were synthesized by a high-temperature precursor-injection method using the semiconductor nanocrystal Cu1.94S as a catalyst. The intrinsic cationic deficiencies formed at high temperature by Cu ions made the Cu1.94S nanocrystal a good candidate for catalyzing the nucleation and subsequent growth of In 2S3 nanocrystals, eventually leading to the formation of heterostructured Cu2S-In2S3 nanocrystals. Gelification of the reaction systems, which were composed of different types of nanocrystal precursors and solvent, was found to be a very effective measure for controlling the growth kinetics of the heterostructured particles. Consequently, matchsticklike Cu2S3-In2S3 heterostructured nanorods, teardroplike quasi-core/shell Cu2S@In2S3 nanocrystals, and pencil-like In2S3 nanorods were successfully obtained by manipulating the gelification of the reaction system; this formed a solid experimental basis for further discussion of the growth mechanisms for differently shaped and structured nanocrystals. By reaction with 1,10-phenanthroline, a reagent that strongly and selectively binds to Cu(+), a compositional transformation from binary matchsticklike Cu2S-In2S3 nanorods to pure In2S3 nanorods was successfully achieved.

  12. Cadmium sulfide-copper sulfide heterojunction cell research. Annual report, September 1, 1979-August 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    1980-12-01

    The primary goal of this program, increasing the conversion efficiency of a thin-film cell based on CdS/Cu/sub 2/S, has been achieved. A number of (CdZn)S/Cu/sub 2/S cells have been made with conversion efficiencies in excess of 10% when tested in collimated sunlight. The highest efficiency achieved was 10.2% for a cell with 16% Zinc which had the following parameters; V/sub oc/ = 0.60V, J/sub sc/ = 22.8 mA/cm/sup 2/ (pro-rated to 100 mW/cm/sup 2/) FF = 74.9%. Further improvement in the performance of CdS/Cu/sub 2/S cells beyond the previously reported 9.2%, was found to be limited by deficiencies in the fundamental knowledge and control of the Cu/sub 2/S layer. A number of process changes in the production of CdS/Cu/sub 2/S cells have been explored and are reported on. Transient capacitance measurements on CdS/Cu/sub 2/S cells and further development of an integral encapsulation are also reported.

  13. Cadmium sulfide-copper sulfide heterojunction cell research. Quarterly progress report, March 1-May 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    1980-11-01

    A complete statistical analysis of the yield of CdS/Cu/sub 2/S cells produced by the standard processes is presented. Progress has been made on producing (CdZn)S films with the appropriate properties to yield high efficiency cells. Further studies of capacitance and transient-capacitance are reported. Defects in electron beam deposited glass are shown to be responsible for lack of effective sealing against atmospheric attack.

  14. Photoactive nanocrystals by low-temperature welding of copper sulfide nanoparticles and indium sulfide nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hui Min; Tan, Jia Yi; Batabyal, Sudip K; Magdassi, Shlomo; Mhaisalkar, Subodh G; Wong, Lydia H

    2014-12-01

    We successfully utilize the concept of coalescence and room-temperature sintering to prepare morphologically different nanoparticles. n-Type chalcogenide (CuIn5 S8 ) nanocrystals are synthesized at room temperature by simple mixing of oppositely charged precursor nanoparticles. The coalescence of polycation-coated CuS nanoparticles and negatively charged In2 S3 nanoplates is driven by close contact of the particles due to electrostatic interactions. Analysis by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging, and Raman spectroscopy confirms the formation of single-phase CuIn5 S8 without traceable secondary phase. In a photovoltaic device, the use of the coalesced particles yields a power conversion efficiency of 1.8%.

  15. Cadmium sulfide/copper sulfide heterojunction cell research. Final report, February 26, 1979-July 15, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, J. A.; Cornog, D. G.

    1980-06-30

    Extensive modifications were made to the multi-source deposition apparatus. These include the installation of a larger vacuum chamber on the existing system. The new chamber provides improved inter-source shielding, an improved substrate mounting and heating system, and a vacuum interlock for introducing substrates. CdS resistivity control by both In doping and off-stoichiometric deposition has been investigated. Indium doping has been achieved both by diffusion from a pre-deposited In layer and by using In doped sputtering targets. Resistivities in the range 0.1 to 5 ..cap omega..-cm have been obtained for target doping levels of from 0.1 to 1 at. percent of In. These resistivities were found to be critically dependent on the H/sub 2/S injection rate, apparently because of compensation by Cd vacancies. Off-stoichiometry CdS coatings with solar-illuminated resistivities of about 10/sup 2/ ..cap omega..-cm have been deposited, using a cyclic reactive sputtering process were the H/sub 2/S injection is periodically switched on and off. The Cu/sub x/S deposition process was found to be sensitive to the period of cathode operation prior to coating deposition, probably because of the conditioning of cathode and shield surfaces. All-sputter-deposited Cd(Zn)S/Cu/sub 2/S cells, with Cd(Zn)S layers deposited using a Cd-0.10 Zn target doped with 2 atomic percent In, have yielded efficiencies of approx. 0.4%. All-sputtered cells with efficiencies of approx. 0.6% have been fabricated, using undoped CdS deposited by the pulse injection process. Efficiencies of approx. 1.2% have been achieved for cells with undoped sputter-deposited CdS and CuCl dry processed Cu/sub 2/S.

  16. A Reaction Involving Oxygen and Metal Sulfides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, William D. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a procedure for oxygen generation by thermal decomposition of potassium chlorate in presence of manganese dioxide, reacted with various sulfides. Provides a table of sample product yields for various sulfides. (JM)

  17. Sulfide Stability of Planetary Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caiazza, C. M.; Righter, K.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Chesley, J. T.; Ruiz, J.

    2004-01-01

    The isotopic system, 187Re 187Os, can be used to determine the role of crust and mantle in magma genesis. In order to apply the system to natural samples, we must understand variations in Re/Os concentrations. It is thought that low [Os] and [Re] in basalts can be attributed to sulfide (FeS) saturation, as Re behaves incompatibly to high degrees of evolution until sulfide saturation occurs [1]. Previous work has shown that lunar basalts are sulfide under-saturated, and mid-ocean ridge, ocean-island and Martian (shergottites) basalts are saturated [2,3]. However, little is known about arc basalts. In this study, basaltic rocks were analyzed across the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt.

  18. Seasonal and spatial patterns of metals at a restored copper mine site. I. Stream copper and zinc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bambic, D.G.; Alpers, C.N.; Green, P.G.; Fanelli, E.; Silk, W.K.

    2006-01-01

    Seasonal and spatial variations in metal concentrations and pH were found in a stream at a restored copper mine site located near a massive sulfide deposit in the Foothill copper-zinc belt of the Sierra Nevada, California. At the mouth of the stream, copper concentrations increased and pH decreased with increased streamflow after the onset of winter rain and, unexpectedly, reached extreme values 1 or 2 months after peaks in the seasonal hydrographs. In contrast, aqueous zinc and sulfate concentrations were highest during low-flow periods. Spatial variation was assessed in 400 m of reach encompassing an acidic, metal-laden seep. At this seep, pH remained low (2-3) throughout the year, and copper concentrations were highest. In contrast, the zinc concentrations increased with downstream distance. These spatial patterns were caused by immobilization of copper by hydrous ferric oxides in benthic sediments, coupled with increasing downstream supply of zinc from groundwater seepage.

  19. Mechanical and Electrical Properties of Palladium-Coated Copper Wires with Flash Gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chia-Yun; Hung, Fei-Yi; Lui, Truan-Sheng

    2017-03-01

    Palladium-coated copper wire with flash gold (PCA) is a fine wire with an oxidation resistance layer. A new sulfidation test has been assessed in this work, confirming that PCA wires show better sulfidation corrosion resistance than either palladium-coated or bare copper wires. The sulfided surface of PCA was analyzed, along with its bonding strength and electrical properties. The metallurgic mechanism for formation of free air balls during the electric flame-off (EFO) process was identified. The flash gold layer of PCA wires can improve certain shortcomings, including: (1) efficiently promoting sulfidation corrosion resistance, (2) solving the problem of palladium segregation during the EFO process, (3) reducing the starting voltage, and (4) stabilizing the electrical resistivity of the bonding interface.

  20. Mechanism of Mineral Phase Reconstruction for Improving the Beneficiation of Copper and Iron from Copper Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhengqi; Zhu, Deqing; Pan, Jan; Zhang, Feng

    2016-09-01

    To maximize the recovery of iron and copper from copper slag, the modification process by adding a compound additive (a mixture of hematite, pyrite and manganous oxide) and optimizing the cooling of the slag was studied. The phase reconstruction mechanism of the slag modification process was revealed by thermodynamic calculations, x-ray diffraction, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the synergy between the burnt lime and the compound additive promotes the generation of target minerals, such as magnetite and copper matte. In addition, the multifunctional compound additive is able to improve the fluidity of the molten slag, which facilitates the coalescence and growth of fine particles of the target minerals. As a result, the percentage of iron distributed in the form of magnetite increased from 32.9% to 65.1%, and that of the copper exiting in the form of metallic copper and copper sulfide simultaneously increased from 80.0% to 90.3%. Meanwhile, the grains of the target minerals in the modified slag grew markedly to a mean size of over 50 μm after slow cooling. Ultimately, the beneficiation efficiency of copper and iron was improved because of the ease with which the target minerals could be liberated.

  1. The Effect of Oxygen Potential on the Sulfide Capacity for Slags Containing Multivalent Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allertz, Carl; Selleby, Malin; Sichen, Du

    2016-10-01

    The dependence of sulfide capacity on the oxygen partial pressure for slags containing multivalent species was investigated experimentally using a slag containing vanadium oxide. Copper-slag equilibration experiments were carried out at 1873 K (1600 °C) in the approximate oxygen partial pressure range 10-15.4 to 10-9 atm. The sulfide capacity was found to be strongly dependent on the oxygen potential in this slag system, increasing with the oxygen partial pressure. The sulfide capacity changed by more than two orders of magnitude over the oxygen partial pressure range. The effect of changing oxygen partial pressure was found to be much greater than the effect of changing slag composition at a fixed oxygen partial pressure.

  2. Determining the Optimum Cut-Off Grades in Sulfide Copper Deposits / Określanie Optymalnej Wartości Odcięcia Zawartości Procentowej Pierwiastka Użytecznego W Złożach Siarczku Miedzi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Esmaeil; Oraee, Kazem; Shafahi, Zia Aldin; Ghasemzadeh, Hasan

    2015-03-01

    Optimum cut-off grades determination in mining life affects production planning and ultimate pit limit and it is also important from social, economical and environmental aspects. Calculation of optimum cut-off grades has been less considered for mines containing various mineral processing methods. In this paper, an optimization technique is applied to obtain optimum cut-off grades for both concentration and heap leaching processes. In this technique, production costs and different recoveries of heap leaching method directed into modeling different annual cash flows in copper mines. Considering the governing constraints, the Lagrange multiplier method is practiced to optimize the cut-off grades in which the objective function is supposed to maximize Net Present Value. The results indicate the effect of heap leaching process on the optimum cut-off grades of primary and secondary sulfide deposits. Określanie optymalnego poziomu odcięcia dla zawartości procentowej pierwiastka użytecznego ma poważny wpływ na planowanie produkcji, określanie ostatecznych limitów zasobów złoża; jest to także ważna kwestia z punktu widzenia kwestii społecznych, ekonomicznych i środowiskowych. Obliczanie optymalnego poziomu odcięcia dla zawartości procentowej pierwiastka użytecznego nie było zwykle szeroko rozważane w przypadku kopalni prowadzących ciągły system przeróbki. W pracy tej przedstawiono technikę optymalizacji określania poziomu zawartości procentowej pierwiastka użytecznego z uwzględnieniem zarówno procesów koncentracji jak i ługowania. W metodzie uwzględniono koszty produkcji i różne wskaźniki odzysku rudy, wielkości te wykorzystane zostały do modelowania rocznych przepływów gotówki w kopalniach miedzi. Uwzględniając narzucone ograniczenia, zastosowano metodę mnożników Lagrange'a w celu optymalizacji określania poziomu zawartości procentowej pierwiastka użytecznego, gdzie przyjętą funkcją celu jest

  3. High-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of sulfidation of brass at the rubber/brass interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Kenichi; Kakubo, Takashi; Shimizu, Katsunori; Amino, Naoya; Mase, Kazuhiko; Komatsu, Takayuki

    2013-01-01

    High resolution photoelectron spectroscopy is utilized to investigate the chemical composition at the rubber/brass interface to elucidate the origin of strong adhesion as well as the degradation between rubber and brass. Special attention has been given to copper sulfides formed at the interface during the vulcanization reaction at 170 °C. At least five sulfur-containing species are identified in the adhesive interlayer including crystalline CuS and amorphous CuxS (x ≃ 2). These copper sulfide species are not uniformly distributed within the layer, but there exits the concentration gradation; the concentration of CuxS is high in the region on the rubber side and is diminished in the deeper region, while vice versa for that of CuS. Degradation of the interface adhesive strength by prolonged vulcanization arises from the decrease in the CuxS/CuS ratio accompanying desulfurization of the adhesive layer.

  4. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL... § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or...

  5. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL... § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or...

  6. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808... Safety Systems § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown, as defined in § 250.490 of this...

  7. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Completion Operations § 250.504 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-completion operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or...

  8. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Workover Operations § 250.604 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-workover operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or...

  9. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604...-Workover Operations § 250.604 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-workover operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined...

  10. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808... OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Production Safety Systems § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of...

  11. 30 CFR 250.808 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.808 Section 250.808 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL... § 250.808 Hydrogen sulfide. Production operations in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or...

  12. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504...-Completion Operations § 250.504 Hydrogen sulfide. When a well-completion operation is conducted in zones known to contain hydrogen sulfide (H2S) or in zones where the presence of H2S is unknown (as defined...

  13. Artificial Corrosion of Cu-Alloys. A Contribution to Understanding Microbial and Nonmicrobial Sulfide Corrosion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    the course of the experiment. Hydrolysis of cupric ion may have been responsible for this. Reactions occurring in solutions with sufficient dissolved...ity of the aqueous sulfur species to be 10-2 and 10-4 mgl/L, respec- tively, and the activity of the cupric ion to be 10 . Final and initial solution...of a porous copper - sulfide film inhibits the natural growth of a protective cuprous oxide film. Also, Syrett 3 suggests that a film of hetero

  14. Elevated corrosion rates and hydrogen sulfide in homes with 'Chinese Drywall'.

    PubMed

    Allen, Joseph G; MacIntosh, David L; Saltzman, Lori E; Baker, Brian J; Matheson, Joanna M; Recht, Joel R; Minegishi, Taeko; Fragala, Matt A; Myatt, Theodore A; Spengler, John D; Stewart, James H; McCarthy, John F

    2012-06-01

    In December 2008, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) began receiving reports about odors, corrosion, and health concerns related to drywall originating from China. In response, a detailed environmental health and engineering evaluation was conducted of 41 complaint and 10 non-complaint homes in the Southeast U.S. Each home investigation included characterization of: 1) drywall composition; 2) indoor and outdoor air quality; 3) temperature, moisture, and building ventilation; and 4) copper and silver corrosion rates. Complaint homes had significantly higher hydrogen sulfide concentrations (mean 0.82 vs. copper sulfide and silver sulfide corrosion compared to non-complaint homes (Cu(2)S: 476 vs. <32 Å/30 d, p<0.01; Ag(2)S: 1472 vs. 389 Å/30 d, p<0.01). The abundance of carbonate and strontium in drywall was also elevated in complaint homes, and appears to be useful objective marker of problematic drywall in homes that meet other screening criteria (e.g., constructed or renovated in 2006-2007, reports of malodor and accelerated corrosion). This research provides empirical evidence of the direct association between homes constructed with 'Chinese Drywall' in 2006-2007 and elevated corrosion rates and hydrogen sulfide concentrations in indoor air.

  15. Copper cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Copper cyanide ; CASRN 544 - 92 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  16. Transition metal sulfide loaded catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, V.A.; Iton, L.E.; Pasterczyk, J.W.; Winterer, M.; Krause, T.R.

    1994-04-26

    A zeolite-based catalyst is described for activation and conversion of methane. A zeolite support includes a transition metal (Mo, Cr or W) sulfide disposed within the micropores of the zeolite. The catalyst allows activation and conversion of methane to C[sub 2]+ hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere, thereby avoiding formation of oxides of carbon.

  17. Transition metal sulfide loaded catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, Victor A.; Iton, Lennox E.; Pasterczyk, James W.; Winterer, Markus; Krause, Theodore R.

    1994-01-01

    A zeolite based catalyst for activation and conversion of methane. A zeolite support includes a transition metal (Mo, Cr or W) sulfide disposed within the micropores of the zeolite. The catalyst allows activation and conversion of methane to C.sub.2 + hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere, thereby avoiding formation of oxides of carbon.

  18. p-Chlorophenyl methyl sulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    p - Chlorophenyl methyl sulfide ; CASRN 123 - 09 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for N

  19. Production of sulfur gases and carbon dioxide by synthetic weathering of crushed drill cores from the Santa Cruz porphyry copper deposit near Casa Grande, Pinal County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinkle, M.E.; Ryder, J.L.; Sutley, S.J.; Botinelly, T.

    1990-01-01

    Samples of ground drill cores from the southern part of the Santa Cruz porphyry copper deposit, Casa Grande, Arizona, were oxidized in simulated weathering experiments. The samples were also separated into various mineral fractions and analyzed for contents of metals and sulfide minerals. The principal sulfide mineral present was pyrite. Gases produced in the weathering experiments were measured by gas chromatography. Carbon dioxide, oxygen, carbonyl sulfide, sulfur dioxide and carbon disulfide were found in the gases; no hydrogen sulfide, organic sulfides, or mercaptans were detected. Oxygen concentration was very important for production of the volatiles measured; in general, oxygen concentration was more important to gas production than were metallic element content, sulfide mineral content, or mineral fraction (oxide or sulfide) of the sample. The various volatile species also appeared to be interactive; some of the volatiles measured may have been formed through gas reactions. ?? 1990.

  20. Biogeochemistry of dissolved hydrogen sulfide species and carbonyl sulfide in the western North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radford-Knȩry, Joël; Cutter, Gregory A.

    1994-12-01

    The biogeochemistry of total sulfide dissolved in the open ocean is a poorly understood component of the global sulfur cycle. Here, the cycling of total sulfide was examined in the western North Atlantic Ocean using specially developed sampling and analytical methods. Total sulfide (particulate + dissolved sulfide) concentrations ranged from <2-550 pmol/L; concentrations were highest in the mixed layer and decreased with depth. Significant levels (up to 19 pmol/L) of free sulfide (uncomplexed sulfide) were determined in the top 50 m of the water column. Sources of total sulfide were examined. In particular, the rate of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) hydrolysis was redetermined under oceanographic conditions, and the depth distribution of OCS was examined. The patterns of near-surface enrichment (up to 150 pmol/L) and depletion at depth observed in OCS depth profiles suggest in situ production of OCS. To quantify the sources and sinks of total sulfide in the mixed layer of the Sargasso Sea, a budget was constructed. The rate of total sulfide production was 5.5 pmol L-1 h-1 (OCS hydrolysis + atmospheric input), and total sulfide removal rate was 115 pmol L -1 h-1 (oxidation + particulate sinking). The significant difference between the known sources and sinks indicates that other processes are important for the cycling of sulfide. Similarities in the depth distribution of total sulfide and chlorophyll a, and results from recent laboratory experiments argue strongly in favor of biological involvement in the production of total sulfide in the open ocean.

  1. Ore microscopy of the Paoli silver-copper deposit, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, C.A.; Hagni, R.D.; Berendsen, P.

    1991-01-01

    The Paoli silver-copper deposit is located in south-central Oklahoma, 56 km south-southeast from Norman, Oklahoma. It was mined for high-grade silver-copper near the beginning of this century, and intensive exploratory drilling during the early 1970's delineated unmined portions of the deposit. A collaborative study between the U.S.G.S., the Kansas Geological Survey, and the University of Missouri-Rolla was undertaken to provide new information on the character of red bed copper deposits of the Midcontinent region. The Paoli deposit has been interpreted to occur as a roll-front type of deposit. The silver and copper mineralization occurs within paleochannels in the Permian Wellington Formation. The silver-copper interfaces appear to be controlled by oxidation-reduction interfaces that are marked by grey to red color changes in the host sandstone. Ore microscopic examinations of polished thin sections show that unoxidized ore consists of chalcocite, digenite, chalcopyrite, covellite and pyrite; and oxidized ores are characterized by covellite, bornite, hematite and goethite. In sandstone-hosted ores, chalcocite and digenite replace dolomite and border clastic quartz grains. In siltstone-hosted ores, the copper sulfide grains have varied shapes; most are irregular in shape and 5-25 ??m across, others have euhedral shapes suggestive of pyrite crystal replacements, and some are crudely spherical and are 120-200 ??m across. Chalcopyrite is the predominant copper sulfide at depth. Covellite and malachite replace chalcocite and digenite near the surface. Silver only occurs as native silver; most as irregularly shaped grains 40-80 ??m across, but some as cruciform crystals that are up to 3.5 mm across. The native silver has been deposited after copper sulfides, and locally replaces chalcocite. Surficial nodules of pyrite, malachite and hematite locally are present in outcrops at the oxidation-reduction fronts. Polished sections of the nodules show that malachite forms a

  2. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, H.; Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1990-01-09

    A composition of matter is described which is comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide. A method for making this composition of matter is also described. This invention relates to the art of powder metallurgy and, more particularly, it relates to dispersion strengthened metals.

  3. Copper peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, L.

    1988-01-01

    A number of oxidizing agents, including chlorine, bromine, ozone and other peroxides, were allowed to act on copper solutions with the intention of forming copper peroxide. The only successful agent appears to be hydrogen peroxide. It must be used in a neutral 50 to 30 percent solution at a temperature near zero. Other methods described in the literature apparently do not work. The excess of hydrogen must be quickly sucked out of the brown precipitate, which it is best to wash with alcohol and ether. The product, crystalline under a microscope, can be analyzed only approximately. It approaches the formula CuO2H2O. In alkaline solution it appears to act catalytically in causing the decomposition of other peroxides, so that Na2O2 cannot be used to prepare it. On the addition of acids the H2O2 is regenerated. The dry substance decomposes much more slowly than the moist but is not very stable.

  4. Induced Polarization Responses of the Specimen with Sulfide Ore Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.; Sung, N. H.

    2012-04-01

    Basic data of the physical properties of the rocks is required to effectively interpret geologic structures and mineralized zones in study areas from the geophysical data in the field of subsurface investigations and mineral resources explorations. In this study, the spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurement system in the laboratory was constructed to obtain the IP characteristics of the specimen with sulfide ore minerals. The SIP measurement system consists of lab transmitter for electrical current transmission, and GDP-32 for current receiver. The SIP system employs 14 steps of frequencies from 0.123 to 1,024 Hz, and uses copper sulfate solution as an electrolyte. The SIP data for system verification was acquired using a measurement system of parallel circuit with fixed resistance and condenser. This measured data was in good agreement with Cole-Cole model data. First of all, the experiment on the SIP response was conducted in the laboratory with the mixture of glass beads and pyrite powders for ore grade assessment using characteristics of IP response of the rocks. The results show that the phase difference of IP response to the frequency is nearly proportional to the weight content of pyrite, and that the dominant frequency of the IP response varies with the size of the pyrite powder. Subsequently, the specimens used for SIP measurement are slate and limestone which were taken from drilling cores and outcrops of skarn ore deposits. All specimens are cylindrical in shape, with a diameter of 5 cm and a length of 10 cm. When measuring SIP of water-saturated specimens, the specimen surface is kept dry, tap water is put into the bottom of sample holder and a lid is closed. It is drawn that the SIP characteristics of the rocks show the phase difference depends on the amount of the sulfide minerals. The phase difference did not occur with frequencies applied in the absence of sulfide minerals in the rock specimens. On the contrary, the rock specimens containing

  5. Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity of sulfided hexanuclear molybdenum cluster compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Spink, D.

    1990-09-21

    Hexanuclear molybdenum clusters with mixed chloride and sulfide bridging ligands were prepared by reacting {alpha}-MoCl{sub 2} with sodium hydrosulfide in the presence of sodium butoxide. The resulting species, Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub (8-x)}S{sub x}{center dot}npy(x {congruent} 3.6, n {congruent} 4, py = pyridine), was pyrophoric and insoluble. The mixed sulfide chloride cluster species Mo{sub 6}S{sub 4}Cl{sub 4}{center dot}6OPEt{sub 3} and Mo{sub 6}S{sub {approximately}5}Cl{sub {approximately}3}{center dot}6PEt{sub 3} and Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}6PEt{sub 3} were isolated and characterized. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance, electron paramagnetic resonance, and UV/visible spectra were obtained for each fraction. The completely sulfided cluster, Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}6PEt{sub 3}, was prepared similarly and used in various experiments as a possible precursor to Chevrel phase materials of the type Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}or M{sub n}Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}. With the goal of removing all of the triethylphosphine ligands, Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}6PEt{sub 3} was reacted with the transition metal carbonyls molybdenum hexacarbonyl and dicobalt octacarbonyl. Reaction on the molecular sulfide cluster with copper(I) chloride in toluene gave a completely insoluble product. The reaction of Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}6PEt{sub 3} with propylene sulfide gave a product whose infrared spectra showed only very weak peaks associated with coordinated triethylphosphine. The elemental analysis of this product fit the formula Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}5SPEt{sub 3}. Reactivity of the outer ligands of the Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}npy and Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}(6{minus}x)PrNH{sub x} clusters were investigated. Crystalline Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8}{center dot}6THT was recovered from the reaction of the n-propylamine derivative with THT. A crystal structure determination was done. 87 refs., 12 fig., 15 tabs.

  6. Marine diagenesis of hydrothermal sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Moammar, M.O.

    1985-01-01

    An attempt is made to discuss the artificial and natural oxidation and hydrolysis of hydrothermal sulfide upon interaction with normal seawater. Synthetic and natural ferrosphalerite particles used in kinetic oxidation and hydrolysis studies in seawater develop dense, crystalline coatings consisting of ordered and ferrimagnetic delta-(Fe, Zn)OOH. Due to the formation of this reactive diffusion barrier, the release of Zn into solution decreases rapidly, and sulfide oxidation is reduced to a low rate determined by the diffusion of oxygen through the oxyhydroxide film. This also acts as an efficient solvent for ions such as Zn/sup 2 +/, Ca/sup 2 +/, and possibly Cd/sup 2 +/, which contribute to the stabilization of the delta-FeOOH structure. The oxidation of sulfide occurs in many seafloor spreading areas, such as 21/sup 0/N on the East Pacific Ridge. In these areas the old surface of the sulfide chimneys are found to be covered by an orange stain, and sediment near the base of nonactive vents is also found to consist of what has been referred to as amorphous iron oxide and hydroxide. This thesis also discusses the exceedingly low solubility of zinc in seawater, from delta-(Fe, Zn)OOH and the analogous phase (zinc-ferrihydroxide) and the zinc exchange minerals, 10-A manganate and montmorillonite. The concentrations of all four are of the same magnitude (16, 36.4, and 12 nM, respectively) as the zinc concentration in deep ocean water (approx. 10 nM), which suggests that manganates and montmorillonite with iron oxyhydroxides control zinc concentration in the deep ocean.

  7. Optimization of chemical bath deposited cadmium sulfide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Oladeji, I.O.; Chow, L.

    1997-07-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) is known to be an excellent heterojunction partner of p-type cadmium telluride (CdTe) or p-type copper indium diselenide (CuInSe{sub 2}) due essentially to its high electron affinity. It is widely used as a window material in high efficiency thin-film solar cells based on CdTe or CuInSe{sub 2} owing to its transparency and photoconductivity among other properties. The authors report the optimization of CdS thin film grown by chemical bath deposition where homogeneous reactions are minimized. The optimum parameters have enabled them to maximize the thickness of the deposited film in a single dip and to grow thicker films by periodically replenishing the concentration of reactants while the substrate remains continuously dipped in the reaction bath. Characterization results reveal the deposited CdS films exhibit improved optical and electrical properties.

  8. Sulfidation mechanism for zinc oxide nanoparticles and the effect of sulfidation on their solubility.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rui; Levard, Clément; Michel, F Marc; Brown, Gordon E; Lowry, Gregory V

    2013-03-19

    Environmental transformations of nanoparticles (NPs) affect their properties and toxicity potential. Sulfidation is an important transformation process affecting the fate of NPs containing metal cations with an affinity for sulfide. Here, the extent and mechanism of sulfidation of ZnO NPs were investigated, and the properties of resulting products were carefully characterized. Synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis reveal that transformation of ZnO to ZnS occurs readily at ambient temperature in the presence of inorganic sulfide. The extent of sulfidation depends on sulfide concentration, and close to 100% conversion can be obtained in 5 days given sufficient addition of sulfide. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy showed formation of primarily ZnS NPs smaller than 5 nm, indicating that sulfidation of ZnO NPs occurs by a dissolution and reprecipitation mechanism. The solubility of partially sulfidized ZnO NPs is controlled by the remaining ZnO core and not quenched by a ZnS shell formed as was observed for partially sulfidized Ag NPs. Sulfidation also led to NP aggregation and a decrease of surface charge. These changes suggest that sulfidation of ZnO NPs alters the behavior, fate, and toxicity of ZnO NPs in the environment. The reactivity and fate of the resulting <5 nm ZnS particles remains to be determined.

