Science.gov

Sample records for copy images ii

  1. Teaching Ad Copy--I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welty, Ward; Vanden Bergh, Bruce G.

    1981-01-01

    Ward Welty notes that the standard advertising course could be improved by including a unit of study in rhetoric, especially Aristotelian rhetoric. Bruce Vanden Bergh reports on research on the differences in creating advertising copy for radio versus the visual media of magazines, newspapers, and television. (RL)

  2. Copy-move forgery detection in digital image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alamro, Loai; Yusoff, Nooraini

    2016-08-01

    Copy-move is considered as one of the most popular kind of digital image tempering, in which one or more parts of a digital image are copied and pasted into different locations. Geometric transformation is among the major challenges in detecting copy-move forgery of a digital image. In such forgery, the copied and moved parts of a forged image are either rotated or/and re-scaled. Hence, in this study we propose a combination of Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) and Speeded Up Robust Features (SURF) to detect a copy-move activity. The experiments results prove that the proposed method is superior with overall accuracy 95%. The copy-move attacks in digital image has been successfully detected and the method is also can detect the fraud parts exposed to rotation and scaling issue.

  3. Detecting Copy Move Forgery In Digital Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Ashima; Saxena, Nisheeth; Vasistha, S. K.

    2012-03-01

    In today's world several image manipulation software's are available. Manipulation of digital images has become a serious problem nowadays. There are many areas like medical imaging, digital forensics, journalism, scientific publications, etc, where image forgery can be done very easily. To determine whether a digital image is original or doctored is a big challenge. To find the marks of tampering in a digital image is a challenging task. The detection methods can be very useful in image forensics which can be used as a proof for the authenticity of a digital image. In this paper we propose the method to detect region duplication forgery by dividing the image into overlapping block and then perform searching to find out the duplicated region in the image.

  4. Copy-move forgery detection from printed images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amerini, Irene; Caldelli, Roberto; Del Bimbo, Alberto; Di Fuccia, Andrea; Saravo, Luigi; Rizzo, Anna Paola

    2014-02-01

    Counterfeiting digital images through a copy-move forgery is one of the most common ways of manipulating the semantic content of a picture, whereby a portion of the image is copy-pasted elsewhere into the same image. It could happen, however, instead of a digital image only its analog version may be available. Scanned or recaptured (by a digital camera) printed documents are widely used in a number of different scenarios, for example a photo published on a newspaper or a magazine. In this paper, the problem of detecting and localizing copy-move forgeries from a printed picture is focused. The copy-move manipulation is detected by verifying the presence of duplicated patches in the scanned image by using a SIFT-based method, tailored for printed image case. Printing and scanning/recapturing scenario is quite challenging because it involves different kinds of distortions. The goal is to experimentally investigate the requirement set under which reliable copy-move forgery detection is possible. We carry out a series of experiments, to pursue all the different issues involved in this application scenario by considering diverse kinds of print and re-acquisition circumstances. Experimental results point out that forgery detection is still successful though with reduced performances, as expected.

  5. Review of hard copy systems for digital medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apple, Bernard A.; Tennant, Mark H.; Thomas, Jule W., Jr.

    1996-03-01

    In this paper we review image requirements and the potential use of various printing technologies to record digital diagnostic radiographic information. An analysis of limitations and advantages of alternate imaging systems compared to current laser imager/silver halide film systems will be presented. The future move to digital radiology along with its hard copy requirements will also be discussed. The winning technologies in the market place will be determined by their ability to provide adequate image quality at low cost while meeting productivity, durability, and convenience requirements. The first technology to meet these requirements will have a tremendous advantage in the market place. Medical imaging hard copy is dominated by the use of silver halide media providing monochrome images of diagnostic image quality. As new digital medical imaging modalities have emerged they have opened the door to new hard copy technologies. These new technologies have been born and nurtured outside the medical market by small markets with high image quality requirements or by large markets with lower image quality requirements. The former have tended to provide high cost, high quality solutions and the latter low cost, low quality solutions. Silver halide media still dominates, at least in part, because it provides high image quality at a relatively low cost. Yet, the trend away from wet silver halide is evident. These new hard copy technologies are being tested to determine their applicability to the medical market and are finding niches where they provide value. A clear winner that provides the required image quality at low cost has yet to emerge.

  6. Photographic copy of computer enhanced color photographic image. Photographer and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of computer enhanced color photographic image. Photographer and computer draftsman unknown. Original photographic image located in the office of Modjeski and Masters, Consulting Engineers at 1055 St. Charles Avenue, New Orleans, LA 70130. COMPUTER ENHANCED COLOR PHOTOGRAPH SHOWING THE PROPOSED HUEY P. LONG BRIDGE WIDENING LOOKING FROM THE WEST BANK TOWARD THE EAST BANK. - Huey P. Long Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River approximately midway between nine & twelve mile points upstream from & west of New Orleans, Jefferson, Jefferson Parish, LA

  7. Type II dehydroquinase: molecular replacement with many copies

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Kirsty Anne; Robinson, David Alexander; Lapthorn, Adrian Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    Type II dehydroquinase is a small (150-amino-acid) protein which in solution packs together to form a dodecamer with 23 cubic symmetry. In crystals of this protein the symmetry of the biological unit can be coincident with the crystallographic symmetry, giving rise to cubic crystal forms with a single monomer in the asymmetric unit. In crystals where this is not the case, multiple copies of the monomer are present, giving rise to significant and often confusing noncrystallographic symmetry in low-symmetry crystal systems. These different crystal forms pose a variety of challenges for solution by molecular replacement. Three examples of structure solutions, including a highly unusual triclinic crystal form with 16 dodecamers (192 monomers) in the unit cell, are described. Four commonly used molecular-replacement packages are assessed against two of these examples, one of high symmetry and the other of low symmetry; this study highlights how program performance can vary significantly depending on the given problem. In addition, the final refined structure of the 16-dodecamer triclinic crystal form is analysed and shown not to be a superlattice structure, but rather an F-centred cubic crystal with frustrated crystallographic symmetry. PMID:18094474

  8. Aviation Pilot Training I & II. Flight Syllabus. Field Review Copy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Upchurch, Richard

    This guide for aviation pilot training I and II begins with a course description, resource information, and a course outline. The syllabus is designed to be used concurrently with the ground school program. A minimum of 29 flights are scheduled with a minimum of 40 hours total flight time. Tasks/competencies are categorized into five concept/duty…

  9. Detecting of copy-move forgery in digital images using fractional Fourier transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Renqing; Bai, Zhengyao; Yin, Liguo; Gao, Hao

    2015-07-01

    Copy-move forgery is one of the most simple and commonly used forging methods, where a part of image itself is copied and pasted on another part of the same image. This paper presents a new approach for copy-move forgery detection where fractional Fourier transform (FRFT) is used. First, the 1-level discrete wavelet transform (DWT) of the forged image is to reduce its dimension. Next, the low frequency the sub-band is divided into overlapped blocks of equal size. The fractional Fourier transform of each block is calculated and the vector of the coefficients is constructed. All feature vectors are sorted using lexicographical order. Finally, the difference of adjacent feature vectors is evaluated and employed to locate the duplicated regions which have the same feature vectors. Experimental results show that the proposed method is effective in detection of the copy-move forgery regions.

  10. Passive detection of copy-move forgery in digital images: state-of-the-art.

    PubMed

    Al-Qershi, Osamah M; Khoo, Bee Ee

    2013-09-10

    Currently, digital images and videos have high importance because they have become the main carriers of information. However, the relative ease of tampering with images and videos makes their authenticity untrustful. Digital image forensics addresses the problem of the authentication of images or their origins. One main branch of image forensics is passive image forgery detection. Images could be forged using different techniques, and the most common forgery is the copy-move, in which a region of an image is duplicated and placed elsewhere in the same image. Active techniques, such as watermarking, have been proposed to solve the image authenticity problem, but those techniques have limitations because they require human intervention or specially equipped cameras. To overcome these limitations, several passive authentication methods have been proposed. In contrast to active methods, passive methods do not require any previous information about the image, and they take advantage of specific detectable changes that forgeries can bring into the image. In this paper, we describe the current state-of-the-art of passive copy-move forgery detection methods. The key current issues in developing a robust copy-move forgery detector are then identified, and the trends of tackling those issues are addressed.

  11. Image copy-move forgery detection based on polar cosine transform and approximate nearest neighbor searching.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuenan

    2013-01-10

    Copy-move is one of the most commonly used image tampering operation, where a part of image content is copied and then pasted to another part of the same image. In order to make the forgery visually convincing and conceal its trace, the copied part may subject to post-processing operations such as rotation and blur. In this paper, we propose a polar cosine transform and approximate nearest neighbor searching based copy-move forgery detection algorithm. The algorithm starts by dividing the image into overlapping patches. Robust and compact features are extracted from patches by taking advantage of the rotationally-invariant and orthogonal properties of the polar cosine transform. Potential copy-move pairs are then detected by identifying the patches with similar features, which is formulated as approximate nearest neighbor searching and accomplished by means of locality-sensitive hashing (LSH). Finally, post-verifications are performed on potential pairs to filter out false matches and improve the accuracy of forgery detection. To sum up, the LSH based similar patch identification and the post-verification methods are two major novelties of the proposed work. Experimental results reveal that the proposed work can produce accurate detection results, and it exhibits high robustness to various post-processing operations. In addition, the LSH based similar patch detection scheme is much more effective than the widely used lexicographical sorting.

  12. Aviation Pilot Training II. Task Analyses: [Year II.] Field Review Copy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Upchurch, Richard

    This guide for aviation pilot II training begins with a course description, resource information, and a course outline. Tasks/competencies are categorized into 10 concept/duty areas: understanding aircraft staffs and procedures for safe recovery; understanding procedures for constant altitude turns; understanding procedures for traffic pattern…

  13. Research on Copy-Move Image Forgery Detection Using Features of Discrete Polar Complex Exponential Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Yanfen; Zhong, Junliu

    2015-12-01

    With the aid of sophisticated photo-editing software, such as Photoshop, copy-move image forgery operation has been widely applied and has become a major concern in the field of information security in the modern society. A lot of work on detecting this kind of forgery has gained great achievements, but the detection results of geometrical transformations of copy-move regions are not so satisfactory. In this paper, a new method based on the Polar Complex Exponential Transform is proposed. This method addresses issues in image geometric moment, focusing on constructing rotation invariant moment and extracting features of the rotation invariant moment. In order to reduce rounding errors of the transform from the Polar coordinate system to the Cartesian coordinate system, a new transformation method is presented and discussed in detail at the same time. The new method constructs a 9 × 9 shrunk template to transform the Cartesian coordinate system back to the Polar coordinate system. It can reduce transform errors to a much greater degree. Forgery detection, such as copy-move image forgery detection, is a difficult procedure, but experiments prove our method is a great improvement in detecting and identifying forgery images affected by the rotated transform.

  14. Image-quality assessment of monochrome monitors for medical soft copy display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weibrecht, Martin; Spekowius, Gerhard; Quadflieg, Peter; Blume, Hartwig R.

    1997-05-01

    Soft-copy presentation of medical images is becoming part of the medical routine as more and more health care facilities are converted to digital filmless hospital and radiological information management. To provide optimal image quality, display systems must be incorporated when assessing the overall system image quality. We developed a method to accomplish this. The proper working of the method is demonstrated with the analysis of four different monochrome monitors. We determined display functions and veiling glare with a high-performance photometer. Structure mottle of the CRT screens, point spread functions and images of stochastic structures were acquired by a scientific CCD camera. The images were analyzed with respect to signal transfer characteristics and noise power spectra. We determined the influence of the monitors on the detective quantum efficiency of a simulated digital x-ray imaging system. The method follows a physical approach; nevertheless, the results of the analysis are in good agreement with the subjective impression of human observers.

  15. A complete passive blind image copy-move forensics scheme based on compound statistics features.

    PubMed

    Peng, Fei; Nie, Yun-ying; Long, Min

    2011-10-10

    Since most sensor pattern noise based image copy-move forensics methods require a known reference sensor pattern noise, it generally results in non-blinded passive forensics, which significantly confines the application circumstances. In view of this, a novel passive-blind image copy-move forensics scheme is proposed in this paper. Firstly, a color image is transformed into a grayscale one, and wavelet transform based de-noising filter is used to extract the sensor pattern noise, then the variance of the pattern noise, the signal noise ratio between the de-noised image and the pattern noise, the information entropy and the average energy gradient of the original grayscale image are chosen as features, non-overlapping sliding window operations are done to the images to divide them into different sub-blocks. Finally, the tampered areas are detected by analyzing the correlation of the features between the sub-blocks and the whole image. Experimental results and analysis show that the proposed scheme is completely passive-blind, has a good detection rate, and is robust against JPEG compression, noise, rotation, scaling and blurring.

  16. Passive forensics for copy-move image forgery using a method based on DCT and SVD.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jie; Guo, Jichang

    2013-12-10

    As powerful image editing tools are widely used, the demand for identifying the authenticity of an image is much increased. Copy-move forgery is one of the tampering techniques which are frequently used. Most existing techniques to expose this forgery need to improve the robustness for common post-processing operations and fail to precisely locate the tampering region especially when there are large similar or flat regions in the image. In this paper, a robust method based on DCT and SVD is proposed to detect this specific artifact. Firstly, the suspicious image is divided into fixed-size overlapping blocks and 2D-DCT is applied to each block, then the DCT coefficients are quantized by a quantization matrix to obtain a more robust representation of each block. Secondly, each quantized block is divided non-overlapping sub-blocks and SVD is applied to each sub-block, then features are extracted to reduce the dimension of each block using its largest singular value. Finally, the feature vectors are lexicographically sorted, and duplicated image blocks will be matched by predefined shift frequency threshold. Experiment results demonstrate that our proposed method can effectively detect multiple copy-move forgery and precisely locate the duplicated regions, even when an image was distorted by Gaussian blurring, AWGN, JPEG compression and their mixed operations.

  17. Improved DCT-based detection of copy-move forgery in images.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanping; Lu, Wei; Sun, Wei; Long, Dongyang

    2011-03-20

    Techniques for digital image tampering are becoming more and more sophisticated and widespread. Copy-move forgery is one of the tampering techniques that are frequently used. In this paper, an improved DCT-based method is developed to detect this specific artifact. Firstly, the image is divided into fixed-size overlapping blocks and, DCT is applied to each block to represent its features. Truncating is employed to reduce the dimension of the features. Then the feature vectors are lexicographically sorted and, duplicated image blocks will be neighboring in the sorted list. Thus duplicated image blocks will be compared in the matching step. To make the method more robust, a scheme to judge whether two feature vectors are similar is imported. Experiment results demonstrated that the proposed method can detect the duplicated regions even when an image was distorted by JPEG compression, blurring or additive white Gaussian noise.

  18. TRIIG - Time-lapse reproduction of images through interactive graphics. [digital processing of quality hard copy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckner, J. D.; Council, H. W.; Edwards, T. R.

    1974-01-01

    Description of the hardware and software implementing the system of time-lapse reproduction of images through interactive graphics (TRIIG). The system produces a quality hard copy of processed images in a fast and inexpensive manner. This capability allows for optimal development of processing software through the rapid viewing of many image frames in an interactive mode. Three critical optical devices are used to reproduce an image: an Optronics photo reader/writer, the Adage Graphics Terminal, and Polaroid Type 57 high speed film. Typical sources of digitized images are observation satellites, such as ERTS or Mariner, computer coupled electron microscopes for high-magnification studies, or computer coupled X-ray devices for medical research.

  19. Single-image hard-copy display of the spine utilizing digital radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artz, Dorothy S.; Janchar, Timothy; Milzman, David; Freedman, Matthew T.; Mun, Seong K.

    1997-04-01

    Regions of the entire spine contain a wide latitude of tissue densities within the imaged field of view presenting a problem for adequate radiological evaluation. With screen/film technology, the optimal technique for one area of the radiograph is sub-optimal for another area. Computed radiography (CR) with its inherent wide dynamic range, has been shown to be better than screen/film for lateral cervical spine imaging, but limitations are still present with standard image processing. By utilizing a dynamic range control (DRC) algorithm based on unsharp masking and signal transformation prior to gradation and frequency processing within the CR system, more vertebral bodies can be seen on a single hard copy display of the lateral cervical, thoracic, and thoracolumbar examinations. Examinations of the trauma cross-table lateral cervical spine, lateral thoracic spine, and lateral thoracolumbar spine were collected on live patient using photostimulable storage phosphor plates, the Fuji FCR 9000 reader, and the Fuji AC-3 computed radiography reader. Two images were produced from a single exposure; one with standard image processing and the second image with the standard process and the additional DRC algorithm. Both sets were printed from a Fuji LP 414 laser printer. Two different DRC algorithms were applied depending on which portion of the spine was not well visualized. One algorithm increased optical density and the second algorithm decreased optical density. The resultant image pairs were then reviewed by a panel of radiologists. Images produced with the additional DRC algorithm demonstrated improved visualization of previously 'under exposed' and 'over exposed' regions within the same image. Where lung field had previously obscured bony detail of the lateral thoracolumbar spine due to 'over exposure,' the image with the DRC applied to decrease the optical density allowed for easy visualization of the entire area of interest. For areas of the lateral cervical spine

  20. A robust detection algorithm for copy-move forgery in digital images.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yanjun; Gao, Tiegang; Fan, Li; Yang, Qunting

    2012-01-10

    With the availability of the powerful editing software and sophisticated digital cameras, region duplication is becoming more and more popular in image manipulation where part of an image is pasted to another location to conceal undesirable objects. Most existing techniques to detect such tampering are mainly at the cost of higher computational complexity. In this paper, we present an efficient and robust approach to detect such specific artifact. Firstly, the original image is divided into fixed-size blocks, and discrete cosine transform (DCT) is applied to each block, thus, the DCT coefficients represent each block. Secondly, each cosine transformed block is represented by a circle block and four features are extracted to reduce the dimension of each block. Finally, the feature vectors are lexicographically sorted, and duplicated image blocks will be matched by a preset threshold value. In order to make the algorithm more robust, some parameters are proposed to remove the wrong similar blocks. Experiment results show that our proposed scheme is not only robust to multiple copy-move forgery, but also to blurring or nosing adding and with low computational complexity.

  1. 1981 Image II Conference Proceedings.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    reverse side if nece.a rid ldentify b block number) area of interest computer simulation flight simulation behavioral visual research data base...visual cue requirements. visual data base development for terrain flight simulation. transformation realism, and strategies to optimize CIG image content... data base design and structure. The Image Generation/Display Conference was conceived in 1977 at the Opera- tions Training Division (formerly the

  2. Preparing Colorful Astronomical Images II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levay, Z. G.; Frattare, L. M.

    2002-12-01

    We present additional techniques for using mainstream graphics software (Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator) to produce composite color images and illustrations from astronomical data. These techniques have been used on numerous images from the Hubble Space Telescope to produce photographic, print and web-based products for news, education and public presentation as well as illustrations for technical publication. We expand on a previous paper to present more detail and additional techniques, taking advantage of new or improved features available in the latest software versions. While Photoshop is not intended for quantitative analysis of full dynamic range data (as are IRAF or IDL, for example), we have had much success applying Photoshop's numerous, versatile tools to work with scaled images, masks, text and graphics in multiple semi-transparent layers and channels.

  3. Image copy-move forgery detection based on sped-up robust features descriptor and adaptive minimal-maximal suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bin; Sun, Xingming; Xin, Xiangyang; Hu, Weifeng; Wu, Youxin

    2015-11-01

    Region duplication is a simple and effective operation to create digital image forgeries, where a continuous portion of pixels in an image is copied and pasted to a different location in the same image. Many prior copy-move forgery detection methods suffer from their inability to detect the duplicated region, which is subjected to various geometric transformations. A keypoint-based approach is proposed to detect the copy-move forgery in an image. Our method starts by extracting the keypoints through a fast Hessian detector. Then the adaptive minimal-maximal suppression (AMMS) strategy is developed for distributing the keypoints evenly throughout an image. By using AMMS and a sped-up robust feature descriptor, the proposed method is able to deal with the problem of insufficient keypoints in the almost uniform area. Finally, the geometric transformation performed in cloning is recovered by using the maximum likelihood estimation of the homography. Experimental results show the efficacy of this technique in detecting copy-move forgeries and estimating the geometric transformation parameters. Compared with the state of the art, our approach obtains a higher true positive rate and a lower false positive rate.

  4. The Value of Imaging Part II: Value beyond Image Interpretation.

    PubMed

    Duong, Phuong-Anh T; Pastel, David A; Sadigh, Gelareh; Ballard, David; Sullivan, Joseph C; Bresnahan, Brian; Buch, Karen; Duszak, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Although image interpretation is an essential part of radiologists' value, there are other ways in which we contribute to patient care. Part II of the value of imaging series reviews current initiatives that demonstrate value beyond the image interpretation. Standardizing processes, reducing the radiation dose of our examinations, clarifying written reports, improving communications with patients and providers, and promoting appropriate imaging through decision support are all ways we can provide safer, more consistent, and higher quality care. As payers and policy makers push to drive value, research that demonstrates the value of these endeavors, or lack thereof, will become increasingly sought after and supported.

  5. Zodiac II: Debris Disk Imaging Potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Traub Wesley; Bryden, Geoff; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Chen, Pin; Trauger, John

    2011-01-01

    Zodiac II is a proposed coronagraph on a balloon-borne platform, for the purpose of observing debris disks around nearby stars. Zodiac II will have a 1.2-m diameter telescope mounted in a balloon-borne gondola capable of arcsecond quality pointing, and with the capability to make long-duration (several week) flights. Zodiac II will have a coronagraph able to make images of debris disks, meaning that its scattered light speckles will be at or below an average contrast level of about 10(exp -7) in three narrow (7 percent) bands centered on the V band, and one broad (20%) one at I band. We will discuss the potential science to be done with Zodiac II.

  6. The ELISE II Project: A Digital Image Library for Europe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strunz, Bob; Waters, Mairead

    This paper describes the progress made under the ELISE II electronic image library project from a technical standpoint. The ELISE II project is a European-wide initiative that aims to provide a comprehensive electronic image library service for Europe. It is funded under the European Commission, DG XIII-E, Telematics for Libraries Initiative. The…

  7. Topoisomerase II α Status in Renal Medullary Carcinoma: Immuno-Expression and Gene Copy Alterations of a Potential Target of Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Albadine, Roula; Wang, Wenle; Brownlee, Noel A.; Toubaji, Antoun; Billis, Athanase; Argani, Perdram; Epstein, Jonathan I.; Garvin, A. Julian; Cousi, Rima; Schaeffer, Edward M.; Pavlovich, Christian; Netto, George J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Renal medullary carcinoma is an aggressive renal neoplasm without currently available effective therapy to our knowledge. Topoisomerase II α is a gyrase involved in cell proliferation, and DNA maintenance and repair. Topoisomerase II α is a target of inhibiting agents such as anthracyclines. Triggered by a recent response to topoisomerase II α inhibitors in a patient with renal medullary carcinoma, we evaluated topoisomerase II α expression in relation to the proliferation index and topoisomerase II α gene copy number status in a larger series of patients with renal medullary carcinoma. Materials and Methods Archival tissues from 14 renal medullary carcinomas were retrieved from our 3 institutions. Immunohistochemistry was performed using monoclonal antibodies for topoisomerase II α and Ki67. The percent of cells with positive nuclear staining was assessed in the highest area of expression for each marker. A previously suggested greater than 5% cutoff was used for topoisomerase II α over expression. The topoisomerase II α gene copy number was evaluated using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Locus specific topoisomerase II α gene and chromosome 17 centromere probes were used. The total number of topoisomerase II α and chromosome 17 centromere signals was counted in 150 cells per tumor and a topoisomerase II α-to-chromosome 17 centromere signal ratio was calculated in each tumor. A topoisomerase II α-to-chromosome 17 centromere ratio of 2.0 or greater and less than 0.8 was used as a cutoff for amplification and deletion, respectively. The percent of tumor cells with polysomic, eusomic or monosomic chromosome 17 status was also determined. Results On immuno-expression analysis topoisomerase II α immunohistochemistry was technically inconclusive in 1 renal medullary carcinoma. Topoisomerase II α was over expressed in 11 of 13 renal medullary carcinomas (85%) (median 50%, range 1% to 80%). As expected, a high Ki67 proliferation index was noted

  8. A population genetic study of the evolution of SINEs. II. Sequence evolution under the master copy model

    SciTech Connect

    Tachida, Hidenori

    1996-06-01

    A transient population genetic model of SINE (short interspersed repetitive element) evolution is presented, assuming the master copy model is theoretically investigated. Means and variances of consensus frequency of nucleotides, nucleotide homozygosity, and the number of shared differences that are considered to have been caused by mutations occurring in the master copy lineages are computed. All quantities investigated are shown to be monotone functions of the duration of the expansion period. Thus, they can be used to estimate the expansion period although their sampling variances are generally large. Using the theoretical results, the Sb subfamily of human Alu sequences is analyzed. First, the expansion period is estimated from the observed mean and variance of homozygosity. The expansion period is shown to be short compared to the time since the end of the expansion of the subfamily. However, the observed number of the shared differences is more than twice that expected under the master copy model with the estimated expansion period. Alternative models to explain this observation are discussed, including one with multiple master copy loci. 38 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Copy Machine Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommer, Jean

    1984-01-01

    Images created with copy machines make children feel successful, as their work acquires the authority of being printed. Students can learn advanced processes like electrostatic image-making and can get involved in projects like making collages. They acquire an appreciation of design and of two-dimensional composition. (CS)

  10. Chopping Copy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Don

    1994-01-01

    Discusses ways an editor can cut out words to help the reader understand quickly. Discusses dead wood, redundancy, redundancy in thought, smothered verbs, false precision, editing and academia, and making copy smoother. (SR)

  11. Image degradation in aerial imagery duplicates. [photographic processing of photographic film and reproduction (copying)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    A series of Earth Resources Aircraft Program data flights were made over an aerial test range in Arizona for the evaluation of large cameras. Specifically, both medium altitude and high altitude flights were made to test and evaluate a series of color as well as black-and-white films. Image degradation, inherent in duplication processing, was studied. Resolution losses resulting from resolution characteristics of the film types are given. Color duplicates, in general, are shown to be degraded more than black-and-white films because of the limitations imposed by available aerial color duplicating stock. Results indicate that a greater resolution loss may be expected when the original has higher resolution. Photographs of the duplications are shown.

  12. Digital image centering. II. [for astronomical photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, L. H.; Van Altena, W. F.

    1978-01-01

    Digital image centering algorithms were compared in a test involving microdensitometer raster scans of a refractor parallax series consisting of 22 stars on 26 plates. The highest accuracy in determining stellar image positions was provided by an algorithm which involved fitting of a symmetric Gaussian curve and a flat background to the image marginal density distributions. Algorithms involving transmission marginals instead of density marginals were found to be less accurate. The repeatability and computational efficiency of the digital image centering technique were also studied.

  13. Digitizing Images for Curriculum 21: Phase II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Alice D.

    Although visual databases exist for the study of art, architecture, geography, health care, and other areas, readily accessible sources of quality images are not available for engineering faculty interested in developing multimedia modules or for student projects. Presented here is a brief review of Phase I of the Engineering Visual Database…

  14. Structured Forms Reference Set of Binary Images II (SFRS2)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Structured Forms Reference Set of Binary Images II (SFRS2) (PC database for purchase)   The second NIST database of structured forms (Special Database 6) consists of 5,595 pages of binary, black-and-white images of synthesized documents containing hand-print. The documents in this database are 12 different tax forms with the IRS 1040 Package X for the year 1988.

  15. Measured responsivities of generation II and hybrid image intensifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, G.J.; King, N.S.P.; Thomas, M.C.

    1995-07-01

    We have measured the absolute and coupled system responsivities of several image intensifier types at several wavelengths in the visible spectrum. Intensifiers characterized include microchannel plate (MCP) generation II proximity-focused and hybrid generation I/generation II electrostatic-focused designs. Configurations including single plate, double plate, nominal and high strip current MCPs, and standard S20 and super generation II enhanced S-20 photocathodes were evaluated. Absolute responsivity measurements were performed using NIST-traceable radiometry instrumentation. The normalized relative sensitivities and overall optical luminous gain performance provided by individual intensifiers when similarly coupled to either high resolution 10-bit RS-170 CCD or FPS cameras are presented along with their radiometric data.

  16. A small-molecule dye for NIR-II imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antaris, Alexander L.; Chen, Hao; Cheng, Kai; Sun, Yao; Hong, Guosong; Qu, Chunrong; Diao, Shuo; Deng, Zixin; Hu, Xianming; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Xiaodong; Yaghi, Omar K.; Alamparambil, Zita R.; Hong, Xuechuan; Cheng, Zhen; Dai, Hongjie

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescent imaging of biological systems in the second near-infrared window (NIR-II) can probe tissue at centimetre depths and achieve micrometre-scale resolution at depths of millimetres. Unfortunately, all current NIR-II fluorophores are excreted slowly and are largely retained within the reticuloendothelial system, making clinical translation nearly impossible. Here, we report a rapidly excreted NIR-II fluorophore (~90% excreted through the kidneys within 24 h) based on a synthetic 970-Da organic molecule (CH1055). The fluorophore outperformed indocyanine green (ICG)--a clinically approved NIR-I dye--in resolving mouse lymphatic vasculature and sentinel lymphatic mapping near a tumour. High levels of uptake of PEGylated-CH1055 dye were observed in brain tumours in mice, suggesting that the dye was detected at a depth of ~4 mm. The CH1055 dye also allowed targeted molecular imaging of tumours in vivo when conjugated with anti-EGFR Affibody. Moreover, a superior tumour-to-background signal ratio allowed precise image-guided tumour-removal surgery.

  17. Fluorescence imaging of single-copy DNA sequences within the human genome using PNA-directed padlock probe assembly

    PubMed Central

    Yaroslavsky, Anastasia I.; Smolina, Irina V.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY We present a novel approach for fluorescent in situ detection of short, single-copy sequences within genomic DNA in human cells. The single copy sensitivity and single base specificity of our method is achieved due to the combination of three components. First, a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probe locally opens a chosen target site, which allows a padlock DNA probe to access the site and become ligated. Second, rolling circle amplification (RCA) generates thousands of single-stranded copies of the target sequence. Finally, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is used to visualize the amplified DNA. We validate this new technique by successfully detecting six unique target sites on human mitochondrial and autosomal DNA. We also demonstrate the high specificity of this method by detecting X- and Y- specific sequences on human sex chromosomes and by simultaneously detecting three unique target sites. Finally, we discriminate two target sites that differ by two nucleotides. The PNA-RCA-FISH approach is a unique in situ hybridization method capable of multi-target visualization within human chromosomes and nuclei that does not require DNA denaturation and is extremely sequence specific. PMID:23521801

  18. Comparison between Mg II k and Ca II H images recorded by SUNRISE/SuFI

    SciTech Connect

    Danilovic, S.; Hirzberger, J.; Riethmüller, T. L.; Solanki, S. K.; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A.; Gizon, L.; Berkefeld, T.; Schmidt, W.; Knölker, M.; Rodríguez, J. Blanco; Iniesta, J. C. Del Toro

    2014-03-20

    We present a comparison of high-resolution images of the solar surface taken in the Mg II k and Ca II H channels of the Filter Imager on the balloon-borne solar observatory SUNRISE. The Mg and Ca lines are sampled with 0.48 nm and 0.11 nm wide filters, respectively. The two channels show remarkable qualitative and quantitative similarities in the quiet Sun, in an active region plage and during a small flare. However, the Mg filtergrams display 1.4-1.7 times higher intensity contrast and appear more smeared and smoothed in the quiet Sun. In addition, the fibrils in a plage are wider. Although the exposure time is 100 times longer for Mg images, the evidence suggests that these differences cannot be explained only with instrumental effects or the evolution of the solar scene. The differences at least partially arise because of different line-formation heights, the stronger response of Mg k emission peaks to the higher temperatures, and the larger height range sampled by the broad Mg filter used here. This is evidently manifested during the flare when a surge in Mg evolves differently than in Ca.

  19. SHIELD II: TRGB Distance Measurements from HST Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, John M.; McQuinn, Kristen B.; Skillman, Evan D.; SHIELD Team

    2016-01-01

    The "Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs II" ("SHIELD II") is a multiwavelength, legacy-class observational campaign that is facilitating the study of both internal and global evolutionary processes in low-mass dwarf galaxies discovered by the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey. The observations and science expand on the results from detailed studies of 12 similarly low-mass dwarf galaxies from the original SHIELD campaign. New HST observations of 18 SHIELD II galaxies have allowed us to determine their TRGB distances, thus anchoring the physical scales on which our ongoing analysis is based. Combined with the HST observations of the original 12 SHIELD galaxies presented in McQuinn et al. (2014, 2015), these HST optical images enable a holistic study of the fundamental parameters and characteristics of a statistically robust sample of 30 extremely low-mass galaxies. Additional science goals include an accurate census of the dark matter contents of these galaxies, a spatial and temporal study of star formation within them, and a characterization of the fundamental parameters that change as galaxy masses range from "mini-halo" to star-forming dwarf.Support for this work was provided by NSF grant AST-1211683 to JMC at Macalester College, and by NASA through grant GO-13750 from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  20. Optical Imaging of Paramagnetic Bead-DNA Aggregation Inhibition Allows for Low Copy Number Detection of Infectious Pathogens.

    PubMed

    DuVall, Jacquelyn A; Borba, Juliane C; Shafagati, Nazly; Luzader, Deborah; Shukla, Nishant; Li, Jingyi; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Kendall, Melissa M; Feldman, Sanford H; Landers, James P

    2015-01-01

    DNA-paramagnetic silica bead aggregation in a rotating magnetic field facilitates the quantification of DNA with femtogram sensitivity, but yields no sequence-specific information. Here we provide an original description of aggregation inhibition for the detection of DNA and RNA in a sequence-specific manner following loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). The fragments generated via LAMP fail to induce chaotrope-mediated bead aggregation; however, due to their ability to passivate the bead surface, they effectively inhibit bead aggregation by longer 'trigger' DNA. We demonstrate the utility of aggregation inhibition as a method for the detection of bacterial and viral pathogens with sensitivity that approaches single copies of the target. We successfully use this methodology for the detection of notable food-borne pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica, as well as Rift Valley fever virus, a weaponizable virus of national security concern. We also show the concentration dependence of aggregation inhibition, suggesting the potential for quantification of target nucleic acid in clinical and environmental samples. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability to rapidly detect infectious pathogens by utilizing a cell phone and custom-written application (App), making this novel detection modality fully portable for point-of-care use.

  1. Optical Imaging of Paramagnetic Bead-DNA Aggregation Inhibition Allows for Low Copy Number Detection of Infectious Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    DuVall, Jacquelyn A.; Borba, Juliane C.; Shafagati, Nazly; Luzader, Deborah; Shukla, Nishant; Li, Jingyi; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Kendall, Melissa M.; Feldman, Sanford H.; Landers, James P.

    2015-01-01

    DNA-paramagnetic silica bead aggregation in a rotating magnetic field facilitates the quantification of DNA with femtogram sensitivity, but yields no sequence-specific information. Here we provide an original description of aggregation inhibition for the detection of DNA and RNA in a sequence-specific manner following loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). The fragments generated via LAMP fail to induce chaotrope-mediated bead aggregation; however, due to their ability to passivate the bead surface, they effectively inhibit bead aggregation by longer ‘trigger’ DNA. We demonstrate the utility of aggregation inhibition as a method for the detection of bacterial and viral pathogens with sensitivity that approaches single copies of the target. We successfully use this methodology for the detection of notable food-borne pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica, as well as Rift Valley fever virus, a weaponizable virus of national security concern. We also show the concentration dependence of aggregation inhibition, suggesting the potential for quantification of target nucleic acid in clinical and environmental samples. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability to rapidly detect infectious pathogens by utilizing a cell phone and custom-written application (App), making this novel detection modality fully portable for point-of-care use. PMID:26068926

  2. Evaluation of Laser Stabilization and Imaging Systems for LCLS-II - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, Matthew

    2015-08-19

    This presentation covers data collected on two commercial laser stabilization systems, Guidestar-II and MRC, and two optical imaging systems. Additionally, general information about LCLS-II and how to go about continuing-testing is covered.

  3. Analysis of copy-number variation, insertional polymorphism, and methylation status of the tiniest class I (TRIM) and class II (MITE) transposable element families in various rice strains.

    PubMed

    Baruch, Omer; Kashkush, Khalil

    2012-05-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) dominate the genetic capacity of most eukaryotes, especially plants, where they may compose up to 90% of the genome. Many studies, both in plants and animals reported that in fact non-autonomous elements that have lost their protein-coding sequences and became miniature elements were highly associated with genes, and showed a high level of transpositional activity such as mPing family in rice. In this study, we have investigated in detail the copy number, insertional polymorphism and the methylation status of the tiniest LTR retrotransposon family, termed TRIM, in nine rice strains, in comparison with mPing. While TRIM showed similar copy numbers (average of 79 insertions) in all the nine rice strains, the copy number of mPing varied dramatically (ranging from 6 to 203 insertions) in the same strains. Site-specific PCR analysis revealed that ~58% of the TRIM elements have identical insertion sites among the nine rice strains, while none of the mPing elements (100% polymorphism) have identical insertion sites in the same strains. Finally, over 65% of the TRIM insertion sites were cytosine methylated in all nine rice strains, while the level of the methylated mPing insertion sites ranged between 43 and 81.5%. The findings of this study indicate that unlike mPing, TRIM is most probably a fossil TE family in rice. In addition, the data shows that there might be a strong correlation between TE methylation and copy number.

  4. Breaking and Entering: Copying and Copy Protection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westlake, Wayne; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Describes several commercially-available computer programs which allow users to make copies of "protected" software. Current costs, program features, and ordering information are provided for these "encryption" programs. Also describes a monthly journal (The HARDCORE Computist) which focuses on unlocking copy-protected…

  5. FIRST HIGH-RESOLUTION IMAGES OF THE SUN IN THE 2796 Å Mg II k LINE

    SciTech Connect

    Riethmüller, T. L.; Solanki, S. K.; Hirzberger, J.; Danilovic, S.; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A.; Gizon, L.; Berkefeld, T.; Schmidt, W.; Knölker, M.; Del Toro Iniesta, J. C.

    2013-10-10

    We present the first high-resolution solar images in the Mg II k 2796 Å line. The images, taken through a 4.8 Å broad interference filter, were obtained during the second science flight of Sunrise in 2013 June by the Sunrise Filter Imager (SuFI) instrument. The Mg II k images display structures that look qualitatively very similar to images taken in the core of Ca II H. The Mg II images exhibit reversed granulation (or shock waves) in the internetwork regions of the quiet Sun, at intensity contrasts that are similar to those found in Ca II H. Very prominent in Mg II are bright points, both in the quiet Sun and in plage regions, particularly near the disk center. These are much brighter than at other wavelengths sampled at similar resolution. Furthermore, Mg II k images also show fibril structures associated with plage regions. Again, the fibrils are similar to those seen in Ca II H images, but tend to be more pronounced, particularly in weak plage.

  6. Study protocol: the Whitehall II imaging sub-study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Whitehall II (WHII) study of British civil servants provides a unique source of longitudinal data to investigate key factors hypothesized to affect brain health and cognitive ageing. This paper introduces the multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol and cognitive assessment designed to investigate brain health in a random sample of 800 members of the WHII study. Methods/design A total of 6035 civil servants participated in the WHII Phase 11 clinical examination in 2012–2013. A random sample of these participants was included in a sub-study comprising an MRI brain scan, a detailed clinical and cognitive assessment, and collection of blood and buccal mucosal samples for the characterisation of immune function and associated measures. Data collection for this sub-study started in 2012 and will be completed by 2016. The participants, for whom social and health records have been collected since 1985, were between 60–85 years of age at the time the MRI study started. Here, we describe the pre-specified clinical and cognitive assessment protocols, the state-of-the-art MRI sequences and latest pipelines for analyses of this sub-study. Discussion The integration of cutting-edge MRI techniques, clinical and cognitive tests in combination with retrospective data on social, behavioural and biological variables during the preceding 25 years from a well-established longitudinal epidemiological study (WHII cohort) will provide a unique opportunity to examine brain structure and function in relation to age-related diseases and the modifiable and non-modifiable factors affecting resilience against and vulnerability to adverse brain changes. PMID:24885374

  7. Image understanding and the man-machine interface II

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, E.B.; Pearson, J.J.

    1989-01-01

    Topics covered in this book include: Image understanding concepts and models, Image understanding systems and applications; and Advanced man-machine interfaces. The papers presented include Update on strategic computing computes vision: taking image understanding to the next plateau and Tiling strategies for image parallelism.

  8. High-performance IR thermography system based on Class II Thermal Imaging Common Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Ian G.

    1991-03-01

    The Class II Thermal Imaging Common Modules were originally developed for the U.K. Ministry of Defence as the basis of a number of high performance thermal imaging systems for use by the British Armed Forces. These systems are characterized by high spatial resolution, high thermal resolution and real time thermal image update rate. A TICM II thermal imaging system uses a cryogenically cooled eight element Cadmium- Mercury-Telluride (CMT) SPRITE (Signal PRocessing In The Element) detector which is mechanically scanned over the thermal scene to be viewed. The TALYTHERM system is based on a modified TICM II thermal image connected to an IBM PC-AT compatible computer having image processing hardware installed and running the T.E.M.P.S. (Thermal Emission Measurement and Processing System) software package for image processing and data analysis. The operation of a TICM II thermal imager is briefly described highlighting the use of the SPRITE detector which coupled with a serial/parallel scanning technique yields high temporal, spatial and thermal resolutions. The conversion of this military thermal image into thermography system is described, including a discussion of the modifications required to a standard imager. The technique for extracting temperature information from a real time thermal image and how this is implemented in a TALYTHERM system is described. The D.A.R.T. (Discrete Attenuation of Radiance Thermography) system which is based on an extensively modified TICM II thermal imager is also described. This system is capable of measuring temperatures up to 1000 degrees C whilst maintaining the temporal and spatial resolutions inherent in a TICM II imager. Finally applications of the TALYTHERM in areas such as NDT (Non Destructive Testing), medical research and military research are briefly described.

  9. Copy-left and Copy-right

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanderPlas, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Any discussion of open licensing almost invariably devolves into a debate between copy-left licenses and permissive licenses, both sides defending their views with a nearly religious fervor. Copy-left licenses, typified by the GPL family of licenses, require all derived products to maintain the open, GPL license. Permissive licenses, typified by the BSD family of licenses, do not impose such requirements. I'll briefly explore the common arguments put forth in favor of either approach, and discuss some concrete examples of where these approaches have helped or hindered the software packages that used them.

  10. Tandem Repeats, High Copy Number and Remarkable Diel Expression Rhythm of Form II RuBisCO in Prorocentrum donghaiense (Dinophyceae)

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xinguo; Zhang, Huan; Lin, Senjie

    2013-01-01

    Gene structure and expression regulation of form II RuBisCO (rbcII) in dinoflagellates are still poorly understood. Here we isolated this gene (Pdrbc) and investigated its diel expression pattern in a harmful algal bloom forming dinoflagellate Prorocentrum donghaiense. We obtained cDNA sequences with triple tandem repeats of the coding unit (CU); the 5′ region has the sequence of a typical dinoflagellate plastid gene, encoding an N-terminus with two transmembrane regions separated by a plastid transit peptide. The CUs (1,455 bp except 1464 bp in last CU) are connected through a 63 bp spacer. Phylogenetic analysis showed that rbcII CUs within species formed monophyletic clusters, indicative of intraspecific gene duplication or purifying evolution. Using quantitative PCR (qPCR) we estimated 117±40 CUs of Pdrbc in the P. donghaiense genome. Although it is commonly believed that most dinoflagellate genes lack transcriptional regulation, our RT-qPCR analysis on synchronized cultures revealed remarkable diel rhythm of Pdrbc expression, showing significant correlations of transcript abundance with the timing of the dark-to-light transition and cell cycle G2M-phase. When the cultures were shifted to continuous light, Pdrbc expression remained significantly correlated with the G2M-phase. Under continuous darkness the cell cycle was arrested at the G1 phase, and the rhythm of Pdrbc transcription disappeared. Our results suggest that dinoflagellate rbcII 1) undergoes duplication or sequence purification within species, 2) is organized in tandem arrays in most species probably to facilitate efficient translation and import of the encoded enzyme, and 3) is regulated transcriptionally in a cell cycle-dependent fashion at least in some dinoflagellates. PMID:23976999

  11. Aesthetic Pursuits: Windows, Frames, Words, Images--Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Ken

    2005-01-01

    In Part I of this study (Burke, 2005), the author presented the essentials of Image Presentation Theory--IPT--and its application to the analytical explication of various spatial designs in and psychological responses to images, from the illusions of depth in what is referred to as "windows" in cinema theory to the more patterned abstractions of…

  12. Apple Image Processing Educator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunther, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    A software system design is proposed and demonstrated with pilot-project software. The system permits the Apple II microcomputer to be used for personalized computer-assisted instruction in the digital image processing of LANDSAT images. The programs provide data input, menu selection, graphic and hard-copy displays, and both general and detailed instructions. The pilot-project results are considered to be successful indicators of the capabilities and limits of microcomputers for digital image processing education.

  13. Evaluation of Laser Stabilization and Imaging Systems for LCLS-II - Final Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, Matthew

    2015-08-20

    By combining the top performing commercial laser beam stabilization system with the most ideal optical imaging configuration, the beamline for the Linear Accelerator Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) will deliver the highest quality and most stable beam to the cathode. To determine the optimal combination, LCLS-II beamline conditions were replicated and the systems tested with a He-Ne laser. The Guidestar-II and MRC active laser beam stabilization systems were evaluated for their ideal positioning and stability. Both a two and four lens optical imaging configuration was then evaluated for beam imaging quality, magnification properties, and natural stability. In their best performances when tested over fifteen hours, Guidestar-II kept the beam stable over approximately 70-110um while the MRC system kept it stable over approximately 90-100um. During short periods of time, Guidestar-II kept the beam stable between 10-20um, but was more susceptible to drift over time, while the MRC system maintained the beam between 30-50um with less overall drift. The best optical imaging configuration proved to be a four lens system that images to the iris located in the cathode room and from there, imaged to the cathode. The magnification from the iris to the cathode was 2:1, within an acceptable tolerance to the expected 2.1:1 magnification. The two lens configuration was slightly more stable in small periods of time (less than 10 minutes) without the assistance of a stability system, approximately 55um compared to approximately 70um, but the four lens configurations beam image had a significantly flatter intensity distribution compared to the two lens configuration which had a Gaussian distribution. A final test still needs to be run with both stability systems running at the same time through the four lens system. With this data, the optimal laser beam stabilization system can be determined for the beamline of LCLS-II.

  14. Relationship between fatigue of generation II image intensifier and input illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qingyou

    1995-09-01

    If there is fatigue for an image intesifier, then it has an effect on the imaging property of the night vision system. In this paper, using the principle of Joule Heat, we derive a mathematical formula for the generated heat of semiconductor photocathode. We describe the relationship among the various parameters in the formula. We also discuss reasons for the fatigue of Generation II image intensifier caused by bigger input illumination.

  15. Cervical spondylotic myelopathy: Part II: clinical and imaging considerations *

    PubMed Central

    Burns, SH; O’Connor, SM; Mior, SA

    1991-01-01

    In this, the second of a two part series, we continue to review the recent literature pertaining to cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Caused by the compromise of the spinal canal resulting from the superimposition of spondylotic changes upon a congenitally narrowed canal, CSM has a predictable radiographic and clinical presentation. The clinical presentation frequently includes both upper and lower motor neuron signs and symptoms. Careful analysis of the plain film images usually reveals a spinal canal measuring 12 mm or less. Additional imaging modalities confirm the diagnosis. This paper presents the clinical and imaging characteristics underlying CSM and stresses the importance of including CSM in the differential diagnosis of patients complaining of neck and leg dysfunctions. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4

  16. Planetary Data Systems (PDS) Imaging Node Atlas II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanboli, Alice; McAuley, James M.

    2013-01-01

    The Planetary Image Atlas (PIA) is a Rich Internet Application (RIA) that serves planetary imaging data to the science community and the general public. PIA also utilizes the USGS Unified Planetary Coordinate system (UPC) and the on-Mars map server. The Atlas was designed to provide the ability to search and filter through greater than 8 million planetary image files. This software is a three-tier Web application that contains a search engine backend (MySQL, JAVA), Web service interface (SOAP) between server and client, and a GWT Google Maps API client front end. This application allows for the search, retrieval, and download of planetary images and associated meta-data from the following missions: 2001 Mars Odyssey, Cassini, Galileo, LCROSS, Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, Mars Exploration Rover, Mars Express, Magellan, Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Pathfinder, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, MESSENGER, Phoe nix, Viking Lander, Viking Orbiter, and Voyager. The Atlas utilizes the UPC to translate mission-specific coordinate systems into a unified coordinate system, allowing the end user to query across missions of similar targets. If desired, the end user can also use a mission-specific view of the Atlas. The mission-specific views rely on the same code base. This application is a major improvement over the initial version of the Planetary Image Atlas. It is a multi-mission search engine. This tool includes both basic and advanced search capabilities, providing a product search tool to interrogate the collection of planetary images. This tool lets the end user query information about each image, and ignores the data that the user has no interest in. Users can reduce the number of images to look at by defining an area of interest with latitude and longitude ranges.

  17. Ulnar-sided wrist pain. II. Clinical imaging and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Atsuya; Souza, Felipe; Vezeridis, Peter S.; Blazar, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Pain at the ulnar aspect of the wrist is a diagnostic challenge for hand surgeons and radiologists due to the small and complex anatomical structures involved. In this article, imaging modalities including radiography, arthrography, ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), CT arthrography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and MR arthrography are compared with regard to differential diagnosis. Clinical imaging findings are reviewed for a more comprehensive understanding of this disorder. Treatments for the common diseases that cause the ulnar-sided wrist pain including extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) tendonitis, flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) tendonitis, pisotriquetral arthritis, triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) lesions, ulnar impaction, lunotriquetral (LT) instability, and distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability are reviewed. PMID:20012039

  18. Imaging performance of annular apertures. II - Line spread functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tschunko, H. F. A.

    1978-01-01

    Line images formed by aberration-free optical systems with annular apertures are investigated in the whole range of central obstruction ratios. Annular apertures form lines images with central and side line groups. The number of lines in each line group is given by the ratio of the outer diameter of the annular aperture divided by the width of the annulus. The theoretical energy fraction of 0.889 in the central line of the image formed by an unobstructed aperture increases for centrally obstructed apertures to 0.932 for the central line group. Energy fractions for the central and side line groups are practically constant for all obstruction ratios and for each line group. The illumination of rectangular secondary apertures of various length/width ratios by apertures of various obstruction ratios is discussed.

  19. Rank-ordered filter for edge enhancement of cellular images using interval type II fuzzy set.

    PubMed

    Chaira, Tamalika

    2015-10-01

    An edge-enhancement technique using an interval type II fuzzy set that uses rank-ordered filter to enhance the edges of cellular images is proposed. When cellular images from any laboratory are digitized, scanned, and stored, some kind of degradation occurs, and directly using a rank-ordered filter may not produce clear edges. These images contain uncertainties, present in edges or boundaries of the image. Fuzzy sets that take into account these uncertainties may be a good tool to process these images. However, a fuzzy set sometimes does not produce better results. We used an interval type II fuzzy set, which considers the uncertainty in a different way. It considers the membership function in the fuzzy set as "fuzzy," so the membership values lie within an interval range. A type II fuzzy set has upper and lower membership levels, and with the two levels, a new membership function is computed using Hamacher t-conorm. A new fuzzy image is formed. A rank-ordered filter is applied to the image to obtain an edge-enhanced image. The proposed method is compared with the existing methods visually and quantitatively using entropic method. Entropy of the proposed method is higher (0.4418) than the morphology method (0.2275), crisp method (0.3599), and Sobel method (0.2669), implying that the proposed method is better.

  20. Rank-ordered filter for edge enhancement of cellular images using interval type II fuzzy set

    PubMed Central

    Chaira, Tamalika

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. An edge-enhancement technique using an interval type II fuzzy set that uses rank-ordered filter to enhance the edges of cellular images is proposed. When cellular images from any laboratory are digitized, scanned, and stored, some kind of degradation occurs, and directly using a rank-ordered filter may not produce clear edges. These images contain uncertainties, present in edges or boundaries of the image. Fuzzy sets that take into account these uncertainties may be a good tool to process these images. However, a fuzzy set sometimes does not produce better results. We used an interval type II fuzzy set, which considers the uncertainty in a different way. It considers the membership function in the fuzzy set as “fuzzy,” so the membership values lie within an interval range. A type II fuzzy set has upper and lower membership levels, and with the two levels, a new membership function is computed using Hamacher t-conorm. A new fuzzy image is formed. A rank-ordered filter is applied to the image to obtain an edge-enhanced image. The proposed method is compared with the existing methods visually and quantitatively using entropic method. Entropy of the proposed method is higher (0.4418) than the morphology method (0.2275), crisp method (0.3599), and Sobel method (0.2669), implying that the proposed method is better. PMID:26702406

  1. Multifunctional in vivo vascular imaging using near-infrared II fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Guosong; Lee, Jerry C.; Robinson, Joshua T.; Raaz, Uwe; Xie, Liming; Huang, Ngan F.; Cooke, John P.; Dai, Hongjie

    2013-01-01

    In vivo real-time epifluorescence imaging of mouse hindlimb vasculatures in the second near-infrared region (NIR-II, 1.1–1.4 µm) is performed using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as fluorophores. Both high spatial resolution (~30 µm) and temporal resolution (<200 ms/frame) for small vessel imaging are achieved 1~3 mm deep in the tissue owing to the beneficial NIR-II optical window that affords deep anatomical penetration and low scattering. This spatial resolution is unattainable by traditional NIR imaging (NIR-I, 0.75–0.9 µm) or microscopic computed tomography (micro-CT), while the temporal resolution far exceeds scanning microscopic imaging techniques. Arterial and venous vessels are unambiguously differentiated using a dynamic contrast-enhanced NIR-II imaging technique based on their distinct hemodynamics. Further, the deep tissue penetration, high spatial and temporal resolution of NIR-II imaging allow for precise quantifications of blood velocity in both normal and ischemic femoral arteries, which are beyond the capability of ultrasonography at lower blood velocity. PMID:23160236

  2. Sale of the century: images of nursing in the Movietonews during World War II.

    PubMed

    Stevens, S Y

    1990-07-01

    Images of nursing in televised news have been problematic at a time when recruitment of nurses is a critical need. During the World War II years, a massive campaign successfully recruited nurses, and newsreels were a major source of news information. An analysis of two years, 1942 to 1944, of the Movietonews, the largest US newsreel company, identifies images presented during the times, considers those images in a historical context, and proposes successful recruitment strategies that could be useful today. Nursing's scientific base, the great demand for nurses, and a link between public needs and nurses' skill and intelligence are powerful images that should be promulgated in today's news media.

  3. A lucky imaging multiplicity study of exoplanet host stars - II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginski, C.; Mugrauer, M.; Seeliger, M.; Buder, S.; Errmann, R.; Avenhaus, H.; Mouillet, D.; Maire, A.-L.; Raetz, S.

    2016-04-01

    The vast majority of extrasolar planets are detected by indirect detection methods such as transit monitoring and radial velocity measurements. While these methods are very successful in detecting short-periodic planets, they are mostly blind to wide sub-stellar or even stellar companions on long orbits. In our study, we present high-resolution imaging observations of 60 exoplanet hosts carried out with the lucky imaging instrument AstraLux at the Calar Alto 2.2 m telescope as well as with the new Spectro-Polarimetric High-contrast Exoplanet REsearch (SPHERE) high-resolution adaptive optics imager at the ESO/VLT in the case of a known companion of specific interest. Our goal is to study the influence of stellar multiplicity on the planet formation process. We detected and confirmed four previously unknown stellar companions to the exoplanet hosts HD 197037, HD 217786, Kepler-21 and Kepler-68. In addition, we detected 11 new low-mass stellar companion candidates which must still be confirmed as bound companions. We also provide new astrometric and photometric data points for the recently discovered very close binary systems WASP-76 and HD 2638. Furthermore, we show for the first time that the previously detected stellar companion to the HD 185269 system is a very low mass binary. Finally, we provide precise constraints on additional companions for all observed stars in our sample.

