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Sample records for cord blood cells

  1. Osmotic parameters of red blood cells from umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Zhurova, Mariia; McGann, Locksley E; Acker, Jason P

    2014-06-01

    The transfusion of red blood cells from umbilical cord blood (cord RBCs) is gathering significant interest for the treatment of fetal and neonatal anemia, due to its high content of fetal hemoglobin as well as numerous other potential benefits to fetuses and neonates. However, in order to establish a stable supply of cord RBCs for clinical use, a cryopreservation method must be developed. This, in turn, requires knowledge of the osmotic parameters of cord RBCs. Thus, the objective of this study was to characterize the osmotic parameters of cord RBCs: osmotically inactive fraction (b), hydraulic conductivity (Lp), permeability to cryoprotectant glycerol (Pglycerol), and corresponding Arrhenius activation energies (Ea). For Lp and Pglycerol determination, RBCs were analyzed using a stopped-flow system to monitor osmotically-induced RBC volume changes via intrinsic RBC hemoglobin fluorescence. Lp and Pglycerol were characterized at 4°C, 20°C, and 35°C using Jacobs and Stewart equations with the Ea calculated from the Arrhenius plot. Results indicate that cord RBCs have a larger osmotically inactive fraction compared to adult RBCs. Hydraulic conductivity and osmotic permeability to glycerol of cord RBCs differed compared to those of adult RBCs with the differences dependent on experimental conditions, such as temperature and osmolality. Compared to adult RBCs, cord RBCs had a higher Ea for Lp and a lower Ea for Pglycerol. This information regarding osmotic parameters will be used in future work to develop a protocol for cryopreserving cord RBCs. PMID:24727610

  2. Quality of red blood cells isolated from umbilical cord blood stored at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhurova, Mariia; Akabutu, John; Acker, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) from cord blood contain fetal hemoglobin that is predominant in newborns and, therefore, may be more appropriate for neonatal transfusions than currently transfused adult RBCs. Post-collection, cord blood can be stored at room temperature for several days before it is processed for stem cells isolation, with little known about how these conditions affect currently discarded RBCs. The present study examined the effect of the duration cord blood spent at room temperature and other cord blood characteristics on cord RBC quality. RBCs were tested immediately after their isolation from cord blood using a broad panel of quality assays. No significant decrease in cord RBC quality was observed during the first 65 hours of storage at room temperature. The ratio of cord blood to anticoagulant was associated with RBC quality and needs to be optimized in future. This knowledge will assist in future development of cord RBC transfusion product.

  3. Saving the leftovers: models for banking cord blood stem cells.

    PubMed

    Cogdell, Kimberly J

    2009-01-01

    Each year there are over four million live births in the United States. Each birth produces umbilical cord blood stem cells, which are usually discarded. The author argues that rather than discarding the umbilical cord, this valuable resource of cord blood should be banked and used for research and therapeutic purposes. Umbilical cord blood could provide a solution to the critical need to find matching donors for hematopoietic transplants in patients who have no matching bone marrow donors. Creating a system of universal donation to a public bank will greatlyincrease the number of donors and therefore, the number of matches for patients. Such a system will facilitate the development and use of new technologies and transplant procedures, while providing an opportunity for treatment to individuals who would otherwise not be able to find suitable donors.

  4. Saving the leftovers: models for banking cord blood stem cells.

    PubMed

    Cogdell, Kimberly J

    2009-01-01

    Each year there are over four million live births in the United States. Each birth produces umbilical cord blood stem cells, which are usually discarded. The author argues that rather than discarding the umbilical cord, this valuable resource of cord blood should be banked and used for research and therapeutic purposes. Umbilical cord blood could provide a solution to the critical need to find matching donors for hematopoietic transplants in patients who have no matching bone marrow donors. Creating a system of universal donation to a public bank will greatlyincrease the number of donors and therefore, the number of matches for patients. Such a system will facilitate the development and use of new technologies and transplant procedures, while providing an opportunity for treatment to individuals who would otherwise not be able to find suitable donors. PMID:20101907

  5. Expansion of human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chou, Song; Chu, Pat; Hwang, William; Lodish, Harvey

    2010-10-01

    A recent Science paper reported a purine derivative that expands human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells in culture (Boitano et al., 2010) by antagonizing the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Major problems need to be overcome before ex vivo HSC expansion can be used clinically.

  6. [Allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with unrelated cord blood: report of three cases from the Chilean cord blood bank].

    PubMed

    Barriga, Francisco; Wietstruck, Angélica; Rojas, Nicolás; Bertin, Pablo; Pizarro, Isabel; Carmona, Amanda; Guilof, Alejandro; Rojas, Iván; Oyarzún, Enrique

    2013-08-01

    Public cord blood banks are a source of hematopoietic stem cells for patients with hematological diseases who lack a family donor and need allogeneic transplantation. In June 2007 we started a cord blood bank with units donated in three maternity wards in Santiago, Chile. We report the first three transplants done with cord blood units form this bank. Cord blood units were obtained by intrauterine collection at delivery. They were depleted of plasma and red cells and frozen in liquid nitrogen. Tests for total nucleated cells, CD34 cell content, viral serology, bacterial cultures and HLA A, B and DRB1 were done. Six hundred cord blood units were stored by March 2012. Three patients received allogeneic transplant with cord blood from our bank, two with high risk lymphoblastic leukemia and one with severe congenital anemia. They received conditioning regimens according to their disease and usual supportive care for unrelated donor transplantation until full hematopoietic and immune reconstitution was achieved. The three patients had early engraftment of neutrophils and platelets. The child corrected his anemia and the leukemia patients remain in complete remission. The post-transplant course was complicated with Epstein Barr virus, cytomegalovirus and BK virus infection. Two patients are fully functional 24 and 33 months after transplant, the third is still receiving immunosuppression.

  7. Cord Blood Cells for Developmental Toxicology and Environmental Health

    PubMed Central

    Il’yasova, Dora; Kloc, Noreen; Kinev, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The Tox21 program initiated a shift in toxicology toward in vitro testing with a focus on the biological mechanisms responsible for toxicological response. We discuss the applications of these initiatives to developmental toxicology. Specifically, we briefly review current approaches that are widely used in developmental toxicology to demonstrate the gap in relevance to human populations. An important aspect of human relevance is the wide variability of cellular responses to toxicants. We discuss how this gap can be addressed by using cells isolated from umbilical cord blood, an entirely non-invasive source of fetal/newborn cells. Extension of toxicological testing to collections of human fetal/newborn cells would be useful for better understanding the effect of toxicants on fetal development in human populations. By presenting this perspective, we aim to initiate a discussion about the use of cord blood donor-specific cells to capture the variability of cellular toxicological responses during this vulnerable stage of human development. PMID:26697419

  8. Adoptive Immunotherapy using Regulatory T cells and Virus-specific T cells Derived from Cord Blood

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Patrick J.; Bollard, Catherine M.; Brunstein, Claudio G

    2014-01-01

    Cord blood transplantation, an alternative to traditional stem cell transplants (bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation), is an attractive option for patients lacking suitable stem cell transplant donors. Cord blood units have also proven to be a valuable donor source for the development of cellular therapeutics. Virus-specific T cells and regulatory T cells are two cord blood derived products that have shown promise in early phase clinical trials to prevent and/or treat viral infections and graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), respectively. Here we describe how current strategies utilizing cord blood-derived regulatory T cells and virus-specific T cells have been developed to improve outcomes for cord blood transplant recipients. PMID:25632003

  9. Human umbilical cord blood cells and diabetes mellitus: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Reddi, Alluru S; Kothari, Neil; Kuppasani, Kishore; Ende, Norman

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapy for patients with diabetes is an area of great interest to both scientists and clinicians. Human umbilical cord blood cells (HUCBCs) are being increasingly used as a source of stem cells for cell-based therapy for diabetes because these cells can differentiate into pancreatic islet β-cells. Administration of HUCBCs has been shown to lower blood glucose levels in diabetic animal models. The use of autologous HUCBC transfusion in type 1 diabetic children has not shown any benefit. However, "Stem Cell Educator" therapy has shown promise in long term lowering of blood glucose levels in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients. In this review, we will briefly discuss recent advances in HUCBC therapy in the treatment of diabetes and some of its complications.

  10. Cord-Blood Banking

    MedlinePlus

    ... cord blood mainly because of the promise that stem cell research holds for the future. Most of us would have little use for stem cells now, but research into using them to treat diseases is ongoing — ...

  11. Cord Blood Mononuclear Cells Have a Potential to Produce NK Cells Using IL2Rg Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Khaziri, Nahid; Mohammadi, Momeneh; Aliyari, Zeinab; Soleimani Rad, Jafar; Tayefi Nasrabadi, Hamid; Nozad Charoudeh, Hojjatollah

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Although bone marrow represents the main site for NK cell development and also distinct thymic-dependentNK cell pathway was identified, the cytokines effect on the NK cell generation from cord blood is unclear. Studies were identified the role of cytokines in the regulation of bone marrow and thymic NK cells. Previous studies reported that IL15 are critical for bone marrow dependent and IL7 is important for thymic NK cells. It is remain unclear the cytokines influence on the expantion of NK cells in cord blood mononuclear cells. Methods: We evaluated cultured cord blood mononuclear cells suplememnted with combinations of cytokines using FACS in distinct time points. In this study, we presented the role of IL2, IL7 and IL15 as members of the common gamma receptor -chain (Il2rg) on the expansion NK cells from cord blood cells. Results: By investigating cord blood mononuclear cells in vitro , we demonstrated that IL2 and IL15 are important for expansion of NK cells. IL2 in comparision with IL15 has more influences in NK cell expansion. In contrast IL-7 is dispensable for NK cell generation in cord blood. Conclusion: Thus,IL-2Rg cytokines play complementary roles and are indispensable for homeostasis of NK cell development in cord blood. Probably these cytokines could help to use NK beneficials in engrafment of transplanted cells and Anti tumor activity of NK cells. PMID:27123412

  12. Cord Blood as a Source of Natural Killer Cells.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Rohtesh S; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2015-01-01

    Cord blood (CB) offers several unique advantages as a graft source for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The risk of relapse and graft vs. host disease after cord blood transplantation (CBT) is lower than what is typically observed after other graft sources with a similar degree of human leukocyte antigen mismatch. Natural killer (NK) cells have a well-defined role in both innate and adaptive immunity and as the first lymphocytes to reconstitute after HSCT and CBT, and they play a significant role in protection against early relapse. In this article, we highlight the uses of CB NK cells in transplantation and adoptive immunotherapy. First, we will describe differences in the phenotype and functional characteristics of NK cells in CB as compared with peripheral blood. Then, we will review some of the obstacles we face in using resting CB NK cells for adoptive immunotherapy, and discuss methods to overcome them. We will review the current literature on killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors ligand mismatch and outcomes after CBT. Finally, we will touch on current strategies for the use of CB NK cells in cellular immunotherapy. PMID:26779484

  13. Human umbilical cord blood cell grafts for brain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong-Hyuk; Borlongan, Cesar V; Willing, Alison E; Eve, David J; Cruz, L Eduardo; Sanberg, Cyndy D; Chung, Yong-Gu; Sanberg, Paul R

    2009-01-01

    Irreversible and permanent damage develop immediately adjacent to the region of reduced cerebral blood perfusion in stroke patients. Currently, the proven thrombolytic treatment for stroke, tissue plasminogen activator, is only effective when administered within 3 h after stroke. These disease characteristics should be taken under consideration in developing any therapeutic intervention designed to widen the narrow therapeutic range, especially cell-based therapy. Over the past several years, our group and others have characterized the therapeutic potential of human umbilical cord blood cells for stroke and other neurological disorders using in vitro and vivo models focusing on the cells' ability to differentiate into nonhematopoietic cells including neural lineage, as well as their ability to produce several neurotrophic factors and modulate immune and inflammatory reaction. Rather than the conventional cell replacement mechanism, we advance alternative pathways of graft-mediated brain repair involving neurotrophic effects resulting from release of various growth factors that afford cell survival, angiogenesis, and anti-inflammation. Eventually, these multiple protective and restorative effects from umbilical cord blood cell grafts may be interdependent and act in harmony in promoting therapeutic benefits for stroke. PMID:19523333

  14. The treatment of neurodegenerative disorders using umbilical cord blood and menstrual blood-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sanberg, Paul R; Eve, David J; Willing, Alison E; Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana; Tan, Jun; Sanberg, Cyndy D; Allickson, Julie G; Cruz, L Eduardo; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2011-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation is a potentially important means of treatment for a number of disorders. Two different stem cell populations of interest are mononuclear umbilical cord blood cells and menstrual blood-derived stem cells. These cells are relatively easy to obtain, appear to be pluripotent, and are immunologically immature. These cells, particularly umbilical cord blood cells, have been studied as either single or multiple injections in a number of animal models of neurodegenerative disorders with some degree of success, including stroke, Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Sanfilippo syndrome type B. Evidence of anti-inflammatory effects and secretion of specific cytokines and growth factors that promote cell survival, rather than cell replacement, have been detected in both transplanted cells.

  15. Umbilical cord blood stem cells for myocardial repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Greco, Nicholas; Laughlin, Mary J

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality with substantial economic cost. There remains a need for therapeutic improvement for patients refractory to revascularization and those who redevelop occlusions following revascularization. Early evidence linked age-associated reductions in the levels of circulating marrow-derived hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), characterized by expression of early HSC markers CD133 and CD34, with the occurrence of cardiovascular events and associated death. Heart tissue has the endogenous ability to regenerate through the activation of resident cardiac stem cells or through recruitment of a stem cell population from other tissues, such as bone marrow. A number of clinical trials have utilized patient-derived autologous bone marrow-derived cells or whole BM uncultured mononuclear cells (MNC) infused or injected locally to augment angiogenesis. In most cases of treating animal models with human cells, the frequency of stem cell engraftment, the subsequent number of newly generated cardiomyocytes and vascular cells, and the augmentation of endogenous microvascular collateralization, either by deposition, transdifferentiation, and/or by cell fusion, appear to be too low to explain the significant cardiac improvement. Initially, it was hypothesized that cell therapy may work by cell replacement mechanisms, but recent evidence suggests alternatively that cell therapy works by providing trophic support to the injured tissues. An alternative hypothesis is that the transplanted stem cells release soluble cytokines and growth factors (i.e., paracrine factors) that function in a paracrine fashion, contributing to cardiac repair and regeneration by inducing cytoprotection and neovascularization. Another hypothesis which may also be operative is that cell therapy may mediate endogenous regeneration by the activation of resident cardiac stem cell. Well-established clinical trials have used cord blood for the treatment of

  16. Isolation of whole mononuclear cells from peripheral blood and cord blood.

    PubMed

    Fuss, Ivan J; Kanof, Marjorie E; Smith, Phillip D; Zola, Heddy

    2009-04-01

    Peripheral blood is the primary source of lymphoid cells for investigation of the human immune system. Its use is facilitated by Ficoll-Hypaque density gradient centrifugation-a simple and rapid method of purifying peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) that takes advantage of the density differences between mononuclear cells and other elements found in the blood sample. Thus, cells are distributed in the solution in layers based on the differences in their density/size. Additional purification methods can be employed as the mononuclear cell sample can be purified from monocytes by adherence or by exposure to L-leucine methyl ester; these methods are described for both procedures. Cord blood and peripheral blood from infants contain immature cells, including nucleated red cells, which can result in significant contamination of the mononuclear cell layer, and removal of these cells requires additional steps that are described. The isolation procedures presented here can also be applied to cell populations derived from tissues.

  17. The meanings of consent to the donation of cord blood stem cells: perspectives from an interview-based study of a public cord blood bank in England

    PubMed Central

    Busby, Helen

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the perspectives of women who have agreed that their umbilical cord blood may be collected for a public ‘cord blood bank’, for use in transplant medicine or research. Drawing on interview data from 27 mothers who agreed to the collection and use of their umbilical cord blood, these choices and the informed consent process are explored. It is shown that the needs of sick children requiring transplants are prominent in narrative accounts of cord blood banking, together with high expectations for future applications of stem cells. Given this dynamic, a concern arises that the complex and multiple uses of tissues and related data might be oversimplified in the consent process. In conclusion, the positive finding of a commitment to mutuality in cord blood banking among these women is underlined, and its implications for the wider debate on cord blood banking are discussed. PMID:21666742

  18. [Umbilical cord blood as a source of stem cells].

    PubMed

    Bojanić, Ines; Golubić Cepulić, Branka

    2006-06-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is a source of the rare but precious primitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and progenitor cells that can reconstitute the hematopoietic system in patients with malignant and nonmalignant disorders treated with myeloablative therapy. UCB cells possess an enhanced capacity for progenitor cell proliferation and self-renewal in vitro. UCB is usually discarded, and it exists in almost limitless supply. The blood remaining in the delivered placenta is safely and easily collected and stored. The predominant collection procedure currently practiced involves a relatively simple venipuncture, followed by gravity drainage into a standard sterile anti-coagulant-filled blood bag, using a closed system, similar to the one utilized on whole blood collection. After aliquots have been removed for routine testing, the units are cryopreserved and stored in liquid nitrogen. UCB banks are being established throughout the world and UCB units are collected for allogeneic unrelated and related HSC transplantation. In unrelated cord blood banks donated UCB units are collected and stored for allogeneic use in patients who do not have an identified HLA matched relative. UCB banks report available units to national and international donor registries. The second model of UCB banking is referred to as family banking, where UCB is stored for the benefit of the donor or their family members. After more than one decade of clinical experience, it is currently accepted that UCB transplants, related and unrelated, are equivalent to or might compare favorably with bone marrow (BM) transplants, especially in children. Initial studies of long-term survival in children with both malignant and non-malignant hematologic disorders, who were transplanted with UCB from a sibling donor, demonstrated comparable or superior survival to children who received BM transplantation. One factor that limits the use of UCB transplantation in adult patients is the relatively limited number of

  19. [THE USE AND STORAGE OF STEM CELLS AND CORD BLOOD: FRENCH AND ENGLISH LAW COMPARATIVE APPROACH].