  9. Cross-comparison of leaching strains isolated from two different regions: Chambishi and Dexing copper mines.

    PubMed

    Ngom, Baba; Liang, Yili; Liu, Xueduan

    2014-01-01

    A cross-comparison of six strains isolated from two different regions, Chambishi copper mine (Zambia, Africa) and Dexing copper mine (China, Asia), was conducted to study the leaching efficiency of low grade copper ores. The strains belong to the three major species often encountered in bioleaching of copper sulfide ores under mesophilic conditions: Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, and Leptospirillum ferriphilum. Prior to their study in bioleaching, the different strains were characterized and compared at physiological level. The results revealed that, except for copper tolerance, strains within species presented almost similar physiological traits with slight advantages of Chambishi strains. However, in terms of leaching efficiency, native strains always achieved higher cell density and greater iron and copper extraction rates than the foreign microorganisms. In addition, microbial community analysis revealed that the different mixed cultures shared almost the same profile, and At. ferrooxidans strains always outcompeted the other strains.

  10. Cross-Comparison of Leaching Strains Isolated from Two Different Regions: Chambishi and Dexing Copper Mines

    PubMed Central

    Ngom, Baba; Liang, Yili; Liu, Xueduan

    2014-01-01

    A cross-comparison of six strains isolated from two different regions, Chambishi copper mine (Zambia, Africa) and Dexing copper mine (China, Asia), was conducted to study the leaching efficiency of low grade copper ores. The strains belong to the three major species often encountered in bioleaching of copper sulfide ores under mesophilic conditions: Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, and Leptospirillum ferriphilum. Prior to their study in bioleaching, the different strains were characterized and compared at physiological level. The results revealed that, except for copper tolerance, strains within species presented almost similar physiological traits with slight advantages of Chambishi strains. However, in terms of leaching efficiency, native strains always achieved higher cell density and greater iron and copper extraction rates than the foreign microorganisms. In addition, microbial community analysis revealed that the different mixed cultures shared almost the same profile, and At. ferrooxidans strains always outcompeted the other strains. PMID:25478575

  11. Evaluation of a constructed wetland treatment system specifically designed to decrease bioavailable copper in a wastestream.

    PubMed

    Murray-Gulde, Cynthia L; Bearr, Jonathan; Rodgers, John H

    2005-05-01

    A specifically designed constructed wetland decreased copper concentrations in a wastestream to 22 microg Cu/L and eliminated associated toxicity. Metal toxicity is a function of both concentration and form. This research measured copper partitioning to ligands within the wetland and observed changes in copper form with regard to bioavailability. Average monthly copper concentrations in the constructed wetland treatment system ranged from 10 to 47 microg/L in the upstream (i.e., inflow to the constructed wetland prior to the retention basin) and from non-detection to 11 microg/L in the downstream (i.e., outflow to the receiving stream). On average, 78% total-recoverable, 85% acid-soluble, and 83% soluble copper were removed from inflow to outflow of this constructed wetland; however, total recoverable and acid-soluble copper measurements were not useful indicators of bioavailable copper. Survival of Ceriodaphnia dubia increased from an average of 2% survival in the inflow to 96% in the outflow and reproduction increased from an average of 8 to 24 neonates/female, respectively. Soluble copper is a more accurate predictor of the concentration at which effects were observed. Average ratio of acid volatile sulfides to simultaneously extractable metals was 1.4: 0.06 micromol/g indicating sufficient sulfides to sequester available metals in the system.

  12. 40 CFR 425.03 - Sulfide analytical methods and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Provisions § 425.03 Sulfide analytical methods and applicability. (a) The potassium ferricyanide titration... the potassium ferricyanide titration method for the determination of sulfide in wastewaters...

  13. Synthesis and Optical Properties of Sulfide Nanoparticles Prepared in Dimethylsulfoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuebin; Ma, Lun; Zhang, Xing; Joly, Alan G.; Liu, Zuli; Chen, Wei

    2008-11-01

    Many methods have been reported for the formation of sulfide nanoparticles by the reaction of metallic salts with sulfide chemical sources in aqueous solutions or organic solvents. Here, we report the formation of sulfide nanoparticles in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) by boiling metallic salts without sulfide sources. The sulfide sources are generated from the boiling of DMSO and react with metallic salts to form sulfide nanoparticles. In this method DMSO functions as a solvent and a sulfide source as well as a stabilizer for the formation of the nanoparticles. The recipe is simple and economical making sulfide nanoparticles formed in this way readily available for many potential applications.

  14. A field investigation of the relationship between zinc and acid volatile sulfide concentrations in freshwater sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ankley, Gerald T.; Liber, Karsten; Call, Daniel J.; Markee, Thomas P.; Canfield, Timothy J.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    1996-01-01

    Understanding relationships between cationic metals such as cadmium, copper, nickel, lead and zinc, and amorphous iron sulfides, measured as acid volatile sulfide (AVS), is key to predicting metal bioavailability and toxicity insediments. The objective of the present study was to assess seasonal and spatial variations of AVS in freshwater sediments contaminated with zinc. Sediments were sampled from three streams with varying levels of zinc contamination at two different times, March and June of 1995, representing cold- and warm-weather situations. Interstitial (pore) water concentrations of zinc, and solid phase concentrations of AVS and zinc were measured in surficial and deep sediment horizons. Toxicity tests (10-d) with the amphipodHyalella azteca were conducted using intact cores. Sediment zinc concentrations from six sites within the primary test stream differed by about five-fold, and also varied seasonally. Acid volatile sulfide concentrations were generally lower than those of zinc, and pore water zinc concentrations typically were elevated. There was a positive correlation between solid-phase AVS and zinc concentrations, suggesting that the system was dominated by zinc, as opposed to iron sulfides. In contrast to expectations arising from some studies of seasonal variations of AVS in iron-dominated systems, AVS concentrations were smaller in June than in March. However, this was likely due to a major storm event and associated sediment scouring before the June sampling, rather than to seasonal processes related to variations in temperature and dissolved oxygen. Based upon an indirect analysis of depth variations in AVS, there was some indication that zinc sulfide might be less prone to oxidation than iron sulfide. There was a strong correlation between toxicity of the sediment samples toH. azteca and interstitial water concentrations of zinc; however, the possible contribution of other contaminants to sediment toxicity cannot be dismissed.

  15. COPPER CORROSION RESEARCH UPDATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Copper release and corrosion related issues continue to be important to many water systems. The objective of this presentation is to discuss the current state of copper research at the USEPA. Specifically, the role of aging on copper release, use of phosphates for copper corrosio...

  16. Copper speciation in variably toxic sediments at the Ely Copper Mine, Vermont, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimball, Bryn E.; Foster, Andrea L.; Seal II, Robert R.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Webb, Samuel M.; Hammarstrom, Jane M.

    2016-01-01

    At the Ely Copper Mine Superfund site, Cu concentrations exceed background values in both streamwater (160–1200 times) and sediments (15–79 times). Previously, these sediment samples were incubated with laboratory test organisms, and they exhibited variable toxicity for different stream sites. In this study we combined bulk- and microscale techniques to determine Cu speciation and distribution in these contaminated sediments on the basis of evidence from previous work that Cu was the most important stressor in this environment and that variable observed toxicity could have resulted from differences in Cu speciation. Copper speciation results were similar at microscopic and bulk scales. The major Cu species in the more toxic samples were sorbed or coprecipitated with secondary Mn (birnessite) and Fe minerals (jarosite and goethite), which together accounted for nearly 80% of the total Cu. The major Cu species in the less toxic samples were Cu sulfides (chalcopyrite and a covellite-like phase), making up about 80–95% of the total Cu, with minor amounts of Cu associated with jarosite or goethite. These Cu speciation results are consistent with the toxicity results, considering that Cu sorbed or coprecipitated with secondary phases at near-neutral pH is relatively less stable than Cu bound to sulfide at lower pH. The more toxic stream sediment sites were those that contained fewer detrital sulfides and were upstream of the major mine waste pile, suggesting that removal and consolidation of sulfide-bearing waste piles on site may not eliminate all sources of bioaccessible Cu.

  17. Copper Speciation in Variably Toxic Sediments at the Ely Copper Mine, Vermont, United States.

    PubMed

    Kimball, Bryn E; Foster, Andrea L; Seal, Robert R; Piatak, Nadine M; Webb, Samuel M; Hammarstrom, Jane M

    2016-02-02

    At the Ely Copper Mine Superfund site, Cu concentrations exceed background values in both streamwater (160-1200 times) and sediments (15-79 times). Previously, these sediment samples were incubated with laboratory test organisms, and they exhibited variable toxicity for different stream sites. In this study we combined bulk- and microscale techniques to determine Cu speciation and distribution in these contaminated sediments on the basis of evidence from previous work that Cu was the most important stressor in this environment and that variable observed toxicity could have resulted from differences in Cu speciation. Copper speciation results were similar at microscopic and bulk scales. The major Cu species in the more toxic samples were sorbed or coprecipitated with secondary Mn (birnessite) and Fe minerals (jarosite and goethite), which together accounted for nearly 80% of the total Cu. The major Cu species in the less toxic samples were Cu sulfides (chalcopyrite and a covellite-like phase), making up about 80-95% of the total Cu, with minor amounts of Cu associated with jarosite or goethite. These Cu speciation results are consistent with the toxicity results, considering that Cu sorbed or coprecipitated with secondary phases at near-neutral pH is relatively less stable than Cu bound to sulfide at lower pH. The more toxic stream sediment sites were those that contained fewer detrital sulfides and were upstream of the major mine waste pile, suggesting that removal and consolidation of sulfide-bearing waste piles on site may not eliminate all sources of bioaccessible Cu.

  18. Alternative Anode Reaction for Copper Electrowinning

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2005-07-01

    This report describes a project funded by the Department of Energy, with additional funding from Bechtel National, to develop a copper electrowinning process with lower costs and lower emissions than the current process. This new process also includes more energy efficient production by using catalytic-surfaced anodes and a different electrochemical couple in the electrolyte, providing an alternative oxidation reaction that requires up to 50% less energy than is currently required to electrowin the same quantity of copper. This alternative anode reaction, which oxidizes ferric ions to ferrous, with subsequent reduction back to ferric using sulfur dioxide, was demonstrated to be technically and operationally feasible. However, pure sulfur dioxide was determined to be prohibitively expensive and use of a sulfur burner, producing 12% SO{sub 2}, was deemed a viable alternative. This alternate, sulfur-burning process requires a sulfur burner, waste heat boiler, quench tower, and reaction towers. The electrolyte containing absorbed SO{sub 2} passes through activated carbon to regenerate the ferrous ion. Because this reaction produces sulfuric acid, excess acid removal by ion exchange is necessary and produces a low concentration acid suitable for leaching oxide copper minerals. If sulfide minerals are to be leached or the acid unneeded on site, hydrogen was demonstrated to be a potential reductant. Preliminary economics indicate that the process would only be viable if significant credits could be realized for electrical power produced by the sulfur burner and for acid if used for leaching of oxidized copper minerals on site.

  19. Medical Functions of Hydrogen Sulfide.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is a gasomediator synthesized from L- and D-cysteine in various tissues. It is involved in a number of physiological and pathological processes. H(2)S exhibits antiatherosclerotic, vasodilator, and proangiogenic properties, and protects the kidney and heart from damage following ischemia/reperfusion injury. H(2)S donors may be natural or synthetic, and may be used for the safe treatment of a wide range of diseases. This review article summarizes the current state of knowledge of the therapeutic function of H(2)S.

  20. Preparation of amorphous sulfide sieves

    DOEpatents

    Siadati, Mohammad H.; Alonso, Gabriel; Chianelli, Russell R.

    2006-11-07

    The present invention involves methods and compositions for synthesizing catalysts/porous materials. In some embodiments, the resulting materials are amorphous sulfide sieves that can be mass-produced for a variety of uses. In some embodiments, methods of the invention concern any suitable precursor (such as thiomolybdate salt) that is exposed to a high pressure pre-compaction, if need be. For instance, in some cases the final bulk shape (but highly porous) may be same as the original bulk shape. The compacted/uncompacted precursor is then subjected to an open-flow hot isostatic pressing, which causes the precursor to decompose and convert to a highly porous material/catalyst.

  1. Molybdenum sulfide/carbide catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Alonso, Gabriel; Chianelli, Russell R.; Fuentes, Sergio; Torres, Brenda

    2007-05-29

    The present invention provides methods of synthesizing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2) and carbon-containing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2-xC.sub.x) catalysts that exhibit improved catalytic activity for hydrotreating reactions involving hydrodesulfurization, hydrodenitrogenation, and hydrogenation. The present invention also concerns the resulting catalysts. Furthermore, the invention concerns the promotion of these catalysts with Co, Ni, Fe, and/or Ru sulfides to create catalysts with greater activity, for hydrotreating reactions, than conventional catalysts such as cobalt molybdate on alumina support.

  2. Lithium-cupric sulfide cell

    SciTech Connect

    Cuesta, A.J.; Bump, D.D.

    1980-01-01

    Lithium cells have become the primary power source for cardiac pacemakers due to their reliability and longevity at low current drain rates. A lithium-cupric sulfide cell was developed which makes maximum use of the shape of a pacemaker's battery compartment. The cell has a stable voltage throughout 90% of its lifetime. It then drops to a second stable voltage before depletion. The voltage drop creates a small decrease in pacemaker rate, which alerts the physician to replace the pacemaker. No loss of capacity due to self-discharge as been seen to date, and cells have proven to be safe under extreme conditions. 2 refs.

  3. Copper(II) mediated facile and ultra fast peptide synthesis in methanol.

    PubMed

    Mali, Sachitanand M; Jadhav, Sandip V; Gopi, Hosahudya N

    2012-07-18

    A novel, ultrafast, mild and scalable amide bond formation strategy in methanol using simple thioacids and amines is described. The mechanism suggests that the coupling reactions are initially mediated by CuSO(4)·5H(2)O and subsequently catalyzed by in situ generated copper sulfide. The pure peptides were isolated in satisfactory yields in less than 5 minutes.

  4. Phase analytical studies of industrial copper smelting slags. Part I: Silicate slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rüffler, R.; Dávalos, J.

    1998-12-01

    The pyrometallurgical extraction of copper from sulfide ore concentrates is determined by the behaviour of the associated iron during smelting. Hence, 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy is an attractive tool for studying the phases in silicate slags from German and Chilean smelting plants. Other methods used were ore microscopy, electron microprobe analysis, and X-ray powder diffraction.

  5. Copper-mediated stereospecific C-H oxidative sulfenylation of terminal alkenes with disulfides.

    PubMed

    Tu, Hai-Yong; Hu, Bo-Lun; Deng, Chen-Liang; Zhang, Xing-Guo

    2015-11-04

    A copper and iodine-mediated C-H oxidative sulfenylation of olefins with diaryl disulfides has been developed for the stereospecific synthesis of vinyl thioether. With the combination of Cu(OTf)2 and I2, a variety of terminal alkenes underwent oxidative coupling reaction with various diaryl disulfides successfully to afford the corresponding E-vinyl sulfides in moderate to good yields.

  6. Copper and copper proteins in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Montes, Sergio; Rivera-Mancia, Susana; Diaz-Ruiz, Araceli; Tristan-Lopez, Luis; Rios, Camilo

    2014-01-01

    Copper is a transition metal that has been linked to pathological and beneficial effects in neurodegenerative diseases. In Parkinson's disease, free copper is related to increased oxidative stress, alpha-synuclein oligomerization, and Lewy body formation. Decreased copper along with increased iron has been found in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus of Parkinson's disease patients. Copper influences iron content in the brain through ferroxidase ceruloplasmin activity; therefore decreased protein-bound copper in brain may enhance iron accumulation and the associated oxidative stress. The function of other copper-binding proteins such as Cu/Zn-SOD and metallothioneins is also beneficial to prevent neurodegeneration. Copper may regulate neurotransmission since it is released after neuronal stimulus and the metal is able to modulate the function of NMDA and GABA A receptors. Some of the proteins involved in copper transport are the transporters CTR1, ATP7A, and ATP7B and the chaperone ATOX1. There is limited information about the role of those biomolecules in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease; for instance, it is known that CTR1 is decreased in substantia nigra pars compacta in Parkinson's disease and that a mutation in ATP7B could be associated with Parkinson's disease. Regarding copper-related therapies, copper supplementation can represent a plausible alternative, while copper chelation may even aggravate the pathology.

  7. Copper and Copper Proteins in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Mancia, Susana; Diaz-Ruiz, Araceli; Tristan-Lopez, Luis; Rios, Camilo

    2014-01-01

    Copper is a transition metal that has been linked to pathological and beneficial effects in neurodegenerative diseases. In Parkinson's disease, free copper is related to increased oxidative stress, alpha-synuclein oligomerization, and Lewy body formation. Decreased copper along with increased iron has been found in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus of Parkinson's disease patients. Copper influences iron content in the brain through ferroxidase ceruloplasmin activity; therefore decreased protein-bound copper in brain may enhance iron accumulation and the associated oxidative stress. The function of other copper-binding proteins such as Cu/Zn-SOD and metallothioneins is also beneficial to prevent neurodegeneration. Copper may regulate neurotransmission since it is released after neuronal stimulus and the metal is able to modulate the function of NMDA and GABA A receptors. Some of the proteins involved in copper transport are the transporters CTR1, ATP7A, and ATP7B and the chaperone ATOX1. There is limited information about the role of those biomolecules in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease; for instance, it is known that CTR1 is decreased in substantia nigra pars compacta in Parkinson's disease and that a mutation in ATP7B could be associated with Parkinson's disease. Regarding copper-related therapies, copper supplementation can represent a plausible alternative, while copper chelation may even aggravate the pathology. PMID:24672633

  8. Variation in sulfide tolerance of photosystem II in phylogenetically diverse cyanobacteria from sulfidic habitats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Scott R.; Bebout, Brad M.

    2004-01-01

    Physiological and molecular phylogenetic approaches were used to investigate variation among 12 cyanobacterial strains in their tolerance of sulfide, an inhibitor of oxygenic photosynthesis. Cyanobacteria from sulfidic habitats were found to be phylogenetically diverse and exhibited an approximately 50-fold variation in photosystem II performance in the presence of sulfide. Whereas the degree of tolerance was positively correlated with sulfide levels in the environment, a strain's phenotype could not be predicted from the tolerance of its closest relatives. These observations suggest that sulfide tolerance is a dynamic trait primarily shaped by environmental variation. Despite differences in absolute tolerance, similarities among strains in the effects of sulfide on chlorophyll fluorescence induction indicated a common mode of toxicity. Based on similarities with treatments known to disrupt the oxygen-evolving complex, it was concluded that sulfide toxicity resulted from inhibition of the donor side of photosystem II.

  9. Experimental Investigation and Modeling of Copper Smelting Slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starodub, Konstantin; Kuminova, Yaroslava; Dinsdale, Alan; Cheverikin, Vladimir; Filichkina, Vera; Saynazarov, Abdukahhar; Khvan, Alexandra; Kondratiev, Alex

    2016-10-01

    Effective extraction of copper from sulfide ores requires careful operation of a copper smelter, which in turn depends very much on chemistry of the feed and resulted slag and matte. For example, chemical composition of copper smelting slags has to be in a certain range to ensure that their properties are within specific limits. Disobeying these rules may lead to complications in smelting operation, poor quality of the copper products, and premature shutdown of the copper smelter. In the present paper the microstructure and phase composition of slags from the Almalyk copper flash smelter were investigated experimentally and then modeled thermodynamically to evaluate potential ways of improvement and optimization of the copper smelting process and its products. The slag samples were taken at different stages of the copper smelting process: on slag tapping, after slag transportation to a deposition site, and at the site. Experimental investigation included the XRD, XRF, and SEM techniques, which were also confirmed by the traditional wet chemistry analysis. Thermodynamic modeling was carried out using thermochemical software package MTDATA, which enables thermodynamic and physical properties of the matte, slag, and gas phases to be calculated in a wide range of temperatures, pressures, and chemical compositions. In addition, slag viscosities and corresponding matte settling rates were estimated using the modified Urbain and Utigard-Warczok models, and the Hadamard-Rybczynski equation, respectively. It was found that the copper content in the slags may vary significantly depending on the location of slag sampling. Cu was found to be present as sulfide particles, almost no Cu was found to be dissolved in the slag. Analysis of microstructure and phase composition showed that major phase found in the samples is fayalite, while other phases are complex spinels (based on magnetite), different sulfides, and a glass-like phase. Thermodynamic calculations demonstrated the

  10. The role of hydrogen sulfide in burns.

    PubMed

    Akter, Farhana

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is a novel gasotransmitter that has been shown to play a major role in regulating vascular tone. However, the role of hydrogen sulfide in inflammation, sepsis and burns has only recently been studied. In animal studies, hydrogen sulfide has been shown to play a role in both promoting and inhibiting inflammation. Understanding the role of H2S in sepsis and shock is particularly important due to the high mortality associated with both conditions. In animal sepsis models, hydrogen sulfide appears to increase survival. Severe burns are associated with an inflammatory response that causes increased permeability and edema. Currently, there are few studies that have examined the exact role of hydrogen sulfide in burns. However, the role of hydrogen sulfide in inflammation enables us to hypothesize its role in burns. This review highlights the role of hydrogen sulfide in the mechanisms of action underlying inflammation, wound healing and sepsis as well as examining the potential role of hydrogen sulfide in burns. The authors of this article hope that this review will stimulate research to discover the exact role of this fascinating molecule in burns.

  11. Catalyst and process for oxidizing hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Hass, R.H.; Ward, J.W.

    1984-04-24

    Catalysts comprising bismuth and vanadium components are highly active and stable, especially in the presence of water vapor, for oxidizing hydrogen sulfide to sulfur or SO/sub 2/. Such catalysts have been found to be especially active for the conversion of hydrogen sulfide to sulfur by reaction with oxygen or SO/sub 2/.

  12. Ferrous and Sulfide Treatment of Electroplating Wastewater.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    chromium contaminants and the precipitation of heavy metal contaminants from contaminated electroplating wastewater. The wastewater is first adjusted...to a pH of from about 8 to 10 and then treated with sodium sulfide to provide sulfide ions to effect precipitation of heavy metal contaminants followed

  13. Ammonia and hydrogen sulfide removal using biochar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reducing ammonia and hydrogen sulfide emissions from livestock facilities is an important issue for many communities and livestock producers. Ammonia has been regarded as odorous, precursor for particulate matter (PM), and contributed to livestock mortality. Hydrogen sulfide is highly toxic at elev...

  14. Hassle free synthesis of nanodimensional Ni, Cu and Zn sulfides for spectral sensing of Hg, Cd and Pb: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Zarina; Singha, Shib Shankar; Saha, Abhijit; Sen, Kamalika

    2017-04-01

    A simple room temperature synthesis method of Ni, Cu and Zn sulfide nanoparticles (NPs) in aqueous medium is reported here. The NPs stabilized in aqueous medium by the citrate ions were characterized by UV-vis, ζ potentials, TEM and Raman spectroscopic techniques. The solid NPs could be isolated from the aqueous medium when allowed to stand for a prolonged time ( 20 h). The solids were also characterized by IR and powder X-ray analysis. The nanoparticles were further used for the development of facile optical sensing and detection of heavy metal ions at trace scale. Alterations in the absorption spectra of the generated NPs were indicative of their interactions with heavy metal ions. Raman spectral measurements further validate the detection technique. It is found that out of the three synthesized nanoparticles, nickel sulfide NP is a specific sensor for mercury ions whereas zinc sulfide and copper sulfide NPs act as sensors for Hg2 +, Cd2 + and Pb2 +.

  15. Hassle free synthesis of nanodimensional Ni, Cu and Zn sulfides for spectral sensing of Hg, Cd and Pb: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Zarina; Singha, Shib Shankar; Saha, Abhijit; Sen, Kamalika

    2017-04-05

    A simple room temperature synthesis method of Ni, Cu and Zn sulfide nanoparticles (NPs) in aqueous medium is reported here. The NPs stabilized in aqueous medium by the citrate ions were characterized by UV-vis, ζ potentials, TEM and Raman spectroscopic techniques. The solid NPs could be isolated from the aqueous medium when allowed to stand for a prolonged time (~20h). The solids were also characterized by IR and powder X-ray analysis. The nanoparticles were further used for the development of facile optical sensing and detection of heavy metal ions at trace scale. Alterations in the absorption spectra of the generated NPs were indicative of their interactions with heavy metal ions. Raman spectral measurements further validate the detection technique. It is found that out of the three synthesized nanoparticles, nickel sulfide NP is a specific sensor for mercury ions whereas zinc sulfide and copper sulfide NPs act as sensors for Hg(2+), Cd(2+) and Pb(2+).

  16. Hydrogen sulfide pollution in wastewater treatment facilities

    SciTech Connect

    AlDhowalia, K.H. )

    1987-01-01

    The hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) found in wastewater collection systems and wastewater treatment facilities results from the bacterial reduction of the sulfate ion (SO{sub 4}). Hydrogen sulfide is a gas that occurs both in the sewer atmosphere and as a dissolved gas in the wastewater. When raw wastewater first enters the wastewater treatment facility by gravity most of the hydrogen sulfide is in the gaseous phase and will escape into the atmosphere at the inlet structures. Also some of the dissolved hydrogen sulfide will be released at points of turbulance such as at drops in flow, flumes, or aeration chambers. Several factors can cause excessive hydrogen sulfide concentrations in a sewerage system. These include septic sewage, long flow times in the sewerage system, high temperatures, flat sewer grades, and poor ventilation. These factors are discussed in this paper.

  17. A computational study of adhesion between rubber and metal sulfides at rubber-brass interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Chian Ye; Hirvi, Janne T.; Suvanto, Mika; Bazhenov, Andrey S.; Ajoviita, Tommi; Markkula, Katriina; Pakkanen, Tapani A.

    2015-05-01

    Computational study at level of density functional theory has been carried out in order to investigate the adhesion between rubber and brass plated steel cord, which has high importance in tire manufacturing. Adsorption of natural rubber based adsorbate models has been studied on zinc sulfide, ZnS(1 1 0), and copper sulfide, Cu2S(1 1 1) and CuS(0 0 1), surfaces as the corresponding phases are formed in adhesive interlayer during rubber vulcanization. Saturated hydrocarbons exhibited weak interactions, whereas unsaturated hydrocarbons and sulfur-containing adsorbates interacted with the metal atoms of sulfide surfaces more strongly. Sulfur-containing adsorbates interacted with ZnS(1 1 0) surface stronger than unsaturated hydrocarbons, whereras both Cu2S(1 1 1) and CuS(0 0 1) surfaces showed opposite adsorption preference as unsaturated hydrocarbons adsorbed stronger than sulfur-containing adsorbates. The different interaction strength order can play role in rubber-brass adhesion with different relative sulfide concentrations. Moreover, Cu2S(1 1 1) surface exhibits higher adsorption energies than CuS(0 0 1) surface, possibly indicating dominant role of Cu2S in the adhesion between rubber and brass.

  18. Dissolved sulfides in the oxic water column of San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuwabara, J.S.; Luther, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Trace contaminants enter major estuaries such as San Francisco Bay from a variety of point and nonpoint sources and may then be repartitioned between solid and aqueous phases or altered in chemical speciation. Chemical speciation affects the bioavailability of metals as well as organic ligands to planktonic and benthic organisms, and the partitioning of these solutes between phases. Our previous, work in south San Francisco Bay indicated that sulfide complexation with metals may be of particular importance because of the thermodynamic stability of these complexes. Although the water column of the bay is consistently well-oxygenated and typically unstratified with respect to dissolved oxygen, the kinetics of sulfide oxidation could exert at least transient controls on metal speciation. Our initial data on dissolved sulfides in the main channel of both the northern and southern components of the bay consistently indicate submicromolar concenrations (from <1 nM to 162 nM), as one would expect in an oxidizing environment. However, chemical speciation calculations over the range of observed sulfide concentrations indicate that these trace concentrations in the bay water column can markedly affect chemical speciation of ecologically significant trace metals such as cadmium, copper, and zinc.

  19. Weathering of sulfides on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Roger G.; Fisher, Duncan S.

    1987-01-01

    Pyrrhotite-pentlandite assemblages in mafic and ultramafic igneous rocks may have contributed significantly to the chemical weathering reactions that produce degradation products in the Martian regolith. By analogy and terrestrial processes, a model is proposed whereby supergene alteration of these primary Fe-Ni sulfides on Mars has generated secondary sulfides (e.g., pyrite) below the water table and produced acidic groundwater containing high concentrations of dissolved Fe, Ni, and sulfate ions. The low pH solutions also initiated weathering reactions of igneous feldspars and ferromagnesian silicates to form clay silicate and ferric oxyhydroxide phases. Near-surface oxidation and hydrolysis of ferric sulfato-and hydroxo-complex ions and sols formed gossan above the water table consisting of poorly crystalline hydrated ferric sulfates (e.g., jarosite), oxides (ferrihydrite, goethite), and silica (opal). Underlying groundwater, now permafrost contains hydroxo sulfato complexes of Fe, Al, Mg, Ni, which may be stabilized in frozen acidic solutions beneath the surface of Mars. Sublimation of permafrost may replenish colloidal ferric oxides, sulfates, and phyllosilicates during dust storms on Mars.