  4. Imaging of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Part II: Ultrasonography and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Grochowska, Elżbieta; Gietka, Piotr; Płaza, Mateusz; Pracoń, Grzegorz; Saied, Fadhil; Walentowska-Janowicz, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common autoimmune systemic disease of the connective tissue affecting individuals in the developmental age. Radiography, which was described in the first part of this publication, is the standard modality in the assessment of this condition. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging enable early detection of the disease which affects soft tissues, as well as bones. Ultrasound assessment involves: joint cavities, tendon sheaths and bursae for the presence of synovitis, intraand extraarticular fat tissue to visualize signs of inflammation, hyaline cartilage, cartilaginous epiphysis and subchondral bone to detect cysts and erosions, and ligaments, tendons and their entheses for signs of enthesopathies and tendinopathies. Magnetic resonance imaging is indicated in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis for assessment of inflammation in peripheral joints, tendon sheaths and bursae, bone marrow involvement and identification of inflammatory lesions in whole-body MRI, particularly when the clinical picture is unclear. Also, MRI of the spine and spinal cord is used in order to diagnose synovial joint inflammation, bone marrow edema and spondylodiscitis as well as to assess their activity, location, and complications (spinal canal stenosis, subluxation, e.g. in the atlantoaxial region). This article discusses typical pathological changes seen on ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. The role of these two methods for disease monitoring, its identification in the pre-clinical stage and establishing its remission are also highlighted. PMID:27679727

  5. Topoisomerase II alpha gene copy loss has adverse prognostic significance in ERBB2-amplified breast cancer: a retrospective study of paraffin-embedded tumor specimens and medical charts

    PubMed Central

    Usha, Lydia; Tabesh, Bita; Morrison, Larry E; Rao, Ruta D; Jacobson, Kris; Zhu, April; Basu, Sanjib; Coon, John S

    2008-01-01

    Background Amplification of the ERBB2 (Her-2/neu) oncogene, which occurs in approximately 25% of breast carcinomas, is a known negative prognostic factor. Available data indicate that a variable number of nearby genes on chromosome 17q may be co-amplified or deleted, forming a continuous amplicon of variable size. In approximately 25% of these patients, the amplicon extends to the gene for topoisomerase II alpha (TOP2A), a target for anthracyclines. We sought to understand the significance of these associated genomic changes for breast cancer prognosis and predicting response to therapy. Methods and patients Archival tissue samples from 63 breast cancer patients with ERBB2 amplification, stages 0–IV, were previously analyzed with FISH probes for genes located near ERBB2. In the present study, the clinical outcome data were determined for all patients presenting at stages I–III for whom adequate clinical follow up was available. Results Four amplicon patterns (Classes) were identified. These were significantly associated with the clinical outcome, specifically, recurrence of breast cancer. The Amplicon class IV with deleted TOP2A had 67% (6/9) cases with recurrence, whereas the other three classes combined had only 12% (3/25) cases (p-value = 0.004) at the time of last follow-up. TOP2A deletion was also significantly associated with time to recurrence (p-value = 0.0002). After adjusting for age in Cox regression analysis, the association between TOP2A deletion and time to recurrence remains strongly significant (p-value = 0.002) whereas the association with survival is marginally significant (p-value = 0.06). Conclusion TOP2A deletion is associated with poor prognosis in ERBB2-amplified breast carcinomas. Clarification of the mechanism of this association will require additional study. PMID:18702822

  6. Applications with Intense OTR Images II: Microbunched Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumpkin, A. H.; Dejus, R. J.; Rule, D. W.

    2004-12-01

    In this second application for intense images we take advantage of the coherent enhancement of optical transition radiation (OTR) due to self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free-electron laser (FEL)-induced microbunching of the beam. A much smaller number of total particles is involved, but the microbunched fraction (NB) gives a NB2 enhancement. We report measurements on the z-dependent growth of the coherent OTR (COTR) and the effects of beam size and electron beam/photon beam coalignment in the COTR interferograms.

  7. DETAILED DECOMPOSITION OF GALAXY IMAGES. II. BEYOND AXISYMMETRIC MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Chien Y.; Ho, Luis C.; Impey, Chris D.; Rix, Hans-Walter E-mail: lho@obs.carnegiescience.ed E-mail: rix@mpia-hd.mpg.d

    2010-06-15

    We present a two-dimensional (2D) fitting algorithm (GALFIT, ver. 3) with new capabilities to study the structural components of galaxies and other astronomical objects in digital images. Our technique improves on previous 2D fitting algorithms by allowing for irregular, curved, logarithmic and power-law spirals, ring, and truncated shapes in otherwise traditional parametric functions like the Sersic, Moffat, King, Ferrer, etc., profiles. One can mix and match these new shape features freely, with or without constraints, and apply them to an arbitrary number of model components of numerous profile types, so as to produce realistic-looking galaxy model images. Yet, despite the potential for extreme complexity, the meaning of the key parameters like the Sersic index, effective radius, or luminosity remains intuitive and essentially unchanged. The new features have an interesting potential for use to quantify the degree of asymmetry of galaxies, to quantify low surface brightness tidal features beneath and beyond luminous galaxies, to allow more realistic decompositions of galaxy subcomponents in the presence of strong rings and spiral arms, and to enable ways to gauge the uncertainties when decomposing galaxy subcomponents. We illustrate these new features by way of several case studies that display various levels of complexity.

  8. Artificial auroras in the upper atmosphere. II - Imaging results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mende, S. B.; Burch, J. L.; Swenson, G. R.; Aamodt, E. K.; Geller, S. P.; Rairden, R. L.; Hassler, P. L.

    1993-01-01

    On the ATLAS 1 mission (STS-45, launched March 24, 1992) two experiments, AEPI (Atmospheric Emissions Photometric Imaging) and SEPAC (Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators) performed the first of a series of active experiments intended to probe the atmosphere, ionosphere and magnetosphere with electron beams. The luminous artificial aurora generated by the electron beam interaction was detected and measured by AEPI both in white light and in a narrow wavelength band at 427.8 nm (peak intensity 5 kR). Modelling calculation showed that there was a significant contribution from emissions originating near the spacecraft. The spatial intensity distribution of the observed auroral patch is consistent with emission contribution from both high and low altitude regions. An extended tail in the direction of the shuttle wake was observed in the 427.8 nm channel, consistent with a decay time associated with the dissipation of the hot electron plasma.

  9. Photographic copy of reproduced photograph dated 1942. Exterior view, west ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of reproduced photograph dated 1942. Exterior view, west elevation. Building camouflaged during World War II. - Grand Central Air Terminal, 1310 Air Way, Glendale, Los Angeles County, CA

  10. Diagnostic imaging of psoriatic arthritis. Part II: magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Pracoń, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Plain radiography reveals specific, yet late changes of advanced psoriatic arthritis. Early inflammatory changes are seen both on magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound within peripheral joints (arthritis, synovitis), tendons sheaths (tenosynovitis, tendovaginitis) and entheses (enthesitis, enthesopathy). In addition, magnetic resonance imaging enables the assessment of inflammatory features in the sacroiliac joints (sacroiliitis), and the spine (spondylitis). In this article, we review current opinions on the diagnostics of some selective, and distinctive features of psoriatic arthritis concerning magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound and present some hypotheses on psoriatic arthritis etiopathogenesis, which have been studied with the use of magnetic resonance imaging. The following elements of the psoriatic arthritis are discussed: enthesitis, extracapsular inflammation, dactylitis, distal interphalangeal joint and nail disease, and the ability of magnetic resonance imaging to differentiate undifferentiated arthritis, the value of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:27446601

  11. Construction of a Ca II Core-to-Wing Ratio Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, H.

    2015-12-01

    To understand Earth's climate, we must first understand the Sun. However, there are still significant uncertainties associated with both the fundamental mechanisms of solar variability and how they enter into the Earth's climate system. An important method to study the causes of solar variability can be found through the analysis of solar images. The Precision Solar Photometric Telescope (PSPT) located at the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO) acquires images of the Sun in three different photometric bands to monitor the evolution of solar surface features that change over the course of a solar cycle. These images provide a complete knowledge about the Sun by targeting different layers of the solar atmosphere. Though raw images are meaningful and important, precision image processing is required to remove instrumental artifacts and false features that may appear in these images prior to usage for scientific purposes. A scientific application of the high precision solar images is investigated by analyzing a set of narrow band of Calcium II K core and wing images. The Core and Wing images are processed to remove the influence of the center-to-limb variation; the resultant core-to-wing ratio image enhances the appearance of network structures on the entire solar disk along with the more obvious facula and plage brightening associated with the passage of active regions.

  12. A Survey of Partition-Based Techniques for Copy-Move Forgery Detection

    PubMed Central

    Nathalie Diane, Wandji Nanda; Xingming, Sun; Moise, Fah Kue

    2014-01-01

    A copy-move forged image results from a specific type of image tampering procedure carried out by copying a part of an image and pasting it on one or more parts of the same image generally to maliciously hide unwanted objects/regions or clone an object. Therefore, detecting such forgeries mainly consists in devising ways of exposing identical or relatively similar areas in images. This survey attempts to cover existing partition-based copy-move forgery detection techniques. PMID:25152931

  13. A survey of partition-based techniques for copy-move forgery detection.

    PubMed

    Diane, Wandji Nanda Nathalie; Xingming, Sun; Moise, Fah Kue

    2014-01-01

    A copy-move forged image results from a specific type of image tampering procedure carried out by copying a part of an image and pasting it on one or more parts of the same image generally to maliciously hide unwanted objects/regions or clone an object. Therefore, detecting such forgeries mainly consists in devising ways of exposing identical or relatively similar areas in images. This survey attempts to cover existing partition-based copy-move forgery detection techniques.

  14. TU-B-19A-01: Image Registration II: TG132-Quality Assurance for Image Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, K; Mutic, S

    2014-06-15

    AAPM Task Group 132 was charged with a review of the current approaches and solutions for image registration in radiotherapy and to provide recommendations for quality assurance and quality control of these clinical processes. As the results of image registration are always used as the input of another process for planning or delivery, it is important for the user to understand and document the uncertainty associate with the algorithm in general and the Result of a specific registration. The recommendations of this task group, which at the time of abstract submission are currently being reviewed by the AAPM, include the following components. The user should understand the basic image registration techniques and methods of visualizing image fusion. The disclosure of basic components of the image registration by commercial vendors is critical in this respect. The physicists should perform end-to-end tests of imaging, registration, and planning/treatment systems if image registration is performed on a stand-alone system. A comprehensive commissioning process should be performed and documented by the physicist prior to clinical use of the system. As documentation is important to the safe implementation of this process, a request and report system should be integrated into the clinical workflow. Finally, a patient specific QA practice should be established for efficient evaluation of image registration results. The implementation of these recommendations will be described and illustrated during this educational session. Learning Objectives: Highlight the importance of understanding the image registration techniques used in their clinic. Describe the end-to-end tests needed for stand-alone registration systems. Illustrate a comprehensive commissioning program using both phantom data and clinical images. Describe a request and report system to ensure communication and documentation. Demonstrate an clinically-efficient patient QA practice for efficient evaluation of image

  15. Enhancing studies of the connectome in autism using the autism brain imaging data exchange II.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Adriana; O'Connor, David; Chen, Bosi; Alaerts, Kaat; Anderson, Jeffrey S; Assaf, Michal; Balsters, Joshua H; Baxter, Leslie; Beggiato, Anita; Bernaerts, Sylvie; Blanken, Laura M E; Bookheimer, Susan Y; Braden, B Blair; Byrge, Lisa; Castellanos, F Xavier; Dapretto, Mirella; Delorme, Richard; Fair, Damien A; Fishman, Inna; Fitzgerald, Jacqueline; Gallagher, Louise; Keehn, R Joanne Jao; Kennedy, Daniel P; Lainhart, Janet E; Luna, Beatriz; Mostofsky, Stewart H; Müller, Ralph-Axel; Nebel, Mary Beth; Nigg, Joel T; O'Hearn, Kirsten; Solomon, Marjorie; Toro, Roberto; Vaidya, Chandan J; Wenderoth, Nicole; White, Tonya; Craddock, R Cameron; Lord, Catherine; Leventhal, Bennett; Milham, Michael P

    2017-03-14

    The second iteration of the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (ABIDE II) aims to enhance the scope of brain connectomics research in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Consistent with the initial ABIDE effort (ABIDE I), that released 1112 datasets in 2012, this new multisite open-data resource is an aggregate of resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and corresponding structural MRI and phenotypic datasets. ABIDE II includes datasets from an additional 487 individuals with ASD and 557 controls previously collected across 16 international institutions. The combination of ABIDE I and ABIDE II provides investigators with 2156 unique cross-sectional datasets allowing selection of samples for discovery and/or replication. This sample size can also facilitate the identification of neurobiological subgroups, as well as preliminary examinations of sex differences in ASD. Additionally, ABIDE II includes a range of psychiatric variables to inform our understanding of the neural correlates of co-occurring psychopathology; 284 diffusion imaging datasets are also included. It is anticipated that these enhancements will contribute to unraveling key sources of ASD heterogeneity.

  16. Enhancing studies of the connectome in autism using the autism brain imaging data exchange II

    PubMed Central

    Di Martino, Adriana; O’Connor, David; Chen, Bosi; Alaerts, Kaat; Anderson, Jeffrey S.; Assaf, Michal; Balsters, Joshua H.; Baxter, Leslie; Beggiato, Anita; Bernaerts, Sylvie; Blanken, Laura M. E.; Bookheimer, Susan Y.; Braden, B. Blair; Byrge, Lisa; Castellanos, F. Xavier; Dapretto, Mirella; Delorme, Richard; Fair, Damien A.; Fishman, Inna; Fitzgerald, Jacqueline; Gallagher, Louise; Keehn, R. Joanne Jao; Kennedy, Daniel P.; Lainhart, Janet E.; Luna, Beatriz; Mostofsky, Stewart H.; Müller, Ralph-Axel; Nebel, Mary Beth; Nigg, Joel T.; O’Hearn, Kirsten; Solomon, Marjorie; Toro, Roberto; Vaidya, Chandan J.; Wenderoth, Nicole; White, Tonya; Craddock, R. Cameron; Lord, Catherine; Leventhal, Bennett; Milham, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    The second iteration of the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (ABIDE II) aims to enhance the scope of brain connectomics research in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Consistent with the initial ABIDE effort (ABIDE I), that released 1112 datasets in 2012, this new multisite open-data resource is an aggregate of resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and corresponding structural MRI and phenotypic datasets. ABIDE II includes datasets from an additional 487 individuals with ASD and 557 controls previously collected across 16 international institutions. The combination of ABIDE I and ABIDE II provides investigators with 2156 unique cross-sectional datasets allowing selection of samples for discovery and/or replication. This sample size can also facilitate the identification of neurobiological subgroups, as well as preliminary examinations of sex differences in ASD. Additionally, ABIDE II includes a range of psychiatric variables to inform our understanding of the neural correlates of co-occurring psychopathology; 284 diffusion imaging datasets are also included. It is anticipated that these enhancements will contribute to unraveling key sources of ASD heterogeneity. PMID:28291247

  17. Ultraviolet imaging telescope and optical emission-line observations of H II regions in M81

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Jesse K.; Cheng, K.-P.; Bohlin, Ralph C.; Cornett, Robert H.; Hintzen, P. M. N.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Roberts, Morton S.; Smith, Andrew M.; Smith, Eric P.; Stecher, Theodore P.

    1995-01-01

    Images of the type Sab spiral galaxy M81 were obtained in far-UV and near-UV bands by the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT) during the Astro-1 Spacelab mission of 1990 December. Magnitudes in the two UV bands are determined for 52 H II regions from the catalog of Petit, Sivan, & Karachentsev (1988). Fluxes of the H-alpha and H-beta emission lines are determined from CCD images. Extinctions for the brightest H II regions are determined from observed Balmer decrements. Fainter H II regions are assigned the average of published radio-H-alpha extinctions for several bright H II regions. The radiative transfer models of Witt, Thronson, & Capuano (1992) are shown to predict a relationship between Balmer Decrement and H-alpha extinction consistent with observed line and radio fluxes for the brightest 7 H II regions and are used to estimate the UV extinction. Ratios of Lyman continuum with ratios predicted by model spectra computed for initial mass function (IMF) slope equal to -1.0 and stellar masses ranging from 5 to 120 solar mass. Ages and masses are estimated by comparing the H-alpha and far-UV fluxes and their ratio with the models. The total of the estimated stellar masses for the 52 H II regions is 1.4 x 10(exp 5) solar mass. The star-formation rate inferred for M81 from the observed UV and H-alpha fluxes is low for a spiral galaxy at approximately 0.13 solar mass/yr, but consistent with the low star-formation rates obtained by Kennicutt (1983) and Caldwell et al. (1991) for early-type spirals.

  18. Image transfer through cirrus clouds. II. Wave-front segmentation and imaging.

    PubMed

    Landesman, Barbara T; Matson, Charles L

    2002-12-20

    A hybrid technique to simulate the imaging of space-based objects through cirrus clouds is presented. The method makes use of standard Huygens-Fresnel propagation beyond the cloud boundary and a novel vector trace approach within the cloud. At the top of the cloud, the wave front is divided into an array of input gradient vectors, which are in turn transmitted through the cloud model by use of the Coherent Illumination Ray Trace and Imaging Software for Cirrus. At the bottom of the cloud, the output vector distribution is used to reconstruct a wave front that continues propagating to the ground receiver. Images of the object as seen through cirrus clouds with different optical depths are compared with a diffraction-limited image. Turbulence effects from the atmospheric propagation are not included.

  19. A solar type II radio burst from coronal mass ejection-coronal ray interaction: Simultaneous radio and extreme ultraviolet imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yao; Du, Guohui; Feng, Shiwei; Kong, Xiangliang; Wang, Bing; Feng, Li; Guo, Fan; Li, Gang

    2014-05-20

    Simultaneous radio and extreme ultraviolet (EUV)/white-light imaging data are examined for a solar type II radio burst occurring on 2010 March 18 to deduce its source location. Using a bow-shock model, we reconstruct the three-dimensional EUV wave front (presumably the type-II-emitting shock) based on the imaging data of the two Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory spacecraft. It is then combined with the Nançay radio imaging data to infer the three-dimensional position of the type II source. It is found that the type II source coincides with the interface between the coronal mass ejection (CME) EUV wave front and a nearby coronal ray structure, providing evidence that the type II emission is physically related to the CME-ray interaction. This result, consistent with those of previous studies, is based on simultaneous radio and EUV imaging data for the first time.

  20. A Eu(II)-Containing Cryptate as a Redox Sensor in Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Living Tissue.

    PubMed

    Ekanger, Levi A; Polin, Lisa A; Shen, Yimin; Haacke, E Mark; Martin, Philip D; Allen, Matthew J

    2015-11-23

    The Eu(II) ion rivals Gd(III) in its ability to enhance contrast in magnetic resonance imaging. However, all reported Eu(II)-based complexes have been studied in vitro largely because the tendency of Eu(II) to oxidize to Eu(III) has been viewed as a major obstacle to in vivo imaging. Herein, we present solid- and solution-phase characterization of a Eu(II)-containing cryptate and the first in vivo use of Eu(II) to provide contrast enhancement. The results indicate that between one and two water molecules are coordinated to the Eu(II) core upon dissolution. We also demonstrate that Eu(II)-based contrast enhancement can be observed for hours in a mouse.

  1. MightySat II.1 Hyperspectral Imager: Summary of On-Orbit Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    system is composed of a telescope and a re-imaging system4 (Figure 1). The telescope is a 165mm clear aperture Ritchey - Cretien design.3 The system...tolerances. Camera Lens Assembly Interferometer Telescope Figure 1: Exploded view of the Fourier Transform Hyperspectral Instrument on-board MightySat II.1...launch (as of 2 July 2001). The temperature sensors are located on or near the telescope (HSITT), interferometer (HSIIT), and the camera (HSICT). All

  2. Near-infrared (Fe II) and Pa Beta imaging and spectroscopy of Arp 220

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armus, L.; Shupe, D. L.; Matthews, K.; Soifer, B. T.; Neugebauer, G.

    1995-01-01

    We have imaged the ultraluminous infrared galaxy Arp 220 in light of the near-infrared (Fe II) 1.257 micron and Pa-beta lines, and have obtained spectra in the J- and H-band atmospheric windows. Arp 220 is a strong source of (Fe II) and Pa-beta emission, with luminosities of 1.3 x 10(exp 41) and 9.2 x 10(exp 40) ergs/s, respectively. The (Fe II) and Pa-beta emission are both extended over the central 2 sec-3 sec, but with different morphologies. We suggest that the extended (Fe II) emission is produced through the interaction of fast shocks with ambient gas in the interstellar medium (ISM) at the base of the outflowing, supernovae-driven superwind mapped by Heckman et al. (1987). The bolometric luminosity of the starburst required to power this wind is estimated to be at least 2 x 10(exp 11) solar luminosity. If the spatially unresolved (Fe II) emission is produced via a large number of supernova remnants, the implied rate is approximately 0.6/yr. The overall luminosity of such a starburst could account for a large fraction (1/2-1/3) of the Arp 220 energy budget, but the large deficit of ionizing photons (as counted by the Pa-beta luminosity) requires that the starburst be rapidly declining and/or have a low upper mass cutoff. Alternatively, dust may effectively compete with the gas for ionizing photons, or much of the ionizing radiation may escape through 'holes' in the ISM. It is also possible that a buried active galactic nuclei (AGN) produces a large fraction of the unresolved (Fe II) and Pa-beta emission. We briefly discuss these possibilities in light of these new imaging and spectroscopic data.

  3. Sono-photoacoustic imaging of gold nanoemulsions: Part II. Real time imaging

    PubMed Central

    Arnal, Bastien; Wei, Chen-Wei; Perez, Camilo; Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Lombardo, Michael; Pelivanov, Ivan; Pozzo, Lilo D.; O’Donnell, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging using exogenous agents can be limited by degraded specificity due to strong background signals. This paper introduces a technique called sono-photoacoustics (SPA) applied to perfluorohexane nanodroplets coated with gold nanospheres. Pulsed laser and ultrasound (US) excitations are applied simultaneously to the contrast agent to induce a phase-transition ultimately creating a transient microbubble. The US field present during the phase transition combined with the large thermal expansion of the bubble leads to 20–30 dB signal enhancement. Aqueous solutions and phantoms with very low concentrations of this agent were probed using pulsed laser radiation at diagnostic exposures and a conventional US array used both for excitation and imaging. Contrast specificity of the agent was demonstrated with a coherent differential scheme to suppress US and linear PA background signals. SPA shows great potential for molecular imaging with ultrasensitive detection of targeted gold coated nanoemulsions and cavitation-assisted theranostic approaches. PMID:25893170

  4. A New Approach for Copy-Move Detection Based on Improved Weber Local Descriptor.

    PubMed

    Saadat, Shabnam; Moghaddam, Mohsen Ebrahimi; Mohammadi, Mohsen

    2015-11-01

    One of the most common image tampering techniques is copy-move; in this technique, one or more parts of the image are copied and pasted in another area of the image. Recently, various methods have been proposed for copy-move detection; however, many of these techniques are not robust to additional changes like geometric transformation, and they are failed to be useful for detecting small copied areas. In this paper, a new method based on point descriptors which are derived from the integration of textural feature-based Weber law and statistical features of the image is presented. In this proposed approach, modified multiscale version of Weber local descriptor is presented to make the method robust versus geometric transformation and detect small copied areas. The results of the experiments showed that our method can detect small copied areas and copy-move tampered images which are influenced by rotation, scaling, noise addition, compression, blurring, and mirroring.

  5. AN IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY OF FOUR STRONG Mg II ABSORBERS REVEALED BY GRB 060418

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, L. K.; Prochaska, J. X.; Chen, H.-W.; Bloom, J. S.

    2009-08-20

    We present results from an imaging and spectroscopic study of four strong Mg II absorbers of W(2796) {approx}> 1 A revealed by the afterglow of GRB 060418 at z{sub GRB} = 1.491. These absorbers, at z = 0.603, 0.656, 1.107, and z {sub GRB}, exhibit large ion abundances that suggest neutral gas columns characteristic of damped Ly{alpha} systems. The imaging data include optical images obtained using Low-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (LRIS) on the Keck I telescope and using Advanced Camera for Surveys on board Hubble Space Telescope, and near-infrared H-band images obtained using Persson's Auxiliary Nasmyth Infrared Camera on the Magellan Baade Telescope and K'-band images obtained using NIRC2 with laser guide star adaptive optics on the Keck II telescope. These images reveal six distinct objects at {delta} {theta} {approx}< 3.''5 of the afterglow's position, two of which exhibit well-resolved mature disk morphology, one shows red colors, and three are blue compact sources. Follow-up spectroscopic observations using LRIS confirm that one of the disk galaxies coincides with the Mg II absorber at z = 0.656. The observed broadband spectral energy distributions of the second disk galaxy and the red source indicate that they are associated with the absorbers at z = 0.603 and z = 1.107, respectively. These results show that strong Mg II absorbers identified in gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow spectra are associated with typical galaxies of luminosity {approx}0.1 - 1 L{sub *} at impact parameter of {rho} {approx}< 10 h {sup -1} kpc. The close angular separation would preclude easy detections toward a bright quasar. Finally, we associate the remaining three blue compact sources with the GRB host galaxy, noting that they are likely star-forming knots located at projected distances of {rho} = 2 - 12 h {sup -1} kpc from the afterglow. At the afterglow's position, we derive a 2{sigma} upper limit to the underlying star-formation rate intensity of 0.0074 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} kpc

  6. Design of site specific radiopharmaceuticals for tumor imaging. (Parts I and II)

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dort, M.E.

    1983-01-01

    Part I. Synthetic methods were developed for the preparation of several iodinated benzoic acid hydrazides as labeling moieties for indirect tagging of carbonyl-containing bio-molecules and potential tumor-imaging agents. Biodistribution studies conducted in mice on the derivatives having the I-125 label ortho to a phenolic OH demonstrated a rapid in vivo deiodination. Part II. The reported high melanin binding affinity of quinoline and other heterocyclic antimalarial drugs led to the development of many analogues of such molecules as potential melanoma-imaging agents. Once such analogue iodochloroquine does exhibit high melanin binding, but has found limited clinical use due to appreciable accumulation in non-target tissues such as the adrenal cortex and inner ear. This project developed a new series of candidate melanoma imaging agents which would be easier to radio-label, could yield higher specific activity product, and which might demonstrate more favorable pharmacokinetic and dosimetric characteristics compared to iodochloroquine.

  7. [Digitalization, archival storage and use of image documentation in the GastroBase-II system].

    PubMed

    Kocna, P

    1997-05-14

    "GastroBase-II" is a module of the clinical information system "KIS-ComSyD"; The main part is represented by structured data-text with an expert system including on-line image digitalization in gastroenterology (incl. endoscopic, X-ray and endosonography pictures). The hardware and software of the GastroBase are described as well as six-years experiences with application of digitalized image data. An integration of a picture into text, reports, slides for a lecture or an electronic atlas is documented with examples. Briefly are reported out experiences with graphic editors (PhotoStyler), text editor (WordPerfect) and slide preparation for lecturing with the presentation software PowerPoint. The multimedia applications on the CD-ROM illustrate a modern trend using digitalized image documentation for pregradual and postgradual education.

  8. Digital authentication with copy-detection patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, Justin

    2004-06-01

    Technologies for making high-quality copies of documents are getting more available, cheaper, and more efficient. As a result, the counterfeiting business engenders huge losses, ranging to 5% to 8% of worldwide sales of brand products, and endangers the reputation and value of the brands themselves. Moreover, the growth of the Internet drives the business of counterfeited documents (fake IDs, university diplomas, checks, and so on), which can be bought easily and anonymously from hundreds of companies on the Web. The incredible progress of digital imaging equipment has put in question the very possibility of verifying the authenticity of documents: how can we discern genuine documents from seemingly "perfect" copies? This paper proposes a solution based on creating digital images with specific properties, called a Copy-detection patterns (CDP), that is printed on arbitrary documents, packages, etc. CDPs make an optimal use of an "information loss principle": every time an imae is printed or scanned, some information is lost about the original digital image. That principle applies even for the highest quality scanning, digital imaging, printing or photocopying equipment today, and will likely remain true for tomorrow. By measuring the amount of information contained in a scanned CDP, the CDP detector can take a decision on the authenticity of the document.

  9. Rare Copy Number Variants

    PubMed Central

    Grozeva, Detelina; Kirov, George; Ivanov, Dobril; Jones, Ian R.; Jones, Lisa; Green, Elaine K.; St Clair, David M.; Young, Allan H.; Ferrier, Nicol; Farmer, Anne E.; McGuffin, Peter; Holmans, Peter A.; Owen, Michael J.; O’Donovan, Michael C.; Craddock, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Context Recent studies suggest that copy number variation in the human genome is extensive and may play an important role in susceptibility to disease, including neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. The possible involvement of copy number variants (CNVs) in bipolar disorder has received little attention to date. Objectives To determine whether large (>100 000 base pairs) and rare (found in <1% of the population) CNVs are associated with susceptibility to bipolar disorder and to compare with findings in schizophrenia. Design A genome-wide survey of large, rare CNVs in a case-control sample using a high-density microarray. Setting The Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. Participants There were 1697 cases of bipolar disorder and 2806 nonpsychiatric controls. All participants were white UK residents. Main Outcome Measures Overall load of CNVs and presence of rare CNVs. Results The burden of CNVs in bipolar disorder was not increased compared with controls and was significantly less than in schizophrenia cases. The CNVs previously implicated in the etiology of schizophrenia were not more common in cases with bipolar disorder. Conclusions Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder differ with respect to CNV burden in general and association with specific CNVs in particular. Our data are consistent with the possibility that possession of large, rare deletions may modify the phenotype in those at risk of psychosis: those possessing such events are more likely to be diagnosed as having schizophrenia, and those without them are more likely to be diagnosed as having bipolar disorder. PMID:20368508

  10. Synthesis and evaluation of 18F-labeled ATP competitive inhibitors of topoisomerase II as probes for imaging topoisomerase II expression

    PubMed Central

    Daumar, Pierre; Zeglis, Brian M.; Ramos, Nicholas; Divilov, Vadim; Sevak, Kuntal Kumar; Pillarsetty, NagaVaraKishore; Lewis, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    Type II topoisomerase (Topo-II) is an ATP-dependent enzyme that is essential in the transcription, replication, and chromosome segregation processes and, as such, represents an attractive target for cancer therapy. Numerous studies indicate that the response to treatment with Topo-II inhibitors is highly dependent on both the levels and the activity of the enzyme. Consequently, a non-invasive assay to measure tumoral Topo-II levels has the potential to differentiate responders from non-responders. With the ultimate goal of developing a radiofluorinated tracer for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, we have designed, synthesized, and evaluated a set of fluorinated compounds based on the structure of the ATP-competitive Topo-II inhibitor QAP1. Compounds 18 and 19b showed inhibition of Topo-II in in vitro assays and exhibited moderate, Topo-II level dependent cytotoxicity in SK-BR-3 and MCF-7 cell lines. Based on these results, 18F-labeled analogs of these two compounds were synthesized and evaluated as PET probes for imaging Topo-II overexpression in mice bearing SK-BR-3 xenografts. [18F]-18 and [18F]-19b were synthesized from their corresponding protected tosylated derivatives by fluorination and subsequent deprotection. Small animal PET imaging studies indicated that both compounds do not accumulate in tumors and exhibit poor pharmacokinetics, clearing from the blood pool very rapidly and getting metabolized over. The insights gained from the current study will surely aid in the design and construction of future generations of PET agents for the non-invasive delineation of Topo-II expression. PMID:25240701

  11. The Ba II 4554 / Hβ Imaging Polarimeter for the Dutch Open Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snik, F.; Bettonvil, F. C. M.; Jägers, A. P. L.; Hammerschlag, R. H.; Rutten, R. J.; Keller, C. U.

    2006-12-01

    In order to expand the high-resolution, multi-wavelength imaging capabilities of the Dutch Open Telescope (DOT), an additional polarimetric channel based on a 80 mÅ tunable Lyot filter for Ba II 4554 and Hβ has been designed and constructed. The large atomic mass and the resulting steep line wings, make Ba II 4554 particularly suitable for the creation of photospheric Dopplergrams and Stokes-V magnetograms. The line also yields a significant degree of linear (scattering) polarization for observations near the limb of the Sun, which is modified by both horizontal and vertical weak-field topologies through the Hanle effect and hyperfine-structure level crossing. The polarimeter is based on liquid crystal variable retarders (LCVRs) as polarization modulators in combination with the Lyot filter's entrance polarizer. The tunability of the LCVRs is exploited to enable specific wavelength calibration, selection of the reference frame of linear polarization, and optimization of instrumental polarization cross-talk, which for the DOT is constant in time. With the future Ba II 4554 photospheric magnetograms, we expect to be able to discern magnetic structures of about 150 km with field strengths down to 100 G, and that Hanle-type observations can be performed at a resolution of about 1 arcsec. The range of applicability of Hβ imaging polarimetry has to be explored after installation.

  12. 11. Photographic copy of copy of Twin Lakes Outlet Works ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photographic copy of copy of Twin Lakes Outlet Works construction drawing dated January 15, 1951. Drawn by W.A. Doe for the Twin Lakes Reservoir and Canal Co. (copy in possession of Bureau of Reclamation, location of original unknown) 'AS CONSTRUCTED' PLANS OF 1949-1950, REHABILITATION OF TWIN LAKES RESERVOIR OUTLET WORKS, DETAILS OF UPSTREAM WING WALLS. - Twin Lakes Dam & Outlet Works, Beneath Twin Lakes Reservoir, T11S, R80W, S22, Twin Lakes, Lake County, CO

  13. 12. Photographic copy of copy of Twin Lakes Outlet Works ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photographic copy of copy of Twin Lakes Outlet Works construction drawing dated January 15, 1951. Drawn by W.A. Doe for the Twin Lakes Reservoir and Canal Co. (copy in possession of Bureau of Reclamation, location of original unknown) 'AS CONSTRUCTED' PLANS OF 1949-50, REHABILITATION OF TWIN LAKES RESERVOIR OUTLET WORKS, DETAILS OF DISCHARGE BASIN. - Twin Lakes Dam & Outlet Works, Beneath Twin Lakes Reservoir, T11S, R80W, S22, Twin Lakes, Lake County, CO

  14. Primary research on image of plasma in CO II laser welding with high-speed photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinhe; Ma, Licai; Xie, Yaozheng; Zhang, Yong

    2006-02-01

    In this paper the image by high-speed photography of plasma in CO II laser welding is studied including the area of these images, the change rate of these images, the isogray line of the image and the maximal variation of the image gray. The used laser is RS850 made in German and the high-speed photography is NAC-10 made in Japan. The weld material is low carbon steel. The welding parameters include laser power 4KW, welding speed 1.2m/min, shielding gas Helium, Helium flow rate 11L/min. The parameters for high-speed photography are as exposure time 1/5000 of second, shoot frequency 1000 frame/s. According to the analyses the main conclusion as follows: In the experiment, the values of gray of these images cover from 40 to 255. The area of the plasma is oscillation and the average frequency of the oscillation is about 300Hz. The laser welding plasma can be divided to three parts: periphery, smoothness and core from the external to inner. The isogray line of the periphery is very irregular because of shocking of the shielding gas and the metal spatter. In the core region, the thermal motion of the electrons is violent, so there is lots of little division with complex shape. The gap of isogrey line in the periphery region and core region are larger than it in the smoothing region. The isogrey lines of the image in the melting pool link with the isogray line of the image of the laser welding plasma, so it can be used to checking the temperature field each other. There exits an isothermal kernel in the core region.

  15. A functional ruthenium(ii) complex for imaging biothiols in living bodies.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhiqiang; Gao, Quankun; An, Xin; Song, Bo; Yuan, Jingli

    2015-05-07

    A unique ruthenium(ii) complex, [Ru(bpy)2(DNS-bpy)](PF6)2 [bpy: 2,2'-bipyridine, DNS-bpy: 4-(2,4-dinitrophenylthio)-2,2'-bipyridine], that can act as a probe for the recognition and luminescence sensing of biothiols has been designed and synthesized. Due to the presence of effective photo-induced electron transfer (PET) from the potent electron donor (Ru-bpy centre) to the strong electron acceptor (2,4-dinitrophenyl moiety), the Ru(ii) complex itself is weakly luminescent. Reaction of [Ru(bpy)2(DNS-bpy)](PF6)2 with biothiols leads to the replacement of the 2,4-dinitrophenyl moiety by biothiols, which results in the loss of PET within the complex, to allow recovery of the MLCT-based emission of the Ru(ii) complex with an 80-fold increase in luminescence intensity. Taking advantage of the high specificity and sensitivity, and the excellent photophysical properties of Ru(ii) complexes, [Ru(bpy)2(DNS-bpy)](PF6)2 was successfully applied to the luminescence imaging of biothiols in living Daphnia magna. The results demonstrated the practical applicability of [Ru(bpy)2(DNS-bpy)](PF6)2 as a luminescent probe for the monitoring of biothiols in living bodies.

  16. Airflow analyses using thermal imaging in Arizona's Meteor Crater as part of METCRAX II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grudzielanek, A. Martina; Vogt, Roland; Cermak, Jan; Maric, Mateja; Feigenwinter, Iris; Whiteman, C. David; Lehner, Manuela; Hoch, Sebastian W.; Krauß, Matthias G.; Bernhofer, Christian; Pitacco, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    In October 2013 the second Meteor Crater Experiment (METCRAX II) took place at the Barringer Meteorite Crater (aka Meteor Crater) in north central Arizona, USA. Downslope-windstorm-type flows (DWF), the main research objective of METCRAX II, were measured by a comprehensive set of meteorological sensors deployed in and around the crater. During two weeks of METCRAX II five infrared (IR) time lapse cameras (VarioCAM® hr research & VarioCAM® High Definition, InfraTec) were installed at various locations on the crater rim to record high-resolution images of the surface temperatures within the crater from different viewpoints. Changes of surface temperature are indicative of air temperature changes induced by flow dynamics inside the crater, including the DWF. By correlating thermal IR surface temperature data with meteorological sensor data during intensive observational periods the applicability of the IR method of representing flow dynamics can be assessed. We present evaluation results and draw conclusions relative to the application of this method for observing air flow dynamics in the crater. In addition we show the potential of the IR method for METCRAX II in 1) visualizing airflow processes to improve understanding of these flows, and 2) analyzing cold-air flows and cold-air pooling.

  17. Colour hard-copy from workstation screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, C. A.

    It is possible to produce a colour print on the DEC LJ250 inkjet printer of either the entire screen or a portion of the screen from VAXstations, DECstations, SUN workstations and the IKON image display. This document describes how to achieve this with each of the above workstations. The IKONPAINT software which is used to produce colour hard-copy from the IKON screen on the inkjet printer is fully documented in SUN/71 and is not described here.

  18. Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Using the HI-ART II Helical Tomotherapy System

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Timothy W. Hudes, Richard; Dziuba, Sylwester; Kazi, Abdul; Hall, Mark; Dawson, Dana

    2008-07-01

    The highly integrated adaptive radiation therapy (HI-ART II) helical tomotherapy unit is a new radiotherapy machine designed to achieve highly precise and accurate treatments at all body sites. The precision and accuracy of the HI-ART II is similar to that provided by stereotactic radiosurgery systems, hence the historical distinction between external beam radiotherapy and stereotactic procedures based on differing precision requirements is removed for this device. The objectives of this work are: (1) to describe stereotactic helical tomotherapy processes (SRS, SBRT); (2) to show that the precision and accuracy of the HI-ART meet the requirements defined for SRS and SBRT; and (3) to describe the clinical implementation of a stereotactic image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) system that incorporates optical motion management.

  19. MONSTIR II: A 32-channel, multispectral, time-resolved optical tomography system for neonatal brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Robert J. Magee, Elliott; Everdell, Nick; Magazov, Salavat; Varela, Marta; Airantzis, Dimitrios; Gibson, Adam P.; Hebden, Jeremy C.

    2014-05-15

    We detail the design, construction and performance of the second generation UCL time-resolved optical tomography system, known as MONSTIR II. Intended primarily for the study of the newborn brain, the system employs 32 source fibres that sequentially transmit picosecond pulses of light at any four wavelengths between 650 and 900 nm. The 32 detector channels each contain an independent photo-multiplier tube and temporally correlated photon-counting electronics that allow the photon transit time between each source and each detector position to be measured with high temporal resolution. The system's response time, temporal stability, cross-talk, and spectral characteristics are reported. The efficacy of MONSTIR II is demonstrated by performing multi-spectral imaging of a simple phantom.

  20. MONSTIR II: A 32-channel, multispectral, time-resolved optical tomography system for neonatal brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Robert J.; Magee, Elliott; Everdell, Nick; Magazov, Salavat; Varela, Marta; Airantzis, Dimitrios; Gibson, Adam P.; Hebden, Jeremy C.

    2014-05-01

    We detail the design, construction and performance of the second generation UCL time-resolved optical tomography system, known as MONSTIR II. Intended primarily for the study of the newborn brain, the system employs 32 source fibres that sequentially transmit picosecond pulses of light at any four wavelengths between 650 and 900 nm. The 32 detector channels each contain an independent photo-multiplier tube and temporally correlated photon-counting electronics that allow the photon transit time between each source and each detector position to be measured with high temporal resolution. The system's response time, temporal stability, cross-talk, and spectral characteristics are reported. The efficacy of MONSTIR II is demonstrated by performing multi-spectral imaging of a simple phantom.

  1. Development of bi-spectral InAs/GaSb type II superlattice image detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadelmann, T.; Wörl, A.; Wauro, M.; Daumer, V.; Niemasz, J.; Luppold, W.; Simon, T.; Riedel, M.; Rehm, R.; Walther, M.

    2014-06-01

    InAs/GaSb superlattices are characterized by a broken-gap type II band alignment. Their effective band gap can be engineered to match mid to long wavelength infrared (IR) photon energies. Fraunhofer IAF has developed image detectors for threat warning systems based on this material system that are capable of spatially and temporally coincident detection in two mid-IR wavelength ranges. We review the present status of the processing technology, report continuous improvements achieved in key areas of detector performance, including defect density and noise behavior, and present initial results for statistical characterization of ensembles of detector elements with respect to diode characteristics and noise.

  2. [Fe II] 1.64 μm IMAGING OBSERVATIONS OF THE OUTFLOW FEATURES AROUND ULTRACOMPACT H II REGIONS IN THE FIRST GALACTIC QUADRANT

    SciTech Connect

    Shinn, Jong-Ho; Kim, Kee-Tae; Lee, Jae-Joon; Kyeong, Jaemann; Hwang, Narae; Park, Byeong-Gon; Lee, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Koo, Bon-Chul; Pyo, Tae-Soo

    2014-09-01

    We present [Fe II] 1.644 μm features around ultracompact H II regions (UCHIIs) found on a quest for the ''footprint'' outflow features of UCHIIs—the features produced by outflowing materials ejected during an earlier, active accretion phase of massive young stellar objects (MYSOs). We surveyed 237 UCHIIs in the first Galactic quadrant, employing the CORNISH UCHII catalog and UWIFE data, which is an imaging survey in [Fe II] 1.644 μm performed with UKIRT-WFCAM under ∼0.''8 seeing conditions. The [Fe II] features were found around five UCHIIs, one of which was less plausible. We interpret the [Fe II] features to be shock-excited by outflows from YSOs and estimate the outflow mass-loss rates from the [Fe II] flux which are ∼1 × 10{sup –6}-4 × 10{sup –5} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. We propose that the [Fe II] features might be the ''footprint'' outflow features, but more studies are required to clarify whether or not this is the case. This is based on the morphological relation between the [Fe II] and 5 GHz radio features, the outflow mass-loss rate, the travel time of the [Fe II] features, and the existence of several YSO candidates near the UCHIIs. The UCHIIs accompanying the [Fe II] features have relatively higher peak flux densities. The fraction of UCHIIs accompanying the [Fe II] features, 5/237, is small when compared to the ∼90% detection rate of high-velocity CO gas around UCHIIs. We discuss some possible explanations for the low detection rate.

  3. Photocopy of copy of 1922 map, revised in 1936. Copy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of copy of 1922 map, revised in 1936. Copy in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Directorate of Public Works, building 118. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Bounded by East Colfax to south, Peoria Street to west, Denver City/County & Adams County Line to north, & U.S. Route 255 to east, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  4. 10. Photographic copy of copy of original construction drawing, dated ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photographic copy of copy of original construction drawing, dated 1899?. Original in possession of Twin Lakes Reservoir and Canal Company, Ordway, Colorado. PLAN OF DAM AND HEAD GATES FOR THE TWIN LAKES RESERVOIR. - Twin Lakes Dam & Outlet Works, Beneath Twin Lakes Reservoir, T11S, R80W, S22, Twin Lakes, Lake County, CO

  5. Accurate segmentation of leukocyte in blood cell images using Atanassov's intuitionistic fuzzy and interval Type II fuzzy set theory.

    PubMed

    Chaira, Tamalika

    2014-06-01

    In this paper automatic leukocyte segmentation in pathological blood cell images is proposed using intuitionistic fuzzy and interval Type II fuzzy set theory. This is done to count different types of leukocytes for disease detection. Also, the segmentation should be accurate so that the shape of the leukocytes is preserved. So, intuitionistic fuzzy set and interval Type II fuzzy set that consider either more number of uncertainties or a different type of uncertainty as compared to fuzzy set theory are used in this work. As the images are considered fuzzy due to imprecise gray levels, advanced fuzzy set theories may be expected to give better result. A modified Cauchy distribution is used to find the membership function. In intuitionistic fuzzy method, non-membership values are obtained using Yager's intuitionistic fuzzy generator. Optimal threshold is obtained by minimizing intuitionistic fuzzy divergence. In interval type II fuzzy set, a new membership function is generated that takes into account the two levels in Type II fuzzy set using probabilistic T co norm. Optimal threshold is selected by minimizing a proposed Type II fuzzy divergence. Though fuzzy techniques were applied earlier but these methods failed to threshold multiple leukocytes in images. Experimental results show that both interval Type II fuzzy and intuitionistic fuzzy methods perform better than the existing non-fuzzy/fuzzy methods but interval Type II fuzzy thresholding method performs little bit better than intuitionistic fuzzy method. Segmented leukocytes in the proposed interval Type II fuzzy method are observed to be distinct and clear.

  6. The Belle II imaging Time-of-Propagation (iTOP) detector

    DOE PAGES

    Fast, J.

    2017-02-16

    High precision flavor physics measurements are an essential complement to the direct searches for new physics at the LHC ATLAS and CMS experiments. We will perform these measurements using the upgraded Belle II detector that will take data at the SuperKEKB accelerator. With 40x the luminosity of KEKB, the detector systems must operate efficiently at much higher rates than the original Belle detector. A central element of the upgrade is the barrel particle identification system. Belle II has built and installed an imaging-Time-of-Propagation (iTOP) detector. The iTOP uses quartz optics as Cherenkov radiators. The photons are transported down the quartzmore » bars via total internal reflection with a spherical mirror at the forward end to reflect photons to the backward end where they are imaged onto an array of segmented Micro-Channel Plate Photo-Multiplier Tubes (MCP-PMTs). The system is read out using giga-samples per second waveform sampling Application-Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs). Furthermore, we used the combined timing and spatial distribution of the photons for each event to determine particle species. This paper provides an overview of the iTOP system.« less

  7. Mechanisms of COPI vesicle formation

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Victor W.; Yang, Jia-Shu

    2009-01-01

    Coat Protein I (COPI) is one of the most intensely investigated coat complexes. Numerous studies have contributed to a general understanding of how coat proteins act to initiate intracellular vesicular transport. This review highlights key recent findings that have shaped our current understanding of how COPI vesicles are formed. PMID:19854177

  8. Counting copy number and calories.

    PubMed

    White, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    Copy number variation (CNV) at several genomic loci has been associated with different human traits and diseases, but in many cases the findings could not be replicated. A new study provides insights into the degree of variation present at the amylase locus and calls into question a previous association between amylase copy number and body mass index.

  9. Tuning the cellular uptake properties of luminescent heterobimetallic iridium(III)-ruthenium(II) DNA imaging probes.

    PubMed

    Wragg, Ashley; Gill, Martin R; Turton, David; Adams, Harry; Roseveare, Thomas M; Smythe, Carl; Su, Xiaodi; Thomas, Jim A

    2014-10-20

    The synthesis of two new luminescent dinuclear Ir(III)-Ru(II) complexes containing tetrapyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c:3'',2''-h:2''',3'''-j]phenazine (tpphz) as the bridging ligand is reported. Unlike many other complexes incorporating cyclometalated Ir(III) moieties, these complexes display good water solubility, allowing the first cell-based study on Ir(III)-Ru(II) bioprobes to be carried out. Photophysical studies indicate that emission from each complex is from a Ru(II) excited state and both complexes display significant in vitro DNA-binding affinities. Cellular studies show that each complex is rapidly internalised by HeLa cells, in which they function as luminescent nuclear DNA-imaging agents for confocal microscopy. Furthermore, the uptake and nuclear targeting properties of the complex incorporating cyclometalating 2-(4-fluorophenyl)pyridine ligands around its Ir(III) centre is enhanced in comparison to the non-fluorinated analogue, indicating that fluorination may provide a route to promote cell uptake of transition-metal bioprobes.

  10. Detection of Copy-Rotate-Move Forgery Using Zernike Moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Seung-Jin; Lee, Min-Jeong; Lee, Heung-Kyu

    As forgeries have become popular, the importance of forgery detection is much increased. Copy-move forgery, one of the most commonly used methods, copies a part of the image and pastes it into another part of the the image. In this paper, we propose a detection method of copy-move forgery that localizes duplicated regions using Zernike moments. Since the magnitude of Zernike moments is algebraically invariant against rotation, the proposed method can detect a forged region even though it is rotated. Our scheme is also resilient to the intentional distortions such as additive white Gaussian noise, JPEG compression, and blurring. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed scheme is appropriate to identify the forged region by copy-rotate-move forgery.

  11. Bacterial Imaging and Photodynamic Inactivation Using Zinc(II)-Dipicolylamine BODIPY Conjugates†

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Douglas R.; Gan, Haiying; Smith, Bradley D.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted imaging and antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation (PDI) are emerging methods for detecting and eradicating pathogenic microorganisms. This study describes two structurally related optical probes that are conjugates of a zinc(II)-dipicolylamine targeting unit and a BODIPY chromophore. One probe is a microbial targeted fluorescent imaging agent, mSeek, and the other is an oxygen photosensitizing analogue, mDestroy. The conjugates exhibited high fluorescence quantum yield and singlet oxygen production, respectively. Fluorescence imaging and detection studies examined four bacterial strains: E. coli, S. aureus, K. pneumonia, and B. thuringiensis vegetative cells and purified spores. The fluorescent probe, mSeek, is not phototoxic and enabled detection of all tested bacteria at concentrations of ~100 CFU/mL for B. thuringiensis spores, ~1000 CFU/mL for S. aureus and ~10,000 CFU/mL for E. coli. The photosensitizer analogue, mDestroy, inactivated 99–99.99% of bacterial samples and selectively killed bacterial cells in the presence of mammalian cells. However, mDestroy was ineffective against B. thuringiensis spores. Together, the results demonstrate a new two-probe strategy to optimize PDI of bacterial infection/contamination. PMID:26063101

  12. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging of Physiological Free Cu(II) Levels in Live Cells with a Cu(II)-Selective Carbonic Anhydrase-Based Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    McCranor, Bryan J.; Szmacinski, Henryk; Zeng, Hui Hui; Stoddard, A.K.; Hurst, Tamiika; Fierke, Carol A.; Lakowicz, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Copper is a required trace element that plays key roles in a number of human enzymes, such that copper deficiency or genetic defects in copper transport lead to serious or fatal disease. Rae, et al., had famously predicted that free copper ion levels in the cell cytoplasm were extremely low, typically too low to be observable. We recently developed a variant of human apocarbonic anhydrase II for sensing metal ions that exhibits 25-fold better selectivity for Cu(II) over Zn(II) than the wild type protein, enabling us to accurately measure Cu(II) in the presence of ordinary cellular (picomolar) concentrations of free zinc. We inserted a fluorescent labeled Cu(II)-specific variant of human apocarbonic anhydrase into PC-12 cells and found that the levels are indeed extremely low (in the femtomolar range). We imaged the free Cu(II) levels in living cells by means of frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime microscopy. Implications of this finding are discussed. PMID:24671220

  13. Manganese (II) Chelate Functionalized Copper Sulfide Nanoparticles for Efficient Magnetic Resonance/Photoacoustic Dual-Modal Imaging Guided Photothermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Renfa; Jing, Lijia; Peng, Dong; Li, Yong; Tian, Jie; Dai, Zhifei

    2015-01-01

    The integration of diagnostic and therapeutic functionalities into one nanoplatform shows great promise in cancer therapy. In this research, manganese (II) chelate functionalized copper sulfide nanoparticles were successfully prepared using a facile hydrothermal method. The obtained ultrasmall nanoparticles exhibit excellent photothermal effect and photoaoustic activity. Besides, the high loading content of Mn(II) chelates makes the nanoparticles attractive T1 contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In vivo photoacoustic imaging (PAI) results showed that the nanoparticles could be efficiently accumulated in tumor site in 24 h after systematic administration, which was further validated by MRI tests. The subsequent photothermal therapy of cancer in vivo was achieved without inducing any observed side effects. Therefore, the copper sulfide nanoparticles functionalized with Mn(II) chelate hold great promise as a theranostic nanomedicine for MR/PA dual-modal imaging guided photothermal therapy of cancer. PMID:26284144

  14. Manganese (II) Chelate Functionalized Copper Sulfide Nanoparticles for Efficient Magnetic Resonance/Photoacoustic Dual-Modal Imaging Guided Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Renfa; Jing, Lijia; Peng, Dong; Li, Yong; Tian, Jie; Dai, Zhifei

    2015-01-01

    The integration of diagnostic and therapeutic functionalities into one nanoplatform shows great promise in cancer therapy. In this research, manganese (II) chelate functionalized copper sulfide nanoparticles were successfully prepared using a facile hydrothermal method. The obtained ultrasmall nanoparticles exhibit excellent photothermal effect and photoaoustic activity. Besides, the high loading content of Mn(II) chelates makes the nanoparticles attractive T1 contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In vivo photoacoustic imaging (PAI) results showed that the nanoparticles could be efficiently accumulated in tumor site in 24 h after systematic administration, which was further validated by MRI tests. The subsequent photothermal therapy of cancer in vivo was achieved without inducing any observed side effects. Therefore, the copper sulfide nanoparticles functionalized with Mn(II) chelate hold great promise as a theranostic nanomedicine for MR/PA dual-modal imaging guided photothermal therapy of cancer.

  15. Characterization and monitoring of Flamingos-II, a near-IR imager and spectrograph at Gemini South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krogsrud, David; Diaz, Ruben; Ferrero, Gabriel; Mora, Marcelo; Navarete, Felipe; Schirmer, Mischa

    2015-01-01

    We present results of the characterization and continual monitoring of the Flamingos-II instrument. Currently installed at Gemini South Observatory, Flamingos-II is a near-IR imager and longslit/multi-object spectrograph. In addition to the characterization of the detector, methodologies and results of the Science Verification pipeline, Telluric corrections, and Multi-Object Spectrograph (MOS) mask design software are presented.

  16. Thin film interference optics for imaging the O II 834-A airglow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seely, John F.; Hunter, William R.