    PubMed

    Madanamoothoo, Allane

    2015-07-01

    Becoming parents is one of the greatest wishes of a lot of couples. When their dreams come true, prior to the birth of the child, parents have to face several points: the choice of the name, place of delivery, breast or bottle feeding, etc. Recently, they have to face the issues of cord blood stem cells. Researchers and cord blood banks are also interested in those cells. In many countries a lot of advertising is made around umbilical cord blood stem cells. In France as in England, the use and preservation of cord blood are regulated by the legislators without necessarily having the same approach. The objective of this paper is to present English and French law approaches' on cord blood stem cells.

  20. [THE USE AND STORAGE OF STEM CELLS AND CORD BLOOD: FRENCH AND ENGLISH LAW COMPARATIVE APPROACH].

    PubMed

    Madanamoothoo, Allane

    2015-07-01

    Becoming parents is one of the greatest wishes of a lot of couples. When their dreams come true, prior to the birth of the child, parents have to face several points: the choice of the name, place of delivery, breast or bottle feeding, etc. Recently, they have to face the issues of cord blood stem cells. Researchers and cord blood banks are also interested in those cells. In many countries a lot of advertising is made around umbilical cord blood stem cells. In France as in England, the use and preservation of cord blood are regulated by the legislators without necessarily having the same approach. The objective of this paper is to present English and French law approaches' on cord blood stem cells. PMID:27356356

  1. Osmotic tolerance limits of red blood cells from umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Zhurova, Mariia; Lusianti, Ratih E; Higgins, Adam Z; Acker, Jason P

    2014-08-01

    Effective methods for long-term preservation of cord red blood cells (RBCs) are needed to ensure a readily available supply of RBCs to treat fetal and neonatal anemia. Cryopreservation is a potential long-term storage strategy for maintaining the quality of cord RBCs for the use in intrauterine and neonatal transfusion. However, during cryopreservation, cells are subjected to damaging osmotic stresses during cryoprotectant addition and removal and freezing and thawing that require knowledge of osmotic tolerance limits in order to optimize the preservation process. The objective of this study was to characterize the osmotic tolerance limits of cord RBCs in conditions relevant to cryopreservation, and compare the results to the osmotic tolerance limits of adult RBCs. Osmotic tolerance limits were determined by exposing RBCs to solutions of different concentrations to induce a range of osmotic volume changes. Three treatment groups of adult and cord RBCs were tested: (1) isotonic saline, (2) 40% w/v glycerol, and (3) frozen-thawed RBCs in 40% w/v glycerol. We show that cord RBCs are more sensitive to shrinkage and swelling than adult RBCs, indicating that osmotic tolerance limits should be considered when adding and removing cryoprotectants. In addition, freezing and thawing resulted in both cord and adult RBCs becoming more sensitive to post-thaw swelling requiring that glycerol removal procedures for both cell types ensure that cell volume excursions are maintained below 1.7 times the isotonic osmotically active volume to attain good post-wash cell recovery. Our results will help inform the development of optimized cryopreservation protocol for cord RBCs. PMID:24836371

  2. Osmotic tolerance limits of red blood cells from umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Zhurova, Mariia; Lusianti, Ratih E; Higgins, Adam Z; Acker, Jason P

    2014-08-01

    Effective methods for long-term preservation of cord red blood cells (RBCs) are needed to ensure a readily available supply of RBCs to treat fetal and neonatal anemia. Cryopreservation is a potential long-term storage strategy for maintaining the quality of cord RBCs for the use in intrauterine and neonatal transfusion. However, during cryopreservation, cells are subjected to damaging osmotic stresses during cryoprotectant addition and removal and freezing and thawing that require knowledge of osmotic tolerance limits in order to optimize the preservation process. The objective of this study was to characterize the osmotic tolerance limits of cord RBCs in conditions relevant to cryopreservation, and compare the results to the osmotic tolerance limits of adult RBCs. Osmotic tolerance limits were determined by exposing RBCs to solutions of different concentrations to induce a range of osmotic volume changes. Three treatment groups of adult and cord RBCs were tested: (1) isotonic saline, (2) 40% w/v glycerol, and (3) frozen-thawed RBCs in 40% w/v glycerol. We show that cord RBCs are more sensitive to shrinkage and swelling than adult RBCs, indicating that osmotic tolerance limits should be considered when adding and removing cryoprotectants. In addition, freezing and thawing resulted in both cord and adult RBCs becoming more sensitive to post-thaw swelling requiring that glycerol removal procedures for both cell types ensure that cell volume excursions are maintained below 1.7 times the isotonic osmotically active volume to attain good post-wash cell recovery. Our results will help inform the development of optimized cryopreservation protocol for cord RBCs.

  3. Transplantation of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood promotes functional recovery after traumatic spinal cord injury in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, L P; Iglesias, D; Nicola, F C; Steffens, D; Valentim, L; Witczak, A; Zanatta, G; Achaval, M; Pranke, P; Netto, C A

    2012-01-01

    Cell transplantation is a promising experimental treatment for spinal cord injury. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood in promoting functional recovery when transplanted after a contusion spinal cord injury. Female Wistar rats (12 weeks old) were submitted to spinal injury with a MASCIS impactor and divided into 4 groups: control, surgical control, spinal cord injury, and one cell-treated lesion group. Mononuclear cells from umbilical cord blood of human male neonates were transplanted in two experiments: a) 1 h after surgery, into the injury site at a concentration of 5 x 10(6) cells diluted in 10 µL 0.9% NaCl (N = 8-10 per group); b) into the cisterna magna, 9 days after lesion at a concentration of 5 x 10(6) cells diluted in 150 µL 0.9% NaCl (N = 12-14 per group). The transplanted animals were immunosuppressed with cyclosporin-A (10 mg/kg per day). The BBB scale was used to evaluate motor behavior and the injury site was analyzed with immunofluorescent markers to label human transplanted cells, oligodendrocytes, neurons, and astrocytes. Spinal cord injury rats had 25% loss of cord tissue and cell treatment did not affect lesion extension. Transplanted cells survived in the injured area for 6 weeks after the procedure and both transplanted groups showed better motor recovery than the untreated ones (P < 0.05). The transplantation of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood promoted functional recovery with no evidence of cell differentiation. PMID:22183246

  4. Transplantation of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood promotes functional recovery after traumatic spinal cord injury in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, L.P.; Iglesias, D.; Nicola, F.C.; Steffens, D.; Valentim, L.; Witczak, A.; Zanatta, G.; Achaval, M.; Pranke, P.; Netto, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    Cell transplantation is a promising experimental treatment for spinal cord injury. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood in promoting functional recovery when transplanted after a contusion spinal cord injury. Female Wistar rats (12 weeks old) were submitted to spinal injury with a MASCIS impactor and divided into 4 groups: control, surgical control, spinal cord injury, and one cell-treated lesion group. Mononuclear cells from umbilical cord blood of human male neonates were transplanted in two experiments: a) 1 h after surgery, into the injury site at a concentration of 5 x 106 cells diluted in 10 µL 0.9% NaCl (N = 8-10 per group); b) into the cisterna magna, 9 days after lesion at a concentration of 5 x 106 cells diluted in 150 µL 0.9% NaCl (N = 12-14 per group). The transplanted animals were immunosuppressed with cyclosporin-A (10 mg/kg per day). The BBB scale was used to evaluate motor behavior and the injury site was analyzed with immunofluorescent markers to label human transplanted cells, oligodendrocytes, neurons, and astrocytes. Spinal cord injury rats had 25% loss of cord tissue and cell treatment did not affect lesion extension. Transplanted cells survived in the injured area for 6 weeks after the procedure and both transplanted groups showed better motor recovery than the untreated ones (P < 0.05). The transplantation of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood promoted functional recovery with no evidence of cell differentiation. PMID:22183246

  5. Cord blood T cells mediate enhanced antitumor effects compared with adult peripheral blood T cells.

    PubMed

    Hiwarkar, Prashant; Qasim, Waseem; Ricciardelli, Ida; Gilmour, Kimberly; Quezada, Sergio; Saudemont, Aurore; Amrolia, Persis; Veys, Paul

    2015-12-24

    Unrelated cord blood transplantation (CBT) without in vivo T-cell depletion is increasingly used to treat high-risk hematologic malignancies. Following T-replete CBT, naïve CB T cells undergo rapid peripheral expansion with memory-effector differentiation. Emerging data suggest that unrelated CBT, particularly in the context of HLA mismatch and a T-replete graft, may reduce leukemic relapse. To study the role of CB T cells in mediating graft-versus-tumor responses and dissect the underlying immune mechanisms for this, we compared the ability of HLA-mismatched CB and adult peripheral blood (PB) T cells to eliminate Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-driven human B-cell lymphoma in a xenogeneic NOD/SCID/IL2rg(null) mouse model. CB T cells mediated enhanced tumor rejection compared with equal numbers of PB T cells, leading to improved survival in the CB group (P < .0003). Comparison of CB T cells that were autologous vs allogeneic to the lymphoma demonstrated that this antitumor effect was mediated by alloreactive rather than EBV-specific T cells. Analysis of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes demonstrated that CB T cells mediated this enhanced antitumor effect by rapid infiltration of the tumor with CCR7(+)CD8(+) T cells and prompt induction of cytotoxic CD8(+) and CD4(+) T-helper (Th1) T cells in the tumor microenvironment. In contrast, in the PB group, this antilymphoma effect is impaired because of delayed tumoral infiltration of PB T cells and a relative bias toward suppressive Th2 and T-regulatory cells. Our data suggest that, despite being naturally programmed toward tolerance, reconstituting T cells after unrelated T-replete CBT may provide superior Tc1-Th1 antitumor effects against high-risk hematologic malignancies.

  6. Sibling cord blood donor program for hematopoietic cell transplantation: the 20-year experience in the Rome Cord Blood Bank.

    PubMed

    Screnci, Maria; Murgi, Emilia; Valle, Veronica; Tamburini, Anna; Pellegrini, Maria Grazia; Strano, Sabrina; Corona, Francesca; Ambrogi, Eleonora Barbacci; Girelli, Gabriella

    2016-03-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) represents a source of hematopoietic stem cells for patients lacking a suitably matched and readily available related or unrelated stem cell donor. As UCB transplantation from compatible sibling provides good results in children therefore directed sibling UCB collection and banking is indicated in family who already have a child with a disease potentially treatable with an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Particularly, related UCB collection is recommended when the patients urgently need a transplantation. To provide access to all patients in need, we developed a "Sibling cord blood donor program for hematopoietic cell transplantation". Here we report results of this project started 20years ago. To date, in this study a total of 194 families were enrolled, a total of 204 UCB samples were successfully collected and 15 pediatric patients have been transplanted. Recently, some authors have suggested novel role for UCB other than in the transplantation setting. Therefore, future studies in the immunotherapy and regenerative medicine areas could expand indication for sibling directed UCB collection.

  7. Transplantation of umbilical cord blood stem cells for treating spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong-Hyuk; Lee, Jeong-Hyun; Borlongan, Cesario V; Sanberg, Paul R; Chung, Yong-Gu; Cho, Tai-Hyoung

    2011-03-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) develops primary and secondary damage to neural tissue and this often results in permanent disability of the motor and sensory functions. However, there is currently no effective treatment except methylprednisolone, and the use of methylprednisolone has also been questioned due to its moderate efficacy and the drug's downside. Regenerative medicine has remarkably developed since the discovery of stem cells, and many studies have suggested the potential of cell-based therapies for neural injury. Especially, the therapeutic potential of human umbilical cord blood cells (hUCB cells) for intractable neurological disorders has been demonstrated using in vitro and vivo models. The hUCB cells are immune naïve and they are able to differentiate into other phenotypes, including the neural lineage. Their ability to produce several neurotropic factors and to modulate immune and inflammatory reactions has also been noted. Recent evidence has emerged suggesting alternative pathways of graft-mediated neural repair that involve neurotrophic effects. These effects are caused by the release of various growth factors that promote cell survival, angiogenesis and anti-inflammation, and this is all aside from a cell replacement mechanism. In this review, we present the recent findings on the stemness properties and the therapeutic potential of hUCB as a safe, feasible and effective cellular source for transplantation in SCI. These multifaceted protective and restorative effects from hUCB grafts may be interdependent and they act in harmony to promote therapeutic benefits for SCI. Nevertheless, clinical studies with hUCB are still rare because of the concerns about safety and efficiency. Among these concerns, the major histocompatibility in allogeneic transplantation is an important issue to be addressed in future clinical trials for treating SCI.

  8. Prostaglandin-modulated umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cutler, Corey; Multani, Pratik; Robbins, David; Kim, Haesook T; Le, Thuy; Hoggatt, Jonathan; Pelus, Louis M; Desponts, Caroline; Chen, Yi-Bin; Rezner, Betsy; Armand, Philippe; Koreth, John; Glotzbecker, Brett; Ho, Vincent T; Alyea, Edwin; Isom, Marlisa; Kao, Grace; Armant, Myriam; Silberstein, Leslie; Hu, Peirong; Soiffer, Robert J; Scadden, David T; Ritz, Jerome; Goessling, Wolfram; North, Trista E; Mendlein, John; Ballen, Karen; Zon, Leonard I; Antin, Joseph H; Shoemaker, Daniel D

    2013-10-24

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is a valuable source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) for use in allogeneic transplantation. Key advantages of UCB are rapid availability and less stringent requirements for HLA matching. However, UCB contains an inherently limited HSC count, which is associated with delayed time to engraftment, high graft failure rates, and early mortality. 16,16-Dimethyl prostaglandin E2 (dmPGE2) was previously identified to be a critical regulator of HSC homeostasis, and we hypothesized that brief ex vivo modulation with dmPGE2 could improve patient outcomes by increasing the "effective dose" of HSCs. Molecular profiling approaches were used to determine the optimal ex vivo modulation conditions (temperature, time, concentration, and media) for use in the clinical setting. A phase 1 trial was performed to evaluate the safety and therapeutic potential of ex vivo modulation of a single UCB unit using dmPGE2 before reduced-intensity, double UCB transplantation. Results from this study demonstrated clear safety with durable, multilineage engraftment of dmPGE2-treated UCB units. We observed encouraging trends in efficacy, with accelerated neutrophil recovery (17.5 vs 21 days, P = .045), coupled with preferential, long-term engraftment of the dmPGE2-treated UCB unit in 10 of 12 treated participants.

  9. Transplantation of human umbilical cord blood or amniotic epithelial stem cells alleviates mechanical allodynia after spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Roh, Dae-Hyun; Seo, Min-Soo; Choi, Hoon-Seong; Park, Sang-Bum; Han, Ho-Jae; Beitz, Alvin J; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Lee, Jang-Hern

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is a potential treatment for spinal cord injury (SCI), and a variety of different stem cell types have been grafted into humans suffering from spinal cord trauma or into animal models of spinal injury. Although several studies have reported functional motor improvement after transplantation of stem cells into injured spinal cord, the benefit of these cells for treating SCI-induced neuropathic pain is not clear. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic effect of transplanting human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) or amniotic epithelial stem cells (hAESCs) on SCI-induced mechanical allodynia (MA) and thermal hyperalgesia (TH) in T13 spinal cord hemisected rats. Two weeks after SCI, hUCB-MSCs or hAESCs were transplanted around the spinal cord lesion site, and behavioral tests were performed to evaluate changes in SCI-induced MA and TH. Immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses were also performed to evaluate possible therapeutic effects on SCI-induced inflammation and the nociceptive-related phosphorylation of the NMDA NR1 receptor subunit. While transplantation of hUCB-MSCs showed a tendency to reduce MA, transplantation of hAESCs significantly reduced MA. Neither hUCB-MSC nor hAESC transplantation had any effect on SCI-induced TH. Transplantation of hAESCs also significantly reduced the SCI-induced increase in NMDA receptor NR1 subunit phosphorylation (pNR1) expression in the spinal cord. Both hUCB-MSCs and hAESCs reduced the SCI-induced increase in spinal cord expression of the microglial marker, F4/80, but not the increased expression of GFAP or iNOS. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that the transplantation of hAESCs into the injured spinal cord can suppress mechanical allodynia, and this effect seems to be closely associated with the modulation of spinal cord microglia activity and NR1 phosphorylation.