  20. Using XAS and SXRF to Study Copper in Wilson Disease at the Molecular and Tissue Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralle, Martina; Blackburn, Ninian J.; Lutsenko, Svetlana

    2007-02-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is a genetic disorder of copper metabolism associated with severe hepatic, neurological, and psychiatric abnormalities. In WD, the billiary copper excretion is impaired and copper accumulates in tissues, particularly in the liver and the brain. The affected gene, ATP7B, encodes the copper transporting ATPase, Wilson disease protein (WNDP). WNDP has six copper binding sites in the N-terminal portion of the molecule. Each site includes the conserved amino acid sequence MXCXXC, and binds 1 Cu(I) through its 2 cysteine residues. We performed X-ray absorption studies at the Cu Kα-edge on the recombinant N-terminal domain of WNDP (N-WNDP). Copper was bound to N-WNDP either in vivo or in vitro in the presence of different reducing agents. We found that in N-WNDP copper is predominantly coordinated in a linear fashion by two cysteines, with the appearance of a Cu-Cu interaction when all metal binding sites are filled. Increasing amounts of reducing agents containing sulfide or phosphine groups led to binding of the exogenous ligands to copper thereby increasing the coordination number of copper from two to three. To better understand the role of copper in WD, we utilized livers of the 6-weeks-old Atp7b-/- mice (an animal model for WD) in which the copper concentration was 10-20-fold higher compared to that of the control mice. The distribution of copper in hepatocytes was evaluated by synchrotron based X-ray fluorescence microprobe (SXRF). We demonstrate that we can prepare liver slices that retain copper and can detect copper with subcellular resolution. On the same sections μ-XANES (spot size: 5 micron) was used to determine the oxidation state of copper.

  1. Using XAS and SXRF to Study Copper in Wilson Disease at the Molecular and Tissue Level

    SciTech Connect

    Ralle, Martina; Lutsenko, Svetlana; Blackburn, Ninian J.

    2007-02-02

    Wilson disease (WD) is a genetic disorder of copper metabolism associated with severe hepatic, neurological, and psychiatric abnormalities. In WD, the billiary copper excretion is impaired and copper accumulates in tissues, particularly in the liver and the brain. The affected gene, ATP7B, encodes the copper transporting ATPase, Wilson disease protein (WNDP). WNDP has six copper binding sites in the N-terminal portion of the molecule. Each site includes the conserved amino acid sequence MXCXXC, and binds 1 Cu(I) through its 2 cysteine residues. We performed X-ray absorption studies at the Cu K{alpha}-edge on the recombinant N-terminal domain of WNDP (N-WNDP). Copper was bound to N-WNDP either in vivo or in vitro in the presence of different reducing agents. We found that in N-WNDP copper is predominantly coordinated in a linear fashion by two cysteines, with the appearance of a Cu-Cu interaction when all metal binding sites are filled. Increasing amounts of reducing agents containing sulfide or phosphine groups led to binding of the exogenous ligands to copper thereby increasing the coordination number of copper from two to three. To better understand the role of copper in WD, we utilized livers of the 6-weeks-old Atp7b-/- mice (an animal model for WD) in which the copper concentration was 10-20-fold higher compared to that of the control mice. The distribution of copper in hepatocytes was evaluated by synchrotron based X-ray fluorescence microprobe (SXRF). We demonstrate that we can prepare liver slices that retain copper and can detect copper with subcellular resolution. On the same sections {mu}-XANES (spot size: 5 micron) was used to determine the oxidation state of copper.

  2. Using Xas And Sxrf to Study Copper in Wilson Disease at the Molecular And Tissue Level

    SciTech Connect

    Ralle, M.; Blackburn, N.J.; Lutsenko, S.

    2009-06-05

    Wilson disease (WD) is a genetic disorder of copper metabolism associated with severe hepatic, neurological, and psychiatric abnormalities. In WD, the billiary copper excretion is impaired and copper accumulates in tissues, particularly in the liver and the brain. The affected gene, ATP7B, encodes the copper transporting ATPase, Wilson disease protein (WNDP). WNDP has six copper binding sites in the N-terminal portion of the molecule. Each site includes the conserved amino acid sequence MXCXXC, and binds 1 Cu(I) through its 2 cysteine residues. We performed X-ray absorption studies at the Cu K{sub {alpha}}-edge on the recombinant N-terminal domain of WNDP (N-WNDP). Copper was bound to N-WNDP either in vivo or in vitro in the presence of different reducing agents. We found that in N-WNDP copper is predominantly coordinated in a linear fashion by two cysteines, with the appearance of a Cu-Cu interaction when all metal binding sites are filled. Increasing amounts of reducing agents containing sulfide or phosphine groups led to binding of the exogenous ligands to copper thereby increasing the coordination number of copper from two to three. To better understand the role of copper in WD, we utilized livers of the 6-weeks-old Atp7b-/- mice (an animal model for WD) in which the copper concentration was 10--20-fold higher compared to that of the control mice. The distribution of copper in hepatocytes was evaluated by synchrotron based X-ray fluorescence microprobe (SXRF). We demonstrate that we can prepare liver slices that retain copper and can detect copper with subcellular resolution. On the same sections {mu}-XANES (spot size: 5 micron) was used to determine the oxidation state of copper.

  3. Transient Kinetic Analysis of Hydrogen Sulfide Oxidation Catalyzed by Human Sulfide Quinone Oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Mishanina, Tatiana V; Yadav, Pramod K; Ballou, David P; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-10-09

    The first step in the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway is catalyzed by sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR), which belongs to the family of flavoprotein disulfide oxidoreductases. During the catalytic cycle, the flavin cofactor is intermittently reduced by sulfide and oxidized by ubiquinone, linking H2S oxidation to the electron transfer chain and to energy metabolism. Human SQR can use multiple thiophilic acceptors, including sulfide, sulfite, and glutathione, to form as products, hydrodisulfide, thiosulfate, and glutathione persulfide, respectively. In this study, we have used transient kinetics to examine the mechanism of the flavin reductive half-reaction and have determined the redox potential of the bound flavin to be -123 ± 7 mV. We observe formation of an unusually intense charge-transfer (CT) complex when the enzyme is exposed to sulfide and unexpectedly, when it is exposed to sulfite. In the canonical reaction, sulfide serves as the sulfur donor and sulfite serves as the acceptor, forming thiosulfate. We show that thiosulfate is also formed when sulfide is added to the sulfite-induced CT intermediate, representing a new mechanism for thiosulfate formation. The CT complex is formed at a kinetically competent rate by reaction with sulfide but not with sulfite. Our study indicates that sulfide addition to the active site disulfide is preferred under normal turnover conditions. However, under pathological conditions when sulfite concentrations are high, sulfite could compete with sulfide for addition to the active site disulfide, leading to attenuation of SQR activity and to an alternate route for thiosulfate formation.

  4. Integration of Semiconducting Sulfides for Full-Spectrum Solar Energy Absorption and Efficient Charge Separation.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Tao-Tao; Liu, Yan; Li, Yi; Zhao, Yuan; Wu, Liang; Jiang, Jun; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2016-05-23

    The full harvest of solar energy by semiconductors requires a material that simultaneously absorbs across the whole solar spectrum and collects photogenerated electrons and holes separately. The stepwise integration of three semiconducting sulfides, namely ZnS, CdS, and Cu2-x S, into a single nanocrystal, led to a unique ternary multi-node sheath ZnS-CdS-Cu2-x S heteronanorod for full-spectrum solar energy absorption. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in the nonstoichiometric copper sulfide nanostructures enables effective NIR absorption. More significantly, the construction of pn heterojunctions between Cu2-x S and CdS leads to staggered gaps, as confirmed by first-principles simulations. This band alignment causes effective electron-hole separation in the ternary system and hence enables efficient solar energy conversion.

  5. Green synthesis of covellite nanocrystals using biologically generated sulfide: potential for bioremediation systems.

    PubMed

    da Costa, J P; Girão, Ana Violeta; Lourenço, João P; Monteiro, O C; Trindade, Tito; Costa, Maria Clara

    2013-10-15

    This work describes the synthesis of CuS powders in high yield and via an environmentally friendly and straightforward process, under ambient conditions (temperature and pressure), by adding to aqueous copper (II) a nutrient solution containing biologically generated sulfide from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The powders obtained were composed of CuS (covellite) nanoparticles (NPs) exhibiting a spheroid morphology (<5 nm). The relevance of this method to obtain CuS supported solid substrates has been demonstrated by performing the synthesis in the presence of TiO2 and SiO2 submicron particles. We further extended the work carried out, which substantiates the potential of using biogenic sulfide for the production of covellite nanocrystals and composites, using the effluent of a bioremediation column. Hence, such process results in the synthesis of added value products obtained from metal rich effluents, such as metallurgical and industrial ones, or Acid Mine Drainage (AMD), when associated with bioremediation processes.

  6. 40 CFR 425.04 - Applicability of sulfide pretreatment standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... hydrogen sulfide gas. (3) The characteristics of the receiving POTWs headworks, preliminary and primary... opportunities for release of hydrogen sulfide gas. (4) The occurrence of any prior sulfide related interference... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Applicability of sulfide...

  7. 40 CFR 425.04 - Applicability of sulfide pretreatment standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... hydrogen sulfide gas. (3) The characteristics of the receiving POTWs headworks, preliminary and primary... opportunities for release of hydrogen sulfide gas. (4) The occurrence of any prior sulfide related interference... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Applicability of sulfide...

  8. 40 CFR 425.04 - Applicability of sulfide pretreatment standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... hydrogen sulfide gas. (3) The characteristics of the receiving POTWs headworks, preliminary and primary... opportunities for release of hydrogen sulfide gas. (4) The occurrence of any prior sulfide related interference... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Applicability of sulfide...

  9. 40 CFR 425.04 - Applicability of sulfide pretreatment standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... hydrogen sulfide gas. (3) The characteristics of the receiving POTWs headworks, preliminary and primary... opportunities for release of hydrogen sulfide gas. (4) The occurrence of any prior sulfide related interference... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicability of sulfide...

  10. 40 CFR 425.04 - Applicability of sulfide pretreatment standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... hydrogen sulfide gas. (3) The characteristics of the receiving POTWs headworks, preliminary and primary... opportunities for release of hydrogen sulfide gas. (4) The occurrence of any prior sulfide related interference... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Applicability of sulfide...

  11. Metal hydrogen sulfide superconducting temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashov, N. A.; Kutukov, A. A.; Mazur, E. A.

    2017-01-01

    Éliashberg theory is generalized to the electronphonon (EP) systems with the not constant density of electronic states. The phonon contribution to the anomalous electron Green's function (GF) is considered. The generalized Éliashberg equations with the variable density of electronic states are resolved for the hydrogen sulphide SH3 phase under pressure. The dependence of both the real and the imaginary part of the order parameter on the frequency in the SH3 phase is obtained. The Tc = 177 K value in the hydrogen sulfide SH3 phase at the pressure P = 225 GPa has been defined. The results of the solution of the Eliashberg equations for the Im-3m (170 GPa), Im-3m (200 GPa) and R3m (120 GPa) phases are presented. A peak value Tc = 241 K of the superconducting transition temperature has been predicted.

  12. Redox biochemistry of hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Kabil, Omer; Banerjee, Ruma

    2010-07-16

    H(2)S, the most recently discovered gasotransmitter, might in fact be the evolutionary matriarch of this family, being both ancient and highly reduced. Disruption of gamma-cystathionase in mice leads to cardiovascular dysfunction and marked hypertension, suggesting a key role for this enzyme in H(2)S production in the vasculature. However, patients with inherited deficiency in gamma-cystathionase apparently do not present vascular pathology. A mitochondrial pathway disposes sulfide and couples it to oxidative phosphorylation while also exposing cytochrome c oxidase to this metabolic poison. This report focuses on the biochemistry of H(2)S biogenesis and clearance, on the molecular mechanisms of its action, and on its varied biological effects.

  13. Structural studies in limestone sulfidation

    SciTech Connect

    Fenouil, Laurent A.

    1993-05-01

    This study investigates the sulfidation of limestone at high temperatures (700--900°C) as the first step in the design of a High-Temperature Coal-Gas Clean-Up system using millimeter-size limestone particles. Several workers have found that the rate of this reaction significantly decreases after an initial 10 to 15% conversion of CaCO3 to CaS. The present work attempts to explain this feature. It is first established that millimeter-size limestone particles do not sinter at temperatures up to the CaCO3 calcination point (899°C at 1.03 bar CO2} partial pressure). It is then shown that CaS sinters rapidly at 750 to 900°C if CO2 is present in the gas phase. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) photographs and Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) data reveal that the CaS product layer sinters and forms a quasi-impermeable coating around the CaCO3 grains that greatly hinders more H2S from reaching the still unreacted parts of the stone. Moreover, most of the pores initially present within the limestone structure begin to disappear or, at least, are significantly reduced in size. From then on, subsequent conversion is limited by diffusion of H2S through the CaS layer, possibly by S2- ionic diffusion. The kinetics is then adequately described by a shrinking-core model, in which a sharp front of completely converted limestone is assumed to progress toward the center of the pellet. Finally, experimental evidence and computer simulations using simple sintering models suggest that the CaS sintering, responsible for the sharp decrease in the sulfidation rate, is surface-diffusion controlled.

  14. Microbial control of hydrogen sulfide production

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, A.D.; Bhupathiraju, V.K.; Wofford, N.; McInerney, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    A sulfide-resistant strain of Thiobacillus denitrificans, strain F, prevented the accumulation of sulfide by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans when both organisms were grown in liquid medium. The wild-type strain of T. denitrificans did not prevent the accumulation of sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans. Strain F also prevented the accumulation of sulfide by a mixed population of sulfate-reducing bacteria enriched from an oil field brine. Fermentation balances showed that strain F stoichiometrically oxidized the sulfide produced by D. desulfuricans and the oil field brine enrichment to sulfate. The ability of a strain F to control sulfide production in an experimental system of cores and formation water from the Redfield, Iowa, natural gas storage facility was also investigated. A stable, sulfide-producing biofilm was established in two separate core systems, one of which was inoculated with strain F while the other core system (control) was treated in an identical manner, but was not inoculated with strain F. When formation water with 10 mM acetate and 5 mM nitrate was injected into both core systems, the effluent sulfide concentrations in the control core system ranged from 200 to 460 {mu}M. In the test core system inoculated with strain F, the effluent sulfide concentrations were lower, ranging from 70 to 110 {mu}M. In order to determine whether strain F could control sulfide production under optimal conditions for sulfate-reducing bacteria, the electron donor was changed to lactate and inorganic nutrients (nitrogen and phosphate sources) were added to the formation water. When nutrient-supplemented formation water with 3.1 mM lactate and 10 mM nitrate was used, the effluent sulfide concentrations of the control core system initially increased to about 3,800 {mu}M, and then decreased to about 1,100 {mu}M after 5 weeks. However, in the test core system inoculated with strain F, the effluent sulfide concentrations were much lower, 160 to 330 {mu}M.

  15. Nanostructured lead sulfide: synthesis, structure and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovnikov, S. I.; Gusev, A. I.; Rempel, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    The theoretical and experimental results of recent studies dealing with nanostructured lead sulfide are summarized and analyzed. The key methods for the synthesis of nanostructured lead sulfide are described. The crystal structure of PbS in nanopowders and nanofilms is discussed. The influence of the size of nanostructure elements on the optical and thermal properties of lead sulfide is considered. The dependence of the band gap of PbS on the nanoparticle (crystallite) size for powders and films is illustrated. The bibliography includes 222 references.

  16. Removal of methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide, dimethyl disulfide, and hydrogen sulfide from contaminated air by Thiobacillus thioparus TK-m

    SciTech Connect

    Kanagawa, T.; Mikami, E.

    1989-03-01

    Methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide, dimethyl disulfide, and hydrogen sulfide were efficiently removed from contaminated air by Thiobacillus thioparus TK-m and oxidized to sulfate stoichiometrically. More than 99.99% of dimethyl sulfide was removed when the load was less than 4.0 g of dimethyl sulfide per g (dry cell weight) per day.

  17. Investigation on laboratory and pilot-scale airlift sulfide oxidation reactor under varying sulfide loading rate.

    PubMed

    Pokasoowan, Chanya; Kanitchaidecha, Wilawan; K C, Bal Krishna; Annachhatre, Ajit P

    2009-01-01

    Airlift bioreactor was established for recovering sulfur from synthetic sulfide wastewater under controlled dissolved oxygen condition. The maximum recovered sulfur was 14.49 g/day when sulfide loading rate, dissolved oxygen (DO) and pH values were 2.97 kgHS(-)/m(3)-day, 0.2-1.0 mg/L and 7.2-7.8, respectively. On the other hand, the increase in recovered sulfur reduced the contact surface of sulfide oxidizing bacteria which affects the recovery process. This effect caused to reduce the conversion of sulfide to sulfur. More recovered sulfur was produced at high sulfide loading rate due to the change of metabolic pathway of sulfide-oxidizing bacteria which prevented the toxicity of sulfide in the culture. The maximum activity in this system was recorded to be about 3.28 kgS/kgVSS-day. The recovered sulfur contained organic compounds which were confirmed by the results from XRD and CHN analyzer. Afterwards, by annealing the recovered sulfur at 120 degrees C for 24 hrs under ambient Argon, the percentage of carbon reduced from 4.44% to 0.30%. Furthermore, the percentage of nitrogen and hydrogen decreased from 0.79% and 0.48% to 0.00% and 0.14%, respectively. This result showed the success in increasing the purity of recovered sulfur by using the annealing technique. The pilot-scale biological sulfide oxidation process was carried out using real wastewater from Thai Rayon Industry in Thailand. The airlift reactor successfully removed sulfide more than 90% of the influent sulfide at DO concentration of less than 0.1 mg/L, whereas the elementary sulfur production was 2.37 kgS/m(3)-day at sulfide loading rate of 2.14 kgHS(-)/m(3)-day. The sulfur production was still increasing as the reactor had not yet reached its maximum sulfide loading rate.

  18. Nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria as microbial oxidants for rapid biological sulfide removal.

    PubMed

    De Gusseme, Bart; De Schryver, Peter; De Cooman, Michaël; Verbeken, Kim; Boeckx, Pascal; Verstraete, Willy; Boon, Nico

    2009-01-01

    The emission of hydrogen sulfide into the atmosphere of sewer systems induces the biological production of sulfuric acid, causing severe concrete corrosion. As a possible preventive solution, a microbial consortium of nitrate-reducing, sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB) was enriched in a continuously stirred tank reactor in order to develop a biological technique for the removal of dissolved sulfide. The consortium, dominated by Arcobacter sp., was capable of removing 99% of sulfide. Stable isotope fractioning of the sulfide indicated that the oxidation was a biological process. The capacity of the NR-SOB consortium for rapid removal of sulfide was demonstrated by using it as an inoculum in synthetic and real sewage. Removal rates up to 52 mg sulfide-S g VSS(-1) h(-1) were achieved, to our knowledge the highest removal rate reported so far for freshwater species in the absence of molecular oxygen. Further long-term incubation experiments revealed the capacity of the bacteria to oxidize sulfide without the presence of nitrate, suggesting that an oxidized redox reserve is present in the culture.

  19. Sulfides from Martian and Lunar Basalts: Comparative Chemistry for Ni Co Cu and Se

    SciTech Connect

    J Papike; P Burger; C Shearer; S Sutton; M Newville; Y Choi; A Lanzirotti

    2011-12-31

    Here Mars and Moon are used as 'natural laboratories' with Moon displaying lower oxygen fugacities ({approx}IW-1) than Mars ({approx}IW to FMQ). Moon has lower concentrations of Ni and Co in basaltic melts than does Mars. The major sulfides are troilite (FeS) in lunar basalts and pyrrhotite (Fe{sub 1-x}S) in martian basalts. This study focuses on the concentrations of Ni, Co, Cu, and Se. We chose these elements because of their geochemical importance and the feasibility of analyzing them with a combination of synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) and electron microprobe (EPMA) techniques. The selenium concentrations could only be analyzed, at high precision, with SXRF techniques as they are <150 ppm, similar to concentrations seen in carbonaceous chondrites and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Nickel and Co are in higher concentrations in martian sulfides than lunar and are higher in martian olivine-bearing lithologies than olivine-free varieties. The sulfides in individual samples show very large ranges in concentration (e.g., Ni ranges from 50 000 ppm to <5 ppm). These large ranges are mainly due to compositional heterogeneities within individual grains due to diffusion and phase separation. Electron microprobe wavelength-dispersive (WDS) mapping of Ni, Co, and Cu show the diffusion trajectories. Nickel and Co have almost identical diffusion trajectories leading to the likely nucleation of pentlandite (Ni,Co,Fe){sub 9}S{sub 8}, and copper diffuses along separate pathways likely toward chalcopyrite nucleation sites (CuFeS{sub 2}). The systematics of Ni and Co in lunar and martian sulfides clearly distinguish the two parent bodies, with martian sulfides displaced to higher Ni and Co values.

  20. Ridding Groundwater of Hydrogen Sulfide. Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lochrane, Thomas G.

    1979-01-01

    This article is the first in a series reviewing the problems associated with hydrogen sulfide in drinking water sources. Discussion centers on identification of a cost-effective balance between aeration and chlorination treatment operations. (AS)

  1. Hydrogen sulfide in hemostasis: friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata

    2014-06-25

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a well known toxic gas that is synthesized from the amino acids: cysteine (Cys) and homocysteine (Hcy) by three enzymes: cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) and mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3-MST). Hydrogen sulfide, like carbon monoxide (CO) or nitric oxide (NO) is a signaling molecule in different biological systems, including the cardiovascular system. Moreover, hydrogen sulfide plays a role in the pathogenesis of various cardiovascular diseases. It modulates different elements of hemostasis (activation of blood platelet, and coagulation process) as well as proliferation and apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells. However, the biological role and the therapeutic potential of H2S is not clear. This review summarizes the different functions of hydrogen sulfide in hemostasis.

  2. [Fatal outcome of an hydrogen sulfide poisoning].

    PubMed

    Querellou, E; Jaffrelot, M; Savary, D; Savry, C; Perfus, J-P

    2005-10-01

    We report a case of fatal outcome poisoning by massive exposure to hydrogen sulfide of a sewer worker. This rare event was associated with a moderate intoxication of two members of the rescue team. The death was due to asystole and massive lung oedema. Autopsy analysis showed diffuse necrotic lesions in lungs. Hydrogen sulfide is a direct and systemic poison, produced by organic matter decomposition. The direct toxicity mechanism is still unclear. The systemic toxicity is due to an acute toxicity by oxygen depletion at cellular level. It is highly diffusable and potentially very dangerous. At low concentration, rotten egg smell must trigger hydrogen sulfide suspicion since at higher concentration it is undetectable, making intoxication possible. In case of acute intoxication, there is an almost instantaneous cardiovascular failure and a rapid death. Hydrogen sulfide exposure requires prevention measures and more specifically the use of respiratory equipment for members of the rescue team.

  3. The subchronic oral toxicity of polyphenylene sulfide.

    PubMed

    Thomas, W C; Kirwin, C J; Wazeter, F X; Jessup, D C

    1984-02-01

    Polyphenylene sulfide was offered to Charles River CD rats for 6 months in the diet at concentrations of 0.00, 0.50, 2.75 and 5.00% (w/w). In this study, animals of both sexes consumed polyphenylene sulfide for 6 months without exhibiting compound-related effects. Parameters studied were: body weight, hematology, clinical chemistry, urinalysis, organ weights, gross pathology and histopathology.

  4. Development of Zinc Sulfide Seeker Window Material

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 15 JAN 2005 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Development of...contrasting to the currently used THAAD sapphire window and validate the predictions for an alternate seeker window material, multispectral zinc...and validate the capability of multispectral zinc sulfide seeker window material. The use of zinc sulfide as a replacement window for the current

  5. Effect of Nitrate on Biogenic Sulfide Production

    PubMed Central

    Jenneman, Gary E.; McInerney, M. J.; Knapp, Roy M.

    1986-01-01

    The addition of 59 mM nitrate inhibited biogenic sulfide production in dilute sewage sludge (10% [vol/vol]) amended with 20 mM sulfate and either acetate, glucose, or hydrogen as electron donors. Similar results were found when pond sediment or oil field brines served as the inoculum. Sulfide production was inhibited for periods of at least 6 months and was accompanied by the oxidation of resazurin from its colorless reduced state to its pink oxidized state. Lower amounts of nitrate (6 or 20 mM) and increased amounts of sewage sludge resulted in only transient inhibition of sulfide production. The addition of 156 mM sulfate to bottles with 59 mM nitrate and 10% (vol/vol) sewage sludge or pond sediment resulted in sulfide production. Nitrate, nitrite, and nitrous oxide were detected during periods where sulfide production was inhibited, whereas nitrate, nitrite, and nitrous oxide were below detectable levels at the time sulfide production began. The oxidation of resazurin was attributed to an increase in nitrous oxide which persisted in concentration of about 1.0 mM for up to 5 months. The numbers of sulfate-reducing organisms decreased from 106 CFU ml−1 sludge to less than detectable levels after prolonged incubation of oxidized bottles. The addition of 10 mM glucose to oxidized bottles after 14.5 weeks of incubation resulted in rereduction of the resazurin and subsequent sulfide production. The prolonged inhibition of sulfide production was attributed to an increase in oxidation-reduction potential due to biogenic production of nitrous oxide, which appeared to have a cytotoxic effect on sulfate-reducing populations. PMID:16347078

  6. Copper-tantalum alloy

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.

    1986-07-15

    A tantalum-copper alloy can be made by preparing a consumable electrode consisting of an elongated copper billet containing at least two spaced apart tantalum rods extending longitudinally the length of the billet. The electrode is placed in a dc arc furnace and melted under conditions which co-melt the copper and tantalum to form the alloy.

  7. Demystifying Controlling Copper Corrosion

    EPA Science Inventory

    The LCR systematically misses the highest health and corrosion risk sites for copper. Additionally, there are growing concerns for WWTP copper in sludges and discharge levels. There are many corrosion control differences between copper and lead. This talk explains the sometimes c...

  8. Photooxidation of methyl sulfide, ethyl sulfide, and methanethiol

    SciTech Connect

    Grosjean, D.

    1984-06-01

    Products of sunlight-irradiated mixtures of oxides of nitrogen and alkyl sulfides (RSR, R = CH/sub 3/, C/sub 2/H/sub 5/) and methanethiol (CH/sub 3/SH) in air include formaldehyde (R = CH/sub 3/), acetaldehyde and PAN (R = C/sub 2/H/sub 5/), sulfur dioxide, and alkyl nitrates (RONO/sub 2/) as well as particulate alkanesulfonic acids (RSO/sub 2/OH) and inorganic sulfate. The nature and yields of gaseous and particulate products are discussed in terms of OH-initiated reaction pathways, including C-S bond scission, and subsequent reactions of alkythiyl radicals (RS), including those leading to photolabile RSNO and stable RSNO/sub 2/ products for which indirect evidence is presented. SO/sub 2/ yields are found to vary according to the relative importance of the competing pathways RS + O/sub 2/ (a) and RS + NO/sub 2/ (b), for which a ratio k/sub b/ / k/sub a/ approx. 2 x 10/sup 6/ is derived from data for irradiated RSR-NO/sub x/, RSH-Cl/sub 2/, and RSH-Cl/sub 2/-NO/sub 2/ mixtures.

  9. [Copper IUDs (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Thiery, M

    1983-10-01

    Following initial development of the Grafenberg ring in the 1920's, IUDs fell into disuse until the late 1950s, when plastic devices inserted using new technology began to gain worldwide acceptance. Further research indicated that copper had a significant antifertility effect which increased with increasing surface area, and several copper IUDs were developed and adapted, including the Copper T 200, the Copper T 220C, and the Copper T 380 A, probably the most effective yet. The Gravigard and Multiload are 2 other copper devices developed according to somewhat different principles. Copper devices are widely used not so much because of their great effectiveness as because of their suitability for nulliparous patients and their ease of insertion, which minimizes risk of uterine perforation. Records of 2584 women using Copper IUDs for 7190 women-years and 956 women using devices without copper for 6059 women-years suggest that the copper devices were associated with greater effectiveness and fewer removals for complications. Research suggests that the advantages of copper IUDs become more significant with increased duration of use. Contraindications to copper devices include allergy to copper and hepatolenticular degeneration. No carcinogenic or teratogenic effect of copper devices has been found, but further studies are needed to rule out other undesirable effects. Significant modifications of copper devices in recent years have been developed to increase their effectiveness, prolong their duration of usefulness, facilitate insertion and permit insertion during abortion or delivery. The upper limit of the surface area of copper associated with increased effectiveness appears to be between 200-300 sq mm, and at some point increases in copper exposure may provoke expulsion of the IUD. The duration of fertility inhibition of copper IUDs is usually estimated at 2-3 years, but recent research indicates that it may be 6-8 years, and some devices may retain copper surface

  10. A laboratory formulated sediment incorporating synthetic acid volatile sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, A.M.