    1991-01-01

    Normal incidence thin film interference mirrors and filters have been designed to image the O II 834-A airglow. It is shown that MgF2 is a useful spacer material for this wavelength region. The mirrors consist of thin layers of MgF2 in combination with other materials that are chosen to reflect efficiently in a narrow band centered at 834 A. Peak reflectance of 60 percent can be obtained with a passband 200 A wide. Al/MgF2/Si and Al/MgF2/SiC interference coatings have been designed to reflect 834 A and to absorb the intense H I 1216 A airglow. An In/MgF2/In interference filter is designed to transmit 834 A and attenuate 1216 A radiation. Interference photocathode coatings for rejecting 1216 A radiation are also discussed.

  17. First Resolved Images of a Spacecraft in Geostationary Orbit with the Keck-II 10 m Telescope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    2009, with the adaptive optics on the largest telescope on the planet, the 10 m Keck-II on the 14000 foot summit of Mauna Kea . 1. Observations As...part of an engineering run at the Keck-II 10 m telescope on Mauna Kea , several adaptive optics images were obtained of geostationary satellite GE-23, a...largest telescope on the planet, the 10 m Keck-II on the 14000 foot summit of Mauna Kea . 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17

  18. Proper Motion of the Leo II Dwarf Galaxy Based On Hubble Space Telescope Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatek, Slawomir; Pryor, Carlton; Olszewski, Edward W.

    2016-12-01

    This article reports a measurement of the proper motion of Leo II, a dwarf galaxy that is a likely satellite of the Milky Way, based on imaging with the Hubble Space Telescope and Wide Field Camera 3. The measurement uses compact background galaxies as standards of rest in both channels of the camera for two distinct pointings of the telescope, as well as a QSO in one channel for each pointing, resulting in the weighted average of six measurements. The measured proper motion in the the equatorial coordinate system is (μ α ,μ δ )=(-6.9+/- 3.7,-8.7+/- 3.9) mas century-1 and in the Galactic coordinate system it is (μ ℓ,μ b)=(6.2+/- 3.9,-9.2+/- 3.7) mas century-1. The implied space velocity with respect to the Galactic center is (Π,Θ,Z) =(-37+/- 38,117+/- 43,40+/- 16) km s-1 or, expressed in Galactocentric radial and tangential components, (Vr,Vtan )=(21.9+/- 1.5,127+/- 42) km s-1. The space velocity implies that the instantaneous orbital inclination is 68°, with a 95% confidence interval of (66°,80°). The measured motion supports the hypothesis that Leo II, Leo IV, Leo V, Crater 2, and the globular cluster Crater fell into the Milky Way as a group.

  19. Images in the rocket ultraviolet - Young clusters in H II regions of M83

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohlin, Ralph C.; Cornett, Robert H.; Hill, Jesse K.; Stecher, Theodore P.

    1990-01-01

    UV images of M83 at 1540 and 2360 A reveal 18 compact sources that are associated with H II regions. E(B - V) values were estimated individually from the observed UV and optical colors and the Galactic UV extinction curve, using theoretical flux distributions. The dereddened colors are consistent with ages up to 3 x 10 to the 6th yr. A maximum possible age of 6.5 x 10 to the 6th yr is obtained assuming foreground reddening only. The distribution of observed colors is consistent with the Galactic reddening curve but not with enhanced far-UV extinction, as in the LMC 30 Dor curve. The H-alpha fluxes suggest either that dust within the H II regions absorbs up to 70 percent of the Lyman continuum radiation or that a similar fraction of the H-alpha flux is below the surface brightness detection limit. Cluster mass estimates depend on the range of stellar masses present but are probably in the range 10,000-100,000 solar masses.

  20. Serial Assessment of Therapeutic Response to a New Radiosensitization Treatment, Kochi Oxydol-Radiation Therapy for Unresectable Carcinomas, Type II (KORTUC II), in Patients with Stage I/II Breast Cancer Using Breast Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yaogawa, Shin; Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Morita-Tokuhiro, Shiho; Tsuzuki, Akira; Akima, Ryo; Itoh, Kenji; Morio, Kazuo; Yasunami, Hiroaki; Onogawa, Masahide; Kariya, Shinji; Nogami, Munenobu; Nishioka, Akihito; Miyamura, Mitsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Background: We have developed a new radiosensitization treatment called Kochi Oxydol-Radiation Therapy for Unresectable Carcinomas, Type II (KORTUC II). Using KORTUC II, we performed breast-conserving treatment (BCT) without any surgical procedure for elderly patients with breast cancer in stages I/II or patients refusing surgery. Since surgery was not performed, histological confirmation of the primary tumor region following KORTUC II treatment was not possible. Therefore, to precisely evaluate the response to this new therapy, a detailed diagnostic procedure is needed. The goal of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic response to KORTUC II treatment in patients with stage I/II breast cancer using annual breast contrast-enhanced (CE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: Twenty-one patients with stage I/II breast cancer who were elderly and/or refused surgery were enrolled in this study. All patients underwent MRI prior to and at 3 to 6 months after KORTUC II, and then approximately biannually thereafter. Findings from MRI were compared with those from other diagnostic modalities performed during the same time period. Results: KORTUC II was well tolerated, with minimal adverse effects. All of 21 patients showed a clinically complete response (cCR) on CE MRI. The mean period taken to confirm cCR on the breast CE MRI was approximately 14 months. The mean follow-up period for the patients was 61.9 months at the end of October 2014. Conclusions: The therapeutic effect of BCT using KORTUC II without surgery could be evaluated by biannual CE MRI evaluations. Approximately 14 months were required to achieve cCR in response to this therapy. PMID:26703733

  1. 4. Photographic copy of Quartermaster General drawing (original locate at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Photographic copy of Quartermaster General drawing (original locate at Fort Hood, Texas). Plans, elevations & sections, drawing number 800-305 - Fort Hood, World War II Temporary Buildings, Dispatcher House, North of Park Avenue at Forty-ninth Street, Killeen, Bell County, TX

  2. Angiotensin II-induced angiotensin II type I receptor lysosomal degradation studied by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hewang; Yu, Peiying; Felder, Robin A.; Periasamy, Ammasi; Jose, Pedro A.

    2009-02-01

    Upon activation, the angiotensin (Ang) II type 1 receptor (AT1Rs) rapidly undergoes endocytosis. After a series of intracellular processes, the internalized AT1Rs recycle back to the plasma membrane or are trafficked to proteasomes or lysosomes for degradation. We recently reported that AT1Rs degrades in proteasomes upon stimulation of the D5 dopamine receptor (D5R) in human renal proximal tubule and HEK-293 cells. This is in contrast to the degradation of AT1R in lysosomes upon binding Ang II. However, the dynamic regulation of the AT1Rs in lysosomes is not well understood. Here we investigated the AT1Rs lysosomal degradation using FRET-FLIM in HEK 293 cells heterologously expressing the human AT1R tagged with EGFP as the donor fluorophore. Compared to its basal state, the lifetime of AT1Rs decreased after a 5-minute treatment with Ang II treatment and colocalized with Rab5 but not Rab7 and LAMP1. With longer Ang II treatment (30 min), the AT1Rs lifetime decreased and co-localized with Rab5, as well as Rab7 and LAMP1. The FLIM data are corroborated with morphological and biochemical co-immunoprecipitation studies. These data demonstrate that Ang II induces the internalization of AT1Rs into early sorting endosomes prior to trafficking to late endosomes and subsequent degradation in lysosomes.

  3. Thermal imaging QC for silicon strip staves of the ATLAS phase II upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergel Infante, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    A new silicon strip detector is part of the phase II upgrade of the ATLAS inner tracker. Light-material carbon fiber honeycomb sandwich staves serve as mechanical support for the strip sensors and readout modules and to move the dissipated heat out of the detector. A cooling pipe inside the stave is embedded in heat-conducting foam that thermally connects the pipe with the readout modules. The staves are required to pass a set of quality control (QC) tests before they are populated with readout modules. One test uses a non-invasive inspection method of infrared (IR) thermal imaging of the heat path while the stave is cooled to around -40°C at ambient room temperature. Imperfections in the manufacturing, such as the delamination of the stave facing from the foam, will exhibit a different temperature profile compared to a flawless stave. We report on the current status of the thermal imaging QC measurements including a characterization of various contributions to the uncertainties in the temperature reading of the IR camera such as pedestal variations, common-mode noise, vignetting, and statistical fluctuations across the field of view.

  4. 17 CFR 232.104 - Unofficial PDF copies included in an electronic submission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... electronic submission. An unofficial PDF copy may contain graphic and image material (but not animated... tabular representation of any omitted graphic or image material. (c) If a filer omits an unofficial...

  5. Performance confirmation of the Belle II imaging Time Of Propogation (iTOP) prototype counter

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Alan; Liu, Yang; Belhorn, Matt; Browder, Thomas; Varner, Gary; Andrew, Matt; Rosen, Marc; Barrett, Matthew; Nishimura, Kurtis; Anderson, Eric Iijima, Toru; /Nagoya U. /PNL, Richland

    2011-10-17

    modest image expansion volume and more highly pixelated image plane improve the theoretical detector performance, since timing alone is limited by chromatic dispersion of the Cherenkov photons. This imaging-TOP (or iTOP) counter is the basis of Belle II barrel PID upgrade. However, a number of critical performance parameters must be demonstrated prior to releasing this prototype design for production manufacture.

  6. Nanoscale Mn(II) -Coordination Polymers for Cell Imaging and Heterogeneous Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Koushik; Dastidar, Parthasarathi

    2016-12-23

    A mixed ligand approach was exploited to synthesize a new series of Mn(II) -based coordination polymers (CPs), namely, CP1 {[Mn(μ-dpa)(μ-4,4'-bp)]⋅MeOH}∞ , CP2 {[Mn3 (μ-dpa)3 (2,2'-bp)2 ]}∞ , CP3 {[Mn3 (μ-dpa)3 (1,10-phen)2 ]⋅2 H2 O}∞ , CP4 {[Mn(μ-dpa)(μ-4,4'-bpe)1.5 ]⋅H2 O}∞ , CP5 {[Mn2 (μ-dpa)2 (μ-4,4'-bpe)2 ]⋅1/2  DEF}∞ , and CP6 {[Mn(μ-dpa)(μ-4,4'-bpe)1.5 ]⋅1/2  DMA}∞ (dpa=3,5-dicarboxyphenyl azide, 2,2'-bp=2,2'-bipyridine, 1,10-phen=1,10-phenanthroline, 4,4'-bpe=1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethylene, 4,4'-bp=4,4'-bipyridine, DEF=N,N-diethylformamide, DMA=N,N-dimethylacetamide), to develop multifunctional CPs. Various techniques, such as single-crystal X-ray diffraction (SXRD), FTIR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and thermogravimetric analysis, were employed to fully characterize these CPs. The majority of the CPs displayed a four-connected sql topology, whereas CP4 and CP6 exhibited a two-dimensional SnS network architecture, which was further entangled in a polycatenation mode. Compound CP1 displayed an open framework structure. The CPs were scaled down to the nanoregime in a ball mill for cell imaging studies. Whereas CP2 and CP4 were employed for cell imaging with RAW264.7 cells, CP1 was exploited for both cell imaging and heterogeneous catalysis in a cyanosilylation reaction.

  7. Zero-Copy Objects System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burleigh, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    Zero-Copy Objects System software enables application data to be encapsulated in layers of communication protocol without being copied. Indirect referencing enables application source data, either in memory or in a file, to be encapsulated in place within an unlimited number of protocol headers and/or trailers. Zero-copy objects (ZCOs) are abstract data access representations designed to minimize I/O (input/output) in the encapsulation of application source data within one or more layers of communication protocol structure. They are constructed within the heap space of a Simple Data Recorder (SDR) data store to which all participating layers of the stack must have access. Each ZCO contains general information enabling access to the core source data object (an item of application data), together with (a) a linked list of zero or more specific extents that reference portions of this source data object, and (b) linked lists of protocol header and trailer capsules. The concatenation of the headers (in ascending stack sequence), the source data object extents, and the trailers (in descending stack sequence) constitute the transmitted data object constructed from the ZCO. This scheme enables a source data object to be encapsulated in a succession of protocol layers without ever having to be copied from a buffer at one layer of the protocol stack to an encapsulating buffer at a lower layer of the stack. For large source data objects, the savings in copy time and reduction in memory consumption may be considerable.

  8. Imaging of Early-Type Sa-Sab Spiral Galaxies. II. Global Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hameed, Salman; Devereux, Nick

    2005-06-01

    New results, based on one of the most comprehensive Hα imaging surveys of nearby Sa-Sab spirals completed to date, reveals early-type spirals to be a diverse group of galaxies that span a wide range in massive star formation rates. While the majority of Sa-Sab galaxies in our sample are forming stars at a modest rate, a significant fraction (~29%) exhibit star formation rates greater than 1 Msolar yr-1, rivaling the most prolifically star-forming late-type spirals. A similar diversity is apparent in the star formation history of Sa-Sab spirals as measured by their Hα equivalent widths. Consistent with our preliminary results presented in the first paper in this series, we find giant H II regions [L(Hα)>=1039 ergs s-1] in the disks of ~37% of early-type spirals. We suspect that recent minor mergers or past interactions are responsible for the elevated levels of Hα emission and, perhaps, for the presence of giant H II regions in these galaxies. Our results, however, are not in total agreement with the Hα study of Kennicutt & Kent, who did not find any early-type spirals with Hα equivalent widths >14 Å. A close examination of the morphological classification of galaxies, however, suggests that systematic differences between the Revised Shapley-Ames Catalog and the Second Reference Catalogue may be responsible for the contrasting results. Based on observations obtained with the 3.5 m telescope at Apache Point Observatory (APO) and the 0.9 m telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO). The APO 3.5 m telescope is owned and operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium.

  9. To Copy-Protect or Not to Copy-Protect?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacks, Jonathan

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the issues of software piracy, why people illegally copy software, protection afforded software developers by copyright laws, and current and future methods of disk-based protection built into software by developers and the problems these methods have created. (MBR)

  10. APPLEPIPS /Apple Personal Image Processing System/ - An interactive digital image processing system for the Apple II microcomputer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masuoka, E.; Rose, J.; Quattromani, M.

    1981-01-01

    Recent developments related to microprocessor-based personal computers have made low-cost digital image processing systems a reality. Image analysis systems built around these microcomputers provide color image displays for images as large as 256 by 240 pixels in sixteen colors. Descriptive statistics can be computed for portions of an image, and supervised image classification can be obtained. The systems support Basic, Fortran, Pascal, and assembler language. A description is provided of a system which is representative of the new microprocessor-based image processing systems currently on the market. While small systems may never be truly independent of larger mainframes, because they lack 9-track tape drives, the independent processing power of the microcomputers will help alleviate some of the turn-around time problems associated with image analysis and display on the larger multiuser systems.

  11. Mg ii Lines Observed During the X-class Flare on 29 March 2014 by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Heinzel, P.; Kleint, L.; Kašparová, J.

    2015-12-01

    Mg ii lines represent one of the strongest emissions from the chromospheric plasma during solar flares. In this article, we studied the Mg ii lines observed during the X1 flare on 29 March 2014 (SOL2014-03-29T17:48) by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). IRIS detected large intensity enhancements of the Mg ii h and k lines, subordinate triplet lines, and several other metallic lines at the flare footpoints during this flare. We have used the advantage of the slit-scanning mode (rastering) of IRIS and performed, for the first time, a detailed analysis of spatial and temporal variations of the spectra. Moreover, we were also able to identify positions of strongest hard X-ray (HXR) emissions using the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observations and to correlate them with the spatial and temporal evolution of IRIS Mg ii spectra. The light curves of the Mg ii lines increase and peak contemporarily with the HXR emissions but decay more gradually. There are large red asymmetries in the Mg ii h and k lines after the flare peak. We see two spatially well-separated groups of Mg ii line profiles, non-reversed and reversed. In some cases, the Mg ii footpoints with reversed profiles are correlated with HXR sources. We show the spatial and temporal behavior of several other line parameters (line metrics) and briefly discuss them. Finally, we have synthesized the Mg ii k line using our non-LTE code with the Multilevel Accelerated Lambda Iteration (MALI) technique. Two kinds of models are considered, the flare model F2 of Machado et al. ( Astrophys. J. 242, 336, 1980) and the models of Ricchiazzi and Canfield ( Astrophys. J. 272, 739, 1983, RC models). Model F2 reproduces the peak intensity of the non-reversed Mg ii k profile at flare maximum, but does not account for high wing intensities. On the other hand, the RC models show the sensitivity of Mg ii line intensities to various electron-beam parameters. Our simulations also show that

  12. The International Deep Planet Survey. II. The frequency of directly imaged giant exoplanets with stellar mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galicher, R.; Marois, C.; Macintosh, B.; Zuckerman, B.; Barman, T.; Konopacky, Q.; Song, I.; Patience, J.; Lafrenière, D.; Doyon, R.; Nielsen, E. L.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Radial velocity and transit methods are effective for the study of short orbital period exoplanets but they hardly probe objects at large separations for which direct imaging can be used. Aims: We carried out the international deep planet survey of 292 young nearby stars to search for giant exoplanets and determine their frequency. Methods: We developed a pipeline for a uniform processing of all the data that we have recorded with NIRC2/Keck II, NIRI/Gemini North, NICI/Gemini South, and NACO/VLT for 14 yr. The pipeline first applies cosmetic corrections and then reduces the speckle intensity to enhance the contrast in the images. Results: The main result of the international deep planet survey is the discovery of the HR 8799 exoplanets. We also detected 59 visual multiple systems including 16 new binary stars and 2 new triple stellar systems, as well as 2279 point-like sources. We used Monte Carlo simulations and the Bayesian theorem to determine that 1.05+2.80-0.70% of stars harbor at least one giant planet between 0.5 and 14 MJ and between 20 and 300 AU. This result is obtained assuming uniform distributions of planet masses and semi-major axes. If we consider power law distributions as measured for close-in planets instead, the derived frequency is 2.30+5.95-1.55%, recalling the strong impact of assumptions on Monte Carlo output distributions. We also find no evidence that the derived frequency depends on the mass of the hosting star, whereas it does for close-in planets. Conclusions: The international deep planet survey provides a database of confirmed background sources that may be useful for other exoplanet direct imaging surveys. It also puts new constraints on the number of stars with at least one giant planet reducing by a factor of two the frequencies derived by almost all previous works. Tables 11-15 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  13. Velocity Fields in H II Regions Using High Resolution Imaging Fabry-Perot Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seema, P.

    1996-05-01

    The thesis comprises of two parts: I. Instrumentation II. Observations, results and discussion. An imaging Fabry-Perot spectrometer (IFPS) is designed and constructed for the studies on kinematics of extended astronomical objects (Seema et al., 1992). IFPS comprises of a field aperture, collimating lens and a two dimensional imaging sensor called Imaging Photon Detector (IPD). It is the first time that IPD which uses a resistive anode for position determination is being used in the spectroscopic studies of astronomical objects. Observations were made on Orion and Trifid nebula covering a wide field of view using a 35cm Celestron-14 telescope (f/11 cassegrain) at Gurushikhar, Mt.Abu, India. Orion Nebula: Observations were made in [OIII] 5007A, line with a spectral resolution of 6 km/sec and spatial resolution of 4" covering a field of view of 10.5', to study (i) general velocity flow (ii) high velocity flow and (iii)random motions. Line profiles generated for about 2000 positions showed an asymmetric shape with (a)a narrow component 20 +- 3 km/sec and (b) a broad component 50 +- 3 km/sec. The two components could be interpreted in terms of the interaction of the ionized gas (from the trapezium stars) with the condensations present in the nebula, resulting in the secondary flows. The iso-velocity contour map generated for both the components showed velocity flow in agreement with the champagne flow model (Tenorio-Tagle 1982). A model emission line profile constructed assuming a champagne flow in [OIII] 5007A, line for a position 2' away from theta-1 C Ori showed a reasonably good agreement with the narrow component of the observed profile. Certain high velocity flow (~50 km/s) regions are observed to be superimposed on the main flow of the narrow component. These flows are either radiation pressure driven stellar winds or jets generated during the formation phase of Young stellar objects. The radial velocity was found to be low with no high velocity flow regions in

  14. 53. PRODUCTION MOLDS. THESE MOLDS ARE COPIES OF THE ORIGINAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. PRODUCTION MOLDS. THESE MOLDS ARE COPIES OF THE ORIGINAL MOLDS IN THE MORAVIAN POTTERY AND TILE WORKS COLLECTION, AND ARE USED TO PRESS TILES. THE FACTORY KEEPS TEN PRODUCTION MOLDS FOR EACH IMAGE. THE ORIGINAL MOLDS ARE NOT USED IN PRODUCTION. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  15. 3. Credit WCT. Photographic copy of photograph, view northwest up ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Credit WCT. Photographic copy of photograph, view northwest up route of tunnel as it is extended north to new construction at Test Stand 'E.' Image made from Test Stand 'D' tower. (JPL negative no. 384-3062-B, 29 January 1962) - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Test Stand E, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  16. RNA polymerase II transcription on the fast lane.

    PubMed

    Marcello, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II is the process that copies DNA into RNA leading to the expression of a specific gene. Averaged estimates of polymerase elongation rates in mammalian cells have been shown to vary between 1 and 4 kilobases per minute. However, recent advances in live cell imaging allowed direct measurements of RNA biogenesis from a single gene exceeded 50 kb·min(-1) . This unexpected finding opens novel and intriguing perspectives on the control of metazoan transcription.

  17. Analysis of Ca II K images aiming to determine long-term trends in solar irradiance variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Anuradha; Ermolli, Ilaria; Krivova, Natalie; Solanki, Sami

    2013-04-01

    The change in radiative output of the Sun on time scales longer than a day is attributed to the variability in solar surface magnetic fields. Direct irradiance measurements are only available for less than four decades. To reconstruct long term trends in solar total and spectral irradiance, proxies of solar surface magnetism like sunspot, facular and network areas are needed. Currently, sunspot records alone are used for this purpose, from which the deduction of facular and network areas is rather indirect. Historical records of full disk images of the Sun taken in the Ca II K spectral line (393.3 nm) have the potential to provide far more direct information about the distribution and evolution of faculae and network elements. The latter appear as bright regions in the Ca II K spectroheliograms and their intensity is correlated with the magnetic field strength of the features on the solar surface. Solar full disk images in the Ca II K line have been recorded since the beginning of the 20th century at a number of solar observatories such as at Arcetri (Italy), Mount Wilson(California, US) and Kodaikanal (India). The images are available in digitized archives that contain the data processed for standard instrumental calibrations. To utilize these records for irradiance studies, the next step is to identify the bright magnetic features from the images using feature recognition techniques. We test different feature identification methods which are first applied to a set of recent images from the PSPT instrument at the Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, taken during three periods characterized by high, medium and low levels of activity. Then the performance of these methods to historical images from Arcetri, Mt. Wilson and Kodaikanal archives is tested. The results will be presented and discussed here.

  18. Asteroid (16) Psyche: Triaxial Ellipsoid Dimensions and Rotational Pole from Keck II NIRC2 AO Images and Keck I OSIRIS Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, Jack D.; Conrad, Al; Reddy, Vishnu; de Kleer, Katherine R.; Adamkovics, Mate; de Pater, Imke; Merline, William J.; Tamblyn, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) images of asteroid (16) Psyche obtained at 4 epochs with the NIRC2 camera at the 10m W. M. Keck Observatory (Keck II) on UT 2015 December 25 lead to triaxial ellipsoid diameters of 279±4 x 230±2 x 195±14 km, and a rotational pole at RA=29° and Dec=-2°. Adding 6 more epochs obtained nearly simultaneously with the OSIRIS system at Keck I, as well as two more epochs from Keck II in 2009, yields diameters of 273±2 x 232±2 x 165±3 km, and a pole at RA=37° and Dec=+1°. (Errors are formal fit parameter uncertainties; an additional 4% uncertainty is possible from systematic biases.) The differing perspectives between 2015 (sub-Earth latitude Θ=-50°) and 2009 (Θ=-6°) improves primarily the c dimension and the location of the rotational pole, but illustrates how well images from even a single night can determine the size, shape, and pole of an asteroid. The 2015 observations were obtained as part of a campaign to study Psyche with many techniques over a few months, including radar from Arecibo and images from Magellan.These handful of images show the same rugged outline as the radius vector model available on the DAMIT website, constructed from many lightcurves and scaled by previous Keck AO images. In fact Psyche has rotated some 125,350 times between the first lightcurve in 1955 and our 2015 AO images, exactly 60 years apart to the day. Since the asteroid has such a high obliquity, these lightcurves have scanned well into both northern and southern hemispheres. The difference between the pole derived from our images and the radius vector model pole is only 7°, and the mean diameters of Psyche are 219 and 211 km, respectively.

  19. Osmium(II) polypyridyl polyarginine conjugate as a probe for live cell imaging; a comparison of uptake, localization and cytotoxicity with its ruthenium(II) analogue.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Aisling; Dolan, Ciarán; Moriarty, Roisin D; Martin, Aaron; Neugebauer, Ute; Forster, Robert J; Davies, Anthony; Volkov, Yuri; Keyes, Tia E

    2015-08-28

    A first investigation into the application of a luminescent osmium(ii) bipyridine complex to live cell imaging is presented. Osmium(ii) (bis-2,2-bipyridyl)-2(4-carboxylphenyl) imidazo[4,5f][1,10]phenanthroline was prepared and conjugated to octaarginine, a cell penetrating peptide. The photophysics, cell uptake and cytotoxicity of this osmium complex conjugate were performed and compared with its ruthenium analogue. Cell uptake and distribution of both ruthenium and osmium conjugates were very similar with rapid transmembrane transport of the osmium probe (complete within approx. 20 min) and dispersion throughout the cytoplasm and organelles. The near-infrared (NIR) emission of the osmium complex (λmax 726 nm) coincides well with the biological optical window and this facilitated luminescent and luminescence lifetime imaging of the cell which was well resolved from cell autofluorescence. The large Stokes shift of the emission also permitted resonance Raman mapping of the dye within CHO cells. Rather surprisingly, the osmium conjugate exhibited very low cytotoxicity when incubated both in the dark and under visible irradiation. This was attributed to the remarkable stability of this complex which was reflected by the complete absence of photo-bleaching of the complex even under extended continuous irradiation. In addition, when compared to its ruthenium analogue its luminescence was short-lived in water therefore rendering it insensitive to O2.

  20. The Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE-II). Difference Image Analysis of the Bulge Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wozniak, P. R.

    2000-12-01

    During 1997-1999 observing seasons (mid March to mid December) the OGLE-II project collected more than 11,000 2Kx8K frames (over 370 GB of pixel data) of the Galactic Bulge using 1.3m Warsaw Telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. Each of the 49 fields has roughly 200-300 measurements in I band. The fields span the range approximately from -10 to 10 deg in galactic longitude. I present a complete reanalysis of this data set using the optimal image subtraction method developed by Alard and Lupton (1998) and Alard (1999). Databases of difference measurements contain about 100,000 variable objects. This information is supplemented with colors from DoPhot photometry. Noise properties of our difference light curves are exceptionally good for this kind of massive monitoring program. The nongaussian tail in the distribution of residuals is totally negligible for usual applications. For faint stars the measurement errors are only 1.15 times photon noise. The difference photometry is always at least a factor of 2 better than results from DoPhot. Systematic effects due to blending are greatly relieved, the most important difference being the unbiased value of the variable light centroid. We discovered 512 microlensing events (compared to 214 from DoPhot photometry, Udalski et al. 2000). 305 of those were found fully algorithmically and have good quality light curves making them very well suited for optical depth determination. In the nearest future we plan to obtain an upper limit on the number of jupiters around microlenses as these should manifest themselves in the nongaussian tail of the residual distribution. Next possibilities include much better and larger extinction maps of the bulge and studies of the galactic bar. With 300-500 events we should be able to study the depth of the lens/source populations (Stanek 1996).

  1. SynchroMed II intrathecal pump memory errors due to repeated magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kosturakis, Alyssa; Gebhardt, Rodolfo

    2012-01-01

    Cancer patients with severe refractory pain are often managed with implantable drug delivery systems (IDDS). The only drugs with US Food and Drug Administration approval for intrathecal use are morphine, ziconotide, and baclofen. Other drugs used and mixed include, hydromorphone, bupivacaine, sufentanil, and fentanyl. These patients often undergo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for disease-related monitoring and diagnoses. Although uncommon, IDDS can fail to resume normal functioning after MRI, potentially causing complications. The magnetic field of an MRI will temporarily stop the rotor of the pump motor and suspend drug delivery for the duration of the MRI exposure. The pump should resume normal operation when removed from the MRI magnetic field, but there is a potential for a delay in the return of proper drug infusion and a delay in the logging of motor stall events after an MRI in the SynchroMed II pumps. A 57-year-old man who underwent multiple MRIs with an implanted IDDS experienced 2 separate memory failures leading to multiple complications. After the first pump malfunction, the patient developed withdrawal symptoms and was treated in the emergency department. The first time, a memory reset resolved the problem. The second time, 29 months later, the patient was admitted to the hospital to manage withdrawal symptoms and the pump had to be exchanged with a new device. Post-MRI pump interrogation should be performed on all patients with IDDS to ensure proper functioning of the pump. Special attention should be paid to patients receiving baclofen, as acute withdrawal can be very serious, even deadly.

  2. Super-resolution imaging of fluorescently labeled, endogenous RNA Polymerase II in living cells with CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene editing

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Won-Ki; Jayanth, Namrata; Mullen, Susan; Tan, Tzer Han; Jung, Yoon J.; Cissé, Ibrahim I.

    2016-01-01

    Live cell imaging of mammalian RNA polymerase II (Pol II) has previously relied on random insertions of exogenous, mutant Pol II coupled with the degradation of endogenous Pol II using a toxin, α-amanitin. Therefore, it has been unclear whether over-expression of labeled Pol II under an exogenous promoter may have played a role in reported Pol II dynamics in vivo. Here we label the endogenous Pol II in mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells using the CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing system. Using single-molecule based super-resolution imaging in the living cells, we captured endogenous Pol II clusters. Consistent with previous studies, we observed that Pol II clusters were short-lived (cluster lifetime ~8 s) in living cells. Moreover, dynamic responses to serum-stimulation, and drug-mediated transcription inhibition were all in agreement with previous observations in the exogenous Pol II MEF cell line. Our findings suggest that previous exogenously tagged Pol II faithfully recapitulated the endogenous polymerase clustering dynamics in living cells, and our approach may in principle be used to directly label transcription factors for live cell imaging. PMID:27782203

  3. Super-resolution imaging of fluorescently labeled, endogenous RNA Polymerase II in living cells with CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene editing.

    PubMed

    Cho, Won-Ki; Jayanth, Namrata; Mullen, Susan; Tan, Tzer Han; Jung, Yoon J; Cissé, Ibrahim I

    2016-10-26

    Live cell imaging of mammalian RNA polymerase II (Pol II) has previously relied on random insertions of exogenous, mutant Pol II coupled with the degradation of endogenous Pol II using a toxin, α-amanitin. Therefore, it has been unclear whether over-expression of labeled Pol II under an exogenous promoter may have played a role in reported Pol II dynamics in vivo. Here we label the endogenous Pol II in mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells using the CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing system. Using single-molecule based super-resolution imaging in the living cells, we captured endogenous Pol II clusters. Consistent with previous studies, we observed that Pol II clusters were short-lived (cluster lifetime ~8 s) in living cells. Moreover, dynamic responses to serum-stimulation, and drug-mediated transcription inhibition were all in agreement with previous observations in the exogenous Pol II MEF cell line. Our findings suggest that previous exogenously tagged Pol II faithfully recapitulated the endogenous polymerase clustering dynamics in living cells, and our approach may in principle be used to directly label transcription factors for live cell imaging.

  4. Digital image processing techniques for enhancement and classification of SeaMARC II side scan sonar imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Thomas Beckett, IV; Hussong, Donald

    1989-06-01

    The recent growth in the production rate of digital side scan sonar images, coupled with the rapid expansion of systematic seafloor exploration programs, has created a need for fast and quantitative means of processing seafloor imagery. Computer-aided analytical techniques fill this need. A number of numerical techniques used to enhance and classify imagery produced by SeaMARC II, a long-range combination side scan sonar, and bathymetric seafloor mapping system are documented. Three categories of techniques are presented: (1) preprocessing corrections (radiometric and geometric), (2) feature extraction, and (3) image segmentation and classification. An introduction to the concept of "feature vectors" is provided, along with an explanation of the method of evaluation of a texture feature vector based upon gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM). An alternative to the a priori texel (texture element) subdivision of images is presented in the form of region growing and texture analysis (REGATA). This routine provides a texture map of spatial resolution superior to that obtainable with arbitrarily assigned texel boundaries and minimizes the possibility of mixed texture signals due to the combination of two or more textures in an arbitrarily assigned texel. Computer classification of these textural features extracted via the GLCM technique results in transformation of images into maps of image texture. These maps may either be interpreted in terms of the theoretical relationships shown between texture signatures and wavelength or converted to geologic maps by correlation of texture signatures with ground truth data. These techniques are applied to SeaMARC II side scan sonar imagery from a variety of geologic environments, including lithified and nonlithified sedimentary formations, volcanic and sedimentary debris flows, and crystalline basaltic outcrops. Application of the above processing steps provided not only superior images for both subjective and quantitative

  5. 48 CFR 3401.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... GENERAL ED ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 3401.105-3 Copies. Copies of the... EDAR is available for viewing at: http://www.ed.gov/policy/fund/reg/clibrary/edar.html....

  6. 48 CFR 3401.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... GENERAL ED ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 3401.105-3 Copies. Copies of the... EDAR is available for viewing at: http://www.ed.gov/policy/fund/reg/clibrary/edar.html....

  7. 48 CFR 3401.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... GENERAL ED ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 3401.105-3 Copies. Copies of the... EDAR is available for viewing at: http://www.ed.gov/policy/fund/reg/clibrary/edar.html....

  8. 48 CFR 3401.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... GENERAL ED ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 3401.105-3 Copies. Copies of the... EDAR is available for viewing at: http://www.ed.gov/policy/fund/reg/clibrary/edar.html....

  9. Advanced imaging techniques II: using a compound microscope for photographing point-mount specimens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Digital imaging technology has revolutionized the practice photographing insects for scientific study. Herein described are lighting and mounting techniques designed for imaging micro Hymenoptera. Techniques described here are applicable to all small insects, as well as other invertebrates. The ke...

  10. 48 CFR 1401.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Copies. 1401.105-3 Section 1401.105-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 1401.105-3 Copies. Copies of...

  11. 48 CFR 1401.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Copies. 1401.105-3 Section 1401.105-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 1401.105-3 Copies. Copies of...

  12. 48 CFR 1401.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Copies. 1401.105-3 Section 1401.105-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 1401.105-3 Copies. Copies of...

  13. 48 CFR 1401.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Copies. 1401.105-3 Section 1401.105-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 1401.105-3 Copies. Copies of...

  14. 14 CFR 187.7 - Copies; seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Copies; seal. 187.7 Section 187.7... REGULATIONS FEES § 187.7 Copies; seal. The fees for furnishing photostatic or similar copies of documents and for affixation of the seal for a certification or validation are the same as those provided in...

  15. 14 CFR 187.7 - Copies; seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Copies; seal. 187.7 Section 187.7... REGULATIONS FEES § 187.7 Copies; seal. The fees for furnishing photostatic or similar copies of documents and for affixation of the seal for a certification or validation are the same as those provided in...

  16. 14 CFR 187.7 - Copies; seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Copies; seal. 187.7 Section 187.7... REGULATIONS FEES § 187.7 Copies; seal. The fees for furnishing photostatic or similar copies of documents and for affixation of the seal for a certification or validation are the same as those provided in...

  17. 14 CFR 187.7 - Copies; seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Copies; seal. 187.7 Section 187.7... REGULATIONS FEES § 187.7 Copies; seal. The fees for furnishing photostatic or similar copies of documents and for affixation of the seal for a certification or validation are the same as those provided in...

  18. 14 CFR 187.7 - Copies; seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Copies; seal. 187.7 Section 187.7... REGULATIONS FEES § 187.7 Copies; seal. The fees for furnishing photostatic or similar copies of documents and for affixation of the seal for a certification or validation are the same as those provided in...

  19. 48 CFR 3401.104-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Copies. 3401.104-3 Section 3401.104-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL ED ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 3401.104-3 Copies. Copies of...

  20. 48 CFR 2001.104-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Copies. 2001.104-3 Section 2001.104-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION GENERAL NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 2001.104-3 Copies. Copies...

  1. 48 CFR 2001.104-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Copies. 2001.104-3 Section 2001.104-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION GENERAL NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 2001.104-3 Copies. Copies...

  2. 48 CFR 2001.104-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Copies. 2001.104-3 Section 2001.104-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION GENERAL NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 2001.104-3 Copies. Copies...

  3. 48 CFR 2001.104-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Copies. 2001.104-3 Section 2001.104-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION GENERAL NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 2001.104-3 Copies. Copies...

  4. 48 CFR 2001.104-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Copies. 2001.104-3 Section 2001.104-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION GENERAL NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ACQUISITION REGULATION SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 2001.104-3 Copies. Copies...

  5. 36 CFR 703.20 - File copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false File copies. 703.20 Section... Is Not a Party § 703.20 File copies. The Office of the General Counsel will maintain the official file of copies of all demands served on the Library and deciding officials' responses....

  6. Copy-move forgery detection using multiresolution local binary patterns.

    PubMed

    Davarzani, Reza; Yaghmaie, Khashayar; Mozaffari, Saeed; Tapak, Meysam

    2013-09-10

    Copy-move forgery is one of the most popular tampering artifacts in digital images. In this paper, we present an efficient method for copy-move forgery detection using Multiresolution Local Binary Patterns (MLBP). The proposed method is robust to geometric distortions and illumination variations of duplicated regions. Furthermore, the proposed block-based method recovers parameters of the geometric transformations. First, the image is divided into overlapping blocks and feature vectors for each block are extracted using LBP operators. The feature vectors are sorted based on lexicographical order. Duplicated image blocks are determined in the block matching step using k-d tree for more time reduction. Finally, in order to both determine the parameters of geometric transformations and remove the possible false matches, RANSAC (RANdom SAmple Consensus) algorithm is used. Experimental results show that the proposed approach is able to precisely detect duplicated regions even after distortions such as rotation, scaling, JPEG compression, blurring and noise adding.

  7. Quantitative annular dark-field imaging of single-layer graphene-II: atomic-resolution image contrast.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Shunsuke; Koshiya, Shogo; Nagai, Takuro; Kikkawa, Jun; Ishizuka, Kazuo; Kimoto, Koji

    2015-12-01

    We have investigated how accurately atomic-resolution annular dark-field (ADF) images match between experiments and simulations to conduct more reliable crystal structure analyses. Quantitative ADF imaging, in which the ADF intensity at each pixel represents the fraction of the incident probe current, allows us to perform direct comparisons with simulations without the use of fitting parameters. Although the conventional comparison suffers from experimental uncertainties such as an amorphous surface layer and specimen thickness, in this study we eliminated such uncertainties by using a single-layer graphene as a specimen. Furthermore, to reduce image distortion and shot noises in experimental images, multiple acquisitions with drift correction were performed, and the atomic ADF contrast was quantitatively acquired. To reproduce the experimental ADF contrast, we used three distribution functions as the effective source distribution in simulations. The optimum distribution function and its full-width at half-maximum were evaluated by measuring the residuals between the experimental and simulated images. It was found that the experimental images could be explained well by a linear combination of a Gaussian function and a Lorentzian function with a longer tail than the Gaussian function.

  8. Library Synthesis, Screening, and Discovery of Modified Zinc(II)-Bis(dipicolylamine) Probe for Enhanced Molecular Imaging of Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Zinc(II)-bis(dipicolylamine) (Zn-BDPA) coordination complexes selectively target the surfaces of dead and dying mammalian cells, and they have promise as molecular probes for imaging cell death. A necessary step toward eventual clinical imaging applications is the development of next-generation Zn-BDPA complexes with enhanced affinity for the cell death membrane biomarker, phosphatidylserine (PS). This study employed an iterative cycle of library synthesis and screening, using a novel rapid equilibrium dialysis assay, to discover a modified Zn-BDPA structure with high and selective affinity for vesicles containing PS. The lead structure was converted into a deep-red fluorescent probe and its targeting and imaging performance was compared with an unmodified control Zn-BDPA probe. The evaluation process included a series of FRET-based vesicle titration studies, cell microscopy experiments, and rat tumor biodistribution measurements. In all cases, the modified probe exhibited comparatively higher affinity and selectivity for the target membranes of dead and dying cells. The results show that this next-generation deep-red fluorescent Zn-BDPA probe is well suited for preclinical molecular imaging of cell death in cell cultures and animal models. Furthermore, it should be possible to substitute the deep-red fluorophore with alternative reporter groups that enable clinically useful, deep-tissue imaging modalities, such as MRI and nuclear imaging. PMID:24575875

  9. Intravital Imaging Reveals Angiotensin II-Induced Transcytosis of Albumin by Podocytes.

    PubMed

    Schießl, Ina Maria; Hammer, Anna; Kattler, Veronika; Gess, Bernhard; Theilig, Franziska; Witzgall, Ralph; Castrop, Hayo

    2016-03-01

    Albuminuria is a hallmark of kidney disease of various etiologies and usually caused by deterioration of glomerular filtration barrier integrity. We recently showed that angiotensin II (Ang II) acutely increases albumin filtration in the healthy kidney. Here, we used intravital microscopy to assess the effects of Ang II on podocyte function in rats. Acute infusion of 30, 60, or 80 ng/kg per minute Ang II enhanced the endocytosis of albumin by activation of the type 1 Ang II receptor and resulted in an average (±SEM) of 3.7±2.2, 72.3±18.6 (P<0.001), and 239.4±34.6 µm(3) (P<0.001) albumin-containing vesicles per glomerulus, respectively, compared with none at baseline or 10 ng/kg per minute Ang II. Immunostaining of Ang II-infused kidneys confirmed the presence of albumin-containing vesicles, which colocalized with megalin, in podocin-positive cells. Furthermore, podocyte endocytosis of albumin was markedly reduced in the presence of gentamicin, a competitive inhibitor of megalin-dependent endocytosis. Ang II infusion increased the concentration of albumin in the subpodocyte space, a potential source for endocytic protein uptake, and gentamicin further increased this concentration. Some endocytic vesicles were acidified and colocalized with LysoTracker. Most vesicles migrated from the capillary to the apical aspect of the podocyte and were eventually released into the urinary space. This transcytosis accounted for approximately 10% of total albumin filtration. In summary, the transcellular transport of proteins across the podocyte constitutes a new pathway of glomerular protein filtration. Ang II enhances the endocytosis and transcytosis of plasma albumin by podocytes, which may eventually impair podocyte function.

  10. A Deep Narrowband Imaging Search for C IV and He II Emission from Lyα Blobs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrigoni Battaia, Fabrizio; Yang, Yujin; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Matsuda, Yuichi; Yamada, Toru; Hayashino, Tomoki

    2015-05-01

    We conduct a deep narrowband imaging survey of 13 Lyα blobs (LABs) located in the SSA22 proto-cluster at z ˜ 3.1 in the C iv and He ii emission lines in an effort to constrain the physical process powering the Lyα emission in LABs. Our observations probe down to unprecedented surface brightness (SB) limits of (2.1-3.4) × 10-18 erg s-1 cm-2 arcsec-2 per 1 arcsec2 aperture (5σ) for the He ii λ1640 and C iv λ1549 lines, respectively. We do not detect extended He ii and C iv emission in any of the LABs, placing strong upper limits on the He ii/Lyα and C iv/Lyα line ratios, of 0.11 and 0.16, for the brightest two LABs in the field. We conduct detailed photoionization modeling of the expected line ratios and find that, although our data constitute the deepest ever observations of these lines, they are still not deep enough to rule out a scenario where the Lyα emission is powered by the ionizing radiation from an obscured active galactic nucleus. Our models can accommodate He ii/Lyα and C iv/Lyα ratios as low as ≃0.05 and ≃0.07, respectively, implying that one needs to reach SB as low as (1-1.5) × 10-18 erg s-1 cm-2 arcsec-2 (at 5σ) in order to rule out a photoionization scenario. These depths will be achievable with the new generation of image-slicing integral field units such as the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) on VLT and the Keck Cosmic Web Imager (KCWI). We also model the expected He ii/Lyα and C iv/Lyα in a different scenario, where Lyα emission is powered by shocks generated in a large-scale superwind, but find that our observational constraints can only be met for shock velocities vs ≳ 250 km s-1, which appear to be in conflict with recent observations of quiescent kinematics in LABs. .

  11. Copying and Evolution of Neuronal Topology

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Chrisantha; Karishma, K. K.; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2008-01-01

    We propose a mechanism for copying of neuronal networks that is of considerable interest for neuroscience for it suggests a neuronal basis for causal inference, function copying, and natural selection within the human brain. To date, no model of neuronal topology copying exists. We present three increasingly sophisticated mechanisms to demonstrate how topographic map formation coupled with Spike-Time Dependent Plasticity (STDP) can copy neuronal topology motifs. Fidelity is improved by error correction and activity-reverberation limitation. The high-fidelity topology-copying operator is used to evolve neuronal topologies. Possible roles for neuronal natural selection are discussed. PMID:19020662

  12. Chimpanzees copy dominant and knowledgeable individuals: implications for cultural diversity.

    PubMed

    Kendal, Rachel; Hopper, Lydia M; Whiten, Andrew; Brosnan, Sarah F; Lambeth, Susan P; Schapiro, Steven J; Hoppitt, Will

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary theory predicts that natural selection will fashion cognitive biases to guide when, and from whom, individuals acquire social information, but the precise nature of these biases, especially in ecologically valid group contexts, remains unknown. We exposed four captive groups of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) to a novel extractive foraging device and, by fitting statistical models, isolated four simultaneously operating transmission biases. These include biases to copy (i) higher-ranking and (ii) expert individuals, and to copy others when (iii) uncertain or (iv) of low rank. High-ranking individuals were relatively un-strategic in their use of acquired knowledge, which, combined with the bias for others to observe them, may explain reports that high innovation rates (in juveniles and subordinates) do not generate a correspondingly high frequency of traditions in chimpanzees. Given the typically low rank of immigrants in chimpanzees, a 'copying dominants' bias may contribute to the observed maintenance of distinct cultural repertoires in neighboring communities despite sharing similar ecology and knowledgeable migrants. Thus, a copying dominants strategy may, as often proposed for conformist transmission, and perhaps in concert with it, restrict the accumulation of traditions within chimpanzee communities whilst maintaining cultural diversity.

  13. Chimpanzees copy dominant and knowledgeable individuals: implications for cultural diversity

    PubMed Central

    Kendal, Rachel; Hopper, Lydia M.; Whiten, Andrew; Brosnan, Sarah F.; Lambeth, Susan P.; Schapiro, Steven J.; Hoppitt, Will

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary theory predicts that natural selection will fashion cognitive biases to guide when, and from whom, individuals acquire social information, but the precise nature of these biases, especially in ecologically valid group contexts, remains unknown. We exposed four captive groups of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) to a novel extractive foraging device and, by fitting statistical models, isolated four simultaneously operating transmission biases. These include biases to copy (i) higher-ranking and (ii) expert individuals, and to copy others when (iii) uncertain or (iv) of low rank. High-ranking individuals were relatively un-strategic in their use of acquired knowledge, which, combined with the bias for others to observe them, may explain reports that high innovation rates (in juveniles and subordinates) do not generate a correspondingly high frequency of traditions in chimpanzees. Given the typically low rank of immigrants in chimpanzees, a ‘copying dominants’ bias may contribute to the observed maintenance of distinct cultural repertoires in neighboring communities despite sharing similar ecology and knowledgeable migrants. Thus, a copying dominants strategy may, as often proposed for conformist transmission, and perhaps in concert with it, restrict the accumulation of traditions within chimpanzee communities whilst maintaining cultural diversity. PMID:27053916

  14. Deep Hubble Space Telescope Imaging of IC 1613. II. The Star Formation History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skillman, Evan D.; Tolstoy, Eline; Cole, Andrew A.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Saha, Abhijit; Gallagher, J. S.; Dohm-Palmer, R. C.; Mateo, Mario

    2003-10-01

    We have taken deep images of an outlying field in the Local Group dwarf irregular galaxy IC 1613 with the WFPC2 aboard the Hubble Space Telescope in the standard broadband F555W (V, 8 orbits) and F814W (I, 16 orbits) filters. The photometry reaches to V=27.7 (MV=+3.4) and I=27.1 (MI=+2.8) at the 50% completeness level, the deepest to date for an isolated dwarf irregular galaxy. We analyze the resulting color-magnitude diagram (CMD) and compare it with CMDs created from theoretical stellar models using three different methods to derive a star formation history (SFH) as well as constrain the chemical evolution for IC 1613. All three methods find an enhanced star formation rate (SFR), at roughly the same magnitude (factor of 3), over roughly the same period (from 3 to 6 Gyr ago). Additionally, all three methods were driven to similar age-metallicity relationships (AMR) that show an increase from [Fe/H]~-1.3 at earliest times to [Fe/H]~-0.7 at present. Good agreement is found between the AMR which is derived from the CMD analysis and that which can be inferred from the derived SFH at all but the earliest ages. The agreement between the three models and the self-consistency of the derived chemical enrichment history support the reality of the derived SFH of IC 1613 and, more generally, are supportive of the practice of constructing galaxy SFHs from CMDs. A comparison of the newly observed outer field with an earlier studied central field of IC 1613 shows that the SFR in the outer field has been significantly depressed during the last Gyr. This implies that the optical scale length of the galaxy has been decreasing with time and that comparison of galaxies at intermediate redshift with present-day galaxies should take this effect into account. Comparing the CMD of the outer field of IC 1613 with CMDs of Milky Way dSph companions, we find strong similarities between IC 1613 and the more distant dSph companions (Carina, Fornax, Leo I, and Leo II) in that all are dominated

  15. TU-D-BRD-01: Image Guided SBRT II: Challenges ' Pitfalls

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Z; Yin, F; Cho, J

    2014-06-15

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has been effective treatment for the management of various diseases, which often delivers high radiation dose in a single or a few fractions. SBRT therefore demands precise treatment delivery to the tumor while sparing adjacent healthy tissue. Recent developments in image guidance enable target localization with increased accuracy. With such improvements in localization, image-guided SBRT has been widely adopted into clinical practice. In SBRT, high radiation dose is generally delivered with small fields. Therefore, it is crucial to accurately measure dosimetric data for the small fields during commissioning. In addition, image-guided SBRT demands accurate image localization to ensure safety and quality of patient care. Lately, the reports of AAPM TG 142 and TG 104 have been published and added recommendations for imaging devices that are integrated with the linear accelerator for SBRT. Furthermore, various challenges and potential pitfalls lie in the clinical implementation of image-guided SBRT. In this lecture, these challenges and pitfalls of image-guided SBRT will be illustrated and discussed from dosimetric, technical and clinical perspectives.Being a promising technique, image-guided SBRT has shown great potentials, and will lead to more accurate and safer SBRT treatments. Learning Objectives: To understand dosimetric challenges and pitfalls for IGRT application in SBRT. To understand major clinical challenges and pitfalls for IGRT application in SBRT. To understand major technical challenges and pitfalls for IGRT application in SBRT.

  16. WE-PIS-Exhibit Hall-01: Tools for TG-142 Linac Imaging QA II

    SciTech Connect

    Childress, N; Murray, B

    2014-06-15

    Partners in Solutions is an exciting new program in which AAPM partners with our vendors to present practical “hands-on” information about the equipment and software systems that we use in our clinics. The therapy topic this year is solutions for TG-142 recommendations for linear accelerator imaging QA. Note that the sessions are being held in a special purpose room built on the Exhibit Hall Floor, to encourage further interaction with the vendors. Using DoseLab to Perform TG-142 Imaging QA The goals of this session will be to present a clinical overview of acquiring images for TG-142 Imaging QA, as well as analyzing and evaluating results using DoseLab software. DoseLab supports planar imaging QA analysis using almost any QA phantom provided by numerous vendors. General advantages and disadvantages of selecting each of these phantoms will be briefly summarized. Best practices for selecting image acquisition parameters will be presented. A demonstration of using DoseLab software to perform a series of TG-142 tests will be performed. We will disuss why DoseLab uses its own set of imaging QA formulas, and why imaging QA measurement values of the same nominal properties will vary between TG- 142 software packages. Because TG-142 does not specify baseline and tolerance values for imaging QA, the presentation will recommend performing the manufacturer's acceptance test procedure to validate the equipment is functioning correctly. Afterwards, results can be obtained using the clinic's selected set of phantoms, image acquisition parameters, and TG-142 software to set proper baseline values. This presentation will highlight the reasons why comparing imaging QA results can be trickier than comparing linear accelerator treatment results and what physicists should keep in mind when comparing imaging QA results for different machines. Physicists are often unsure of the next step when there is an issue discovered during Imaging QA. Therefore, a few common examples of

  17. Abnormalities of the neonatal brain: MR imaging. Part II. Hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    McArdle, C B; Richardson, C J; Hayden, C K; Nicholas, D A; Amparo, E G

    1987-05-01

    Eighty-five infants, 82 of whom were 29-44 weeks postconceptional age, were imaged with a 0.6-T magnet. Eight infants had cerebral infarction. In premature neonates with very water, low-intensity white matter on T1-weighted images, ultrasound was better than both computed tomography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in depicting parenchymal changes of infarction or edema. However, after 37 weeks gestation, MR imaging was superior. Cerebral atrophy, present in seven infants, was consistent with subarachnoid space widths of 7 mm or more, or subarachnoid space widths of 5-6 mm with ventricular/brain ratios of 0.36 or greater. Delayed myelination was seen in a total of 18 infants with histories of hypoxic-ischemic insult. MR imaging shows promise in the neonatal period. It facilitates recognition of infarcts in full-term infants and may be used to predict abnormal neurologic outcome in infants who have initial delayed myelination.

  18. Mice anesthesia, analgesia, and care, Part II: anesthetic considerations in preclinical imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Gargiulo, Sara; Greco, Adelaide; Gramanzini, Matteo; Esposito, Silvia; Affuso, Andrea; Brunetti, Arturo; Vesce, Giancarlo

    2012-01-01

    Animal experiments are necessary for a better understanding of diseases and for developing new therapeutic strategies. The mouse (Mus musculus) is currently the most popular laboratory animal in biomedical research. Mice imaging procedures are increasingly used in preclinical research because they allow in vivo monitoring and they are readily available for longitudinal and noninvasive studies as well as investigations into the evolution of diseases and the effects of new therapies. New imaging techniques and sophisticated laboratory animal imaging tools are currently producing a large body of evidence about the possible interference of anesthesia with different imaging methods that have the potential to compromise the results of in vivo studies. The purpose of this article is to review the existing literature on molecular imaging studies in mice, to describe the effects of different anesthetic protocols on their outcome, and to report our own experience with such studies.

  19. Far ultraviolet wide field imaging and photometry - Spartan-202 Mark II Far Ultraviolet Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, George R.; Heckathorn, Harry M.; Opal, Chet B.; Witt, Adolf N.; Henize, Karl G.

    1988-01-01

    The U.S. Naval Research Laboratory' Mark II Far Ultraviolet Camera, which is expected to be a primary scientific instrument aboard the Spartan-202 Space Shuttle mission, is described. This camera is intended to obtain FUV wide-field imagery of stars and extended celestial objects, including diffuse nebulae and nearby galaxies. The observations will support the HST by providing FUV photometry of calibration objects. The Mark II camera is an electrographic Schmidt camera with an aperture of 15 cm, a focal length of 30.5 cm, and sensitivity in the 1230-1600 A wavelength range.