  10. Leukemia cell microvesicles promote survival in umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Razmkhah, Farnaz; Soleimani, Masoud; Mehrabani, Davood; Karimi, Mohammad Hossein; Kafi-abad, Sedigheh Amini

    2015-01-01

    Microvesicles can transfer their contents, proteins and RNA, to target cells and thereby transform them. This may induce apoptosis or survival depending on cell origin and the target cell. In this study, we investigate the effect of leukemic cell microvesicles on umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells to seek evidence of apoptosis or cell survival. Microvesicles were isolated from both healthy donor bone marrow samples and Jurkat cells by ultra-centrifugation and were added to hematopoietic stem cells sorted from umbilical cord blood samples by magnetic associated cell sorting (MACS) technique. After 7 days, cell count, cell viability, flow cytometry analysis for hematopoietic stem cell markers and qPCR for P53 gene expression were performed. The results showed higher cell number, higher cell viability rate and lower P53 gene expression in leukemia group in comparison with normal and control groups. Also, CD34 expression as the most important hematopoietic stem cell marker, did not change during the treatment and lineage differentiation was not observed. In conclusion, this study showed anti-apoptotic effect of leukemia cell derived microvesicles on umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:26862318

  11. Can cord blood banks transform into induced pluripotent stem cell banks?

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongyan; Rao, Mahendra S

    2015-06-01

    The discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and the rapid evolution of clinically compliant protocols to generate such lines from a variety of tissue sources has raised the possibility that personalized medicine may be achievable in the near future. Several strategies to deliver iPSCs for iPSC-derived cell-based therapy have been proposed: one such model has been the cell-banking model, using processes developed by the cord blood industry. The cord blood industry has evolved primarily as a banking model in which units of cord blood harvested from discarded placenta are stored either in a public or a private cord blood bank for future use. The consideration of a cord blood--like banking model has been further spurred by the realization that this population of cells is an ideal starting sample to generate pluripotent cells. Spurred by these technological advances, major efforts are underway to develop a current Good Manufacturing Practice--compliant protocol to generate iPSCs from cord blood and to develop a haplobanking strategy. In this article, we discuss the issues that may affect such an effort. PMID:25770678

  12. Different expression of NOS isoforms in early endothelial progenitor cells derived from peripheral and cord blood.

    PubMed

    Muscari, Claudio; Gamberini, Chiara; Carboni, Marco; Basile, Ilaria; Farruggia, Giovanna; Bonafè, Francesca; Giordano, Emanuele; Caldarera, Claudio Marcello; Guarnieri, Carlo

    2007-11-01

    Cord blood and peripheral-adult blood were compared as different sources of early endothelial precursor cells (eEPCs). Total mononuclear cells (MNCs) were obtained from both blood types and committed to eEPCs by exposure to fibronectin, VEGF, IGF-I, and bFGF. Under this condition, MNCs seeded at the density of 3 x 10(5) cells/cm(2) assumed a spindle shape, which was indicative of developing eEPCs, and expanded in a similar manner irrespective to the blood sources. Ulex europaeus agglutinin (UEA-1) and acetylated low density lipoprotein (acLDL) double staining was present in 90% in both peripheral- and cord-blood eEPCs after 2-week expansion. Also, the ability of eEPCs to form tubule-like structures in Matrigel was independent of their blood source, but dependent on the presence of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). eNOS and nNOS were not detectable by Western blotting in both peripheral and cord-blood eEPCs upon 3 weeks and their mRNA levels were lower than 2% relative to those present in HUVECs. On the contrary, iNOS protein was detectable in peripheral-blood eEPCs, but not in cord-blood eEPCs and HUVECs, as well as iNOS mRNA was more concentrated in peripheral-blood eEPCs than in cord-blood eEPCs and HUVECs. These data suggest that: (a) peripheral and cord blood can be considered comparable sources of eEPCs when they are expanded and differentiated in a short-term period; (b) the extremely low expression of constitutive NOS isoforms in the eEPCs of both blood types should markedly reduce their ability to regulate NO-dependent vasorelaxation; (c) the presence of iNOS in peripheral-blood eEPCs could improve the process of vasculogenesis.

  13. Therapeutic potential of umbilical cord blood cells for type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    He, Binbin; Li, Xia; Yu, Haibo; Zhou, Zhiguang

    2015-11-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is a chronic disorder that results from autoimmune-mediated destruction of pancreatic islet β-cells. However, to date, no conventional intervention has successfully treated the disease. The optimal therapeutic method for T1DM should effectively control the autoimmunity, restore immune homeostasis, preserve residual β-cells, reverse β-cell destruction, and protect the regenerated insulin-producing cells against re-attack. Umbilical cord blood is rich in regulatory T (T(reg)) cells and multiple types of stem cells that exhibit immunomodulating potential and hold promise in their ability to restore peripheral tolerance towards pancreatic islet β-cells through remodeling of immune responses and suppression of autoreactive T cells. Recently, reinfusion of autologous umbilical cord blood or immune cells from cord blood has been proposed as a novel therapy for T1DM, with the advantages of no risk to the donors, minimal ethical concerns, a low incidence of graft-versus-host disease and easy accessibility. In this review, we revisit the role of autologous umbilical cord blood or immune cells from cord blood-based applications for the treatment of T1DM. PMID:25799887

  14. Therapeutic potential of umbilical cord blood cells for type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    He, Binbin; Li, Xia; Yu, Haibo; Zhou, Zhiguang

    2015-11-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is a chronic disorder that results from autoimmune-mediated destruction of pancreatic islet β-cells. However, to date, no conventional intervention has successfully treated the disease. The optimal therapeutic method for T1DM should effectively control the autoimmunity, restore immune homeostasis, preserve residual β-cells, reverse β-cell destruction, and protect the regenerated insulin-producing cells against re-attack. Umbilical cord blood is rich in regulatory T (T(reg)) cells and multiple types of stem cells that exhibit immunomodulating potential and hold promise in their ability to restore peripheral tolerance towards pancreatic islet β-cells through remodeling of immune responses and suppression of autoreactive T cells. Recently, reinfusion of autologous umbilical cord blood or immune cells from cord blood has been proposed as a novel therapy for T1DM, with the advantages of no risk to the donors, minimal ethical concerns, a low incidence of graft-versus-host disease and easy accessibility. In this review, we revisit the role of autologous umbilical cord blood or immune cells from cord blood-based applications for the treatment of T1DM.

  15. [Knockdown of Puma protects cord blood CD34(+) cells against γ- irradiation].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Zhang, Hong-Yan; Pang, Ya-Kun; Gu, Hai-Hui; Xu, Jing; Yuan, Wei-Ping; Cheng, Tao

    2014-04-01

    Puma (P53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis) is a BCL-2 homology 3 (BH3)-only BCL-1 family member and a critical mediator of P53-dependent and -independent apoptosis. Puma plays an essential role in the apoptosis of hematopoietic stem cells exposed to irradiation without an increased risk of malignancies. This study was purposed to develop an effective lentiviral vector to target Puma in human hematopoietic cells and to investigate the effect of Puma gene knockdown on the biological function of human cord blood CD34(+) cells. SF-LV-shPuma-EGFP and control vectors were constructed, and packaged with the pSPAX2/pMD2.G packaging plasmids via 293T cells to produce pseudo-type lentiviruses. SF-LV-shPuma-EGFP or control lentiviruses were harvested within 72 hours after transfection and then were used to transduce human cord blood CD34(+) cells. GFP(+) transduced cells were sorted by flow cytometry (FCM) for subsequent studies. Semi-quantitative real time RT PCR, Western blot, FCM with Annexin V-PE/7-AAD double staining, Ki67 staining, colony forming cell assay (CFC), CCK-8 assay and BrdU incorporation were performed to determine the expression of Puma and its effect on the cord blood CD34(+) cells. The results showed that Puma was significantly knocked down in cord blood CD34(+) cells and the low expression of Puma conferred a radio-protective effect on the cord blood CD34(+) cells. This effect was achieved through reduced apoptosis and sustained quiescence after irradiation due to Puma knockdown. It is concluded that knockdown of puma gene in CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells of human cord blood possesses the radioprotective effect, maintains the cells in silence targeting Puma in human hematopoietic cells may have a similar effect with that on mouse hematopoietic cells as previously shown, and our lentiviral targeting system for Puma provides a valuable tool for future translational studies with human cells.

  16. Differentiation of Donor-Derived Cells Into Microglia After Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kazuya; Kakuda, Yumiko; Munemoto, Saori; Yamazaki, Hirohito; Nozaki, Ichiro; Yamada, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies have indicated that microglia originate from immature progenitors in the yolk sac. After birth, microglial populations are maintained under normal conditions via self-renewal without the need to recruit monocyte-derived microglial precursors. Peripheral cell invasion of the brain parenchyma can only occur with disruption of the blood-brain barrier. Here, we report an autopsy case of an umbilical cord blood transplant recipient in whom cells derived from the donor blood differentiated into ramified microglia in the recipient brain parenchyma. Although the blood-brain barrier and glia limitans seemed to prevent invasion of these donor-derived cells, most of the invading donor-derived ramified cells were maintained in the cerebral cortex. This result suggests that invasion of donor-derived cells occurs through the pial membrane. PMID:26226134

  17. [Observation on the biological behavior of human umbilical cord blood adherent cells].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Wang, Pin; Chen, Xing-Hua; Liu, Lin; Peng, Xian-Gui; Kong, Pei-Yan; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Qing-Yu

    2005-02-01

    To study the possibility of separation and culture of human umbilical cord blood adherent cell (HUCBAC), the umbilical cord blood CD34(+) cells were cultured in Dexter system in order to evaluate and observe the biological behavior of adherent cells in vitro. The results showed that all cells were cultured with Dexter system. By day 9-14 (at a median of 11.2 days), adherent cell colonies formed and reached their maximum at 15-22 days (mean 19.6 days), by day 28, all adherent cells spread over the bottom of Petri dish. By means of light microscopy, these cells were found to differentiate into three kinds of cells in culture of 28 days: fibroblast-liked cell, macrophage liked cell and small-round cells. The ratio of these three kinds of cells was 56.8%, 38%, 5.5% respectively. Cytochemistry assay revealed that the positive rate reached 100% in NSE stain and PAS stain; the adherent cell by ALP stain were shown 35% positive, but in POX stain the result was negative. Immunohistochemistry stain revealed that the positive rate of cord adherent cells for CD106, CD29, CD44, CD45, CD50, Fn, Ln, collagen IV etc reached 96%, 93%, 98%, 68%, 72%, 92%, 74%, 83% respectively. It is concluded there are hematopoietic adherent precursors in cord blood CD34(+) cells and the HUCBAC shows some biological behavior of hematopoietic stromal cells.

  18. Reconstitution activity of hypoxic cultured human cord blood CD34-positive cells in NOG mice

    SciTech Connect

    Shima, Haruko; Takubo, Keiyo; Iwasaki, Hiroko; Yoshihara, Hiroki; Gomei, Yumiko; Hosokawa, Kentaro; Arai, Fumio; Takahashi, Takao; Suda, Toshio

    2009-01-16

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside in hypoxic areas of the bone marrow. However, the role of hypoxia in the maintenance of HSCs has not been fully characterized. We performed xenotransplantation of human cord blood cells cultured in hypoxic or normoxic conditions into adult NOD/SCID/IL-2R{gamma}{sup null} (NOG) mice. Hypoxic culture (1% O{sub 2}) for 6 days efficiently supported the maintenance of HSCs, although cell proliferation was suppressed compared to the normoxic culture. In contrast, hypoxia did not affect in vitro colony-forming ability. Upregulation of a cell cycle inhibitor, p21, was observed in hypoxic culture. Immunohistochemical analysis of recipient bone marrow revealed that engrafted CD34{sup +}CD38{sup -} cord blood HSCs were hypoxic. Taken together, these results demonstrate the significance of hypoxia in the maintenance of quiescent human cord blood HSCs.

  19. Effect of cord blood serum on ex vivo human limbal epithelial cell culture.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Anindita; Dutta, Jayanta; Das, Sumantra; Datta, Himadri

    2012-12-01

    Limbal cell transplantation is an efficacious procedure for rehabilitation of visual acuity in patients with severe ocular surface disorders. Cultivation of limbal epithelial stem cell with fetal bovine serum for transplantation has been a promising treatment for reconstructing the ocular surface in severe limbal stem cell deficiency caused by Steven Johnson syndrome, chemical or thermal injury. This technique of "cell therapy" has been accepted worldwide but the cost of cultivating the cells for transplantation is high. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of cord blood serum in place of fetal bovine serum on the growth of human limbal epithelial cell culture. Our group has experimented with human cord blood serum which was obtained free of cost from willing donors. The use of human cord blood serum in place of fetal bovine serum for ex vivo culture of limbal stem cell has helped us in reducing the cost of culture. Fresh human limbal tissues from donor cadavers were cultured on intact and denuded amniotic membrane. Cells were proliferated in vitro with cell culture media containing human cord blood serum. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence cytochemistry of cultured human limbal epithelial stem cell was done for characterization of the cells.

  20. Successful hematopoietic reconstitution with transplantation of erythrocyte-depleted allogeneic human umbilical cord blood cells in a child with leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Pahwa, R N; Fleischer, A; Than, S; Good, R A

    1994-01-01

    Cord blood, a potent source of hematopoietic stem cells, has been shown to successfully reconstitute hematopoiesis following allogeneic transplantation in a variety of disorders. A major drawback of cord blood has been the risk of transfusion reactions in ABO blood group incompatibility and drastic reduction in the stem cell pool if the cord blood is manipulated to remove red cells prior to cryopreservation or after thawing. This report describes an erythrocyte depletion method employing 3% gelatin-induced erythrocyte sedimentation for the selective removal of red cells from cord blood. The red cell-depleted fraction was shown to be enriched in progenitor cells and in cells secreting hematopoietic cytokines interleukin 3, granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and interleukin 6; a major source for cytokines was from cord T cells. This preparative technique was employed to separate out red cells from cord blood of an infant delivered by cesarean section who had an 8-year-old sibling with leukemia. Histocompatibility testing of cord cells revealed complete matching with the patient. A cord cell transplant of cryopreserved and thawed cells consisting of 4 x 10(7) nucleated cells per kg was administered to the patient following myeloablative chemotherapy. The patient's quick hematologic recovery and 9-month disease-free period to date suggest that 3% gelatin separation of erythrocytes is a simple method that can be successfully used for transplanting cord cells for malignant/nonmalignant diseases. PMID:8183934

  1. Cell differentiation mediated by co-culture of human umbilical cord blood stem cells with murine hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Stecklum, Maria; Wulf-Goldenberg, Annika; Purfürst, Bettina; Siegert, Antje; Keil, Marlen; Eckert, Klaus; Fichtner, Iduna

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, purified human cord blood stem cells were co-cultivated with murine hepatic alpha mouse liver 12 (AML12) cells to compare the effect on endodermal stem cell differentiation by either direct cell-cell interaction or by soluble factors in conditioned hepatic cell medium. With that approach, we want to mimic in vitro the situation of preclinical transplantation experiments using human cells in mice. Cord blood stem cells, cultivated with hepatic conditioned medium, showed a low endodermal differentiation but an increased connexin 32 (Cx32) and Cx43, and cytokeratin 8 (CK8) and CK19 expression was monitored by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Microarray profiling indicated that in cultivated cord blood cells, 604 genes were upregulated 2-fold, with the highest expression for epithelial CK19 and epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin). On ultrastructural level, there were no major changes in the cellular morphology, except a higher presence of phago(ly)some-like structures observed. Direct co-culture of AML12 cells with cord blood cells led to less incisive differentiation with increased sex-determining region Y-box 17 (SOX17), Cx32 and Cx43, as well as epithelial CK8 and CK19 expressions. On ultrastructural level, tight cell contacts along the plasma membranes were revealed. FACS analysis in co-cultivated cells quantified dye exchange on low level, as also proved by time relapse video-imaging of labelled cells. Modulators of gap junction formation influenced dye transfer between the co-cultured cells, whereby retinoic acid increased and 3-heptanol reduced the dye transfer. The study indicated that the cell-co-cultured model of human umbilical cord blood cells and murine AML12 cells may be a suitable approach to study some aspects of endodermal/hepatic cell differentiation induction. PMID:25270685

  2. Time related variations in stem cell harvesting of umbilical cord blood

    PubMed Central

    Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Miscio, Giuseppe; Fontana, Andrea; Copetti, Massimiliano; Francavilla, Massimo; Bosi, Alberto; Perfetto, Federico; Valoriani, Alice; De Cata, Angelo; Santodirocco, Michele; Totaro, Angela; Rubino, Rosa; di Mauro, Lazzaro; Tarquini, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) contains hematopoietic stem cells and multipotent mesenchymal cells useful for treatment in malignant/nonmalignant hematologic-immunologic diseases and regenerative medicine. Transplantation outcome is correlated with cord blood volume (CBV), number of total nucleated cells (TNC), CD34+ progenitor cells and colony forming units in UCB donations. Several studies have addressed the role of maternal/neonatal factors associated with the hematopoietic reconstruction potential of UCB, including: gestational age, maternal parity, newborn sex and birth weight, placental weight, labor duration and mode of delivery. Few data exist regarding as to how time influences UCB collection and banking patterns. We retrospectively analyzed 17.936 cord blood donations collected from 1999 to 2011 from Tuscany and Apulia Cord Blood Banks. Results from generalized multivariable linear mixed models showed that CBV, TNC and CD34+ cell were associated with known obstetric and neonatal parameters and showed rhythmic patterns in different time domains and frequency ranges. The present findings confirm that volume, total nucleated cells and stem cells of the UCB donations are hallmarked by rhythmic patterns in different time domains and frequency ranges and suggest that temporal rhythms in addition to known obstetric and neonatal parameters influence CBV, TNC and CD34+ cell content in UBC units. PMID:26906327

  3. Time related variations in stem cell harvesting of umbilical cord blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Miscio, Giuseppe; Fontana, Andrea; Copetti, Massimiliano; Francavilla, Massimo; Bosi, Alberto; Perfetto, Federico; Valoriani, Alice; de Cata, Angelo; Santodirocco, Michele; Totaro, Angela; Rubino, Rosa; di Mauro, Lazzaro; Tarquini, Roberto

    2016-02-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) contains hematopoietic stem cells and multipotent mesenchymal cells useful for treatment in malignant/nonmalignant hematologic-immunologic diseases and regenerative medicine. Transplantation outcome is correlated with cord blood volume (CBV), number of total nucleated cells (TNC), CD34+ progenitor cells and colony forming units in UCB donations. Several studies have addressed the role of maternal/neonatal factors associated with the hematopoietic reconstruction potential of UCB, including: gestational age, maternal parity, newborn sex and birth weight, placental weight, labor duration and mode of delivery. Few data exist regarding as to how time influences UCB collection and banking patterns. We retrospectively analyzed 17.936 cord blood donations collected from 1999 to 2011 from Tuscany and Apulia Cord Blood Banks. Results from generalized multivariable linear mixed models showed that CBV, TNC and CD34+ cell were associated with known obstetric and neonatal parameters and showed rhythmic patterns in different time domains and frequency ranges. The present findings confirm that volume, total nucleated cells and stem cells of the UCB donations are hallmarked by rhythmic patterns in different time domains and frequency ranges and suggest that temporal rhythms in addition to known obstetric and neonatal parameters influence CBV, TNC and CD34+ cell content in UBC units.