    1995-12-31

    The usefulness of laboratory formulated sediment (LFS) for sediment research applications might be expanded if sediment characteristics other than particle size distribution, organic carbon and pH could be artificially manipulated. This report describes the development of a LFS containing synthetic acid volatile sulfide (AVS). Several formulations were evaluated with respect to their toxicological effects on Hyalella azteca, and their chemical stability and oxidation dynamics in the H. azteca toxicity test system. Optimal amphipod survival was obtained in prepared LFS formulations where the molar cation-to-sulfide ratio was near unity. The synthetic AVS at the surface of the test system oxidized quickly, but was fairly stable for up to 28 days when isolated from air or oxygenated water. AVS analysis of core slices show a clear, dissolved oxygen-diffusion limited oxidation profile. A selected synthetic AVS formulation, as determined by (maximum) H. azteca survival, was evaluated with respect to complexation of copper and nickel, and the corresponding reduction in metal bioavailability. The toxicity of whole sediment and pore water from metal-spiked LFS containing synthetic AVS was evaluated by the 10-d H. azteca toxicity test and the Microtox{reg_sign} bioassay, respectively. As expected, test responses to amended LFS with metal-to-AVS molar ratios less than one were not significantly different than the unspiked, amended LFS. In contrast, amended LFS with metal-to AVS molar ratios greater than one had significant effects on the response of the two test species. Complexation of the metals was confirmed by sediment and pore water chemical analyses. This formulation may provide consistent and controlled substrates with which to investigate metal/sediment chemistry and toxicity, and to develop sediment quality criteria for metals.

  11. Hydrogen sulfide and translational medicine

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei; Cheng, Ze-yu; Zhu, Yi-zhun

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) along with carbon monoxide and nitric oxide is an important signaling molecule that has undergone large numbers of fundamental investigations. H2S is involved in various physiological activities associated with the regulation of homeostasis, vascular contractility, pro- and anti-inflammatory activities, as well as pro- and anti-apoptotic activities etc. However, the actions of H2S are influenced by its concentration, reaction time, and cell/disease types. Therefore, H2S is a signaling molecule without definite effect. The use of existing H2S donors is limited because of the instant release and short lifetime of H2S. Thus, translational medicine involving the sustained and controlled release of H2S is of great value for both scientific and clinical uses. H2S donation can be manipulated by different ways, including where H2S is given, how H2S is donated, or the specific structures of H2S-releasing drugs and H2S donor molecules. This review briefly summarizes recent progress in research on the physiological and pathological functions of H2S and H2S-releasing drugs, and suggests hope for future investigations. PMID:24096643

  12. Hydrogen Sulfide as a Gasotransmitter

    PubMed Central

    Gadalla, Moataz M.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) are well established as messenger molecules throughout the body, gasotransmitters, based on striking alterations in mice lacking the appropriate biosynthetic enzymes. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is even more chemically reactive, but till recently there was little definitive evidence for its physiologic formation. Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS, EC 4.2.1.22), and Cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE; EC 4.4.1.1), also known as cytathionase, can generate H2S from cyst(e)ine. Very recent studies with mice lacking these enzymes have established that CSE is responsible for H2S formation in the periphery, while in the brain CBS is the biosynthetic enzyme. Endothelial-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) activity is reduced 80% in the mesenteric artery of mice with deletion of CSE, establishing H2S as a major physiologic EDRF. H2S appears to signal predominantly by S-sulfhydrating cysteines in its target proteins, analogous to S-nitrosylation by NO. Whereas S-nitrosylation typically inhibits enzymes, S-sulfhydration activates them. S-nitrosylation basally affects 1–2% of its target proteins, while 10–25% of H2S target proteins are S-sulfhydrated. In summary, H2S appears to be a physiologic gasotransmitter of comparable importance to NO and CO. PMID:20067586

  13. NEAR-CONTINUOUS MEASUREMENT OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE AND CARBONYL SULFIDE BY AN AUTOMATIC GAS CHROMATOGRAPH

    EPA Science Inventory

    An automatic gas chromatograph with a flame photometric detector that samples and analyzes hydrogen sulfide and carbonyl sulfide at 30-s intervals is described. Temperature programming was used to elute trace amounts of carbon disulfide present in each injection from a Supelpak-S...

  14. Hydrogen sulfide induces oxidative damage to RNA and DNA in a sulfide-tolerant marine invertebrate.

    PubMed

    Joyner-Matos, Joanna; Predmore, Benjamin L; Stein, Jenny R; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Julian, David

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide acts as an environmental toxin across a range of concentrations and as a cellular signaling molecule at very low concentrations. Despite its toxicity, many animals, including the mudflat polychaete Glycera dibranchiata, are periodically or continuously exposed to sulfide in their environment. We tested the hypothesis that a broad range of ecologically relevant sulfide concentrations induces oxidative stress and oxidative damage to RNA and DNA in G. dibranchiata. Coelomocytes exposed in vitro to sulfide (0-3 mmol L(-1) for 1 h) showed dose-dependent increases in oxidative stress (as 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein fluorescence) and superoxide production (as dihydroethidine fluorescence). Coelomocytes exposed in vitro to sulfide (up to 0.73 mmol L(-1) for 2 h) also acquired increased oxidative damage to RNA (detected as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine) and DNA (detected as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine). Worms exposed in vivo to sulfide (0-10 mmol L(-1) for 24 h) acquired elevated oxidative damage to RNA and DNA in both coelomocytes and body wall tissue. While the consequences of RNA and DNA oxidative damage are poorly understood, oxidatively damaged deoxyguanosine bases preferentially bind thymine, causing G-T transversions and potentially causing heritable point mutations. This suggests that sulfide can be an environmental mutagen in sulfide-tolerant invertebrates.

  15. Enzymatic potential of heterotrophic bacteria from a neutral copper mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Costa, Bruna Zucoloto da; Rodrigues, Viviane Drumond; Oliveira, Valéria Maia de; Ottoboni, Laura Maria Mariscal; Marsaioli, Anita Jocelyne

    Copper mine drainages are restricted environments that have been overlooked as sources of new biocatalysts for bioremediation and organic syntheses. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the enzymatic activities (esterase, epoxide hydrolase and monooxygenase) of 56 heterotrophic bacteria isolated from a neutral copper mine drainage (Sossego Mine, Canaã dos Carajás, Brazil). Hydrolase and monooxygenase activities were detected in 75% and 20% of the evaluated bacteria, respectively. Bacterial strains with good oxidative performance were also evaluated for biotransformation of organic sulfides. Fourteen strains with good enzymatic activity were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, revealing the presence of three genera: Bacillus, Pseudomonas and Stenotrophomonas. The bacterial strains B. megaterium (SO5-4 and SO6-2) and Pseudomonas sp. (SO5-9) efficiently oxidized three different organic sulfides to their corresponding sulfoxides. In conclusion, this study revealed that neutral copper mine drainages are a promising source of biocatalysts for ester hydrolysis and sulfide oxidation/bioremediation. Furthermore, this is a novel biotechnological overview of the heterotrophic bacteria from a copper mine drainage, and this report may support further microbiological monitoring of this type of mine environment.

  16. Experimental simulations of sulfide formation in the solar nebula.

    PubMed

    Lauretta, D S; Lodders, K; Fegley, B

    1997-07-18

    Sulfurization of meteoritic metal in H2S-H2 gas produced three different sulfides: monosulfide solid solution [(Fe,Ni)1-xS], pentlandite [(Fe,Ni)9-xS8], and a phosphorus-rich sulfide. The composition of the remnant metal was unchanged. These results are contrary to theoretical predictions that sulfide formation in the solar nebula produced troilite (FeS) and enriched the remaining metal in nickel. The experimental sulfides are chemically and morphologically similar to sulfide grains in the matrix of the Alais (class CI) carbonaceous chondrite, suggesting that these meteoritic sulfides may be condensates from the solar nebula.

  17. Acute copper toxicity following copper glycinate injection.

    PubMed

    Oon, S; Yap, C-H; Ihle, B U

    2006-11-01

    We present a patient who developed multi-organ failure due to severe copper toxicity following attempted suicide by s.c. injection of copper glycinate. Acute copper toxicity is rare in the developed world, although it occurs more frequently in developing world countries, where it is a common mode of suicide. Acute toxicity usually results from oral ingestion and there are several local and systemic effects. Specific management can be difficult as there is little evidence regarding the efficacy of chelating agents in acute toxicity.

  18. Reduction of acid rock drainage using steel slag in cover systems over sulfide rock waste piles.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Rodrigo Pereira; Leite, Adilson do Lago; Borghetti Soares, Anderson

    2015-04-01

    The extraction of gold, coal, nickel, uranium, copper and other earth-moving activities almost always leads to environmental damage. In metal and coal extraction, exposure of sulfide minerals to the atmosphere leads to generation of acid rock drainage (ARD) and in underground mining to acid mine drainage (AMD) due to contamination of infiltrating groundwater. This study proposes to develop a reactive cover system that inhibits infiltration of oxygen and also releases alkalinity to increase the pH of generated ARD and attenuate metal contaminants at the same time. The reactive cover system is constructed using steel slag, a waste product generated from steel industries. This study shows that this type of cover system has the potential to reduce some of the adverse effects of sulfide mine waste disposal on land. Geochemical and geotechnical characterization tests were carried out. Different proportions of sulfide mine waste and steel slag were studied in leachate extraction tests. The best proportion was 33% of steel slag in dry weight. Other tests were conducted as follows: soil consolidation, saturated permeability and soil water characteristic curve. The cover system was numerically modeled through unsaturated flux analysis using Vadose/w. The solution proposed is an oxygen transport barrier that allows rain water percolation to treat the ARD in the waste rock pile. The results showed that the waste pile slope is an important factor and the cover system must have 5 m thickness to achieve an acceptable effectiveness.

  19. State-of-the-art hydrogen sulfide control for geothermal energy systems: 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, F.B.; Hill, J.H.; Phelps, P.L. Jr.

    1980-03-01

    Existing state-of-the-art technologies for removal of hydrogen sulfide are discussed along with a comparative assessment of their efficiencies, reliabilities and costs. Other related topics include the characteristics of vapor-dominated and liquid-dominated resources, energy conversion systems, and the sources of hydrogen sulfide emissions. It is indicated that upstream control technologies are preferred over downsteam technologies primarily because upstream removal of hydrogen sulfide inherently controls all downstream emissions including steam-stacking. Two upstream processes for vapor-dominated resources appear promising; the copper sulfate (EIC) process, and the steam converter (Coury) process combined with an off-gas abatement system such as a Stretford unit. For liquid-dominated systems that produce steam, the process where the non-condensible gases are scrubbed with spent geothermal fluid appears to be promising. An efficient downstream technology is the Stretford process for non-condensible gas removal. In this case, partitioning in the surface condenser will determine the overall abatement efficiency. Recommendations for future environmental control technology programs are included.

  20. Copper in developmental stuttering.

    PubMed

    Alm, Per A

    2005-01-01

    It has previously been reported that men with developmental stuttering showed reduced concentration of copper in the blood, and a negative correlation between the copper level and the severity of stuttering. Disorders of copper metabolism may result in dysfunction of the basal ganglia system and dystonia, a motor disorder sharing some traits of stuttering. It has been shown that copper ions affect the dopamine and the GABA systems. With this background we investigated the plasma level of copper, the copper binding protein ceruloplasmin, and the estimated level of free copper in stuttering adults. Sixteen men with developmental stuttering were compared with 16 men without speech problems. The samples were assayed in one batch in a pseudorandom and counterbalanced order. No significant differences were found between stuttering men and the control group in any of the biological variables, and no negative correlation between copper and the general severity of stuttering was shown. On the contrary, an explorative analysis resulted in a positive correlation between high plasma copper and superfluous muscular activity during stuttering (r=0.51, p=0.04). This result indicates that there is no relation between developmental stuttering and low plasma copper in the main population of stuttering adults.

  1. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits Amyloid Formation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are large aggregates of misfolded proteins, which are often associated with various neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, and vascular dementia. The amount of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is known to be significantly reduced in the brain tissue of people diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease relative to that of healthy individuals. These findings prompted us to investigate the effects of H2S on the formation of amyloids in vitro using a model fibrillogenic protein hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL). HEWL forms typical β-sheet rich fibrils during the course of 70 min at low pH and high temperatures. The addition of H2S completely inhibits the formation of β-sheet and amyloid fibrils, as revealed by deep UV resonance Raman (DUVRR) spectroscopy and ThT fluorescence. Nonresonance Raman spectroscopy shows that disulfide bonds undergo significant rearrangements in the presence of H2S. Raman bands corresponding to disulfide (RSSR) vibrational modes in the 550–500 cm–1 spectral range decrease in intensity and are accompanied by the appearance of a new 490 cm–1 band assigned to the trisulfide group (RSSSR) based on the comparison with model compounds. The formation of RSSSR was proven further using a reaction with TCEP reduction agent and LC-MS analysis of the products. Intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence study shows a strong denaturation of HEWL containing trisulfide bonds. The presented evidence indicates that H2S causes the formation of trisulfide bridges, which destabilizes HEWL structure, preventing protein fibrillation. As a result, small spherical aggregates of unordered protein form, which exhibit no cytotoxicity by contrast with HEWL fibrils. PMID:25545790

  2. [Sulfide removal from wastewater by nanoscale iron].

    PubMed

    Xi, Hong-bo; Yang, Qi; Shang, Hai-tao; Hao, Chun-bo; Li, Zhi-ling

    2008-09-01

    Influencing factors, adsorption isotherm, adsorption kinetics and preliminary discussion on the mechanism of sulfide adsorption by nanoscale iron prepared in laboratory were studied using manual simulation sulfide wastewater. Experimental results indicate that the removal efficiency of S2- increases with increasing iron dosage and decreases with increasing initial S2- concentration and pH values. The removal efficiency of S2- is 100% when initial concentration is less than 100 mg x L(-1) and are 87.34%, 65.80% and 44.61% at pH 2, 7 and 13. The temperature at 25 degrees C favors the maximum adsorption of S2- with 19.17 mg x g(-1) of equilibrium adsorption quantity and the adsorption capacity decreas at higher or lower temperature. The adsorption data fit well to the Langmuir equation and the Freundlich equation. The sulfide adsorption follows the pseudo second order equation with the maximum initial sorption rate(h) is 1.575 3 mg x (g x mg)(-1) at 25 degrees C and the adsorption rate constant increases with the increasing of temperature. The activation energy(Ea) is 8.22 kJ x mol(-1). The mechanism of sulfide removal is being sorbed onto the iron nanoparticles via formation of surface compleses, FeOSH and iron sulfides (FeS, FeS2, FeSn).

  3. Critical currents in sputtered copper molybdenum sulphide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, S. A.; Woollam, J. A.; Kammerdiner, L.; Luo, H.-L.

    1977-01-01

    Critical currents in a sputtered Chevrel-phase copper molybdenum sulfide have been measured at 4.2 K as a function of applied magnetic field. Self-field critical-current values up to 10 to the 9th A/sq m were found, decreasing to 10 to the 8th A/sq m at 3 T. Graphs of pinning forces versus field were found to be independent of field direction, and the pinning mechanism is sample independent. Critical-current densities for sputtered lead molybdenum sulphide are estimated to be about 10 to the 8th A/sq m at 26 T based on a scaling law for pinning.

  4. Handling of Copper and Copper Oxide Nanoparticles by Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bulcke, Felix; Dringen, Ralf

    2016-02-01

    Copper is an essential trace element for many important cellular functions. However, excess of copper can impair cellular functions by copper-induced oxidative stress. In brain, astrocytes are considered to play a prominent role in the copper homeostasis. In this short review we summarise the current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms which are involved in the handling of copper by astrocytes. Cultured astrocytes efficiently take up copper ions predominantly by the copper transporter Ctr1 and the divalent metal transporter DMT1. In addition, copper oxide nanoparticles are rapidly accumulated by astrocytes via endocytosis. Cultured astrocytes tolerate moderate increases in intracellular copper contents very well. However, if a given threshold of cellular copper content is exceeded after exposure to copper, accelerated production of reactive oxygen species and compromised cell viability are observed. Upon exposure to sub-toxic concentrations of copper ions or copper oxide nanoparticles, astrocytes increase their copper storage capacity by upregulating the cellular contents of glutathione and metallothioneins. In addition, cultured astrocytes have the capacity to export copper ions which is likely to involve the copper ATPase 7A. The ability of astrocytes to efficiently accumulate, store and export copper ions suggests that astrocytes have a key role in the distribution of copper in brain. Impairment of this astrocytic function may be involved in diseases which are connected with disturbances in brain copper metabolism.

  5. Geology of the Copper King Mine area, Prairie Divide, Larimer County, Colorado (Part 1)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sims, Paul Kibler; Phair, George

    1952-01-01

    The Copper King mine, in Larimer County, Colo., in the northern part of the Front Range of Colorado, was operated for a short time prior to World War II for copper and zino, but since 1949, when pitchblende was discovered on the mine dump, it has been worked for uranium. The bedrock in the mine area consists predominantly of pre-Cambrian (Silver Plums) granite with minor migmatite and metasediments--biotite-quartz-plagioclase gneiss, biotite schist, quartzite, amphibolite, amphibole skarn, and biotite skols. The metasediments occur as inclusions that trend northeast in the granite. This trend is essentially parallel to the prevailing foliation in the granite. At places the metasediments are crosscut sharply by the granite to form angular, partly discordant, steep-walled bodies in the granite. Faults, confined to a narrow zone that extends through the mine, cut both the pre-Cambrian rocks and the contained sulfide deposits. The Copper King fault, a breccia zone, contains a deposit of pitchblende; the other faults are believed to be later than the ore. The two types of mineral deposits--massive sulfide and pitchblende deposits--in the mine area, are of widely different mineralogy, age, and origin. The massive sulfide deposits are small and consist of pyrite, sphalerite, chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite, and in places magnetite in amphibole skarn, mice skols, and quartzite. The deposit at the Copper King mine has yielded small quantities of high-grade sphalerite ore. The massive sulfides are pyrometasomatic deposits of pre-Cambrian age. The pitchblende at the Copper King mine is principally in the Copper King vein, a tight, hard breccia zone that cuts through both granite and the massive sulfide deposit. A small part of the pitchblende is in small fractures near the vein and in boxwork pyrite adjacent to the vein; the post-ore faults, close to their intersection with the Copper King vein, contain some radioactive material, but elsewhere, so far as is known, they are barren

  6. The copper-nickel concentration log: A tool for stratigraphic interpretation within the ultramafic and basal zones of the stillwater complex, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drew, L.J.; Bawiec, W.J.; Page, N.J.; Schuenemeyer, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    An analogue to the electric well log was devised for copper-nickel concentration drill-hole data from the Basal and lower part of the Ultramafic zones of the Stillwater Complex using automated data processing. The copper-nickel concentration logs graphically represent intensity (concentration) values that reflect the distribution of the elements in sulfide and silicate minerals. Four major patterns are recognized by their characteristic variations in copper and nickel intensity: (1) relatively flat, low-level copper-intensity signatures associated with arcuate nickel-intensity patterns that correlate with rocks in the Peridotite member of the Ultramafic zone; (2) arcuate or bulb-like patterns of copper and nickel intensity that correlate closely with the Basal bronzite cumulate member of the Basal zone; (3) complex patterns consisting of intervals of low-intensity copper and moderate-intensity nickel, spikes of high nickel and copper intensity, and high copper intensity associated with low nickel intensity that correlate respectively with cordierite-pyroxene hornfels, massive sulfide, norites and mineralized diabase dikes in the Basal norite member; and (4) large intervals of extremely low copper and nickel intensity that correlate with quartz-orthopyroxene hornfels. The recognition and interpretation of these patterns allow two- and three-dimensional stratigraphic and lithologic reconstructions to be done by means of concentration-log correlations instead of variable quality lithologic logging. ?? 1985.

  7. Discovery of Hg-Cu-bearing metal-sulfide assemblages in a primitive H-3 chondrite: Towards a new insight in early solar system processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caillet Komorowski, Catherine; El Goresy, Ahmed; Miyahara, Masaaki; Boudouma, Omar; Ma, Chi

    2012-10-01

    We report here the discovery of a novel meteoritic paragenesis consisting of sub-micrometric HgS, Cu sulfides, and Hg metal, associated with polycrystalline fine-grained native Cu in opaque mineral aggregates heterogeneously distributed in the matrix of the H-3 Tieschitz unequilibrated ordinary chondrite (UOC). The systematic association of Hg with Cu in Tieschitz chondrite provides a unique opportunity to place robust constraints on the origin of these assemblages either by condensation and sulfidation in a local nebular reservoir of non-solar composition, followed by gentle and fast accretion, or by sublimation of Hg from the hot interior of the asteroid and recondensation in its cold outer regions. The sulfide phase relations support low temperature conditions (<300 °C), implying that subsequent to accretion indigenous hydrothermal processing, oxidation/sulfidation, transportation, or shock-induced thermal processing of the assemblage on the parent body earlier proposed are very unlikely and unrealistic. Origin of HgS by sublimation of Hg from the hotter asteroid interior and precipitation as cinnabar in the colder surface regions is discrepant with our findings and can be ruled out because cinnabar occurs only in Tieschitz matrix in alternating rhythmic intergrowth with Cu-sulfide. The sublimation scenario calls for co-evaporation of both the highly volatile Hg as HgS and Hg metal and the moderately volatile Cu both as Cu metal, or their sulfides and deposition as sulfides in alternating episodes. Our findings provide further ample evidence refuting the repeated claim of formation of native copper in chondritic metal by shock-induced impact melting. Cold accretion is the only reasonable possibility to preserve the delicate accretionary intergrowth textures, the polycrystallinity of FeNi-metal, native Cu, Hg-Cu-sulfides and native Hg globules and the high Hg concentration retained in this meteorite. Our findings strongly suggest that Tieschitz resided near the

  8. Preparation of silver-activated zinc sulfide thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, C.; Swindells, F. E.

    1968-01-01

    Silver improves luminescence and reduces contamination of zinc sulfide phosphors. The silver is added after the zinc sulfide phosphors are deposited in thin films by vapor evaporation, but before calcining, by immersion in a solution of silver salt.

  9. Recent findings on sinks for sulfide in gravity sewer networks.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, A H; Hvitved-Jacobsen, T; Vollertsen, J

    2006-01-01

    Sulfide buildup in sewer networks is associated with several problems, including health impacts, corrosion of sewer structures and odor nuisance. In recent years, significant advances in the knowledge of the major processes governing sulfide buildup in sewer networks have been made. This paper summarizes this newly obtained knowledge and emphasizes important implications of the findings. Model simulations of the in-sewer processes important for the sulfur cycle showed that sulfide oxidation in the wetted biofilm is typically the most important sink for dissolved sulfide in gravity sewers. However, sulfide emission and thereby potential hydrogen sulfide buildup in the sewer atmosphere is of particular importance in sewers constructed with large diameter pipes, in sewers constructed with steep slopes and in sewers conveying low pH wastewater. Precipitation of metal sulfides is only important when the sulfide concentration in the wastewater is low; i.e. less than 1 g Sm(-3).

  10. Sulfide and methane production in sewer sediments.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiwen; Ni, Bing-Jie; Ganigué, Ramon; Werner, Ursula; Sharma, Keshab R; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated significant sulfide and methane production by sewer biofilms, particularly in rising mains. Sewer sediments in gravity sewers are also biologically active; however, their contribution to biological transformations in sewers is poorly understood at present. In this study, sediments collected from a gravity sewer were cultivated in a laboratory reactor fed with real wastewater for more than one year to obtain intact sediments. Batch test results show significant sulfide production with an average rate of 9.20 ± 0.39 g S/m(2)·d from the sediments, which is significantly higher than the areal rate of sewer biofilms. In contrast, the average methane production rate is 1.56 ± 0.14 g CH4/m(2)·d at 20 °C, which is comparable to the areal rate of sewer biofilms. These results clearly show that the contributions of sewer sediments to sulfide and methane production cannot be ignored when evaluating sewer emissions. Microsensor and pore water measurements of sulfide, sulfate and methane in the sediments, microbial profiling along the depth of the sediments and mathematical modelling reveal that sulfide production takes place near the sediment surface due to the limited penetration of sulfate. In comparison, methane production occurs in a much deeper zone below the surface likely due to the better penetration of soluble organic carbon. Modelling results illustrate the dependency of sulfide and methane productions on the bulk sulfate and soluble organic carbon concentrations can be well described with half-order kinetics.

  11. Evolution of sulfide mineralization on Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, R.G.; Fisher, D.S. )

    1990-08-30

    The presence of komatiitic igneous rocks on Marks, based on geochemical evidence from SNC meteorites and Viking X ray fluorescence analyses of the regolith, suggests that massive and disseminated iron sulfide mineralization occurs near the Martian surface. Analogies are drawn between possible ultramafic Fe-Ni sulfides on Mars and terrestrial pyrrhotite-pentlandite ore deposits associated with Archean komatiites formed during early crustal development on Earth. Partial melting of the mantle as a result of high radiogenic heat production then, extrusion of turbulent high-temperature ultramafic lavas, segregation of immiscible FeS melts during cooling, gravitational settling and fractional crystallization of sulfide minerals in magma chambers or lava flows produced massive and disseminated sulfide mineralization associated with terrestrial komatiites. Comparable processes probably occurred on Mars where, on account of the inferred higher Fe/(Fe + Mg) ratio of the X ray mantle (estimated to contain {approximately}4.5 wt % S), iron-rich basaltic magmas were produced by partial melting at depths and temperatures exceeding 165 km and 1,400{degree}C, respectively. Adiabatic diapiric emplacement of these iron-rich, very low viscosity basaltic melts transported significant concentrations of dissolved sulfur as S{sup 2{minus}} and HS{sup {minus}} from the mantle. Ensuing sulfide mineralization may have been either thinly disseminated within ultramafic lavas erupting over large areas of Mars or concentrated locally at the base of structural depressions. Cumulate ore deposits several meters thick may occur at the base of intrusions or in near-surface magma chambers. The evidence for insignificant plate tectonic activity on Mars and minimal interactions of Martian mantle with crust, hydrosphere and atmosphere has restricted the evolution of sulfide ore deposits there.

  12. Copper-Silicon Bronzes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1933-05-11

    copper alloys which have good static properties are disa:cinting in their endurance properties. The silicide allo~rs that are given high tensile strength...notched endurance tests and on cast alloys of this type, are lacking. uowever, preliminary reports state that a copper beryllium alloy of about 2 1/2...properties re- main almost the same. Grain size increases with sil- icon. III A study of hardening copper by heat treating its alloys with silicides

  13. Method for inhibiting oxidation of metal sulfide-containing material

    DOEpatents

    Elsetinow, Alicia; Borda, Michael J.; Schoonen, Martin A.; Strongin, Daniel R.

    2006-12-26

    The present invention provides means for inhibiting the oxidation of a metal sulfide-containing material, such as ore mine waste rock or metal sulfide taiulings, by coating the metal sulfide-containing material with an oxidation-inhibiting two-tail lipid coating (12) thereon, thereby inhibiting oxidation of the metal sulfide-containing material in acid mine drainage conditions. The lipids may be selected from phospholipids, sphingolipids, glycolipids and combinations thereof.

  14. Membrane for hydrogen recovery from streams containing hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Pradeep K.

    2007-01-16

    A membrane for hydrogen recovery from streams containing hydrogen sulfide is provided. The membrane comprises a substrate, a hydrogen permeable first membrane layer deposited on the substrate, and a second membrane layer deposited on the first layer. The second layer contains sulfides of transition metals and positioned on the on a feed side of the hydrogen sulfide stream. The present invention also includes a method for the direct decomposition of hydrogen sulfide to hydrogen and sulfur.

  15. Hair copper in intrauterine copper device users.

    PubMed

    Thiery, M; Heyndrickx, A; Uyttersprot, C

    1984-03-01

    The antifertility effect of copper-bearing IUDs is based on continuous release of copper, which is a result of the reaction between the metal and the uterine secretions. Released cupric ions collect in the endometrium and in the uterine fluid but significant accumulation has not been found in the bloodstream or elsewhere. Following Laker's suggestion that hair be used for monitoring essential trace elements, e.g., copper, we checked the copper content of the hair of women wearing copper-bearing IUDs. Samples of untreated pubic hair removed by clipping before diagnostic curettage were obtained from 10 young (24-34 years old), white caucasian females who until then had been wearing an MLCu250 IUD for more than 1 year. Pubes from 10 comparable (sex, age, race) subjects who had never used a Cu-containing device served as controls. The unwashed material was submitted to the toxicology laboratory, where the copper content was assessed by flameless atomic absorption, a technique whose lower limit of measurement lies at a concentration of 0.05 mcg Cu/ml fluid (50 ppb). Hair samples were washed to remove extraneous traces of metal according to the prescriptions of the International Atomic Energy Agency, weighed, and mineralized, after which a small volume (10 mcl) of the diluted fluid was fed into the graphite furnace. Each sample (75-150 mg) was analyzed 4 times, both before and after washing. Since the cleaning procedure reduces the weight of the sample (mainly by the removal of fat, dust, etc.) this explains why the percentage copper content of washed hair is higher than that of unwashed hair belonging to the same subject. The results indicate that there was no significant difference (Mann-Whitney U test) between the mean copper levels of both unwashed and washed pubes from women who were using or had never used an MLCu250 IUD. We therefore conclude that the use of this copper-containing device is not associated with significant accumulation of copper in (pubic) hair.

  16. Sulfide Inclusions in Electroslag Remelted Steels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    8089 6ASS ACUET NTO TEC C MDEDP FMTRA EC F01/SULFIDE INCLUSIONS I N ELECTROSLAG REMELTED STEELS (U)~JAN 1 40BOLDY, T FUJII, D R PoI RIER DAAGA6-78-C...NATIONAL BUREAU Of SIAND1ARDS 1963-A A): D O C AMMRC TR 81-4 SULFIDE INCLUSIONS P ELECTROSLAG REMELTED STEELS January 1981 M. D . Boldy, T. Fujii, D . R...Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. ELECT S APR8 1981D S[tE TED Prepared for D ARMY MATERIALS AND MECHANICS RESEARCH CENTER Watertown

  17. Acute inhalation toxicity of carbonyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, J.M.; Hahn, F.F.; Barr, E.B.