  20. Review of ultrasound image guidance in external beam radiotherapy part II: intra-fraction motion management and novel applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shea, Tuathan; Bamber, Jeffrey; Fontanarosa, Davide; van der Meer, Skadi; Verhaegen, Frank; Harris, Emma

    2016-04-01

    Imaging has become an essential tool in modern radiotherapy (RT), being used to plan dose delivery prior to treatment and verify target position before and during treatment. Ultrasound (US) imaging is cost-effective in providing excellent contrast at high resolution for depicting soft tissue targets apart from those shielded by the lungs or cranium. As a result, it is increasingly used in RT setup verification for the measurement of inter-fraction motion, the subject of Part I of this review (Fontanarosa et al 2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 R77-114). The combination of rapid imaging and zero ionising radiation dose makes US highly suitable for estimating intra-fraction motion. The current paper (Part II of the review) covers this topic. The basic technology for US motion estimation, and its current clinical application to the prostate, is described here, along with recent developments in robust motion-estimation algorithms, and three dimensional (3D) imaging. Together, these are likely to drive an increase in the number of future clinical studies and the range of cancer sites in which US motion management is applied. Also reviewed are selections of existing and proposed novel applications of US imaging to RT. These are driven by exciting developments in structural, functional and molecular US imaging and analytical techniques such as backscatter tissue analysis, elastography, photoacoustography, contrast-specific imaging, dynamic contrast analysis, microvascular and super-resolution imaging, and targeted microbubbles. Such techniques show promise for predicting and measuring the outcome of RT, quantifying normal tissue toxicity, improving tumour definition and defining a biological target volume that describes radiation sensitive regions of the tumour. US offers easy, low cost and efficient integration of these techniques into the RT workflow. US contrast technology also has potential to be used actively to assist RT by manipulating the tumour cell environment and by

  1. DETECTING ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI USING MULTI-FILTER IMAGING DATA. II. INCORPORATING ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, X. Y.; De Robertis, M. M.

    2013-10-01

    This is the second paper of the series Detecting Active Galactic Nuclei Using Multi-filter Imaging Data. In this paper we review shapelets, an image manipulation algorithm, which we employ to adjust the point-spread function (PSF) of galaxy images. This technique is used to ensure the image in each filter has the same and sharpest PSF, which is the preferred condition for detecting AGNs using multi-filter imaging data as we demonstrated in Paper I of this series. We apply shapelets on Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey Wide Survey ugriz images. Photometric parameters such as effective radii, integrated fluxes within certain radii, and color gradients are measured on the shapelets-reconstructed images. These parameters are used by artificial neural networks (ANNs) which yield: photometric redshift with an rms of 0.026 and a regression R-value of 0.92; galaxy morphological types with an uncertainty less than 2 T types for z ≤ 0.1; and identification of galaxies as AGNs with 70% confidence, star-forming/starburst (SF/SB) galaxies with 90% confidence, and passive galaxies with 70% confidence for z ≤ 0.1. The incorporation of ANNs provides a more reliable technique for identifying AGN or SF/SB candidates, which could be very useful for large-scale multi-filter optical surveys that also include a modest set of spectroscopic data sufficient to train neural networks.

  2. Direct imaging with highly diluted apertures - II. Properties of the point spread function of a hypertelescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patru, F.; Tarmoul, N.; Mourard, D.; Lardière, O.

    2009-06-01

    In the future, optical stellar interferometers will provide true images thanks to larger number of telescopes and to advanced cophasing subsystems. These conditions are required to have sufficient resolution elements (resel) in the image and to provide direct images in the hypertelescope mode. It has already been shown that hypertelescopes provide snapshot images with a significant gain in sensitivity without inducing any loss of the useful field of view for direct imaging applications. This paper aims at studying the properties of the point spread functions of future large arrays using the hypertelescope mode. Numerical simulations have been performed and criteria have been defined to study the image properties. It is shown that the choice of the configuration of the array is a trade-off between the resolution, the halo level and the field of view. A regular pattern of the array of telescopes optimizes the image quality (low halo level and maximum encircled energy in the central peak), but decreases the useful field of view. Moreover, a non-redundant array is less sensitive to the space aliasing effect than a redundant array.

  3. Radio reflection imaging of asteroid and comet interiors II: Results and recommendations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, Robert E.; Stillman, David E.; Sava, Paul; Ittharat, Detchai

    2015-05-01

    We modeled orbital surface-penetrating radar of an asteroid and comet using two-dimensional finite-difference wavefield migration, in order to assess key target properties and experiment parameters required to fully image internal structure. Migration places radar echoes in their correct positions in a complex subsurface and is a complementary tool to travel-time tomography. The target shape was scaled from 433 Eros to 0.5-km mean diameter for an asteroid and 10 km for a comet. The interiors were populated with a power-law distribution of spherical blocks. We used an image structural similarity index to compare the internal surfaces reconstructed under different assumptions to a "best" image using optimum parameters. We found that successful internal imaging of the asteroid was not sensitive to whether the block interstices were regolith or void. Frequency dependence between 5 and 15 MHz was also minor. Internal interfaces could also be imaged if the attenuation was higher than that inferred within volcanic plains on Mars, but not as high as measured in a strongly fractured volcanic tuff on Earth. The overall imaging quality for the comet was statistically similar to the asteroid, but there was less variability due to smaller internal contrasts. A key finding is that imaging was vastly improved by using a second spacecraft as a radar receiver. A subsatellite with a different orbit will eventually provide a range of different illumination geometries over each part of the target. Finally, the results depend strongly on the specified internal velocity distribution, representing partial progress in complementary tomographic velocity estimation. The modeled impedance contrasts within the asteroid are larger than those typically encountered in exploration seismology and very much larger than in medical imaging, and so the velocity used to migrate the reflections must be close to the actual distribution. This again emphasizes the need for joint traveltime tomography and

  4. 92. PRODUCTION MOLDS. THESE MOLDS ARE COPIES OF THE ORIGINAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    92. PRODUCTION MOLDS. THESE MOLDS ARE COPIES OF THE ORIGINAL MOLDS IN THE MORAVIAN POTTERY AND TILE WORKS COLLECTION, AND ARE USED TO PRESS TILES. THE FACTORY KEEPS TEN PRODUCTION MOLDS FOR EACH IMAGE. THE ORIGINAL MOLDS ARE NOT USED IN PRODUCTION. SAME VIEW AS PA-107-53. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  5. Microcomputer-based image processing system for CT/MRI scans: II. Expert system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, John C. K.; Yu, Peter K. N.; Cheng, Andrew Y. S.; Ho, Wai-Chin

    1991-06-01

    A microcomputer-based image processing system is used to digitize and process serial sections of CT/MRI scan and reconstruct three-dimensional images of brain structures and brain lesions. The images grabbed also serve as templates and different vital regions with different risk values are also traced out for 3D reconstruction. A knowledge-based system employing rule-based programming has been built to help identifying brain lesions and to help planning trajectory for operations. The volumes of the lesions are also automatically determined. Such system is very useful for medical skills archival, tumor size monitoring, survival and outcome forecasting, and consistent neurosurgical planning.

  6. Imaging appearance of entrapped periosteum within a distal femoral Salter-Harris II fracture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Johnathan; Abel, Mark F; Fox, Michael G

    2015-10-01

    Salter Harris II fractures of the distal femur are associated with a high incidence of complications, especially premature physeal closure. Many risk factors for this high rate of premature physeal closure have been proposed. More recently, entrapment of periosteum within the physis has been suggested as an additional predisposing factor for premature physeal closure. The radiographic diagnosis of entrapped soft tissues, including periosteum, can be suggested in the setting of a Salter-Harris II fracture when the fracture does not reduce and physeal widening >3 mm remains. We report a patient who sustained a distal femoral Salter-Harris II fracture following a valgus injury. The patient had persistent distal medial physeal widening >5 mm following attempted reduction. A subsequent MRI revealed a torn periosteum entrapped within the distal femoral physis. Following removal of the periosteum, the patient developed a leg length discrepancy which required physiodesis of the contralateral distal femur. We present this case to raise awareness of the importance of having a high index of suspicion of periosteal entrapment in the setting of Salter-Harris II fractures since most consider entrapped periosteum an indication for surgery.

  7. GEOSTAR-II: A Prototype Water Vapor Imager/Sounder for the Path Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, Todd; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn; Kangaslahti, Pekka; Lim, Boon; Tanner, Alan; Harding, Dennis; Owen, Heather; Soria, Mary; ODwyer, Ian; Ruf, Christopher; Miller, Ryan; Block, Bruce; Flynn, Michael; Whitaker, Sterling

    2011-01-01

    We describe the development and progress of the GeoSTAR-II risk reduction activity for the NASA Earth Science Decadal Survey PATH Mission. The activity directly addresses areas of technical risk including the system design, low noise receiver production, sub-array development, signal distribution and digital signal processing.

  8. Image Making and Personal Narratives with Japanese-American Survivors of World War II Internment Camps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Carleen; Kuwada, Kali; Potter, Penelope; Cameron, Danielle; Hoshino, Janice

    2007-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the verbal and art making responses of Japanese-American elders who experienced the trauma of internment during World War II. Six Nisei (second generation Japanese-Americans) were asked to recall memories of their experiences during and immediately following internment; 3 of the participants also created art images…

  9. Combining imaging and anticancer properties with new heterobimetallic Pt(ii)/M(i) (M = Re, (99m)Tc) complexes.

    PubMed

    Quental, Letícia; Raposinho, Paula; Mendes, Filipa; Santos, Isabel; Navarro-Ranninger, Carmen; Alvarez-Valdes, Amparo; Huang, Huaiyi; Chao, Hui; Rubbiani, Riccardo; Gasser, Gilles; Quiroga, Adoración G; Paulo, António

    2017-02-06

    In this article, we report on the development of new metal-based anticancer agents with imaging, chemotherapeutic and photosensitizing properties. Hence, a new heterobimetallic complex (Pt-LQ-Re) was prepared by connecting a non-conventional trans-chlorido Pt(ii) complex to a photoactive Re tricarbonyl unit (LQ-Re), which can be replaced by (99m)Tc to allow for in vivo imaging. We describe the photophysical and biological properties of the new complexes, in the dark and upon light irradiation (DNA interaction, cellular localization and uptake, and cytotoxicity). Furthermore, planar scintigraphic images of mice injected with Pt-LQ-Tc clearly showed that the radioactive compound is taken up by the excretory system organs, namely liver and kidneys, without significant retention in other tissues. All in all, the strategy of conjugating a chemotherapeutic compound with a PDT photosensitizer endows the resulting complexes with an intrinsic cytotoxic activity in the dark, driven by the non-classical platinum core, and a selective activity upon light irradiation. Most importantly, the possibility of integrating a SPECT imaging radiometal ((99m)Tc) in the structure of these new heterobimetallic complexes might allow for in vivo non-invasive visualization of their tumoral accumulation, a crucial issue to predict therapeutic outcomes.

  10. High angular resolution stellar imaging with occultations from the Cassini spacecraft - II. Kronocyclic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Paul N.; Tuthill, Peter G.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Hedman, Matthew M.; Lloyd, James P.

    2015-05-01

    We present an advance in the use of Cassini observations of stellar occultations by the rings of Saturn for stellar studies. Stewart et al. demonstrated the potential use of such observations for measuring stellar angular diameters. Here, we use these same observations, and tomographic imaging reconstruction techniques, to produce two-dimensional images of complex stellar systems. We detail the determination of the basic observational reference frame. A technique for recovering model-independent brightness profiles for data from each occulting edge is discussed, along with the tomographic combination of these profiles to build an image of the source star. Finally, we demonstrate the technique with recovered images of the α Centauri binary system and the circumstellar environment of the evolved late-type giant star, Mira.

  11. Characterization of statistical prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS): II. Application to dose reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Lauzier, Pascal Theriault; Chen Guanghong

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: The ionizing radiation imparted to patients during computed tomography exams is raising concerns. This paper studies the performance of a scheme called dose reduction using prior image constrained compressed sensing (DR-PICCS). The purpose of this study is to characterize the effects of a statistical model of x-ray detection in the DR-PICCS framework and its impact on spatial resolution. Methods: Both numerical simulations with known ground truth and in vivo animal dataset were used in this study. In numerical simulations, a phantom was simulated with Poisson noise and with varying levels of eccentricity. Both the conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) and the PICCS algorithms were used to reconstruct images. In PICCS reconstructions, the prior image was generated using two different denoising methods: a simple Gaussian blur and a more advanced diffusion filter. Due to the lack of shift-invariance in nonlinear image reconstruction such as the one studied in this paper, the concept of local spatial resolution was used to study the sharpness of a reconstructed image. Specifically, a directional metric of image sharpness, the so-called pseudopoint spread function (pseudo-PSF), was employed to investigate local spatial resolution. Results: In the numerical studies, the pseudo-PSF was reduced from twice the voxel width in the prior image down to less than 1.1 times the voxel width in DR-PICCS reconstructions when the statistical model was not included. At the same noise level, when statistical weighting was used, the pseudo-PSF width in DR-PICCS reconstructed images varied between 1.5 and 0.75 times the voxel width depending on the direction along which it was measured. However, this anisotropy was largely eliminated when the prior image was generated using diffusion filtering; the pseudo-PSF width was reduced to below one voxel width in that case. In the in vivo study, a fourfold improvement in CNR was achieved while qualitatively maintaining sharpness

  12. Imaging flux vortices in type II superconductors with a commercial transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Loudon, J C; Midgley, P A

    2009-05-01

    Flux vortices in superconductors can be imaged using transmission electron microscopy because the electron beam is deflected by the magnetic flux associated with the vortices. This technique has a better spatial and temporal resolution than many other imaging techniques and is sensitive to the magnetic flux density within each vortex, not simply the fields at the sample surface. Despite these advantages, only two groups have successfully employed the technique using specially adapted instruments. Here we demonstrate that vortices can be imaged with a modern, commercial transmission electron microscope operating at 300kV equipped with a field emission gun, Lorentz lens and a liquid helium cooled sample holder. We introduce superconductivity for non-specialists and discuss techniques for simulating and optimising images of flux vortices. Sample preparation is discussed in detail as the main difficulty with the technique is the requirement for samples with very large (>10microm), flat areas so that the image is not dominated by diffraction contrast. We have imaged vortices in superconducting Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8-delta) and use correlation functions to investigate the ordered arrangements they adopt as a function of applied magnetic field.

  13. Dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging: II. Task-oriented statistical estimation.

    PubMed

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Lodge, Martin A; Zhou, Y; Wahl, Richard L; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-10-21

    In the context of oncology, dynamic PET imaging coupled with standard graphical linear analysis has been previously employed to enable quantitative estimation of tracer kinetic parameters of physiological interest at the voxel level, thus, enabling quantitative PET parametric imaging. However, dynamic PET acquisition protocols have been confined to the limited axial field-of-view (~15-20 cm) of a single-bed position and have not been translated to the whole-body clinical imaging domain. On the contrary, standardized uptake value (SUV) PET imaging, considered as the routine approach in clinical oncology, commonly involves multi-bed acquisitions, but is performed statically, thus not allowing for dynamic tracking of the tracer distribution. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. In a companion study, we presented a novel clinically feasible dynamic (4D) multi-bed PET acquisition protocol as well as the concept of whole-body PET parametric imaging employing Patlak ordinary least squares (OLS) regression to estimate the quantitative parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V. In the present study, we propose an advanced hybrid linear regression framework, driven by Patlak kinetic voxel correlations, to achieve superior trade-off between contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and mean squared error (MSE) than provided by OLS for the final Ki parametric images, enabling task-based performance optimization. Overall, whether the observer's task is to detect a tumor or quantitatively assess treatment response, the proposed statistical estimation framework can be adapted to satisfy the specific task performance criteria, by adjusting the Patlak correlation-coefficient (WR) reference value. The multi-bed dynamic acquisition protocol, as optimized in the preceding companion study

  14. WE-F-BRD-01: HDR Brachytherapy II: Integrating Imaging with HDR

    SciTech Connect

    Craciunescu, O; Todor, D; Leeuw, A de

    2014-06-15

    In recent years, with the advent of high/pulsed dose rate afterloading technology, advanced treatment planning systems, CT/MRI compatible applicators, and advanced imaging platforms, image-guided adaptive brachytherapy treatments (IGABT) have started to play an ever increasing role in modern radiation therapy. The most accurate way to approach IGABT treatment is to provide the infrastructure that combines in a single setting an appropriate imaging device, a treatment planning system, and a treatment unit. The Brachytherapy Suite is not a new concept, yet the modern suites are incorporating state-of-the-art imaging (MRI, CBCT equipped simulators, CT, and /or US) that require correct integration with each other and with the treatment planning and delivery systems. Arguably, an MRI-equipped Brachytherapy Suite is the ideal setup for real-time adaptive brachytherapy treatments. The main impediment to MRI-IGABT adoption is access to MRI scanners. Very few radiation oncology departments currently house MRI scanners, and even fewer in a dedicated Brachytherapy Suite. CBCT equipped simulators are increasingly offered by manufacturers as part of a Brachytherapy Suite installation. If optimized, images acquired can be used for treatment planning, or can be registered with other imaging modalities. This infrastructure is relevant for all forms of brachytherapy, especially those utilizing multi-fractionated courses of treatment such as prostate and cervix. Moreover, for prostate brachytherapy, US imaging systems can be part of the suite to allow for real-time HDR/LDR treatments. Learning Objectives: Understand the adaptive workflow of MR-based IGBT for cervical cancer. Familiarize with commissioning aspects of a CBCT equipped simulator with emphasis on brachytherapy applications Learn about the current status and future developments in US-based prostate brachytherapy.

  15. Monitoring of thermal therapy based on shear modulus changes: II. Shear wave imaging of thermal lesions.

    PubMed

    Arnal, Bastien; Pernot, Mathieu; Tanter, Mickael

    2011-08-01

    The clinical applicability of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for noninvasive therapy is currently hampered by the lack of robust and real-time monitoring of tissue damage during treatment. The goal of this study is to show that the estimation of local tissue elasticity from shear wave imaging (SWI) can lead to a precise mapping of the lesion. HIFU treatment and monitoring were respectively performed using a confocal setup consisting of a 2.5-MHz single element transducer focused at 34 mm on ex vivo samples and an 8-MHz ultrasound diagnostic probe. Ultrasound-based strain imaging was combined with shear wave imaging on the same device. The SWI sequences consisted of 2 successive shear waves induced at different lateral positions. Each wave was created with pushing beams of 100 μs at 3 depths. The shear wave propagation was acquired at 17,000 frames/s, from which the elasticity map was recovered. HIFU sonications were interleaved with fast imaging acquisitions, allowing a duty cycle of more than 90%. Thus, elasticity and strain mapping was achieved every 3 s, leading to real-time monitoring of the treatment. When thermal damage occurs, tissue stiffness was found to increase up to 4-fold and strain imaging showed strong shrinkages that blur the temperature information. We show that strain imaging elastograms are not easy to interpret for accurate lesion characterization, but SWI provides a quantitative mapping of the thermal lesion. Moreover, the concept of shear wave thermometry (SWT) developed in the companion paper allows mapping temperature with the same method. Combined SWT and shear wave imaging can map the lesion stiffening and temperature outside the lesion, which could be used to predict the eventual lesion growth by thermal dose calculation. Finally, SWI is shown to be robust to motion and reliable in vivo on sheep muscle.

  16. Single molecule imaging of RNA polymerase II using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodin, Thor; Fu, Jianhua; Umemura, Kazuo; Gad, Mohammed; Jarvis, Suzi; Ishikawa, Mitsuru

    2003-03-01

    An atomic force microscopy (AFM) study of the shape, orientation and surface topology of RNA polymerase II supported on silanized freshly cleaved mica was made. The overall aim is to define the molecular topology of RNA polymerase II in appropriate fluids to help clarify the relationship of conformational features to biofunctionality. A Nanoscope III atomic force microscope was used in the tapping mode with oxide-sharpened (8-10 nm) Si 3N 4 probes in aqueous zinc chloride buffer. The main structural features observed by AFM were compared to those derived from electron-density plots based on X-ray crystallographic studies. The conformational features included a bilobal silhouette with an inverted umbrella-shaped crater connected to a reaction site. These studies provide a starting point for constructing a 3D-AFM profiling analysis of proteins such as RNA polymerase complexes.

  17. Demonstration of dual-band infrared thermal imaging for bridge inspection. Phase II, final report

    SciTech Connect

    Durbin, P.F.; Del Grande, N.K.; Schaich, P.C.

    1996-03-01

    Developing and implementing methods of effective bridge rehabilitation is a major issue for the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The nation spends $5 billion annually to replace, rehabilitate or construct new bridges. According to the National Bridge Inventory, over 100,000 U.S. bridges are structurally deficient. About 40,000 of these bridges have advanced deck deterioration. The most common causes of serious deck deterioration is delamination. Delaminations result when steel reinforcements within the bridge deck corrode, creating gaps that separate the concrete into layers. A reliable inspection technology, capable of identifying delaminations, would represent a power new tool in bridge maintenance. To date, most bridge inspections rely on human interpretation of surface visual features of chain dragging. These methods are slow, disruptive, unreliable and raise serious safety concerns. Infrared thermal imaging detects subsurface delaminations and surface clutter, which is introduced by foreign material on the roadway. Typically, foreign material which is not always evident on a video tape image, produces a unique IR reflectance background unlike the thermal response of a subsurface delamination. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) uses dual-band infrared (DBIR) thermal imaging to identify and remove nonthermal IR reflectance backgrounds from foreign material on the roadway. DBIR methods improve the performance of IR thermal imaging by a factor of ten, compared to single-band infrared (SBIR) methods. DBIR thermal imaging allows precise temperature measurement to reliably locate bridge deck delaminations and remove wavelength-dependent emissivity variations due to foreign material on the roadway.

  18. Contrast in Terahertz Images of Archival Documents—Part II: Influence of Topographic Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardon, Tiphaine; May, Robert K.; Taday, Philip F.; Strlič, Matija

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the potential of terahertz time-domain imaging in reflection mode to reveal archival information in documents in a non-invasive way. In particular, this study explores the parameters and signal processing tools that can be used to produce well-contrasted terahertz images of topographic features commonly found in archival documents, such as indentations left by a writing tool, as well as sieve lines. While the amplitude of the waveforms at a specific time delay can provide the most contrasted and legible images of topographic features on flat paper or parchment sheets, this parameter may not be suitable for documents that have a highly irregular surface, such as water- or fire-damaged documents. For analysis of such documents, cross-correlation of the time-domain signals can instead yield images with good contrast. Analysis of the frequency-domain representation of terahertz waveforms can also provide well-contrasted images of topographic features, with improved spatial resolution when utilising high-frequency content. Finally, we point out some of the limitations of these means of analysis for extracting information relating to topographic features of interest from documents.

  19. Contrast in Terahertz Images of Archival Documents—Part II: Influence of Topographic Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardon, Tiphaine; May, Robert K.; Taday, Philip F.; Strlič, Matija

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the potential of terahertz time-domain imaging in reflection mode to reveal archival information in documents in a non-invasive way. In particular, this study explores the parameters and signal processing tools that can be used to produce well-contrasted terahertz images of topographic features commonly found in archival documents, such as indentations left by a writing tool, as well as sieve lines. While the amplitude of the waveforms at a specific time delay can provide the most contrasted and legible images of topographic features on flat paper or parchment sheets, this parameter may not be suitable for documents that have a highly irregular surface, such as water- or fire-damaged documents. For analysis of such documents, cross-correlation of the time-domain signals can instead yield images with good contrast. Analysis of the frequency-domain representation of terahertz waveforms can also provide well-contrasted images of topographic features, with improved spatial resolution when utilising high-frequency content. Finally, we point out some of the limitations of these means of analysis for extracting information relating to topographic features of interest from documents.

  20. Live-cell Imaging of Pol II Promoter Activity to Monitor Gene expression with RNA IMAGEtag reporters

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Ilchung; Ray, Judhajeet; Gupta, Vinayak; Ilgu, Muslum; Beasley, Jonathan; Bendickson, Lee; Mehanovic, Samir; Kraus, George A.; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit

    2014-04-20

    We describe a ribonucleic acid (RNA) reporter system for live-cell imaging of gene expression to detect changes in polymerase II activity on individual promoters in individual cells. The reporters use strings of RNA aptamers that constitute IMAGEtags (Intracellular MultiAptamer GEnetic tags) that can be expressed from a promoter of choice. For imaging, the cells are incubated with their ligands that are separately conjugated with one of the FRET pair, Cy3 and Cy5. The IMAGEtags were expressed in yeast from the GAL1, ADH1 or ACT1 promoters. Transcription from all three promoters was imaged in live cells and transcriptional increases from the GAL1 promoter were observed with time after adding galactose. Expression of the IMAGEtags did not affect cell proliferation or endogenous gene expression. Advantages of this method are that no foreign proteins are produced in the cells that could be toxic or otherwise influence the cellular response as they accumulate, the IMAGEtags are short lived and oxygen is not required to generate their signals. The IMAGEtag RNA reporter system provides a means of tracking changes in transcriptional activity in live cells and in real time.

  1. Short-lag Spatial Coherence Imaging on Matrix Arrays Part II: Phantom and In Vivo Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Jakovljevic, Marko; Byram, Brett C.; Hyun, Dongwoon; Dahl, Jeremy J.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2014-01-01

    In Part I of the paper, we demonstrated through simulation the potential of volumetric Short-lag Spatial Coherence (SLSC) imaging to improve visualization of hypoechoic targets in three dimensions. Here, we demonstrate the application of volumetric SLSC imaging in phantom and in vivo experiments using a clinical 3-D ultrasound scanner and matrix array. Using a custom single-channel acquisition tool, we collected partially beamformed channel data from the fully sampled matrix array at high speeds and created matched B-mode and SLSC volumes of a vessel phantom and in vivo liver vasculature. 2-D and 3-D images rendered from the SLSC volumes display reduced clutter and improved visibility of the vessels when compared to their B-mode counterparts. We use concurrently acquired color Doppler volumes to confirm the presence of the vessels of interest and to define the regions inside the vessels used in contrast and CNR calculations. SLSC volumes show higher CNR values than their matched B-mode volumes while the contrast values appear to be similar between the two imaging methods. PMID:24960701

  2. Motion correction of PET brain images through deconvolution: II. Practical implementation and algorithm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunath, N.; Faber, T. L.; Suryanarayanan, S.; Votaw, J. R.

    2009-02-01

    Image quality is significantly degraded even by small amounts of patient motion in very high-resolution PET scanners. When patient motion is known, deconvolution methods can be used to correct the reconstructed image and reduce motion blur. This paper describes the implementation and optimization of an iterative deconvolution method that uses an ordered subset approach to make it practical and clinically viable. We performed ten separate FDG PET scans using the Hoffman brain phantom and simultaneously measured its motion using the Polaris Vicra tracking system (Northern Digital Inc., Ontario, Canada). The feasibility and effectiveness of the technique was studied by performing scans with different motion and deconvolution parameters. Deconvolution resulted in visually better images and significant improvement as quantified by the Universal Quality Index (UQI) and contrast measures. Finally, the technique was applied to human studies to demonstrate marked improvement. Thus, the deconvolution technique presented here appears promising as a valid alternative to existing motion correction methods for PET. It has the potential for deblurring an image from any modality if the causative motion is known and its effect can be represented in a system matrix.

  3. AUTOMATIC DETECTION AND TRACKING OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS. II. MULTISCALE FILTERING OF CORONAGRAPH IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, Jason P.; Morgan, Huw; Habbal, Shadia R.; Gallagher, Peter T.

    2012-06-20

    Studying coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in coronagraph data can be challenging due to their diffuse structure and transient nature, and user-specific biases may be introduced through visual inspection of the images. The large amount of data available from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO), and future coronagraph missions also makes manual cataloging of CMEs tedious, and so a robust method of detection and analysis is required. This has led to the development of automated CME detection and cataloging packages such as CACTus, SEEDS, and ARTEMIS. Here, we present the development of a new CORIMP (coronal image processing) CME detection and tracking technique that overcomes many of the drawbacks of current catalogs. It works by first employing the dynamic CME separation technique outlined in a companion paper, and then characterizing CME structure via a multiscale edge-detection algorithm. The detections are chained through time to determine the CME kinematics and morphological changes as it propagates across the plane of sky. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated by its application to a selection of SOHO/LASCO and STEREO/SECCHI images, as well as to synthetic coronagraph images created from a model corona with a variety of CMEs. The algorithms described in this article are being applied to the whole LASCO and SECCHI data sets, and a catalog of results will soon be available to the public.

  4. Automatic Detection and Tracking of Coronal Mass Ejections. II. Multiscale Filtering of Coronagraph Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Jason P.; Morgan, Huw; Habbal, Shadia R.; Gallagher, Peter T.

    2012-06-01

    Studying coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in coronagraph data can be challenging due to their diffuse structure and transient nature, and user-specific biases may be introduced through visual inspection of the images. The large amount of data available from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO), and future coronagraph missions also makes manual cataloging of CMEs tedious, and so a robust method of detection and analysis is required. This has led to the development of automated CME detection and cataloging packages such as CACTus, SEEDS, and ARTEMIS. Here, we present the development of a new CORIMP (coronal image processing) CME detection and tracking technique that overcomes many of the drawbacks of current catalogs. It works by first employing the dynamic CME separation technique outlined in a companion paper, and then characterizing CME structure via a multiscale edge-detection algorithm. The detections are chained through time to determine the CME kinematics and morphological changes as it propagates across the plane of sky. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated by its application to a selection of SOHO/LASCO and STEREO/SECCHI images, as well as to synthetic coronagraph images created from a model corona with a variety of CMEs. The algorithms described in this article are being applied to the whole LASCO and SECCHI data sets, and a catalog of results will soon be available to the public.

  5. Development of automated image co-registration techniques: Part II - multisensor imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Lundeen, T.F.; Andrews, A.K.; Perry, E.M.; Whyatt, M.V.; Steinmaus, K.L.

    1996-10-01

    This is the second in a series of PNNL Multispectral Imagery (ST474D) reports on automated co-registration and rectification of multisensor imagery. In the first report, a semi-automated registration procedure was introduced based on methods proposed by Chen and Lee which emphasized registration of same sensor imagery. The Chen and Lee approach is outlined in Figure 1, and is described in detail in the first report. PNNL made several enhancements to the Chen and Lee approach; these modifications are outlined in Figure 2 and are also described in detail in the first report. The PNNL enhancements to the Chen and Lee approach introduced in the first phase have been named Multisensor Image Registration Automation (MIRA). These improvements increased computational efficiency and offered additional algorithms for coarse matching of disparate image types. In the MIRA approach, one set of optimum GCP locations are determined based on a Delaunay triangulation technique using an initial set of GCPs provided by the user, rather than repeating this step for each added control point as is proposed by Chen and Lee. The Chen and Lee approach uses an adjacent pixel difference algorithm for coarse matching patches of the reference image with the source image, while the MIRA approach adds other algorithms. Also the MIRA approach checks to determine if the a newly determined GCP fits the existing warping equation.

  6. 22 CFR 401.13 - Copies required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Copies required. 401.13 Section 401.13 Foreign Relations INTERNATIONAL JOINT COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND CANADA RULES OF PROCEDURE Applications § 401.13... additional copies of the documents mentioned therein as may be requested by the Commission shall be...

  7. 22 CFR 401.13 - Copies required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Copies required. 401.13 Section 401.13 Foreign Relations INTERNATIONAL JOINT COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND CANADA RULES OF PROCEDURE Applications § 401.13... additional copies of the documents mentioned therein as may be requested by the Commission shall be...

  8. 22 CFR 401.13 - Copies required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Copies required. 401.13 Section 401.13 Foreign Relations INTERNATIONAL JOINT COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND CANADA RULES OF PROCEDURE Applications § 401.13... additional copies of the documents mentioned therein as may be requested by the Commission shall be...

  9. 22 CFR 401.13 - Copies required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Copies required. 401.13 Section 401.13 Foreign Relations INTERNATIONAL JOINT COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND CANADA RULES OF PROCEDURE Applications § 401.13... additional copies of the documents mentioned therein as may be requested by the Commission shall be...

  10. 22 CFR 401.13 - Copies required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Copies required. 401.13 Section 401.13 Foreign Relations INTERNATIONAL JOINT COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND CANADA RULES OF PROCEDURE Applications § 401.13... additional copies of the documents mentioned therein as may be requested by the Commission shall be...

  11. 48 CFR 3001.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Copies. 3001.105-3 Section 3001.105-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, HOMELAND SECURITY....105-3 Copies. Official versions of the HSAR are available in the Code of Federal Regulations,...

  12. 48 CFR 3001.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....105-3 Copies. The HSAR is available in the Federal Register and electronically at http://www.dhs.gov... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Copies. 3001.105-3 Section 3001.105-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, HOMELAND...

  13. 48 CFR 3001.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Copies. 3001.105-3 Section 3001.105-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, HOMELAND SECURITY....105-3 Copies. Official versions of the HSAR are available in the Code of Federal Regulations,...

  14. 48 CFR 3001.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ....105-3 Copies. The HSAR is available in the Federal Register and electronically at http://www.dhs.gov... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Copies. 3001.105-3 Section 3001.105-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, HOMELAND...

  15. 48 CFR 201.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Copies. 201.105-3 Section 201.105-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GENERAL FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM Purpose, Authority, Issuance 201.105-3 Copies....

  16. 48 CFR 1501.105-3 - Copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Copies. 1501.105-3 Section 1501.105-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL GENERAL... 20402. Copies of loose-leaf EPAAR are distributed within EPA and may be obtained from the EPA...

  17. High resolution imaging with multilayer telescopes: resolution performance of the MSSTA II telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Galarce, Dennis S.; Walker, Arthur B. C. II; Gore, David B.; Kankelborg, Charles C.; Hoover, Richard B.; Barbee, T. W. Jr.; Boerner, P. F. X.

    2000-04-01

    The Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array (MSSTA) is a sounding rocket-borne observatory composed of a set of normal-incidence multilayer-coated telescopes that obtained selected bandpass spectroheliograms (44 to 1550 Aa) of the solar atmosphere. These spectroheliograms were recorded on specially fabricated XUV and FUV 70-mm Kodak film. Rocket launches of this instrument payload took place in 1991 (MSSTA I) and 1994 (MSSTA II) at the White Sands Missile Test Range in New Mexico, sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) sounding rocket experiment program. Immediately prior to the 1994 launch, visible light focusing tests of each telescope were performed in situ using a 1951 standard Air Force high-resolution test target, to measure optical resolution performance. We determined that the MSSTA II telescopes performed at diffraction-limited resolutions down to 0.70 arcsec at visible wavelengths. Based on these measurements, we calculate an upper bound to the focusing errors that incorporate the sum of all uncorrelated system focus errors that affect resolution performance. Coupling these upper bound estimates with the in-band diffraction limits, surface scattering errors and payload pointing jitter, we demonstrate that 11 of 19 MSSTA II telescopes--having negligible figures of focus errors in comparison to the corresponding visible diffraction limits--performed at sub arcsecond resolution at their operational FUV/EUV/XUV wavelengths during flight. We estimate the in-band performance down to 0.14{+-}0.08 arcsec. (c) 2000 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

  18. Zn(II)-coordination modulated ligand photophysical processes – the development of fluorescent indicators for imaging biological Zn(II) ions

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhao; Simmons, J. Tyler; Sreenath, Kesavapillai

    2014-01-01

    Molecular photophysics and metal coordination chemistry are the two fundamental pillars that support the development of fluorescent cation indicators. In this article, we describe how Zn(II)-coordination alters various ligand-centered photophysical processes that are pertinent to developing Zn(II) indicators. The main aim is to show how small organic Zn(II) indicators work under the constraints of specific requirements, including Zn(II) detection range, photophysical requirements such as excitation energy and emission color, temporal and spatial resolutions in a heterogeneous intracellular environment, and fluorescence response selectivity between similar cations such as Zn(II) and Cd(II). In the last section, the biological questions that fluorescent Zn(II) indicators help to answer are described, which have been motivating and challenging this field of research. PMID:25071933

  19. A dinuclear ruthenium(II) complex as turn-on luminescent probe for hypochlorous acid and its application for in vivo imaging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zonglun; Gao, Kuo; Wang, Beng; Yan, Hui; Xing, Panfei; Zhong, Chongmin; Xu, Yongqian; Li, Hongjuan; Chen, Jianxin; Wang, Wei; Sun, Shiguo

    2016-01-01

    A dinuclear ruthenium(II) complex Ruazo was designed and synthesized, in which oxidative cyclization of the azo and o-amino group was employed for the detection of hypochlorous acid (HClO) in aqueous solution. The non-emissive Ruazo formed highly luminescent triazole-ruthenium(II) complex in presence of HClO and successfully imaged HClO in living cell and living mouse. PMID:27356618

  20. MORPH-II, a software package for the analysis of scanning-electron-micrograph images for the assessment of the fractal dimension of exposed stone surfaces

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mossotti, Victor G.; Eldeeb, A. Raouf

    2000-01-01

    Turcotte, 1997, and Barton and La Pointe, 1995, have identified many potential uses for the fractal dimension in physicochemical models of surface properties. The image-analysis program described in this report is an extension of the program set MORPH-I (Mossotti and others, 1998), which provided the fractal analysis of electron-microscope images of pore profiles (Mossotti and Eldeeb, 1992). MORPH-II, an integration of the modified kernel of the program MORPH-I with image calibration and editing facilities, was designed to measure the fractal dimension of the exposed surfaces of stone specimens as imaged in cross section in an electron microscope.

  1. Image Pretreatment Tools II: Normalization Techniques for 2-DE and 2-D DIGE.

    PubMed

    Robotti, Elisa; Marengo, Emilio; Quasso, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Gel electrophoresis is usually applied to identify different protein expression profiles in biological samples (e.g., control vs. pathological, control vs. treated). Information about the effect to be investigated (a pathology, a drug, a ripening effect, etc.) is however generally confounded with experimental variability that is quite large in 2-DE and may arise from small variations in the sample preparation, reagents, sample loading, electrophoretic conditions, staining and image acquisition. Obtaining valid quantitative estimates of protein abundances in each map, before the differential analysis, is therefore fundamental to provide robust candidate biomarkers. Normalization procedures are applied to reduce experimental noise and make the images comparable, improving the accuracy of differential analysis. Certainly, they may deeply influence the final results, and to this respect they have to be applied with care. Here, the most widespread normalization procedures are described both for what regards the applications to 2-DE and 2D Difference Gel-electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) maps.

  2. Prospect for UV observations from the Moon. II. Instrumental design of an ultraviolet imager LUCI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Joice; Prakash, Ajin; Sarpotdar, Mayuresh; Sreejith, A. G.; Nirmal, K.; Ambily, S.; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant; Brosch, Noah

    2017-02-01

    We present a design for a near-ultraviolet (NUV) imaging instrument which may be flown on a range of available platforms, including high-altitude balloons, nanosatellites, or space missions. Although all current UV space missions adopt a Ritchey-Chrétien telescope design, this requires aspheric optics, making the optical system complex, expensive and challenging for manufacturing and alignment. An all-spherical configuration is a cost-effective and simple solution. We have aimed for a small payload which may be launched by different platforms and we have designed a compact, light-weight payload which will withstand all launch loads. No other UV payloads have been previously reported with an all-spherical optical design for imaging in the NUV domain and a weight below 2 kg. Our main science goal is focused on bright UV sources not accessible by the more sensitive large space UV missions.

  3. Photographic copy of drawing by Modjeski and Masters, Engineers of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of drawing by Modjeski and Masters, Engineers of the proposed Huey P. Long Bridge Widening. Original drawing located in the office of Modjeski and Masters, Consulting Engineers at 1055 St. Charles Avenue, New Orleans, LA. 70130. MAY 13, 2005 DRAWING OF THE PROPOSED HUEY P. LONG BRIDGE WIDENING, U.S. 90, MAIN BRIDGE SUPERSTRUCTURE, SHOWING ELEVATION AND SECTIONS AT PIER I AND II AND GENERAL DETAILS – 1. - Huey P. Long Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River approximately midway between nine & twelve mile points upstream from & west of New Orleans, Jefferson, Jefferson Parish, LA

  4. Photographic copy of drawing by Modjeski and Masters, Engineers of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of drawing by Modjeski and Masters, Engineers of the proposed Huey P. Long Bridge Widening. Original drawing located in the office of Modjeski and Masters, Consulting Engineers at 1055 St. Charles Avenue, New Orleans, LA. 70130. MAY 13, 2005 DRAWING OF THE PROPOSED HUEY P. LONG BRIDGE WIDENING, U.S. 90, MAIN BRIDGE SUPERSTRUCTURE, SHOWING STRUCTURE PLAN AND ELEVATION -2 AND TYPICAL SECTION THROUGH BRIDGE AT PIER I AND II. - Huey P. Long Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River approximately midway between nine & twelve mile points upstream from & west of New Orleans, Jefferson, Jefferson Parish, LA

  5. TESTING THE NO-HAIR THEOREM WITH OBSERVATIONS IN THE ELECTROMAGNETIC SPECTRUM. II. BLACK HOLE IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Johannsen, Tim; Psaltis, Dimitrios E-mail: dpsaltis@email.arizona.ed

    2010-07-20

    According to the no-hair theorem, all astrophysical black holes are fully described by their masses and spins. This theorem can be tested observationally by measuring (at least) three different multipole moments of the spacetimes of black holes. In this paper, we analyze images of black holes within a framework that allows us to calculate observables in the electromagnetic spectrum as a function of the mass, spin, and, independently, the quadrupole moment of a black hole. We show that a deviation of the quadrupole moment from the expected Kerr value leads to images of black holes that are either prolate or oblate depending on the sign and magnitude of the deviation. In addition, there is a ring-like structure around the black hole shadow with a diameter of {approx}10 black hole masses that is substantially brighter than the image of the underlying accretion flow and that is independent of the astrophysical details of accretion flow models. We show that the shape of this ring depends directly on the mass, spin, and quadrupole moment of the black hole and can be used for an independent measurement of all three parameters. In particular, we demonstrate that this ring is highly circular for a Kerr black hole with a spin a {approx}< 0.9 M, independent of the observer's inclination, but becomes elliptical and asymmetric if the no-hair theorem is violated. Near-future very long baseline interferometric observations of Sgr A* will image this ring and may allow for an observational test of the no-hair theorem.

  6. A Computer-Aided Type-II Fuzzy Image Processing for Diagnosis of Meniscus Tear.

    PubMed

    Zarandi, M H Fazel; Khadangi, A; Karimi, F; Turksen, I B

    2016-12-01

    Meniscal tear is one of the prevalent knee disorders among young athletes and the aging population, and requires correct diagnosis and surgical intervention, if necessary. Not only the errors followed by human intervention but also the obstacles of manual meniscal tear detection highlight the need for automatic detection techniques. This paper presents a type-2 fuzzy expert system for meniscal tear diagnosis using PD magnetic resonance images (MRI). The scheme of the proposed type-2 fuzzy image processing model is composed of three distinct modules: Pre-processing, Segmentation, and Classification. λ-nhancement algorithm is used to perform the pre-processing step. For the segmentation step, first, Interval Type-2 Fuzzy C-Means (IT2FCM) is applied to the images, outputs of which are then employed by Interval Type-2 Possibilistic C-Means (IT2PCM) to perform post-processes. Second stage concludes with re-estimation of "η" value to enhance IT2PCM. Finally, a Perceptron neural network with two hidden layers is used for Classification stage. The results of the proposed type-2 expert system have been compared with a well-known segmentation algorithm, approving the superiority of the proposed system in meniscal tear recognition.

  7. The SWAP EUV Imaging Telescope. Part II: In-flight Performance and Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halain, J.-P.; Berghmans, D.; Seaton, D. B.; Nicula, B.; De Groof, A.; Mierla, M.; Mazzoli, A.; Defise, J.-M.; Rochus, P.

    2013-08-01

    The Sun Watcher with Active Pixel System detector and Image Processing (SWAP) telescope was launched on 2 November 2009 onboard the ESA PROBA2 technological mission and has acquired images of the solar corona every one to two minutes for more than two years. The most important technological developments included in SWAP are a radiation-resistant CMOS-APS detector and a novel onboard data-prioritization scheme. Although such detectors have been used previously in space, they have never been used for long-term scientific observations on orbit. Thus SWAP requires a careful calibration to guarantee the science return of the instrument. Since launch we have regularly monitored the evolution of SWAP's detector response in-flight to characterize both its performance and degradation over the course of the mission. These measurements are also used to reduce detector noise in calibrated images (by subtracting dark-current). Because accurate measurements of detector dark-current require large telescope off-points, we also monitored straylight levels in the instrument to ensure that these calibration measurements are not contaminated by residual signal from the Sun. Here we present the results of these tests and examine the variation of instrumental response and noise as a function of both time and temperature throughout the mission.

  8. The pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis in radiological studies. Part II: Imaging studies in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Zaniewicz-Kaniewska, Katarzyna; Warczyńska, Agnieszka; Matuszewska, Genowefa; Saied, Fadhil; Kunisz, Wojciech

    2012-09-01

    Early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis followed by early initiation of treatment, prevent the destruction of joints and progression to disability in the majority of patients. A traditional X-ray fails to capture early inflammatory changes, while late changes (e.g. erosions) appear after a significant delay, once 20-30% of bone mass has been lost. Sonography and magnetic resonance imaging studies have shown that erosions are seen in the first 3 months from the appearance of symptoms in 10-26% of patients, while in 75% they are seen in the first 2 years of the disease. Power Doppler ultrasound and dynamic magnetic resonance studies allow for qualitative, semiquantitative and quantitative monitoring of the vascularization of the synovium. In addition, magnetic resonance enables assessment of the bone marrow. The ultrasonographic examination using a state-of-the-art apparatus with a high-frequency probe allows for images with great spatial resolution and for the visualization of soft tissues and bone surfaces. However, the changes seen in ultrasonography (synovial pathologies, the presence of exudate, tendons changes, cartilage and bone lesions, pathologies of tendon attachments and ligaments - enthesopathies) are not only specific for rheumatoid arthritis and occur in other rheumatic diseases. Qualitative methods are sufficient for diagnosing the disease through ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging. Whereas semiquantitative and quantitative scales serve to monitor the disease course - efficacy of conservative treatment and qualification for radioisotope synovectomy or surgical synovectomy - and to assess treatment efficacy.

  9. Research on copying system of dynamic multiplex holographic stereograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Huaiping; Yang, Hong; Zheng, Tong

    2003-05-01

    The most important advantage of holographic stereograms over conventional hologram is that they can produce 3D images at any desired scale with movement, holographers in many countries involved in the studies towards it. We began our works in the early 80's and accomplished two research projects automatic system for making synthetic holograms and multiplex synthetic rainbow holograms, Based on these works, a large scale holographic stereogram of an animated goldfish was made by us for practical advertisement. In order to meet the needs of the market, a copying system for making multiplex holographic stereograms, and a special kind of silver halide holographic film developed by us recently. The characteristic of the copying system and the property of the special silver-halide emulsion are introduced in this paper.

  10. Developing a genetically encoded green fluorescent protein mutant for sensitive light-up fluorescent sensing and cellular imaging of Hg(II).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Guo, Daiping; Wang, Qian; Wu, Xin; Li, Zhao; Zheng, Zhenhua; Yin, Boyuan; Xia, Lin; Tang, Jixian; Luo, Wenxin; Xia, Ningshao; Jiang, Yunbao

    2015-05-30

    Hg(II) is well-known for quenching fluorescence in a distance dependent manner. Nevertheless, when we exposed the fluorophore of a green fluorescent protein (GFP) toward Hg(II), through H148C mutation, the GFP fluorescence could be "lighted up" by Hg(II) down to sub-nM level. The detection linear range is 0.5-3.0 nM for protein solutions at 8.0 nM. The GFPH148C protein displayed a promising selectivity toward Hg(II) and also the cellular imaging capacity. Spectra measurements suggested that the ground-state redistribution of protein contributed to the fluorescence enhancement, which was found not limited to Hg(II), and thus presented an opening for building a pool of GFP-based chemosensors toward other heavy metal ions.

  11. Micro-angiography for neuro-vascular imaging. II. Cascade model analysis.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Arundhuti; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R; Hoffmann, Kenneth R

    2003-11-01

    A micro-angiographic detector was designed and its performance was previously tested to evaluate its feasibility as an improvement over current x-ray detectors for neuro-interventional imaging. The detector was shown to have a modulation transfer function value of about 2% at the Nyquist frequency of 10 cycles/mm and a zero frequency detective quantum efficiency [DQE(0)] value of about 55%. An assessment of the system was required to evaluate whether the current system was performing at its full potential and to determine if any of its components could be optimized to further improve the output. For the purpose, in this study, the parallel cascade theory was used to analyze the performance of the detector under neuro-angiographic conditions by studying the output at the various stages in the imaging chain. A simple model for the spread of light in the CsI(Tl) entrance phosphor was developed and the resolution degradation due to K-fluorescence absorption was calculated. The total gain of the system was found to result in 21 e(-) (rms) detected at the charge coupled device per absorbed x-ray photon. The gain and the spread of quanta in the imaging chain were used to calculate theoretically the DQE using the parallel cascade model. The results of the model-based calculations matched fairly well with the experimental data previously obtained. This model was then used to optimize the phosphor thickness for the detector. The results showed that the area under the DQE curve had a maximum value at 150 microm of CsI(Tl), though when weighted by the squared signal in frequency space of a 100-microm-diam iodinated vessel, the integral DQE reached a maximum at 250 microm of CsI(Tl). Further, possible locations for gain increase in the imaging chain were determined, and the output of the improved system was simulated. Thus a theoretical analysis for the micro-angiographic detector was performed to better assess its potential.

  12. Integrated imaging of hepatic tumors in childhood. Part II. Benign lesions (congenital, reparative, and inflammatory)

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.H.; Greenspan, B.S.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have encountered benign liver masses as frequently as malignant lesions in children with hepatomegaly. Lesions studied included abscesses, cavernous hemangioma/hemangioendothelioma, adenoma of glycogen storage disease, choledochal cysts, focal nodular hyperplasia, cystic hepatoblastoma, and hamartoma. An intergrated imaging protocol involving ultrasound, computed tomography, and scintigraphy proved to be more helpful than any one modality in establishing the benign or malignant nature of a hepatic neoplasm and the type of tumor, which is of particular importance when surgical exploration and/or biopsy is contraindicated.

  13. Two-mode squeezed light source for quantum illumination and quantum imaging II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masada, Genta

    2016-09-01

    Two-mode squeezed light is a macroscopic quantum entangled state of electro-magnetic fields and shows non-classical correlation between quadrature phase amplitudes in each optical mode. In this work the author is developing a high-quality two-mode squeezed light source for exploring the possibility of a quantum radar system based on a quantum illumination method and also expecting to apply it to quantum imaging. Two-mode squeezed light can be generated by combining two independent single-mode squeezed light beams using a beam splitter with a relative optical phase of 90 degrees between them. In current experimental progress the author developed two sub-threshold optical parametric oscillators to generate single-mode squeezed light beams. In the actual quantum radar or quantum imaging system, a turbulent atmosphere degrades quantum entanglement of a light source and affects performance of target detection. An optical loss is one of the simplest and most probable examples of environmental factors. In this work an evaluation method for quantum entanglement of two-mode squeezed light source is developed with consideration for the optical loss based on Duan's inseparability criteria.

  14. Turn-by-Turn Imaging of the Transverse Beam Profile in PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Alan A.; Petree, Mark; /SLAC

    2006-12-18

    During injection or instability, the transverse profile of an individual bunch in a storage ring can change significantly in a few turns. However, most synchrotron-light imaging techniques are not designed for this time scale. We have developed a novel diagnostic that enhances the utility of a fast gated camera by adding, inexpensively, some features of a dual-axis streak camera, in order to watch the turn-by-turn evolution of the transverse profile, in both x and y. The beam's elliptical profile is reshaped using cylindrical lenses to form a tall and narrow ellipse--essentially the projection of the full ellipse onto one transverse axis. We do this projection twice, by splitting the beam into two paths at different heights, and rotating the ellipse by 90{sup o} on one path. A rapidly rotating mirror scans these vertical ''pencils'' of light horizontally across the photocathode of the camera, which is gated for 3 ns on every Nth ring turn. A single readout of the camera captures 100 images, looking like a stroboscopic photograph of a moving object. We have observed the capture of injected charge into a bunch and the rapid change of beam size at the onset of a fast instability.

  15. Pupil plane interferometry in the near infrared. II - Phase recovery and image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monin, J.-L.; Mariotti, J.-M.; Ghez, P.; Perrier, C.; Desbat, L.

    1992-07-01

    We describe a 2D method to extract the phase of turbulence-blurred near-IR interferograms in the plane of the telescope pupil. The instrument and its principle have been described by Mariotti et al. (1992). The phase data are obtained from near-IR interference fringes produced by a Michelson interferometer in the image of the telescope pupil. We have developed an equivalent of the Knox-Thompson algorithm, using the spatial correlation of the phase over the pupil to recover the actual 2D phase of the complex visibility function. We compute and average the spatial gradients of the instantaneous phase, and a minimal norm least squares method is then used to recover the actual phase over the pupil. The modulus and the phase can be used to recover diffraction-limited images. We present an application of the method on a simulated binary system, together with first results on some astronomical data recently obtained at the 4.20-m William Herschel Telescope of the Royal Greenwich Observatory at La Palma. Tentative deconvolutions are presented.

  16. Image analysis of gunshot residue on entry wounds. II--A statistical estimation of firing range.

    PubMed

    Brown, H; Cauchi, D M; Holden, J L; Allen, F C; Cordner, S; Thatcher, P

    1999-03-29

    A statistical investigation of the relationship between firing range and the amount and distribution of gunshot residue (GSR), used automated image analysis (IA) to quantify GSR deposit resulting from firings into pig skin, from distances ranging between contact and 45 cm. Overall, for a Ruger .22 semi-automatic rifle using CCI solid point, high velocity ammunition, the total area of GSR deposit on the skin sections decreased in a non-linear fashion with firing range. More specifically there were significant differences in the amount of GSR deposited from shots fired at contact compared with shots fired from distances between 2.5 and 45 cm; and between shots fired from a distance of 20 cm or less, with shots fired at a distance of 30 cm or more. In addition, GSR particles were heavily concentrated in the wound tract only for contact and close range shots at 2.5 cm, while the particle distribution was more uniform between the wound tract and the skin surfaces for shots fired from distances greater than 2.5 cm. Consequently, for future scientific investigations of gunshot fatalities, once standards have been established for the weapon and ammunition type in question, image analysis quantification of GSR deposited in and around the gunshot wound may be capable of providing a reliable, statistical basis for estimating firing range.

  17. High-contrast Imager for Complex Aperture Telescopes (HICAT): II. Design overview and first light results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N'Diaye, Mamadou; Choquet, Elodie; Egron, Sylvain; Pueyo, Laurent; Leboulleux, Lucie; Levecq, Olivier; Perrin, Marshall D.; Elliot, Erin; Wallace, J. Kent; Hugot, Emmanuel; Marcos, Michel; Ferrari, Marc; Long, Chris A.; Anderson, Rachel; DiFelice, Audrey; Soummer, Rémi

    2014-08-01

    We present a new high-contrast imaging testbed designed to provide complete solutions in wavefront sensing, control and starlight suppression with complex aperture telescopes. The testbed was designed to enable a wide range of studies of the effects of such telescope geometries, with primary mirror segmentation, central obstruction, and spiders. The associated diffraction features in the point spread function make high-contrast imaging more challenging. In particular the testbed will be compatible with both AFTA-like and ATLAST-like aperture shapes, respectively on-axis monolithic, and on-axis segmented telescopes. The testbed optical design was developed using a novel approach to define the layout and surface error requirements to minimize amplitude­ induced errors at the target contrast level performance. In this communication we compare the as-built surface errors for each optic to their specifications based on end-to-end Fresnel modelling of the testbed. We also report on the testbed optical and optomechanical alignment performance, coronagraph design and manufacturing, and preliminary first light results.