  4. Delayed cord clamping in red blood cell alloimmunization: safe, effective, and free?

    PubMed

    McAdams, Ryan M

    2016-04-01

    Hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN), an alloimmune disorder due to maternal and fetal blood type incompatibility, is associated with fetal and neonatal complications related to red blood cell (RBC) hemolysis. After delivery, without placental clearance, neonatal hyperbilirubinemia may develop from ongoing maternal antibody-mediated RBC hemolysis. In cases refractory to intensive phototherapy treatment, exchange transfusions (ET) may be performed to prevent central nervous system damage by reducing circulating bilirubin levels and to replace antibody-coated red blood cells with antigen-negative RBCs. The risks and costs of treating HDN are significant, but appear to be decreased by delayed umbilical cord clamping at birth, a strategy that promotes placental transfusion to the newborn. Compared to immediate cord clamping (ICC), safe and beneficial short-term outcomes have been demonstrated in preterm and term neonates receiving delayed cord clamping (DCC), a practice that may potentially be effective in cases RBC alloimmunization.

  5. Three-dimensional refractive index tomograms and deformability of individual human red blood cells from cord blood of newborn infants and maternal blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, HyunJoo; Ahn, Taegyu; Kim, Kyoohyun; Lee, Sangyun; Kook, Song-yi; Lee, Dongheon; Suh, In Bum; Na, Sunghun; Park, YongKeun

    2015-11-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) from the cord blood of newborn infants have distinctive functions in fetal and infant development. To systematically investigate the biophysical characteristics of individual cord RBCs in newborn infants, a comparative study was performed on RBCs from the cord blood of newborn infants and from adult mothers or nonpregnant women using optical holographic microtomography. Optical measurements of the distributions of the three-dimensional refractive indices and the dynamic membrane fluctuations of individual RBCs were used to investigate the morphological, biochemical, and mechanical properties of cord, maternal, and adult RBCs at the individual cell level. The volume and surface area of the cord RBCs were significantly larger than those of the RBCs from nonpregnant women, and the cord RBCs had more flattened shapes than that of the RBCs in adults. In addition, the hemoglobin (Hb) content in the cord RBCs from newborns was significantly higher. The Hb concentration in the cord RBCs was higher than that in the nonpregnant women or maternal RBCs, but they were within the physiological range of adults. Interestingly, the amplitudes of the dynamic membrane fluctuations in cord RBCs were comparable to those in nonpregnant women and maternal RBCs, suggesting that the deformability of cord RBCs is similar to that of healthy RBCs in adults.

  6. Three-dimensional refractive index tomograms and deformability of individual human red blood cells from cord blood of newborn infants and maternal blood.

    PubMed

    Park, HyunJoo; Ahn, Taegyu; Kim, Kyoohyun; Lee, Sangyun; Kook, Song-Yi; Lee, Dongheon; Suh, In Bum; Na, Sunghun; Park, YongKeun

    2015-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) from the cord blood of newborn infants have distinctive functions in fetal and infant development. To systematically investigate the biophysical characteristics of individual cord RBCs in newborn infants, a comparative study was performed on RBCs from the cord blood of newborn infants and from adult mothers or nonpregnant women using optical holographic microtomography. Optical measurements of the distributions of the three-dimensional refractive indices and the dynamic membrane fluctuations of individual RBCs were used to investigate the morphological, biochemical, and mechanical properties of cord, maternal, and adult RBCs at the individual cell level. The volume and surface area of the cord RBCs were significantly larger than those of the RBCs from nonpregnant women, and the cord RBCs had more flattened shapes than that of the RBCs in adults. In addition, the hemoglobin (Hb) content in the cord RBCs from newborns was significantly higher. The Hb concentration in the cord RBCs was higher than that in the nonpregnant women or maternal RBCs, but they were within the physiological range of adults. Interestingly, the amplitudes of the dynamic membrane fluctuations in cord RBCs were comparable to those in nonpregnant women and maternal RBCs, suggesting that the deformability of cord RBCs is similar to that of healthy RBCs in adults. PMID:26259511

  7. Design guidelines for an umbilical cord blood stem cell therapy quality assessment model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Januszewski, Witold S.; Michałek, Krzysztof; Yagensky, Oleksandr; Wardzińska, Marta

    The paper enlists the pivotal guidelines for producing an empirical umbilical cord blood stem cell therapy quality assessment model. The methodology adapted was single equation linear model with domain knowledge derived from MEDAFAR classification. The resulting model is ready for therapeutical application.

  8. Artificial human tissues from cord and cord blood stem cells for multi-organ regenerative medicine: viable alternatives to animal in vitro toxicology.

    PubMed

    Jurga, Marcin; Forraz, Nico; McGuckin, Colin P

    2010-05-01

    New medicinal products and procedures must meet very strict safety criteria before being applied for use in humans. The laboratory procedures involved require the use of large numbers of animals each year. Furthermore, such investigations do not always give an accurate translation to the human setting. Here, we propose a viable alternative to animal testing, which uses novel technology featuring human cord and cord blood stem cells. With over 130 million children born each year, cord and cord blood remains the most widely available alternative to the use of animals or cadaveric human tissues for in vitro toxicology.

  9. Early peripheral blood and T-cell chimerism dynamics after umbilical cord blood transplantation supported with haploidentical cells.

    PubMed

    Kwon, M; Martínez-Laperche, C; Balsalobre, P; Serrano, D; Anguita, J; Gayoso, J; Díez-Martín, J L; Buño, I

    2014-02-01

    Single-unit umbilical cord blood (CB) SCT is limited by low total nucleated cell (TNC) dose. Co-infusion of CD34+ cells from a third party HLA-mismatched donor, known as dual or haplo-cord transplant, reduces the period of post-transplant neutropenia and related complications. The aim of this study was to analyze the value of early post-transplant peripheral blood (PB) and T cell chimerism after 28 dual transplants regarding CB engraftment. Cumulative incidence of myeloid engraftment at 30 days was 93% with a median time to engraftment of 14 days (10-29). Patients who developed CB graft failure (n=5) showed very low percentages of CB cells on days +14, +21 and +28 with decreasing dynamics. On the other hand, percentages of CB cells in patients who achieved CB engraftment increased over time. Interestingly, such patients showed two distinct chimerism dynamics in PB, but all of them showed a predominance of CB T cells early after SCT with increasing dynamics over time. Early post-transplant chimerism dynamics in PB and T cells predicts CB graft failure enabling rapid therapeutic measures to be applied. On the other hand, early increasing percentages of CB T cells correlates with ultimate CB engraftment.

  10. Recent Stem Cell Advances: Cord Blood and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell for Cardiac Regeneration- a Review.

    PubMed

    Medhekar, Sheetal Kashinath; Shende, Vikas Suresh; Chincholkar, Anjali Baburao

    2016-05-30

    Stem cells are primitive self renewing undifferentiated cell that can be differentiated into various types of specialized cells like nerve cell, skin cells, muscle cells, intestinal tissue, and blood cells. Stem cells live in bone marrow where they divide to make new blood cells and produces peripheral stem cells in circulation. Under proper environment and in presence of signaling molecules stem cells begin to develop into specialized tissues and organs. These unique characteristics make them very promising entities for regeneration of damaged tissue. Day by day increase in incidence of heart diseases including left ventricular dysfunction, ischemic heart disease (IHD), congestive heart failure (CHF) are the major cause of morbidity and mortality. However infracted tissue cannot regenerate into healthy tissue. Heart transplantation is only the treatment for such patient. Due to limitation of availability of donor for organ transplantation, a focus is made for alternative and effective therapy to treat such condition. In this review we have discussed the new advances in stem cells such as use of cord stem cells and iPSC technology in cardiac repair. Future approach of CB cells was found to be used in tissue repair which is specifically observed for improvement of left ventricular function and myocardial infarction. Here we have also focused on how iPSC technology is used for regeneration of cardiomyocytes and intiating neovascularization in myocardial infarction and also for study of pathophysiology of various degenerative diseases and genetic disease in research field.

  11. Recent Stem Cell Advances: Cord Blood and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell for Cardiac Regeneration- a Review

    PubMed Central

    Medhekar, Sheetal Kashinath; Shende, Vikas Suresh; Chincholkar, Anjali Baburao

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells are primitive self renewing undifferentiated cell that can be differentiated into various types of specialized cells like nerve cell, skin cells, muscle cells, intestinal tissue, and blood cells. Stem cells live in bone marrow where they divide to make new blood cells and produces peripheral stem cells in circulation. Under proper environment and in presence of signaling molecules stem cells begin to develop into specialized tissues and organs. These unique characteristics make them very promising entities for regeneration of damaged tissue. Day by day increase in incidence of heart diseases including left ventricular dysfunction, ischemic heart disease (IHD), congestive heart failure (CHF) are the major cause of morbidity and mortality. However infracted tissue cannot regenerate into healthy tissue. Heart transplantation is only the treatment for such patient. Due to limitation of availability of donor for organ transplantation, a focus is made for alternative and effective therapy to treat such condition. In this review we have discussed the new advances in stem cells such as use of cord stem cells and iPSC technology in cardiac repair. Future approach of CB cells was found to be used in tissue repair which is specifically observed for improvement of left ventricular function and myocardial infarction. Here we have also focused on how iPSC technology is used for regeneration of cardiomyocytes and intiating neovascularization in myocardial infarction and also for study of pathophysiology of various degenerative diseases and genetic disease in research field. PMID:27426082

  12. Applications of human umbilical cord blood cells in central nervous system regeneration.

    PubMed

    Herranz, Antonio S; Gonzalo-Gobernado, Rafael; Reimers, Diana; Asensio, Maria J; Rodríguez-Serrano, Macarena; Bazán, Eulalia

    2010-03-01

    In recent decades, there has been considerable amount of information about embryonic stem cells (ES). The dilemma facing scientists interested in the development and use of human stem cells in replacement therapies is the source of these cells, i.e. the human embryo. There are many ethical and moral problems related to the use of these cells. Hematopoietic stem cells from umbilical cord blood have been proposed as an alternative source of embryonic stem cells. After exposure to different agents, these cells are able to express antigens of diverse cellular lineages, including the neural type. The In vitro manipulation of human umbilical cord blood (hUCB) cells has shown their stem capacity and plasticity. These cells are easily accessible, In vitro amplifiable, well tolerated by the host, and with more primitive molecular characteristics that give them great flexibility. Overall, these properties open a promising future for the use of hUCB in regenerative therapies for the Central Nervous System (CNS). This review will focus on the available literature concerning umbilical cord blood cells as a therapeutic tool for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19807661

  13. Applications of human umbilical cord blood cells in central nervous system regeneration.

    PubMed

    Herranz, Antonio S; Gonzalo-Gobernado, Rafael; Reimers, Diana; Asensio, Maria J; Rodríguez-Serrano, Macarena; Bazán, Eulalia

    2010-03-01

    In recent decades, there has been considerable amount of information about embryonic stem cells (ES). The dilemma facing scientists interested in the development and use of human stem cells in replacement therapies is the source of these cells, i.e. the human embryo. There are many ethical and moral problems related to the use of these cells. Hematopoietic stem cells from umbilical cord blood have been proposed as an alternative source of embryonic stem cells. After exposure to different agents, these cells are able to express antigens of diverse cellular lineages, including the neural type. The In vitro manipulation of human umbilical cord blood (hUCB) cells has shown their stem capacity and plasticity. These cells are easily accessible, In vitro amplifiable, well tolerated by the host, and with more primitive molecular characteristics that give them great flexibility. Overall, these properties open a promising future for the use of hUCB in regenerative therapies for the Central Nervous System (CNS). This review will focus on the available literature concerning umbilical cord blood cells as a therapeutic tool for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. Key Immune Cell Cytokines Affects the Telomere Activity of Cord Blood Cells In vitro

    PubMed Central

    Brazvan, Balal; Farahzadi, Raheleh; Mohammadi, Seyede Momeneh; Montazer Saheb, Soheila; Shanehbandi, Dariush; Schmied, Laurent; Soleimani Rad, Jafar; Darabi, Masoud; Nozad Charoudeh, Hojjatollah

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Telomere is a nucleoprotein complex at the end of eukaryotic chromosomes and its length is regulated by telomerase. The number of DNA repeat sequence (TTAGGG)n is reduced with each cell division in differentiated cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of SCF (Stem Cell Factor), Flt3 (Fms- Like tyrosine kinase-3), Interleukin-2, 7 and 15 on telomere length and hTERT gene expression in mononuclear and umbilical cord blood stem cells (CD34+ cells) during development to lymphoid cells. Methods: The mononuclear cells were isolated from umbilical cord blood by Ficoll-Paque density gradient. Then cells were cultured for 21 days in the presence of different cytokines. Telomere length and hTERT gene expression were evaluated in freshly isolated cells, 7, 14 and 21 days of culture by real-time PCR. The same condition had been done for CD34+ cells but telomere length and hTERT gene expression were measured at initial and day 21 of the experiment. Results: Highest hTERT gene expression and maximum telomere length were measured at day14 of MNCs in the presence of IL-7 and IL-15. Also, there was a significant correlation between telomere length and telomerase gene expression in MNCs at 14 days in a combination of IL-7 and IL-15 (r = 0.998, p =0.04). In contrast, IL-2 showed no distinct effect on telomere length and hTERT gene expression in cells. Conclusion: Taken together, IL-7 and IL-15 increased telomere length and hTERT gene expression at 14 day of the experiment. In conclusion, it seems likely that cells maintain naïve phenotype due to prolonged exposure of IL-7 and IL-15. PMID:27478776

  15. Notch signaling: from stem cell expansion to improving cord blood transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mayani, Hector

    2010-08-01

    Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells has been a major goal for experimental hematologists and stem cell biologists during the last two decades. The clinical implications of such a procedure are obvious, considering the increasing interest in cell therapy protocols. This is particularly true in the setting of cord blood transplants, in which increased numbers of such primitive cells are needed. The study analyzed in this article indicates that by stimulating the Notch signal transduction pathway in primitive cord blood cells it is possible to significantly increase the numbers of both hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Furthermore, infusion of such expanded cells in patients receiving a cord blood transplant results in a significant reduction in the time to myeloid engraftment. The relevance of this study is twofold--on the one hand, it shows that the Notch pathway is involved in the expansion capacity of primitive hematopoietic cells in culture, and on the other hand, it indicates that ex vivo-expanded stem/progenitor cells can have a role in hematopoietic transplantation settings. PMID:21083031

  16. DECREASED LEVEL OF CORD BLOOD CIRCULATING ENDOTHELIAL COLONY-FORMING CELLS IN PREECLAMPSIA

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Hernandez, Rocio; Miranda, Maria L.; Stiefel, Pablo; Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Praena-Fernández, Juan M.; Dominguez-Simeon, Maria J.; Villar, Jose; Moreno-Luna, Rafael; Melero-Martin, Juan M.

    2014-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-related disorder associated with increased cardiovascular risk for the offspring. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are a subset of circulating endothelial progenitor cells that participate in the formation of vasculature during development. However, the effect of preeclampsia on fetal levels of ECFCs is largely unknown. In this study, we sought to determine whether cord blood ECFC abundance and function are altered in preeclampsia. We conducted a prospective cohort study that included women with normal (n=35) and preeclamptic (n=15) pregnancies. We measured ECFC levels in the umbilical cord blood of neonates and characterized ECFC phenotype, cloning-forming ability, proliferation and migration towards VEGF-A and FGF-2, in vitro formation of capillary-like structures, and in vivo vasculogenic ability in immunodeficient mice. We found that the level of cord blood ECFCs was statistically lower in preeclampsia than in control pregnancies (P = .04), a reduction that was independent of other obstetric factors. In addition, cord blood ECFCs from preeclamptic pregnancies required more time to emerge in culture than control ECFCs. However, once derived in culture, ECFC function was deemed normal and highly similar between preeclampsia and control, including the ability to form vascular networks in vivo. This study demonstrates that preeclampsia affects ECFC abundance in neonates. A reduced level of ECFCs during preeclamptic pregnancies may contribute to an increased risk of developing future cardiovascular events. PMID:24752434

  17. Decreased level of cord blood circulating endothelial colony-forming cells in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Hernandez, Rocio; Miranda, Maria L; Stiefel, Pablo; Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Praena-Fernández, Juan M; Dominguez-Simeon, Maria J; Villar, Jose; Moreno-Luna, Rafael; Melero-Martin, Juan M

    2014-07-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-related disorder associated with increased cardiovascular risk for the offspring. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are a subset of circulating endothelial progenitor cells that participate in the formation of vasculature during development. However, the effect of preeclampsia on fetal levels of ECFCs is largely unknown. In this study, we sought to determine whether cord blood ECFC abundance and function are altered in preeclampsia. We conducted a prospective cohort study that included women with normal (n=35) and preeclamptic (n=15) pregnancies. We measured ECFC levels in the umbilical cord blood of neonates and characterized ECFC phenotype, cloning-forming ability, proliferation, and migration toward vascular endothelial growth factor-A and fibroblast growth factor-2, in vitro formation of capillary-like structures, and in vivo vasculogenic ability in immunodeficient mice. We found that the level of cord blood ECFCs was statistically lower in preeclampsia than in control pregnancies (P=0.04), a reduction that was independent of other obstetric factors. In addition, cord blood ECFCs from preeclamptic pregnancies required more time to emerge in culture than control ECFCs. However, once derived in culture, ECFC function was deemed normal and highly similar between preeclampsia and control, including the ability to form vascular networks in vivo. This study demonstrates that preeclampsia affects ECFC abundance in neonates. A reduced level of ECFCs during preeclamptic pregnancies may contribute to an increased risk of developing future cardiovascular events.