    1995-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS), a colorless gas, is a side product of industrial procedures sure as coal hydrogenation and gasification. It is structurally related to and is a metabolite of carbon disulfide. COS is metabolized in the body by carbonic anhydrase to hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), which is thought to be responsible for COS toxicity. No threshold limit value for COS has been established. Results of these studies indicate COS (with an LC{sub 50} of 590 ppm) is slightly less acutely toxic than H{sub 2}S (LC{sub 50} of 440 ppm).

  18. Modeling of Sulfide Microenvironments on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenzer, S. P.; Bridges, J. C.; McAdam, A.; Steer, E. D.; Conrad, P. G.; Kelley, S. P.; Wiens, R. C.; Mangold, N.; Grotzinger, J.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Franz, H. B.; Sutter, B.

    2016-01-01

    Yellowknife Bay (YKB; sol 124-198) is the second site that the Mars Science Laboratory Rover Curiosity investigated in detail on its mission in Gale Crater. YKB represents lake bed sediments from an overall neutral pH, low salinity environment, with a mineralogical composition which includes Ca-sulfates, Fe oxide/hydroxides, Fe-sulfides, amorphous material, and trioctahedral phyllosilicates. We investigate whether sulfide alteration could be associated with ancient habitable microenvironments in the Gale mudstones. Some textural evidence for such alteration may be pre-sent in the nodules present in the mudstone.

  19. Evolution of sulfide mineralization on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Roger G.; Fisher, Duncan S.

    1990-01-01

    It has been previously suggested, on the basis of compositional and petrographic similarities noted between komatites, SNC meteorites, and the silicate portion of the Martian regolith fines, that iron-sulfide ore deposites may exist on Mars. This paper examines the possible locations of Archean-type sulfide and related ore deposits on Mars, their evolution, and the emplacement mechanisms for the ore deposit. The clues to these questions are deduced by applying to Mars the temporal patterns of ore distribution on earth and the experimental observations on sulfur solubility in basaltic melts.

  20. Biogenic nanoparticles: copper, copper oxides, copper sulphides, complex copper nanostructures and their applications.

    PubMed

    Rubilar, Olga; Rai, Mahendra; Tortella, Gonzalo; Diez, Maria Cristina; Seabra, Amedea B; Durán, Nelson

    2013-09-01

    Copper nanoparticles have been the focus of intensive study due to their potential applications in diverse fields including biomedicine, electronics, and optics. Copper-based nanostructured materials have been used in conductive films, lubrification, nanofluids, catalysis, and also as potent antimicrobial agent. The biogenic synthesis of metallic nanostructured nanoparticles is considered to be a green and eco-friendly technology since neither harmful chemicals nor high temperatures are involved in the process. The present review discusses the synthesis of copper nanostructured nanoparticles by bacteria, fungi, and plant extracts, showing that biogenic synthesis is an economically feasible, simple and non-polluting process. Applications for biogenic copper nanoparticles are also discussed.

  1. High adherence copper plating process

    DOEpatents

    Nignardot, Henry

    1993-01-01

    A process for applying copper to a substrate of aluminum or steel by electrodeposition and for preparing an aluminum or steel substrate for electrodeposition of copper. Practice of the invention provides good adhesion of the copper layer to the substrate.

  2. 21 CFR 872.1870 - Sulfide detection device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sulfide detection device. 872.1870 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1870 Sulfide detection device. (a) Identification. A sulfide detection device is a device consisting of an AC-powered control unit, probe handle,...

  3. A study of the trace sulfide mineral assemblages in the Stillwater Complex, Montana, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aird, Hannah M.; Ferguson, Katherine M.; Lehrer, Malia L.; Boudreau, Alan E.

    2017-03-01

    The sulfide assemblages of the Stillwater Complex away from the well-studied ore zones are composed mainly of variable proportions of pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, pentlandite, and ±pyrite. Excluding vein assemblages and those affected by greenschist and lower temperature alteration, the majority can be classified into two broad assemblages, defined here as pristine (multiphase, often globular in shape) or volatile-bearing (multiphase, high-temperature, volatile-rich minerals such as biotite, hornblende, or an unmixed calcite-dolomite assemblage). The volatile-bearing assemblages are mainly found within and below the J-M reef, where native copper and sphalerite are also locally present. Pristine sulfides are found throughout the stratigraphy. Both groups can be affected by apparent S loss in the form of pyrite being converted to magnetite and chalcopyrite to a Cu-Fe-oxide (delafossite), with little to no silicate alteration. An upward trend from pentlandite-rich to pyrrhotite-rich to pyrite-rich assemblages is observed in the footwall rocks in upper GN-I, and the same trend repeats from just below the reef and continues into the overlying N-II and GN-II. Modeling suggests that the sulfide Ni in the Peridotite Zone is largely controlled by silicate Ni. When taken together, observations are most readily explained by the remobilization of selected elements by a high-temperature fluid with the apparent loss of S > Cu > Ni. This could concentrate ore metals by vapor refining, eventually producing a platinum group element-enriched sulfide ore zone, such as the J-M reef.

  4. A study of the trace sulfide mineral assemblages in the Stillwater Complex, Montana, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aird, Hannah M.; Ferguson, Katherine M.; Lehrer, Malia L.; Boudreau, Alan E.

    2016-07-01

    The sulfide assemblages of the Stillwater Complex away from the well-studied ore zones are composed mainly of variable proportions of pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, pentlandite, and ±pyrite. Excluding vein assemblages and those affected by greenschist and lower temperature alteration, the majority can be classified into two broad assemblages, defined here as pristine (multiphase, often globular in shape) or volatile-bearing (multiphase, high-temperature, volatile-rich minerals such as biotite, hornblende, or an unmixed calcite-dolomite assemblage). The volatile-bearing assemblages are mainly found within and below the J-M reef, where native copper and sphalerite are also locally present. Pristine sulfides are found throughout the stratigraphy. Both groups can be affected by apparent S loss in the form of pyrite being converted to magnetite and chalcopyrite to a Cu-Fe-oxide (delafossite), with little to no silicate alteration. An upward trend from pentlandite-rich to pyrrhotite-rich to pyrite-rich assemblages is observed in the footwall rocks in upper GN-I, and the same trend repeats from just below the reef and continues into the overlying N-II and GN-II. Modeling suggests that the sulfide Ni in the Peridotite Zone is largely controlled by silicate Ni. When taken together, observations are most readily explained by the remobilization of selected elements by a high-temperature fluid with the apparent loss of S > Cu > Ni. This could concentrate ore metals by vapor refining, eventually producing a platinum group element-enriched sulfide ore zone, such as the J-M reef.

  5. A laboratory-formulated sediment incorporating synthetic acid-volatile sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, A.M.

    1996-12-01

    The application of laboratory-formulated sediment (LFS) could be expanded if toxicologically significant characteristics of sediment other than particle-size distribution, organic carbon content, and pH could be manipulated. This report describes the preparation of a LFS containing synthetic acid-volatile sulfide (AVS) and shows its similarity to natural sediment AVS. Several formulations were evaluated with respect to toxicity to Hyalella azteca and chemical stability. Amphipod survival was highest (95%) in LFS formulations in which the molar iron(II)/sulfide ratio was near 1, although amphipod survival was > 80% in six of seven formulations with {le} 20% excess metal or sulfide. Synthetic AVS in the test system oxidized rapidly at the sediment surface, but AVS at depth was stable for > 30 d when isolated from air or aerated water. Oxidation-reduction potential measurements and AVS analysis of core slices revealed a vertical oxidation profile, apparently established and limited by oxygen diffusion. A formulation consisting of a 1:1 molar ratio of iron and sulfide (FeS) was evaluated with respect to complexation of copper, zinc, and nickel and to the corresponding reduction in toxicity using 10-d H. azteca toxicity texts. Amphipod mortality in metal-spiked LFS with metal/AVS molar ratios > 1 was high relative to controls. In contrast, amphipod survival in metal-spiked LFS with metal/AVS molar ratios < 1 was generally similar to amphipod survival in nonspiked LFS containing synthetic AVS. A few exceptions, where toxicity was noted when metal/AVS ratios were < 1, could be explained by high concentrations of dissolved iron, which was released by the metal + AVS displacement reaction. The LFS containing synthetic AVS appears to mimic natural sediment AVS and thus can provide consistent and controlled substrates suitable for investigating metal/sediment chemistry and toxicity and for developing realistic sediment quality criteria for metals.

  6. Copper-containing zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Price, Geoffrey L.; Kanazirev, Vladislav

    1996-01-01

    A catalyst useful in the conversion of nitrogen oxides or in the synthesis of nitriles or imines from amines, formed by preparing an intimate mechanical mixture of a copper (II)-containing species, such as CuO or CuCl.sub.2, or elemental copper, with a zeolite having a pore mouth comprising 10 oxygen atoms, such as ZSM-5, converting the elemental copper or copper (II) to copper (I), and driving the copper (I) into the zeolite.

  7. Copper-containing zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Price, G.L.; Kanazirev, V.

    1996-12-10

    A catalyst useful in the conversion of nitrogen oxides or in the synthesis of nitriles or imines from amines, is formed by preparing an intimate mechanical mixture of a copper (II)-containing species, such as CuO or CuCl{sub 2}, or elemental copper, with a zeolite having a pore mouth comprising 10 oxygen atoms, such as ZSM-5, converting the elemental copper or copper (II) to copper (I), and driving the copper (I) into the zeolite.

  8. Uranium-bearing copper deposits in the Coyote district, Mora County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zeller, H.D.; Baltz, Elmer Harold

    1954-01-01

    Uranium-bearing copper deposits occur in steeply dipping beds of the Sangre de Cristo formation of Pennsylvanian and Permian(?) age south of Coyote, Mora County, N. Mex. Mapping and sampling of these deposits indicate that they are found in lenticular carbonaceous zones in shales and arkosic sandstones. Samples from these zones contain as much as 0.067 percent uranium and average 3 percent copper. Metatyuyamunite is dissemihatedin some of the arkosic sandstone beds, and uraninite is present in some of the copper sulfide nodules occurring in the shale. These sulfide nodules are composed principally of chalcocite but include some bornite, covellite, pyrite, and malachite. Most of the samples were collected near the surface from the weathered zone. The copper and uranium were probably deposited with the sediments and concentrated into zones during compaction and lithification. Carbonaceous material in the Sangre de Cristo formation provided the environment that precipitated uranium and copper from mineral-charged connate waters forced from the clayey sediments.

  9. Using surface plasmon resonances to test the durability of silver-copper films.

    PubMed

    Bussjager, R J; Macleod, H A

    1996-09-01

    Silver has high reflectivity in the visible and infrared but cannot be used fully because of its distressing lack of durability. A technique that uses the surface plasmon resonance phenomenon offers a sensitive method for studying the corrosion of silver and assessing improvements. It has been used in the investigation of the effects of flashing a thin layer, approximately 1 nm thick, of copper over silver in an attempt at cathodic protection. Tests include exposing silver and silver-copper films to air, 94% relative humidity, water, and hydrogen sulfide.

  10. Improved Electroformed Structural Copper and Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.; Hudson, W.; Babcock, B.; Edwards, R.

    1998-01-01

    Electroforming offers a superior means for fabricating internally cooled heat exchangers and structures subjected to thermal environments. Copper is deposited from many such applications because of the good thermal conductivity. It suffers from mediocre yield strength as a structural material and loses mechanical strength at intermediate temperatures. Mechanical properties similar to those of electroformed nickel are desired. Phase 1 examined innovative means to improve deposited copper structural performance. Yield strengths as high as 483 MPa (70 ksi) were obtained with useful ductility while retaining a high level of purity essential to good thermal conductivity. Phase 2 represents a program to explore new additive combinations in copper electrolytes to produce a more fine, equiaxed grain which can be thermally stabilized by other techniques such as alloying in modest degrees and dispersion strengthening. Evaluation of new technology - such as the codeposition of fullerness (diamond-like) particles were made to enhance thermal conductivity in low alloys. A test fire quality tube-bundle engine was fabricated using these copper property improvement concepts to show the superiority of the new coppers and fabrications methods over competitive technologies such as brazing and plasma deposition.

  11. Esterase Activated Carbonyl Sulfide/Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) Donors.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Preeti; Bora, Prerona; Ravikumar, Govindan; Jos, Swetha; Chakrapani, Harinath

    2017-01-06

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a mediator of a number of cellular processes, and modulating cellular levels of this gas has emerged as an important therapeutic area. Localized generation of H2S is thus very useful but highly challenging. Here, we report pivaloyloxymethyl-based carbonothioates and carbamothioates that are activated by the enzyme, esterase, to generate carbonyl sulfide (COS), which is hydrolyzed to H2S.

  12. 30 CFR 250.490 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... black lettering as follows: Letter height Wording 12 inches Danger. Poisonous Gas. Hydrogen Sulfide. 7... well-control techniques to prevent formation fracturing in an open hole within the pressure limits of... designed consistent with the anticipated depth, conditions of the hole, and reservoir environment to...

  13. 30 CFR 250.490 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... black lettering as follows: Letter height Wording 12 inches Danger. Poisonous Gas. Hydrogen Sulfide. 7... well-control techniques to prevent formation fracturing in an open hole within the pressure limits of... designed consistent with the anticipated depth, conditions of the hole, and reservoir environment to...

  14. Comparison of Hydrogen Sulfide Analysis Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bethea, Robert M.

    1973-01-01

    A summary and critique of common methods of hydrogen sulfide analysis is presented. Procedures described are: reflectance from silver plates and lead acetate-coated tiles, lead acetate and mercuric chloride paper tapes, sodium nitroprusside and methylene blue wet chemical methods, infrared spectrophotometry, and gas chromatography. (BL)

  15. Optical investigation of polyphenylene sulfide composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahate, A. S.; Nemade, K. R.; Waghuley, S. A.

    2013-06-01

    The synthesis of Polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) composite is done through chemical route using AlCl3 as Lewis acid. The Lewis acid/monomer stichometric ratio was taken to 99:1. To know the optical properties of composite, UV-VIS spectroscopy employed for the manipulation of optical properties such as extinction coefficient, optical conductivity, real dielectric constant, and imaginary dielectric constant.

  16. METHOD OF OBTAINING SULFIDES OF ORGANOFLUOROSILICON COMPOUNDS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    are subjected to interaction with unsaturated sulfides in the presence of a solution of chloroplatinic acid in isopropyl alcohol with heating up to 40-150C. (Author)...and also as additives to lubricating oils , antioxidants, and vulcanization accelerators. The method consists of the following: Fluorohydride silanes

  17. Nucleation of mercury sulfide by dealkylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enescu, Mironel; Nagy, Kathryn L.; Manceau, Alain

    2016-12-01

    Metal sulfide minerals are assumed to form naturally at ambient conditions via reaction of a metallic element with (poly)sulfide ions, usually produced by microbes in oxygen-depleted environments. Recently, the formation of mercury sulfide (β-HgS) directly from linear Hg(II)-thiolate complexes (Hg(SR)2) in natural organic matter and in cysteine solutions was demonstrated under aerated conditions. Here, a detailed description of this non-sulfidic reaction is provided by computations at a high level of molecular-orbital theory. The HgS stoichiometry is obtained through the cleavage of the S-C bond in one thiolate, transfer of the resulting alkyl group (R’) to another thiolate, and subsequent elimination of a sulfur atom from the second thiolate as a thioether (RSR’). Repetition of this mechanism leads to the formation of RS-(HgS)n-R chains which may self-assemble in parallel arrays to form cinnabar (α-HgS), or more commonly, quickly condense to four-coordinate metacinnabar (β-HgS). The mechanistic pathway is thermodynamically favorable and its predicted kinetics agrees with experiment. The results provide robust theoretical support for the abiotic natural formation of nanoparticulate HgS under oxic conditions and in the absence of a catalyst, and suggest a new route for the (bio)synthesis of HgS nanoparticles with improved technological properties.

  18. Monitoring sulfide and sulfate-reducing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, R.S.

    1995-12-31

    Simple yet precise and accurate methods for monitoring sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfide remain useful for the study of bacterial souring and corrosion. Test kits are available to measure sulfide in field samples. A more precise methylene blue sulfide assay for both field and laboratory studies is described here. Improved media, compared to that in API RP-38, for enumeration of SRB have been formulated. One of these, API-RST, contained cysteine (1.1 mM) as a reducing agent, which may be a confounding source of sulfide. While cysteine was required for rapid enumeration of SRB from environmental samples, the concentration of cysteine in medium could be reduced to 0.4 mM. It was also determined that elevated levels of yeast extract (>1 g/liter) could interfere with enumeration of SRB from environmental samples. The API-RST medium was modified to a RST-11 medium. Other changes in medium composition, in addition to reduction of cysteine, included reduction of the concentration of phosphate from 3.4 mM to 2.2 mM, reduction of the concentration of ferrous iron from 0.8 mM to 0.5 mM and preparation of a stock mineral solution to ease medium preparation. SRB from environmental samples could be enumerated in a week in this medium.

  19. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL... equipment and flow lines, circulating the well, swabbing, and pulling tubing, pumps, and packers. The...

  20. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL... equipment and flow lines, circulating the well, swabbing, and pulling tubing, pumps, and packers. The...

  1. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL... equipment and flow lines, circulating the well, swabbing, and pulling tubing, pumps, and packers. The...

  2. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL... equipment and flow lines, circulating the well, swabbing, and pulling tubing, pumps and packers. The...

  3. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL... equipment and flow lines, circulating the well, swabbing, and pulling tubing, pumps and packers. The...

  4. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL... equipment and flow lines, circulating the well, swabbing, and pulling tubing, pumps and packers. The...

  5. REACTION PROCESSES OF ARSENIC IN SULFIDIC SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fate of arsenic in the environment is fundamentally linked to its speciation. Arsenic in aerobic environments is predominantly arsenate, however under reducing conditions arsenite species dominate. In anoxic or sulfidic environments thioarsenite ((As(OH)x(SH)yz-) species alon...

  6. Nucleation of mercury sulfide by dealkylation

    PubMed Central

    Enescu, Mironel; Nagy, Kathryn L.; Manceau, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Metal sulfide minerals are assumed to form naturally at ambient conditions via reaction of a metallic element with (poly)sulfide ions, usually produced by microbes in oxygen-depleted environments. Recently, the formation of mercury sulfide (β-HgS) directly from linear Hg(II)-thiolate complexes (Hg(SR)2) in natural organic matter and in cysteine solutions was demonstrated under aerated conditions. Here, a detailed description of this non-sulfidic reaction is provided by computations at a high level of molecular-orbital theory. The HgS stoichiometry is obtained through the cleavage of the S-C bond in one thiolate, transfer of the resulting alkyl group (R’) to another thiolate, and subsequent elimination of a sulfur atom from the second thiolate as a thioether (RSR’). Repetition of this mechanism leads to the formation of RS-(HgS)n-R chains which may self-assemble in parallel arrays to form cinnabar (α-HgS), or more commonly, quickly condense to four-coordinate metacinnabar (β-HgS). The mechanistic pathway is thermodynamically favorable and its predicted kinetics agrees with experiment. The results provide robust theoretical support for the abiotic natural formation of nanoparticulate HgS under oxic conditions and in the absence of a catalyst, and suggest a new route for the (bio)synthesis of HgS nanoparticles with improved technological properties. PMID:27991599

  7. COPPER RESEARCH UPDATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provides an update and overview of new research results and remaining research needs with respect to copper corrosion control issues. The topics to be covered include: occurrence of elevated copper release in systems that meet the Action Level; impact of water c...

  8. Oxygen Demand of Fresh and Stored Sulfide Solutions and Sulfide-Rich Constructed Wetland Effluent.

    PubMed

    Chan, Carolyn; Farahbakhsh, Khosrow

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated the contribution of hydrogen sulfide to biological oxygen demand (BOD5) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) in wastewater effluents, and documented the effect of storage times and conditions on the BOD5 and COD of pH-adjusted sodium sulfide solutions as well as graywater wetland effluent. Initial COD measurements of sulfide solutions were 84-89% of the theoretical oxygen demand (ThOD), 1.996 mg O2/mg S, whereas unseeded BOD5 measurements were 55-77%. For sulfide solutions, all storage conditions led to declines of >15% (COD, BOD5), and >31% (sulfide). For wetland effluent, storage without headspace was effective in reducing COD losses (3.7%), compared to storage with headspace (17%), and affected changes in turbidity, UVA-254 and pH. The results suggest that storage times and conditions should be controlled and reported when reporting BOD5 and COD of sulfide-rich samples. Wetland models representing sulfate reduction as a method of COD removal may need to be reconsidered.

  9. Green Luminescent Copper Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, Y.; Annapurna, S.; Bhikshamaiah, G.; Singh, A. K.

    2016-09-01

    Copper nanoparticles are synthesized by a green chemical reduction method using Gum Kondagogu extract as stabilizer. The as-prepared powder samples are characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Small Angle X-Ray Scattering (SAXS), UV-Visible Spectroscopy, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques. The as-prepared copper nanoparticles are found to be FCC crystalline and nearly monodispersed with particles size 19 nm. Photoluminescence (PL) measurement showed strong green visible emission and PL intensity was found enhanced with the presence of natural extract on copper nanoparticle surface. The increase in the PL intensity was mainly due to copper nanoparticles. Photoluminescence spectra of copper nanoparticles show an emission peak at 430 nm when illuminated at 325 nm.

  10. Investigation of Copper Ammonia Leaching from Smelter Slags: Characterization, Leaching and Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidari, Ehsan; Aghazadeh, Valeh

    2015-10-01

    Although ammonia leaching of copper from slags has been reported generally as a part of copper slag utilization methods, but no detailed studies have been reported in the literature. In this research, we tried to investigate the effect of different parameters on ammonia leaching of copper from copper smelting slag by identifying different copper-bearing phases and following them during leaching time. Mineralogical characterization of the smelting slag (1.7 pct Cu) was done using X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, diagnostic leaching tests, and scanning electron microscopy. The characterization studies indicated that main copper-bearing species are soluble copper oxides and chalcocite along with minor amount of covellite, bornite, blister copper particles, and chalcopyrite. It was also found that only approximately 0.2 pct Cu was present in the insoluble bulk silicate phases. These results suggest that approximately 88 pct of the total copper of slag could be extracted by ammonia sulfide leaching. Leaching tests were carried out and the effects of various parameters, namely pH, ammonia concentration, temperature, presence of oxygen, stirring speed, and pulp density were examined on copper leaching. The temperature and stirring speed had the most pronounced effect on the copper leaching, whereas ammonia affected the leaching yield at low concentrations of ammonia. It was found that 78 pct of Cu could be extracted within 4 hours and under optimum conditions: T = 343 K (70 °C), 2M ammonia, pH 10.5, stirring speed = 900 rpm, pulp density = 10 pct ( w s/ v). The kinetic data were analyzed with the shrinking core models, and it was found that the leaching process is controlled by both the interfacial transfer and diffusion across the product layer and the activation energy is calculated to be 49.4 kJ mol-1.

  11. Iron sulfide minerals in Black Sea sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, C.; Robin, E.; Henkel, S.; Kasten, S.; Bleil, U.

    2009-04-01

    This study presents an integrated geochemical, environmental magnetic, and electron microscopic approach to better understand the physicochemical processes in deep sea sediments from the northwestern Black Sea. The investigated gravity core GC 214 was retrieved in 2007 during RV Meteor cruise M72/1 west of the Crimean Peninsula in a water depth of 1686 mbsf. Geochemical analyses of the pore water and solid phase indicate non-steady state sedimentation. The oxygen-depleted water column conditions, anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and related microbially-driven sulfate reduction favor a highly complex iron sulfide mineral assemblage in the sediment column. The detailed magnetic susceptibility and remanence measurements indicate an irregularly stratified depth profile showing intervals of particularly high values. Further environmental magnetic analyses depict strongly elevated coercivities for those depth horizons, suggesting greigite as one of the main magnetic carrier minerals. Automated chemical classification (ACC), using electron dispersive spectrometer (EDS) attached to a JEOL840 scanning electron microscope (SEM), on dispersed particle samples permitted the identification of greigite (Fe3S4) next to pyrrhotite (Fe7S8), pyrite (FeS2) and monosulfides (FeS), but also allowed for the absolute quantification of the various mineral phases. These analyses were carried out on magnetic extracts and density separates to be able to calculate budgets between the different present iron sulfides. We obtained excellent correlations between the different iron sulfide concentrations and the magnetic signal. Additional analyses on polished sections yield inside into the details of the sulfidization pathways along the depth profile of the sediment sequence and help to develop a more general process model for this particular geochemical (paleo-)environment. Keywords: Black Sea, iron sulfides, environmental magnetism, anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), scanning electron

  12. Analog Experiments on Sulfide Foams in Magmatic Ore Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitch, A. M.; Dahn, D.; Zavala, K.

    2009-05-01

    Metal sulfides form as an immiscible phase from silicate magmas. Dynamic mingling and unmingling of the two phases is important for the development of economic deposits: mingling promotes enrichment of the sulfide in valuable metals, and subsequent unmingling generates massive sulfide. Analog experiments were carried out to investigate mingling processes in immiscible systems, using oil, water and small beads to represent magma, sulfide liquid and silicate crystals. Stirring or injection led to the formation of a foam of analog sulfide droplets within an analog silicate framework. We propose that the partial collapse of such a foam explains massive sulfide lenses at the Voisey's Bay magmatic sulfide deposit, and that crystallization of silicate crystals in the remaining foam walls generates 'net-textured' ores. In the experiments, solid particles had a profound effect on unmingling: analog sulfide droplets were stably contained within analog crystal-rich magma and did not coalesce. We therefore suggest that 'net' and 'leopard' textures in disseminated sulfides indicate mingling of sulfide with crystal-poor magma, whereas isolated disseminated patches of sulfide indicate mingling with a crystal-rich magma.

  13. Oxidation of hydrogen sulfide by human liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Helmy, Nada; Prip-Buus, Carina; Vons, Corinne; Lenoir, Véronique; Abou-Hamdan, Abbas; Guedouari-Bounihi, Hala; Lombès, Anne; Bouillaud, Frédéric

    2014-09-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is the third gasotransmitter discovered. Sulfide shares with the two others (NO and CO) the same inhibiting properties towards mitochondrial respiration. However, in contrast with NO or CO, sulfide at concentrations lower than the toxic (μM) level is an hydrogen donor and a substrate for mitochondrial respiration. This is due to the activity of a sulfide quinone reductase found in a large majority of mitochondria. An ongoing study of the metabolic state of liver in obese patients allowed us to evaluate the sulfide oxidation capacity with twelve preparations of human liver mitochondria. The results indicate relatively high rates of sulfide oxidation with a large variability between individuals. These observations made with isolated mitochondria appear in agreement with the main characteristics of sulfide oxidation as established before with the help of cellular models.

  14. Sulfide in surface waters of the western Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutter, Gregory A.; Krahforst, Christian F.

    1988-11-01

    Using newly developed techniques, some preliminary data on hydrogen sulfide in surface waters of the western Atlantic have been obtained. Concentrations of total sulfide range from <0.1 to 1.1 nmol/L, and vary on a diel basis. At these concentrations, sulfide may affect the cycling of several trace metals via the formation of stable complexes. Production of sulfide in oxygenated seawater may occur through the hydrolysis of carbonyl sulfide or by sulfate reduction within macroscopic particles in the water column. Removal mechanisms can include oxidation, complexation with particulate trace metals, and metal sulfide precipitation. However, the temporal and spatial distributions suggest a complex set of processes governing the behavior of sulfide in the surface ocean.

  15. Sulfide elimination by intermittent nitrate dosing in sewer sediments.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanchen; Wu, Chen; Zhou, Xiaohong; Zhu, David Z; Shi, Hanchang

    2015-01-01

    The formation of hydrogen sulfide in biofilms and sediments in sewer systems can cause severe pipe corrosions and health hazards, and requires expensive programs for its prevention. The aim of this study is to propose a new control strategy and the optimal condition for sulfide elimination by intermittent nitrate dosing in sewer sediments. The study was carried out based on lab-scale experiments and batch tests using real sewer sediments. The intermittent nitrate dosing mode and the optimal control condition were investigated. The results indicated that the sulfide-intermittent-elimination strategy by nitrate dosing is advantageous for controlling sulfide accumulation in sewer sediment. The oxidation-reduction potential is a sensitive indicator parameter that can reflect the control effect and the minimum N/S (nitrate/sulfide) ratio with slight excess nitrate is necessary for optimal conditions of efficient sulfide control with lower carbon source loss. The optimal control condition is feasible for the sulfide elimination in sewer systems.

  16. Bioaccessibility and Solubility of Copper in Copper-Treated Lumber

    EPA Science Inventory

    Micronized copper (MC)-treated lumber is a recent replacement for Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCA) and Ammonium Copper (AC)-treated lumbers; though little is known about the potential risk of copper (Cu) exposure from incidental ingestion of MC-treated wood. The bioaccessibility o...

  17. Killing of bacteria by copper surfaces involves dissolved copper.

    PubMed

    Molteni, Cristina; Abicht, Helge K; Solioz, Marc

    2010-06-01

    Bacteria are rapidly killed on copper surfaces. However, the mechanism of this process remains unclear. Using Enterococcus hirae, the effect of inactivation of copper homeostatic genes and of medium compositions on survival and copper dissolution was tested. The results support a role for dissolved copper ions in killing.

  18. In-Situ Generation of Oxide Nanowire Arrays from AgCuZn Alloy Sulfide with Enhanced Electrochemical Oxygen-Evolving Performance.