  18. Intercomparison of methods for image quality characterization. II. Noise power spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbins, James T. III; Samei, Ehsan; Ranger, Nicole T.; Chen Ying

    2006-05-15

    Second in a two-part series comparing measurement techniques for the assessment of basic image quality metrics in digital radiography, in this paper we focus on the measurement of the image noise power spectrum (NPS). Three methods were considered: (1) a method published by Dobbins et al. [Med. Phys. 22, 1581-1593 (1995)] (2) a method published by Samei et al. [Med. Phys. 30, 608-622 (2003)], and (3) a new method sanctioned by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC 62220-1, 2003), developed as part of an international standard for the measurement of detective quantum efficiency. In addition to an overall comparison of the estimated NPS between the three techniques, the following factors were also evaluated for their effect on the measured NPS: horizontal versus vertical directional dependence, the use of beam-limiting apertures, beam spectrum, and computational methods of NPS analysis, including the region-of-interest (ROI) size and the method of ROI normalization. Of these factors, none was found to demonstrate a substantial impact on the amplitude of the NPS estimates ({<=}3.1% relative difference in NPS averaged over frequency, for each factor considered separately). Overall, the three methods agreed to within 1.6%{+-}0.8% when averaged over frequencies >0.15 mm{sup -1}.

  19. THE TRENDS HIGH-CONTRAST IMAGING SURVEY. II. DIRECT DETECTION OF THE HD 8375 TERTIARY

    SciTech Connect

    Crepp, Justin R.; Johnson, John Asher; Yantek, Scott M.; Howard, Andrew W.; Marcy, Geoff W.; Isaacson, Howard; Fischer, Debra A.; Wright, Jason T.; Feng Ying

    2013-07-01

    We present the direct imaging detection of a faint tertiary companion to the single-lined spectroscopic binary HD 8375 AB. Initially noticed as an 53 m s{sup -1} yr{sup -1} Doppler acceleration by Bowler et al., we have obtained high-contrast adaptive optics observations at Keck using NIRC2 that spatially resolve HD 8375 C from its host(s). Astrometric measurements demonstrate that the companion shares a common proper-motion. We detect orbital motion in a clockwise direction. Multiband relative photometry measurements are consistent with an early M-dwarf spectral type ({approx}M1V). Our combined Doppler and imaging observations place a lower-limit of m {>=} 0.297 M{sub Sun} on its dynamical mass. We also provide a refined orbit for the inner pair using recent radial velocity measurements obtained with the High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer. HD 8375 is one of many triple-star systems that are apparently missing in the solar neighborhood.

  20. The human parietal operculum. II. Stereotaxic maps and correlation with functional imaging results.

    PubMed

    Eickhoff, Simon B; Amunts, Katrin; Mohlberg, Hartmut; Zilles, Karl

    2006-02-01

    In this study we describe the localization of the cytoarchitectonic subdivisions of the human parietal operculum in stereotaxic space and relate these anatomically defined cortical areas to the location of the functionally defined secondary somatosensory cortex (SII cortex) using a meta-analysis of functional imaging results. The human parietal operculum consists of four distinct cytoarchitectonic areas (OP 1-4) as shown in the preceding publication. The 10 cytoarchitectonically examined brains were 3-D-reconstructed and spatially normalized to the T1-weighted single-subject template of the Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI). A probabilistic map was calculated for each area in this standard stereotaxic space. A cytoarchitectonic summary map of the four cortical areas on the human parietal operculum which combines these probabilistic maps was subsequently computed for the comparison with a meta-analysis of functional locations of SII. The meta-analysis used the results from 57 fMRI and PET studies and allowed the comparison of the functionally defined SII region to the cytoarchitectonic map of the parietal operculum. The functional localization of SII showed a good match to the cytoarchitectonically defined region. Therefore the cytoarchitectonic maps of OP 1-4 of the human parietal operculum can be interpreted as an anatomical correlate of the (functionally defined) human SII region. Our results also suggest that the SII foci reported in functional imaging studies may actually reflect activations in either of its architectonic subregions.

  1. Multiwavelength Diffraction-limited Imaging of the Evolved Carbon Star IRC +10216. II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuthill, P. G.; Monnier, J. D.; Danchi, W. C.

    2005-05-01

    High angular resolution images of IRC +10216 taken at various bandpasses within the near-infrared H, K, and L bands are presented. The maps have the highest angular resolution yet recovered and were reconstructed from interferometric measurements obtained at the Keck I telescope in 1997 December and 1998 April, forming a subset of a seven-epoch monitoring program presented earlier by Tuthill and coworkers in Paper I. Systematic changes with observing wavelength are found and discussed in the context of present geometrical models for the circumstellar envelope. With these new high-resolution, multiwavelength data and contemporaneous photometry, we also revisit the hypothesis that the bright compact core of the nebula (component ``A'') marks the location of the central carbon star. We find that directly measured properties of the core (angular size, flux density, color temperature) are consistent with a reddened carbon star photosphere (line-of-sight τ2.2=5.3).

  2. Phase II Trial of Hypofractionated Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jarad M.; Rosewall, Tara; Bayley, Andrew; Bristow, Robert; Chung, Peter; Crook, Juanita; Gospodarowicz, Mary; McLean, Michael; Menard, Cynthia; Milosevic, Michael; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To assess in a prospective trial the feasibility and late toxicity of hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had clinical stage T1c-2cNXM0 disease. They received 60 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks with intensity-modulated radiotherapy including daily on-line image guidance with intraprostatic fiducial markers. Results: Between June 2001 and March 2004, 92 patients were treated with hypofractionated RT. The cohort had a median prostate-specific antigen value of 7.06 ng/mL. The majority had Gleason grade 5-6 (38%) or 7 (59%) disease, and 82 patients had T1c-T2a clinical staging. Overall, 29 patients had low-risk, 56 intermediate-risk, and 7 high-risk disease. Severe acute toxicity (Grade 3-4) was rare, occurring in only 1 patient. Median follow-up was 38 months. According to the Phoenix definition for biochemical failure, the rate of biochemical control at 14 months was 97%. According to the previous American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition, biochemical control at 3 years was 76%. The incidence of late toxicity was low, with no severe (Grade {>=}3) toxicity at the most recent assessment. Conclusions: Hypofractionated RT using 60 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks with image guidance is feasible and is associated with low rates of late bladder and rectal toxicity. At early follow-up, biochemical outcome is comparable to that reported for conventionally fractionated controls. The findings are being tested in an ongoing, multicenter, Phase III trial.

  3. The Lyman alpha reference sample. II. Hubble space telescope imaging results, integrated properties, and trends

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, Matthew; Östlin, Göran; Duval, Florent; Sandberg, Andreas; Guaita, Lucia; Melinder, Jens; Rivera-Thorsen, Thøger; Adamo, Angela; Schaerer, Daniel; Verhamme, Anne; Orlitová, Ivana; Mas-Hesse, J. Miguel; Otí-Floranes, Héctor; Cannon, John M.; Pardy, Stephen; Atek, Hakim; Kunth, Daniel; Laursen, Peter; Herenz, E. Christian

    2014-02-10

    We report new results regarding the Lyα output of galaxies, derived from the Lyman Alpha Reference Sample, and focused on Hubble Space Telescope imaging. For 14 galaxies we present intensity images in Lyα, Hα, and UV, and maps of Hα/Hβ, Lyα equivalent width (EW), and Lyα/Hα. We present Lyα and UV radial light profiles and show they are well-fitted by Sérsic profiles, but Lyα profiles show indices systematically lower than those of the UV (n ≈ 1-2 instead of ≳ 4). This reveals a general lack of the central concentration in Lyα that is ubiquitous in the UV. Photometric growth curves increase more slowly for Lyα than the far ultraviolet, showing that small apertures may underestimate the EW. For most galaxies, however, flux and EW curves flatten by radii ≈10 kpc, suggesting that if placed at high-z only a few of our galaxies would suffer from large flux losses. We compute global properties of the sample in large apertures, and show total Lyα luminosities to be independent of all other quantities. Normalized Lyα throughput, however, shows significant correlations: escape is found to be higher in galaxies of lower star formation rate, dust content, mass, and nebular quantities that suggest harder ionizing continuum and lower metallicity. Six galaxies would be selected as high-z Lyα emitters, based upon their luminosity and EW. We discuss the results in the context of high-z Lyα and UV samples. A few galaxies have EWs above 50 Å, and one shows f{sub esc}{sup Lyα} of 80%; such objects have not previously been reported at low-z.

  4. Image-derived and arterial blood sampled input functions for quantitative PET imaging of the angiotensin II subtype 1 receptor in the kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Tao; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.; Li, Xin; Vranesic, Melin; Lodge, Martin A.; Gulaldi, Nedim C. M.; Szabo, Zsolt

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The radioligand {sup 11}C-KR31173 has been introduced for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of the angiotensin II subtype 1 receptor in the kidney in vivo. To study the biokinetics of {sup 11}C-KR31173 with a compartmental model, the input function is needed. Collection and analysis of arterial blood samples are the established approach to obtain the input function but they are not feasible in patients with renal diseases. The goal of this study was to develop a quantitative technique that can provide an accurate image-derived input function (ID-IF) to replace the conventional invasive arterial sampling and test the method in pigs with the goal of translation into human studies. Methods: The experimental animals were injected with [{sup 11}C]KR31173 and scanned up to 90 min with dynamic PET. Arterial blood samples were collected for the artery derived input function (AD-IF) and used as a gold standard for ID-IF. Before PET, magnetic resonance angiography of the kidneys was obtained to provide the anatomical information required for derivation of the recovery coefficients in the abdominal aorta, a requirement for partial volume correction of the ID-IF. Different image reconstruction methods, filtered back projection (FBP) and ordered subset expectation maximization (OS-EM), were investigated for the best trade-off between bias and variance of the ID-IF. The effects of kidney uptakes on the quantitative accuracy of ID-IF were also studied. Biological variables such as red blood cell binding and radioligand metabolism were also taken into consideration. A single blood sample was used for calibration in the later phase of the input function. Results: In the first 2 min after injection, the OS-EM based ID-IF was found to be biased, and the bias was found to be induced by the kidney uptake. No such bias was found with the FBP based image reconstruction method. However, the OS-EM based image reconstruction was found to reduce variance in the subsequent

  5. ACTA Technology Presents EPA with Patent Copy

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    US EPA SBIR awardee, ACTA Technology, presented James H. Johnson, Director of the US EPA National Center for Environmental Research, and April Richards, Program Manager of the US EPA's SBIR Program, with a copy of their Red Ribbon patent.

  6. Kinetic versus Energetic Discrimination in Biological Copying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, Pablo; Pigolotti, Simone

    2013-05-01

    We study stochastic copying schemes in which discrimination between a right and a wrong match is achieved via different kinetic barriers or different binding energies of the two matches. We demonstrate that, in single-step reactions, the two discrimination mechanisms are strictly alternative and cannot be mixed to further reduce the error fraction. Close to the lowest error limit, kinetic discrimination results in a diverging copying velocity and dissipation per copied bit. On the other hand, energetic discrimination reaches its lowest error limit in an adiabatic regime where dissipation and velocity vanish. By analyzing experimentally measured kinetic rates of two DNA polymerases, T7 and Polγ, we argue that one of them operates in the kinetic and the other in the energetic regime. Finally, we show how the two mechanisms can be combined in copying schemes implementing error correction through a proofreading pathway.

  7. Line copy presentation slides with Kodalith.

    PubMed

    Kraushar, M F; Bailey, B A

    1978-08-01

    Line copy presentation slides with white letters on a blue background can be produced with a two-step process. The slides are more permanent than diazo slides, and the process is faster and less expensive.

  8. Nickel(II) complexes of N-CH2CF3 cyclam derivatives as contrast agents for (19)F magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Blahut, Jan; Hermann, Petr; Gálisová, Andrea; Herynek, Vít; Císařová, Ivana; Tošner, Zdeněk; Kotek, Jan

    2016-01-14

    Kinetically inert Ni(ii) complexes of N(1),N(8)-bis(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)cyclams with hydrogen atoms or phosphonic acid groups in the N(4),N(11)-positions show significant (19)F NMR relaxation rate enhancement useful for 19-fluorine MRI imaging.

  9. NASA printing, duplicating, and copying management handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This handbook provides information and procedures for the implementation of NASA policy and applicable laws and regulations relating to printing, duplicating, and copying. The topics addressed include a description of relevant laws and regulations, authorizations required, and responsible entities for NASA printing, duplicating, and copying. The policy of NASA is to ensure understanding and application of authority and responsibility on printing matters. Where necessary, the handbook clarifies the intent of basic laws and regulations applicable to NASA.

  10. COPI Is Required for Enterovirus 71 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianmin; Wu, Zhiqiang; Jin, Qi

    2012-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71), a member of the Picornaviridae family, is found in Asian countries where it causes a wide range of human diseases. No effective therapy is available for the treatment of these infections. Picornaviruses undergo RNA replication in association with membranes of infected cells. COPI and COPII have been shown to be involved in the formation of picornavirus-induced vesicles. Replication of several picornaviruses, including poliovirus and Echovirus 11 (EV11), is dependent on COPI or COPII. Here, we report that COPI, but not COPII, is required for EV71 replication. Replication of EV71 was inhibited by brefeldin A and golgicide A, inhibitors of COPI activity. Furthermore, we found EV71 2C protein interacted with COPI subunits by co-immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assay, indicating that COPI coatomer might be directed to the viral replication complex through viral 2C protein. Additionally, because the pathway is conserved among different species of enteroviruses, it may represent a novel target for antiviral therapies. PMID:22662263

  11. Single copy DNA homology in sea stars.

    PubMed

    Smith, M J; Nicholson, R; Stuerzl, M; Lui, A

    1982-01-01

    The sequence homology in the single copy DNA of sea stars has been measured. Labeled single copy DNA from Pisaster ochraceus was reannealed with excess genomic DNA from P. brevispinus, Evasterias troschelii, Pycnopodia helianthoides, Solaster stimpsoni, and Dermasterias imbricata. Reassociation reactions were performed under two criteria of salt and temperature. The extent of reassociation and thermal denaturation characteristics of hybrid single copy DNA molecules follow classical taxonomic lines. P. brevispinus DNA contains essentially all of the sequences present in P. ochraceus single copy tracer while Evasterias and Pycnopodia DNAs contain 52% and 46% of such sequences respectively. Reciprocal reassociation reactions with labeled Evasterias single copy DNA confirm the amount and fidelity of the sequence homology. There is a small definite reaction of uncertain homology between P. ochraceus single copy DNA and Solaster or Dermasterias DNA. Similarly Solaster DNA contains sequences homologous to approximately 18% of Dermasterias unique DNA. The thermal denaturation temperatures of heteroduplexes indicate that the genera Pisaster and Evasterias diverged shortly after the divergence of the subfamilies Pycnopodiinae and Asteriinae. The two Pisaster species diverged more recently, probably in the most recent quarter of the interval since the separation of the genera Pisaster and Evasterias.

  12. Developmental features of the neonatal brain: MR imaging. Part II. Ventricular size and extracerebral space.

    PubMed

    McArdle, C B; Richardson, C J; Nicholas, D A; Mirfakhraee, M; Hayden, C K; Amparo, E G

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with a 0.6-T magnet was performed on 51 neonates, aged 29-42 weeks postconception. In 45 neonates, the ventricular/brain ratio (V/B) at the level of the frontal horns and midbody of the lateral ventricles ranged from 0.26 to 0.34. In six other infants a V/B of 0.36 or greater was associated with either cerebral atrophy or obstructive hydrocephalus. The width of the extracerebral space measured along specified points varied little in the neonatal period and ranged from 0 to 4 mm in 48 infants. Extracerebral space widths of 5-6 mm were seen in three other infants with severe asphyxia. Prominence of the subarachnoid space overlying the posterior parietal lobes is normal in neonates and should not be confused with cerebral atrophy. The authors conclude that V/B ratios of 0.26-0.34 and extracerebral space widths of 0-4 mm represent the normal range, and that neonates whose measurements exceed these values should be followed up.

  13. Psychophysics of prosthetic vision: II. stochastic sampling, the phosphene image, and noise.

    PubMed

    Hallum, Luke E; Chen, Spencer C; Cloherty, Shaun L; Lovell, Nigel H

    2006-01-01

    Stimulation of the diseased retina via an intraocular electrode array is a proposed means of restoring some vision to the profoundly blind. A prosthetic device to this end would involve post-implantation calibration (analogous to cochlear implant fitting), wherein the subject indicates those discrete positions in the visual field where luminous percepts are elicited. This procedure would be a source of noise, because the indicated positions would only approximate the actual positions in the visual field. Put differently, the procedure introduces sampling jitter, and would therefore affect clinical outcomes such as mobility and reading speeds. The nature of this noise is the concern of the present paper; we derive an expression for the noise power spectrum as it relates to the statistical nature of the sampling jitter. We show that, generally, jitter has greater effect on higher spatial-frequencies, that is, those areas of the implantee's visual perception that represent fine detail are more prone to noise. More specifically, the noise spectrum depends on the characteristic function of the random variable describing the sampling jitter. Our results signal the need for experimental work that characterizes sampling jitter in implantees, plus the need for simulations that allow a better understanding of perception and the noisy phosphene image.

  14. 29 CFR 2201.7 - Fees for copying, searching, and review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requested for a commercial use. No copying fee shall be charged for educational, scientific, or news media..., or by docket number, or that are otherwise easily identifiable. (ii) Educational, scientific or news... representative of the news media. (iii) Other non-commercial requests. No fee shall be charged for the first...

  15. 29 CFR 2201.7 - Fees for copying, searching, and review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requested for a commercial use. No copying fee shall be charged for educational, scientific, or news media..., or by docket number, or that are otherwise easily identifiable. (ii) Educational, scientific or news... representative of the news media. (iii) Other non-commercial requests. No fee shall be charged for the first...

  16. 29 CFR 2201.7 - Fees for copying, searching, and review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requested for a commercial use. No copying fee shall be charged for educational, scientific, or news media..., or by docket number, or that are otherwise easily identifiable. (ii) Educational, scientific or news... representative of the news media. (iii) Other non-commercial requests. No fee shall be charged for the first...

  17. 29 CFR 2201.7 - Fees for copying, searching, and review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requested for a commercial use. No copying fee shall be charged for educational, scientific, or news media..., or by docket number, or that are otherwise easily identifiable. (ii) Educational, scientific or news... representative of the news media. (iii) Other non-commercial requests. No fee shall be charged for the first...

  18. 20 CFR 408.405 - When do we require original records or copies as evidence?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false When do we require original records or copies as evidence? 408.405 Section 408.405 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Evidence Requirements General Information § 408.405 When do...

  19. 20 CFR 408.405 - When do we require original records or copies as evidence?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When do we require original records or copies as evidence? 408.405 Section 408.405 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Evidence Requirements General Information § 408.405 When do...

  20. 20 CFR 408.405 - When do we require original records or copies as evidence?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false When do we require original records or copies as evidence? 408.405 Section 408.405 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Evidence Requirements General Information § 408.405 When do...

  1. 20 CFR 408.405 - When do we require original records or copies as evidence?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false When do we require original records or copies as evidence? 408.405 Section 408.405 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Evidence Requirements General Information § 408.405 When do...

  2. 20 CFR 408.405 - When do we require original records or copies as evidence?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false When do we require original records or copies as evidence? 408.405 Section 408.405 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL BENEFITS FOR CERTAIN WORLD WAR II VETERANS Evidence Requirements General Information § 408.405 When do...

  3. Discussion on copy constructor in C++ programming language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Fafen; Du, Ruiqing

    2011-12-01

    C++ is a widely used object-orientated programming language in the software industry. The purpose of this paper is to discuss concept and application of the copy constructor, a special constructor in C++. As fundamental knowledge, constructor and destructor were introduced at first. Several examples of copy constructor were presented to illustrate concept of copy constructor and its use. Shallow copy and deep copy were also presented. After discussions on copy constructor by analyzing all the examples of copy constructor, the conclusion was made about that how to define a copy constructor and how to use it properly.

  4. CARMENES input catalogue of M dwarfs. II. High-resolution imaging with FastCam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortés-Contreras, M.; Béjar, V. J. S.; Caballero, J. A.; Gauza, B.; Montes, D.; Alonso-Floriano, F. J.; Jeffers, S. V.; Morales, J. C.; Reiners, A.; Ribas, I.; Schöfer, P.; Quirrenbach, A.; Amado, P. J.; Mundt, R.; Seifert, W.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We search for low-mass companions of M dwarfs and characterize their multiplicity fraction with the purpose of helping in the selection of the most appropriate targets for the CARMENES exoplanet survey. Methods: We obtained high-resolution images in the I band with the lucky imaging instrument FastCam at the 1.5 m Telescopio Carlos Sánchez for 490 mid- to late-M dwarfs. For all the detected binaries, we measured angular separations, position angles, and magnitude differences in the I band. We also calculated the masses of each individual component and estimated orbital periods, using the available magnitude and colour relations for M dwarfs and our own MJ-spectral type and mass-MI relations. To avoid biases in our sample selection, we built a volume-limited sample of M0.0-M5.0 dwarfs that is complete up to 86% within 14 pc. Results: From the 490 observed stars, we detected 80 companions in 76 systems, of which 30 are new discoveries. Another six companion candidates require additional astrometry to confirm physical binding. The multiplicity fraction in our observed sample is 16.7 ± 2.0%. The bias-corrected multiplicity fraction in our volume-limited sample is 19.5 ± 2.3% for angular separations of 0.2 to 5.0 arcsec (1.4-65.6 au), with a peak in the distribution of the projected physical separations at 2.5-7.5 au. For M0.0-M3.5 V primaries, our search is sensitive to mass ratios higher than 0.3 and there is a higher density of pairs with mass ratios over 0.8 compared to those at lower mass ratios. Binaries with projected physical separations shorter than 50 au also tend to be of equal mass. For 26 of our systems, we estimated orbital periods shorter than 50 a, 10 of which are presented here for the first time. We measured variations in angular separation and position angle that are due to orbital motions in 17 of these systems. The contribution of binaries and multiples with angular separations shorter than 0.2 arcsec, longer than 5.0 arcsec, and of

  5. Integration of hard copy and soft copy exploitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fultz, Roy C., Jr.

    1996-11-01

    Exploitation of remotely sensed and aerially derived imagery has, in the past, been primarily performed through the use of analog light tables, by displaying individual pieces or rolls of imagery over a brightly lit surface to allow light through the nonopaque surface of the film medium. The interpreter would then peer through optical viewing scopes allowing him (or her) to analyze the imagery. Over the course of the last two decades, digital data, or as it is better known, "softcopy imagery," has for many become the desired path which technology has dictated. Softcopy imagery offers many benefits, such as the ability to manipulate imagery in ways analog workstations cannot and were never designed to do. Functions which can be performed on softcopy imagery are endless and growing constantly: image spatial rectification, pixel manipulation, image contrast, and brightness enhancements. All are performed by the running of algorithmic equations to manipulate the digital data. It has become evident that in the future a large portion of imagery analysis will be performed by softcopy. However, studies indicate that aerial imagery will continue to be acquired via hardcopy means for many civil, educational, and commercial applications in the foreseeable future, making it clear that any large scale transformation from hardcopy to softcopy will not be feasible for a long time to come. A major issue dictating the slow-down in this transition is the over 35 years of hardcopy imagery archived and housed in facilities throughout the world, including the recently declassified "Corona" satellite imagery which will provide a wealth of hardcopy data for use by ecologists and conservationists. Yes, the technology to transfer hardcopy to softcopy exists, but the time and cost required to complete this task would be phenomenal and, in many cases, when digitization and storage become affordable, it still may prove beneficial to retain the imagery in a hardcopy form for retention of the

  6. Feasibility of High Frequency Acoustic Imaging for Inspection of Containments: Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Rudzinsky, J.; Bondaryk, J.; Conti, M.

    1999-07-01

    The nuclear power industry is concerned with corrosive thinning of portions of the metallic pressure boundary, particularly in areas that are not directly accessible for inspection. This study investigated the feasibility of detecting these thickness degradations using ultrasonic imaging. A commercial ultrasonic system was used to carry out several full-scale, controlled laboratory experiments. Measurements of 0.5 MHz shear wave levels propagated in 25-mm-thick steel plate embedded in concrete showed 1.4-1.6 dB of signal loss for each centimeter of two-way travel in the steel plate (compared to previous numerical predictions of 3-4 dB), and 1.3 dB of signal loss per centimeter of two-way travel in steel plates embedded in concrete prior to setting of the concrete (i.e., plastic). Negligible losses were measured in plates with a decoupling treatment applied between the steel and concrete to simulate the unbonded portions of the pressure boundary. Scattered signals from straight slots of different size and shape were investigated. The return from a 4-mm-deep rectangular slots exhibited levels 23 dB down relative to incidence and 4-6 dB higher than those obtained from both ''v'' shaped and rounded slots of similar depth. The system displayed an input/output dynamic range of 125 dB and measurement variability less than 1-2dB. Based on these results, a 4-mm-deep, rounded degradation embedded 30 cm in concrete has expected returns of -73dB relative to the input and should therefore be detectable. Results of this and a prior study indicate that the technique has merit and should be developed more fully and demonstrated in the field.

  7. Spatial distribution of intrinsic and scattering seismic attenuation in active volcanic islands - II: Deception Island images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudencio, Janire; Ibáñez, Jesús M.; García-Yeguas, Araceli; Del Pezzo, Edoardo; Posadas, Antonio M.

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we present regional maps of the inverse intrinsic quality factor (Qi-1), the inverse scattering quality factor (Qs-1) and total inverse quality factor (Qt-1) for the volcanic environment of Deception Island (Antarctica). Our attenuation study is based on diffusion approximation, which permits us to obtain the attenuation coefficients for every single couple source-receiver separately. The data set used in this research is derived from an active seismic experiment using more than 5200 offshore shots (air guns) recorded at 32 onshore seismic stations and four ocean bottom seismometers. To arrive at a regional distribution of these values, we used a new mapping technique based on a Gaussian space probability function. This approach led us to create `2-D probabilistic maps' of values of intrinsic and scattering seismic attenuation. The 2-D tomographic images confirm the existence of a high attenuation body below an inner bay of Deception Island. This structure, previously observed in 2-D and 3-D velocity tomography of the region, is associated with a massive magma reservoir. Magnetotelluric studies reach a similar interpretation of this strong anomaly. Additionally, we observed areas with lower attenuation effects that bear correlation with consolidated structures described in other studies and associated with the crystalline basement of the area. Our calculations of the transport mean-free path and absorption length for intrinsic attenuation gave respective values of ≈ 950 m and 5 km, which are lower than the values obtained in tectonic regions or volcanic areas such as Tenerife Island. However, as observed in other volcanic regions, our results indicate that scattering effects dominate strongly over the intrinsic attenuation.

  8. ADAPTIVE OPTICS IMAGES. II. 12 KEPLER OBJECTS OF INTEREST AND 15 CONFIRMED TRANSITING PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, E. R.; Dupree, A. K.; Kulesa, C.; McCarthy, D.

    2013-07-01

    All transiting planet observations are at risk of contamination from nearby, unresolved stars. Blends dilute the transit signal, causing the planet to appear smaller than it really is, or producing a false positive detection when the target star is blended with an eclipsing binary. High spatial resolution adaptive optics images are an effective way of resolving most blends. Here we present visual companions and detection limits for 12 Kepler planet candidate host stars, of which 4 have companions within 4''. One system (KOI 1537) consists of two similar-magnitude stars separated by 0.''1, while KOI 174 has a companion at 0.''5. In addition, observations were made of 15 transiting planets that were previously discovered by other surveys. The only companion found within 1'' of a known planet is the previously identified companion to WASP-2b. An additional four systems have companions between 1'' and 4'': HAT-P-30b (3.''7, {Delta}Ks = 2.9), HAT-P-32b (2.''9, {Delta}Ks = 3.4), TrES-1b (2.''3, {Delta}Ks = 7.7), and WASP-P-33b (1.''9, {Delta}Ks = 5.5), some of which have not been reported previously. Depending on the spatial resolution of the transit photometry for these systems, these companion stars may require a reassessment of the planetary parameters derived from transit light curves. For all systems observed, we report the limiting magnitudes beyond which additional fainter objects located 0.''1-4'' from the target may still exist.

  9. Imaging cognition II: An empirical review of 275 PET and fMRI studies.

    PubMed

    Cabeza, R; Nyberg, L

    2000-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have been extensively used to explore the functional neuroanatomy of cognitive functions. Here we review 275 PET and fMRI studies of attention (sustained, selective, Stroop, orientation, divided), perception (object, face, space/motion, smell), imagery (object, space/motion), language (written/spoken word recognition, spoken/no spoken response), working memory (verbal/numeric, object, spatial, problem solving), semantic memory retrieval (categorization, generation), episodic memory encoding (verbal, object, spatial), episodic memory retrieval (verbal, nonverbal, success, effort, mode, context), priming (perceptual, conceptual), and procedural memory (conditioning, motor, and nonmotor skill learning). To identify consistent activation patterns associated with these cognitive operations, data from 412 contrasts were summarized at the level of cortical Brodmann's areas, insula, thalamus, medial-temporal lobe (including hippocampus), basal ganglia, and cerebellum. For perception and imagery, activation patterns included primary and secondary regions in the dorsal and ventral pathways. For attention and working memory, activations were usually found in prefrontal and parietal regions. For language and semantic memory retrieval, typical regions included left prefrontal and temporal regions. For episodic memory encoding, consistently activated regions included left prefrontal and medial temporal regions. For episodic memory retrieval, activation patterns included prefrontal, medial temporal, and posterior midline regions. For priming, deactivations in prefrontal (conceptual) or extrastriate (perceptual) regions were consistently seen. For procedural memory, activations were found in motor as well as in non-motor brain areas. Analysis of regional activations across cognitive domains suggested that several brain regions, including the cerebellum, are engaged by a variety of cognitive

  10. Image processing algorithms and techniques II; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Jose, CA, Feb. 25-Mar. 1, 1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civanlar, Mehmet R.; Mitra, Sanjit K.; Moorhead, Robert J., II

    Recent developments and novel ideas in electronic imaging science and technology are examined. Particular attention is given to color imagery, image processing and filtering techniques, image/image sequence restoration and reconstruction, image analysis and pattern recognition, image coding, and parallel architectures for image processing. Consideration is also given to color correction using principal components, optimum intensity-dependent spread filters in image processing, iterative algorithms with fast-convergence rates in nonlinear image restoration, optimal regularization parameter estimation for image restoration, simultaneous object estimation and image reconstruction in a Bayesian setting, automatic recognition of bones in X-ray bone densitometry, a novel nonlinear filter for image enhancement, image compression for digital video tape recording with high-speed playback capability, image-coding based on two-channel conjugate vector quantization, and artificial neural network models for image understanding.

  11. Detection of copy-move forgery using a method based on blur moment invariants.

    PubMed

    Mahdian, Babak; Saic, Stanislav

    2007-09-13

    In our society digital images are a powerful and widely used communication medium. They have an important impact on our life. In recent years, due to the advent of high-performance commodity hardware and improved human-computer interfaces, it has become relatively easy to create fake images. Modern, easy to use image processing software enables forgeries that are undetectable by the naked eye. In this work we propose a method to automatically detect and localize duplicated regions in digital images. The presence of duplicated regions in an image may signify a common type of forgery called copy-move forgery. The method is based on blur moment invariants, which allows successful detection of copy-move forgery, even when blur degradation, additional noise, or arbitrary contrast changes are present in the duplicated regions. These modifications are commonly used techniques to conceal traces of copy-move forgery. Our method works equally well for lossy format such as JPEG. We demonstrate our method on several images affected by copy-move forgery.

  12. The necessity of exterior orientation parameters for the rigorous geometric correction of MEIS-II airborne digital images

    SciTech Connect

    Bannari, A.; Morin, D.; Gibson, J.R.

    1996-11-01

    The Canada Land Use Monitoring Program is attempting to replace aerial photographs by remote sensing imagery (satellite or airborne). The Canada Center for Remote Sensing (CCRS) is implementing an airborne multi-detector electro-optical imaging system (MEIS-II). The acceptance of airborne scanners has been slow principally due to poor spatial resolution and distortions induced by aircraft motion. To address this geometric problem, CCRS has developed a rigorous correction method based on fundamental photogrammetric principles (collinearity and coplanarity) and auxiliary navigation data (attitude, altitude and aircraft speed) measured in relation to time by an inertial navigation system (INS). The method can process images in monoscopy or stereoscopy. It uses primarily a low-order polynomial function for correcting auxiliary data based on the method of least squares and a few control points. The results are then used in the geometric correction procedure. In this study, we discuss the effect of geometric distortions caused by aircraft motion and we test two geometric correction methods. The first method is the one developed by CCRS mentioned above. The second method is based on a second order polynomial function. The effect of control point precision on the reliability of the geometric correction using geodetic points and other points derived from the 1/20 000 topographical map is examined. The results show a noticeable difference between the two approaches tested. The photogrammetric method, based on the condition of collinearity and coplanarity, and related to navigation data, results in precision in the order of one pixel with geodetic control points. The use of geodetic control points permits the elimination of the planimetric error characteristic of the topographical map. The polynomial method provides precision which is in the order of five pixels whatever the type and precision of the control points. 18 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Design of a Highly Specific And Noninvasive Biosensor Suitable for Real-Time in Vivo Imaging of Mercury (II) Uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Chapleau, R.R.; Blomberg, R.; Ford, P.C.; Sagermann, M.

    2009-05-12

    Mercury is a ubiquitous pollutant that when absorbed is extremely toxic to a wide variety of biochemical processes. Mercury (II) is a strong, invisible poison that is rapidly absorbed by tissues of the intestinal tract, kidneys, and liver upon ingestion. In this study, a novel fluorescence-based biosensor is presented that allows for the direct monitoring of the uptake and distribution of the metal under noninvasive in vivo conditions. With the introduction of a cysteine residue at position 205, located in close proximity to the chromophore, the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from Aequorea victoria was converted into a highly specific biosensor for this metal ion. The mutant protein exhibits a dramatic absorbance and fluorescence change upon mercuration at neutral pH. Absorbance and fluorescence properties with respect to the metal concentration exhibit sigmoidal binding behavior with a detection limit in the low nanomolar range. Time-resolved binding studies indicate rapid subsecond binding of the metal to the protein. The crystal structures obtained of mutant eGFP205C indicate a possible access route of the metal into the core of the protein. To our knowledge, this engineered protein is a first example of a biosensor that allows for noninvasive and real-time imaging of mercury uptake in a living cell. A major advantage is that its expression can be genetically controlled in many organisms to enable unprecedented studies of tissue specific mercury uptake.

  14. The Surface Brightness Contribution of II Peg: A Comparison of TiO Band Analysis and Doppler Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senavci, H. V.; O'Neal, D.; Hussain, G. A. J.; Barnes, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the surface brightness contribution of the very well known active SB1 binary II Pegasi , to determine the star spot filling factor and the spot temperature parameters. In this context, we analyze 54 spectra of the system taken over 6 nights in September - October of 1996, using the 2.1m Otto Struve Telescope equipped with SES at the McDonald Observatory. We measure the spot temperatures and spot filling factors by fitting TiO molecular bands in this spectroscopic dataset, with model atmosphere approximation using ATLAS9 and with proxy stars obtained with the same instrument. The same dataset is then used to also produce surface spot maps using the Doppler imaging technique. We compare the spot filling factors obtained with the two independent techniques in order to better characterise the spot properties of the system and to better assess the limitations inherent to both techniques. The results obtained from both techniques show that the variation of spot filling factor as a function of phase agree well with each other, while the amount of TiO and DI spot

  15. First Light Adaptive Optics Images from the Keck II Telescope: A New Era of High Angular Resolution Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wizinowich, P.; Acton, D. S.; Shelton, C.; Stomski, P.; Gathright, J.; Ho, K.; Lupton, W.; Tsubota, K.; Lai, O.; Max, C.; Brase, J.; An, J.; Avicola, K.; Olivier, S.; Gavel, D.; Macintosh, B.; Ghez, A.; Larkin, J.

    2000-03-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) is a technology that corrects in real time for the blurring effects of atmospheric turbulence, in principle allowing Earth-bound telescopes to achieve their diffraction limit and to ``see'' as clearly as if they were in space. The power of AO using natural guide stars has been amply demonstrated in recent years on telescopes up to 3-4 m in diameter. The next breakthrough in astronomical resolution was expected to occur with the implementation of AO on the new generation of large, 8-10 m diameter telescopes. In this paper we report the initial results from the first of these AO systems, now coming on line on the 10 m diameter Keck II Telescope. The results include the highest angular resolution images ever obtained from a single telescope (0.022" and 0.040" at 0.85 and 1.65 μm wavelengths, respectively), as well as tests of system performance on three astronomical targets.

  16. Design of a highly specific and noninvasive biosensor suitable for real-time in vivo imaging of mercury (II) uptake.

    PubMed

    Chapleau, Richard R; Blomberg, Rebecca; Ford, Peter C; Sagermann, Martin

    2008-04-01

    Mercury is a ubiquitous pollutant that when absorbed is extremely toxic to a wide variety of biochemical processes. Mercury (II) is a strong, "invisible" poison that is rapidly absorbed by tissues of the intestinal tract, kidneys, and liver upon ingestion. In this study, a novel fluorescence-based biosensor is presented that allows for the direct monitoring of the uptake and distribution of the metal under noninvasive in vivo conditions. With the introduction of a cysteine residue at position 205, located in close proximity to the chromophore, the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from Aequorea victoria was converted into a highly specific biosensor for this metal ion. The mutant protein exhibits a dramatic absorbance and fluorescence change upon mercuration at neutral pH. Absorbance and fluorescence properties with respect to the metal concentration exhibit sigmoidal binding behavior with a detection limit in the low nanomolar range. Time-resolved binding studies indicate rapid subsecond binding of the metal to the protein. The crystal structures obtained of mutant eGFP205C indicate a possible access route of the metal into the core of the protein. To our knowledge, this engineered protein is a first example of a biosensor that allows for noninvasive and real-time imaging of mercury uptake in a living cell. A major advantage is that its expression can be genetically controlled in many organisms to enable unprecedented studies of tissue specific mercury uptake.

  17. Design of a highly specific and noninvasive biosensor suitable for real-time in vivo imaging of mercury (II) uptake

    PubMed Central

    Chapleau, Richard R.; Blomberg, Rebecca; Ford, Peter C.; Sagermann, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Mercury is a ubiquitous pollutant that when absorbed is extremely toxic to a wide variety of biochemical processes. Mercury (II) is a strong, “invisible” poison that is rapidly absorbed by tissues of the intestinal tract, kidneys, and liver upon ingestion. In this study, a novel fluorescence-based biosensor is presented that allows for the direct monitoring of the uptake and distribution of the metal under noninvasive in vivo conditions. With the introduction of a cysteine residue at position 205, located in close proximity to the chromophore, the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from Aequorea victoria was converted into a highly specific biosensor for this metal ion. The mutant protein exhibits a dramatic absorbance and fluorescence change upon mercuration at neutral pH. Absorbance and fluorescence properties with respect to the metal concentration exhibit sigmoidal binding behavior with a detection limit in the low nanomolar range. Time-resolved binding studies indicate rapid subsecond binding of the metal to the protein. The crystal structures obtained of mutant eGFP205C indicate a possible access route of the metal into the core of the protein. To our knowledge, this engineered protein is a first example of a biosensor that allows for noninvasive and real-time imaging of mercury uptake in a living cell. A major advantage is that its expression can be genetically controlled in many organisms to enable unprecedented studies of tissue specific mercury uptake. PMID:18305194

  18. Theoretical Design and Material Growth of Type-II Antimonide-based Superlattices for Infrared Detection and Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Binh-Minh

    dark current until the device performance is dominated by the surface component. The results of this thesis' work show that the design and material quality of bulk Type-II-superlattice is thus not a limiting factor for optimal device performance. Further employment of the M-structure superlattice has resulted in a novel device architecture called the pMp design. This novel device is a hybrid between conventional photoconductive and photovoltaic detectors. Profiting from the advantages of its parents' configurations, the pMp design has shown numerous advantageous for infrared detections such as low generation-recombination current, suppressed tunneling current, and reduced surface leakage while keeping high optical efficiency of the detectors based on long-diffusion-length minority electrons. This design can also be used as a simple architecture for bias-selectable dual color detection which is proven to mitigate the difficulties of both the material growth and the device fabrication. In addition to improving the performance of single element detectors, this work also contributed to the successful demonstration of focal plane arrays at the Center for Quantum Devices. For the first time, the polarity of Type-II photodiodes has been matched with the requirement of commercially available Read Out Integrated Circuits (ROICs) through the realization of n-type InAsSb This polarity matching has significantly improved the imaging quality because it allows the bias and carrier types to be correctly utilized. Furthermore, attempts on 3" in diameter superlattice growth wafer were made, which resulted in excellent material uniformity across the whole wafer. Finally, targetting "color" imaging, different sophisticated architectures for dual spectral detection were demonstrated, in which each channel exhibited similar performance as that of single element detectors. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  19. Horizontal flow fields observed in Hinode G-band images. II. Flow fields in the final stages of sunspot decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, M.; Balthasar, H.; Deng, N.; Liu, C.; Shimizu, T.; Wang, H.; Denker, C.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Generation and dissipation of magnetic fields is a fundamental physical process on the Sun. In comparison to flux emergence and the initial stages of sunspot formation, the demise of sunspots still lacks a comprehensive description. Aims: The evolution of sunspots is most commonly discussed in terms of their intensity and magnetic field. Here, we present additional information about the three-dimensional flow field in the vicinity of sunspots towards the end of their existence. Methods: We present a subset of multi-wavelengths observations obtained with the Japanese Hinode mission, the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), and the Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) at Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain during the time period 2010 November 18-23. Horizontal proper motions were derived from G-band and Ca ii H images, whereas line-of-sight velocities were extracted from VTT echelle Hα λ656.28 nm spectra and Fe i λ630.25 nm spectral data of the Hinode/Spectro-Polarimeter, which also provided three-dimensional magnetic field information. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board SDO provided continuum images and line-of-sight magnetograms, in addition to the high-resolution observations for the entire disk passage of the active region. Results: We perform a quantitative study of photospheric and chromospheric flow fields in and around decaying sunspots. In one of the trailing sunspots of active region NOAA 11126, we observe moat flow and moving magnetic features (MMFs), even after its penumbra had decayed. We also detect a superpenumbral structure around this pore. We find that MMFs follow well-defined, radial paths from the spot all the way to the border of a supergranular cell surrounding the spot. In contrast, flux emergence near the other sunspot prevents the establishment of similar well ordered flow patterns, which could be discerned around a tiny pore of merely 2 Mm diameter. After the disappearance of the sunspots/pores, a coherent patch of abnormal

  20. Evolution of ribosomal RNA gene copy number on the sex chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Lyckegaard, E M; Clark, A G

    1991-07-01

    A diverse array of cellular and evolutionary forces--including unequal crossing-over, magnification, compensation, and natural selection--is at play modulating the number of copies of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes on the X and Y chromosomes of Drosophila. Accurate estimates of naturally occurring distributions of copy numbers on both the X and Y chromosomes are needed in order to explore the evolutionary end result of these forces. Estimates of relative copy numbers of the ribosomal DNA repeat, as well as of the type I and type II inserts, were obtained for a series of 96 X chromosomes and 144 Y chromosomes by using densitometric measurements of slot blots of genomic DNA from adult D. melanogaster bearing appropriate deficiencies that reveal chromosome-specific copy numbers. Estimates of copy number were put on an absolute scale with slot blots having serial dilutions both of the repeat and of genomic DNA from nonpolytene larval brain and imaginal discs. The distributions of rRNA copy number are decidedly skewed, with a long tail toward higher copy numbers. These distributions were fitted by a population genetic model that posits three different types of exchange events--sister-chromatid exchange, intrachromatid exchange, and interchromosomal crossing-over. In addition, the model incorporates natural selection, because experimental evidence shows that there is a minimum number of functional elements necessary for survival. Adequate fits of the model were found, indicating that either natural selection also eliminates chromosomes with high copy number or that the rate of intrachromatid exchange exceeds the rate of interchromosomal exchange.

  1. 23. Photographic copy enlargement from a 4x5 copy negative of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Photographic copy enlargement from a 4x5 copy negative of a drawing (Original drawing located on abandoned NASA site, currently owned by the City of Downey, Downey, Calfornia). JANUARY 1960 USAF PLANT 16 MASTER PLOT AND GRID PLAN. - NASA Industrial Plant, Missile Research Laboratory, 12214 Lakewood Boulevard, Downey, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. 22. Photographic copy enlargement from a 4x5 copy negative of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Photographic copy enlargement from a 4x5 copy negative of a print. (Original print located on abandoned NASA site, currently owned by the City of Downey, Downey, California). 1954 USAF PLANT 16 AERIAL BUILDING 41 NORTH TO SOUTH. - NASA Industrial Plant, Missile Research Laboratory, 12214 Lakewood Boulevard, Downey, Los Angeles County, CA

  3. 15. Photographic copy englargement from a 4x5 copy negative (Original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Photographic copy englargement from a 4x5 copy negative (Original drawing located on abandoned NASA site, currently owned by the City of Downey, Downey, California). 1980 BLDG 10, BLDG 42 FLOOR PLAN, NASA MARCH 15 1980. - NASA Industrial Plant, Maintenance Facility, 12214 Lakewood Boulevard, Downey, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. 9. Photographic copy enlargement from a 4x5 copy negative. (Original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Photographic copy enlargement from a 4x5 copy negative. (Original drawing located on abandoned NASA site, currently owned by the City of Downey, Downey, California). 1976 BLDGS.25, 41 SITE PLAN. - NASA Industrial Plant, Storage Facility, 12214 Lakewood Boulevard, Downey, Los Angeles County, CA

  5. 14. Photographic copy englargement from a 4x5 copy negative (Original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Photographic copy englargement from a 4x5 copy negative (Original photograph by original photographer located on abandoned NASA site, currently owned by the City of Downey, Downey, California). AERIAL PHOTOGRAPH 1935-1936 CONSOLIDATED VULTEE AIRCRAFT CORPORATION FROM WEST TO EAST - NASA Industrial Plant, Maintenance Facility, 12214 Lakewood Boulevard, Downey, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. Mechanisms of change in gene copy number.

    PubMed

    Hastings, P J; Lupski, James R; Rosenberg, Susan M; Ira, Grzegorz

    2009-08-01

    Deletions and duplications of chromosomal segments (copy number variants, CNVs) are a major source of variation between individual humans and are an underlying factor in human evolution and in many diseases, including mental illness, developmental disorders and cancer. CNVs form at a faster rate than other types of mutation, and seem to do so by similar mechanisms in bacteria, yeast and humans. Here we review current models of the mechanisms that cause copy number variation. Non-homologous end-joining mechanisms are well known, but recent models focus on perturbation of DNA replication and replication of non-contiguous DNA segments. For example, cellular stress might induce repair of broken replication forks to switch from high-fidelity homologous recombination to non-homologous repair, thus promoting copy number change.

  7. Gene copy number and malaria biology

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Tim J.C.; Patel, Jigar; Ferdig, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    Alteration in gene copy number provides a simple way to change expression levels and alter phenotype. This was fully appreciated by bacteriologists more than 25 years ago, but the extent and implications of copy number polymorphism (CNP) have only recently become apparent in other organisms. New methods demonstrate the ubiquity of CNPs in eukaryotes and their medical importance in humans. CNP is also widespread in the Plasmodium falciparum genome and has an important and underappreciated role in determining phenotype. In this review, we summarize the distribution of CNP, its evolutionary dynamics within populations, its functional importance and its mode of evolution. PMID:19559648

  8. In vivo imaging of oxidative stress in the kidney of diabetic mice and its normalization by angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker

    SciTech Connect

    Sonta, Toshiyo; Inoguchi, Toyoshi . E-mail: toyoshi@intmed3.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Matsumoto, Shingo; Yasukawa, Keiji; Inuo, Mieko; Tsubouchi, Hirotaka; Sonoda, Noriyuki; Kobayashi, Kunihisa; Utsumi, Hideo; Nawata, Hajime

    2005-05-06

    This study was undertaken to evaluate oxidative stress in the kidney of diabetic mice by electron spin resonance (ESR) imaging technique. Oxidative stress in the kidney was evaluated as organ-specific reducing activity with the signal decay rates of carbamoyl-PROXYL probe using ESR imaging. The signal decay rates were significantly faster in corresponding image pixels of the kidneys of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice than in those of controls. This technique further demonstrated that administration of angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker (ARB), olmesartan (5 mg/kg), completely restored the signal decay rates in the diabetic kidneys to control values. In conclusion, this study provided for the first time the in vivo evidence for increased oxidative stress in the kidneys of diabetic mice and its normalization by ARB as evaluated by ESR imaging. This technique would be useful as a means of further elucidating the role of oxidative stress in diabetic nephropathy.

  9. Spatial organization of RNA polymerase II inside a mammalian cell nucleus revealed by reflected light-sheet superresolution microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ziqing W.; Roy, Rahul; Gebhardt, J. Christof M.; Suter, David M.; Chapman, Alec R.; Xie, X. Sunney

    2014-01-01

    Superresolution microscopy based on single-molecule centroid determination has been widely applied to cellular imaging in recent years. However, quantitative imaging of the mammalian nucleus has been challenging due to the lack of 3D optical sectioning methods for normal-sized cells, as well as the inability to accurately count the absolute copy numbers of biomolecules in highly dense structures. Here we report a reflected light-sheet superresolution microscopy method capable of imaging inside the mammalian nucleus with superior signal-to-background ratio as well as molecular counting with single-copy accuracy. Using reflected light-sheet superresolution microscopy, we probed the spatial organization of transcription by RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) molecules and quantified their global extent of clustering inside the mammalian nucleus. Spatiotemporal clustering analysis that leverages on the blinking photophysics of specific organic dyes showed that the majority (>70%) of the transcription foci originate from single RNAP II molecules, and no significant clustering between RNAP II molecules was detected within the length scale of the reported diameter of “transcription factories.” Colocalization measurements of RNAP II molecules equally labeled by two spectrally distinct dyes confirmed the primarily unclustered distribution, arguing against a prevalent existence of transcription factories in the mammalian nucleus as previously proposed. The methods developed in our study pave the way for quantitative mapping and stoichiometric characterization of key biomolecular species deep inside mammalian cells. PMID:24379392

  10. Spatial organization of RNA polymerase II inside a mammalian cell nucleus revealed by reflected light-sheet superresolution microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ziqing W; Roy, Rahul; Gebhardt, J Christof M; Suter, David M; Chapman, Alec R; Xie, X Sunney

    2014-01-14

    Superresolution microscopy based on single-molecule centroid determination has been widely applied to cellular imaging in recent years. However, quantitative imaging of the mammalian nucleus has been challenging due to the lack of 3D optical sectioning methods for normal-sized cells, as well as the inability to accurately count the absolute copy numbers of biomolecules in highly dense structures. Here we report a reflected light-sheet superresolution microscopy method capable of imaging inside the mammalian nucleus with superior signal-to-background ratio as well as molecular counting with single-copy accuracy. Using reflected light-sheet superresolution microscopy, we probed the spatial organization of transcription by RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) molecules and quantified their global extent of clustering inside the mammalian nucleus. Spatiotemporal clustering analysis that leverages on the blinking photophysics of specific organic dyes showed that the majority (>70%) of the transcription foci originate from single RNAP II molecules, and no significant clustering between RNAP II molecules was detected within the length scale of the reported diameter of "transcription factories." Colocalization measurements of RNAP II molecules equally labeled by two spectrally distinct dyes confirmed the primarily unclustered distribution, arguing against a prevalent existence of transcription factories in the mammalian nucleus as previously proposed. The methods developed in our study pave the way for quantitative mapping and stoichiometric characterization of key biomolecular species deep inside mammalian cells.

  11. The Effects of Answer Copying on the Ability Level Estimates of Cheater Examinees in Answer Copying Pairs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zopluoglu, Cengiz; Davenport, Ernest C., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of answer copying on the ability level estimates of cheater examinees in answer copying pairs. The study generated answer copying pairs for each of 1440 conditions, source ability (12) x cheater ability (12) x amount of copying (10). The average difference between the ability level estimates…

  12. An Experimental Test of the Accumulated Copying Error Model of Cultural Mutation for Acheulean Handaxe Size

    PubMed Central

    Kempe, Marius; Lycett, Stephen; Mesoudi, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Archaeologists interested in explaining changes in artifact morphology over long time periods have found it useful to create models in which the only source of change is random and unintentional copying error, or ‘cultural mutation’. These models can be used as null hypotheses against which to detect non-random processes such as cultural selection or biased transmission. One proposed cultural mutation model is the accumulated copying error model, where individuals attempt to copy the size of another individual's artifact exactly but make small random errors due to physiological limits on the accuracy of their perception. Here, we first derive the model within an explicit mathematical framework, generating the predictions that multiple independently-evolving artifact chains should diverge over time such that their between-chain variance increases while the mean artifact size remains constant. We then present the first experimental test of this model in which 200 participants, split into 20 transmission chains, were asked to faithfully copy the size of the previous participant's handaxe image on an iPad. The experimental findings supported the model's prediction that between-chain variance should increase over time and did so in a manner quantitatively in line with the model. However, when the initial size of the image that the participants resized was larger than the size of the image they were copying, subjects tended to increase the size of the image, resulting in the mean size increasing rather than staying constant. This suggests that items of material culture formed by reductive vs. additive processes may mutate differently when individuals attempt to replicate faithfully the size of previously-produced artifacts. Finally, we show that a dataset of 2601 Acheulean handaxes shows less variation than predicted given our empirically measured copying error variance, suggesting that other processes counteracted the variation in handaxe size generated by

  13. Integrated Geophysical Studies to Image the Remains of Amenemeht II Pyramid's Complex in Dahshour Necropolis, Giza, Egypt.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Abbas Mohamed; Atya, Magdy; El-Emam, Ahmed; Ghazala, Hosny, ,, Prof.; Shaaban, Fathy, ,, Dr; Odah, Hatem, ,, Prof; Ibrahim, El-Khedr, ,, Prof; Lethy, Ahmed, ,, Dr

    2009-04-01

    Dahshour archaeological site is located adjacent to Giza necropolis at about 25 km south of Cairo. The site itself is an imperative necropolis that attracts the attention of the archaeologists. This location is a spectator of several historical episodes that start with the pyramidal complexes from the early dynasties (the mud brick tombs, the mastabas, and the Bent Pyramid) passing through the phase of the Step Pyramid of Zoser at Saqqara to the first complete pyramid in the history (the Red pyramid of Senefro "Khofo's father"). In 2002, the local archaeological supervisors suggested an area around the debris of the White pyramid (of Amenemeht II) for reconnaissance magnetic survey. The survey had been completed using the gradiometer FM36. More than 98 survey grids (20 x 20 m) of a surface area of 39200 m2 have been measured. The results reported the recognition of some parts of the mortuary temple, the causeway, and some other anomalies that could not be attributed to specific archaeological aspect. Therefore, an integrated geophysical survey was proposed, in the present work, to get more details help to identify these objects. The ground penetrating radar (GPR, SIR2000), the electrical resistance meter (Geoscan RM15), and the electromagnetic profiler (GEM300) have been utilized to acquire the data. They have been applied to selected zones to investigate specific objects and oriented to solve the problems questioned by the local archaeological inspectors. The study conveyed an superior image of the whole measured site and helped to identify most of the detected artifacts. Furthermore, the margins of the causeway and its infrastructure have been perfectly delineated. However, the possible place of the eastern entrance and the Valley temple have been tentatively located. Keywords: Archaeo-geophysics, Dahshour, White Pyramid

  14. Copies of clinic letters to the family.

    PubMed

    Bartle, D G; Diskin, L; Finlay, F

    2004-11-01

    In April 2004 guidelines were introduced advising that letters to the GP should be copied to parents of young people. A study was carried out to ascertain the views of young people and their parents as to who they felt should receive correspondence after an outpatient appointment.

  15. Genomic characteristics of cattle copy number variations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We performed a systematic analysis of cattle copy number variations (CNVs) using the Bovine HapMap SNP genotyping data, including 539 animals of 21 modern cattle breeds and 6 outgroups. After correcting genomic waves and considering the trio information, we identified 682 candidate CNV regions (CNVR...