  18. Isolation, Culture, and Characterization of Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Bieback, Karen; Netsch, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood (CB) is considered one of the youngest available sources of adult stem cells. Besides hematopoietic stem cells, CB has been shown to contain endothelial progenitor cells as well as mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC). To isolate MSC from cord blood, CB is collected into a sterile bag containing the anticoagulant citrate-phosphate-dextrose (CPD). The CB is then processed by density-gradient centrifugation to obtain mononuclear cells (MNC). These are cultured until the outgrowth of fibroblastoid cell colonies appears. After reaching a subconfluent stage, cells are harvested, expanded, and characterized as cord blood mesenchymal stromal cells (CB-MSC) according to standard criteria: plastic adherence, fibroblast morphology, CFU-f assay, proliferation potential, immune phenotype, and differentiation potential.Apparently, the frequency of MSC in CB is extremely low. Thus, not every CB unit will provide adequate MSC isolation yields. Different strategies have been proposed aiming to optimize the isolation success by selecting CB units of optimal quality. It is commonly agreed on that a high CB volume, a high cellular content, and a short time frame between birth and MSC isolation are criteria that will enhance the MSC isolation success.The procedures in this chapter are standardized protocols that were established and optimized in the authors' research laboratory; however, various modifications of the protocols are possible. PMID:27236676

  19. The rationale behind collecting umbilical cord blood

    PubMed Central

    Zech, Nicolas H.; Broer, Nikolas; Ribitsch, Iris; Zech, Mathias H.; Broer, Karl-heinz; Ertan, Kubilay; Preisegger, Karl-heinz

    2010-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is an increasingly important and rich source of stem cells. These cells can be used for the treatment of many diseases, including cancers and immune and genetic disorders. For patients for whom no suitable related donor is available, this source of hematopoietic stem cells offers substantial advantages, notably the relative ease of procurement, the absence of risk to the donor, the small likelihood of transmitting clinically important infections, the low risk of severe graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and the rapid availability of placental blood for transplantation centers. Even though almost 80 diseases are treatable with cord blood stem cells, 97 percent of cord blood is still disposed of after birth and lost for patients in need! To improve availability of stem cells to a broader community, efforts should be undertaken to collect cord blood and expectant parents should be properly informed of their options with regard to cord blood banking. PMID:24591908

  20. Human cord blood CD34+ progenitor cells acquire functional cardiac properties through a cell fusion process.

    PubMed

    Avitabile, Daniele; Crespi, Alessia; Brioschi, Chiara; Parente, Valeria; Toietta, Gabriele; Devanna, Paolo; Baruscotti, Mirko; Truffa, Silvia; Scavone, Angela; Rusconi, Francesca; Biondi, Andrea; D'Alessandra, Yuri; Vigna, Elisa; Difrancesco, Dario; Pesce, Maurizio; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Barbuti, Andrea

    2011-05-01

    The efficacy of cardiac repair by stem cell administration relies on a successful functional integration of injected cells into the host myocardium. Safety concerns have been raised about the possibility that stem cells may induce foci of arrhythmia in the ischemic myocardium. In a previous work (36), we showed that human cord blood CD34(+) cells, when cocultured on neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes, exhibit excitation-contraction coupling features similar to those of cardiomyocytes, even though no human genes were upregulated. The aims of the present work are to investigate whether human CD34(+) cells, isolated after 1 wk of coculture with neonatal ventricular myocytes, possess molecular and functional properties of cardiomyocytes and to discriminate, using a reporter gene system, whether cardiac differentiation derives from a (trans)differentiation or a cell fusion process. Umbilical cord blood CD34(+) cells were isolated by a magnetic cell sorting method, transduced with a lentiviral vector carrying the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene, and seeded onto primary cultures of spontaneously beating rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. Cocultured EGFP(+)/CD34(+)-derived cells were analyzed for their electrophysiological features at different time points. After 1 wk in coculture, EGFP(+) cells, in contact with cardiomyocytes, were spontaneously contracting and had a maximum diastolic potential (MDP) of -53.1 mV, while those that remained isolated from the surrounding myocytes did not contract and had a depolarized resting potential of -11.4 mV. Cells were then resuspended and cultured at low density to identify EGFP(+) progenitor cell derivatives. Under these conditions, we observed single EGFP(+) beating cells that had acquired an hyperpolarization-activated current typical of neonatal cardiomyocytes (EGFP(+) cells, -2.24 ± 0.89 pA/pF; myocytes, -1.99 ± 0.63 pA/pF, at -125 mV). To discriminate between cell autonomous differentiation and fusion, EGFP(+)/CD34

  1. Religious perspectives on umbilical cord blood banking.

    PubMed

    Jordens, Christopher F C; O'Connor, Michelle A C; Kerridge, Ian H; Stewart, Cameron; Cameron, Andrew; Keown, Damien; Lawrence, Rabbi Jeremy; McGarrity, Andrew; Sachedina, Abdulaziz; Tobin, Bernadette

    2012-03-01

    Umbilical cord blood is a valuable source of haematopoietic stem cells. There is little information about whether religious affiliations have any bearing on attitudes to and decisions about its collection, donation and storage. The authors provided information about umbilical cord blood banking to expert commentators from six major world religions (Catholicism, Anglicanism, Islam, Judaism, Hinduism and Buddhism) and asked them to address a specific set of questions in a commentary. The commentaries suggest there is considerable support for umbilical cord blood banking in these religions. Four commentaries provide moral grounds for favouring public donation over private storage. None attach any particular religious significance to the umbilical cord or to the blood within it, nor place restrictions on the ethnicity or religion of donors and recipients. Views on ownership of umbilical cord blood vary. The authors offer a series of general points for those who seek a better understanding of religious perspectives on umbilical cord blood banking. PMID:22558902

  2. Religious perspectives on umbilical cord blood banking.

    PubMed

    Jordens, Christopher F C; O'Connor, Michelle A C; Kerridge, Ian H; Stewart, Cameron; Cameron, Andrew; Keown, Damien; Lawrence, Rabbi Jeremy; McGarrity, Andrew; Sachedina, Abdulaziz; Tobin, Bernadette

    2012-03-01

    Umbilical cord blood is a valuable source of haematopoietic stem cells. There is little information about whether religious affiliations have any bearing on attitudes to and decisions about its collection, donation and storage. The authors provided information about umbilical cord blood banking to expert commentators from six major world religions (Catholicism, Anglicanism, Islam, Judaism, Hinduism and Buddhism) and asked them to address a specific set of questions in a commentary. The commentaries suggest there is considerable support for umbilical cord blood banking in these religions. Four commentaries provide moral grounds for favouring public donation over private storage. None attach any particular religious significance to the umbilical cord or to the blood within it, nor place restrictions on the ethnicity or religion of donors and recipients. Views on ownership of umbilical cord blood vary. The authors offer a series of general points for those who seek a better understanding of religious perspectives on umbilical cord blood banking.

  3. Knowledge and attitudes of pregnant women with regard to collection, testing and banking of cord blood stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Conrad V.; Gordon, Kevin; Hof, Michiel Van den; Taweel, Shaureen; Baylis, Françoise

    2003-01-01

    Background Umbilical cord blood is used as a source of hematopoietic stem cells for bone marrow transplantation in the treatment of malignant and nonmalignant disease. We sought to examine pregnant women's knowledge and attitudes regarding cord blood banking, as their support is crucial to the success of cord blood transplant programs. Methods A questionnaire examining sociodemographic factors and women's attitudes to cord blood banking was developed on the basis of findings from 2 focus groups and a pilot study. The questionnaire was distributed to 650 women attending antenatal clinics at a regional women's hospital between April and July 2001. Results A total of 443 women (68%) responded. More than half of the women (307/438 or 70% [95% confidence interval, CI, 66% to 74%]) reported poor or very poor knowledge about cord blood banking. Many of the respondents (299/441 or 68% [95% CI 63% to 72%]) thought that physicians should talk to pregnant women about the collection of cord blood, and they wanted to receive information about this topic from health care professionals (290/441 or 66% [95% CI 61% to 70%]) or prenatal classes (308/441 or 70% [95% CI 65% to 74%]). Most of the women (379/442 or 86% [95% CI 82% to 89%]) would elect to store cord blood in a public bank, many citing altruism as the reason for this choice. A much smaller proportion (63/442 or 14% [95% CI 11% to 18%]) would elect private banking, indicating that this would be a good investment or that they would feel guilty if the blood had not been stored. Additional acceptable uses for cord blood included research (mentioned by 294/436 women or 67% [95% CI 63% to 72%]) and gene therapy (mentioned by 169/437 women or 39% [95% CI 34% to 43%]). Interpretation Most of the women in this study supported the donation of cord blood to public cord blood banks for potential transplantation and research. PMID:12642424

  4. Human Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cells: Rational for Use as a Neuroprotectant in Ischemic Brain Disease

    PubMed Central

    Arien-Zakay, Hadar; Lecht, Shimon; Nagler, Arnon; Lazarovici, Philip

    2010-01-01

    The use of stem cells for reparative medicine was first proposed more than three decades ago. Hematopoietic stem cells from bone marrow, peripheral blood and human umbilical cord blood (CB) have gained major use for treatment of hematological indications. CB, however, is also a source of cells capable of differentiating into various non-hematopoietic cell types, including neural cells. Several animal model reports have shown that CB cells may be used for treatment of neurological injuries. This review summarizes the information available on the origin of CB-derived neuronal cells and the mechanisms proposed to explain their action. The potential use of stem/progenitor cells for treatment of ischemic brain injuries is discussed. Issues that remain to be resolved at the present stage of preclinical trials are addressed. PMID:20957109

  5. Hypoxic Preconditioning Increases Survival and Pro-Angiogenic Capacity of Human Cord Blood Mesenchymal Stromal Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Andreas Matthäus; Klose, Kristin; Bieback, Karen; Korinth, Dirk; Schneider, Maria; Seifert, Martina; Choi, Yeong-Hoon; Kurtz, Andreas; Falk, Volkmar; Stamm, Christof

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxic preconditioning was shown to improve the therapeutic efficacy of bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) upon transplantation in ischemic tissue. Given the interest in clinical applications of umbilical cord blood-derived MSCs, we developed a specific hypoxic preconditioning protocol and investigated its anti-apoptotic and pro-angiogenic effects on cord blood MSCs undergoing simulated ischemia in vitro by subjecting them to hypoxia and nutrient deprivation with or without preceding hypoxic preconditioning. Cell number, metabolic activity, surface marker expression, chromosomal stability, apoptosis (caspases-3/7 activity) and necrosis were determined, and phosphorylation, mRNA expression and protein secretion of selected apoptosis and angiogenesis-regulating factors were quantified. Then, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were subjected to simulated ischemia in co-culture with hypoxically preconditioned or naïve cord blood MSCs, and HUVEC proliferation was measured. Migration, proliferation and nitric oxide production of HUVECs were determined in presence of cord blood MSC-conditioned medium. Cord blood MSCs proved least sensitive to simulated ischemia when they were preconditioned for 24 h, while their basic behavior, immunophenotype and karyotype in culture remained unchanged. Here, “post-ischemic” cell number and metabolic activity were enhanced and caspase-3/7 activity and lactate dehydrogenase release were reduced as compared to non-preconditioned cells. Phosphorylation of AKT and BAD, mRNA expression of BCL-XL, BAG1 and VEGF, and VEGF protein secretion were higher in preconditioned cells. Hypoxically preconditioned cord blood MSCs enhanced HUVEC proliferation and migration, while nitric oxide production remained unchanged. We conclude that hypoxic preconditioning protects cord blood MSCs by activation of anti-apoptotic signaling mechanisms and enhances their angiogenic potential. Hence, hypoxic preconditioning

  6. Identification of stem cells from human umbilical cord blood with embryonic and hematopoietic characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Yong . E-mail: yongzhao@uic.edu; Wang Honglan; Mazzone, Theodore

    2006-08-01

    We identified stem cells from the umbilical cord blood, designated cord blood-stem cells (CB-SC). CB-SC displayed important embryonic stem (ES) cell characteristics including expression of ES-cell-specific molecular markers including transcription factors OCT-4 and Nanog, along with stage-specific embryonic antigen (SSEA)-3 and SSEA-4. CB-SC also expressed hematopoietic cell antigens including CD9, CD45 and CD117, but were negative for CD34. CB-SC displayed very low immunogenicity as indicated by expression of a very low level of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens and failure to stimulate the proliferation of allogeneic lymphocytes. CB-SC could give rise to cells with endothelial-like and neuronal-like characteristics in vitro, as demonstrated by expression of lineage-associated markers. Notably, CB-SC could be stimulated to differentiate into functional insulin-producing cells in vivo and eliminated hyperglycemia after transplantation into a streptozotocin-induced diabetic mouse model. These findings may have significant potential to advance stem-cell-based therapeutics.

  7. Cord Blood Derived CD4+CD25high T Cells Become Functional Regulatory T Cells upon Antigen Encounter

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Elisabeth; Bannert, Christina; Gruber, Saskia; Klunker, Sven; Spittler, Andreas; Akdis, Cezmi A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Upon antigen exposure, cord blood derived T cells respond to ubiquitous environmental antigens by high proliferation. To date it remains unclear whether these “excessive” responses relate to different regulatory properties of the putative T regulatory cell (Treg) compartment or even expansion of the Treg compartment itself. Methods: Cord blood (>37 week of gestation) and peripheral blood (healthy controls) were obtained and different Treg cell subsets were isolated. The suppressive potential of Treg populations after antigen exposure was evaluated via functional inhibition assays ([3H]thymidine incorporation assay and CFSE staining) with or without allergen stimulation. The frequency and markers of CD4+CD25highFoxP3+ T cells were characterized by mRNA analysis and flow cytometry. Results: Cord blood derived CD4+CD25high cells did not show substantial suppressor capacity upon TCR activation, in contrast to CD4+CD25high cells freshly purified from adult blood. This could not be explained by a lower frequency of FoxP3+CD4+CD25highcells or FOXP3 mRNA expression. However, after antigen-specific stimulation in vitro, these cells showed strong proliferation and expansion and gained potent suppressive properties. The efficiency of their suppressive capacity can be enhanced in the presence of endotoxins. If T-cells were sorted according to their CD127 expression, a tiny subset of Treg cells (CD4+CD25+CD127low) is highly suppressive even without prior antigen exposure. Conclusion: Cord blood harbors a very small subset of CD4+CD25high Treg cells that requires antigen-stimulation to show expansion and become functional suppressive Tregs. PMID:22272233

  8. Autologous umbilical cord blood transfusion.

    PubMed Central

    Ballin, A.; Arbel, E.; Kenet, G.; Berar, M.; Kohelet, D.; Tanay, A.; Zakut, H.; Meytes, D.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine some aspects of umbilical cord blood collection for autologous transfusion in premature infants. All 120 microbacterial cultures (aerobic and anaerobic) of cord blood samples as well as 30 cultures of mycoplasma were treated. Cord prothrombin fragment (F 1 + 2) concentrations were quantified at one and 10 minutes after clamping of the cord. F 1 + 2 concentrations assessed on 25 newborn infants were similar and no linear association with time of clamping could be drawn. This means that cord blood thrombosis is not activated for at least 10 minutes following clamping of the cord. As far as is known, the first newborn infant to benefit from this method of transfusion is reported here. The premature infant received two portions of autologous blood (on days 5 and 7). No untoward effects were noted. Blood, collected from the umbilical cord, is a safe source for autotransfusion, provided that bacteriological testing has been carried out. PMID:8535878

  9. Potential for access to embryonic-like cells from human umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    McGuckin, C P; Forraz, N

    2008-02-01

    All too often media attention clouds the reality that there are many types of stem cell. The embryos, bone marrow and umbilical cord blood (UCB) are the three most used sources. However, despite what it would appear, embryonic stem cells have not been the first to yield life-saving cures at present. Faster routes to clinical intervention have been using adult stem cells that can be sourced from bone marrow and from cord blood, and that are readily accessible and are more ethically acceptable to the general public. Both these non-embryonic sources have been able to provide sufficient numbers of cells to allow development of clinical translational protocols. Bone marrow-derived cells have been used successfully in myocardial infarct therapy where relining by endothelial tissue has allowed limited reperfusion to damaged cardiac tissue. UCB have also demonstrated significant success for around 20 years in haematotransplantation. With a global human population in excess of 6 billion, births thus UCB, remain the largest untouched source of stem cells available every year. UCB also provide a distinct advantage over other adult stem cells due to the length of the telomere and also due protected immunological status of the developing neonatal environment. The total mutation load in the UCB populations is clearly likely to be significant less than in adult tissues.

  10. Family-directed umbilical cord blood banking

    PubMed Central

    Gluckman, Eliane; Ruggeri, Annalisa; Rocha, Vanderson; Baudoux, Etienne; Boo, Michael; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Welte, Kathy; Navarrete, Cristina; van Walraven, Suzanna M.