    PubMed

    Xie, Minghao; Ai, Shiqi; Yang, Jian; Yang, Yudi; Chen, Yihan; Jin, Yong

    2015-08-12

    In this study, AgCuZn sulfide is fabricated on the surface of AgCuZn alloys by hydrothermal sulfuration. This ternary metal sulfide is equipped with enhanced activity toward oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in an alkaline electrolyte. Through comparison of the alloys with diverse compositions, we find out the best electrochemical property of a particular alloy sulfide forming on a AgCuZn substrate (Ag:Cu:Zn=43:49:8). The alloy sulfide exhibits an onset overpotential (η) of 0.27 V with a Tafel slope of 95±2 mV dec(-1) and a current density of 130 mA cm(-2) at η of 0.57 V. Moreover, the obtained AgCuZn sulfide displays excellent stability, where the current density can increase to 130% of the initial value after a water electrolysis test for 100,000 s (27.7 h). Through investigating the electrode before and after the electrocatalysis, we find a remarkable activated process during which self-supported copper-silver oxide nanowire (CuO-Ag2O NW) arrays in situ form on the surface of the electrode. This work provides a feasible strategy for synthesis of high performance nonprecious metal electrocatalysts for water splitting.

  19. The mineralogy and the isotopic composition of sulfur in hydrothermal sulfide/sulfate deposits on the East Pacific Rise, 21 deg N latitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Styrt, M. M.; Brackmann, A. J.; Holland, H. D.; Clark, B. C.; Pisutha-Arnond, V.; Eldridge, C. S.; Ohmoto, H.

    1981-01-01

    The mineralogy and isotopic composition of sulfur found in hydrothermal deposits associated with five groups of vents along the ridge axis of the East Pacific Rise near 21 deg N latitude are investigated. Solid samples of mixed sulfides and sulfates from mounds, chimneys and the surrounding sediment as well as fresh basaltic glass were examined with a portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer and by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, and electron microprobe analysis. For the three vents of exit temperature close to 350 C, the chimneys are found to be rich in copper sulfides, while for those of temperatures around 300 C, zinc sulfide is found to predominate. The major sulfides found in the chimneys include wurtzite, chalcopyrite, pyrite and cubanite, with anhydrite the dominant sulfate. Significant mineralogical differences are found between active and inactive vents. The isotopic composition of sulfur in anhydrites from active vents is observed to be close to that of sea water and consistent with a derivation from sea water sulfate. The isotopic composition of sulfur in the sulfide minerals is explained in terms of precipitation from solutions with reduced sulfur derived from basalts or basaltic magmas, and sea water sulfate. Finally, the deposits are interpreted as the results of the mixing of H2S-dominated hydrothermal fluids with cold sea water near the sea floor.

  20. Selective chemical dissolution of sulfides: An evaluation of six methods applicable to assaying sulfide-bound nickel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klock, P.R.; Czamanske, G.K.; Foose, M.; Pesek, J.

    1986-01-01

    Six analytical techniques for the selective chemical dissolution of sulfides are compared with the purpose of defining the best method for accurately determining the concentration of sulfide-bound nickel. Synthesized sulfide phases of known elemental content, mixed with well-analyzed silicates, were used to determine the relative and absolute efficiency, based on Ni and Mg recovery, of the techniques. Tested leach-methods purported to dissolve sulfide from silicate phases include: brominated water, brominated water-carbon tetrachloride, nitric-hydrochloric acid, hydrogen peroxide-ammonium citrate, bromine-methanol and hydrogen peroxide-ascorbic acid. Only the hydrogen peroxide-ammonium citrate method did not prove adequate in dissolving the sulfide phases. The remaining five methods dissolved the sulfide phases, but the indicated amount of attack on the silicate portion ranged from 3% to 100%. The bromine-methanol method is recommended for assaying sulfide-Ni deposits when Ni is also present in silicate phases. ?? 1986.

  1. Fabricating Copper Nanotubes by Electrodeposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, E. H.; Ramsey, Christopher; Bae, Youngsam; Choi, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Copper tubes having diameters between about 100 and about 200 nm have been fabricated by electrodeposition of copper into the pores of alumina nanopore membranes. Copper nanotubes are under consideration as alternatives to copper nanorods and nanowires for applications involving thermal and/or electrical contacts, wherein the greater specific areas of nanotubes could afford lower effective thermal and/or electrical resistivities. Heretofore, copper nanorods and nanowires have been fabricated by a combination of electrodeposition and a conventional expensive lithographic process. The present electrodeposition-based process for fabricating copper nanotubes costs less and enables production of copper nanotubes at greater rate.

  2. Arsenic speciation in natural sulfidic geothermal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Nicole S.; Stefánsson, Andri; Sigfússon, Bergur

    2014-10-01

    The speciation of arsenic in natural sulfidic geothermal waters was studied using chemical analyses and thermodynamic aqueous speciation calculations. Samples were collected in three geothermal systems in Iceland, having contrasting H2S concentrations in the reservoir (high vs. low). The sampled waters contained 7-116 ppb As and <0.01-77.6 ppm H2S with pH of 8.56-9.60. The analytical setup used for the determination of arsenic species (Ion Chromatography-Hydride Generation Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry, IC-HG-AFS) was field-deployed and the samples analyzed within ∼5 min of sampling in order to prevent changes upon storage, which were shown to be considerable regardless of the sample storage method used. Nine aqueous arsenic species were detected, among others arsenite (HnAsO3n-3), thioarsenite (HnAsS3n-3), arsenate (HnAsO4n-3), monothioarsenate (HnAsSO3n-3), dithioarsenate (HnAsS2O2n-3), trithioarsenate (HnAsS3O) and tetrathioarsenate (HnAsS4n-3). The results of the measured aqueous arsenic speciation in the natural geothermal waters and comparison with thermodynamic calculations reveal that the predominant factors determining the species distribution are sulfide concentration and pH. In alkaline waters with low sulfide concentrations the predominant species are AsIII oxyanions. This can be seen in samples from a liquid-only well, tapping water that is H2S-poor and free of oxygen. At intermediate sulfide concentration AsIII and AsV thio species become important and predominate at high sulfide concentration, as seen in two-phase well waters, which have high H2S concentrations in the reservoir. Upon oxidation, for instance due to mixing of the reservoir fluid with oxygenated water upon ascent to the surface, AsV oxyanions form, as well as AsV thio complexes if the sulfide concentration is intermediate to high. This oxidation process can be seen in samples from hot springs in the Geysir geothermal area. While the thermodynamic modeling allows for a first

  3. Uranium in the Copper King Mine, Black Hawk No. 1 Claim, Larimer County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granger, Harry Clifford; King, Robert Ugstad

    1951-01-01

    Radioactive rock was discovered on the dump of the Copper King mine, sec. 8, T. 10 N., R. 72 W., Larirrier County, Colo., in the summer of 1949. The mine had been prospected intermittently for copper and zinc since 1,916, but there is no record that ore was produced. The country rock is pre-Cambrian granite containing many schist inclusions and narrow pegmatite dikes. Pitchblende disseminated in chlorite and sulfides was deposited in an obscure vein system during an intermediate stage of mineralization. This stage was preceded by biotitic alteration of amphiboles and sulfide deposition. The latest stage of mineralization is represented-by the limonitic dense quartz vein followed during mining. The uranium-bearing vein is about 2-3 feet wide and the dense quartz vein is less than 6 inches wide. Both veins are bordered by 1-3 feet of biotite- and sulfide-bearing granite and arriphibole schist. The uranium content of 26 samples taken in the mine and on the dump ranges from 0.002 to 1.40 percent. These samples contained as much as 2.97 percent copper and 5.96 percent zinc. The general outlook for further prospecting near the Copper King shaft is not favorable, because much of the 'immediately surrounding area has been thoroughly investigated without finding abnormal radioactivity. The most favorable environment for concentration of uranium minerals appears to have been in or near schist inclusions in granite, and further exploration in nearby prospects may result in the discovery of other uranium-bearing deposits. In the Copper King mine, additional exploration would aid in determining the extent of the uranium-bearing material.

  4. Sulfide Intrusion and Detoxification in the Seagrass Zostera marina.

    PubMed

    Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Holmer, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Gaseous sulfide intrusion into seagrasses growing in sulfidic sediments causes little or no harm to the plant, indicating the presence of an unknown sulfide tolerance or detoxification mechanism. We assessed such mechanism in the seagrass Zostera marina in the laboratory and in the field with scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, chromatographic and spectrophotometric methods, and stable isotope tracing coupled with a mass balance of sulfur compounds. We found that Z. marina detoxified gaseous sediment-derived sulfide through incorporation and that most of the detoxification occurred in underground tissues, where sulfide intrusion was greatest. Elemental sulfur was a major detoxification compound, precipitating on the inner wall of the aerenchyma of underground tissues. Sulfide was metabolized into thiols and entered the plant sulfur metabolism as well as being stored as sulfate throughout the plant. We conclude that avoidance of sulfide exposure by reoxidation of sulfide in the rhizosphere or aerenchyma and tolerance of sulfide intrusion by incorporation of sulfur in the plant are likely major survival strategies of seagrasses in sulfidic sediments.

  5. Sulfide, the first inorganic substrate for human cells.

    PubMed

    Goubern, Marc; Andriamihaja, Mireille; Nübel, Tobias; Blachier, François; Bouillaud, Frédéric

    2007-06-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is produced inside the intestine and is known as a poison that inhibits cellular respiration at the level of cytochrome oxidase. However, sulfide is used as an energetic substrate by many photo- and chemoautotrophic bacteria and by animals such as the lugworm Arenicola marina. The concentrations of sulfide present in their habitats are comparable with those present in the human colon. Using permeabilized colonic cells to which sulfide was added by an infusion pump we show that the maximal respiratory rate of colonocyte mitochondria in presence of sulfide compares with that obtained with succinate or L-alpha-glycerophosphate. This oxidation is accompanied by mitochondrial energization. In contrast, other cell types not naturally exposed to high concentration of sulfide showed much lower oxidation rates. Mitochondria showed a very high affinity for sulfide that permits its use as an energetic substrate at low micromolar concentrations, hence, below the toxic level. However, if the supply of sulfide exceeds the oxidation rate, poisoning renders mitochondria inefficient and our data suggest that an anaerobic mechanism involving partial reversion of Krebs cycle already known in invertebrates takes place. In conclusion, this work provides additional and compelling evidence that sulfide is not only a toxic compound. According to our study, sulfide appears to be the first inorganic substrate for mammalian cells characterized thus far.

  6. Enhanced reductive dechlorination of trichloroethylene by sulfidated nanoscale zerovalent iron.

    PubMed

    Rajajayavel, Sai Rajasekar C; Ghoshal, Subhasis

    2015-07-01

    Direct injection of reactive nanoscale zerovalent iron particles (NZVI) is considered to be a promising approach for remediation of aquifers contaminated by chlorinated organic pollutants. In this study we show that the extent of sulfidation of NZVI enhances the rate of dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) compared to that by unamended NZVI, and the enhancement depends on the Fe/S molar ratio. Experiments where TCE was reacted with NZVI sulfidated to different extents (Fe/S molar ratios 0.62-66) showed that the surface-area normalized first-order TCE degradation rate constant increased up to 40 folds compared to non-sulfidated NZVI. Fe/S ratios in the range of 12-25 provided the highest TCE dechlorination rates, and rates decreased at both higher and lower Fe/S. In contrast, sulfidated NZVI exposed to water in the absence of TCE showed significantly lower hydrogen evolution rate (2.75 μmol L(-1) h(-1)) compared to that by an unamended NZVI (6.92 μmol L(-1) h(-1)), indicating that sulfidation of NZVI suppressed corrosion reactions with water. Sulfide (HS(-)) ions reacted rapidly with NZVI and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses showed formation of a surface layer of FeS and FeS2. We propose that more electrons are preferentially conducted from sulfidated NZVI than from unamended NZVI to TCE, likely because of greater binding of TCE on the reactive sites of the iron sulfide outer layer. Resuspending sulfidated NZVI in sulfide-free or sulfide containing solutions altered the TCE degradation rate constants because of changes in the FeS layer thickness. Sulfidated NZVI maintained its high reactivity in the presence of multiple mono and divalent ions and with polyelectrolyte coatings. Thus, sulfide ions in groundwater can significantly alter NZVI reactivity.

  7. The Evolution of Sulfide Tolerance in the Cyanobacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Scott R.; Bebout, Brad M.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Understanding how the function of extant microorganisms has recorded both their evolutionary histories and their past interactions with the environment is a stated goal of astrobiology. We are taking a multidisciplinary approach to investigate the diversification of sulfide tolerance mechanisms in the cyanobacteria, which vary both in their degree of exposure to sulfide and in their capacity to tolerate this inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport. Since conditions were very reducing during the first part of Earth's history and detrital sulfides have been found in Archean sediments, mechanisms conferring sulfide tolerance may have been important for the evolutionary success of the ancestors of extant cyanobacteria. Two tolerance mechanisms have been identified in this group: (1) resistance of photosystem II, the principal target of sulfide toxicity; and (2) maintenance of the ability to fix carbon despite photosystem II inhibition by utilizing sulfide as an electron donor in photosystem I - dependent, anoxygenic photosynthesis. We are presently collecting comparative data on aspects of sulfide physiology for laboratory clones isolated from a variety of habitats. These data will be analyzed within a phylogenetic framework inferred from molecular sequence data collected for these clones to test how frequently different mechanisms of tolerance have evolved and which tolerance mechanism evolved first. In addition, by analyzing these physiological data together with environmental sulfide data collected from our research sites using microelectrodes, we can also test whether the breadth of an organism's sulfide tolerance can be predicted from the magnitude of variation in environmental sulfide concentration it has experienced in its recent evolutionary past and whether greater average sulfide concentration and/or temporal variability in sulfide favors the evolution of a particular mechanism of sulfide tolerance.

  8. Cadmium zinc sulfide by solution growth

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Wen S.

    1992-05-12

    A process for depositing thin layers of a II-VI compound cadmium zinc sulfide (CdZnS) by an aqueous solution growth technique with quality suitable for high efficiency photovoltaic or other devices which can benefit from the band edge shift resulting from the inclusion of Zn in the sulfide. A first solution comprising CdCl.sub.2 2.5H.sub.2 O, NH.sub.4 Cl, NH.sub.4 OH and ZnCl.sub.2, and a second solution comprising thiourea ((NH.sub.2).sub.2 CS) are combined and placed in a deposition cell, along with a substrate to form a thin i.e. 10 nm film of CdZnS on the substrate. This process can be sequentially repeated with to achieve deposition of independent multiple layers having different Zn concentrations.

  9. Iron-sulfide redox flow batteries

    DOEpatents

    Xia, Guan-Guang; Yang, Zhenguo; Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Liu, Jun; Graff, Gordon L

    2013-12-17

    Iron-sulfide redox flow battery (RFB) systems can be advantageous for energy storage, particularly when the electrolytes have pH values greater than 6. Such systems can exhibit excellent energy conversion efficiency and stability and can utilize low-cost materials that are relatively safer and more environmentally friendly. One example of an iron-sulfide RFB is characterized by a positive electrolyte that comprises Fe(III) and/or Fe(II) in a positive electrolyte supporting solution, a negative electrolyte that comprises S.sup.2- and/or S in a negative electrolyte supporting solution, and a membrane, or a separator, that separates the positive electrolyte and electrode from the negative electrolyte and electrode.

  10. Iron-sulfide redox flow batteries

    DOEpatents

    Xia, Guanguang; Yang, Zhenguo; Li, Liyu; Kim, Soowhan; Liu, Jun; Graff, Gordon L

    2016-06-14

    Iron-sulfide redox flow battery (RFB) systems can be advantageous for energy storage, particularly when the electrolytes have pH values greater than 6. Such systems can exhibit excellent energy conversion efficiency and stability and can utilize low-cost materials that are relatively safer and more environmentally friendly. One example of an iron-sulfide RFB is characterized by a positive electrolyte that comprises Fe(III) and/or Fe(II) in a positive electrolyte supporting solution, a negative electrolyte that comprises S.sup.2- and/or S in a negative electrolyte supporting solution, and a membrane, or a separator, that separates the positive electrolyte and electrode from the negative electrolyte and electrode.

  11. Speciation of arsenic in sulfidic waters

    PubMed Central

    Wilkin, Richard T; Wallschläger, Dirk; Ford, Robert G

    2003-01-01

    Formation constants for thioarsenite species have been determined in dilute solutions at 25°C, ΣH2S from 10-7.5 to 10-3.0 M, ΣAs from 10-5.6 to 10-4.8 M, and pH 7 and 10. The principal inorganic arsenic species in anoxic aquatic systems are arsenite, As(OH)30, and a mononuclear thioarsenite with an S/As ratio of 3:1. Thioarsenic species with S/As ratios of 1 : 1,2 : 1, and 4 : 1 are lesser components in sulfidic solutions that might be encountered in natural aquatic environments. Thioarsenites dominate arsenic speciation at sulfide concentrations > 10-4.3 M at neutral pH. Conversion from neutral As(OH)30 to anionic thioarsenite species may regulate the transport and fate of arsenic in sulfate-reducing environments by governing sorption and mineral precipitation reactions.

  12. Mineralogy and Geochemical Processes of Carbonate Mineral-rich Sulfide Mine Tailings, Zimapan, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClure, R. J.; Deng, Y.; Loeppert, R.; Herbert, B. E.; Carrillo, R.; Gonzalez, C.

    2009-12-01

    Mining for silver, lead, zinc, and copper in Zimapan, Hidalgo State, Mexico has been ongoing since 1576. High concentrations of heavy metals have been found in several mine tailing heaps in the Zimapan area, with concentrations of arsenic observed as high as 28,690 mg/kg and levels of Pb as high as 2772 mg/kg. Unsecured tailings heaps and associated acid mine drainage has presented tremendous problems to revegetation, water quality, and dust emission control in the Zimapan area. Although acid mine drainage problems related to weathering of sulfide minerals have been extensively studied and are well known, the weathering products of sulfides in areas with a significant presence of carbonate minerals and their effect on the mobility of heavy metals warrant further study. Carbonate minerals are expected to neutralize sulfuric acid produced from weathering of sulfide minerals, however, in the Zimapan area localized areas of pH as low as 1.8 were observed within carbonate mineral-rich tailing heaps. The objectives of this study are to characterize (1) the heavy metal-containing sulfide minerals in the initial tailing materials, (2) the intermediate oxidation products of sulfide minerals within the carbonate-rich tailings, (3) chemical species of heavy metals within pH gradients between 1.8 and 8.2, the approximate natural pH of limestone, and (4) the mobility of soluble and colloidal heavy metals and arsenic within the carbonate-rich tailings. Representative mine tailings and their intermediate oxidation products have been sampled from the Zimapan area. Mineralogical characterization will be conducted with X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, electron microscopes and microprobes, and chemical methods. Chemical species will be extracted by selective dissolution methods. Preliminary results have identified calcite as the dominant mineral in the tailing heaps with a pH of 7, suggesting non-equilibrium with the acidic weathering products. Other minerals identified in

  13. Single-layer transition metal sulfide catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Thoma, Steven G.

    2011-05-31

    Transition Metal Sulfides (TMS), such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2), are the petroleum industry's "workhorse" catalysts for upgrading heavy petroleum feedstocks and removing sulfur, nitrogen and other pollutants from fuels. We have developed an improved synthesis technique to produce SLTMS catalysts, such as molybdenum disulfide, with potentially greater activity and specificity than those currently available. Applications for this technology include heavy feed upgrading, in-situ catalysis, bio-fuel conversion and coal liquefaction.

  14. Subsurface heaters with low sulfidation rates

    SciTech Connect

    John, Randy Carl; Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-12-10

    A system for heating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes a heater having an elongated ferromagnetic metal heater section. The heater is located in an opening in a formation. The heater section is configured to heat the hydrocarbon containing formation. The exposed ferromagnetic metal has a sulfidation rate that goes down with increasing temperature of the heater, when the heater is in a selected temperature range.

  15. Micromachining with copper lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, Martyn R. H.; Bell, Andy; Foster-Turner, Gideon; Rutterford, Graham; Chudzicki, J.; Kearsley, Andrew J.

    1997-04-01

    In recent years the copper laser has undergone extensive development and has emerged as a leading and unique laser for micromachining. The copper laser is a high average power (10 - 250 W), high pulse repetition rate (2 - 32 kHz), visible laser (511 nm and 578 nm) that produces high peak power (typically 200 kW), short pulses (30 ns) and very good beam quality (diffraction limited). This unique set of laser parameters results in exceptional micro-machining in a wide variety of materials. Typical examples of the capabilities of the copper laser include the drilling of small holes (10 - 200 micrometer diameter) in materials as diverse as steel, ceramic, diamond and polyimide with micron precision and low taper (less than 1 degree) cutting and profiling of diamond. Application of the copper laser covers the electronic, aerospace, automotive, nuclear, medical and precision engineering industries.

  16. Volatility of copper

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.A.; Simonson, J.M.; Joyce, D.B.

    1996-08-01

    The relevant aqueous thermodynamics of copper and its oxides are evaluated and summarized with emphasis on solubility, hydrolysis, and complexation. The solubilities of metallic copper, solid cuprous and cupric oxides in steam measured by Pocock and Stewart in 1963 are discussed and the latter data are fitted in the form of established empirical equations and compared to other existing results. No other sources of data were found for the solubility of copper and cupric oxide in steam and even these data are very limited. Discussion of corresponding available solubility data on both oxide phases in liquid water is given. The possible effects of complexing agents are considered. A brief discussion is provided of the role of surface adsorption in determining the fate of dissolved copper in the boiler. 37 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Redetermination of piperidinium hydrogen sulfide structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andras, Maria T.; Hepp, Aloysius F.; Fanwick, Phillip E.; Duraj, Stan A.; Gordon, Edward M.

    1994-01-01

    The presence of adventitious water in a reaction between dicyclopentamethylene thiuram-disulfide (C5H10NCS2)(sub 2) and a picoline solution of tricyclopentadienyl indium(III) (C5H5)(sub 3). It resulted in the formation of piperidinium hydrogen sulfide (C5H13NS). The piperidinium hydrogen sulfide produced in this way was unambiguously characterized by X-ray crystallography. The structure determination showed that the piperidinium hydrogen sulfide crystal (MW = 119.23 g/mol) has an orthorhombic (Pbcm) unit cell whose parameters are: a = 9.818(2), b = 7.3720(1), c = 9.754(1) A, V = 706.0(3) A(exp 3), Z=4. D(sub chi) = 1.122 g cm(exp -3), Mo K(alpha) (lamda = 0.71073), mu= 3.36 cm(exp -1), F(000) = 264.0, T =293 K, R = 0.036 for 343 reflections with F(sub O)(sup 2) greater than 3 sigma (F(sub O)(sup 2)) and 65 variables. The compound consists of (C5H10NH2)(+) cations and (SH)(-) anions with both species residing on crystallographic mirror planes. N-H -- S hydrogen bonding contributes to the interconnection of neighboring piperidinium components of the compound.

  18. Organization of the human mitochondrial hydrogen sulfide oxidation pathway.

    PubMed

    Libiad, Marouane; Yadav, Pramod Kumar; Vitvitsky, Victor; Martinov, Michael; Banerjee, Ruma

    2014-11-07

    Sulfide oxidation is expected to play an important role in cellular switching between low steady-state intracellular hydrogen sulfide levels and the higher concentrations where the physiological effects are elicited. Yet despite its significance, fundamental questions regarding how the sulfide oxidation pathway is wired remain unanswered, and competing proposals exist that diverge at the very first step catalyzed by sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR). We demonstrate that, in addition to sulfite, glutathione functions as a persulfide acceptor for human SQR and that rhodanese preferentially synthesizes rather than utilizes thiosulfate. The kinetic behavior of these enzymes provides compelling evidence for the flow of sulfide via SQR to glutathione persulfide, which is then partitioned to thiosulfate or sulfite. Kinetic simulations at physiologically relevant metabolite concentrations provide additional support for the organizational logic of the sulfide oxidation pathway in which glutathione persulfide is the first intermediate formed.

  19. Process for producing cadmium sulfide on a cadmium telluride surface

    DOEpatents

    Levi, D.H.; Nelson, A.J.; Ahrenkiel, R.K.

    1996-07-30

    A process is described for producing a layer of cadmium sulfide on a cadmium telluride surface to be employed in a photovoltaic device. The process comprises providing a cadmium telluride surface which is exposed to a hydrogen sulfide plasma at an exposure flow rate, an exposure time and an exposure temperature sufficient to permit reaction between the hydrogen sulfide and cadmium telluride to thereby form a cadmium sulfide layer on the cadmium telluride surface and accomplish passivation. In addition to passivation, a heterojunction at the interface of the cadmium sulfide and the cadmium telluride can be formed when the layer of cadmium sulfide formed on the cadmium telluride is of sufficient thickness. 12 figs.

  20. Metal sulfide initiators for metal oxide sorbent regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Turk, Brian S.; Gupta, Raghubir P.

    2001-01-01

    A process of regenerating a sulfided sorbent is provided. According to the process of the invention, a substantial portion of the energy necessary to initiate the regeneration reaction is provided by the combustion of a particulate metal sulfide additive. In using the particulate metal sulfide additive, the oxygen-containing gas used to regenerate the sulfided sorbent can be fed to the regeneration zone without heating or at a lower temperature than used in conventional processes wherein the regeneration reaction is initiated only by heating the oxygen-containing gas. The particulate metal sulfide additive is preferably an inexpensive mineral ore such as iron pyrite which does not adversely affect the regeneration or corresponding desulfurization reactions. The invention further includes a sorbent composition comprising the particulate metal sulfide additive in admixture with an active metal oxide sorbent capable of removing one or more sulfur compounds from a sulfur-containing gas stream.

  1. Metal sulfide initiators for metal oxide sorbent regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Turk, Brian S.; Gupta, Raghubir P.

    1999-01-01

    A process of regenerating a sulfided sorbent is provided. According to the process of the invention, a substantial portion of the energy necessary to initiate the regeneration reaction is provided by the combustion of a particulate metal sulfide additive. In using the particulate metal sulfide additive, the oxygen-containing gas used to regenerate the sulfided sorbent can be fed to the regeneration zone without heating or at a lower temperature than used in conventional processes wherein the regeneration reaction is initiated only by heating the oxygen-containing. The particulate metal sulfide additive is preferably an inexpensive mineral ore such as iron pyrite which does not adversely affect the regeneration or corresponding desulfurization reactions. The invention further includes a sorbent composition comprising the particulate metal sulfide additive in admixture with an active metal oxide sorbent capable of removing one or more sulfur compounds from a sulfur-containing gas stream.

  2. Metal sulfide initiators for metal oxide sorbent regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Turk, B.S.; Gupta, R.P.

    1999-06-22

    A process of regenerating a sulfided sorbent is provided. According to the process of the invention, a substantial portion of the energy necessary to initiate the regeneration reaction is provided by the combustion of a particulate metal sulfide additive. In using the particulate metal sulfide additive, the oxygen-containing gas used to regenerate the sulfided sorbent can be fed to the regeneration zone without heating or at a lower temperature than used in conventional processes wherein the regeneration reaction is initiated only by heating the oxygen-containing gas. The particulate metal sulfide additive is preferably an inexpensive mineral ore such as iron pyrite which does not adversely affect the regeneration or corresponding desulfurization reactions. The invention further includes a sorbent composition comprising the particulate metal sulfide additive in admixture with an active metal oxide sorbent capable of removing one or more sulfur compounds from a sulfur-containing gas stream. 1 fig.

  3. Reactivity of inorganic sulfide species toward a heme protein model.

    PubMed

    Bieza, Silvina A; Boubeta, Fernando; Feis, Alessandro; Smulevich, Giulietta; Estrin, Darío A; Boechi, Leonardo; Bari, Sara E

    2015-01-20

    The reactivity of inorganic sulfide species toward heme peptides was explored under biorelevant conditions in order to unravel the molecular details of the reactivity of the endogenous hydrogen sulfide toward heme proteins. Unlike ferric porphyrinates, which are reduced by inorganic sulfide, some heme proteins can form stable Fe(III)-sulfide adducts. To isolate the protein factors ruling the redox chemistry, we used as a system model, the undecapeptide microperoxidase (MP11), a heme peptide derived from cytochrome c proteolysis that retains the proximal histidine bound to the Fe(III) atom. Upon addition of gaseous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) at pH 6.8, the UV-vis spectra of MP11 closely resembled those of the low-spin ferric hydroxo complex (only attained at an alkaline pH) and cysteine or alkylthiol derivatives, suggesting that the Fe(III) reduction was prevented. The low-frequency region of the resonance Raman spectrum revealed the presence of an Fe(III)-S band at 366 cm(-1) and the general features of a low-spin hexacoordinated heme. Anhydrous sodium sulfide (Na2S) was the source of sulfide of choice for the kinetic evaluation of the process. Theoretical calculations showed no distal stabilization mechanisms for bound sulfide species in MP11, highlighting a key role of the proximal histidine for the stabilization of the Fe(III)-S adducts of heme compounds devoid of distal counterparts, which is significant with regard to the biochemical reactivity of endogenous hydrogen sulfide.