  16. 36 CFR 703.20 - File copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 703.20 Parks, Forests, and Public Property LIBRARY OF CONGRESS DISCLOSURE OR PRODUCTION OF RECORDS OR INFORMATION Testimony by Employees and Production of Documents in Certain Legal Proceedings Where the Library... file of copies of all demands served on the Library and deciding officials' responses....

  17. 36 CFR 703.20 - File copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 703.20 Parks, Forests, and Public Property LIBRARY OF CONGRESS DISCLOSURE OR PRODUCTION OF RECORDS OR INFORMATION Testimony by Employees and Production of Documents in Certain Legal Proceedings Where the Library... file of copies of all demands served on the Library and deciding officials' responses....

  18. 36 CFR 703.20 - File copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 703.20 Parks, Forests, and Public Property LIBRARY OF CONGRESS DISCLOSURE OR PRODUCTION OF RECORDS OR INFORMATION Testimony by Employees and Production of Documents in Certain Legal Proceedings Where the Library... file of copies of all demands served on the Library and deciding officials' responses....

  19. Image understanding and the man-machine interface II; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 17, 18, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Eamon B. (Editor); Pearson, James J. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Image understanding concepts and models, image understanding systems and applications, advanced digital processors and software tools, and advanced man-machine interfaces are among the topics discussed. Particular papers are presented on such topics as neural networks for computer vision, object-based segmentation and color recognition in multispectral images, the application of image algebra to image measurement and feature extraction, and the integration of modeling and graphics to create an infrared signal processing test bed.

  20. Achieving Quality in Cardiovascular Imaging II: proceedings from the Second American College of Cardiology -- Duke University Medical Center Think Tank on Quality in Cardiovascular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pamela S; Chen, Jersey; Gillam, Linda; Hendel, Robert; Hundley, W Gregory; Masoudi, Frederick; Patel, Manesh R; Peterson, Eric

    2009-02-01

    Despite rapid technologic advances and sustained growth, less attention has been focused on quality in imaging than in other areas of cardiovascular medicine. To address this deficit, representatives from cardiovascular imaging societies, private payers, government agencies, the medical imaging industry, and experts in quality measurement met in the second Quality in Cardiovascular Imaging Think Tank. The participants endorsed the previous consensus definition of quality in imaging and proposed quality measures. Additional areas of needed effort included data standardization and structured reporting, appropriateness criteria, imaging registries, laboratory accreditation, partnership development, and imaging research. The second American College of Cardiology-Duke University Think Tank continued the process of the development, dissemination, and adoption of quality improvement initiatives for all cardiovascular imaging modalities.

  1. 17 CFR 232.104 - Unofficial PDF copies included in an electronic submission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... electronic submission. An unofficial PDF copy may contain graphic and image material (but not animated... in an electronic submission. 232.104 Section 232.104 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION REGULATION S-T-GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR ELECTRONIC FILINGS...

  2. From traditional reading rooms to a soft copy environment: radiologist satisfaction survey.

    PubMed

    Rumreich, Lori L; Johnson, Annette J

    2003-09-01

    Academic radiologists are experiencing increased clinical workloads. New technology such as picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) are often justified on the premise of increased efficiency. The authors believe that efficiency can be influenced by the image interpretation environment, and thus they set out to establish baseline satisfaction levels with this environment. The authors surveyed 90 Indiana University (IU) faculty radiologists, fellows, and residents. Their survey was implemented with a questionnaire sent via e-mail. Questions focused on satisfaction with the current soft-copy reading environments and preferences regarding improvements. Of the 90 radiologists surveyed, 55 (61%) responded. Several key findings emerged: (1) Overall satisfaction with the soft-copy environment is low, with nearly half (46%) of respondents rating themselves as "very dissatisfied" or "dissatisfied." (2) Faculty are least satisfied regarding work space ergonomics, room layout, and amount of work space. Appropriate lighting also emerged as an area with low satisfaction and high importance. (3) Ninety-eight percent of respondents indicated that an "ideal" soft-copy environment would have a positive effect on their efficiency. The dissatisfaction with the current soft-copy interpretation environments used by the IU radiologists indicates that this is an area that requires attention. Furthermore, there may be a direct relationship between radiologist efficiency and satisfaction with the image interpretation environment. Attention should be focused on this environment during a soft-copy technology implementation to ensure that planned efficiency gains are realized.

  3. COPI selectively drives maturation of the early Golgi

    DOE PAGES

    Papanikou, Effrosyni; Day, Kasey J.; Austin, Jotham; ...

    2015-12-28

    COPI coated vesicles carry material between Golgi compartments, but the role of COPI in the secretory pathway has been ambiguous. Previous studies of thermosensitive yeast COPI mutants yielded the surprising conclusion that COPI was dispensable both for the secretion of certain proteins and for Golgi cisternal maturation. To revisit these issues, we optimized the anchor-away method, which allows peripheral membrane proteins such as COPI to be sequestered rapidly by adding rapamycin. Video fluorescence microscopy revealed that COPI inactivation causes an early Golgi protein to remain in place while late Golgi proteins undergo cycles of arrival and departure. These dynamics generatemore » partially functional hybrid Golgi structures that contain both early and late Golgi proteins, explaining how secretion can persist when COPI has been inactivated. Our findings suggest that cisternal maturation involves a COPI-dependent pathway that recycles early Golgi proteins, followed by multiple COPI-independent pathways that recycle late Golgi proteins.« less

  4. How to COAAD Images. II. A Coaddition Image that is Optimal for Any Purpose in the Background-dominated Noise Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zackay, Barak; Ofek, Eran O.

    2017-02-01

    Image coaddition is one of the most basic operations that astronomers perform. In Paper I, we presented the optimal ways to coadd images in order to detect faint sources and to perform flux measurements under the assumption that the noise is approximately Gaussian. Here, we build on these results and derive from first principles a coaddition technique that is optimal for any hypothesis testing and measurement (e.g., source detection, flux or shape measurements, and star/galaxy separation), in the background-noise-dominated case. This method has several important properties. The pixels of the resulting coadded image are uncorrelated. This image preserves all the information (from the original individual images) on all spatial frequencies. Any hypothesis testing or measurement that can be done on all the individual images simultaneously, can be done on the coadded image without any loss of information. The PSF of this image is typically as narrow, or narrower than the PSF of the best image in the ensemble. Moreover, this image is practically indistinguishable from a regular single image, meaning that any code that measures any property on a regular astronomical image can be applied to it unchanged. In particular, the optimal source detection statistic derived in Paper I is reproduced by matched filtering this image with its own PSF. This coaddition process, which we call proper coaddition, can be understood as the maximum signal-to-noise ratio measurement of the Fourier transform of the image, weighted in such a way that the noise in the entire Fourier domain is of equal variance. This method has important implications for multi-epoch seeing-limited deep surveys, weak lensing galaxy shape measurements, and diffraction-limited imaging via speckle observations. The last topic will be covered in depth in future papers. We provide an implementation of this algorithm in MATLAB.

  5. Accessing the public MIMIC-II intensive care relational database for clinical research

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care II (MIMIC-II) database is a free, public resource for intensive care research. The database was officially released in 2006, and has attracted a growing number of researchers in academia and industry. We present the two major software tools that facilitate accessing the relational database: the web-based QueryBuilder and a downloadable virtual machine (VM) image. Results QueryBuilder and the MIMIC-II VM have been developed successfully and are freely available to MIMIC-II users. Simple example SQL queries and the resulting data are presented. Clinical studies pertaining to acute kidney injury and prediction of fluid requirements in the intensive care unit are shown as typical examples of research performed with MIMIC-II. In addition, MIMIC-II has also provided data for annual PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenges, including the 2012 Challenge “Predicting mortality of ICU Patients”. Conclusions QueryBuilder is a web-based tool that provides easy access to MIMIC-II. For more computationally intensive queries, one can locally install a complete copy of MIMIC-II in a VM. Both publicly available tools provide the MIMIC-II research community with convenient querying interfaces and complement the value of the MIMIC-II relational database. PMID:23302652

  6. CME Expansion as the Driver of Metric Type II Shock Emission as Revealed by Self-consistent Analysis of High-Cadence EUV Images and Radio Spectrograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouloumvakos, A.; Patsourakos, S.; Hillaris, A.; Vourlidas, A.; Preka-Papadema, P.; Moussas, X.; Caroubalos, C.; Tsitsipis, P.; Kontogeorgos, A.

    2014-06-01

    On 13 June 2010, an eruptive event occurred near the solar limb. It included a small filament eruption and the onset of a relatively narrow coronal mass ejection (CME) surrounded by an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wave front recorded by the Solar Dynamics Observatory's (SDO) Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) at high cadence. The ejection was accompanied by a GOES M1.0 soft X-ray flare and a Type-II radio burst; high-resolution dynamic spectra of the latter were obtained by the Appareil de Routine pour le Traitement et l'Enregistrement Magnetique de l'Information Spectral (ARTEMIS IV) radio spectrograph. The combined observations enabled a study of the evolution of the ejecta and the EUV wave front and its relationship with the coronal shock manifesting itself as metric Type-II burst. By introducing a novel technique, which deduces a proxy of the EUV compression ratio from AIA imaging data and compares it with the compression ratio deduced from the band-split of the Type-II metric radio burst, we are able to infer the potential source locations of the radio emission of the shock on that AIA images. Our results indicate that the expansion of the CME ejecta is the source for both EUV and radio shock emissions. Early in the CME expansion phase, the Type-II burst seems to originate in the sheath region between the EUV bubble and the EUV shock front in both radial and lateral directions. This suggests that both the nose and the flanks of the expanding bubble could have driven the shock.

  7. Oxidation-Responsive, EuII/III-Based, Multimodal Contrast Agent for Magnetic Resonance and Photoacoustic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We report, for the first time, a multimodal, oxidation-responsive contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging and photoacoustic imaging that uses the differences in the properties between Eu in the +2 and +3 oxidation states. The enhancement of contrast in T1-weighted magnetic resonance and photoacoustic imaging was observed in the +2 but not in the +3 oxidation state, and the complex is a known chemical exchange saturation transfer agent for magnetic resonance imaging in the +3 oxidation state. PMID:28393130

  8. Active sensing without efference copy: referent control of perception.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Anatol G

    2016-09-01

    Although action and perception are different behaviors, they are likely to be interrelated, as implied by the notions of perception-action coupling and active sensing. Traditionally, it has been assumed that the nervous system directly preprograms motor commands required for actions and uses a copy of them called efference copy (EC) to also influence our senses. This review offers a critical analysis of the EC concept by identifying its limitations. An alternative to the EC concept is based on the experimentally confirmed notion that sensory signals from receptors are perceived relative to referent signals specified by the brain. These referents also underlie the control of motor actions by predetermining where, in the spatial domain, muscles can work without preprogramming how they should work in terms of motor commands or EC. This approach helps solve several problems of action and explain several sensory experiences, including position sense and the sense that the world remains stationary despite changes in its retinal image during eye or body motion (visual space constancy). The phantom limb phenomenon and other kinesthetic illusions are also explained within this framework.

  9. Laser thermographic technologies for hard copy recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessmel'tsev, Viktor P.; Baev, Sergej G.

    1995-04-01

    Methods of hard copies recording based on thermal interaction of the beam from CO2 or YAG lasers with various kinds of films on any substrates have been developed. The recording processes are single-step and require no additional development. Among them are: (1) Laser thermodestruction of thin mask layers or of a material surface on any kinds of substrates. (2) Laser thermochemical reactions of thermal decomposition of metal salts in solid state phase on a surface of various hygroscopic substrates. The laser recording devices using the methods, described above have been developed and are manufactured now; they allow one to record hard copies with a size of up to 27 X 31 inches, a resolution of 4000 dpi.

  10. A DEEP NARROWBAND IMAGING SEARCH FOR C iv AND He ii EMISSION FROM Lyα BLOBS

    SciTech Connect

    Battaia, Fabrizio Arrigoni; Yang, Yujin; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Matsuda, Yuichi; Yamada, Toru; Hayashino, Tomoki

    2015-05-01

    We conduct a deep narrowband imaging survey of 13 Lyα blobs (LABs) located in the SSA22 proto-cluster at z ∼ 3.1 in the C iv and He ii emission lines in an effort to constrain the physical process powering the Lyα emission in LABs. Our observations probe down to unprecedented surface brightness (SB) limits of (2.1–3.4) × 10{sup −18} erg s{sup −1} cm{sup −2} arcsec{sup −2} per 1 arcsec{sup 2} aperture (5σ) for the He ii λ1640 and C iv λ1549 lines, respectively. We do not detect extended He ii and C iv emission in any of the LABs, placing strong upper limits on the He ii/Lyα and C iv/Lyα line ratios, of 0.11 and 0.16, for the brightest two LABs in the field. We conduct detailed photoionization modeling of the expected line ratios and find that, although our data constitute the deepest ever observations of these lines, they are still not deep enough to rule out a scenario where the Lyα emission is powered by the ionizing radiation from an obscured active galactic nucleus. Our models can accommodate He ii/Lyα and C iv/Lyα ratios as low as ≃0.05 and ≃0.07, respectively, implying that one needs to reach SB as low as (1–1.5) × 10{sup −18} erg s{sup −1} cm{sup −2} arcsec{sup −2} (at 5σ) in order to rule out a photoionization scenario. These depths will be achievable with the new generation of image-slicing integral field units such as the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) on VLT and the Keck Cosmic Web Imager (KCWI). We also model the expected He ii/Lyα and C iv/Lyα in a different scenario, where Lyα emission is powered by shocks generated in a large-scale superwind, but find that our observational constraints can only be met for shock velocities v{sub s} ≳ 250 km s{sup −1}, which appear to be in conflict with recent observations of quiescent kinematics in LABs.

  11. A Fluorescent Indicator for Imaging Lysosomal Zinc(II) with Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET)-Enhanced Photostability and a Narrow Band of Emission

    PubMed Central

    Sreenath, Kesavapillai; Yuan, Zhao; Allen, John R.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a strategy to transfer the zinc(II) sensitivity of a fluoroionophore with low photostability and a broad emission band to a bright and photostable fluorophore with a narrow emission band. The two fluorophores are covalently connected to afford an intramolecular Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) conjugate. The FRET donor in the conjugate is a zinc(II)-sensitive arylvinylbipyridyl fluoroionophore, the absorption and emission of which undergo bathochromic shifts upon zinc(II) coordination. When the FRET donor is excited, efficient intramolecular energy transfer occurs to result in the emission of the acceptor boron dipyrromethene (4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene or BODIPY) as a function of zinc(II) concentration. The broad emission band of the donor/zinc(II) complex is transformed into the strong, narrow emission band of the BODIPY acceptor in the FRET conjugates, which can be captured within the narrow emission window that is preferred for multicolor imaging experiments. In addition to competing with other nonradiative decay processes of the FRET donor, the rapid intramolecular FRET of the excited FRET-conjugate molecule protects the donor fluorophore from photobleaching, thus enhancing the photostability of the indicator. FRET conjugates 3 and 4 contain aliphatic amino groups, which selectively target lysosomes in mammalian cells. This subcellular localization preference was verified by using confocal fluorescence microscopy, which also shows the zinc(II)-enhanced emission of 3 and 4 in lysosomes. It was further shown using two-color structured illumination microscopy (SIM), which is capable of extending the lateral resolution over the Abbe diffraction limit by a factor of two, that the morpholino-functionalized compound 4 localizes in the interior of lysosomes, rather than anchoring on the lysosomal membranes, of live HeLa cells. PMID:25382395

  12. Modeling genetic inheritance of copy number variations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Chen, Zhen; Tadesse, Mahlet G.; Glessner, Joseph; Grant, Struan F. A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Bucan, Maja

    2008-01-01

    Copy number variations (CNVs) are being used as genetic markers or functional candidates in gene-mapping studies. However, unlike single nucleotide polymorphism or microsatellite genotyping techniques, most CNV detection methods are limited to detecting total copy numbers, rather than copy number in each of the two homologous chromosomes. To address this issue, we developed a statistical framework for intensity-based CNV detection platforms using family data. Our algorithm identifies CNVs for a family simultaneously, thus avoiding the generation of calls with Mendelian inconsistency while maintaining the ability to detect de novo CNVs. Applications to simulated data and real data indicate that our method significantly improves both call rates and accuracy of boundary inference, compared to existing approaches. We further illustrate the use of Mendelian inheritance to infer SNP allele compositions in each of the two homologous chromosomes in CNV regions using real data. Finally, we applied our method to a set of families genotyped using both the Illumina HumanHap550 and Affymetrix genome-wide 5.0 arrays to demonstrate its performance on both inherited and de novo CNVs. In conclusion, our method produces accurate CNV calls, gives probabilistic estimates of CNV transmission and builds a solid foundation for the development of linkage and association tests utilizing CNVs. PMID:18832372

  13. CONTRA: copy number analysis for targeted resequencing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jason; Lupat, Richard; Amarasinghe, Kaushalya C.; Thompson, Ella R.; Doyle, Maria A.; Ryland, Georgina L.; Tothill, Richard W.; Halgamuge, Saman K.; Campbell, Ian G.; Gorringe, Kylie L.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: In light of the increasing adoption of targeted resequencing (TR) as a cost-effective strategy to identify disease-causing variants, a robust method for copy number variation (CNV) analysis is needed to maximize the value of this promising technology. Results: We present a method for CNV detection for TR data, including whole-exome capture data. Our method calls copy number gains and losses for each target region based on normalized depth of coverage. Our key strategies include the use of base-level log-ratios to remove GC-content bias, correction for an imbalanced library size effect on log-ratios, and the estimation of log-ratio variations via binning and interpolation. Our methods are made available via CONTRA (COpy Number Targeted Resequencing Analysis), a software package that takes standard alignment formats (BAM/SAM) and outputs in variant call format (VCF4.0), for easy integration with other next-generation sequencing analysis packages. We assessed our methods using samples from seven different target enrichment assays, and evaluated our results using simulated data and real germline data with known CNV genotypes. Availability and implementation: Source code and sample data are freely available under GNU license (GPLv3) at http://contra-cnv.sourceforge.net/ Contact: Jason.Li@petermac.org Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22474122

  14. Finding-specific display presets for computed radiography soft-copy reading.

    PubMed

    Andriole, K P; Gould, R G; Webb, W R

    1999-05-01

    Much work has been done to optimize the display of cross-sectional modality imaging examinations for soft-copy reading (i.e., window/level tissue presets, and format presentations such as tile and stack modes, four-on-one, nine-on-one, etc). Less attention has been paid to the display of digital forms of the conventional projection x-ray. The purpose of this study is to assess the utility of providing presets for computed radiography (CR) soft-copy display, based not on the window/level settings, but on processing applied to the image optimized for visualization of specific findings, pathologies, etc (i.e., pneumothorax, tumor, tube location). It is felt that digital display of CR images based on finding-specific processing presets has the potential to: speed reading of digital projection x-ray examinations on soft copy; improve diagnostic efficacy; standardize display across examination type, clinical scenario, important key findings, and significant negatives; facilitate image comparison; and improve confidence in and acceptance of soft-copy reading. Clinical chest images are acquired using an Agfa-Gevaert (Mortsel, Belgium) ADC 70 CR scanner and Fuji (Stamford, CT) 9000 and AC2 CR scanners. Those demonstrating pertinent findings are transferred over the clinical picture archiving and communications system (PACS) network to a research image processing station (Agfa PS5000), where the optimal image-processing settings per finding, pathologic category, etc, are developed in conjunction with a thoracic radiologist, by manipulating the multiscale image contrast amplification (Agfa MUSICA) algorithm parameters. Soft-copy display of images processed with finding-specific settings are compared with the standard default image presentation for 50 cases of each category. Comparison is scored using a 5-point scale with the positive scale denoting the standard presentation is preferred over the finding-specific processing, the negative scale denoting the finding

  15. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate...

  16. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate...

  17. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate...

  18. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate...

  19. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate...

  20. 19 CFR 133.42 - Infringing copies or phonorecords.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Referral to the U.S. Attorney. In the event that phonorecords or copies of motion pictures arrive in the U... trafficking in counterfeit labels for phonorecords or copies of motion pictures or other audiovisual works...

  1. Most Cancers Caused by Random DNA Copying Errors

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_164252.html Most Cancers Caused by Random DNA Copying Errors While habits, environment can be key ... factors, genes inherited from parents, or simply random DNA copying errors. From their calculations, the researchers now ...

  2. 9. Photocopy of measured drawing (from a copy of the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Photocopy of measured drawing (from a copy of the original; copy in accompanying field records, location of original unknown) Adolf Scherrer, architect ca. 1906 'CROSS SECTION' - Maennerchor Building, 102 West Michigan Street, Indianapolis, Marion County, IN

  3. 17 CFR 230.402 - Number of copies; binding; signatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... copy shall be bound, in one or more parts, without stiff covers. The binding shall be made on the side... filed with the Commission. Each copy shall be bound, in one or more parts, without stiff covers....

  4. 40 CFR 262.22 - Number of copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE The Manifest § 262.22 Number of copies. The manifest consists of at least the number of copies which will provide the generator, each transporter, and the owner... returned to the generator....

  5. 40 CFR 262.22 - Number of copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE The Manifest § 262.22 Number of copies. The manifest consists of at least the number of copies which will provide the generator, each transporter, and the owner... returned to the generator....

  6. 40 CFR 262.22 - Number of copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE The Manifest § 262.22 Number of copies. The manifest consists of at least the number of copies which will provide the generator, each transporter, and the owner... returned to the generator....

  7. 40 CFR 262.22 - Number of copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE The Manifest § 262.22 Number of copies. The manifest consists of at least the number of copies which will provide the generator, each transporter, and the owner... returned to the generator....

  8. 40 CFR 262.22 - Number of copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE The Manifest § 262.22 Number of copies. The manifest consists of at least the number of copies which will provide the generator, each transporter, and the owner... returned to the generator....

  9. Conditionally amplifiable BACs: switching from single-copy to high-copy vectors and genomic clones.

    PubMed

    Wild, Jadwiga; Hradecna, Zdenka; Szybalski, Waclaw

    2002-09-01

    The widely used, very-low-copy BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) vectors are the mainstay of present genomic research. The principal advantage of BACs is the high stability of inserted clones, but an important disadvantage is the low yield of DNA, both for vectors alone and when carrying genomic inserts. We describe here a novel class of single-copy/high-copy (SC/HC) pBAC/oriV vectors that retain all the advantages of low-copy BAC vectors, but are endowed with a conditional and tightly controlled oriV/TrfA amplification system that allows: (1) a yield of ~100 copies of the vector per host cell when conditionally induced with L-arabinose, and (2) analogous DNA amplification (only upon induction and with copy number depending on the insert size) of pBAC/oriV clones carrying >100-kb inserts. Amplifiable clones and libraries facilitate high-throughput DNA sequencing and other applications requiring HC plasmid DNA. To turn on DNA amplification, which is driven by the oriV origin of replication, we used copy-up mutations in the gene trfA whose expression was very tightly controlled by the araC-P(araBAD) promoter/regulator system. This system is inducible by L-arabinose, and could be further regulated by glucose and fucose. Amplification of DNA upon induction with L-arabinose and its modulation by glucose are robust and reliable. Furthermore, we discovered that addition of 0.2% D-glucose to the growth medium helped toward the objective of obtaining a real SC state for all BAC systems, thus enhancing the stability of their maintenance, which became equivalent to cloning into the host chromosome

  10. Variation in topoisomerase I gene copy number as a mechanism for intrinsic drug sensitivity.

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, H. L.; Keith, W. N.

    1996-01-01

    DNA topoisomerase I (topo I) is the principle target for camptothecin and its derivatives such as SN38. Levels of topo I expression vary widely between and within tumour types and the basis for this is poorly understood. We have used fluorescence in situ hybridisation to detect the topo I locus in a panel of breast and colon cancer cell lines. This approach has identified a range of topo I gene copies from 1 to 6 between the cell lines as a result of DNA amplification, polysomy and isochromosome formation. Topo I gene copy number was highly correlated with topo I expression, (rs = 0.92), and inversely correlated to sensitivity to a 1 h exposure to SN38 (rs = -0.904). This illustrates the significant impact of altered topo I gene copy number on intrinsic drug sensitivity and influences potential mechanisms for acquisition of drug resistance. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8761363

  11. Two novel six-coordinated cadmium(II) and zinc(II) complexes from carbazate β-diketonate: crystal structures, enhanced two-photon absorption and biological imaging application.

    PubMed

    Nie, Cuiyun; Zhang, Qiong; Ding, Hongjuan; Huang, Bei; Wang, Xinyan; Zhao, Xianghua; Li, Shengli; Zhou, Hongping; Wu, Jieying; Tian, Yupeng

    2014-01-14

    To explore the photophysical properties of coordination compounds with enhanced two-photon absorption, two novel six-coordinated metal complexes (ML2, M = Cd(ii), Zn(ii)) from carbazole β-diketone ligand (HL = 4,4,4-trifluoro-1-(9-butylcarbazole-3-yl)-1,3-butanedione) were prepared and fully characterized. Their crystal structures were determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. Both variable temperature (1)H NMR spectra and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry proved that the coordination compounds exhibit good stability in solution. The results of time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations indicated that the complexation of the ligands with metal ion extends the electronic delocalization in the coordination compounds, leading to enhanced two-photon absorption. The photophysical properties for the coordination compounds were identified relying on both experimentally and theoretically studies. Finally, confocal microscopy and two-photon microscopy fluorescent imaging of HepG2 cells labeled with the Zn(ii) complexe revealed its potential applications as a biological fluorescent probe.

  12. Photographic copy of circa 1933, 10” x 15” black and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of circa 1933, 10” x 15” black and white aerial photograph. Loose in oversized box located at the National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, Archives Center, Work and Industry Division, Washington, D.C. Original Photographer unknown. AERIAL PHOTOGRAPH SHOWING CONSTRUCTION OF PIERS A, I, II, AND III BEGINNING ON EAST BANK OF RIVER. - Huey P. Long Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River approximately midway between nine & twelve mile points upstream from & west of New Orleans, Jefferson, Jefferson Parish, LA

  13. Real-time image processing II; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 16-18, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juday, Richard D. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The present conference discusses topics in the fields of feature extraction and implementation, filter and correlation algorithms, optical correlators, high-level algorithms, and digital image processing for ranging and remote driving. Attention is given to a nonlinear filter derived from topological image features, IR image segmentation through iterative thresholding, orthogonal subspaces for correlation masking, composite filter trees and image recognition via binary search, and features of matrix-coherent optical image processing. Also discussed are multitarget tracking via hybrid joint transform correlator, binary joint Fourier transform correlator considerations, global image processing operations on parallel architectures, real-time implementation of a differential range finder, and real-time binocular stereo range and motion detection.

  14. Late diagenetic indicators of buried oil and gas: II, Direct detection experiment at Cement and Garza oil fields, Oklahoma and Texas, using enhanced LANDSAT I and II images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donovan, Terrence J.; Termain, Patricia A.; Henry, Mitchell E.

    1979-01-01

    The Cement oil field, Oklahoma, was a test site for an experiment designed to evaluate LANDSAT's capability to detect an alteration zone in surface rocks caused by hydrocarbon microseepage. Loss of iron and impregnation of sandstone by carbonate cements and replacement of gypsum by calcite are the major alteration phenomena at Cement. The bedrock alterations are partially masked by unaltered overlying beds, thick soils, and dense natural and cultivated vegetation. Interpreters biased by detailed ground truth were able to map the alteration zone subjectively using a magnified, filtered, and sinusoidally stretched LANDSAT composite image; other interpreters, unbiased by ground truth data, could not duplicate that interpretation. Similar techniques were applied at a secondary test site (Garza oil field, Texas), where similar alterations in surface rocks occur. Enhanced LANDSAT images resolved the alteration zone to a biased interpreter and some individual altered outcrops could be mapped using higher resolution SKYLAB color and conventional black and white aerial photographs suggesting repeat experiments with LANDSAT C and D.

  15. 1 CFR 18.1 - Original and copies required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Original and copies required. 18.1 Section 18.1... PROCESSING OF DOCUMENTS PREPARATION AND TRANSMITTAL OF DOCUMENTS GENERALLY § 18.1 Original and copies... two duplicate originals or certified copies. 1 However, if the document is printed or processed...

  16. 1 CFR 18.1 - Original and copies required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Original and copies required. 18.1 Section 18.1... PROCESSING OF DOCUMENTS PREPARATION AND TRANSMITTAL OF DOCUMENTS GENERALLY § 18.1 Original and copies... two duplicate originals or certified copies. 1 However, if the document is printed or processed...

  17. 12 CFR 269b.730 - Number of copies; form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Number of copies; form. 269b.730 Section 269b... SYSTEM (CONTINUED) CHARGES OF UNFAIR LABOR PRACTICES General Rules § 269b.730 Number of copies; form... filed with four copies in addition to the original. All matters filed shall be printed, typed,...

  18. 12 CFR 269b.730 - Number of copies; form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Number of copies; form. 269b.730 Section 269b... SYSTEM CHARGES OF UNFAIR LABOR PRACTICES General Rules § 269b.730 Number of copies; form. Except as... copies in addition to the original. All matters filed shall be printed, typed, or otherwise...

  19. Writing Wrongs: Copying as a Strategy for Underachieving EFL Writers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porte, Graeme K.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports on a small-scale study of the outcomes generated by 15 underachieving English-as-a-Foreign-Language university writers copying text displayed on a computer monitor under pressure of time. Analysis of student's copied texts showed that various inaccuracies that were not in the original had passed into the copied version,…

  20. Syllables as Functional Units in a Copying Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kandel, Sonia; Valdois, Sylviane

    2006-01-01

    This research used a copying task to study spelling acquisition from a perception and action perspective. First to fifth graders copied words and pseudo-words on a digitiser. Simultaneously, a camera registered the children's gaze lifts. First and second graders copied the first syllable and then produced a gaze lift to obtain information on the…

  1. Readability as a Factor in Magazine Ad Copy Recall.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wesson, David A.

    1989-01-01

    Examines the relationship between advertising copy readability and advertising effectiveness. Finds that recall is improved when the copy style is either fairly easy or fairly hard to read. Suggests the value of considering copy readability as a potential contributor, though a minor one, to the success of magazine advertising. (RS)

  2. 7 CFR 46.42 - Copies of records; how obtained.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Copies of records; how obtained. 46.42 Section 46.42 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Records § 46.42 Copies of records; how obtained. Copies of records pertaining to licensees under the...

  3. The use of the decision tree technique and image cytometry to characterize aggressiveness in World Health Organization (WHO) grade II superficial transitional cell carcinomas of the bladder.

    PubMed

    Decaestecker, C; van Velthoven, R; Petein, M; Janssen, T; Salmon, I; Pasteels, J L; van Ham, P; Schulman, C; Kiss, R

    1996-03-01

    The aggressiveness of human bladder tumours can be assessed by means of various classification systems, including the one proposed by the World Health Organization (WHO). According to the WHO classification, three levels of malignancy are identified as grades I (low), II (intermediate), and III (high). This classification system operates satisfactorily for two of the three grades in forecasting clinical progression, most grade I tumours being associated with good prognoses and most grade III with bad. In contrast, the grade II group is very heterogeneous in terms of their clinical behaviour. The present study used two computer-assisted methods to investigate whether it is possible to sub-classify grade II tumours: computer-assisted microscope analysis (image cytometry) of Feulgen-stained nuclei and the Decision Tree Technique. This latter technique belongs to the Supervised Learning Algorithm and enables an objective assessment to be made of the diagnostic value associated with a given parameter. The combined use of these two methods in a series of 292 superficial transitional cell carcinomas shows that it is possible to identify one subgroup of grade II tumours which behave clinically like grade I tumours and a second subgroup which behaves clinically like grade III tumours. Of the nine ploidy-related parameters computed by means of image cytometry [the DNA index (DI), DNA histogram type (DHT), and the percentages of diploid, hyperdiploid, triploid, hypertriploid, tetraploid, hypertetraploid, and polyploid cell nuclei], it was the percentage of hyperdiploid and hypertetraploid cell nuclei which enabled identification, rather than conventional parameters such as the DI or the DHT.

  4. Fault systems of the 1971 San Fernando and 1994 Northridge earthquakes, southern California: Relocated aftershocks and seismic images from LARSE II

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuis, G.S.; Clayton, R.W.; Davis, P.M.; Ryberg, T.; Lutter, W.J.; Okaya, D.A.; Hauksson, E.; Prodehl, C.; Murphy, J.M.; Benthien, M.L.; Baher, S.A.; Kohler, M.D.; Thygesen, K.; Simila, G.; Keller, Gordon R.

    2003-01-01

    We have constructed a composite image of the fault systems of the M 6.7 San Fernando (1971) and Northridge (1994), California, earthquakes, using industry reflection and oil test well data in the upper few kilometers of the crust, relocated aftershocks in the seismogenic crust, and LARSE II (Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment, Phase II) reflection data in the middle and lower crust. In this image, the San Fernando fault system appears to consist of a decollement that extends 50 km northward at a dip of ???25?? from near the surface at the Northridge Hills fault, in the northern San Fernando Valley, to the San Andreas fault in the middle to lower crust. It follows a prominent aseismic reflective zone below and northward of the main-shock hypocenter. Interpreted upward splays off this decollement include the Mission Hills and San Gabriel faults and the two main rupture planes of the San Fernando earthquake, which appear to divide the hanging wall into shingle- or wedge-like blocks. In contrast, the fault system for the Northridge earthquake appears simple, at least east of the LARSE II transect, consisting of a fault that extends 20 km southward at a dip of ???33?? from ???7 km depth beneath the Santa Susana Mountains, where it abuts the interpreted San Fernando decollement, to ???20 km depth beneath the Santa Monica Mountains. It follows a weak aseismic reflective zone below and southward of the mainshock hypocenter. The middle crustal reflective zone along the interpreted San Fernando decollement appears similar to a reflective zone imaged beneath the San Gabriel Mountains along the LARSE I transect, to the east, in that it appears to connect major reverse or thrust faults in the Los Angeles region to the San Andreas fault. However, it differs in having a moderate versus a gentle dip and in containing no mid-crustal bright reflections.

  5. Luminescent Ruthenium(II) Complex Bearing Bipyridine and N-Heterocyclic Carbene-based C∧N∧C Pincer Ligand for Live-Cell Imaging of Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, Wai-Kuen; Chung, Lai-Hon; Wong, Matthew Man-Kin; Tsang, Wai-Him; Lo, Hoi-Shing; Liu, Yaxiang; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung; Chiu, Sung-Kay; Wong, Chun-Yuen

    2015-01-01

    Luminescent ruthenium(II)-cyanide complex with N-heterocyclic carbene pincer ligand C∧N∧C = 2,6-bis(1-butylimidazol-2-ylidene)pyridine and 2,2′-bipyridine (bpy) shows minimal cytotoxicity to both human breast carcinoma cell (MCF-7) and human retinal pigmented epithelium cell (RPE) in a wide range of concentration (0.1–500 μM), and can be used for the luminescent imaging of endocytosis of the complex in these cells. PMID:25765974

  6. Laser Detection Of Latent Fingerprints: Tris(2,2'-Bipyridyl)Ruthenium(II) Chloride Hexahydrate As A Staining Dye For Time-Resolved Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, E. R.

    1988-04-01

    The compound tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) chloride hexahydrate is suitable for laser detection of latent fingerprints on difficult surfaces such as wood and masking tape, as well as surfaces such as polyethylene, metal, etc. The fingerprint treatment can Involve either dusting with powder blended with this compound or by solution staining. The compound displays a strong d-n phosphorescence with a lifetime of about 10-6 and is thus very well suited for time-resolved imaging to suppress background fluorescence.

  7. High coating of Ru(II) complexes on gold nanoparticles for single particle luminescence imaging in cells.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Nicola J; Claire, Sunil; Harris, Robert M; Farabi, Shiva; Zikeli, Gerald; Styles, Iain B; Hodges, Nikolas J; Pikramenou, Zoe

    2014-01-18

    Gold nanoparticles are efficiently labelled with a luminescent ruthenium complex, producing 13 and 100 nm diameter, monodisperse red-emissive imaging probes with luminescence lifetimes prolonged over the molecular unit. Single, 100 nm particles are observed in whole cell luminescence imaging which reveals their biomolecular association with chromatin in the nucleus of cancer cells.

  8. Filtering Chromatic Aberration for Wide Acceptance Angle Electrostatic Lenses II--Experimental Evaluation and Software-Based Imaging Energy Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Fazekas, Ádám; Daimon, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Tóth, László

    2016-03-01

    Here, the experimental results of the method of filtering the effect of chromatic aberration for wide acceptance angle electrostatic lens-based system are described. This method can eliminate the effect of chromatic aberration from the images of a measured spectral image sequence by determining and removing the effect of higher and lower kinetic energy electrons on each different energy image, which leads to significant improvement of image and spectral quality. The method is based on the numerical solution of a large system of linear equations and equivalent with a multivariate strongly nonlinear deconvolution method. A matrix whose elements describe the strongly nonlinear chromatic aberration-related transmission function of the lens system acts on the vector of the ordered pixels of the distortion free spectral image sequence, and produces the vector of the ordered pixels of the measured spectral image sequence. Since the method can be applied not only on 2D real- and $k$ -space diffraction images, but also along a third dimension of the image sequence that is along the optical or in the 3D parameter space, the energy axis, it functions as a software-based imaging energy analyzer (SBIEA). It can also be applied in cases of light or other type of optics for different optical aberrations and distortions. In case of electron optics, the SBIEA method makes possible the spectral imaging without the application of any other energy filter. It is notable that this method also eliminates the disturbing background significantly in the present investigated case of reflection electron energy loss spectra. It eliminates the instrumental effects and makes possible to measure the real physical processes better.

  9. Copy Number Heterogeneity of JC Virus Standards

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, Allen C.; Atienza, Ederlyn E.; Wendt, Sharon; Makhsous, Negar; Jerome, Keith R.; Cook, Linda

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Quantitative PCR is a diagnostic mainstay of clinical virology, and accurate quantitation of viral load among labs requires the use of international standards. However, the use of multiple passages of viral isolates to obtain sufficient material for international standards may result in genomic changes that complicate their use as quantitative standards. We performed next-generation sequencing to obtain single-nucleotide resolution and relative copy number of JC virus (JCV) clinical standards. Strikingly, the WHO international standard and the Exact v1/v2 prototype standards for JCV showed 8-fold and 4-fold variation in genomic coverage between different loci in the viral genome, respectively, due to large deletions in the large T antigen region. Intriguingly, several of the JCV standards sequenced in this study with large T antigen deletions were cultured in cell lines immortalized using simian virus 40 (SV40) T antigen, suggesting the possibility of transcomplementation in cell culture. Using a cutoff 5% allele fraction for junctional reads, 7 different rearrangements were present in the JC virus sequences present in the WHO standard across multiple library preparations and sequencing runs. Neither the copy number differences nor the rearrangements were observed in a clinical sample with a high copy number of JCV or a plasmid control. These results were also confirmed by the quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), droplet digital PCR (ddPCR), and Sanger sequencing of multiple rearrangements. In summary, targeting different regions of the same international standard can result in up to an 8-fold difference in quantitation. We recommend the use of next-generation sequencing to validate standards in clinical virology. PMID:27974546

  10. Getting DNA copy numbers without control samples

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The selection of the reference to scale the data in a copy number analysis has paramount importance to achieve accurate estimates. Usually this reference is generated using control samples included in the study. However, these control samples are not always available and in these cases, an artificial reference must be created. A proper generation of this signal is crucial in terms of both noise and bias. We propose NSA (Normality Search Algorithm), a scaling method that works with and without control samples. It is based on the assumption that genomic regions enriched in SNPs with identical copy numbers in both alleles are likely to be normal. These normal regions are predicted for each sample individually and used to calculate the final reference signal. NSA can be applied to any CN data regardless the microarray technology and preprocessing method. It also finds an optimal weighting of the samples minimizing possible batch effects. Results Five human datasets (a subset of HapMap samples, Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM), Ovarian, Prostate and Lung Cancer experiments) have been analyzed. It is shown that using only tumoral samples, NSA is able to remove the bias in the copy number estimation, to reduce the noise and therefore, to increase the ability to detect copy number aberrations (CNAs). These improvements allow NSA to also detect recurrent aberrations more accurately than other state of the art methods. Conclusions NSA provides a robust and accurate reference for scaling probe signals data to CN values without the need of control samples. It minimizes the problems of bias, noise and batch effects in the estimation of CNs. Therefore, NSA scaling approach helps to better detect recurrent CNAs than current methods. The automatic selection of references makes it useful to perform bulk analysis of many GEO or ArrayExpress experiments without the need of developing a parser to find the normal samples or possible batches within the data. The method is

  11. Stolen and lost copies of Vesalius's Fabrica.

    PubMed

    Steeno, Omer; Biesbrouck, Maurits

    2012-01-01

    Thefts and losses of precious books are not rare. Here we report several incidents concerning vesalius's Fabrica: the fire of the University Library of Leuven in Belgium, the fate of the collection of the Leopoldina Library of Halle in Germany, the thefts from the Crerar Library in Chicago and in Christ Church College in Oxford, the disappearance of an exceptionally beautiful 'royal' copy from the Castle of Argenteuil (Belgium), and other Fabrica's missing at the Franeker Library in the Netherlands and at the Library of oradea in West Romania. Finally the means of protecting precious book collections are discussed in short as well as the importance of book identification.

  12. Thinking beyond the block: block matching for copy-move forgery detection revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, Matthias; Schöttle, Pascal; Riess, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Detection of copy{move forgeries is one of the most actively researched topics in image forensics. It has been shown that so-called block-based methods give the highest pixel-wise accuracy for detecting copy{move forgeries. However, matching of block-based features can be computationally extremely demanding. Hence, the current predominant line of thought is that block-based algorithms are too slow to be applicable in practice. In this paper, we revisit the matching stage of block-based copy{move forgery detection methods. We propose an efficient approach for finding duplicate patterns of a given size in integer-valued input data. By design, we focus on the spatial relation of potentially duplicated elements. This allows us to locate copy{move forgeries via bit-wise operations, without expensive block comparisons in the feature space. Experimental investigation of different matching strategies shows that the proposed method has its benefits. However, on a broader scale, our experiments demonstrate that the performance of matching by lexicographic sorting might have been underestimated in previous work, despite its remarkable speed benefit on large images. In fact, in a practical setting, where accuracy and computational efficiency have to be balanced, lexicographic sorting may be considered the method of choice.

  13. Emotion regulation deficits in euthymic bipolar I versus bipolar II disorder: a functional and diffusion-tensor imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Caseras, Xavier; Murphy, Kevin; Lawrence, Natalia S; Fuentes-Claramonte, Paola; Watts, Jessica; Jones, Derek K; Phillips, Mary L

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Emotion regulation deficits are a core feature of bipolar disorder. However, their potential neurobiological underpinnings and existence beyond bipolar I disorder remain unexplored. Our main goal was to investigate whether both individuals with bipolar I and bipolar II disorder show deficits in emotion regulation during an attention control task, and to explore the neurophysiological underpinnings of this potential deficit. Methods Twenty healthy controls, 16 euthymic participants with bipolar I disorder, and 19 euthymic participants with bipolar II disorder completed psychometric and clinical assessments, a neuroimaging emotion regulation paradigm, and an anatomical diffusion-weighted scan. Groups were matched for age, gender, and verbal IQ. Results During the presence of emotional distracters, subjects with bipolar I disorder showed slowed reaction times to targets, and increased blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) responses in the amygdala, accumbens, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, but not increased inverse functional connectivity between these prefrontal and subcortical areas, and altered white matter microstructure organization in the right uncinate fasciculus. Subjects with bipolar II disorder showed no altered reaction times, increased BOLD responses in the same brain areas, increased inverse functional connectivity between the prefrontal cortex and amygdala, and no abnormalities in white matter organization. Conclusions Participants with bipolar I disorder showed abnormalities in functional and anatomical connectivity between prefrontal cortices and subcortical structures in emotion regulation circuitry. However, these deficits did not extend to subjects with bipolar II disorder, suggesting fundamental differences in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder subtypes. PMID:25771686

  14. Flurpiridaz F 18 PET: Phase II Safety and Clinical Comparison with SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging for Detection of Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Daniel S.; Maddahi, Jamshid; Tamarappoo, B. K.; Czernin, Johannes; Taillefer, Raymond; Udelson, James E.; Gibson, C. Michael; Devine, Marybeth; Lazewatsky, Joel; Bhat, Gajanan; Washburn, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Phase II trial to assess flurpiridaz F 18 for safety and compare its diagnostic performance for PET myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) to Tc-99m SPECT-MPI regarding image quality, interpretative certainty, defect magnitude and detection of coronary artery disease (CAD)(≥ 50% stenosis) on invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Background In preclinical and phase I studies, flurpiridaz F 18 has shown characteristics of an essentially ideal MPI tracer. Methods 143 patients from 21 centers underwent rest-stress PET and Tc-99m SPECT-MPI. Eighty-six patients underwent ICA, and 39 had low-likelihood of CAD. Images were scored by 3 independent, blinded readers. Results A higher % of images were rated as excellent/good on PET vs. SPECT on stress (99.2% vs. 88.5%, p<0.01) and rest (96.9% vs. 66.4, p<0.01) images. Diagnostic certainty of interpretation (% cases with definitely abnormal/normal interpretation) was higher for PET vs. SPECT (90.8% vs. 70.9%, p<0.01). In 86 patients who underwent ICA, sensitivity of PET was higher than SPECT [78.8% vs. 61.5%, respectively (p=0.02)]. Specificity was not significantly different (PET:76.5% vs. SPECT:73.5%). Receiver operating characteristic curve area was 0.82±0.05 for PET and 0.70±0.06 for SPECT (p=0.04). Normalcy rate was 89.7% with PET and 97.4% with SPECT (p=NS). In patients with CAD on ICA, the magnitude of reversible defects was greater with PET than SPECT (p=0.008). Extensive safety assessment revealed that flurpiridaz F 18 was safe in this cohort. Conclusions In this Phase 2 trial, PET MPI using flurpiridaz F 18 was safe and superior to SPECT MPI for image quality, interpretative certainty, and overall CAD diagnosis. PMID:23265345

  15. Measurements at the Planetary Emissivity Laboratory in Support of MARA and the TIR Imager on the JAXA Hayabusa II Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helbert, J.; Maturilli, A.; Grott, M.; Knollenberg, J.; Okada, T.; Kührt, E.

    2012-03-01

    At the Planetary Emissivity Laboratory (PEL) at DLR we perform measurements on analog materials to explore the possibility of mineralogical studies with the thermal infrared imager and the radiometer MARA (MAscot RAdiometer) on MASCOT.

  16. Do Long-Lived Features Really Exist in the Solar Photosphere? II. Contrast of Time-Averaged Granulation Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, P. N.; Getling, A. V.

    2008-06-01

    The decrease in the rms contrast of time-averaged images with the averaging time is compared between four data sets: (1) a series of solar granulation images recorded at La Palma in 1993, (2) a series of artificial granulation images obtained in numerical simulations by Rieutord et al. ( Nuovo Cimento 25, 523, 2002), (3) a similar series computed by Steffen and his colleagues (see Wedemeyer et al. in Astron. Astrophys. 44, 1121, 2004), (4) a random field with some parameters typical of the granulation, constructed by Rast ( Astron. Astrophys. 392, L13, 2002). In addition, (5) a sequence of images was obtained from real granulation images by using a temporal and spatial shuffling procedure, and the contrast of the average of n images from this sequence as a function of n is analysed. The series (1) of real granulation images exhibits a considerably slower contrast decrease than do both the series (3) of simulated granulation images and the series (4) of random fields. Starting from some relatively short averaging times t, the behaviour of the contrast in series (3) and (4) resembles the t -1/2 statistical law, whereas the shuffled series (5) obeys the n -1/2 law from n=2 on. Series (2) demonstrates a peculiarly slow decline of contrast, which could be attributed to particular properties of the boundary conditions used in the simulations. Comparisons between the analysed contrast-variation laws indicate quite definitely that the brightness field of solar granulation contains a long-lived component, which could be associated with locally persistent dark intergranular holes and/or with the presence of quasi-regular structures. The suggestion that the random field (4) successfully reproduces the contrast-variation law for the real granulation (Rast in Astron. Astrophys. 392, L13, 2002) can be dismissed.

  17. In vivo real-time visualization of mesenchymal stem cells tropism for cutaneous regeneration using NIR-II fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guangcun; Tian, Fei; Li, Chunyan; Zhang, Yejun; Weng, Zhen; Zhang, Yan; Peng, Rui; Wang, Qiangbin

    2015-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have shown great potential for cutaneous wound regeneration in clinical practice. However, the in vivo homing behavior of intravenously transplanted MSCs to the wounds is still poorly understood. In this work, fluorescence imaging with Ag2S quantum dots (QDs) in the second near-infrared (NIR-II) window was performed to visualize the dynamic homing behavior of transplanted human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to a cutaneous wound in mice. Benefiting from the desirable spatial and temporal resolution of Ag2S QDs-based NIR-II imaging, for the first time, the migration of hMSCs to the wound was dynamically visualized in vivo. By transplanting a blank collagen scaffold in the wound to help the healing, it was found that hMSCs were slowly recruited at the wound after intravenous injection and were predominantly accumulated around the edge of wound. This resulted in poor healing effects in terms of slow wound closure and thin thickness of the regenerated skin. In contrast, for the wound treated by the collagen scaffold loaded with stromal cell derived factor-1α (SDF-1α), more hMSCs were recruited at the wound within a much shorter time and were homogenously distributed across the whole wound area, which enhances the re-epithelialization, the neovascularization, and accelerates the wound healing.

  18. A passive technique for detecting copy-move forgery with rotation based on polar complex exponential transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emam, Mahmoud; Han, Qi; Yu, Liyang; Zhang, Ye; Niu, Xiamu

    2015-07-01

    Copy-move is one of the most common methods for image manipulation. Several methods have been proposed to detect and locate the tampered regions, while many methods failed when the copied regions are rotated before being pasted. A rotational invariant detecting method using Polar Complex Exponential Transform (PCET) is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the original image is divided into overlapping circular blocks, and PCET is employed to each block to extract the rotation-invariant robust features. Secondly, the Approximate Nearest Neighbors (ANN) of each feature vector are collected by Locality Sensitive Hashing (LSH). Experimental results show that the proposed technique is robust to rotation.

  19. Copy number polymorphisms in new HapMap III and Singapore populations.

    PubMed

    Ku, Chee-Seng; Teo, Shu-Mei; Naidoo, Nasheen; Sim, Xueling; Teo, Yik-Ying; Pawitan, Yudi; Seielstad, Mark; Chia, Kee-Seng; Salim, Agus

    2011-08-01

    Copy number variations can be identified using newer genotyping arrays with higher single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) density and copy number probes accompanied by newer algorithms. McCarroll et al. (2008) applied these to the HapMap II samples and identified 1316 copy number polymorphisms (CNPs). In our study, we applied the same approach to 859 samples from three Singapore populations and seven HapMap III populations. Approximately 50% of the 1291 autosomal CNPs were found to be polymorphic only in populations of non-African ancestry. Pairwise comparisons among the 10 populations showed substantial differences in the CNPs frequencies. Additionally, 698 CNPs showed significant differences with false discovery rate (FDR)<0.01 among the 10 populations and these loci overlap with known disease-associated or pharmacogenetic-related genes such as CFHR3 and CFHR1 (age related macular degeneration), GSTTI (metabolism of various carcinogenic compounds and cancers) and UGT2B17 (prostate cancer and graft-versus-host disease). The correlations between CNPs and genome-wide association studies-SNPs were investigated and several loci, which were previously unreported, that may potentially be implicated in complex diseases and traits were found; for example, childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, age-related macular degeneration, breast cancer, response to antipsychotic treatment, rheumatoid arthritis and type-1 diabetes. Additionally, we also found 5014 novel copy number loci that have not been reported previously by McCarroll et al. (2008) in the 10 populations.

  20. To Copy or Not to Copy for Teaching and Scholarship: What Shall I Tell My Client?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardozo, Michael H.

    1976-01-01

    A clear description of what educators, administrators, or students may and may not copy under the various provisions of the Copyright Law Revision of 1976 is attempted, but the author concludes that the language of the law itself makes such a description impossible. (LBH)

  1. Imitation in Young Children: When Who Gets Copied Is More Important than What Gets Copied

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, Mark; Blank, Cornelia

    2011-01-01

    Unlike other animals, human children will copy all of an adult's goal-directed actions, including ones that are clearly unnecessary for achieving the demonstrated goal. Here we highlight how social affiliation is key to this species-specific behavior. Preschoolers watched 2 adults retrieve a toy from a novel apparatus. One adult included…

  2. Image-spectroscopy--II. The removal of plural scattering from extended energy-filtered series by Fourier deconvolution.

    PubMed

    Thomas, P J; Midgley, P A

    2001-08-01

    The increased spectral information obtained by acquiring an EFTEM image-series over several hundred eV allows plural scattering to be removed from loss images using standard deconvolution techniques developed for the quantification of EEL spectra. In this work, both Fourier-log and Fourier-ratio deconvolution techniques have been applied successfully to such image-series. Application of the Fourier-log technique over an energy-loss range of several hundred eV has been achieved by implementation of a novel method that extends the effective dynamic range of EFTEM image-series acquisition by over four orders of magnitude. Experimental results show that the removal of plural scattering from EFTEM image-series gives a significant improvement in quantification for thicker specimen regions. Further, the recovery of the single-scattering distribution using the Fourier-log technique over an extended energy-loss range is shown to result in an increase in both the ionisation-edge jump-ratio and the signal-to-noise ratio.

  3. Imaging the Moon II: Webcam CCD Observations and Analysis (a Two-Week Lab for Non-Majors)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.

    2014-07-01

    Imaging the Moon is a successful two-week lab involving real sky observations of the Moon in which students make telescopic observations and analyze their own images. Originally developed around the 35 mm film camera, a common household object adapted for astronomical work, the lab now uses webcams as film photography has evolved into an obscure specialty technology and increasing numbers of students have little familiarity with it. The printed circuit board with the CCD is harvested from a commercial webcam and affixed to a tube to mount on a telescope in place of an eyepiece. Image frames are compiled to form a lunar mosaic, and crater sizes are measured. Students also work through the logistical steps of telescope time assignment and scheduling. They learn to keep a schedule and work with uncertainties of weather in ways paralleling research observations. Because there is no need for a campus observatory, this lab can be replicated at a wide variety of institutions.

  4. Optimizing technology development and adoption in medical imaging using the principles of innovation diffusion, part II: practical applications.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Bruce I

    2012-02-01

    Successful adoption of new technology development can be accentuated by learning and applying the scientific principles of innovation diffusion. This is of particular importance to areas within the medical imaging practice which have lagged in innovation; perhaps, the most notable of which is reporting which has remained relatively stagnant for over a century. While the theoretical advantages of structured reporting have been well documented throughout the medical imaging community, adoption to date has been tepid and largely relegated to the academic and breast imaging communities. Widespread adoption will likely require an alternative approach to innovation, which addresses the heterogeneity and diversity of the practicing radiologist community along with the ever-changing expectations in service delivery. The challenges and strategies for reporting innovation and adoption are discussed, with the goal of adapting and customizing new technology to the preferences and needs of individual end-users.

  5. Hybrid image and signal processing II; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 18-20, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Casasent, D.P.; Tescher, A.G.

    1990-01-01

    The present conference discusses topics in the research fields of multisensor recognition and tracking, optical correlators and pattern recognition, optical processing applications, phase-only filters, digital signal processing techniques, and neural nets for image processing. Attention is given to multisensor data fusion for multitarget tracking, fast digital phase detection using SAWs, miniature hybrid optical correlators, shape representations by Gabor expansion, and a digital optoelectronic computer for textual pattern matching. Also discussed are feature detection and enhancement by a rotating kernel min-max transformation, a phase-phase implementation of optical correlators, the use of directional consistency with Sobel edge detectors, image-pattern algorithms using neural networks, assembly line inspection using neural networks, and image deconvolution by nonlinear techniques in the Fourier domain.