    2011-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood transplantation from HLA-identical siblings provides good results in children. These results support targeted efforts to bank family cord blood units that can be used for a sibling diagnosed with a disease which can be cured by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or for research that investigates the use of allogeneic or autologous cord blood cells. Over 500 patients transplanted with related cord blood units have been reported to the Eurocord registry with a 4-year overall survival of 91% for patients with non-malignant diseases and 56% for patients with malignant diseases. Main hematologic indications in children are leukemia, hemoglobinopathies or inherited hematologic, immunological or metabolic disorders. However, family-directed cord blood banking is not widely promoted; many cord blood units used in sibling transplantation have been obtained from private banks that do not meet the necessary criteria required to store these units. Marketing by private banks who predominantly store autologous cord blood units has created public confusion. There are very few current validated indications for autologous storage but some new indications might appear in the future. Little effort is devoted to provide unbiased information and to educate the public as to the distinction between the different types of banking, economic models and standards involved in such programs. In order to provide a better service for families in need, directed-family cord blood banking activities should be encouraged and closely monitored with common standards, and better information on current and future indications should be made available. PMID:21750089

  11. Generation of a cord blood-derived Wilms Tumor 1 dendritic cell vaccine for AML patients treated with allogeneic cord blood transplantation

    PubMed Central

    de Haar, Colin; Plantinga, Maud; Blokland, Nina JG; van Til, Niek P; Flinsenberg, Thijs WH; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F; Smits, Evelien L; Boon, Louis; Spel, Lotte; Boes, Marianne; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Nierkens, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The poor survival rates of refractory/relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients after haematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) requires the development of additional immune therapeutic strategies. As the elicitation of tumor-antigen specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) is associated with reduced relapses and enhanced survival, enhanced priming of these CTLs using an anti-AML vaccine may result in long-term immunity against AML. Cord blood (CB), as allogeneic HCT source, may provide a unique setting for such post-HCT vaccination, considering its enhanced graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effects and population of highly responsive naïve T cells. It is our goal to develop a powerful and safe immune therapeutic strategy composed of CB-HCT followed by vaccination with CB CD34+-derived dendritic cells (DCs) presenting the oncoprotein Wilms Tumor-1 (WT1), which is expressed in AML-blasts in the majority of patients. Here, we describe the optimization of a clinically applicable DC culture protocol. This two-step protocol consisting of an expansion phase followed by the differentiation toward DCs, enables us to generate sufficient cord blood-derived DCs (CBDCs) in the clinical setting. At the end of the culture, the CBDCs exhibit a mature surface phenotype, are able to migrate, express tumor antigen (WT1) after electroporation with mRNA encoding the full-length WT1 protein, and stimulate WT1-specific T cells. PMID:26451309

  12. Survival of cord blood haematopoietic stem cells in a hyaluronan hydrogel for ex vivo biomimicry.

    PubMed

    Demange, Elise; Kassim, Yusra; Petit, Cyrille; Buquet, Catherine; Dulong, Virginie; Cerf, Didier Le; Buchonnet, Gérard; Vannier, Jean-Pierre

    2013-11-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) grow in a specified niche in close association with the microenvironment, the so-called 'haematopoietic niche'. Scaffolds have been introduced to overcome the liquid culture limitations, mimicking the presence of the extracellular matrix (ECM). In the present study the hyaluronic acid scaffold, already developed in the laboratory, has been used for the first time to maintain long-term cultures of CD34⁺ haematopoietic cells obtained from human cord blood. One parameter investigated was the impact on ex vivo survival of CD34⁺ cord blood cells (CBCs) on the hyaluronic acid surface, immobilized with peptides containing the RGD motif. This peptide was conjugated by coating the hyaluronan hydrogel and cultured in serum-free liquid phase complemented with stem cell factor (SCF), a commonly indispensable cytokine for haematopoiesis. Our work demonstrated that these hyaluronan hydrogels were superior to traditional liquid cultures by maintaining and expanding the HPCs without the need for additional cytokines, and a colonization of 280-fold increment in the hydrogel compared with liquid culture after 28 days of ex vivo expansion.

  13. Significant clinical, neuropathological and behavioural recovery from acute spinal cord trauma by transplantation of a well-defined somatic stem cell from human umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Schira, Jessica; Gasis, Marcia; Estrada, Veronica; Hendricks, Marion; Schmitz, Christine; Trapp, Thorsten; Kruse, Fabian; Kögler, Gesine; Wernet, Peter; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Müller, Hans Werner

    2012-02-01

    Stem cell therapy is a potential treatment for spinal cord injury and different stem cell types have been grafted into animal models and humans suffering from spinal trauma. Due to inconsistent results, it is still an important and clinically relevant question which stem cell type will prove to be therapeutically effective. Thus far, stem cells of human sources grafted into spinal cord mostly included barely defined heterogeneous mesenchymal stem cell populations derived from bone marrow or umbilical cord blood. Here, we have transplanted a well-defined unrestricted somatic stem cell isolated from human umbilical cord blood into an acute traumatic spinal cord injury of adult immune suppressed rat. Grafting of unrestricted somatic stem cells into the vicinity of a dorsal hemisection injury at thoracic level eight resulted in hepatocyte growth factor-directed migration and accumulation within the lesion area, reduction in lesion size and augmented tissue sparing, enhanced axon regrowth and significant functional locomotor improvement as revealed by three behavioural tasks (open field Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan locomotor score, horizontal ladder walking test and CatWalk gait analysis). To accomplish the beneficial effects, neither neural differentiation nor long-lasting persistence of the grafted human stem cells appears to be required. The secretion of neurite outgrowth-promoting factors in vitro further suggests a paracrine function of unrestricted somatic stem cells in spinal cord injury. Given the highly supportive functional characteristics in spinal cord injury, production in virtually unlimited quantities at GMP grade and lack of ethical concerns, unrestricted somatic stem cells appear to be a highly suitable human stem cell source for clinical application in central nervous system injuries. PMID:21903726

  14. The impact of early- and late-onset preeclampsia on umbilical cord blood cell populations.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Emilie M; Eggink, Alex J; van der Zee, Marten; Lagendijk, Jacqueline; Willemsen, Sten P; de Jonge, Robert; Steegers, Eric A P; Steegers-Theunissen, Regine P M

    2016-08-01

    Pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia (PE) are characterised by an enhanced maternal and fetal inflammatory response with increased numbers of leukocytes in maternal peripheral blood. The impact of PE on newborn umbilical cord blood cell (UCBC) populations however, has been scarcely studied. We hypothesise that PE deranges fetal haematopoiesis and subsequently UCBC populations. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate newborn umbilical cord blood cell populations in early- (EOPE) and late-onset PE (LOPE). A secondary cohort analysis in The Rotterdam Periconceptional Cohort was conducted comprising 23 PE cases, including 11 EOPE and 12 LOPE, and 195 controls, including 153 uncomplicated and 23 fetal growth restriction- and 19 preterm birth complicated controls. UCBC counts and differentials were quantified by flow cytometry and analysed as main outcome measures. Multivariable regression analysis revealed associations of EOPE with decreased leucocyte- (monocytes, neutrophils, eosinophils, immature granulocytes) and thrombocyte counts and increased NRBC counts (all p<0.05). EOPE remained associated with neutrophil- (β-0.92, 95%CI -1.27,-0.57, p<0.001) and NRBC counts (β1.11, 95%CI 0.27,1.95, p=0.010) after adjustment for gestational age and birth weight. LOPE did not reveal any significant association. We conclude that derangements of fetal haematopoiesis, in particular of neutrophil- and NRBC counts, are associated with EOPE only, with a potential impact for future health of the offspring. This heterogeneity in UCBC should be considered as confounder in epigenetic association studies examining EOPE. PMID:27239988

  15. Enforced fucosylation of cord blood hematopoietic cells accelerates neutrophil and platelet engraftment after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Popat, Uday; Mehta, Rohtesh S; Rezvani, Katayoun; Fox, Patricia; Kondo, Kayo; Marin, David; McNiece, Ian; Oran, Betul; Hosing, Chitra; Olson, Amanda; Parmar, Simrit; Shah, Nina; Andreeff, Michael; Kebriaei, Partow; Kaur, Indreshpal; Yvon, Eric; de Lima, Marcos; Cooper, Laurence J N; Tewari, Priti; Champlin, Richard E; Nieto, Yago; Andersson, Borje S; Alousi, Amin; Jones, Roy B; Qazilbash, Muzaffar H; Bashir, Qaiser; Ciurea, Stefan; Ahmed, Sairah; Anderlini, Paolo; Bosque, Doyle; Bollard, Catherine; Molldrem, Jeffrey J; Chen, Julianne; Rondon, Gabriela; Thomas, Michael; Miller, Leonard; Wolpe, Steve; Simmons, Paul; Robinson, Simon; Zweidler-McKay, Patrick A; Shpall, Elizabeth J

    2015-05-01

    Delayed engraftment is a major limitation of cord blood transplantation (CBT), due in part to a defect in the cord blood (CB) cells' ability to home to the bone marrow. Because this defect appears related to low levels of fucosylation of cell surface molecules that are responsible for binding to P- and E-selectins constitutively expressed by the marrow microvasculature, and thus for marrow homing, we conducted a first-in-humans clinical trial to correct this deficiency. Patients with high-risk hematologic malignancies received myeloablative therapy followed by transplantation with 2 CB units, one of which was treated ex vivo for 30 minutes with the enzyme fucosyltransferase-VI and guanosine diphosphate fucose to enhance the interaction of CD34(+) stem and early progenitor cells with microvessels. The results of enforced fucosylation for 22 patients enrolled in the trial were then compared with those for 31 historical controls who had undergone double unmanipulated CBT. The median time to neutrophil engraftment was 17 days (range, 12-34 days) compared with 26 days (range, 11-48 days) for controls (P = .0023). Platelet engraftment was also improved: median was 35 days (range, 18-100 days) compared with 45 days (range, 27-120 days) for controls (P = .0520). These findings support ex vivo fucosylation of multipotent CD34(+) CB cells as a clinically feasible means to improve engraftment efficiency in the double CBT setting. The trial is registered to www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01471067.

  16. Umbilical cord blood transplantation: the first 25 years and beyond.

    PubMed

    Ballen, Karen K; Gluckman, Eliane; Broxmeyer, Hal E

    2013-07-25

    Umbilical cord blood is an alternative hematopoietic stem cell source for patients with hematologic diseases who can be cured by allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Initially, umbilical cord blood transplantation was limited to children, given the low cell dose infused. Both related and unrelated cord blood transplants have been performed with high rates of success for a variety of hematologic disorders and metabolic storage diseases in the pediatric setting. The results for adult umbilical cord blood transplantation have improved, with greater emphasis on cord blood units of sufficient cell dose and human leukocyte antigen match and with the use of double umbilical cord blood units and improved supportive care techniques. Cord blood expansion trials have recently shown improvement in time to engraftment. Umbilical cord blood is being compared with other graft sources in both retrospective and prospective trials. The growth of the field over the last 25 years and the plans for future exploration are discussed.

  17. Hepatitis B Virus Replication in CD34+ Hematopoietic Stem Cells From Umbilical Cord Blood.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanxin; Yan, Qin; Fan, Rongshan; Song, Shupeng; Ren, Hong; Li, Yongguo; Lan, Yinghua

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a hepatotropic virus that can infect extrahepatic tissue. Whether hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can be infected by HBV and serve as a potential virus reservoir is still unknown. In this study, the susceptibility of CD34+ HSCs to HBV was investigated. MATERIAL AND METHODS Cord blood-derived CD34+ HSCs were exposed to HBV in vitro, and immunocytochemistry, transmission electron microscopy, and RT-PCR were used to identify viral-related proteins and specific viral genomic sequences. Then, CD34+ HSCs were challenged by different titers of HBV, and intracellular and supernatant HBV DNA, and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) levels, were examined. In addition, CD34+ peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) from chronic HBV carriers were isolated and cultured, and HBV DNA levels were measured. RESULTS HBV-infected CD34+ cells showed positive signals for HBsAg by DAB staining and TRITC staining, and HBV particles were identified. RT-PCR results showed that the 403 bp PCR products corresponding to the amplified hepatitis B S gene fragment were observed in CD34+ HSCs infected by HBV. In addition, supernatant and intracellular HBV DNA increased with the proliferation of CD34+ HSCs. Similar results were obtained from intracellular HBsAg quantification tests. In addition, HBV DNA levels both in cells and in supernatants of CD34+ PBSCs increased proportionally, and the increments of HBV DNA in the supernatants paralleled those found in cells. CONCLUSIONS HBV can replicate in CD34+ HSCs in cord blood or peripheral blood of chronic HBV carriers. PMID:27188537

  18. Immunotherapy of human neuroblastoma using umbilical cord blood-derived effector cells.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Avadhut D; Clark, Erin M; Wang, Peng; Munger, Corey M; Hegde, Ganapati V; Sanderson, Sam; Dave, Harish P G; Joshi, Shantaram S

    2007-06-01

    Tumors of the nervous system, including neuroblastoma and glioblastoma, are difficult to treat with current therapies. Despite the advances in cancer therapeutics, the outcomes in these patients remain poor and, therefore, new modalities are required. Recent literature demonstrates that cytotoxic effector cells can effectively kill tumors of the nervous system. In addition, we have previously shown that umbilical cord blood (UCB) contains precursors of antitumor cytotoxic effector cells. Therefore, to evaluate the antitumor potential of UCB-derived effector cells, studies were designed to compare the in vitro and in vivo antitumor effects of UCB- and peripheral blood (PB)-derived antigen-nonspecific and antigen-specific effector cells against tumors of the nervous system. Mononuclear cells (MNCs) from UCB were used to generate both interleukin-2 (IL-2)-activated killer (LAK) cells and tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). UCB-derived LAK cells showed a significant in vitro cytotoxicity against IMR-32, SK-NMC, and U-87 human neuroblastoma and glioblastoma, respectively. In addition, the CTLs generated using dendritic cells primed with IMR-32 tumor cell lysate showed a selective cytotoxicity in vitro against IMR-32 cells, but not against U-87 or MDA-231 cells. Furthermore, treatment of SCID mice bearing IMR-32 neuroblastoma with tumor-specific CTLs resulted in a significant (p < 0.01) inhibition of tumor growth and increased overall survival. Thus, these results demonstrate the potential of UCB-derived effector cells against human neuroblastoma and warrant further preclinical studies.

  19. Immunologic properties of differentiated and undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells derived from umbilical cord blood

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyo-Jong; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Kang, Sun-Young; Kim, Hyung-Sik; Park, Se-Jin; Lee, Seung-Yong; Kim, Kwang-Dong; Lee, Hee-Chun; Park, Ji-Kwon; Paik, Won-Young; Lee, Lyon

    2016-01-01

    The expression of immunogenic markers after differentiation of umbilical cord blood (UCB)-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) has been poorly investigated and requires extensive in vitro and in vivo testing for clinical application. The expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) classes on UCB-derived MSC was tested by Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis and immunocytochemical staining. The undifferentiated MSC were moderately positive for HLA-ABC, but almost completely negative for HLA-DR. The MSC differentiated to chondrocytes expressed neither HLA-ABC nor HLA-DR. The proliferation of MSC was not significantly affected by the allogeneic lymphocytes stimulated with concanavalin A. The responder lymphocytes showed no significant decrease in proliferation in the presence of the MSC, but the apoptosis rate of the lymphocytes was increased in the presence of MSC. Taken together, these findings indicate that UCB-derived MSC differentiated to chondrocytes expressed less HLA class I and no class II antigens. The MSC showed an immunomodulatory effect on the proliferation and apoptosis of allogeneic lymphocytes. These data suggest that the differentiated and undifferentiated allogeneic MSC derived from umbilical cord blood can be a useful candidate for allogeneic cell therapy and transplantation without a major risk of rejection. PMID:26726028

  20. Multiple Intravenous Administrations of Human Umbilical Cord Blood Cells Benefit in a Mouse Model of ALS

    PubMed Central

    Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana; Rodrigues, Maria C. O.; Mirtyl, Santhia; Turner, Shanna; Mitha, Shazia; Sodhi, Jasmine; Suthakaran, Subatha; Eve, David J.; Sanberg, Cyndy D.; Kuzmin-Nichols, Nicole; Sanberg, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Background A promising therapeutic strategy for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the use of cell-based therapies that can protect motor neurons and thereby retard disease progression. We recently showed that a single large dose (25×106 cells) of mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood (MNC hUCB) administered intravenously to pre-symptomatic G93A SOD1 mice is optimal in delaying disease progression and increasing lifespan. However, this single high cell dose is impractical for clinical use. The aim of the present pre-clinical translation study was therefore to evaluate the effects of multiple low dose systemic injections of MNC hUCB cell into G93A SOD1 mice at different disease stages. Methodology/Principal Findings Mice received weekly intravenous injections of MNC hUCB or media. Symptomatic mice received 106 or 2.5×106 cells from 13 weeks of age. A third, pre-symptomatic, group received 106 cells from 9 weeks of age. Control groups were media-injected G93A and mice carrying the normal hSOD1 gene. Motor function tests and various assays determined cell effects. Administered cell distribution, motor neuron counts, and glial cell densities were analyzed in mouse spinal cords. Results showed that mice receiving 106 cells pre-symptomatically or 2.5×106 cells symptomatically significantly delayed functional deterioration, increased lifespan and had higher motor neuron counts than media mice. Astrocytes and microglia were significantly reduced in all cell-treated groups. Conclusions/Significance These results demonstrate that multiple injections of MNC hUCB cells, even beginning at the symptomatic disease stage, could benefit disease outcomes by protecting motor neurons from inflammatory effectors. This multiple cell infusion approach may promote future clinical studies. PMID:22319620

  1. Maternal Body-Mass Index and Cord Blood Circulating Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Miranda, Maria L.; Vallejo-Vaz, Antonio J.; Stiefel, Pablo; Praena-Fernández, Juan M.; Bernal-Bermejo, Jose; Jimenez-Jimenez, Luis M.; Villar, Jose; Melero-Martin, Juan M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are a subset of circulating endothelial progenitor cells that are particularly abundant in umbilical cord blood. We sought to determine whether ECFC abundance in cord blood is associated with maternal body-mass index (BMI) in non-pathological pregnancies. Study design We measured the level of ECFCs in the cord blood of neonates (n=27) born from non-obese healthy mothers with non-pathological pregnancies and examined whether ECFC abundance correlated with maternal BMI. We also examined the effect of maternal BMI on ECFC phenotype and function using angiogenic and vasculogenic assays. Results We observed variation in ECFC abundance among subjects and found a positive correlation between pre-pregnancy maternal BMI and ECFC content (r=0.51, P=0.007), which was independent of other obstetric factors. Despite this variation, ECFC phenotype and functionality were deemed normal and highly similar between subjects with maternal BMI <25 kg/m2 and BMI between 25–30 kg/m2, including the ability to form vascular networks in vivo. Conclusions This study underlines the need to consider maternal BMI as a potential confounding factor for cord blood levels of ECFCs in future comparative studies between healthy and pathological pregnancies. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are a subset of progenitor cells that circulate in peripheral blood and can give rise to endothelial cells (1,2), contributing to the formation of new vasculature and the maintenance of vascular integrity (3–5). The mechanisms that regulate the abundance of these cells in vivo remain poorly understood. ECFCs are rare in adult peripheral blood (1,2,10). In contrast, there is an elevated number of these cells in fetal blood during the third trimester of pregnancy (11–13). Emerging evidence indicates that deleterious conditions during fetal life can impair ECFC content and function. For instance, offspring of diabetic mothers have been shown to have

  2. Cytotoxic function of umbilical cord blood natural killer cells: relevance to adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Syh-Jae; Kuo, Ming-Ling

    2011-11-01

    Decreased graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), ease of accessibility, and sustained engraftment encourage the use of umbilical cord blood (UCB) as an alternative source to bone marrow for immune reconstitution in children with leukemia. Natural killer (NK) cells rapidly expand after stem cell transplantation and are important for regulating GVHD and providing graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effects. This review highlights the phenotypic and functional differences between UCB NK cells and adult peripheral blood (APB) NK cells, and discusses the possible therapeutic benefit of using UCB NK cells for adoptive immunotherapy in leukemia. Alloreactive NK cells show potent cytotoxic activities against human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-nonidentical leukemic cells and reduce leukemia relapses. The higher numbers of NK progenitors in UCB makes it a convenient source for ex vivo expansion of UCB NK cells for posttransplant treatment. UCB NK cells readily respond to interleukin-15, which may greatly enhance their antitumor effect. Activation and expansion protocols for UCB NK cells are currently being developed.