  4. Influence of iron on sulfide inhibition in dark biohydrogen fermentation.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Bipro Ranjan; Elbeshbishy, Elsayed; Nakhla, George

    2012-12-01

    Sulfide impact on biohydrogen production using dark fermentation of glucose at 37 °C was investigated. Dissolved sulfide (S(2-)) at a low concentration (25mg/L) increased biohydrogen production by 54% relative to the control (without iron addition). Whereas on initial dissolved S(2-) concentration of 500 mg/L significantly inhibited the biohydrogen production with total cumulative biohydrogen decreasing by 90% compared to the control (without iron addition). At sulfide concentrations of 500 mg S(2-)/L, addition of Fe(2+) at 3-4 times the theoretical requirement to precipitate 100% of the dissolved S(2-) entirely eliminated the inhibitory effect of sulfide.

  5. Hydrogen sulfide inhibits the renal fibrosis of obstructive nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Song, Kai; Wang, Fen; Li, Qian; Shi, Yong-Bing; Zheng, Hui-Fen; Peng, Hanjing; Shen, Hua-Ying; Liu, Chun-Feng; Hu, Li-Fang

    2014-06-01

    Hydrogen sulfide has recently been found decreased in chronic kidney disease. Here we determined the effect and underlying mechanisms of hydrogen sulfide on a rat model of unilateral ureteral obstruction. Compared with normal rats, obstructive injury decreased the plasma hydrogen sulfide level. Cystathionine-β-synthase, a hydrogen sulfide-producing enzyme, was dramatically reduced in the ureteral obstructed kidney, but another enzyme cystathionine-γ-lyase was increased. A hydrogen sulfide donor (sodium hydrogen sulfide) inhibited renal fibrosis by attenuating the production of collagen, extracellular matrix, and the expression of α-smooth muscle actin. Meanwhile, the infiltration of macrophages and the expression of inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in the kidney were also decreased. In cultured kidney fibroblasts, a hydrogen sulfide donor inhibited the cell proliferation by reducing DNA synthesis and downregulating the expressions of proliferation-related proteins including proliferating cell nuclear antigen and c-Myc. Further, the hydrogen sulfide donor blocked the differentiation of quiescent renal fibroblasts to myofibroblasts by inhibiting the transforming growth factor-β1-Smad and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. Thus, low doses of hydrogen sulfide or its releasing compounds may have therapeutic potentials in treating chronic kidney disease.

  6. Recent advances in thiol and sulfide reactive probes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Peng, Hanjing; Wang, Binghe

    2014-06-01

    Because of the biological relevance of thiols and sulfides such as cysteine, homocysteine, glutathione and hydrogen sulfide, their detection has attracted a great deal of research interest. Fluorescent probes are emerging as a new strategy for thiol and hydrogen sulfide analysis due to their high sensitivity, low cost, and ability to detect and image thiols in biological samples. In this short review, we have summarized recent advances in the development of thiol and hydrogen sulfide reactive fluorescent probes. These probes are compared and contrasted with regard to their designing strategies, mechanisms, photophysical properties, and/or reaction kinetics. Biological applications of these probes are also discussed.

  7. Discovery and Characterization of Iron Sulfide and Polyphosphate Bodies Coexisting in Archaeoglobus fulgidus Cells

    PubMed Central

    Toso, Daniel B.; Javed, Muhammad Mohsin; Czornyj, Elizabeth; Zhou, Z. Hong

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic storage granules have long been recognized in bacterial and eukaryotic cells but were only recently identified in archaeal cells. Here, we report the cellular organization and chemical compositions of storage granules in the Euryarchaeon, Archaeoglobus fulgidus strain VC16, a hyperthermophilic, anaerobic, and sulfate-reducing microorganism. Dense granules were apparent in A. fulgidus cells imaged by cryo electron microscopy (cryoEM) but not so by negative stain electron microscopy. Cryo electron tomography (cryoET) revealed that each cell contains one to several dense granules located near the cell membrane. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) show that, surprisingly, each cell contains not just one but often two types of granules with different elemental compositions. One type, named iron sulfide body (ISB), is composed mainly of the elements iron and sulfur plus copper; and the other one, called polyphosphate body (PPB), is composed of phosphorus and oxygen plus magnesium, calcium, and aluminum. PPBs are likely used for energy storage and/or metal sequestration/detoxification. ISBs could result from the reduction of sulfate to sulfide via anaerobic energy harvesting pathways and may be associated with energy and/or metal storage or detoxification. The exceptional ability of these archaeal cells to sequester different elements may have novel bioengineering applications. PMID:27194953

  8. Catalytic dehydrogenation of alcohol over solid-state molybdenum sulfide clusters with an octahedral metal framework

    SciTech Connect

    Kamiguchi, Satoshi; Okumura, Kazu; Nagashima, Sayoko; Chihara, Teiji

    2015-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Solid-state molybdenum sulfide clusters catalyzed the dehydrogenation of alcohol. • The dehydrogenation proceeded without the addition of any oxidants. • The catalytic activity developed when the cluster was activated at 300–500 °C in H{sub 2}. • The Lewis-acidic molybdenum atom and basic sulfur ligand were catalytically active. • The clusters function as bifunctional acid–base catalysts. - Abstract: Solid-state molybdenum sulfide clusters with an octahedral metal framework, the superconducting Chevrel phases, are applied to catalysis. A copper salt of a nonstoichiometric sulfur-deficient cluster, Cu{sub x}Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8–δ} (x = 2.94 and δ ≈ 0.3), is stored in air for more than 90 days. When the oxygenated cluster is thermally activated in a hydrogen stream above 300 °C, catalytic activity for the dehydrogenation of primary alcohols to aldehydes and secondary alcohols to ketones develops. The addition of pyridine or benzoic acid decreases the dehydrogenation activity, indicating that both a Lewis-acidic coordinatively unsaturated molybdenum atom and a basic sulfur ligand synergistically act as the catalytic active sites.

  9. Discovery and Characterization of Iron Sulfide and Polyphosphate Bodies Coexisting in Archaeoglobus fulgidus Cells.

    PubMed

    Toso, Daniel B; Javed, Muhammad Mohsin; Czornyj, Elizabeth; Gunsalus, Robert P; Zhou, Z Hong

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic storage granules have long been recognized in bacterial and eukaryotic cells but were only recently identified in archaeal cells. Here, we report the cellular organization and chemical compositions of storage granules in the Euryarchaeon, Archaeoglobus fulgidus strain VC16, a hyperthermophilic, anaerobic, and sulfate-reducing microorganism. Dense granules were apparent in A. fulgidus cells imaged by cryo electron microscopy (cryoEM) but not so by negative stain electron microscopy. Cryo electron tomography (cryoET) revealed that each cell contains one to several dense granules located near the cell membrane. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) show that, surprisingly, each cell contains not just one but often two types of granules with different elemental compositions. One type, named iron sulfide body (ISB), is composed mainly of the elements iron and sulfur plus copper; and the other one, called polyphosphate body (PPB), is composed of phosphorus and oxygen plus magnesium, calcium, and aluminum. PPBs are likely used for energy storage and/or metal sequestration/detoxification. ISBs could result from the reduction of sulfate to sulfide via anaerobic energy harvesting pathways and may be associated with energy and/or metal storage or detoxification. The exceptional ability of these archaeal cells to sequester different elements may have novel bioengineering applications.

  10. Discovery and Characterization of Iron Sulfide and Polyphosphate Bodies Coexisting in Archaeoglobus fulgidus Cells

    DOE PAGES

    Toso, Daniel B.; Javed, Muhammad Mohsin; Czornyj, Elizabeth; ...

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic storage granules have long been recognized in bacterial and eukaryotic cells but were only recently identified in archaeal cells. Here, we report the cellular organization and chemical compositions of storage granules in the Euryarchaeon, Archaeoglobus fulgidusstrain VC16, a hyperthermophilic, anaerobic, and sulfate-reducing microorganism. Dense granules were apparent inA. fulgiduscells imaged by cryo electron microscopy (cryoEM) but not so by negative stain electron microscopy. Cryo electron tomography (cryoET) revealed that each cell contains one to several dense granules located near the cell membrane. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) show that, surprisingly, each cell containsmore » not just one but often two types of granules with different elemental compositions. One type, named iron sulfide body (ISB), is composed mainly of the elements iron and sulfur plus copper; and the other one, called polyphosphate body (PPB), is composed of phosphorus and oxygen plus magnesium, calcium, and aluminum. PPBs are likely used for energy storage and/or metal sequestration/detoxification. ISBs could result from the reduction of sulfate to sulfide via anaerobic energy harvesting pathways and may be associated with energy and/or metal storage or detoxification. The exceptional ability of these archaeal cells to sequester different elements may have novel bioengineering applications.« less

  11. The application of remote sensing in geobotanical exploration for metal sulfides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masuoka, E. J.; Labovitz, M. L.; Bell, R.; Nelson, R. F.; Broderick, P. W.; Ludwig, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    A field study was conducted in Mineral, VA in 1980-82 to test the suitability of remote sensing techniques for geobotanical exploration. It was found that on trees growing over lead sulfide deposits, buds opened later and leaves were smaller than on trees growing on soils with background levels of lead and copper. This difference in leaf growth could be detected in remotely sensed data. In the spring, the smaller leaf size of metal-stressed trees resulted in a greater contribution from the soil and bark to the total reflectance imaged by the sensor. In the fall, the leaves of metal-stressed oaks sensed earlier than surrounding vegetation, which was also detected in remotely sensed data. It is concluded that vegetation growing on lead sulfide deposits has a shorter growing season than surrounding vegetation on unmineralized soil and that remotely sensed data collected at either end of the growing season can be used to locate geobotanical anomalies associated with these deposits.

  12. Scalable production of microbially mediated zinc sulfide nanoparticles and application to functional thin films.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ji-Won; Ivanov, Ilia N; Joshi, Pooran C; Armstrong, Beth L; Wang, Wei; Jung, Hyunsung; Rondinone, Adam J; Jellison, Gerald E; Meyer, Harry M; Jang, Gyoung Gug; Meisner, Roberta A; Duty, Chad E; Phelps, Tommy J

    2014-10-01

    A series of semiconducting zinc sulfide (ZnS) nanoparticles were scalably, reproducibly, controllably and economically synthesized with anaerobic metal-reducing Thermoanaerobacter species. These bacteria reduced partially oxidized sulfur sources to sulfides that extracellularly and thermodynamically incorporated with zinc ions to produce sparingly soluble ZnS nanoparticles with ∼5nm crystallites at yields of ∼5gl(-1)month(-1). A predominant sphalerite formation was facilitated by rapid precipitation kinetics, a low cation/anion ratio and a higher zinc concentration compared to background to produce a naturally occurring hexagonal form at the low temperature, and/or water adsorption in aqueous conditions. The sphalerite ZnS nanoparticles exhibited narrow size distribution, high emission intensity and few native defects. Scale-up and emission tunability using copper doping were confirmed spectroscopically. Surface characterization was determined using Fourier transform infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies, which confirmed amino acid as proteins and bacterial fermentation end products not only maintaining a nano-dimensional average crystallite size, but also increasing aggregation. The application of ZnS nanoparticle ink to a functional thin film was successfully tested for potential future applications.

  13. Bacterial Killing by Dry Metallic Copper Surfaces▿

    PubMed Central

    Santo, Christophe Espírito; Lam, Ee Wen; Elowsky, Christian G.; Quaranta, Davide; Domaille, Dylan W.; Chang, Christopher J.; Grass, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    Metallic copper surfaces rapidly and efficiently kill bacteria. Cells exposed to copper surfaces accumulated large amounts of copper ions, and this copper uptake was faster from dry copper than from moist copper. Cells suffered extensive membrane damage within minutes of exposure to dry copper. Further, cells removed from copper showed loss of cell integrity. Acute contact with metallic copper surfaces did not result in increased mutation rates or DNA lesions. These findings are important first steps for revealing the molecular sensitive targets in cells lethally challenged by exposure to copper surfaces and provide a scientific explanation for the use of copper surfaces as antimicrobial agents for supporting public hygiene. PMID:21148701

  14. Toxicological analysis of 17 autopsy cases of hydrogen sulfide poisoning resulting from the inhalation of intentionally generated hydrogen sulfide gas.

    PubMed

    Maebashi, Kyoko; Iwadate, Kimiharu; Sakai, Kentaro; Takatsu, Akihiro; Fukui, Kenji; Aoyagi, Miwako; Ochiai, Eriko; Nagai, Tomonori

    2011-04-15

    Although many cases of fatal hydrogen sulfide poisoning have been reported, in most of these cases, it resulted from the accidental inhalation of hydrogen sulfide gas. In recent years, we experienced 17 autopsy cases of fatal hydrogen sulfide poisoning due to the inhalation of intentionally generated hydrogen sulfide gas. In this study, the concentrations of sulfide and thiosulfate in blood, urine, cerebrospinal fluid and pleural effusion were examined using GC/MS. The sulfide concentrations were blood: 0.11-31.84, urine: 0.01-1.28, cerebrospinal fluid: 0.02-1.59 and pleural effusion: 2.00-8.59 (μg/ml), while the thiosulfate concentrations were blood: 0-0.648, urine: 0-2.669, cerebrospinal fluid: 0.004-0.314 and pleural effusion: 0.019-0.140 (μmol/ml). In previous reports, the blood concentration of thiosulfate was said to be higher than that of sulfide in hydrogen sulfide poisoning cases, although the latter was higher than the former in 8 of the 14 cases examined in this study. These results are believed to be strongly influenced by the atmospheric concentration of hydrogen sulfide the victims were exposed to and the time interval between exposure and death.

  15. Evidence supporting biologically mediated sulfide oxidation in hot spring ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, A. D.; Shock, E.

    2011-12-01

    The sulfide concentration of fluids in hydrothermal ecosystems is one of several factors determining the transition to microbial photosynthesis (Cox et al., 2011, Chem. Geol. 280, 344-351). To investigate the loss of sulfide in Yellowstone hot spring systems, measurements of total dissolved sulfide with respect to time were made in incubation experiments conducted on 0.2-micron filtered (killed controls) vs. unfiltered hot spring water at locations with three different pH:sulfide combinations (pH 2.5 with 50 μM sulfide, 5.2 with 5.6 μM sulfide, and 8.3 with 86 μM sulfide). At the higher pH values, the experiments yielded similar rates of sulfide loss in filtered and unfiltered water of approximately 0.8 (pH 5.2) and 7.6 nmol sulfide L-1s-1 (pH 8.3). At the acidic spring, the unfiltered water lost sulfide at a rate 1.6 times that of the filtered water (8.2 vs. 5 nmol sulfide L-1s-1). These results suggest that the pelagic biomass at the pH 5.2 and 8.3 springs may not affect sulfide loss, whereas in the pH 2.5 spring there appears to be an effect. In addition, the incubation of filamentous biomass with unfiltered water increased the rate of sulfide loss by approximately two-fold at a pH of 2.5 (59 vs. 31 nmol L-1s-1; Cox et al., 2011), five-fold at a pH of 5.2 (3.9 vs. 0.8 nmol sulfide L-1s-1), and barely increased the rate of sulfide loss at a pH of 8.3 (9.1 vs. 8.4 nmol sulfide L-1s-1). Sulfide is predominately present as HS- at a pH of 8.3, which may not be taken up as easily by microorganisms as the H2S (aq) that dominates sulfide speciation at pH 2.5 and 5.2. That the loss of sulfide at acidic pH is due to biotic rather than abiotic factors is further supported by studies with whole mat samples that show greater sulfide consumption than killed controls (D'Imperio et al., 2008, AEM 74, 5802-5808). Taken together, the results of these experiments suggest that the majority of sulfide oxidation occurs in the filamentous biomass of hot spring ecosystems, although

  16. Geology of the Fishtie deposit, Central Province, Zambia: iron oxide and copper mineralization in Nguba Group metasedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrickson, Michael D.; Hitzman, Murray W.; Wood, David; Humphrey, John D.; Wendlandt, Richard F.

    2015-08-01

    The Fishtie copper deposit, located in the Central Province of Zambia, contains approximately 55 Mt of 1.04 % Cu at a 0.5 % Cu cut-off in oxide, sulfide, and mixed oxide-sulfide ores. The deposit is hosted in Neoproterozoic diamictites and siltstones of the Grand Conglomérat Formation and overlying Kakontwe Limestone Formation of the lower Nguba Group. The Grand Conglomérat Formation at Fishtie directly overlies basement schists and quartzites. Mineralized zones are located adjacent to high-angle normal faults that appear to control thickness variations in the Grand Conglomérat Formation suggesting synsedimentary fault movement. Iron-rich rocks consisting of nearly monomineralic bands of magnetite and ankerite occur within the Grand Conglomérat Formation. The absence of magnetite-rich clasts in overlying diamictites and the presence of disseminated magnetite, ankerite, and apatite in adjacent diamictites suggest this iron-rich rock formed by replacement of siltstone beds. These magnetite-rich rocks thicken towards normal faults suggesting the faults formed conduits for oxidized hydrothermal solutions. The magnetite-ankerite-quartz rock was overprinted by later hydrothermal alteration and sulfide mineralization. Copper sulfide precipitation was associated with growth of both muscovite and chlorite, together with weak silicification. Sulfides are zoned relative to normal faults with bornite more common in proximity to faults and ore stage pyrite most common in an outer zone with chalcopyrite. Copper sulfides display generally heavy sulfur isotopic values, suggesting sulfide derivation from thermochemical reduction of Neoproterozoic seawater sulfate. Copper mineralized zones in the Grand Conglomérat at Fishtie are megascopically similar to those observed in the newly discovered Kamoa deposit in the southern Democratic Republic of Congo. Alteration and mineralization at Fishtie display lateral zoning relative to normal faults unlike the broad vertical zonation

  17. From Ultrafine Thiolate-Capped Copper Nanoclusters toward Copper Sulfide Nanodiscs: A Thermally-Activated Evolution Route

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-13

    Kim, K . T .; Jeong, Y. J .; Hong, S. H . 1. Mater. Res. 2006, 21 , 2371. (19) Wang, J. ; Huang, H. ; Kesapragada, S. V.; Gall , D . Nano. Lett...1183. ( 21 ) (a) Wang, T.; Yang, W. ; Wu, L. ; Chen, c.; Chu, C. Nanotechnology 2006, 17,7 19. (b) Kim, c.; Gu, W ; Briceno, M. ; Robertson, I. M.; Choi...104, 1206. Matt et al. deposition, 19,20 chemical vapor deposition, 21 y-irradiation,22 UV-light irradiation,23 and sonochemical methods. 24

  18. The use of ERTS-1 images in the search for large sulfide deposits in the Chagai District, Pakistan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Visual examination of color composites was tested under relatively ideal conditions for direct detection of large hydrothermal sulfide deposits at the low-grade porphyry copper deposit at Saindak, western Chagai District, Pakistan. The Saindak deposit is characterized by an elongate zone of easily eroded sulfide-rich rock surrounded by a resistant rim of hornfels and propylitically altered rock. The geomorphic features related to the Saindak deposit are easily distinguished on ERTS-1 images. Attempts to detect a color anomaly using false-color composites were not successful. About 36,000 square km of the western Chagai District were examined on false-color composites for direct evidence of large sulfide deposits. New geologic information acquired from the images was used in conjunction with the known geology to evaluate two previously known proposed areas and to suggest seven additional targets for field checking, one of which is proposed on the basis of tonal anomaly alone. The study also showed that Saindak-type deposits are not likely to be present in some extensive areas of the Chagai District; and also that a rim like that at Saindak does not form if regional metamorphism has increased the resistance of the country rock to erosion.

  19. Influence of various surface pretreatments on adherence of sputtered molybdenum disulfide to silver, gold, copper, and bronze

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1973-01-01

    Solid film lubricants of radio frequency sputtered molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) were applied to silver, gold, copper, and bronze surfaces that had various pretreatments (mechanical polishing, sputter etching, oxidation, and sulfurization). Optical and electron transmission micrographs and electron diffraction patterns were used to interpret the film formation characteristics and to evaluate the sputtering conditions in regard to the film and substrate compatibility. Sputtered MoS2 films flaked and peeled on silver, copper, and bronze surfaces except when the surfaces had been specially oxidized. The flaking and peeling was a result of sulfide compound formation and the corresponding grain growth of the sulfide film. Sputtered MoS2 films showed no peeling and flaking on gold surfaces regardless of surface pretreatment.

  20. Copper and copper-nickel alloys as zebra mussel antifoulants

    SciTech Connect

    Dormon, J.M.; Cottrell, C.M.; Allen, D.G.; Ackerman, J.D.; Spelt, J.K.

    1996-04-01

    Copper has been used in the marine environment for decades as cladding on ships and pipes to prevent biofouling by marine mussels (Mytilus edulis L.). This motivated the present investigation into the possibility of using copper to prevent biofouling in freshwater by both zebra mussels and quagga mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and D. bugensis collectively referred to as zebra mussels). Copper and copper alloy sheet proved to be highly effective in preventing biofouling by zebra mussels over a three-year period. Further studies were conducted with copper and copper-nickel mesh (lattice of expanded metal) and screen (woven wire with a smaller hole size), which reduced the amount of copper used. Copper screen was also found to be strongly biofouling-resistant with respect to zebra mussels, while copper mesh reduced zebra mussel biofouling in comparison to controls, but did not prevent it entirely. Preliminary investigations into the mechanism of copper antifouling, using galvanic couples, indicated that the release of copper ions from the surface of the exposed metal into the surrounding water is directly or indirectly responsible for the biofouling resistance of copper.

  1. Preparation of high purity copper fluoride by fluorinating copper hydroxyfluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. B.; Lundquist, J. R.

    1969-01-01

    Copper fluoride containing no more than 50 ppm of any contaminating element was prepared by the fluorination of copper hydroxyfluoride. The impurity content was obtained by spark source mass spectrometry. High purity copper fluoride is needed as a cathode material for high energy density batteries.

  2. Removal of copper in an integrated sulfate reducing bioreactor-crystallization reactor system.

    PubMed

    Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Hollingsworth, Jeremy; Zhou, Michael S

    2007-02-15

    Removal of copper was investigated using an innovative water treatment system integrating a sulfidogenic bioreactor with a fluidized-bed crystallization reactor containing fine sand to facilitate the recovery of copper as a purified copper-sulfide mineral. The performance of the system was tested using a simulated semiconductor manufacturing wastewater containing high levels of Cu2+ (4-66 mg/L), sulfate, and a mixture of citrate, isopropanol, and polyethylene glycol (Mn 300). Soluble copper removal efficiencies exceeding 99% and effluent copper concentrations averaging 89 micog/L were demonstrated in the two-stage system, with near complete metal removal occurring in the crystallizer. Copper crystals deposited on sand grains were identified as covellite (CuS). The removal of organic constituents did not exceed 70% of the initial chemical oxygen demand due to incomplete degradation of isopropanol and its breakdown product (acetone). Taken as a whole, these results indicate the potential of this novel reactor configuration for the simultaneous removal of heavy metals and organic constituents. The ability of this process to recover heavy metals in a purified form makes it particularly attractive for the treatment of contaminated aqueous streams, including industrial wastewaters and acid mine drainage.

  3. Modeling Sulfides, pH and Hydrogen Sulfide Gas in the Sewers of San Francisco.

    PubMed

    Vollertsen, Jes; Revilla, Nohemy; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning

    2015-11-01

    An extensive measuring campaign targeted on sewer odor problems was undertaken in San Francisco. It was assessed whether a conceptual sewer process model could reproduce the measured concentrations of total sulfide in the wastewater and H2S gas in the sewer atmosphere, and to which degree such simulations have potential for further improving odor and sulfide management. The campaign covered measurement of wastewater sulfide by grab sampling and diurnal sampling, and H2S gas in the sewer atmosphere was logged. The tested model was based on the Wastewater Aerobic/Anaerobic Transformations in Sewers (WATS) sewer process concept, which never had been calibrated to such an extensive dataset. The study showed that the model was capable of reproducing the general levels of wastewater sulfide, wastewater pH, and sewer H2S gas. It could also reproduce the general variability of these parameters, albeit with some uncertainty. It was concluded that the model could be applied for the purpose in mind.

  4. 24-hour urine copper test

    MedlinePlus

    ... associated with providing a urine sample. Alternative Names Quantitative urinary copper Images Copper urine test References McPherson ... for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis ...

  5. Modification of the EIC hydrogen sulfide abatement process to produce valuable by-products. Final report, May 4, 1981-May 4, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Offenhartz, P. O'D.

    1982-06-01

    A program of analytical and experimental studies has been carried out to develop modifications of the CUPROSUL process for the desulfurization of geothermal steam. The objective of the program was to devise practical means to manipulate the chemistry of the process so that the consumption of raw materials could be controlled and a variety of valuable by-products could be produced. The process had been demonstrated, at one-tenth commercial scale, for steam of the Geysers' average composition in a configuration which resulted in essentially complete oxidation of sulfide to sulfate. The ability to control the extent of oxidation would increase process flexibility and extend its range of applicability to steams of widely varying composition. Preliminary market surveys of raw materials required for the process and by-products which could be produced indicated that controlling the oxidation of sulfides to produce elemental sulfur would probably be the preferred process option. Use of lime to treat sulfate-containing purge streams to produce by-product gypsum and ammonia for recycle or sale could also be justified for certain steam compositions. Recovery of ammonium sulfate alone from the purge stream would not normally be justified unless corecovery of other valuable by-products, such as boric acid, was possible at incremental cost. It was found that ferric sulfate was a highly effective, selective oxidant for the controlled oxidation of copper sulfide solids to produce elemental sulfur for sale and copper sulfate for recycle.

  6. Effect of hydrogen sulfide on chemical looping combustion of coal-derived synthesis gas over bentonite-supported metal-oxide oxygen carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, H.J.; Simonyi, T.; Poston, J.; Siriwardane, R.

    2009-09-15

    The effect of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) on the chemical looping combustion of coal-derived synthesis gas with bentonite-supported metal oxides - such as iron oxide, nickel oxide, manganese oxide, and copper oxide - was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). During the reaction with synthesis gas containing H{sub 2}S, metal-oxide oxygen carriers were first reduced by carbon monoxide and hydrogen, and then interacted with H{sub 2}S to form metal sulfide, which resulted in a weight gain during the reduction/sulfidation step. The reduced/sulfurized compounds could be regenerated to form sulfur dioxide and oxides during the oxidation reaction with air. The reduction/oxidation capacities of iron oxide and nickel oxide were not affected by the presence of H{sub 2}S, but both manganese oxide and copper oxide showed decreased reduction/oxidation capacities. However, the rates of reduction and oxidation decreased in the presence of H{sub 2}S for all four metal oxides.

  7. Effect of hydrogen sulfide on chemical looping of coal-derived synthesis gas over bentonite-supported metal---oxide oxygen carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, H.; Simonyi, T.; Poston, J.; Siriwardane, R.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on the chemical looping combustion of coal-derived synthesis gas with bentonite-supported metal oxidesssuch as iron oxide, nickel oxide, manganese oxide, and copper oxideswas investigated by thermogravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). During the reaction with synthesis gas containing H2S, metal-oxide oxygen carriers were first reduced by carbon monoxide and hydrogen, and then interacted with H2S to form metal sulfide, which resulted in a weight gain during the reduction/sulfidation step. The reduced/sulfurized compounds could be regenerated to form sulfur dioxide and oxides during the oxidation reaction with air. The reduction/oxidation capacities of iron oxide and nickel oxide were not affected by the presence of H2S, but both manganese oxide and copper oxide showed decreased reduction/oxidation capacities. However, the rates of reduction and oxidation decreased in the presence of H2S for all four metal oxides.

  8. Impurity Studies in Single Crystal Cadmium Sulfide.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    widths and relative intensities carried out. While studying the exciton emission from pure cadmium sulfide at low temper- atures, Bliel and Broser ...A Ŗ ® tor ® i* or® 0 I jourt! 45 . leeOialdl Split ting Diatitdnl for lon i :d Donor in Cadmni um Sul1$idte AFML-TR-79-4104 B9-19-72(b) H I c CdS...Chem. Phys. 29, 1375 (1958). 4. C. E. Bleil and 1. Broser , Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on the Physics of Semiconductors

  9. High temperature regenerable hydrogen sulfide removal agents

    DOEpatents

    Copeland, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    A system for high temperature desulfurization of coal-derived gases using regenerable sorbents. One sorbent is stannic oxide (tin oxide, SnO.sub.2), the other sorbent is a metal oxide or mixed metal oxide such as zinc ferrite (ZnFe.sub.2 O.sub.4). Certain otherwise undesirable by-products, including hydrogen sulfide (H.sub.2 S) and sulfur dioxide (SO.sub.2) are reused by the system, and elemental sulfur is produced in the regeneration reaction. A system for refabricating the sorbent pellets is also described.