  6. A Phase I/II Study for Analytic Validation of 89Zr-J591 ImmunoPET as a Molecular Imaging Agent for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; O'Donoghue, Joseph A.; Durack, Jeremy C.; Lyashchenko, Serge K.; Cheal, Sarah M.; Beylergil, Volkan; Lefkowitz, Robert A.; Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; Martinez, Danny F.; Fung, Alex Mak; Solomon, Stephen B.; Gonen, Mithat; Heller, Glenn; Loda, Massimo; Nanus, David M.; Tagawa, Scott T.; Feldman, Jarett L.; Osborne, Joseph R.; Lewis, Jason S.; Reuter, Victor E.; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Bander, Neil H.; Scher, Howard I.; Larson, Steven M.; Morris, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Standard imaging for assessing osseous metastases in advanced prostate cancer remains focused on altered bone metabolism and is inadequate for diagnostic, prognostic, or predictive purposes. We performed a first-in-human phase I/II study of 89Zr-DFO-huJ591 (89Zr-J591) PET/CT immunoscintigraphy to assess performance characteristics for detecting metastases compared to conventional imaging modalities (CIMs) and pathology. Experimental Design Fifty patients with progressive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancers were injected with 5 mCi of 89Zr-J591. Whole body PET/CT scans were obtained, and images were analyzed for tumor visualization. Comparison was made to contemporaneously obtained bone scintigraphy and cross-sectional imaging on a lesion-by-lesion basis, and with biopsies of metastatic sites. Results Median standardized uptake value for 89Zr-J591-positive bone lesions (n = 491) was 8.9; soft tissue lesions (n = 90): 4.8 (p < .00003). 89Zr-J591 detected 491 osseous sites compared to 339 by MDP, and 90 soft tissue lesions compared to 124 by CT. Compared to all CIMs combined, 89Zr-J591 detected an additional 99 osseous sites. Forty-six lesions (21 bone, 25 soft tissue) were biopsied in 34 patients; 18/19 89Zr-J591-positive osseous sites and 14/16 89Zr-J591-positive soft tissue sites were positive for prostate cancer. The overall accuracy of 89Zr-J591 was 95.2% (20/21) for osseous lesions and 60% (15/25) for soft tissue lesions. Conclusions 89Zr-J591 imaging demonstrated superior targeting of bone lesions relative to CIMs. Targeting soft tissue lesions was less optimal, although 89Zr-J591 had similar accuracy as individual CIMs. This study will provide benchmark data for comparing performance of proposed PSMA targeting agents for prostate cancer. PMID:26175541

  7. Multiple scattering of light in a spherical cometary atmosphere with an axisymmetric dust jet. II - Image simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chick, Kenneth M.; Gombosi, Tamas I.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical solution for the multiple light scattering in spherical axisymmetric geometry is applied to the simulation of images of a coma as it would appear to a near-flying satellite such as Giotto. The appearance of symmetric comas and dust jets is examined in detail; the nucleus visibility is studied; the effect of forward scattering is considered; and single and multiple scattering effects are quantified. Attention is given to simulated images of a coma with a hollow cone of dust, as predicted by dust-gas hydrodynamic modeling. The cone's appearance is very similar to the northern area of activity on Comet Halley, observed by the Giotto HMC.

  8. Diffraction image formation in optical systems with polarization aberrations. II - Amplitude response matrices for rotationally symmetric systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, James P., Jr.; Chipman, Russell A.

    1991-01-01

    In the previous paper in this series (McGuire and Chipman, 1990), a formulation was established for the calculation and analysis of diffraction image quality in polarizing optical systems illuminated with partially polarized, partially coherent light. In the present paper, the effect of second- and fourth-order polarization aberrations on the image plane diffraction patterns are examined. The amplitude response matrix is calculated for optical systems with small numerical apertures. Numerical results are presented for optical systems with circular apertures for three of the aberration types.

  9. PICASSO: an end-to-end image simulation tool for space and airborne imaging systems II. Extension to the thermal infrared: equations and methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cota, Stephen A.; Lomheim, Terrence S.; Florio, Christopher J.; Harbold, Jeffrey M.; Muto, B. Michael; Schoolar, Richard B.; Wintz, Daniel T.; Keller, Robert A.

    2011-10-01

    In a previous paper in this series, we described how The Aerospace Corporation's Parameterized Image Chain Analysis & Simulation SOftware (PICASSO) tool may be used to model space and airborne imaging systems operating in the visible to near-infrared (VISNIR). PICASSO is a systems-level tool, representative of a class of such tools used throughout the remote sensing community. It is capable of modeling systems over a wide range of fidelity, anywhere from conceptual design level (where it can serve as an integral part of the systems engineering process) to as-built hardware (where it can serve as part of the verification process). In the present paper, we extend the discussion of PICASSO to the modeling of Thermal Infrared (TIR) remote sensing systems, presenting the equations and methods necessary to modeling in that regime.

  10. The standardised copy of pentagons test

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The 'double-diamond copy' task is a simple paper and pencil test part of the Bender-Gestalt Test and the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). Although it is a widely used test, its method of scoring is crude and its psychometric properties are not adequately known. The aim of the present study was to develop a sensitive and reliable method of administration and scoring. Methods The study sample included 93 normal control subjects (53 women and 40 men) aged 35.87 ± 12.62 and 127 patients suffering from schizophrenia (54 women and 73 men) aged 34.07 ± 9.83. Results The scoring method was based on the frequencies of responses of healthy controls and proved to be relatively reliable with Cronbach's α equal to 0.61, test-retest correlation coefficient equal to 0.41 and inter-rater reliability equal to 0.52. The factor analysis produced two indices and six subscales of the Standardised Copy of Pentagons Test (SCPT). The total score as well as most of the individual items and subscales distinguished between controls and patients. The discriminant function correctly classified 63.44% of controls and 75.59% of patients. Discussion The SCPT seems to be a satisfactory, reliable and valid instrument, which is easy to administer, suitable for use in non-organic psychiatric patients and demands minimal time. Further research is necessary to test its psychometric properties and its usefulness and applications as a neuropsychological test. PMID:21481250

  11. Synthesis and evaluation of a radiolabeled bis-zinc(II)-cyclen complex as a potential probe for in vivo imaging of cell death.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongliang; Wu, Zhifang; Li, Sijin; Hu, Kongzhen; Tang, Ganghua

    2017-04-01

    The exposition of phosphatidylserine (PS) from the cell membrane is associated with most cell death programs (apoptosis, necrosis, autophagy, mitotic catastrophe, etc.), which makes PS an attractive target for overall cell death imaging. To this end, zinc(II) macrocycle coordination complexes with cyclic polyamine units as low-molecular-weight annexin mimics have a selective affinity for biomembrane surfaces enriched with PS, and are therefore useful for detection of cell death. In the present study, a (11)C-labeled zinc(II)-bis(cyclen) complex ((11)C-CyclenZn2) was prepared and evaluated as a new positron emission tomography (PET) probe for cell death imaging. (11)C-CyclenZn2 was synthesized by methylation of its precursor, 4-methoxy-2,5-di-[10-methyl-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7-tricarboxylic acid tri-tert-butyl ester] phenol (Boc-Cyclen2) with (11)C-methyl triflate as a prosthetic group in acetone, deprotection by hydrolysis in aqueous HCl solution, and chelation with zinc nitrate. The cell death imaging capability of (11)C-CyclenZn2 was evaluated using in vitro cell uptake assays with camptothecin-treated PC-3 cells, biodistribution studies, and in vivo PET imaging in Kunming mice bearing S-180 fibrosarcoma. Starting from (11)C-methyl triflate, the total preparation time for (11)C-CyclenZn2 was ~40 min, with an uncorrected radiochemical yield of 12 ± 3% (based on (11)C-CH3OTf, n = 10), a radiochemical purity of greater than 95%, and the specific activity of 0.75-1.01 GBq/μmol. The cell death binding specificity of (11)C-CyclenZn2 was demonstrated by significantly different uptake rates in camptothecin-treated and control PC-3 cells in vitro. Inhibition experiments for (18)F-radiofluorinated Annexin V binding to apoptotic/necrotic cells illustrated the necessity of zinc ions for zinc(II)-bis(cyclen) complexation in binding cell death, and zinc(II)-bis(cyclen) complexe and Annexin V had not identical binding pattern with apoptosis

  12. Theoretical design and material growth of Type-II Antimonide-based superlattices for multi-spectral infrared detection and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Anh Minh

    led to the possibility of incorporating this channel to the multi-spectral detection. By combining with the MWIR channel, dual-band SWIR-MWIR photodiodes and focal plane arrays have been demonstrated, giving the capability of delivering both active and passive imaging in one single camera. Dual-band SWIR-MWIR photodiodes with quantum efficiency more than 50% for each channel has been achieved. Just like visible imaging, besides the available dual-band detection, the prospect of incorporating the third infrared waveband detection is very promising for a wide range of applications. However, the challenges for making such devices are so many that little success has been achieved. In the work, we also propose a new approach in device design to realize bias-selectable three-color shortwave-midwave-longwave infrared photodetector based on InAs/GaSb/AlSb type-II superlattice. The effect of conduction band off-set and different doping levels between two absorption layers are employed to control the turn-on voltage for individual channels. For the first time, we demonstrate experimentally Type-II superlattice based three-color photodiodes without using additional terminal contacts. As the applied bias voltage varies, the photodiodes exhibit sequentially the behavior of three different colors, corresponding to the bandgap of three absorbers. Well defined cut-offs and high quantum efficiency in each channel are achieved. While retaining the simplicity in device fabrication, this demonstration opens the new prospect for three-color infrared imaging. Finally, for further improvement, we are looking toward new type-II material called InAs/InAsSb superlattices. Theoretical design and growth techniques have been developed to investigate the properties of this material. We successfully demonstrated the design and growth of MWIR to VLWIR photodiodes based on Type-II InAs/InAsSb with high performance. Given the fact that these two Type-II material systems share the same GaSb substrate

  13. 99mTc-imidodiphosphonate: a superior radio-pharmaceutical for in vivo positive myocardial infarct imaging. II: Clinical data.

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, S P; Ell, P J; Ross, P; Donaldson, R; Elliott, A T; Brown, N J; Williams, E S

    1978-01-01

    99mTc-Imidodiphosphonate was investigated as a new myocardial infarct imaging agent. In the acute phase, 50 patients admitted to the coronary care unit were serially scanned over a period of 7 days. A mobile gamma camera linked on line to a remote data processor was used. Because of higher uptake in infarcted myocardium and faster blood clearance, superior images than those recorded with 99mTc-pyrophosphate were obtained. Its ease of preparation, low cost, and favourable dosimetry (because of its label with conventional 99mTc) transforms this agent into the present radiopharmaceutical of choice for acute infarct imaging in particular if sizing and follow-up is intended versus time and type of treatment. In this series, no false positive cases were seen. The sensitivity of the method in the detection of full thickness myocardial infarction was 95%. It dropped to 70% in the detection of subendocardial infarction. However, some of these apparent false negative cases may reflect severe ischaemia without infarction. It is postulated that this discrimination may not always be realistic. Images PMID:637976

  14. 38 CFR 1.526 - Copies of records and papers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... papers. 1.526 Section 1.526 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... Copies of records and papers. (a) Any person desiring a copy of any record or document in the custody of... plain one-sided paper copies of a standard size (81/2″ × 11″; 81/2″ × 14″; 11″ × 14″) $0.15 per...

  15. 38 CFR 1.526 - Copies of records and papers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... papers. 1.526 Section 1.526 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... Copies of records and papers. (a) Any person desiring a copy of any record or document in the custody of... plain one-sided paper copies of a standard size (81/2″ × 11″; 81/2″ × 14″; 11″ × 14″) $0.15 per...

  16. 38 CFR 1.526 - Copies of records and papers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... papers. 1.526 Section 1.526 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... Copies of records and papers. (a) Any person desiring a copy of any record or document in the custody of... plain one-sided paper copies of a standard size (81/2″ × 11″; 81/2″ × 14″; 11″ × 14″) $0.15 per...

  17. 40 CFR 716.30 - Submission of copies of studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Submission of copies of studies. 716... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.30 Submission of copies of studies. (a)(1) Except as provided in §§ 716.5, 716.20, and 716.50, persons must send to EPA copies of...

  18. SU-E-J-88: Margin Reduction of Level II/III Planning Target Volume for Image-Guided Simultaneous Integrated Boost Head-And-Neck Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Can, S; Neylon, J; Qi, S; Santhanam, A; Low, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of improved normal tissue sparing for head-and-neck (H'N) image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) by employing tighter CTV-to-PTV margins for target level II/III though a GPU-based deformable image registration and dose accumulation framework. Methods: Ten H'N simultaneous integrated boost cases treated on TomoTherapy were retrospectively analyzed. Weekly kVCT scans in addition to daily MVCT scans were acquired for each patient. Reduced margin plans were generated with 0- mm margin for level II and III PTV (while 3-5 mm margin for PTV1) and compared with the standard margin plan using 3-5mm margin to all CTV1-3 (reference plan). An in-house developed GPU-based 3D image deformation tool was used to register and deform the weekly KVCTs with the planning CT and determine the delivered mean/minimum/maximum dose, dose volume histograms (DVHs), etc. Results: Compared with the reference plans, the averaged cord maximum, the right and left parotid doses reduced by 22.7 %, 16.5 %, and 9 % respectively in the reduced margin plans. The V95 for PTV2 and PTV3 were found within 2 and 5% between the reference and tighter margin plans. For the reduced margin plans, the averaged cumulative mean doses were consistent with the planned dose for PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3 within 1.5%, 1.7% and 1.4%. Similar dose variations of the delivered dose were seen for the reference and tighter margin plans. The delivered maximum and mean doses for the cord were 3.55 % and 2.37% higher than the planned doses; a 5 % higher cumulative mean dose for the parotids was also observed for the delivered dose than the planned doses in both plans. Conclusion: By imposing tighter CTV-to-PTV margins for level II and III targets for H'N irradiation, acceptable cumulative doses were achievable when coupled with weekly kVCT guidance while improving normal structure sparing.

  19. COPI selectively drives maturation of the early Golgi

    PubMed Central

    Papanikou, Effrosyni; Day, Kasey J; Austin, Jotham; Glick, Benjamin S

    2015-01-01

    COPI coated vesicles carry material between Golgi compartments, but the role of COPI in the secretory pathway has been ambiguous. Previous studies of thermosensitive yeast COPI mutants yielded the surprising conclusion that COPI was dispensable both for the secretion of certain proteins and for Golgi cisternal maturation. To revisit these issues, we optimized the anchor-away method, which allows peripheral membrane proteins such as COPI to be sequestered rapidly by adding rapamycin. Video fluorescence microscopy revealed that COPI inactivation causes an early Golgi protein to remain in place while late Golgi proteins undergo cycles of arrival and departure. These dynamics generate partially functional hybrid Golgi structures that contain both early and late Golgi proteins, explaining how secretion can persist when COPI has been inactivated. Our findings suggest that cisternal maturation involves a COPI-dependent pathway that recycles early Golgi proteins, followed by multiple COPI-independent pathways that recycle late Golgi proteins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13232.001 PMID:26709839

  20. Quantification of Fewer than Ten Copies of a DNA Biomarker without Amplification or Labeling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoonhee; Kim, Youngkyu; Lee, Donggyu; Roy, Dhruvajyoti; Park, Joon Won

    2016-06-08

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a highly sensitive diagnosis technique for detection of nucleic acids and for monitoring residual disease; however, PCR can be unreliable for samples containing very few target molecules. Here, we describe a quantification method, using force-distance (FD) curve based atomic force microscopy (AFM) to detect a target DNA bound to small (1.4-1.9 μm diameter) probe DNA spots, allowing mapping of entire spots to nanometer resolution. Using a synthetic BCR-ABL fusion gene sequence target, we examined samples containing between one and 10 target copies. A high degree of correlation (r(2) = 0.994) between numbers of target copies and detected probe clusters was observed, and the approach could detect the BCR-ABL biomarker when only a single copy was present, although multiple screens were required. Our results clearly demonstrate that FD curve-based imaging is suitable for quantitative analysis of fewer than 10 copies of DNA biomarkers without amplification, modification, or labeling.

  1. Bis(o-methylserotonin)-containing iridium(III) and ruthenium(II) complexes as new cellular imaging dyes: synthesis, applications, and photophysical and computational studies.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Cristina; Silva López, Carlos; Faza, Olalla Nieto; Fernández-Lodeiro, Javier; Diniz, Mario; Bastida, Rufina; Capelo, Jose Luis; Lodeiro, Carlos

    2013-08-01

    We report the synthesis, characterization, and scope of a new versatile emissive molecular probe functionalized with a 1,10-phenanthroline moiety containing methylserotonin groups as binding sites for metal ion recognition. The synthesis, characterization, and evaluation of the in vitro imaging capability of the iridium(III) and ruthenium(II) complexes [Ir(ppy)2(N-N)](+) and [Ru(bpy)2(N-N)](2+), in which ppy is 2-phenylpyridine, bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine, and N-N is a 1,10-phenanthroline ligand functionalized with two methylserotonin groups to serve as binding sites for metal ion recognition, is reported. The uptake of these compounds by living freshwater fish (Carassius auratus) was studied by fluorescence microscopy, and the cytotoxicity of ligand N-N and [Ru(bpy)2(N-N)](2+) in this species was also investigated.

  2. An amphiphilic ruthenium(II)-polypyridyl appended porphyrin as potential bifunctional two-photon tumor-imaging and photodynamic therapeutic agent.

    PubMed

    Poon, Chun-Ting; Chan, Pui-Shan; Man, Cornelia; Jiang, Feng-Lei; Wong, Ricky Ngok Shun; Mak, Nai-Ki; Kwong, Daniel W J; Tsao, Sai-Wah; Wong, Wai-Kwok

    2010-01-01

    An amphiphilic porphyrin appended with a Ru(II)-polypyridyl complex (Ru-P) showing a moderate two-photon absorption cross-section (178.0+/-26.8GM), high singlet oxygen quantum yield and rapid cellular uptake was synthesized. In vitro study using human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells showed that Ru-P exhibited a strong two-photon induced fluorescence upon uptake, lysosomal localization and potent two-photon induced cytotoxicity. These results show that Ru-P, which was designed to enhance its cellular uptake, can potentially be used as an efficacious bifunctional two-photon tumor-imaging and photodynamic therapeutic agent despite its moderate two-photon absorption cross-section.

  3. Noninvasive positron emission tomography imaging of cell death using a novel small-molecule probe, (18)F labeled bis(zinc(II)-dipicolylamine) complex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongliang; Tang, Xiaolan; Tang, Ganghua; Huang, Tingting; Liang, Xiang; Hu, Kongzhen; Deng, Huaifu; Yi, Chang; Shi, Xinchong; Wu, Kening

    2013-08-01

    The synthetic bis(zinc(II)-dipicolylamine) (DPAZn2) coordination complexes are known to have a high specific and selective affinity to target the exposed phosphatidylserine (PS) on the surface of dead and dying cells. An (18)F-labeled DPAZn2 complex (4-(18)F-Fluoro-benzoyl-bis(zinc(II)-dipicolylamine), (18)F-FB-DPAZn2) as positron emission tomography (PET) tracer was developed and evaluated for in vivo imaging of tumor treated with a chemical agent. The in vitro cell stain studies revealed that fluorescent DPAZn2 complexes (Dansyl-DPAZn2) stained the same cells (apoptotic and necrotic cells) as fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled Annexin V (FITC-Annexin V). The radiosynthesis of (18)F-FB-DPAZn2 was achieved through the amidation the precursor bis(2,2'-dipicolylamine) derivative (DPA2) with the prosthetic group N-succinimidyl-4-[(18)F]-fluorobenzoate ((18)F-SFB) and chelation with zinc nitrate. In the biodistribution study, the fast clearance of (18)F-FB-DPAZn2 from blood and kidney was observed and high uptake in liver and intestine within 90 min postinjection was also found. For the PET imaging, significantly higher tumor uptake of (18)F-FB-DPAZn2 was observed in the adriamycin (ADM)-treated Hepa1-6 hepatocellular carcinoma-bearing mice than that in the untreated tumor-model mice, while a slightly decreased tumor uptake of (18)F-FDG was found in the ADM-treated tumor-bearing mice. The results indicate that (18)F-FB-DPAZn2 has the similar capability of apoptosis detection as FITC-Annexin V and seems to be a potential PET tracer for noninvasive evaluation and monitoring of anti-tumor chemotherapy. The high uptake of (18)F-FB-DPAZn2 in the abdomen needs to optimize the structure for improving its pharmacokinetics characteristics in the future work.

  4. Coumarin-Based Fluorescent Probes for Dual Recognition of Copper(II) and Iron(III) Ions and Their Application in Bio-Imaging

    PubMed Central

    García-Beltrán, Olimpo; Cassels, Bruce K.; Pérez, Claudio; Mena, Natalia; Núñez, Marco T.; Martínez, Natalia P.; Pavez, Paulina; Aliaga, Margarita E.

    2014-01-01

    Two new coumarin-based “turn-off” fluorescent probes, (E)-3-((3,4-dihydroxybenzylidene)amino)-7-hydroxy-2H-chromen-2-one (BS1) and (E)-3-((2,4-dihydroxybenzylidene)amino)-7-hydroxy-2H-chromen-2-one (BS2), were synthesized and their detection of copper(II) and iron(III) ions was studied. Results show that both compounds are highly selective for Cu2+ and Fe3+ ions over other metal ions. However, BS2 is detected directly, while detection of BS1 involves a hydrolysis reaction to regenerate 3-amino-7-hydroxycoumarin (3) and 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde, of which 3 is able to react with copper(II) or iron(III) ions. The interaction between the tested compounds and copper or iron ions is associated with a large fluorescence decrease, showing detection limits of ca. 10−5 M. Preliminary studies employing epifluorescence microscopy demonstrate that Cu2+ and Fe3+ ions can be imaged in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells treated with the tested probes. PMID:24419164

  5. Ru(ii)-polypyridyl surface functionalised gold nanoparticles as DNA targeting supramolecular structures and luminescent cellular imaging agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Calvo, Miguel; Orange, Kim N.; Elmes, Robert B. P.; La Cour Poulsen, Bjørn; Williams, D. Clive; Gunnlaugsson, Thorfinnur

    2015-12-01

    The development of Ru(ii) functionalized gold nanoparticles 1-3.AuNP is described. These systems were found to be mono-disperse with a hydrodynamic radius of ca. 15 nm in water but gave rise to the formation of higher order structures in buffered solution. The interaction of 1-3.AuNP with DNA was also studied by spectroscopic and microscopic methods and suggested the formation of large self-assembly structures in solution. The uptake of 1-3.AuNP by cancer cells was studied using both confocal fluorescence as well as transmission electron microscopy (TEM), with the aim of investigating their potential as tools for cellular biology. These systems displaying a non-toxic profile with favourable photophysical properties may have application across various biological fields including diagnostics and therapeutics.The development of Ru(ii) functionalized gold nanoparticles 1-3.AuNP is described. These systems were found to be mono-disperse with a hydrodynamic radius of ca. 15 nm in water but gave rise to the formation of higher order structures in buffered solution. The interaction of 1-3.AuNP with DNA was also studied by spectroscopic and microscopic methods and suggested the formation of large self-assembly structures in solution. The uptake of 1-3.AuNP by cancer cells was studied using both confocal fluorescence as well as transmission electron microscopy (TEM), with the aim of investigating their potential as tools for cellular biology. These systems displaying a non-toxic profile with favourable photophysical properties may have application across various biological fields including diagnostics and therapeutics. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05598a

  6. From the meso to the nanoscopic scale through synchrotron imaging approaches: advances and near future at the NSLS-II SRX beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Andrade, V.; Thieme, J.; Ganne, J.; Beck, P.; Fayard, B.; Salomé, M.

    2012-12-01

    instrument for Earth Sciences. SRX is one of the first 6 project beamlines of the new National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II). Operating from 4.65 to 28 keV, SRX will comprise a high flux station and a nanoprobe (switchable within a couple of minutes), both operating with a world leading flux. SRX will start early science experiments in spring 2014. References [1] De Andrade, V., Susini, et al., "Submicrometer Hyperspectral X-ray Imaging of Heterogeneous Rocks and Geomaterials: Applications at the Fe K-Edge," Analytical Chemistry, 83(11), 4220-4227 (2011). [2] Beck P., De Andrade V., et al., "The redox state of iron in the matrix of CI, CM and metamorphosed CM chondrites by XANES spectroscopy". In press GCA. [3] Ganne J., De Andrade, et al., "Modern-style plate subduction and HP-LT rocks preserved in the Palaeoproterozoic West African Craton," Nature Geosciences, 5, 60-65, (2012). [4] De Andrade V., Thieme, J, et al., "The sub-micron resolution X-ray spectroscopy beamline at NSLS-II", Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A, 649(1), 46-48 (2011).

  7. CT and MR imaging patterns for pancreatic carcinoma invading the extrapancreatic neural plexus (Part II): Imaging of pancreatic carcinoma nerve invasion

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Hou-Dong; Tang, Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Qiong-Hui; Xiao, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are excellent modalities which have the ability to detect, depict and stage the nerve invasion associated with pancreatic carcinoma. The aim of this article is to review the CT and MR patterns of pancreatic carcinoma invading the extrapancreatic neural plexus and thus provide useful information which could help the choice of treatment methods. Pancreatic carcinoma is a common malignant neoplasm with a high mortality rate. There are many factors influencing the prognosis and treatment options for those patients suffering from pancreatic carcinoma, such as lymphatic metastasis, adjacent organs or tissue invasion, etc. Among these factors, extrapancreatic neural plexus invasion is recognized as an important factor when considering the management of the patients. PMID:22328967

  8. Intraoperative diffusion-weighted imaging for visualization of the pyramidal tracts. Part II: clinical study of usefulness and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, N; Muragaki, Y; Nakamura, R; Lseki, H

    2008-04-01

    Precise identification and preservation of the pyramidal tract during surgery for parenchymal brain tumors is of crucial importance for the avoidance of postoperative deterioration of the motor function. The technique of intraoperative diffusion-weighted imaging (iDWI) using an intraoperative MR scanner of low magnetic field strength (0.3 Tesla) has been developed. Its clinical usefulness and efficacy were evaluated in 10 surgically treated patients with gliomas (5 men and 5 women, mean age: 41.2+/-13.9 years). iDWI permitted visualization of the pyramidal tract on the non-affected side in all 10 cases, and on the affected side in 8 cases. Motion artifacts were observed in four patients, but were not an obstacle to identification of the pyramidal tract. Good correspondence of the anatomical landmarks localization on iDWI and T (1)-weighted imaging was found. All participating neurosurgeons agreed that, in the majority of cases, iDWI was very useful for localization of the pyramidal tract and for clarification of its spatial relationships with the tumor. In conclusion, image quality and accuracy of the iDWI obtained with an MR scanner of low magnetic field strength (0.3 Tesla) are sufficient for possible incorporation into an intraoperative neuronavigation system. The use of iDWI in addition to structural iMRl and subcortical functional mapping with electrical stimulation can potentially result in a reduction of the postoperative morbidity after aggressive surgical removal of lesions located in the vicinity to the motor white matter tracts.

  9. Clinical, imaging, and immunohistochemical characteristics of focal cortical dysplasia Type II extratemporal epilepsies in children: analyses of an institutional case series.

    PubMed

    Knerlich-Lukoschus, Friederike; Connolly, Mary B; Hendson, Glenda; Steinbok, Paul; Dunham, Christopher

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) Type II is divided into 2 subgroups based on the absence (IIA) or presence (IIB) of balloon cells. In particular, extratemporal FCD Type IIA and IIB is not completely understood in terms of clinical, imaging, biological, and neuropathological differences. The aim of the authors was to analyze distinctions between these 2 formal entities and address clinical, MRI, and immunohistochemical features of extratemporal epilepsies in children. METHODS Cases formerly classified as Palmini FCD Type II nontemporal epilepsies were identified through the prospectively maintained epilepsy database at the British Columbia Children's Hospital in Vancouver, Canada. Clinical data, including age of seizure onset, age at surgery, seizure type(s) and frequency, affected brain region(s), intraoperative electrocorticographic findings, and outcome defined by Engel's classification were obtained for each patient. Preoperative and postoperative MRI results were reevaluated. H & E-stained tissue sections were reevaluated by using the 2011 International League Against Epilepsy classification system and additional immunostaining for standard cellular markers (neuronal nuclei, neurofilament, glial fibrillary acidic protein, CD68). Two additional established markers of pathology in epilepsy resection, namely, CD34 and α-B crystallin, were applied. RESULTS Seven nontemporal FCD Type IIA and 7 Type B cases were included. Patients with FCD Type IIA presented with an earlier age of epilepsy onset and slightly better Engel outcome. Radiology distinguished FCD Types IIA and IIB, in that Type IIB presented more frequently with characteristic cortical alterations. Nonphosphorylated neurofilament protein staining confirmed dysplastic cells in dyslaminated areas. The white-gray matter junction was focally blurred in patients with FCD Type IIB. α-B crystallin highlighted glial cells in the white matter and subpial layer with either of the 2 FCD Type II subtypes

  10. Schizophrenia copy number variants and associative learning.

    PubMed

    Clifton, N E; Pocklington, A J; Scholz, B; Rees, E; Walters, J T R; Kirov, G; O'Donovan, M C; Owen, M J; Wilkinson, L S; Thomas, K L; Hall, J

    2017-02-01

    Large-scale genomic studies have made major progress in identifying genetic risk variants for schizophrenia. A key finding from these studies is that there is an increased burden of genomic copy number variants (CNVs) in schizophrenia cases compared with controls. The mechanism through which these CNVs confer risk for the symptoms of schizophrenia, however, remains unclear. One possibility is that schizophrenia risk CNVs impact basic associative learning processes, abnormalities of which have long been associated with the disorder. To investigate whether genes in schizophrenia CNVs impact on specific phases of associative learning we combined human genetics with experimental gene expression studies in animals. In a sample of 11 917 schizophrenia cases and 16 416 controls, we investigated whether CNVs from patients with schizophrenia are enriched for genes expressed during the consolidation, retrieval or extinction of associative memories. We show that CNVs from cases are enriched for genes expressed during fear extinction in the hippocampus, but not genes expressed following consolidation or retrieval. These results suggest that CNVs act to impair inhibitory learning in schizophrenia, potentially contributing to the development of core symptoms of the disorder.

  11. Schizophrenia copy number variants and associative learning

    PubMed Central

    Clifton, N E; Pocklington, A J; Scholz, B; Rees, E; Walters, J T R; Kirov, G; O'Donovan, M C; Owen, M J; Wilkinson, L S; Thomas, K L; Hall, J

    2017-01-01

    Large-scale genomic studies have made major progress in identifying genetic risk variants for schizophrenia. A key finding from these studies is that there is an increased burden of genomic copy number variants (CNVs) in schizophrenia cases compared with controls. The mechanism through which these CNVs confer risk for the symptoms of schizophrenia, however, remains unclear. One possibility is that schizophrenia risk CNVs impact basic associative learning processes, abnormalities of which have long been associated with the disorder. To investigate whether genes in schizophrenia CNVs impact on specific phases of associative learning we combined human genetics with experimental gene expression studies in animals. In a sample of 11 917 schizophrenia cases and 16 416 controls, we investigated whether CNVs from patients with schizophrenia are enriched for genes expressed during the consolidation, retrieval or extinction of associative memories. We show that CNVs from cases are enriched for genes expressed during fear extinction in the hippocampus, but not genes expressed following consolidation or retrieval. These results suggest that CNVs act to impair inhibitory learning in schizophrenia, potentially contributing to the development of core symptoms of the disorder. PMID:27956746

  12. 48 CFR 6302.25 - Copies of papers (Rule 25).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Copies of papers (Rule 25). 6302.25 Section 6302.25 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BOARD OF CONTRACT APPEALS RULES OF PROCEDURE 6302.25 Copies of papers (Rule 25). When books, records, papers,...

  13. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Copy photo: Albern Color Research, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Copy photo: Albern Color Research, Inc., Philadelphia, July 1960 COPY OF A PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN ca. 1904 SHOWING PART OF THE ENFIELD, NEW HAMPSHIRE SHAKER COMMUNITY WITH THE GREAT STONE HOUSE IN THE CENTER - Shaker Church Family General Views, State Route 4A, Enfield, Grafton County, NH

  14. An Evidence-Informed Picture of Course-Related Copying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Rumi

    2016-01-01

    Recent changes in Canadian copyright law have prompted Canada's educational institutions to reexamine their need for a blanket copying license. Users' rights under the amended Copyright Act now include fair dealing for purposes of education, and the Supreme Court has established that copying short excerpts for classroom use can qualify as fair…

  15. 28. Photographic copy of original construction drawing, dated May 22, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Photographic copy of original construction drawing, dated May 22, 1951 (from paper copy at Engineer Flight, Ellsworth Air Force Base, SD). Readiness hangar architectural : building sections & details. - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Readiness Hangar, Kenny Road, southeast corner of interstction with G Avenue, Blackhawk, Meade County, SD

  16. 48 CFR 6302.25 - Copies of papers (Rule 25).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Copies of papers (Rule 25). 6302.25 Section 6302.25 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BOARD OF CONTRACT APPEALS RULES OF PROCEDURE 6302.25 Copies of papers (Rule 25). When books, records, papers,...

  17. 7 CFR 510.2 - Public inspection, copying, and indexing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Public inspection, copying, and indexing. 510.2 Section 510.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PUBLIC INFORMATION § 510.2 Public inspection, copying, and indexing....

  18. 7 CFR 3701.2 - Public inspection, copying, and indexing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Public inspection, copying, and indexing. 3701.2 Section 3701.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ECONOMIC RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PUBLIC INFORMATION § 3701.2 Public inspection, copying, and indexing....

  19. 7 CFR 3404.2 - Public inspection, copying, and indexing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Public inspection, copying, and indexing. 3404.2 Section 3404.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE... inspection, copying, and indexing. 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(2) requires that certain materials be made available...

  20. 7 CFR 3801.2 - Public inspection, copying, and indexing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Public inspection, copying, and indexing. 3801.2 Section 3801.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) WORLD AGRICULTURAL... inspection, copying, and indexing. 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(2) requires that certain materials be made available...

  1. 45 CFR 1703.404 - Copying and transcription charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Copying and transcription charges. 1703.404... Copying and transcription charges. (a) The Commission will charge fees for furnishing records at the rate of ten cents per page for photocopies and at the actual cost of transcription. When the...

  2. 40 CFR 716.30 - Submission of copies of studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Submission of copies of studies. 716.30 Section 716.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.30 Submission of copies...

  3. 37 CFR 1.95 - Copies of exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES National Processing Provisions Models, Exhibits, Specimens § 1.95 Copies of exhibits. Copies of models or other physical exhibits will not ordinarily be furnished by the Office, and any model or exhibit in an application or patent shall not be taken from...

  4. 37 CFR 1.95 - Copies of exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES National Processing Provisions Models, Exhibits, Specimens § 1.95 Copies of exhibits. Copies of models or other physical exhibits will not ordinarily be furnished by the Office, and any model or exhibit in an application or patent shall not be taken from...

  5. 17. Photocopy of copy of drawing of Hangar 1301, dated ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Photocopy of copy of drawing of Hangar 1301, dated June 15, 1944. Copy of drawing stored at 436 Civil Engineer Squadron, Design Management Element Cece, 600 8th Street, Dover Air Force Base, DE - Dover Air Force Base, Hangar No. 1301, Dover, Kent County, DE

  6. 18. Photocopy of copy of drawing of boiler plant and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Photocopy of copy of drawing of boiler plant and shops building, dated June 15, 1944. Copy of drawing stored at 436 Civil Engineer Squadron, Design Management Element Cece, 600 8th Street, Dover AFB, DE - Dover Air Force Base, Hangar No. 1301, Dover, Kent County, DE

  7. 30 CFR 47.72 - Cost for copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cost for copies. 47.72 Section 47.72 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Making HazCom Information Available § 47.72 Cost for copies. (a) The operator...

  8. 30 CFR 47.72 - Cost for copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cost for copies. 47.72 Section 47.72 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Making HazCom Information Available § 47.72 Cost for copies. (a) The operator...

  9. 30 CFR 47.72 - Cost for copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cost for copies. 47.72 Section 47.72 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Making HazCom Information Available § 47.72 Cost for copies. (a) The operator...

  10. 48 CFR 6302.25 - Copies of papers (Rule 25).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Copies of papers (Rule 25). 6302.25 Section 6302.25 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BOARD OF CONTRACT APPEALS RULES OF PROCEDURE 6302.25 Copies of papers (Rule 25). When books, records, papers,...

  11. 48 CFR 6302.25 - Copies of papers (Rule 25).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Copies of papers (Rule 25). 6302.25 Section 6302.25 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BOARD OF CONTRACT APPEALS RULES OF PROCEDURE 6302.25 Copies of papers (Rule 25). When books, records, papers,...

  12. 48 CFR 6302.25 - Copies of papers (Rule 25).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Copies of papers (Rule 25). 6302.25 Section 6302.25 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BOARD OF CONTRACT APPEALS RULES OF PROCEDURE 6302.25 Copies of papers (Rule 25). When books, records, papers,...

  13. Perceiving the Impossible: How Individuals with Autism Copy Paradoxical Figures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, Elizabeth; Ropar, Danielle; Mitchell, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Mottron and colleagues found that individuals with autism were less affected by geometric impossibility than comparison participants on a copying task. The current experiment sought to determine whether a local perceptual style could account for this. Participants with and without autism copied possible and impossible geometric figures. Geometric…

  14. 36 CFR 1254.60 - What are NARA's copying services?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are NARA's copying services? 1254.60 Section 1254.60 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION PUBLIC AVAILABILITY AND USE USING RECORDS AND DONATED HISTORICAL MATERIALS Copying...

  15. 36 CFR 1254.64 - Will NARA certify copies?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Will NARA certify copies? 1254.64 Section 1254.64 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION PUBLIC AVAILABILITY AND USE USING RECORDS AND DONATED HISTORICAL MATERIALS Copying...

  16. 36 CFR 1254.60 - What are NARA's copying services?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What are NARA's copying services? 1254.60 Section 1254.60 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION PUBLIC AVAILABILITY AND USE USING RECORDS AND DONATED HISTORICAL MATERIALS Copying...

  17. 36 CFR 1254.64 - Will NARA certify copies?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Will NARA certify copies? 1254.64 Section 1254.64 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION PUBLIC AVAILABILITY AND USE USING RECORDS AND DONATED HISTORICAL MATERIALS Copying...

  18. 25 CFR 571.13 - Copies of audit reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .../or reports as a result of the audit setting forth the results of each fiscal year. The submission... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Copies of audit reports. 571.13 Section 571.13 Indians... MONITORING AND INVESTIGATIONS Audits § 571.13 Copies of audit reports. (a) Each tribe shall prepare...

  19. 47 CFR 3.25 - Number of copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... AUTHORITIES IN MARITIME AND MARITIME MOBILE-SATELLITE RADIO SERVICES Application Procedures § 3.25 Number of copies. One original and one copy of FCC Form 44, “Application For Certification As An Accounting Authority” will be required. Only applications mailed to the Commission on official, Commission...

  20. 47 CFR 3.25 - Number of copies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... AUTHORITIES IN MARITIME AND MARITIME MOBILE-SATELLITE RADIO SERVICES Application Procedures § 3.25 Number of copies. One original and one copy of FCC Form 44, “Application For Certification As An Accounting Authority” will be required. Only applications mailed to the Commission on official, Commission...

  1. 9. Photographic copy of USRS design drawing, April 1906 (from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Photographic copy of USRS design drawing, April 1906 (from duplicate copy on file at United States Bureau of Reclamation, Denver Service Center, Denver, Colorado). Main canal diversion weir from Salmon River - Salmon Creek Diversion Dam, Salmon Creek, Okanogan, Okanogan County, WA

  2. 7 CFR 3601.2 - Public inspection, copying, and indexing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Public inspection, copying, and indexing. 3601.2 Section 3601.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PUBLIC INFORMATION § 3601.2 Public inspection, copying,...

  3. 7 CFR 3601.2 - Public inspection, copying, and indexing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Public inspection, copying, and indexing. 3601.2 Section 3601.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PUBLIC INFORMATION § 3601.2 Public inspection, copying,...

  4. 7 CFR 3601.2 - Public inspection, copying, and indexing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Public inspection, copying, and indexing. 3601.2 Section 3601.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PUBLIC INFORMATION § 3601.2 Public inspection, copying,...

  5. 8. PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY OF AERIAL PHOTOGRAPH, DATED CA. 19201925, FORT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY OF AERIAL PHOTOGRAPH, DATED CA. 1920-1925, FORT BLISS, ARROW POINTS TO 7TH CAVALRY CANTONMENT, COPY ON FILE IN THE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE, FORT BLISS - Fort Bliss, 7th Cavalry Buildings, U.S. Army Air Defence Artillery Center & Fort Bliss, El Paso, El Paso County, TX

  6. 6. PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY OF ORIGINAL CONSTRUCTION DRAWING, DATED MAY 15, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY OF ORIGINAL CONSTRUCTION DRAWING, DATED MAY 15, 1919, 7TH CAVALRY CANTONMENT POST EXCHANGE, WAR DEPARTMENT, CONSTRUCTION DIVISION, PLAN No. 357, COPY ON FILE IN THE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE, FORT BLISS - Fort Bliss, 7th Cavalry Buildings, U.S. Army Air Defence Artillery Center & Fort Bliss, El Paso, El Paso County, TX

  7. 5. PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY OF ORIGINAL CONSTRUCTION DRAWING, DATED JUNE 14, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY OF ORIGINAL CONSTRUCTION DRAWING, DATED JUNE 14, 1919, 7TH CAVALRY CANTONMENT MESS BUILDING, WAR DEPARTMENT, CONSTRUCTION DIVISION, PLAN No. 316A, COPY ON FILE IN THE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE, FORT BLISS - Fort Bliss, 7th Cavalry Buildings, U.S. Army Air Defence Artillery Center & Fort Bliss, El Paso, El Paso County, TX

  8. 4. PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY OF ORIGINAL CONSTRUCTION DRAWING, DATED MAY 13, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY OF ORIGINAL CONSTRUCTION DRAWING, DATED MAY 13, 1919, DETACHMENT BARRACK WITHOUT MESS, WAR DEPARTMENT, CONSTRUCTION DIVISION, PLAN # 353, COPY ON FILE IN THE ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE, FORT BLISS - Fort Bliss, 7th Cavalry Buildings, U.S. Army Air Defence Artillery Center & Fort Bliss, El Paso, El Paso County, TX

  9. 52. Photocopy of copy of original Officers' Duplex Quarters drawing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. Photocopy of copy of original Officers' Duplex Quarters drawing by Copeland, 7 April 1932 (Original in possession of Veterans Administration, Wichita, Kansas, copy at Ablah Library, Wichita State University). Heating - Veterans Administration Center, Officers Duplex Quarters, 5302 East Kellogg (Legal Address); 5500 East Kellogg (Common Address), Wichita, Sedgwick County, KS

  10. 20. Photographic copy of the original construction drawing, 193031, by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Photographic copy of the original construction drawing, 1930-31, by Sverdrup and Parcel, Consulting Engineers, from microfilm copy at Bridge Division, Missouri Highway and Transportation Department, Jefferson City, Missouri. Truss stress diagram, and plans of laterals and sway braces - Gasconade Bridge, Spanning Gasconade River at State Route 100, Gasconade, Gasconade County, MO

  11. 41. Photographic copy of the original construction drawing, 192627, by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. Photographic copy of the original construction drawing, 1926-27, by Harrington, Howard, and Ash, Consulting Engineers, from microfilm copy at Bridge Division, Missouri Highway and Transportation Department, Jefferson City, Missouri. STRESS SHEET - Cape Girardeau Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River at State Highway 146, Cape Girardeau, Cape Girardeau County, MO

  12. 37. Photographic copy of the original construction drawing, 1934, by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. Photographic copy of the original construction drawing, 1934, by Sverdrup and Parcel, Consulting Engineers, from microfilm copy at Bridge Division, Missouri Highway and Transportation Department. Stress sheet, continuous span - Mark Twain Memorial Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River at US Route 36, Hannibal, Marion County, MO

  13. 53. Photocopy of copy of original Officers' Duplex Quarters drawing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. Photocopy of copy of original Officers' Duplex Quarters drawing by A.G.D., 7 April 1932 (original in possession of Veterans Administration, Wichita, Kansas, copy at Ablah Library, Wichita State University). Electrical - Veterans Administration Center, Officers Duplex Quarters, 5302 East Kellogg (Legal Address); 5500 East Kellogg (Common Address), Wichita, Sedgwick County, KS

  14. Vocal copying of individually distinctive signature whistles in bottlenose dolphins

    PubMed Central

    King, Stephanie L.; Sayigh, Laela S.; Wells, Randall S.; Fellner, Wendi; Janik, Vincent M.

    2013-01-01

    Vocal learning is relatively common in birds but less so in mammals. Sexual selection and individual or group recognition have been identified as major forces in its evolution. While important in the development of vocal displays, vocal learning also allows signal copying in social interactions. Such copying can function in addressing or labelling selected conspecifics. Most examples of addressing in non-humans come from bird song, where matching occurs in an aggressive context. However, in other animals, addressing with learned signals is very much an affiliative signal. We studied the function of vocal copying in a mammal that shows vocal learning as well as complex cognitive and social behaviour, the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus). Copying occurred almost exclusively between close associates such as mother–calf pairs and male alliances during separation and was not followed by aggression. All copies were clearly recognizable as such because copiers consistently modified some acoustic parameters of a signal when copying it. We found no evidence for the use of copying in aggression or deception. This use of vocal copying is similar to its use in human language, where the maintenance of social bonds appears to be more important than the immediate defence of resources. PMID:23427174

  15. 6. Photo copy of photograph, (original owned by Mary Gaudineer, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photo copy of photograph, (original owned by Mary Gaudineer, Beckley, WV, copy at National Forest Office, Elkins, WV), Don Gaudineer, 1934. CONSTRUCTION OF FERNOW EXPERIMENTAL FOREST BUNKHOUSE AND GARAGE. (see also historic photograph WV-237-13) - Parsons Nursery, Fernow Experimental Forest Residence, South side of U.S. Route 219, Parsons, Tucker County, WV

  16. 48. Photographic copy of the original construction drawing, 192627, by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. Photographic copy of the original construction drawing, 1926-27, by Harrington, Howard, and Ash, Consulting Engineers, from microfilm copy at Bridge Division, Missouri Highway and Transportation Department, Jefferson City, Missouri. 671 FT. SPAN, JOINTS L9 TO L12 - Cape Girardeau Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River at State Highway 146, Cape Girardeau, Cape Girardeau County, MO

  17. 54. Photographic copy of the original construction drawing, 192627, by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. Photographic copy of the original construction drawing, 1926-27, by Harrington, Howard, and Ash, Consulting Engineers, from microfilm copy at Bridge Division, Missouri Highway and Transportation Department, Jefferson City, Missouri. 671 FT. SPAN, JOINTS U13 TO U16 - Cape Girardeau Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River at State Highway 146, Cape Girardeau, Cape Girardeau County, MO

  18. 49. Photographic copy of the original construction drawing, 192627, by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. Photographic copy of the original construction drawing, 1926-27, by Harrington, Howard, and Ash, Consulting Engineers, from microfilm copy at Bridge Division, Missouri Highway and Transportation Department, Jefferson City, Missouri. 671 FT. SPAN, JOINTS L13 TO L16 - Cape Girardeau Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River at State Highway 146, Cape Girardeau, Cape Girardeau County, MO

  19. 55. Photographic copy of the original construction drawing, 192627, by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. Photographic copy of the original construction drawing, 1926-27, by Harrington, Howard, and Ash, Consulting Engineers, from microfilm copy at Bridge Division, Missouri Highway and Transportation Department, Jefferson City, Missouri. 671 FT. SPAN, JOINTS U17 TO U20 - Cape Girardeau Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River at State Highway 146, Cape Girardeau, Cape Girardeau County, MO

  20. 47. Photographic copy of the original construction drawing, 192627, by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. Photographic copy of the original construction drawing, 1926-27, by Harrington, Howard, and Ash, Consulting Engineers, from microfilm copy at Bridge Division, Missouri Highway and Transportation Department, Jefferson City, Missouri. 671 FT. SPAN, JOINTS L5 TO L8 - Cape Girardeau Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River at State Highway 146, Cape Girardeau, Cape Girardeau County, MO

  1. 51. Photographic copy of the original construction drawing, 192627, by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. Photographic copy of the original construction drawing, 1926-27, by Harrington, Howard, and Ash, Consulting Engineers, from microfilm copy at Bridge Division, Missouri Highway and Transportation Department, Jefferson City, Missouri. 671 FT. SPAN, JOINTS L0, U2 TO U4, PORTAL AT U2 - Cape Girardeau Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River at State Highway 146, Cape Girardeau, Cape Girardeau County, MO

  2. 50. Photographic copy of the original construction drawing, 192627, by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. Photographic copy of the original construction drawing, 1926-27, by Harrington, Howard, and Ash, Consulting Engineers, from microfilm copy at Bridge Division, Missouri Highway and Transportation Department, Jefferson City, Missouri. 671 FT. SPAN, JOINTS L17 TO L20 - Cape Girardeau Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River at State Highway 146, Cape Girardeau, Cape Girardeau County, MO

  3. 53. Photographic copy of the original construction drawing, 192627, by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. Photographic copy of the original construction drawing, 1926-27, by Harrington, Howard, and Ash, Consulting Engineers, from microfilm copy at Bridge Division, Missouri Highway and Transportation Department, Jefferson City, Missouri. 671 FT. SPAN, JOINTS U9 TO U12 - Cape Girardeau Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River at State Highway 146, Cape Girardeau, Cape Girardeau County, MO

  4. 52. Photographic copy of the original construction drawing, 192627, by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. Photographic copy of the original construction drawing, 1926-27, by Harrington, Howard, and Ash, Consulting Engineers, from microfilm copy at Bridge Division, Missouri Highway and Transportation Department, Jefferson City, Missouri. 671 FT. SPAN, JOINTS U5 TO U8 - Cape Girardeau Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River at State Highway 146, Cape Girardeau, Cape Girardeau County, MO

  5. 46. Photographic copy of the original construction drawing, 192627, by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. Photographic copy of the original construction drawing, 1926-27, by Harrington, Howard, and Ash, Consulting Engineers, from microfilm copy at Bridge Division, Missouri Highway and Transportation Department, Jefferson City, Missouri. 671 FT. SPAN, JOINTS L1 TO L4 - Cape Girardeau Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River at State Highway 146, Cape Girardeau, Cape Girardeau County, MO

  6. 47 CFR 78.67 - Copies of rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Copies of rules. 78.67 Section 78.67 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES CABLE TELEVISION RELAY SERVICE General Operating Requirements § 78.67 Copies of rules. The licensee of a CARS station shall...

  7. 47 CFR 78.67 - Copies of rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Copies of rules. 78.67 Section 78.67 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES CABLE TELEVISION RELAY SERVICE General Operating Requirements § 78.67 Copies of rules. The licensee of a CARS station shall...

  8. 47 CFR 78.67 - Copies of rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Copies of rules. 78.67 Section 78.67 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES CABLE TELEVISION RELAY SERVICE General Operating Requirements § 78.67 Copies of rules. The licensee of a CARS station shall...

  9. 47 CFR 78.67 - Copies of rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Copies of rules. 78.67 Section 78.67 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES CABLE TELEVISION RELAY SERVICE General Operating Requirements § 78.67 Copies of rules. The licensee of a CARS station shall...

  10. 47 CFR 78.67 - Copies of rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Copies of rules. 78.67 Section 78.67 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES CABLE TELEVISION RELAY SERVICE General Operating Requirements § 78.67 Copies of rules. The licensee of a CARS station shall...

  11. 44. Photographic copy of the original construction drawing, 192627, by ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. Photographic copy of the original construction drawing, 1926-27, by Harrington, Howard, and Ash, Consulting Engineers, from microfilm copy at Bridge Division, Missouri Highway and Transportation Department, Jefferson City, Missouri. 671 FT. SPAN, SHOES - Cape Girardeau Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River at State Highway 146, Cape Girardeau, Cape Girardeau County, MO

  12. 7 CFR 370.4 - Facilities for inspection and copying.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 370.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... copying. Facilities for public inspection and copying of the index and materials required to be made... Information Act Coordinator, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Legislative and Public...

  13. Digital Copy of the Pulkovo Plate Collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaev, I.; Kanaeva, N.; Poliakow, E.; Pugatch, T.

    Report is devoted to a problem of saving of the Pulkovo plate collection. In total more than 50 thousand astronegatives are stored in the observatory. First of them are dated back to 1893. A risk of emulsion corrupting raises with current of time. Since 1996 the operation on digitization and record of the images of plates on electronic media (HDD, CD) are carried out in the observatory. The database ECSIP - Electronic Collection of the Star Images of the Pulkovo is created. There are recorded in it both complete, and extracted (separate areas) images of astronegatives. The plates as a whole are scanned on the photoscanner with rather rough optical resolution 600-2400 dpi. The matrixes with the separate images are digitized on the precision measuring machine "Fantasy" with high (6000-25400 dpi) resolution. The DB ECSIP allows to accept and to store different types of data of a matrix structure, including, CCD-frames. Structure of the ECSIP's software includes systems of visualization, processing and manipulation by the images, and also programs for position and photometric measurements. To the present time more than 40% completed and 10% extracted images from its total amount are digitized and recorded in DB ECSIP. The project is fulfilled at financial support by the Ministry of Science of Russian Federation, grant 01-54 "The coordinate -measuring astrographic machine "Fantasy".

  14. Ultrasensitive and selective gold film-based detection of mercury (II) in tap water using a laser scanning confocal imaging-surface plasmon resonance system in real time.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongyan; Yang, Liquan; Zhou, Bingjiang; Liu, Weimin; Ge, Jiechao; Wu, Jiasheng; Wang, Ying; Wang, Pengfei

    2013-09-15

    An ultrasensitive and selective detection of mercury (II) was investigated using a laser scanning confocal imaging-surface plasmon resonance system (LSCI-SPR). The detection limit was as low as 0.01ng/ml for Hg(2+) ions in ultrapure and tap water based on a T-rich, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-modified gold film, which can be individually manipulated using specific T-Hg(2+)-T complex formation. The quenching intensity of the fluorescence images for rhodamine-labeled ssDNA fitted well with the changes in SPR. The changes varied with the Hg(2+) ion concentration, which is unaffected by the presence of other metal ions. The coefficients obtained for ultrapure and tap water were 0.99902 and 0.99512, respectively, for the linear part over a range of 0.01-100ng/ml. The results show that the double-effect sensor has potential for practical applications with ultra sensitivity and selectivity, especially in online or real-time monitoring of Hg(2+) ions pollution in tap water with the further improvement of portable LSCI-SPR instrument.

  15. Ruthenium(II) Complex Incorporated UiO-67 Metal-Organic Framework Nanoparticles for Enhanced Two-Photon Fluorescence Imaging and Photodynamic Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Zhang, Jinfeng; Chelora, Jipsa; Xiong, Yuan; Kershaw, Stephen V; Li, King Fai; Lo, Pik-Kwan; Cheah, Kok Wai; Rogach, Andrey L; Zapien, Juan Antonio; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2017-02-22

    Ruthenium(II) tris(bipyridyl) cationic complex (Ru(bpy)3(2+)) incorporated UiO-67 (Universitetet i Oslo) nanoscale metal-organic frameworks (NMOFs) with an average diameter of ∼92 nm were developed as theranostic nanoplatform for in vitro two-photon fluorescence imaging and photodynamic therapy. After incorporation into porous UiO-67 nanoparticles, the quantum yield, luminescence lifetime, and two-photon fluorescence intensity of Ru(bpy)3(2+) guest molecules were much improved owing to the steric confinement effect of MOF pores. Benefiting from these merits, the as-synthesized nanoparticles managed to be internalized by A549 cells while providing excellent red fluorescence in cytoplasm upon excitation with 880 nm irradiation. Photodynamic therapeutic application of the Ru(bpy)3(2+)-incorporated UiO-67 NMOFs was investigated in vitro. The Ru(bpy)3(2+)-incorporated UiO-67 NMOFs exhibited good biocompatibility without irradiation while having good cell-killing rates upon irradiation. In view of these facts, the developed Ru(bpy)3(2+)-incorporated NMOFs give a new potential pathway to achieve enhanced two-photon fluorescence imaging and photodynamic therapy.