  3. Hepatitis B Virus Replication in CD34+ Hematopoietic Stem Cells From Umbilical Cord Blood

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yanxin; Yan, Qin; Fan, Rongshan; Song, Shupeng; Ren, Hong; Li, Yongguo; Lan, Yinghua

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a hepatotropic virus that can infect extrahepatic tissue. Whether hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can be infected by HBV and serve as a potential virus reservoir is still unknown. In this study, the susceptibility of CD34+ HSCs to HBV was investigated. Material/Methods Cord blood–derived CD34+ HSCs were exposed to HBV in vitro, and immunocytochemistry, transmission electron microscopy, and RT-PCR were used to identify viral-related proteins and specific viral genomic sequences. Then, CD34+ HSCs were challenged by different titers of HBV, and intracellular and supernatant HBV DNA, and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) levels, were examined. In addition, CD34+ peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) from chronic HBV carriers were isolated and cultured, and HBV DNA levels were measured. Results HBV-infected CD34+ cells showed positive signals for HBsAg by DAB staining and TRITC staining, and HBV particles were identified. RT-PCR results showed that the 403 bp PCR products corresponding to the amplified hepatitis B S gene fragment were observed in CD34+ HSCs infected by HBV. In addition, supernatant and intracellular HBV DNA increased with the proliferation of CD34+ HSCs. Similar results were obtained from intracellular HBsAg quantification tests. In addition, HBV DNA levels both in cells and in supernatants of CD34+ PBSCs increased proportionally, and the increments of HBV DNA in the supernatants paralleled those found in cells. Conclusions HBV can replicate in CD34+ HSCs in cord blood or peripheral blood of chronic HBV carriers. PMID:27188537

  4. Putative Epimutagens in Maternal Peripheral and Cord Blood Samples Identified Using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Yoshikazu; Hayakawa, Koji; Arai, Daisuke; Ito, Rie; Iwasaki, Yusuke; Saito, Koichi; Akutsu, Kazuhiko; Takatori, Satoshi; Ishii, Rie; Hayashi, Rumiko; Izumi, Shun-Ichiro; Sugino, Norihiro; Kondo, Fumio; Horie, Masakazu; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki; Makino, Tsunehisa; Hirosawa, Mitsuko; Shiota, Kunio; Ohgane, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of transcription and genome stability by epigenetic systems are crucial for the proper development of mammalian embryos. Chemicals that disturb epigenetic systems are termed epimutagens. We previously performed chemical screening that focused on heterochromatin formation and DNA methylation status in mouse embryonic stem cells and identified five epimutagens: diethyl phosphate (DEP), mercury (Hg), cotinine, selenium (Se), and octachlorodipropyl ether (S-421). Here, we used human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) to confirm the effects of 20 chemicals, including the five epimutagens, detected at low concentrations in maternal peripheral and cord blood samples. Of note, these individual chemicals did not exhibit epimutagenic activity in hiPSCs. However, because the fetal environment contains various chemicals, we evaluated the effects of combined exposure to chemicals (DEP, Hg, cotinine, Se, and S-421) on hiPSCs. The combined exposure caused a decrease in the number of heterochromatin signals and aberrant DNA methylation status at multiple gene loci in hiPSCs. The combined exposure also affected embryoid body formation and neural differentiation from hiPSCs. Therefore, DEP, Hg, cotinine, Se, and S-421 were defined as an “epimutagen combination” that is effective at low concentrations as detected in maternal peripheral and cord blood. PMID:26339649

  5. Not just the brain: methamphetamine disrupts blood-spinal cord barrier and induces acute glial activation and structural damage of spinal cord cells.

    PubMed

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Sharma, Hari S

    2015-01-01

    Acute methamphetamine (METH) intoxication induces metabolic brain activation as well as multiple physiological and behavioral responses that could result in life-threatening health complications. Previously, we showed that METH (9 mg/kg) used in freely moving rats induces robust leakage of blood-brain barrier, acute glial activation, vasogenic edema, and structural abnormalities of brain cells. These changes were tightly correlated with drug-induced brain hyperthermia and were greatly potentiated when METH was used at warm ambient temperatures (29°C), inducing more robust and prolonged hyperthermia. Extending this line of research, here we show that METH also strongly increases the permeability of the blood-spinal cord barrier as evidenced by entry of Evans blue and albumin immunoreactivity in T9-12 segments of the spinal cord. Similar to the blood-brain barrier, leakage of bloodspinal cord barrier was associated with acute glial activation, alterations of ionic homeostasis, water tissue accumulation (edema), and structural abnormalities of spinal cord cells. Similar to that in the brain, all neurochemical alterations correlated tightly with drug-induced elevations in brain temperature and they were enhanced when the drug was used at 29°C and brain hyperthermia reached pathological levels (>40°C). We discuss common features and differences in neural responses between the brain and spinal cord, two inseparable parts of the central nervous system affected by METH exposure. PMID:25687701

  6. Not just the brain: methamphetamine disrupts blood-spinal cord barrier and induces acute glial activation and structural damage of spinal cord cells.

    PubMed

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Sharma, Hari S

    2015-01-01

    Acute methamphetamine (METH) intoxication induces metabolic brain activation as well as multiple physiological and behavioral responses that could result in life-threatening health complications. Previously, we showed that METH (9 mg/kg) used in freely moving rats induces robust leakage of blood-brain barrier, acute glial activation, vasogenic edema, and structural abnormalities of brain cells. These changes were tightly correlated with drug-induced brain hyperthermia and were greatly potentiated when METH was used at warm ambient temperatures (29°C), inducing more robust and prolonged hyperthermia. Extending this line of research, here we show that METH also strongly increases the permeability of the blood-spinal cord barrier as evidenced by entry of Evans blue and albumin immunoreactivity in T9-12 segments of the spinal cord. Similar to the blood-brain barrier, leakage of bloodspinal cord barrier was associated with acute glial activation, alterations of ionic homeostasis, water tissue accumulation (edema), and structural abnormalities of spinal cord cells. Similar to that in the brain, all neurochemical alterations correlated tightly with drug-induced elevations in brain temperature and they were enhanced when the drug was used at 29°C and brain hyperthermia reached pathological levels (>40°C). We discuss common features and differences in neural responses between the brain and spinal cord, two inseparable parts of the central nervous system affected by METH exposure.

  7. Cord blood B cells are mature in their capacity to switch to IgE-producing cells in response to interleukin-4 in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Pastorelli, G; Rousset, F; Pène, J; Peronne, C; Roncarolo, M G; Tovo, P A; de Vries, J E

    1990-01-01

    Neonatal B cells have been considered immature because of their impaired capacity to produce immunoglobulins in response to polyclonal activators in vitro. Here we demonstrate that cord blood mononuclear cells (MNC) produce normal levels of IgE in vitro when cultured in the presence of interleukin-4 (IL-4), indicating that the B cells are mature in their capacity to switch to IgE-producing cells. However, in contrast to adult peripheral blood T cells, cord blood T cells failed to produce detectable levels of IL-4 upon activation by phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) concanavalin A (Con A) or combinations of PHA and the phorbol ester TPA. Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) production by cord blood T cells following activation by Con A or PHA was also strongly reduced. However, high levels of IFN-gamma, significantly higher than those produced by adult T cells, were synthesized in response to combinations of PHA and TPA, indicating that IFN-gamma production by cord blood T cells is not intrinsically defective. In contrast, cord blood T cells produced levels of IL-2 that were significantly higher than those obtained by adult T cells tested in parallel. Collectively, our data indicate that the minimal levels of IgE production measured in cord blood (less than 1 U/ml) are not due to immaturity of the cord blood B cells, but may be associated with the failure of cord blood T cells to produce detectable levels of IL-4, which has been shown to be responsible for induction of IgE synthesis both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:2119917

  8. Human cord blood-derived mononuclear cell transplantation for viral encephalitis-associated cognitive impairment: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Herpes simplex virus is the most common cause of sporadic viral encephalitis. Cognitive impairments persist in most patients who survive herpes simplex virus-caused encephalitis after undergoing currently available treatments. This is the first report on the development of human cord blood-derived mononuclear cell transplantation as a new treatment intervention to improve the prognosis of sequelae of viral encephalitis. Case presentation An 11-year-old Han Chinese boy developed sequelae of viral encephalitis with cognitive, mental and motor impairments in the 8 months following routine treatments. Since receiving allogeneic cord blood-derived mononuclear cell transplantation combined with comprehensive rehabilitation therapies 7 years ago, the patient’s health has significantly improved and remained stable. Conclusions Human cord blood-derived mononuclear cell transplantation may be a potential therapeutic strategy for treating the neuropsychiatric and neurobehavioral sequelae of viral encephalitis. PMID:23835552

  9. Biodistribution of Infused Human Umbilical Cord Blood Cells in Alzheimer's Disease-Like Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Ehrhart, Jared; Darlington, Donna; Kuzmin-Nichols, Nicole; Sanberg, Cyndy D; Sawmiller, Darrell R; Sanberg, Paul R; Tan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Human umbilical cord blood cells (HUCBCs), a prolific source of non-embryonic or adult stem cells, have emerged as effective and relatively safe immunomodulators and neuroprotectors, reducing behavioral impairment in animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, and stroke. In this report, we followed the bioavailability of HUCBCs in AD-like transgenic PSAPP mice and nontransgenic Sprague-Dawley rats. HUCBCs were injected into tail veins of mice or rats at a single dose of 1 × 10(6) or 2.2 × 10(6) cells, respectively, prior to harvesting of tissues at 24 h, 7 days, and 30 days after injection. For determination of HUCBC distribution, tissues from both species were subjected to total DNA isolation and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the gene for human glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Our results show a relatively similar biodistribution and retention of HUCBCs in both mouse and rat organs. HUCBCs were broadly detected both in the brain and several peripheral organs, including the liver, kidney, and bone marrow, of both species, starting within 7 days and continuing up to 30 days posttransplantation. No HUCBCs were recovered in the peripheral circulation, even at 24 h posttransplantation. Therefore, HUCBCs reach several tissues including the brain following a single intravenous treatment, suggesting that this route can be a viable method of administration of these cells for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Committee Opinion No. 648 Summary: Umbilical Cord Blood Banking.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    Once considered a waste product that was discarded with the placenta, umbilical cord blood is now known to contain potentially life-saving hematopoietic stem cells. When used in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, umbilical cord blood offers several distinct advantages over bone marrow or peripheral stem cells. However, umbilical cord blood collection is not part of routine obstetric care and is not medically indicated. Umbilical cord blood collection should not compromise obstetric or neonatal care or alter routine practice for the timing of umbilical cord clamping. If a patient requests information on umbilical cord blood banking, balanced and accurate information regarding the advantages and disadvantages of public and private umbilical cord blood banking should be provided. The routine storage of umbilical cord blood as "biologic insurance" against future disease is not recommended.

  11. ACOG Committee Opinion No. 648: Umbilical Cord Blood Banking.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    Once considered a waste product that was discarded with the placenta, umbilical cord blood is now known to contain potentially life-saving hematopoietic stem cells. When used in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, umbilical cord blood offers several distinct advantages over bone marrow or peripheral stem cells. However, umbilical cord blood collection is not part of routine obstetric care and is not medically indicated. Umbilical cord blood collection should not compromise obstetric or neonatal care or alter routine practice for the timing of umbilical cord clamping. If a patient requests information on umbilical cord blood banking, balanced and accurate information regarding the advantages and disadvantages of public and private umbilical cord blood banking should be provided. The routine storage of umbilical cord blood as "biologic insurance" against future disease is not recommended.

  12. Regulation and direction of umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells to adopt neuronal fate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Lu, Ming

    2014-03-01

    Umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells (UCB-MSCs) transplantation is becoming a promising and attractive cell-based treatment modality for repairing the damaged central nervous system due to its advantages of low immunogenicity, wide range of sources, and less ethical controversy. One of the limitations of this approach is that the proportion of neurons differentiated from UCB-MSCs still remains at low level. Thus, to induce UCB-MSCs to differentiate into neuron-like cells with a higher proportion is one of the key technologies of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Many induction protocols with remarkably higher differentiation rate to neurons have been reported. However, each protocol has its pros and cons and whether the neurons differentiated from UCB-MSCs under a certain protocol has normal nerve function remains controversial. Therefore, to guarantee the success of future clinical applications of UCB-MSCs, more investigations should be performed to improve the induction method and differentiation efficiency.

  13. Neural differentiation of novel multipotent progenitor cells from cryopreserved human umbilical cord blood

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Myoung Woo; Moon, Young Joon; Yang, Mal Sook; Kim, Sun Kyung; Jang, In Keun; Eom, Young-woo; Park, Joon Seong; Kim, Hugh C.; Song, Kye Yong; Park, Soon Cheol; Lim, Hwan Sub; Kim, Young Jin . E-mail: jin@lifecord.co.kr

    2007-06-29

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is a rich source of hematopoietic stem cells, with practical and ethical advantages. To date, the presence of other stem cells in UCB remains to be established. We investigated whether other stem cells are present in cryopreserved UCB. Seeded mononuclear cells formed adherent colonized cells in optimized culture conditions. Over a 4- to 6-week culture period, colonized cells gradually developed into adherent mono-layer cells, which exhibited homogeneous fibroblast-like morphology and immunophenotypes, and were highly proliferative. Isolated cells were designated 'multipotent progenitor cells (MPCs)'. Under appropriate conditions for 2 weeks, MPCs differentiated into neural tissue-specific cell types, including neuron, astrocyte, and oligodendrocyte. Differentiated cells presented their respective markers, specifically, NF-L and NSE for neurons, GFAP for astrocytes, and myelin/oligodendrocyte for oligodendrocytes. In this study, we successfully isolated MPCs from cryopreserved UCB, which differentiated into the neural tissue-specific cell types. These findings suggest that cryopreserved human UCB is a useful alternative source of neural progenitor cells, such as MPCs, for experimental and therapeutic applications.

  14. Comparison of Signaling Pathways Gene Expression in CD34(-) Umbilical Cord Blood and Bone Marrow Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Stojko, Rafał; Bojdys-Szyndlar, Monika; Drosdzol-Cop, Agnieszka; Madej, Andrzej; Wilk, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the biological activity of the total pool of genes in CD34(-) umbilical cord blood and bone marrow stem cells and to search for the differences in signaling pathway gene expression responsible for the biological processes. The introductory analysis revealed a big similarity of gene expression among stem cells. When analyzing GO terms for biological processes, we observed an increased activity of JAK-STAT signaling pathway, calcium-mediated, cytokine-mediated, integrin-mediated signaling pathway, and MAPK in a cluster of upregulating genes in CD34(-) umbilical cord blood stem cells. At the same time, we observed a decreased activity of BMP signaling pathways, TGF-beta pathway, and VEGF receptor signaling pathway in a cluster of downregulating genes in CD34(-) umbilical cord blood stem cells. In accordance with KEGG classification, the cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, toll-like receptor signaling pathway, and JAK-STAT signaling pathway are overrepresented in CD34(-) umbilical cord blood stem cells. A similar gene expression in both CD34(-) UCB and BM stem cells was characteristic for such biological processes as cell division, cell cycle gene expression, mitosis, telomere maintenance with telomerase, RNA and DNA treatment processes during cell division, and similar genes activity of Notch and Wnt signaling pathways.