  10. Iron Sulfide Minerals in Black Sea Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, Christine; Robin, Eric; Henkel, Susann; Courtin-Nomade, Alexandra; Bleil, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    This study presents a mutidisciplinary geochemical and environmental magnetic approach, integrating advanced mineralogical techniques to better understand the physicochemical syn-sedimentary and post-depositional processes in the anoxic sediments from the northwestern Black Sea. The investigated gravity core GC 214 was retrieved in 2007 during RV METEOR cruise M72/1 west of the Crimean Peninsula in a water depth of 1686 mbsf. Geochemical analyses of the pore water and solid phase indicate non-steady state sedimentation. The oxygen-depleted water column conditions, anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), and related microbial-driven sulfate reduction favor a highly complex iron sulfide mineral assemblage in the sediment column. The detailed magnetic susceptibility and remanence measurements indicate an irregularly stratified depth profile showing intervals of particularly high values. Further environmental magnetic analyses of hysteresis loops depict strongly elevated coercivity values for those depth horizons, suggesting metastable ferrimagnetic greigite (Fe3S4) as the main magnetic carrier phase. Automated chemical classification (ACC), using electron dispersive spectrometer (EDS) attached to a JEOL 840 scanning electron microscope (SEM) on dispersed particle samples permitted the absolutequantification of the various present iron mineral phases with depth, identified as greigite (Fe3S4), pyrrhotite (Fe7S8), pyrite (FeS2), and monosulfides (FeS), such as troilite or markasite. The statistically stable ACC analyses were carried out on magnetic extracts and density separates to be able to calculate budgets between the different present iron sulfides. We also obtained excellent correlations between the different iron sulfide concentrations and the magnetic signal, which open the possibility to link the absolute particle concentrations to the magnetic signal. Additional synchrotron based micro-XRD analyses on polished sections yield inside into the details of the

  11. Biogenic production of dimethyl sulfide: Krill grazing

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, K.L.; DiTullio, G.R. )

    1993-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfide (DMS), a dominant sulfur compound in sea water, is a possible precursor for cloud condensation nuclei in the atmosphere and may influence global climate. The primary source of DMS is phytoplankton, but the mechanisms remain uncertain, and concentrations of DMS in the ocean vary spatially and temporally. Laboratory studies suggest zooplankton grazing may be an important process leading to the formation of DMS in the ocean. This paper describes ocean studies which examine the suggestion that grazing by krill may be a significant source for DMS production in the antarctic coastal region. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Hydrogen sulfide induces calcium waves in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Yasuo; Tsugane, Mamiko; Oka, Jun-Ichiro; Kimura, Hideo

    2004-03-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) modifies hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and functions as a neuromodulator. Here, we show that H2S increases intracellular Ca2+ and induces Ca2+ waves in primary cultures of astrocytes as well as hippocampal slices. H2S increases the influx of Ca2+ and to a lesser extent causes the release from intracellular Ca2+ stores. Ca2+ waves induced by neuronal excitation as well as responses to exogenously applied H2S are potently blocked by La3+ and Gd3+, inhibitors of Ca2+ channels. These observations suggest that H2S induces Ca2+ waves that propagate to neighboring astrocytes.

  13. Organic Sulfur Gas Production in Sulfidic Caves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, L. A.; Engel, A. S.; Bennett, P. C.

    2001-12-01

    Lower Kane Cave, Big Horn Basin, WY, permits access to an environment where anaerobic sulfide-rich groundwater meets the aerobic vadose zone. At this interface microorganisms thrive on diverse metabolic pathways including autotrophic sulfur oxidation, sulfate reduction, and aerobic heterotrophy. Springs introduce groundwater rich in H2S to the cave where it both degasses into the cave atmosphere and is used by chemautotrophic sulfur oxidizing bacteria in the cave spring and stream habitat. The cave atmosphere in the immediate vicinity of the springs has elevated levels of CO2, H2S and methane, mirroring the higher concentration of H2S and methane in the spring water. The high CO2 concentrations are attenuated toward the two main sources of fresh air, the cave entrance and breathing holes at the rear of the cave. Conventional toxic gas monitors permit estimations of H2S concentrations, but they have severe cross sensitivity with other reduced sulfur gases, and thus are inadequate for characterization of sulfur cave gases. However employment of a field-based GC revealed elevated concentrations of carbonyl sulfide in cave atmosphere. Cultures of microorganisms collected from the cave optimized for enriching fermenters and autotrophic and heterophic sulfate reducing bacteria each produced carbonyl sulfide suggesting a biogenic in origin of the COS in addition to H2S. Enrichment cultures also produced methanethiol (methyl mercaptan) and an additional as yet undetermined volatile organic sulfur compound. In culture, the organo-sulfur compounds were less abundant than H2S, whereas in the cave atmosphere the organo-sulfur compounds were the dominant sulfur gases. Thus, these organo-sulfur gases may prove to be important sources of both reduced sulfur and organic carbon to microorganisms living on the cave wall in a subaerial habitat. Moreover groundwater has not yet been recognized as a source of sulfur gases to the atmosphere, but with the abundance of sulfidic

  14. Agricultural soils spiked with copper mine wastes and copper concentrate: implications for copper bioavailability and bioaccumulation.

    PubMed

    Ginocchio, Rosanna; Sánchez, Pablo; de la Fuente, Luz María; Camus, Isabel; Bustamante, Elena; Silva, Yasna; Urrestarazu, Paola; Torres, Juan C; Rodríguez, Patricio H

    2006-03-01

    A better understanding of exposure to and effects of copper-rich pollutants in soils is required for accurate environmental risk assessment of copper. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to study copper bioavailability and bioaccumulation in agricultural soils spiked with different types of copper-rich mine solid wastes (copper ore, tailing sand, smelter dust, and smelter slag) and copper concentrate. A copper salt (copper sulfate, CuSO4) that frequently is used to assess soil copper bioavailability and phytotoxicity also was included for comparison. Results showed that smelter dust, tailing sand, and CuSO4 are more likely to be bioavailable and, thus, toxic to plants compared with smelter slag, concentrate, and ore at equivalent total copper concentrations. Differences may be explained by intrinsic differences in copper solubilization from the source materials, but also by their capability to decrease soil pH (confounding effect). The copper toxicity and bioaccumulation in plants also varied according to soil physicochemical characteristics (e.g., pH and total organic carbon) and the available levels of plant nutrients, such as nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium. Chemistry/mineralogy of mine materials, soil/pore-water chemistry, and plant physiological status thus should be integrated for building adequate models to predict phytotoxicity and environmental risk of copper.

  15. Copper-phosphorus alloys offer advantages in brazing copper

    SciTech Connect

    Rupert, W.D.

    1996-05-01

    Copper-phosphorus brazing alloys are used extensively for joining copper, especially refrigeration and air-conditioning copper tubing and electrical conductors. What is the effect of phosphorus when alloyed with copper? The following are some of the major effects: (1) It lowers the melt temperature of copper (a temperature depressant). (2) It increases the fluidity of the copper when in the liquid state. (3) It acts as a deoxidant or a fluxing agent with copper. (4) It lowers the ductility of copper (embrittles). There is a misconception that silver improves the ductility of the copper-phosphorus alloys. In reality, silver added to copper acts in a similar manner as phosphorus. The addition of silver to copper lowers the melt temperature (temperature depressant) and decreases the ductility. Fortunately, the rate and amount at which silver lowers copper ductility is significantly less than that of phosphorus. Therefore, taking advantage of the temperature depressant property of silver, a Ag-Cu-P alloy can be selected at approximately the same melt temperature as a Cu-P alloy, but at a lower phosphorus content. The lowering of the phosphorus content actually makes the alloy more ductile, not the silver addition. A major advantage of the copper-phosphorus alloys is the self-fluxing characteristic when joining copper to copper. They may also be used with the addition of a paste flux on brass, bronze, and specialized applications on silver, tungsten and molybdenum. Whether it is selection of the proper BCuP alloy or troubleshooting an existing problem, the suggested approach is a review of the desired phosphorus content in the liquid metal and how it is being altered during application. In torch brazing, a slight change in the oxygen-fuel ratio can affect the joint quality or leak tightness.

  16. High-quality draft genome sequence of Kocuria marina SO9-6, an actinobacterium isolated from a copper mine

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Daniel B.A.; Pereira, Letícia Bianca; Silva, Marcus Vinícius M. e; Silva, Bárbara P. da; Palermo, Bruna Rafaella Z.; Carlos, Camila; Belgini, Daiane R.B.; Limache, Elmer Erasmo G.; Lacerda, Gileno V. Jr; Nery, Mariana B.P.; Gomes, Milene B.; Souza, Salatiel S. de; Silva, Thiago M. da; Rodrigues, Viviane D.; Paulino, Luciana C.; Vicentini, Renato; Ferraz, Lúcio F.C.; Ottoboni, Laura M.M.

    2015-01-01

    An actinobacterial strain, designated SO9-6, was isolated from a copper iron sulfide mineral. The organism is Gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic, and coccoid. Chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic properties were consistent with its classification in the genus Kocuria. Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of Kocuria marina SO9-6 under accession JROM00000000 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nuccore/725823918), which provides insights for heavy metal bioremediation and production of compounds of biotechnological interest. PMID:26484219

  17. High-quality draft genome sequence of Kocuria marina SO9-6, an actinobacterium isolated from a copper mine.

    PubMed

    Castro, Daniel B A; Pereira, Letícia Bianca; Silva, Marcus Vinícius M E; Silva, Bárbara P da; Palermo, Bruna Rafaella Z; Carlos, Camila; Belgini, Daiane R B; Limache, Elmer Erasmo G; Lacerda, Gileno V Jr; Nery, Mariana B P; Gomes, Milene B; Souza, Salatiel S de; Silva, Thiago M da; Rodrigues, Viviane D; Paulino, Luciana C; Vicentini, Renato; Ferraz, Lúcio F C; Ottoboni, Laura M M

    2015-09-01

    An actinobacterial strain, designated SO9-6, was isolated from a copper iron sulfide mineral. The organism is Gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic, and coccoid. Chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic properties were consistent with its classification in the genus Kocuria. Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of Kocuria marina SO9-6 under accession JROM00000000 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nuccore/725823918), which provides insights for heavy metal bioremediation and production of compounds of biotechnological interest.

  18. Diurnal changes in pore water sulfide concentrations in the seagrass Thalassia testudinum beds: the effects of seagrasses on sulfide dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lee; Dunton

    2000-12-20

    The dynamics of the seagrass-sulfide interaction were examined in relation to diel changes in sediment pore water sulfide concentrations in Thalassia testudinum beds and adjacent bare areas in Corpus Christi Bay and lower Laguna Madre, Texas, USA, during July 1996. Pore water sulfide concentrations in seagrass beds were significantly higher than in adjacent bare areas and showed strong diurnal variations; levels significantly decreased during mid-day at shallow sediment depths (0-10 cm) containing high below-ground tissue biomass and surface area. In contrast, diurnal variations in sediment sulfide concentrations were absent in adjacent bare patches, and at deeper (>10 cm) sediment depths characterized by low below-ground plant biomass or when the grasses were experimentally shaded. These observations suggest that the mid-day depressions in sulfide levels are linked to the transport of photosynthetically produced oxygen to seagrass below-ground tissues that fuels sediment sulfide oxidation. Lower sulfide concentrations in bare areas are likely a result of low sulfate reduction rates due to low organic matter available for remineralization. Further, high reoxidation rates due to rapid exchange between anoxic pore water and oxic overlying water are probably stimulated in bare areas by higher current velocity on the sediment surface than in seagrass beds. The dynamics of pore water sulfides in seagrass beds suggest no toxic sulfide intrusion into below-ground tissues during photosynthetic periods and demonstrate that the sediment chemical environment is considerably modified by seagrasses. The reduced sediment sulfide levels in seagrass beds during photosynthetic periods will enhance seagrass production through reduced sulfide toxicity to seagrasses and sediment microorganisms related to the nutrient cycling.

  19. Understanding Cu release into environment from Kure massive sulfide ore deposits, Kastamonu, NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirel, Cansu; Sonmez, Seref; Balci, Nurgul

    2014-05-01

    Covering a wide range on the earth's crust, oxidation of metal sulfide minerals have vital environmental impacts on the aquatic environment, causing one of the major environmental problems known as acid mine drainage (AMD). Located in the Kastamonu province of the Western Black Sea region, Kure district is one of the major copper mining sites in Turkey. Mining activities in the area heads back to ancient times, such that operation is thought to be started with the Roman Empire. Currently, only the underground mining tunnels of Bakibaba and Asikoy are being operated. Thus, mining heaps and ores of those pyritic deposits have been exposed to the oxidative conditions for so long. As a result of weathering processes of past and recent heaps of the Kure volcanic massive sulfide deposits in addition to the main ore mineral (chalcopyrite), significant amount of metals, especially Cu, are being released into the environment creating undesirable environmental conditions. In order to elucidate Cu release mechanisms from Kure pyritic ore deposits and mining wastes, field and laboratory approaches were used. Surface water and sediment samples from the streams around the mining and waste sites were collected. Groundwater samples from the active underground mining site were also collected. Physical parameters (pH, Eh, T°C, and EC) of water samples were determined in situ and in the laboratory using probes (WTW pH 3110, WTW Multi 9310 and CRISON CM 35). Metal and ion concentrations of the water samples were analysed using ICP-MS and DR 2800 spectrophotometer, respectively. High Cu, Co, Zn and Fe concentrations were determined in the water samples with pH values ranging from 2.9- 4. Cu concentrions ranges from 345 ppm to 36 ppm in the water samples. Consistent with the water samples, high Cu, Fe, Zn and Co were also determined in the sediment samples. Laboratory chalcopyrite oxidation experiments under the conditions representing the field site were set up as biological and

  20. Normal state properties of the ternary molybdenum sulfides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollam, J. A.; Alterovitz, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    By making a large number of normal state and superconducting properties measurements, all on the same ternary molybdenum sulfide samples, we obtain values for Fermi surface and superconducting parameters. From these we conclude that sputtered ternary molybdenum sulfides are not completely in the dirty superconductor limit, and that they are d-band metals with a high electron carrier density.

  1. On the chemical biology of the nitrite/sulfide interaction.

    PubMed

    Cortese-Krott, Miriam M; Fernandez, Bernadette O; Kelm, Malte; Butler, Anthony R; Feelisch, Martin

    2015-04-30

    Sulfide (H2S/HS(-)) has been demonstrated to exert an astounding breadth of biological effects, some of which resemble those of nitric oxide (NO). While the chemistry, biochemistry and potential pathophysiology of the cross-talk between sulfide and NO have received considerable attention lately, a comparable assessment of the potential biological implications of an interaction between nitrite and sulfide is lacking. This is surprising inasmuch as nitrite is not only a known bioactive oxidation product of NO, but also efficiently converted to S-nitrosothiols in vivo; the latter have been shown to rapidly react with sulfide in vitro, leading to formation of S/N-hybrid species including thionitrite (SNO(-)) and nitrosopersulfide (SSNO(-)). Moreover, nitrite is used as a potent remedy against sulfide poisoning in the clinic. The chemistry of interaction between nitrite and sulfide or related bioactive metabolites including polysulfides and elemental sulfur has been extensively studied in the past, yet much of this information appears to have been forgotten. In this review, we focus on the potential chemical biology of the interaction between nitrite and sulfide or sulfane sulfur molecules, calling attention to the fundamental chemical properties and reactivities of either species and discuss their possible contribution to the biology, pharmacology and toxicology of both nitrite and sulfide.

  2. 46 CFR 148.285 - Metal sulfide concentrates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Metal sulfide concentrates. 148.285 Section 148.285... MATERIALS THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Special Requirements for Certain Materials § 148.285 Metal sulfide concentrates. (a) When information given by the shipper under § 148.60 of this part indicates that the...

  3. 46 CFR 148.285 - Metal sulfide concentrates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Metal sulfide concentrates. 148.285 Section 148.285... MATERIALS THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Special Requirements for Certain Materials § 148.285 Metal sulfide concentrates. (a) When information given by the shipper under § 148.60 of this part indicates that the...

  4. 46 CFR 148.285 - Metal sulfide concentrates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Metal sulfide concentrates. 148.285 Section 148.285... MATERIALS THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Special Requirements for Certain Materials § 148.285 Metal sulfide concentrates. (a) When information given by the shipper under § 148.60 of this part indicates that the...

  5. 46 CFR 148.285 - Metal sulfide concentrates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Metal sulfide concentrates. 148.285 Section 148.285... MATERIALS THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Special Requirements for Certain Materials § 148.285 Metal sulfide concentrates. (a) When information given by the shipper under § 148.60 of this part indicates that the...

  6. High adherence copper plating process

    DOEpatents

    Nignardot, H.

    1993-09-21

    A process is described for applying copper to a substrate of aluminum or steel by electrodeposition and for preparing the surface of an aluminum or steel substrate for the electrodeposition of copper. Practice of the invention provides good adhesion of the copper layer to either substrate.

  7. Mechanical properties of gutta-percha sulfide modified asphalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, X. Y.; Gu, X. Y.; Wang, X. W.

    2017-01-01

    Gutta-percha is the isomer of caoutchouc and can be used to enhance the performance of asphalt. In this paper, the produce proceedings of gutta-percha sulfide and gutta-percha sulfide modified asphalt are introduced. The performance indices of gutta-percha sulfide modified asphalt samples with different proportions are examined based on laboratory tests and the optimum ratio of gutta-percha and sulfur is decided.The micromechanism, temperature sensitivity, high and low temperature properties and viscoelasticity of the polymer modified asphalt are analyzed to discuss the modified mechanism and to decide the optimal polymer content. Low temperature bending tests are carried out to verify the low temperature performance of gutta-percha sulfide modified asphalt mixture. Research results showed that gutta-percha sulfide modified asphalt has good low temperature performance and a promising application prospect in the cold regions.

  8. The Hydrolysis of Carbonyl Sulfide at Low Temperature: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shunzheng; Yi, Honghong; Tang, Xiaolong; Jiang, Shanxue; Gao, Fengyu; Zhang, Bowen; Zuo, Yanran; Wang, Zhixiang

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic hydrolysis technology of carbonyl sulfide (COS) at low temperature was reviewed, including the development of catalysts, reaction kinetics, and reaction mechanism of COS hydrolysis. It was indicated that the catalysts are mainly involved metal oxide and activated carbon. The active ingredients which can load on COS hydrolysis catalyst include alkali metal, alkaline earth metal, transition metal oxides, rare earth metal oxides, mixed metal oxides, and nanometal oxides. The catalytic hydrolysis of COS is a first-order reaction with respect to carbonyl sulfide, while the reaction order of water changes as the reaction conditions change. The controlling steps are also different because the reaction conditions such as concentration of carbonyl sulfide, reaction temperature, water-air ratio, and reaction atmosphere are different. The hydrolysis of carbonyl sulfide is base-catalyzed reaction, and the force of the base site has an important effect on the hydrolysis of carbonyl sulfide. PMID:23956697

  9. Physical and microstructural aspects of iron sulfide degradation in concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Thomas; Gallucci, Emanuel; Scrivener, Karen

    2011-03-15

    The microstructural aspects of iron sulfide degradation in dam concrete were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) in both dam concrete samples and laboratory concrete. The results show that iron sulfide inclusions with a diameter of a few micrometers in the aggregates are reactive and appear to generate expansion first in the aggregates and consequently in the cement paste. The expansion from the iron sulfides is a consequence of the increase in volume of the reaction products formed. The types of iron sulfide present in the aggregate, mainly pyrrhotite (FeS) and pyrite (FeS{sub 2}), show similar reaction behavior in the aggregates. The released sulfate can lead to a secondary ettringite formation in the concrete matrix, but the degradation associated with this appears to be minor. The reaction of the iron sulfides was found to be very slow even when laboratory samples were exposed to elevated temperatures.

  10. Kinetics of thermal synthesis of cerium sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbard, Kevin B.; Allahar, Kerry N.; Kolman, David; Butt, Darryl P.

    2008-09-01

    One of the most promising applications for cerium sulfide is as a refractory for molten metal processing, particularly for reactive actinides. Separate processes were used to synthesize cerium monosulfide, cerium sesquisulfide (Ce 2S 3) and cerium hydride (CeH 2). High purity Ce 2S 3 was produced by reacting ceria (CeO 2) and hydrogen sulfide (H 2S) in an induction furnace using a carbon catalyst at temperatures above 2000 °C. CeH 2 was synthesized from cerium metal and hydrogen gas at 100 °C. Ce 2S 3 and CeH 2 were subsequently reacted together in an induction furnace at temperatures above 1700 °C to produce CeS. X-ray diffraction was used to analyze synthesized samples and the kinetics of the CeS synthesis reaction was modeled using a diffusion-limited reaction model. The activation energy for the process was estimated to be 190 kJ/mol.

  11. Normal state of metallic hydrogen sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashov, N. A.; Kutukov, A. A.; Mazur, E. A.

    2017-02-01

    A generalized theory of the normal properties of metals in the case of electron-phonon (EP) systems with a nonconstant density of electron states has been used to study the normal state of the SH3 and SH2 phases of hydrogen sulfide at different pressures. The frequency dependence of the real Re Σ (ω) and imaginary ImΣ (ω) parts of the self-energy Σ (ω) part (SEP) of the Green's function of the electron Σ (ω), real part Re Z (ω), and imaginary part Im Z (ω) of the complex renormalization of the mass of the electron; the real part Re χ (ω) and the imaginary part Imχ (ω) of the complex renormalization of the chemical potential; and the density of electron states N (ɛ) renormalized by strong electron-phonon interaction have been calculated. Calculations have been carried out for the stable orthorhombic structure (space group Im3¯ m) of the hydrogen sulfide SH3 for three values of the pressure P = 170, 180, and 225 GPa; and for an SH2 structure with a symmetry of I4/ mmm ( D4 h1¯7) for three values of pressure P = 150, 180, and 225 GP at temperature T = 200 K.

  12. Hydrogen sulfide and polysulfides as biological mediators.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hideo

    2014-10-09

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is recognized as a biological mediator with various roles such as neuromodulation, regulation of the vascular tone, cytoprotection, anti-inflammation, oxygen sensing, angiogenesis, and generation of mitochondrial energy. It is produced by cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3MST). The activity of CBS is enhanced by S-adenosyl methionine (SAM) and glutathionylation, while it is inhibited by nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO). The activity of CSE and cysteine aminotransferase (CAT), which produces the 3MST substrate 3-mercaptopyruvate (3MP), is regulated by Ca2+. H2S is oxidized to thiosulfate in mitochondria through the sequential action of sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR), sulfur dioxygenase, and rhodanese. The rates of the production and clearance of H2S determine its cellular concentration. Polysulfides (H2Sn) have been found to occur in the brain and activate transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channels, facilitate the translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) to the nucleus, and suppress the activity of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) by sulfurating (sulfhydrating) the target cysteine residues. A cross talk between H2S and NO also plays an important role in cardioprotection as well as regulation of the vascular tone. H2S, polysulfides, and their cross talk with NO may mediate various physiological and pathophysiological responses.

  13. Carbonyl sulfide: No remedy for global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taubman, Steven J.; Kasting, James F.

    1995-04-01

    The enhancement of the stratospheric aerosol layer caused by the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo (June 15, 1991), and the subsequent cooling of the earth's lower atmosphere [Dutton and Christy, 1992; Minnis et al., 1993] shows that stratospheric aerosols can have a strong effect on the earth's climate. This supports the notion that the intentional enhancement of the stratospheric aerosol layer through increased carbonyl sulfide (OCS) emissions might be an effective means for counteracting global warming. Through the use of a one-dimensional photochemical model, we investigate what effect such a program might have on global average stratospheric ozone. In addition, we consider the impact of enhanced OCS emissions on rainwater acidity and on the overall health of both plants and animals. We find that while the warming produced by a single CO2 doubling (1 to 4°C) might be offset with ozone losses of less than 5%, any attempt to use carbonyl sulfide as a permanent solution to global warming could result in depletion of global average ozone by 30% or more. We estimate that in order to achieve cooling of 4°C rainwater pH would fall to between 3.5 and 3.8. Finally, a 4°C cooling at the surface will require that ambient near ground OCS levels rise to above 10 ppmv which is probably greater than the safe exposure limit for humans. Thus, enhanced OCS emissions do not provide an environmentally acceptable solution to the problem of global warming.

  14. Brazing copper to dispersion-strengthened copper

    SciTech Connect

    Ryding, D.G.; Allen, D.; Lee, R.

    1996-08-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a state-of-the-art synchrotron light source that will produce intense x-ray beams, which will allow the study of smaller samples and faster reactions and processes at a greater level of detail that has been possible to date. The beam is produced by using third-generation insertion devices in a 7 GeV electron/positron storage ring that is 1100 meters in circumference. The heat load from these intense high power devices is very high and certain components must sustain total heat loads of 3 to 15 kW and heat fluxes of 30 W/mm{sup 2}. Because the beams will cycle on and off many times, thermal shock and fatigue will be a problem. High heat flux impinging on a small area causes a large thermal gradient that results in high stress. GlidCop{reg_sign}, a dispersion strengthened copper, is the desired material because of its high thermal conductivity and superior mechanical properties as compared to copper and its alloys. GlidCop is not amenable to joining by fusion welding, and brazing requires diligence because of high diffusivity. Brazing procedures were developed using optical and scanning electron microscopy.

  15. Precursors for formation of copper selenide, indium selenide, copper indium diselenide, and/or copper indium gallium diselenide films

    DOEpatents

    Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alexander; Van Hest, Maikel; Ginley, David S

    2014-11-04

    Liquid-based precursors for formation of Copper Selenide, Indium Selenide, Copper Indium Diselenide, and/or copper Indium Galium Diselenide include copper-organoselenides, particulate copper selenide suspensions, copper selenide ethylene diamine in liquid solvent, nanoparticulate indium selenide suspensions, and indium selenide ethylene diamine coordination compounds in solvent. These liquid-based precursors can be deposited in liquid form onto substrates and treated by rapid thermal processing to form crystalline copper selenide and indium selenide films.

  16. Measurement and biological significance of the volatile sulfur compounds hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide in various biological matrices.

    PubMed

    Tangerman, Albert

    2009-10-15

    This review deals with the measurement of the volatile sulfur compounds hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol and dimethyl sulfide in various biological matrices of rats and humans (blood, serum, tissues, urine, breath, feces and flatus). Hydrogen sulfide and methanethiol both contain the active thiol (-SH) group and appear in the free gaseous form, in the acid-labile form and in the dithiothreitol-labile form. Dimethyl sulfide is a neutral molecule and exists only in the free form. The foul odor of these sulfur volatiles is a striking characteristic and plays a major role in bad breath, feces and flatus. Because sulfur is a biologically active element, the biological significance of the sulfur volatiles are also highlighted. Despite its highly toxic properties, hydrogen sulfide has been lately recommended to become the third gasotransmitter, next to nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, based on high concentration found in healthy tissues, such as blood and brain. However, there is much doubt about the reliability of the assay methods used. Many artifacts in the sulfide assays exist. The methods to detect the various forms of hydrogen sulfide are critically reviewed and compared with findings of our group. Recent findings that free gaseous hydrogen sulfide is absent in whole blood urged the need to revisit its role as a blood-borne signaling molecule.

  17. DISSOLUTION OF PLUTONIUM CONTAINING CARRIER PRECIPITATE BY CARBONATE METATHESIS AND SEPARATION OF SULFIDE IMPURITIES THEREFROM BY SULFIDE PRECIPITATION

    DOEpatents

    Duffield, R.B.

    1959-07-14

    A process is described for recovering plutonium from foreign products wherein a carrier precipitate of lanthanum fluoride containing plutonium is obtained and includes the steps of dissolving the carrier precipitate in an alkali metal carbonate solution, adding a soluble sulfide, separating the sulfide precipitate, adding an alkali metal hydroxide, separating the resulting precipitate, washing, and dissolving in a strong acid.

  18. Creative Copper Crests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knab, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how to create an art activity that would link the computer-created business cards of fourth-grade students with an upcoming school-wide medieval event. Creating family crests from copper foil would be a great connection, since they, like business cards, are an individual's way to identify themselves to others.…

  19. Incorporating bioavailability into management limits for copper in sediments contaminated by antifouling paint used in aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Stuart L; Spadaro, David A; O'Brien, Dom

    2013-11-01

    Although now well embedded within many risk-based sediment quality guideline (SQG) frameworks, contaminant bioavailability is still often overlooked in assessment and management of contaminated sediments. To optimise management limits for metal contaminated sediments, we assess the appropriateness of a range methods for modifying SQGs based on bioavailability considerations. The impairment of reproduction of the amphipod, Melita plumulosa, and harpacticoid copepod, Nitocra spinipes, was assessed for sediments contaminated with copper from antifouling paint, located below aquaculture cages. The measurement of dilute acid-extractable copper (AE-Cu) was found to provide the most useful means for monitoring the risks posed by sediment copper and setting management limits. Acid-volatile sulfide was found to be ineffective as a SQG-modifying factor as these organisms live mostly at the more oxidised sediment water interface. SQGs normalised to %-silt/organic carbon were effective, but the benefits gained were too small to justify this approach. The effectiveness of SQGs based on AE-Cu was attributed to a small portion of the total copper being present in potentially bioavailable forms (typically<10% of the total). Much of the non-bioavailable form of copper was likely present as paint flakes in the form of copper (I) oxide, the active ingredient of the antifoulant formulation. While the concentrations of paint-associated copper are very high in some sediments, as the transformation of this form of copper to AE-Cu appears slow, monitoring and management limits should assess the more bioavailable AE-Cu forms, and further efforts be made to limit the release of paint particles into the environment.

  20. Atomic layer deposition of aluminum sulfide thin films using trimethylaluminum and hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Soumyadeep; Sarkar, Shaibal K.; Mahuli, Neha

    2015-01-15

    Sequential exposures of trimethylaluminum and hydrogen sulfide are used to deposit aluminum sulfide thin films by atomic layer deposition (ALD) in the temperature ranging from 100 to 200 °C. Growth rate of 1.3 Å per ALD cycle is achieved by in-situ quartz crystal microbalance measurements. It is found that the growth rate per ALD cycle is highly dependent on the purging time between the two precursors. Increased purge time results in higher growth rate. Surface limited chemistry during each ALD half cycle is studied by in-situ Fourier transformed infrared vibration spectroscopy. Time of flight secondary ion-mass spectroscopy measurement is used to confirm elemental composition of the deposited films.