  16. Expression of COPI components during development of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Grieder, Nicole C; Kloter, Urs; Gehring, Walter J

    2005-12-01

    In a P{lArB} enhancer detector collection, a line was found that showed upregulated expression within centrally to posteriorly located germarial cysts. It was inserted in the gammaCOP locus on chromosome 3R. GammaCOP is a component of the COPI coatomer involved in membrane traffic. Most of the other known components of the COPI coatomer also showed higher expression in the posterior half of the germarium. Not only meiotic germline cysts but also migrating follicle cells upregulate the COPI subunits. During embryonic and larval development, the COPI subunits are expressed ubiquitously as expected for genes required for cell viability. In addition, they are strongly expressed in the salivary glands and the proventriculus. Whether tissue-specific transcriptional upregulation of COPI subunits is required for the reorganization of membranous compartments that are needed for the developmental processes that confer cyst polarity and follicle maturation will have to be addressed in a genetic study.

  17. Protocols for Copying and Proofreading in Template-Assisted Polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigolotti, Simone; Sartori, Pablo

    2016-03-01

    We discuss how information encoded in a template polymer can be stochastically copied into a copy polymer. We consider four different stochastic copy protocols of increasing complexity, inspired by building blocks of the mRNA translation pathway. In the first protocol, monomer incorporation occurs in a single stochastic transition. We then move to a more elaborate protocol in which an intermediate step can be used for error correction. Finally, we discuss the operating regimes of two kinetic proofreading protocols: one in which proofreading acts from the final copying step, and one in which it acts from an intermediate step. We review known results for these models and, in some cases, extend them to analyze all possible combinations of energetic and kinetic discrimination. We show that, in each of these protocols, only a limited number of these combinations leads to an improvement of the overall copying accuracy.

  18. Different Facets of Copy Number Changes: Permanent, Transient, and Adaptive

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Sweta

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal copy number changes are frequently associated with harmful consequences and are thought of as an underlying mechanism for the development of diseases. However, changes in copy number are observed during development and occur during normal biological processes. In this review, we highlight the causes and consequences of copy number changes in normal physiologic processes as well as cover their associations with cancer and acquired drug resistance. We discuss the permanent and transient nature of copy number gains and relate these observations to a new mechanism driving transient site-specific copy gains (TSSGs). Finally, we discuss implications of TSSGs in generating intratumoral heterogeneity and tumor evolution and how TSSGs can influence the therapeutic response in cancer. PMID:26755558

  19. A Role of DLPFC in the Learning Process of Human Mate Copying

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Jin-Ying; Xie, Jiajia; Hu, Die; Fan, Mingxia; Zheng, Li

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, we conducted a behavioral experiment to test the mate coping effect and a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment to test the neural basis involved in the social learning process of mate copying. In the behavioral experiment, participants were asked to rate the attractiveness of isolated opposite-sex (potential mates) facial photographs, then shown the targets associating with a neutral-faced model with textual cues indicating the models’ attitude (interested vs. not-interested) toward the potential mates, and then asked to re-evaluate the potential mates’ attractiveness. Using a similar procedure as the behavioral experiment, participants were scanned while observing the compound images in the fMRI experiment. The mate copying effect was confirmed in the behavioral experiment –greater increase in attractiveness ratings was observed for opposite-sex photographs in the interested than in the not-interested condition. The fMRI results showed that the dorsolateral prefrontal gyrus (DLPFC) was significantly active in the comparison of interested > not-interested condition, suggesting that a cognitive integration and selection function may be involved when participants process information from conditions related to mate copying. PMID:27148151

  20. Additional copies of the proteolipid protein gene causing Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease arise by separate integration into the X chromosome.

    PubMed

    Hodes, M E; Woodward, K; Spinner, N B; Emanuel, B S; Enrico-Simon, A; Kamholz, J; Stambolian, D; Zackai, E H; Pratt, V M; Thomas, I T; Crandall, K; Dlouhy, S R; Malcolm, S

    2000-07-01

    The proteolipid protein gene (PLP) is normally present at chromosome Xq22. Mutations and duplications of this gene are associated with Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD). Here we describe two new families in which males affected with PMD were found to have a copy of PLP on the short arm of the X chromosome, in addition to a normal copy on Xq22. In the first family, the extra copy was first detected by the presence of heterozygosity of the AhaII dimorphism within the PLP gene. The results of FISH analysis showed an additional copy of PLP in Xp22.1, although no chromosomal rearrangements could be detected by standard karyotype analysis. Another three affected males from the family had similar findings. In a second unrelated family with signs of PMD, cytogenetic analysis showed a pericentric inversion of the X chromosome. In the inv(X) carried by several affected family members, FISH showed PLP signals at Xp11.4 and Xq22. A third family has previously been reported, in which affected members had an extra copy of the PLP gene detected at Xq26 in a chromosome with an otherwise normal banding pattern. The identification of three separate families in which PLP is duplicated at a noncontiguous site suggests that such duplications could be a relatively common but previously undetected cause of genetic disorders.

  1. Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number Is Associated with Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Thyagarajan, Bharat; Wang, Renwei; Nelson, Heather; Barcelo, Helene; Koh, Woon-Puay; Yuan, Jian-Min

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number in peripheral blood is associated with increased risk of several cancers. However, data from prospective studies on mtDNA copy number and breast cancer risk are lacking. We evaluated the association between mtDNA copy number in peripheral blood and breast cancer risk in a nested case-control study of 183 breast cancer cases with pre-diagnostic blood samples and 529 individually matched controls among participants of the Singapore Chinese Health Study. The mtDNA copy number was measured using real time PCR. Conditional logistic regression analyses showed that there was an overall positive association between mtDNA copy number and breast cancer risk (Ptrend = 0.01). The elevated risk for higher mtDNA copy numbers was primarily seen for women with <3 years between blood draw and cancer diagnosis; ORs (95% CIs) for 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th quintile of mtDNA copy number were 1.52 (0.61, 3.82), 2.52 (1.03, 6.12), 3.12 (1.31, 7.43), and 3.06 (1.25, 7.47), respectively, compared with the 1st quintile (Ptrend = 0.004). There was no association between mtDNA copy number and breast cancer risk among women who donated a blood sample ≥3 years before breast cancer diagnosis (Ptrend = 0.41). This study supports a prospective association between increased mtDNA copy number and breast cancer risk that is dependent on the time interval between blood collection and breast cancer diagnosis. Future studies are warranted to confirm these findings and to elucidate the biological role of mtDNA copy number in breast cancer risk. PMID:23776581

  2. Image analysis-derived metrics of histomorphological complexity predicts prognosis and treatment response in stage II-III colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mezheyeuski, Artur; Hrynchyk, Ina; Karlberg, Mia; Portyanko, Anna; Egevad, Lars; Ragnhammar, Peter; Edler, David; Glimelius, Bengt; Östman, Arne

    2016-01-01

    The complexity of tumor histomorphology reflects underlying tumor biology impacting on natural course and response to treatment. This study presents a method of computer-aided analysis of tissue sections, relying on multifractal (MF) analyses, of cytokeratin-stained tumor sections which quantitatively evaluates of the morphological complexity of the tumor-stroma interface. This approach was applied to colon cancer collection, from an adjuvant treatment randomized study. Metrics obtained with the method acted as independent markers for natural course of the disease, and for benefit of adjuvant treatment. Comparative analyses demonstrated that MF metrics out-performed standard histomorphological features such as tumor grade, budding and configuration of invasive front. Notably, the MF analyses-derived “αmax” –metric constitutes the first response-predictive biomarker in stage II-III colon cancer showing significant interactions with treatment in analyses using a randomized trial-derived study population. Based on these results the method appears as an attractive and easy-to-implement tool for biomarker identification. PMID:27805003

  3. Green synthesis of nitrogen-doped carbon dots from lotus root for Hg(II) ions detection and cell imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Dan; Shang, Shaoming; Yu, Qin; Shen, Jie

    2016-12-01

    Herein, a facile, green, and fast method was developed in the synthesis of fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (CDs) with nitrogen content of 5.23%, using one-pot microwave treatment of lotus root (LR), without using any other surface passivation agents. The results show that these LR-CDs (with an average diameter of 9.41 nm) possess many outstanding features and have a high quantum yield of 19.0%. We further demonstrated applications of LR-CDs as probes for heavy metal ion detection. The LR-CDs exhibit captivating sensitivity and selectivity toward Hg2+ with a linear range from 0.1 to 60.0 μM and a detection limit of 18.7 nM. Eventually, the LR-CDs were applied for multicolor cell imaging, demonstrating their potential toward diverse applications.

  4. Eclipse period of R1 plasmids during downshift from elevated copy number: Nonrandom selection of copies for replication.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Jan A; Berg, Otto; Nordström, Kurt; Dasgupta, Santanu

    2012-03-01

    The classical Meselson-Stahl density-shift method was used to study replication of pOU71, a runaway-replication derivative of plasmid R1 in Escherichia coli. The miniplasmid maintained the normal low copy number of R1 during steady growth at 30°C, but as growth temperatures were raised above 34°C, the copy number of the plasmid increased to higher levels, and at 42°C, it replicated without control in a runaway replication mode with lethal consequences for the host. The eclipse periods (minimum time between successive replication of the same DNA) of the plasmid shortened with rising copy numbers at increasing growth temperatures (Olsson et al., 2003). In this work, eclipse periods were measured during downshifts in copy number of pOU71 after it had replicated at 39 and 42°C, resulting in 7- and 50-fold higher than normal plasmid copy number per cell, respectively. Eclipse periods for plasmid replication, measured during copy number downshift, suggested that plasmid R1, normally selected randomly for replication, showed a bias such that a newly replicated DNA had a higher probability of replication compared to the bulk of the R1 population. However, even the unexpected nonrandom replication followed the copy number kinetics such that every generation, the plasmids underwent the normal inherited number of replication, n, independent of the actual number of plasmid copies in a newborn cell.

  5. Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey. II. Adaptive Optics Imaging of 969 Kepler Exoplanet Candidate Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, Christoph; Ziegler, Carl; Law, Nicholas M.; Morton, Tim; Riddle, Reed; Atkinson, Dani; Schonhut, Jessica; Crepp, Justin

    2016-07-01

    We initiated the Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey in 2012 to observe each Kepler exoplanet candidate host star with high angular resolution, visible light, laser adaptive optics (AOs) imaging. Our goal is to find nearby stars lying in Kepler's photometric apertures that are responsible for the relatively high probability of false-positive exoplanet detections and that cause underestimates of the size of transit radii. Our comprehensive survey will also shed light on the effects of stellar multiplicity on exoplanet properties and will identify rare exoplanetary architectures. In this second part of our ongoing survey, we observed an additional 969 Kepler planet candidate hosts and we report blended stellar companions up to {{Δ }}m≈ 6 that contribute to Kepler's measured light curves. We found 203 companions within ˜4″ of 181 of the Kepler stars, of which 141 are new discoveries. We measure the nearby star probability for this sample of Kepler planet candidate host stars to be 10.6% ± 1.1% at angular separations up to 2.″5, significantly higher than the 7.4% ± 1.0% probability discovered in our initial sample of 715 stars; we find the probability increases to 17.6% ± 1.5% out to a separation of 4.″0. The median position of Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) observed in this survey are 1.°1 closer to the galactic plane, which may account for some of the nearby star probability enhancement. We additionally detail 50 Keck AO images of Robo-AO observed KOIs in order to confirm 37 companions detected at a <5σ significance level and to obtain additional infrared photometry on higher significance detected companions.

  6. Interactive roles of NPR1 gene-dosage and salt diets on cardiac angiotensin II, aldosterone and pro-inflammatory cytokines levels inmutantmice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Di; Das, Subhankar; Pandey, Kailash N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of the present study was to elucidate the interactive roles of guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPRA) gene (Npr1) and salt diets on cardiac angiotensin II (ANG II), aldosterone and proinflammatory cytokines levels in Npr1 gene-targeted (1-copy, 2-copy, 3-copy, 4-copy) mice. Methods Npr1 genotypes included 1-copy gene-disrupted heterozygous (+/−), 2-copy wild-type (+/+), 3-copy gene-duplicated heterozygous (++/+) and 4-copy gene-duplicated homozygous (++/++) mice. Animals were fed low, normal and high-salt diets. Plasma and cardiac levels of ANG II, aldosterone and pro-inflammatory cytokines were determined. Results With a high-salt diet, cardiac ANG II levels were increased (+) in 1-copy mice (13.7 ± 2.8 fmol/mg protein, 111%) compared with 2-copy mice (6.5 ± 0.6), but decreased (−) in 4-copy (4.0 ± 0.5, 38%) mice. Cardiac aldosterone levels were increased (+) in 1-copy mice (80 ± 4 fmol/mg protein, 79%) compared with 2-copy mice (38 ± 3). Plasma tumour necrosis factor alpha was increased (+) in 1-copy mice (30.27 ± 2.32 pg/ml, 38%), compared with 2-copy mice (19.36 ± 2.49, 24%), but decreased (−) in 3-copy (11.59 ± 1.51, 12%) and 4-copy (7.13 ± 0.52, 22%) mice. Plasma interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1α levels were also significantly increased (+) in 1-copy compared with 2-copy mice but decreased (−) in 3-copy and 4-copy mice. Conclusion These results demonstrate that a high-salt diet aggravates cardiac ANG II, aldosterone and proinflammatory cytokine levels in Npr1 gene-disrupted 1-copy mice, whereas, in Npr1 gene-duplicated (3-copy and 4-copy) mice, high salt did not render such elevation, suggesting the potential roles of Npr1 against salt loading. PMID:23188418

  7. Two Drosophila retrotransposon gypsy subfamilies differ in ability to produce new DNA copies via reverse transcription in Drosophila cultured cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lyubomirskaya, N V; Avedisov, S N; Surkov, S A; Ilyin, Y V

    1993-01-01

    Plasmid DNA constructs containing 5' end truncated retrotransposon gypsy were introduced into Drosophila cultured cells. Appearance of new complete DNA copies with reconstructed via reverse transcription 5'LTR were detected by PCR after transient expression and by Southern blot analysis of genome DNA of stably transformed cells. Two gypsy subfamilies supposed to be different in transpositional activity were analyzed in terms of their ability to produce new DNA copies via reverse transcription in D. hydei cultured cells. It was demonstrated that both gypsy variants undergo retrotransposition but with different efficiency. Images PMID:7688116

  8. Copy number variation in the horse genome.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sharmila; Qu, Zhipeng; Das, Pranab J; Fang, Erica; Juras, Rytis; Cothran, E Gus; McDonell, Sue; Kenney, Daniel G; Lear, Teri L; Adelson, David L; Chowdhary, Bhanu P; Raudsepp, Terje

    2014-10-01

    We constructed a 400K WG tiling oligoarray for the horse and applied it for the discovery of copy number variations (CNVs) in 38 normal horses of 16 diverse breeds, and the Przewalski horse. Probes on the array represented 18,763 autosomal and X-linked genes, and intergenic, sub-telomeric and chrY sequences. We identified 258 CNV regions (CNVRs) across all autosomes, chrX and chrUn, but not in chrY. CNVs comprised 1.3% of the horse genome with chr12 being most enriched. American Miniature horses had the highest and American Quarter Horses the lowest number of CNVs in relation to Thoroughbred reference. The Przewalski horse was similar to native ponies and draft breeds. The majority of CNVRs involved genes, while 20% were located in intergenic regions. Similar to previous studies in horses and other mammals, molecular functions of CNV-associated genes were predominantly in sensory perception, immunity and reproduction. The findings were integrated with previous studies to generate a composite genome-wide dataset of 1476 CNVRs. Of these, 301 CNVRs were shared between studies, while 1174 were novel and require further validation. Integrated data revealed that to date, 41 out of over 400 breeds of the domestic horse have been analyzed for CNVs, of which 11 new breeds were added in this study. Finally, the composite CNV dataset was applied in a pilot study for the discovery of CNVs in 6 horses with XY disorders of sexual development. A homozygous deletion involving AKR1C gene cluster in chr29 in two affected horses was considered possibly causative because of the known role of AKR1C genes in testicular androgen synthesis and sexual development. While the findings improve and integrate the knowledge of CNVs in horses, they also show that for effective discovery of variants of biomedical importance, more breeds and individuals need to be analyzed using comparable methodological approaches.

  9. Copy number variation in Thai population.

    PubMed

    Suktitipat, Bhoom; Naktang, Chaiwat; Mhuantong, Wuttichai; Tularak, Thitima; Artiwet, Paramita; Pasomsap, Ekawat; Jongjaroenprasert, Wallaya; Fuchareon, Suthat; Mahasirimongkol, Surakameth; Chantratita, Wasan; Yimwadsana, Boonsit; Charoensawan, Varodom; Jinawath, Natini

    2014-01-01

    Copy number variation (CNV) is a major genetic polymorphism contributing to genetic diversity and human evolution. Clinical application of CNVs for diagnostic purposes largely depends on sufficient population CNV data for accurate interpretation. CNVs from general population in currently available databases help classify CNVs of uncertain clinical significance, and benign CNVs. Earlier studies of CNV distribution in several populations worldwide showed that a significant fraction of CNVs are population specific. In this study, we characterized and analyzed CNVs in 3,017 unrelated Thai individuals genotyped with the Illumina Human610, Illumina HumanOmniexpress, or Illumina HapMap550v3 platform. We employed hidden Markov model and circular binary segmentation methods to identify CNVs, extracted 23,458 CNVs consistently identified by both algorithms, and cataloged these high confident CNVs into our publicly available Thai CNV database. Analysis of CNVs in the Thai population identified a median of eight autosomal CNVs per individual. Most CNVs (96.73%) did not overlap with any known chromosomal imbalance syndromes documented in the DECIPHER database. When compared with CNVs in the 11 HapMap3 populations, CNVs found in the Thai population shared several characteristics with CNVs characterized in HapMap3. Common CNVs in Thais had similar frequencies to those in the HapMap3 populations, and all high frequency CNVs (>20%) found in Thai individuals could also be identified in HapMap3. The majorities of CNVs discovered in the Thai population, however, were of low frequency, or uniquely identified in Thais. When performing hierarchical clustering using CNV frequencies, the CNV data were clustered into Africans, Europeans, and Asians, in line with the clustering performed with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data. As CNV data are specific to origin of population, our population-specific reference database will serve as a valuable addition to the existing resources for

  10. Converting hard copy documents for electronic dissemination

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, F.

    1994-12-31

    Since the advent of computer systems, the goal of a paperless office, and even a paperless society, has been pursued. While the normal paper flow in an organization is far from totally automated, particularly for items requiring signatures or authorizations, electronic information dissemination is becoming an almost simple task. The reasons for providing on-line documents are many and include faster and easier access for everyone, elimination of printing costs, reduction of wasted shelf and desk space, and the security of having a centrally-located, always up-to-date document. New computer software even provides the user with the ability to annotate documents and to have bookmarks so that the old scribbled-in and dog-eared manual can be replaced without loosing this `customizability`. Moreover, new hypermedia capabilities mean that documents can be read in a non-linear fashion and can include color figures and photographs, audio, and even animation sequences, capabilities which exceed those of paper. The proliferation of network-based information servers, coupled with the growth of the Internet, has enticed academic, governmental, and even commercial organizations to provide increasing numbers of documents and data bases in electronic form via the network, not just to internal staff, but to the public as well. Much of this information, which includes everything from mundane company procedures to spiffy marketing brochures, was previously published only in hard copy. Converting existing documents to electronic form and producing only electronic versions of new documents poses some interesting challenges to the maintainer or author.

  11. Copy Number Profiling of Brazilian Astrocytomas

    PubMed Central

    Bidinotto, Lucas Tadeu; Torrieri, Raul; Mackay, Alan; Almeida, Gisele Caravina; Viana-Pereira, Marta; Cruvinel-Carloni, Adriana; Spina, Maria Luisa; Campanella, Nathalia Cristina; Pereira de Menezes, Weder; Clara, Carlos Afonso; Becker, Aline Paixão; Jones, Chris; Reis, Rui Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Copy number alterations (CNA) are one of the driving mechanisms of glioma tumorigenesis, and are currently used as important biomarkers in the routine setting. Therefore, we performed CNA profiling of 65 astrocytomas of distinct malignant grades (WHO grade I–IV) of Brazilian origin, using array-CGH and microsatellite instability analysis (MSI), and investigated their correlation with TERT and IDH1 mutational status and clinico-pathological features. Furthermore, in silico analysis using the Oncomine database was performed to validate our findings and extend the findings to gene expression level. We found that the number of genomic alterations increases in accordance with glioma grade. In glioblastomas (GBM), the most common alterations were gene amplifications (PDGFRA, KIT, KDR, EGFR, and MET) and deletions (CDKN2A and PTEN). Log-rank analysis correlated EGFR amplification and/or chr7 gain with better survival of the patients. MSI was observed in 11% of GBMs. A total of 69% of GBMs presented TERT mutation, whereas IDH1 mutation was most frequent in diffuse (85.7%) and anaplastic (100%) astrocytomas. The combination of 1p19q deletion and TERT and IDH1 mutational status separated tumor groups that showed distinct age of diagnosis and outcome. In silico validation pointed to less explored genes that may be worthy of future investigation, such as CDK2, DMRTA1, and MTAP. Herein, using an extensive integrated analysis, we indicated potentially important genes, not extensively studied in gliomas, that could be further explored to assess their biological and clinical impact in astrocytomas. PMID:27172220

  12. Copy Number Variation in Familial Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pankratz, Nathan; Dumitriu, Alexandra; Hetrick, Kurt N.; Sun, Mei; Latourelle, Jeanne C.; Wilk, Jemma B.; Halter, Cheryl; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Gusella, James F.; Nichols, William C.; Myers, Richard H.; Foroud, Tatiana; DeStefano, Anita L.

    2011-01-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) are known to cause Mendelian forms of Parkinson disease (PD), most notably in SNCA and PARK2. PARK2 has a recessive mode of inheritance; however, recent evidence demonstrates that a single CNV in PARK2 (but not a single missense mutation) may increase risk for PD. We recently performed a genome-wide association study for PD that excluded individuals known to have either a LRRK2 mutation or two PARK2 mutations. Data from the Illumina370Duo arrays were re-clustered using only white individuals with high quality intensity data, and CNV calls were made using two algorithms, PennCNV and QuantiSNP. After quality assessment, the final sample included 816 cases and 856 controls. Results varied between the two CNV calling algorithms for many regions, including the PARK2 locus (genome-wide p = 0.04 for PennCNV and p = 0.13 for QuantiSNP). However, there was consistent evidence with both algorithms for two novel genes, USP32 and DOCK5 (empirical, genome-wide p-values<0.001). PARK2 CNVs tended to be larger, and all instances that were molecularly tested were validated. In contrast, the CNVs in both novel loci were smaller and failed to replicate using real-time PCR, MLPA, and gel electrophoresis. The DOCK5 variation is more akin to a VNTR than a typical CNV and the association is likely caused by artifact due to DNA source. DNA for all the cases was derived from whole blood, while the DNA for all controls was derived from lymphoblast cell lines. The USP32 locus contains many SNPs with low minor allele frequency leading to a loss of heterozygosity that may have been spuriously interpreted by the CNV calling algorithms as support for a deletion. Thus, only the CNVs within the PARK2 locus could be molecularly validated and associated with PD susceptibility. PMID:21829596

  13. c-myc copy number gain is a powerful prognosticator of disease outcome in cervical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Kübler, Kirsten; Heinenberg, Sally; Rudlowski, Christian; Keyver-Paik, Mignon-Denise; Abramian, Alina; Merkelbach-Bruse, Sabine; Büttner, Reinhard; Kuhn, Walther; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich

    2015-01-20

    Cervical carcinoma develops from preneoplasia by a multistep process. Although most low-grade dysplastic lesions will regress without intervention and even high-grade changes exhibit a substantial rate of regression, a small percentage of dysplasia will progress over time. Thus, indicators are needed to estimate the biological risk and to help avoid overtreatment in women who desire to preserve fertility. In addition to the classical biomarkers, PCR-ELISA-determined HPV genotype and immunohistochemically assessed p16INK4a and Ki-67 expression, cells with integrated HPV and copy number gain of TERC and c-myc were quantified in a panel of 104 benign, intraepithelial neoplastic (CIN I, II, III) and cancerous lesions using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Optimal cut-off values were calculated; Kaplan-Meier curves and a Cox proportional hazard regression model were used to evaluate prognostic signatures. The assay reliably identified HPV integration, TERC and c-myc copy number gain as determined by comparisons with established biomarkers. All biomarker levels increased with the progression of the disease. However, only c-myc copy number gain independently prognosticated a low probability of dysplastic regression. Our results suggest that c-myc plays a key role in the process of dysplastic transformation and might thus be exploited for treatment and follow-up decision-making of cervical dysplasia.

  14. Clinical relevance of copy number profiling in oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    van Kempen, Pauline M W; Noorlag, Rob; Braunius, Weibel W; Moelans, Cathy B; Rifi, Widad; Savola, Suvi; Koole, Ronald; Grolman, Wilko; van Es, Robert J J; Willems, Stefan M

    2015-10-01

    Current conventional treatment modalities in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) are nonselective and have shown to cause serious side effects. Unraveling the molecular profiles of head and neck cancer may enable promising clinical applications that pave the road for personalized cancer treatment. We examined copy number status in 36 common oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in a cohort of 191 oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCC) and 164 oral cavity squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) using multiplex ligation probe amplification. Copy number status was correlated with human papillomavirus (HPV) status in OPSCC, with occult lymph node status in OSCC and with patient survival. The 11q13 region showed gain or amplifications in 59% of HPV-negative OPSCC, whereas this amplification was almost absent in HPV-positive OPSCC. Additionally, in clinically lymph node-negative OSCC (Stage I-II), gain of the 11q13 region was significantly correlated with occult lymph node metastases with a negative predictive value of 81%. Multivariate survival analysis revealed a significantly decreased disease-free survival in both HPV-negative and HPV-positive OPSCC with a gain of Wnt-induced secreted protein-1. Gain of CCND1 showed to be an independent predictor for worse survival in OSCC. These results show that copy number aberrations, mainly of the 11q13 region, may be important predictors and prognosticators which allow for stratifying patients for personalized treatment of HNSCC.

  15. Mitochondrial DNA copy number in peripheral blood and melanoma risk.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie; Gopalakrishnan, Vancheswaran; Lee, Jeffrey E; Fang, Shenying; Zhao, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number in peripheral blood has been suggested as risk modifier in various types of cancer. However, its influence on melanoma risk is unclear. We evaluated the association between mtDNA copy number in peripheral blood and melanoma risk in 500 melanoma cases and 500 healthy controls from an ongoing melanoma study. The mtDNA copy number was measured using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Overall, mean mtDNA copy number was significantly higher in cases than in controls (1.15 vs 0.99, P<0.001). Increased mtDNA copy number was associated with a 1.45-fold increased risk of melanoma (95% confidence interval: 1.12-1.97). Significant joint effects between mtDNA copy number and variables related to pigmentation and history of sunlight exposure were observed. This study supports an association between increased mtDNA copy number and melanoma risk that is independent on the known melanoma risk factors (pigmentation and history of sunlight exposure).

  16. 22 CFR 92.79 - Procuring copies of foreign public documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... foreign officials copies of birth, death, and marriage certificates, or copies of other public records... RELATED SERVICES Copying, Recording, Translating and Procuring Documents § 92.79 Procuring copies of... pay for copies of or extracts from foreign public records obtained at the request of private...

  17. The embedded young stars in the Taurus-Auriga molecular cloud. II - Models for scattered light images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenyon, Scott J.; Whitney, Barbara A.; Gomez, Mercedes; Hartmann, Lee

    1993-01-01

    We describe NIR imaging observations of embedded young stars in the Taurus-Auriga molecular cloud. We find a large range in J-K and H-K colors for these class I sources. The bluest objects have colors similar to the reddest T Tauri stars in the cloud; redder objects lie slightly above the reddening line for standard ISM dust and have apparent K extinctions of up to 5 mag. Most of these sources also show extended NIR emission on scales of 10-20 arcsec which corresponds to linear sizes of 1500-3000 AU. The NIR colors and nebular morphologies for this sample and the magnitude of linear polarization in several sources suggest scattered light produces most of the NIR emission in these objects. We present modeling results that suggest mass infall rates that agree with predictions for cold clouds and are generally consistent with rates estimated from radiative equilibrium models. For reasonable dust grain parameters, the range of colors and extinctions require flattened density distributions with polar cavities evacuated by bipolar outflows. These results support the idea that infall and outflow occur simultaneously in deeply embedded bipolar outflow sources. The data also indicate fairly large centrifugal radii and large inclinations to the rotational axis for a typical source.

  18. Plain papers for color hard copy technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutland, David F.

    1995-04-01

    The expression 'Plain' paper was coined in the early days of electrophotography to distinguish the capabilities of the new dry toner based photocopying process which did not require a sensitized or special coated paper to produce an image. Currently 'Plain' paper is considered in the electronic printing industry, to be any uncoated paper, usually of the type used in office photocopying applications. It is assumed that all 'Plain' papers are identical or at least equivalent in their properties such that all papers will give equivalent print quality performance. Due to the wide availability and low price of 'Plain' papers, it is also considered desirable by vendors of electronic marking processes, that their technology be capable of producing good image quality on 'Plain' paper. The chemical and physical differences which can occur among 'Plain' papers are discussed with respect to the specific image quality and engine reliability requirements of the major nonimpact electronic marking technologies, including electrophotography and laser printing, electrographic and ionographic processes, thermal transfer and ink jet. Paper properties of interest include, smoothness, surface energy, electrical resistivity, porosity and aqueous and nonaqueous liquid adsorption. Color printing has added additional requirements to paper quality, if good image quality is to be achieved and maintained. Given the apparently conflicting requirements for some of the electronic marking technologies, it will be a challenge to define a single grade of paper which will produce optimum print quality for all electronic printing processes.

  19. Atmospheric Retrieval for Direct Imaging Spectroscopy of Gas Giants in Reflected Light. II. Orbital Phase and Planetary Radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Michael; Lupu, Roxana; Marley, Mark S.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Robinson, Tyler; Lewis, Nikole

    2017-03-01

    Future space-based telescopes, such as the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST), will observe the reflected light spectra of directly imaged extrasolar planets. Interpretation of such data presents a number of novel challenges, including accounting for unknown planet radius and uncertain stellar illumination phase angle. Here, we report on our continued development of Markov Chain Monte Carlo retrieval methods for addressing these issues in the interpretation of such data. Specifically, we explore how the unknown planet radius and potentially poorly known observer-planet-star phase angle impacts retrievals of parameters of interest such as atmospheric methane abundance, cloud properties, and surface gravity. As expected, the uncertainty in retrieved values is a strong function of the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the observed spectra, particularly for low metallicity atmospheres, which lack deep absorption signatures. Meaningful results may only be possible above certain S/N thresholds; for cases across a metallicity range of 1–50 times solar, we find that only an S/N of 20 systematically reproduces a value close to the correct methane abundance at all phase angles. However, even in cases where the phase angle is poorly known we find that the planet radius can be constrained to within a factor of two. We find that uncertainty in planet radius decreases at phase angles past quadrature, as the highly forward-scattering nature of the atmosphere at these geometries limits the possible volume of phase space that relevant parameters can occupy. Finally, we present an estimation of possible improvement that can result from combining retrievals against observations at multiple phase angles.

  20. Revisiting the rigidly rotating magnetosphere model for σ Ori E - II. Magnetic Doppler imaging, arbitrary field RRM, and light variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksala, M. E.; Kochukhov, O.; Krtička, J.; Townsend, R. H. D.; Wade, G. A.; Prvák, M.; Mikulášek, Z.; Silvester, J.; Owocki, S. P.

    2015-08-01

    The initial success of the Rigidly Rotating Magnetosphere (RRM) model application to the B2Vp star σ Ori E by Townsend, Owocki & Groote triggered a renewed era of observational monitoring of this archetypal object. We utilize high-resolution spectropolarimetry and the magnetic Doppler imaging (MDI) technique to simultaneously determine the magnetic configuration, which is predominately dipolar, with a polar strength Bd = 7.3-7.8 kG and a smaller non-axisymmetric quadrupolar contribution, as well as the surface distribution of abundance of He, Fe, C, and Si. We describe a revised RRM model that now accepts an arbitrary surface magnetic field configuration, with the field topology from the MDI models used as input. The resulting synthetic H α emission and broad-band photometric observations generally agree with observations, however, several features are poorly fit. To explore the possibility of a photospheric contribution to the observed photometric variability, the MDI abundance maps were used to compute a synthetic photospheric light curve to determine the effect of the surface inhomogeneities. Including the computed photospheric brightness modulation fails to improve the agreement between the observed and computed photometry. We conclude that the discrepancies cannot be explained as an effect of inhomogeneous surface abundance. Analysis of the UV light variability shows good agreement between observed variability and computed light curves, supporting the accuracy of the photospheric light variation calculation. We thus conclude that significant additional physics is necessary for the RRM model to acceptably reproduce observations of not only σ Ori E, but also other similar stars with significant stellar wind-magnetic field interactions.

  1. ALMACAL II: Extreme Star Formation Rate Densities in Dusty Starbursts Revealed by ALMA 20 mas Resolution Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oteo, I.; Zwaan, M. A.; Ivison, R. J.; Smail, I.; Biggs, A. D.

    2017-03-01

    We present ultrahigh spatial resolution (∼20 mas or 150 pc) ALMA observations of the dust continuum at 920 μm and 1.2 mm in two submillimeter sources at z = 3.442, ALMACAL–1 (A–1: {S}870μ {{m}}=6.5+/- 0.2 {mJy}) and ALMACAL–2 (A–2: {S}870μ {{m}}=4.4+/- 0.2 {mJy}). About half of the star formation in each of these sources is dominated by a single compact clump (FWHM size of ∼350 pc). In A–1, two additional fainter clumps are found. The star formation rate (SFR) surface densities of all these clumps are extremely high, {{{Σ }}}{SFR}∼ 1200 to ∼ 3000 {M}ȯ {{yr}}-1 {{kpc}}-2, the highest rates found in high-redshift galaxies. Given their geometry and identical redshifts, there is a possibility that A–1 and A–2 are the lensed images of a single background source that are gravitationally amplified by the blazar host. If this were the case, the effective radius of the dusty galaxy in the source plane would be {R}{eff}∼ 40 {pc} and the demagnified SFR surface density would be {{{Σ }}}{SFR} ∼ 10,000 {M}ȯ {{yr}}-1 {{kpc}}-2, comparable with the eastern nucleus of Arp 220. Although we cannot rule out an AGN contribution, our results suggest that a significant percentage of the enormous far-IR luminosity in some dusty starbursts is extremely compact. The high {{{Σ }}}{SFR} in these sources could only be measured thanks to the ultrahigh-resolution ALMA observations used in this work, demonstrating that long-baseline observations are essential to study and interpret the properties of dusty starbursts in the early Universe.

  2. The Association of Mitochondrial Potential and Copy Number with Pig Oocyte Maturation and Developmental Potential

    PubMed Central

    LEE, Seul-Ki; ZHAO, Ming-Hui; KWON, Jung-Woo; LI, Ying-Hua; LIN, Zi-Li; JIN, Yong-Xun; KIM, Nam-Hyung; CUI, Xiang-Shun

    2014-01-01

    ATP is critical for oocyte maturation, fertilization, and subsequent embryo development. Both mitochondrial membrane potential and copy number expand during oocyte maturation. In order to differentiate the roles of mitochondrial metabolic activity and mtDNA copy number during oocyte maturation, we used two inhibitors, FCCP (carbonyl cyanide p-(tri-fluromethoxy)phenyl-hydrazone) and ddC (2’3-dideoxycytidine), to deplete the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δφm) and mitochondrial copy number, respectively. FCCP (2000 nM) reduced ATP production by affecting mitochondrial Δφm, decreased the mRNA expression of Bmp15 (bone morphogenetic protein 15), and shortened the poly(A) tails of Bmp15, Gdf9 (growth differentiation factor 9), and Cyclin B1 transcripts. FCCP (200 and 2000 nM) also affected p34cdc2 kinase activity. By contrast, ddC did not alter ATP production. Instead, ddC significantly decreased mtDNA copy number (P < 0.05). FCCP (200 and 2000 nM) also decreased extrusion of the first polar body, whereas ddC at all concentrations did not affect the ability of immature oocytes to reach metaphase II. Both FCCP (200 and 2000 nM) and ddC (200 and 2000 µM) reduced parthenogenetic blastocyst formation compared with untreated oocytes. However, these inhibitors did not affect total cell number and apoptosis. These findings suggest that mitochondrial metabolic activity is critical for oocyte maturation and that both mitochondrial metabolic activity and replication contribute to the developmental competence of porcine oocytes. PMID:24492657

  3. HST/WFC3 imaging of protostellar jets in Carina: [Fe II] emission tracing massive jets from intermediate-mass protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Megan; Smith, Nathan

    2013-08-01

    We present narrow-band Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3)-UVIS and WFC3-IR images of four externally irradiated protostellar jets in the Carina nebula: HH 666, HH 901, HH 902 and HH 1066. These massive jets are unusual because they are bathed in UV radiation from dozens of nearby O-type stars, but despite the strong incident ionizing radiation, portions of the jet remain neutral. Near-IR [Fe II] images reveal dense, neutral gas that was not seen in previous studies of Hα emission. We show that near-IR [Fe II] emitting gas must be self-shielded from Lyman continuum photons, regardless of its excitation mechanism (shocks, far-ultraviolet radiation or both). High densities are required for the survival of Fe+ amid the strong Lyman continuum luminosity from Tr14, raising estimates of the mass-loss rates by an order of magnitude. Higher jet mass-loss rates require higher accretion rates on to their driving protostars, implying that these jets are driven by intermediate-mass (˜2-8 M⊙) stars. Indeed, the IR driving sources of two of these outflows have luminosities that require intermediate-mass protostars (the other two are so deeply embedded that their luminosity is uncertain). All four of these HH jets are highly collimated, with opening angles of only a few degrees, similar to those observed in low-mass protostars. We propose that these jets reflect essentially the same outflow phenomenon seen in wide-angle molecular outflows associated with intermediate- and high-mass protostars, but that the collimated atomic jet core is irradiated and rendered observable in the harsh radiative environment of the Carina nebula. In more quiescent environments, this atomic core remains invisible, and outflows traced by shock-excited molecules in the outflow cavity give the impression that these outflows have a wider opening angle. Thus, the externally irradiated jets in Carina constitute a new view of collimated jets from intermediate-mass protostars and offer strong additional evidence

  4. Copy number gain of VCX, X-linked multi-copy gene, leads to cell proliferation and apoptosis during spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhenyao; Zhang, Yan; Zhou, Ran; Song, Ling; Ling, Xiufeng; Hu, Zhibin; Miao, Dengshun; Shen, Hongbing; Xia, Yankai; Wang, Xinru; Lu, Chuncheng

    2016-01-01

    Male factor infertility affects one-sixth of couples worldwide, and non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) is one of the most severe forms. In recent years there has been increasing evidence to implicate the participation of X chromosome in the process of spermatogenesis. To uncover the roles of X-linked multi-copy genes in spermatogenesis, we performed systematic analysis of X-linked gene copy number variations (CNVs) and Y chromosome haplogrouping in 447 idiopathic NOA patients and 485 healthy controls. Interestingly, the frequency of individuals with abnormal level copy of Variable charge, X-linked (VCX) was significantly different between cases and controls after multiple test correction (p = 5.10 × 10−5). To discriminate the effect of gain/loss copies in these genes, we analyzed the frequency of X-linked multi-copy genes in subjects among subdivided groups. Our results demonstrated that individuals with increased copy numbers of Nuclear RNA export factor 2 (NXF2) (p = 9.21 × 10−8) and VCX (p = 1.97 × 10−4) conferred the risk of NOA. In vitro analysis demonstrated that increasing copy number of VCX could upregulate the gene expression and regulate cell proliferation and apoptosis. Our study establishes a robust association between the VCX CNVs and NOA risk. PMID:27705943

  5. Disk Imaging Survey of Chemistry with SMA. II. Southern Sky Protoplanetary Disk Data and Full Sample Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öberg, Karin I.; Qi, Chunhua; Fogel, Jeffrey K. J.; Bergin, Edwin A.; Andrews, Sean M.; Espaillat, Catherine; Wilner, David J.; Pascucci, Ilaria; Kastner, Joel H.

    2011-06-01

    This is the second in a series of papers based on data from DISCS, a Submillimeter Array observing program aimed at spatially and spectrally resolving the chemical composition of 12 protoplanetary disks. We present data on six Southern sky sources—IM Lup, SAO 206462 (HD 135344b), HD 142527, AS 209, AS 205, and V4046 Sgr—which complement the six sources in the Taurus star-forming region reported previously. CO 2-1 and HCO+ 3-2 emission are detected and resolved in all disks and show velocity patterns consistent with Keplerian rotation. Where detected, the emission from DCO+ 3-2, N2H+ 3-2, H2CO 30 3 - 20 2 and 41 4 - 31 3, HCN 3-2, and CN 23 3/4/2 - 12 2/3/1 are also generally spatially resolved. The detection rates are highest toward the M and K stars, while the F star SAO 206462 has only weak CN and HCN emission, and H2CO alone is detected toward HD 142527. These findings together with the statistics from the previous Taurus disks support the hypothesis that high detection rates of many small molecules depend on the presence of a cold and protected disk midplane, which is less common around F and A stars compared to M and K stars. Disk-averaged variations in the proposed radiation tracer CN/HCN are found to be small, despite a two orders of magnitude range of spectral types and accretion rates. In contrast, the resolved images suggest that the CN/HCN emission ratio varies with disk radius in at least two of the systems. There are no clear observational differences in the disk chemistry between the classical/full T Tauri disks and transitional disks. Furthermore, the observed line emission does not depend on the measured accretion luminosities or the number of infrared lines detected, which suggests that the chemistry outside of 100 AU is not coupled to the physical processes that drive the chemistry in the innermost few AU.

  6. Detector development for microPET II: a 1 μl resolution PET scanner for small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatziioannou, A.; Tai, Y. C.; Doshi, N.; Cherry, S. R.

    2001-11-01

    We are currently developing a small animal positron emission tomography (PET) scanner with a design goal of 1 microlitre (1 mm3) image resolution. The detectors consist of a 12 × 12 array of 1 × 1 × 10 mm lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) scintillator crystals coupled to a 64-channel photomultiplier tube (PMT) via 5 cm long optical fibre bundles. The optical fibre connection allows a high detector packing fraction despite the dead space surrounding the active region of the PMT. Optical fibre bundles made from different types of glass were tested for light transmission, and also their effects on crystal identification and energy resolution, and compared to direct coupling of the LSO arrays to the PMTs. We also investigated the effects of extramural absorber (EMA) in the fibre bundles. Based on these results, fibre bundles manufactured from F2 glass were selected. We built three pairs of prototype detectors (directly coupled LSO array, fibre bundle without EMA and fibre bundle with EMA) and measured flood histograms, energy resolution, intrinsic spatial resolution and timing resolution. The results demonstrated an intrinsic spatial resolution (FWHM) of 1.12 mm (directly coupled), 1.23 mm (fibre bundle without EMA coupling) and 1.27 mm (fibre bundle with EMA coupling) using an approximately 500 μm diameter Na-22 point source. Using a 330 μm outer diameter steel needle line source filled with F-18, spatial resolution for the detector with the EMA optical fibre bundle improved to 1.05 mm. The respective timing and energy FWHM values were 1.96 ns, 21% (directly coupled), 2.20 ns, 23% (fibre bundle without EMA) and 2.99 ns, 30% (fibre bundle with EMA). The peak-to-valley ratio in the flood histograms was better with EMA (5:1) compared to the optical fibre bundle without EMA (2.5:1), due to the decreased optical cross-talk. In comparison to the detectors used in our current generation microPET scanner, these detectors substantially improve on the spatial resolution

  7. DISK IMAGING SURVEY OF CHEMISTRY WITH SMA. II. SOUTHERN SKY PROTOPLANETARY DISK DATA AND FULL SAMPLE STATISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Oeberg, Karin I.; Qi Chunhua; Andrews, Sean M.; Espaillat, Catherine; Wilner, David J.; Fogel, Jeffrey K. J.; Bergin, Edwin A.; Pascucci, Ilaria; Kastner, Joel H.

    2011-06-20

    This is the second in a series of papers based on data from DISCS, a Submillimeter Array observing program aimed at spatially and spectrally resolving the chemical composition of 12 protoplanetary disks. We present data on six Southern sky sources-IM Lup, SAO 206462 (HD 135344b), HD 142527, AS 209, AS 205, and V4046 Sgr-which complement the six sources in the Taurus star-forming region reported previously. CO 2-1 and HCO{sup +} 3-2 emission are detected and resolved in all disks and show velocity patterns consistent with Keplerian rotation. Where detected, the emission from DCO{sup +} 3-2, N{sub 2}H{sup +} 3-2, H{sub 2}CO 3{sub 03} - 2{sub 02} and 4{sub 14} - 3{sub 13}, HCN 3-2, and CN 2{sub 33/4/2} - 1{sub 22/3/1} are also generally spatially resolved. The detection rates are highest toward the M and K stars, while the F star SAO 206462 has only weak CN and HCN emission, and H{sub 2}CO alone is detected toward HD 142527. These findings together with the statistics from the previous Taurus disks support the hypothesis that high detection rates of many small molecules depend on the presence of a cold and protected disk midplane, which is less common around F and A stars compared to M and K stars. Disk-averaged variations in the proposed radiation tracer CN/HCN are found to be small, despite a two orders of magnitude range of spectral types and accretion rates. In contrast, the resolved images suggest that the CN/HCN emission ratio varies with disk radius in at least two of the systems. There are no clear observational differences in the disk chemistry between the classical/full T Tauri disks and transitional disks. Furthermore, the observed line emission does not depend on the measured accretion luminosities or the number of infrared lines detected, which suggests that the chemistry outside of 100 AU is not coupled to the physical processes that drive the chemistry in the innermost few AU.

  8. Unenhanced Cone Beam Computed Tomography and Fusion Imaging in Direct Percutaneous Sac Injection for Treatment of Type II Endoleak: Technical Note

    SciTech Connect

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo Ierardi, Anna Maria; Radaelli, Alessandro; Marchi, Giuseppe De; Floridi, Chiara; Piffaretti, Gabriele; Federico, Fontana

    2016-03-15

    AimTo evaluate safety, feasibility, technical success, and clinical success of direct percutaneous sac injection (DPSI) for the treatment of type II endoleaks (T2EL) using anatomical landmarks on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and fusion imaging (FI).Materials and MethodsEight patients with T2EL were treated with DPSI using CBCT as imaging guidance. Anatomical landmarks on unenhanced CBCT were used for referencing T2EL location in the first five patients, while FI between unenhanced CBCT and pre-procedural computed tomography angiography (CTA) was used in the remaining three patients. Embolization was performed with thrombin, glue, and ethylene–vinyl alcohol copolymer. Technical and clinical success, iodinated contrast utilization, procedural time, fluoroscopy time, and mean radiation dose were registered.ResultsDPSI was technically successful in all patients: the needle was correctly positioned at the first attempt in six patients, while in two of the first five patients the needle was repositioned once. Neither minor nor major complications were registered. Average procedural time was 45 min and the average administered iodinated contrast was 13 ml. Mean radiation dose of the procedure was 60.43 Gy cm{sup 2} and mean fluoroscopy time was 18 min. Clinical success was achieved in all patients (mean follow-up of 36 months): no sign of T2EL was reported in seven patients until last CT follow-up, while it persisted in one patient with stability of sac diameter.ConclusionsDPSI using unenhanced CBCT and FI is feasible and provides the interventional radiologist with an accurate and safe alternative to endovascular treatment with limited iodinated contrast utilization.

  9. The effect of oxygen saturation targeting on retinal blood vessel growth using retinal image data from the BOOST-II UK Trial

    PubMed Central

    Moreton, R B R; Fleck, B W; Fielder, A R; Williams, C A; Butler, L; Wilson, C; Cocker, K; Juszczak, E; King, A; Stenson, B; Brocklehurst, P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a disorder of developing retinal blood vessels in preterm infants. The purpose of this nested study was to investigate the effects of higher (91–95%) and lower (85–89%) oxygen saturation (SpO2) targeting on retinal blood vessel growth in preterm infants. Methods Retinal blood vessel growth in the higher (91–95%) and lower (85–89%) oxygen saturation (SpO2) targeting groups was compared. Suitable RetCam (Clarity, Pleasanton, CA, USA) images collected in the BOOST-II UK trial were used. The distances between the centre of the optic disc and the ROP ridge in the temporal and nasal retina were measured in pixel units. Results Images from 38 infants were studied, 20 from the higher SpO2 target group and 18 from the lower SpO2 target group. On average, temporal blood vessels extended further from the optic disc than nasal blood vessels, mean (standard deviation (SD)) 463.39 (55.05) pixels compared with 360.13 (44.47) pixels, respectively, P<0.0001. Temporal blood vessels extended less far from the optic disc in the higher SpO2 target group than in the lower SpO2 target group: mean (SD) 449.83 (56.16) pixels compared with 480.02 (49.94), respectively, P=0.055. Nasal retinal blood vessel measurements were broadly similar in the higher and lower SpO2 target groups; mean (SD) 353.96 (41.95) compared with 370.00 (48.82) pixels, respectively, P=0.38. Conclusions Relatively high oxygen saturation targeting (91–95%) was associated with a trend (P=0.055) towards reduced retinal blood vessel growth in this study of preterm infants. PMID:26795413

  10. Multifaceted interplay between lipophilicity, protein interaction and luminescence parameters of non-intercalative ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes controlling cellular imaging and cytotoxic properties.

    PubMed

    Mazuryk, Olga; Magiera, Katarzyna; Rys, Barbara; Suzenet, Franck; Kieda, Claudine; Brindell, Małgorzata

    2014-12-01

    Here, we examine the photophysical properties of five ruthenium(II) complexes comprising two 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (dip) ligands and functionalized bipyridine (R₁bpy-R₂, where R₁= H or CH3, R₂= H, CH₃, COO⁻,4-[3-(2-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)propyl] or 1,3-dicyclohexyl-1-carbonyl-urea) towards development of luminescence probes for cellular imaging. These complexes have been shown to interact with albumin and the formed adducts exhibited up to eightfold increase in the luminescence quantum yield as well as the average lifetime of emission. It was demonstrated that they cannot bind to DNA through the intercalation mode and its luminescence in the presence of DNA is quenching. Cell viability experiments indicated that all complexes possess significant dose-dependent cytotoxicity (with IC₅₀ 5-19 μM) on 4T1 breast cancer cell line and their anti-proliferative activity correlates very well with their lipophilicity. Cellular uptake was studied by measuring the ruthenium content in cells using ICP-MS technique. As expected, the better uptake is directly related to higher lipophilicity of doubly charged ruthenium complexes while uptake of monocationic one is much lower in spite of the highest lipophilicity. Additionally staining properties were assessed using flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. These experiments showed that complex with 1,3-dicyclohexyl-1-carbonyl-urea substituent exhibits the best staining properties in spite of the lowest luminescence quantum yield in buffered solution (pH 7.4). Our results point out that both the imaging and cytotoxic properties of the studied ruthenium complexes are strongly influence by the level of internalization and protein interaction.

  11. Copy number variation and evolution in humans and chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Perry, George H.; Yang, Fengtang; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Murphy, Carly; Fitzgerald, Tomas; Lee, Arthur S.; Hyland, Courtney; Stone, Anne C.; Hurles, Matthew E.; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Eichler, Evan E.; Carter, Nigel P.; Lee, Charles; Redon, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) underlie many aspects of human phenotypic diversity and provide the raw material for gene duplication and gene family expansion. However, our understanding of their evolutionary significance remains limited. We performed comparative genomic hybridization on a single human microarray platform to identify CNVs among the genomes of 30 humans and 30 chimpanzees as well as fixed copy number differences between species. We found that human and chimpanzee CNVs occur in orthologous genomic regions far more often than expected by chance and are strongly associated with the presence of highly homologous intrachromosomal segmental duplications. By adapting population genetic analyses for use with copy number data, we identified functional categories of genes that have likely evolved under purifying or positive selection for copy number changes. In particular, duplications and deletions of genes with inflammatory response and cell proliferation functions may have been fixed by positive selection and involved in the adaptive phenotypic differentiation of humans and chimpanzees. PMID:18775914

  12. 5. Photographic copy of photograph (Source: Salt River Project Archives, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Photographic copy of photograph (Source: Salt River Project Archives, Tempe, Lubken collection, #R-273) Transformer house under construction. View looking north. July 1, 1908. - Theodore Roosevelt Dam, Transformer House, Salt River, Tortilla Flat, Maricopa County, AZ

  13. 10. Photographic copy of drawing dated January 22, 1908 (Source: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photographic copy of drawing dated January 22, 1908 (Source: Salt River Project) General plans, index to detail plans and sections, transformer house - Theodore Roosevelt Dam, Transformer House, Salt River, Tortilla Flat, Maricopa County, AZ

  14. 11. Photographic copy of drawing dated February 17, 1908 (Source: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photographic copy of drawing dated February 17, 1908 (Source: Salt River Project) Transformer building, first floor plan and sections (Transformer floor) - Theodore Roosevelt Dam, Transformer House, Salt River, Tortilla Flat, Maricopa County, AZ

  15. 8. Photographic copy of photograph (Source: Salt River Project Archives, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Photographic copy of photograph (Source: Salt River Project Archives, Tempe, Box 8040, File 29) View of transformer house looking north. No date. CA. 1920. - Theodore Roosevelt Dam, Transformer House, Salt River, Tortilla Flat, Maricopa County, AZ

  16. 6. Photographic copy of photograph (Source: Salt River Project Archives, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photographic copy of photograph (Source: Salt River Project Archives, Tempe, Lubken collection, #R-295) Transformer house under construction. View looking north. October 5, 1908. - Theodore Roosevelt Dam, Transformer House, Salt River, Tortilla Flat, Maricopa County, AZ

  17. 9. Photographic copy of drawing dated June 24, 1908 (Source: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Photographic copy of drawing dated June 24, 1908 (Source: Salt River Project) Transformer house, general drawing - Theodore Roosevelt Dam, Transformer House, Salt River, Tortilla Flat, Maricopa County, AZ

  18. 118. Photographic copy of historic photo, April 5, 1932 (original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    118. Photographic copy of historic photo, April 5, 1932 (original print filed in Record Group 115, National Archives, Washington, D.C.). INVAR VOLUME METER, PANEL NO. 3, OWYHEE DAM. - Owyhee Dam, Across Owyhee River, Nyssa, Malheur County, OR

  19. 120. Photographic copy of historic photo, April 5, 1932 (original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    120. Photographic copy of historic photo, April 5, 1932 (original print filed in Record Group 115, National Archives, Washington, D.C.). INVAR VOLUME METER IN PANEL NO. 3, OWYHEE DAM. - Owyhee Dam, Across Owyhee River, Nyssa, Malheur County, OR

  20. 119. Photographic copy of historic photo, April 5, 1932 (original ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    119. Photographic copy of historic photo, April 5, 1932 (original print filed in Record Group 115, National Archives, Washington, D.C.). INSTALLING INVAR METER IN PANEL NO. 4, OWYHEE DAM. - Owyhee Dam, Across Owyhee River, Nyssa, Malheur County, OR