  15. Comparison of Signaling Pathways Gene Expression in CD34− Umbilical Cord Blood and Bone Marrow Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stojko, Rafał; Bojdys-Szyndlar, Monika; Drosdzol-Cop, Agnieszka; Madej, Andrzej; Wilk, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the biological activity of the total pool of genes in CD34− umbilical cord blood and bone marrow stem cells and to search for the differences in signaling pathway gene expression responsible for the biological processes. The introductory analysis revealed a big similarity of gene expression among stem cells. When analyzing GO terms for biological processes, we observed an increased activity of JAK-STAT signaling pathway, calcium-mediated, cytokine-mediated, integrin-mediated signaling pathway, and MAPK in a cluster of upregulating genes in CD34− umbilical cord blood stem cells. At the same time, we observed a decreased activity of BMP signaling pathways, TGF-beta pathway, and VEGF receptor signaling pathway in a cluster of downregulating genes in CD34− umbilical cord blood stem cells. In accordance with KEGG classification, the cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, toll-like receptor signaling pathway, and JAK-STAT signaling pathway are overrepresented in CD34− umbilical cord blood stem cells. A similar gene expression in both CD34− UCB and BM stem cells was characteristic for such biological processes as cell division, cell cycle gene expression, mitosis, telomere maintenance with telomerase, RNA and DNA treatment processes during cell division, and similar genes activity of Notch and Wnt signaling pathways. PMID:26839563

  16. Human umbilical cord blood cells or estrogen may be beneficial in treating heatstroke.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-Hsien; Huang, Kuo-Feng; Lin, Mao-Tsun; Chang, Fong-Ming

    2007-03-01

    This current review summarized animal models of heatstroke experimentation that promote our current knowledge of therapeutic effects on cerebrovascular dysfunction, coagulopathy, and/or systemic inflammation with human umbilical cord blood cells (HUCBCs) or estrogen in the setting of heatstroke. Accumulating evidences have demonstrated that HUCBCs provide a promising new therapeutic method against neurodegenerative diseases, such as stroke, traumatic brain injury, and spinal cord injury as well as blood disease. More recently, we have also demonstrated that post- or pretreatment by HUCBCs may resuscitate heatstroke rats with by reducing circulatory shock, and cerebral nitric oxide overload and ischemic injury. Moreover, CD34+ cells sorted from HUCBCs may improve survival by attenuating inflammatory, coagulopathy, and multiorgan dysfunction during experimental heatstroke. Many researchers indicated pro- (e.g. tumor necrosis factor-alpha [TNF-alpha]) and anti-inflammatory (e.g. interleukin-10 [IL-10]) cytokines in the peripheral blood stream correlate with severity of circulatory shock, cerebral ischemia and hypoxia, and neuronal damage occurring in heatstroke. It has been shown that intravenous administration of CD34+ cells can secrete therapeutic molecules, such as neurotrophic factors, and attenuate systemic inflammatory reactions by decreasing serum TNF-alpha but increasing IL-10 during heatstroke. Another line of evidence has suggested that estrogen influences the severity of injury associated with cerebrovascular shock. Recently, we also successfully demonstrated estrogen resuscitated heatstroke rats by ameliorating systemic inflammation. Conclusively, HUCBCs or estrogen may be employed as a beneficial therapeutic strategy in prevention and repair of cerebrovascular dysfunction, coagulopathy, and/or systemic inflammation during heatstroke. PMID:17389184

  17. Preterm white matter brain injury is prevented by early administration of umbilical cord blood cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingang; Yawno, Tamara; Sutherland, Amy; Loose, Jan; Nitsos, Ilias; Bischof, Robert; Castillo-Melendez, Margie; McDonald, Courtney A; Wong, Flora Y; Jenkin, Graham; Miller, Suzanne L

    2016-09-01

    Infants born very preterm are at high risk for neurological deficits including cerebral palsy. In this study we assessed the neuroprotective effects of umbilical cord blood cells (UCBCs) and optimal administration timing in a fetal sheep model of preterm brain injury. 50 million allogeneic UCBCs were intravenously administered to fetal sheep (0.7 gestation) at 12h or 5d after acute hypoxia-ischemia (HI) induced by umbilical cord occlusion. The fetal brains were collected at 10d after HI. HI (n=7) was associated with reduced number of oligodendrocytes (Olig2+) and myelin density (CNPase+), and increased density of activated microglia (Iba-1+) in cerebral white matter compared to control fetuses (P<0.05). UCBCs administered at 12h, but not 5d after HI, significantly protected white matter structures and suppressed cerebral inflammation. Activated microglial density showed a correlation with decreasing oligodendrocyte number (P<0.001). HI caused cell death (TUNEL+) in the internal capsule and cell proliferation (Ki-67+) in the subventricular zone compared to control (P<0.05), while UCBCs at 12h or 5d ameliorated these effects. Additionally, UCBCs at 12h induced a significant systemic increase in interleukin-10 at 10d, and reduced oxidative stress (malondialdehyde) following HI (P<0.05). UCBC administration at 12h after HI reduces preterm white matter injury, via anti-inflammatory and antioxidant actions. PMID:27317990

  18. Differentiating of banked human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells into insulin-secreting cells.

    PubMed

    Phuc, Pham Van; Nhung, Truong Hai; Loan, Dang Thi Tung; Chung, Doan Chinh; Ngoc, Phan Kim

    2011-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB)-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells. They are able to differentiate into functional cells from not only mesoderm but also endoderm. Many researches showed that cells derived from fresh human UCB could transdifferentiate into insulin-secreting cells. In this study, transdifferentiating potential of cryopreserved human UCB-derived MSCs into insulin-secreting cell was investigated. Fresh human UCB was enriched the mononuclear cells by Ficoll-Paque centrifugation. The mononuclear cell population was cryopreserved in cryo-medium containing Iscove's modified Dulbecco's media (IMDM) with 10% DMSO at -196°C for 1 yr. After thawing, mononuclear cells were cultured to isolate MSCs in medium IMDM with 20% FBS supplemented with growth factors. At the fifth passages, MSCs were confirmed by flow cytometry about expression of CD13, CD14, CD34, CD45, CD166, and HLA-DR markers; after that, they were induced to differentiate into adipocytes and osteoblasts. After inducing with specific medium for islet differentiation, there were many clusters of cell like islet at day 14-28. Using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to analyze the expression of functional genes, the result showed that Nestin, Pdx-1, Ngn3, Ils-1, Pax6, Pax4, Nkx2.2, Nkx6.1, Glut-2, Insulin genes expressed. The results showed that MSCs derived from banked cord blood can differentiate into functional pancreatic islet-like cells in vitro. If human MSCs, especially MSCs from banked cord blood of diabetes patients themselves can be isolated, proliferated, differentiated into functional pancreatic islet-like cells, and transplanted back into them (autologous transplantation), their high-proliferation potency and rejection avoidance will provide one promising therapy for diabetes.

  19. Direct intracardiac injection of umbilical cord-derived stromal cells and umbilical cord blood-derived endothelial cells for the treatment of ischemic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Capriglione, Luiz Guilherme A; Barchiki, Fabiane; Miyague, Lye; Jackowski, Danielle; Fracaro, Letícia; Schittini, Andressa V; Senegaglia, Alexandra C; Rebelatto, Carmen LK; Olandoski, Márcia; Correa, Alejandro; Brofman, Paulo RS

    2015-01-01

    The development of new therapeutic strategies is necessary to reduce the worldwide social and economic impact of cardiovascular disease, which produces high rates of morbidity and mortality. A therapeutic option that has emerged in the last decade is cell therapy. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of transplanting human umbilical cord-derived stromal cells (UCSCs), human umbilical cord blood-derived endothelial cells (UCBECs) or a combination of these two cell types for the treatment of ischemic cardiomyopathy (IC) in a Wistar rat model. IC was induced by left coronary artery ligation, and baseline echocardiography was performed seven days later. Animals with a left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) of ≤40% were selected for the study. On the ninth day after IC was induced, the animals were randomized into the following experimental groups: UCSCs, UCBECs, UCSCs plus UCBECs, or vehicle (control). Thirty days after treatment, an echocardiographic analysis was performed, followed by euthanasia. The animals in all of the cell therapy groups, regardless of the cell type transplanted, had less collagen deposition in their heart tissue and demonstrated a significant improvement in myocardial function after IC. Furthermore, there was a trend of increasing numbers of blood vessels in the infarcted area. The median value of LVEF increased by 7.19% to 11.77%, whereas the control group decreased by 0.24%. These results suggest that UCSCs and UCBECs are promising cells for cellular cardiomyoplasty and can be an effective therapy for improving cardiac function following IC. PMID:25576340

  20. Mechanism study for hypoxia induced differentiation of insulin-producing cells from umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bo; Meng, Xian-Hui; Liu, Rui; Yan, Shancheng; Xiao, Zhong-Dang

    2015-10-23

    Recently, we have successfully obtained functional IPCs efficiently from umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells by using hypoxia treatment. In this study, we further elaborated that the improved function and viability of IPCs are the result of the interaction β cell development pathway and c-Met/HGF axis induced by hypoxia. We found that hypoxia induced c-MET elevation is efficiently initiated the early stage differentiation IPCs from MSCs, and HGF improved the fully differentiation of IPCs by inducing the expression of NGN3. This finding may contribute to understanding β cell development and the development of stem cell therapy for diabetes.

  1. Chimerism and use of mesenchymal stem cells in umbilical cord blood transplantation.

    PubMed

    Berglund, Sofia; Uhlin, Michael; Mattsson, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    We performed a retrospective single-center analysis of 50 umbilical cord blood transplantations (UCBTs), focusing on chimerism development. Complete donor chimerism (DC) was associated with acute graft-vs.-host disease (aGVHD) grades II-IV for the CD3 (+) cell lineage (p = 0.01) and, in multivariate analysis, with total body irradiation (TBI) for all lineages (p < 0.01). Overall survival (OS) was negatively associated with patient age, (p < 0.001); aGVHD grades III-IV, (p < 0.001); and treatment with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) (p = 0.027). In conclusion, though multiple factors may have contributed, the association of TBI and DC might be worthy of consideration in the treatment of patients with malignant disease in the UCBT setting. The negative influence of MSCs on OS may be a reason for more careful usage of this treatment modality in combination with UCBT.

  2. Immortalized functional endothelial progenitor cell lines from umbilical cord blood for vascular tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Sobhan, Praveen K; Seervi, Mahendra; Joseph, Jeena; Varghese, Saneesh; Pillai, Prakash Rajappan; Sivaraman, Divya Mundackal; James, Jackson; George, Roshin Elizabeth; Elizabeth, K E; Santhoshkumar, T R; Pillai, M Radhakrishna

    2012-11-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play a significant role in multiple biological processes such as vascular homeostasis, regeneration, and tumor angiogenesis. This makes them a promising cell of choice for studying a variety of biological processes, toxicity assays, biomaterial-cell interaction studies, as well as in tissue-engineering applications. In this study, we report the generation of two clones of SV40-immortalized EPCs from umbilical cord blood. These cells retained most of the functional features of mature endothelial cells and showed no indication of senescence after repeated culture for more than 240 days. Extensive functional characterization of the immortalized cells by western blot, flow cytometry, and immunofluorescence studies substantiated that these cells retained their ability to synthesize nitric oxide, von Willebrand factor, P-Selectin etc. These cells achieved unlimited proliferation potential subsequent to inactivation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21, but failed to form colonies on soft agar. We also show their enhanced growth and survival on vascular biomaterials compared to parental cultures in late population doubling. These immortalized EPCs can be used as a cellular model system for studying the biology of these cells, gene manipulation experiments, cell-biomaterial interactions, as well as a variety of tissue-engineering applications.

  3. Decreasing matrix modulus of PEG hydrogels induces a vascular phenotype in human cord blood stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Mahadevaiah, Shruthi; Robinson, Karyn G.; Kharkar, Prathamesh M.; Kiick, Kristi L.; Akins, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Adult and congenital cardiovascular diseases are significant health problems that are often managed using surgery. Bypass grafting is a principal therapy, but grafts fail at high rates due to hyperplasia, fibrosis, and atherosclerosis. Biocompatible, cellularized materials that attenuate these complications and encourage healthy microvascularization could reduce graft failure, but an improved understanding of biomaterial effects on human stem cells is needed to reach clinical utility. Our group investigates stem-cell-loaded biomaterials for placement along the adventitia of at-risk vessels and grafts. Here, the effects of substrate modulus on human CD34+ stem cells from umbilical cord blood were evaluated. Cells were isolated by immunomagnetic separation and encapsulated in 3, 4, and 6 weight% PEG hydrogels containing 0.032% gelatin and 0.0044% fibronectin. Gels reached moduli of 0.34, 4.5, and 9.1 kPa. Cell viability approached 100%. Cell morphologies appeared similar across gels, but proliferation was significantly lower in 6 wt% gels. Expression profiling using stem cell signaling arrays indicated enhanced self-renewal and differentiation into vascular endothelium among cells in the lower weight percent gels. Thus, modulus was associated with cell proliferation and function. Gels with moduli in the low kilopascal range may be useful in stimulating cell engraftment and microvascularization of graft adventitia. PMID:26016692

  4. Stroke-induced migration of human umbilical cord blood cells: time course and cytokines.

    PubMed

    Newman, Mary B; Willing, Alison E; Manresa, John J; Davis-Sanberg, Cyndy; Sanberg, Paul R

    2005-10-01

    The therapeutic window for treatment of individuals after stroke is narrow, regardless of the treatment regime; extension of this window would provide a major therapeutic advance. In prior reports, we demonstrated significant improvements in the behavioral defects of rats that received human umbilical cord blood (HUCB) cells 24 h after a middle cerebral arterial occlusion. These effects paralleled the recruitment of these cells to the site of tissue damage. While the administration of HUCB cells 24 h after stroke was effective, the optimal time to administer these cells after stroke has not been established. Here, we investigated the migration of HUCB cells to ischemic tissue extracts. After ischemic assault, brain tissue was homogenized, and the supernatants were assayed for their ability to attract HUCB mononuclear cells as well as for levels of several cytokines. We demonstrate increased migratory activity of HUCB cells toward the extracts harvested at 24-72 h after stroke. The extracts possessed increased levels of certain cytokines and chemokines, suggesting their participation in HUCB cell migration. The results from this study are promising in that the current 3-h therapeutic window for the treatment of stroke victims, using approved anticoagulant treatment, may be extended with the use of HUCB cell therapy 24-72 h post stroke. Last, the chemokines present in the supernatant provide a sound starting point to start examining the mechanisms responsible for the in vivo migration of HUCB cells after the induction of stroke. PMID:16305342

  5. Development of stem cells from umbilical cord blood and blood banking: "non-controversial" and "free of political and ethical debate"?

    PubMed

    Skene, Loane

    2012-03-01

    Opponents of human embryo research have understandably welcomed pluripotent stem cells being derived from body cells including cells from umbilical cords after childbirth. The cord would otherwise be discarded and embryos are not destroyed. However, there are other ethical, legal and political issues in cord blood collection, whether for the child's future use, or a public blood bank. Information and consent procedures may be misleading. Some parents have false hopes about potential outcomes. The right of access to stored blood and other benefits is sometimes uncertain for children and their families. Private stem cell repositories may compete with public ones. People may want to impose conditions on donation. Quality control may be an issue.

  6. Immortalized Functional Endothelial Progenitor Cell Lines from Umbilical Cord Blood for Vascular Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Sobhan, Praveen K.; Seervi, Mahendra; Joseph, Jeena; Varghese, Saneesh; Pillai, Prakash Rajappan; Sivaraman, Divya Mundackal; James, Jackson; George, Roshin Elizabeth; Elizabeth, K.E.; Pillai, M. Radhakrishna

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play a significant role in multiple biological processes such as vascular homeostasis, regeneration, and tumor angiogenesis. This makes them a promising cell of choice for studying a variety of biological processes, toxicity assays, biomaterial–cell interaction studies, as well as in tissue-engineering applications. In this study, we report the generation of two clones of SV40-immortalized EPCs from umbilical cord blood. These cells retained most of the functional features of mature endothelial cells and showed no indication of senescence after repeated culture for more than 240 days. Extensive functional characterization of the immortalized cells by western blot, flow cytometry, and immunofluorescence studies substantiated that these cells retained their ability to synthesize nitric oxide, von Willebrand factor, P-Selectin etc. These cells achieved unlimited proliferation potential subsequent to inactivation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21, but failed to form colonies on soft agar. We also show their enhanced growth and survival on vascular biomaterials compared to parental cultures in late population doubling. These immortalized EPCs can be used as a cellular model system for studying the biology of these cells, gene manipulation experiments, cell–biomaterial interactions, as well as a variety of tissue-engineering applications. PMID:22889128

  7. A potential role for B cells in suppressed immune responses in cord blood transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Beaudette-Zlatanova, Britte C.; Le, Phong T.; Knight, Katherine L.; Zhang, Shubin; Zakrzewski, Sandra; Parthasarathy, Mala; Stiff, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated immune reconstitution in 58 adults who received hematopoietic stem cell transplants from allogeneic siblings (allosib), matched unrelated donors (MUD), or cord blood (CB) at 90-day intervals for one year post-transplant. CB recipients had a higher incidence of infections in the first 100 days compared to allosib and MUD recipients. The number of circulating T cells was lower in CB recipients compared to MUD recipients at 90 days and compared to allosib recipients at 180 days. Spectratype analysis of the TCR Vβ complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) of patient lymphocytes revealed that the TCR repertoire remained poorly diversified even at 360 days in nearly all patients. In contrast, the number of circulating B cells was significantly elevated in CB recipients compared to allosib recipients throughout the first year post-transplant and compared to MUD recipients at 9-12 months. Spectratype analysis of the B cell receptor VH CDR3 showed that the B cell repertoire was diversified in most patients by 90 days. CD5pos B cells from assayed CB recipients expressed intracellular IL-10 early post-transplant. Our data suggest that B cells, in addition to T cells, may play a role in impaired immune responses in CB transplant patients. PMID:22732699

  8. Human cord blood suppressor T lymphocytes. II. Characterization of inducer of suppressor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, H.; Delespesse, G.

    1986-06-01

    Previously, we reported an antigen nonspecific inducer of T suppressor cell factor (TisF) produced by cord blood mononuclear cells (MNC) in 48-hr, two-way mixed lymphocyte cultures (MLC). The target of this factor was a radiosensitive, T4+ (T8-) adult suppressor T cell subset. The cellular origin of this TisF was examined in the present study. IgG production by pokeweed mitogen (PWM)-stimulated adult MNC was used as an assay for TisF activity. It was found that TisF-producing cells formed rosettes with sheep erythrocytes (E+) and were independent of adherent cells (AC) in the production of TisF. They were resistant to irradiation (2500 rads) and phenotypic characterization with T cell reactive monoclonal antibodies indicated that they resided in the T8- (T4+) population. Furthermore, both TQ1- and TQ1+ cells were required for the production of TisF activity and such activity could not be reconstituted by supernatants from TQ1- MLC and TQ1+ MLC. These results indicate that the production of TisF is dependent upon interactions between radioresistant E+, T8-, TQ1- and radioresistant E+, T8-, TQ1+ cells.

  9. A cord blood monocyte–derived cell therapy product accelerates brain remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Buntz, Susan; Scotland, Paula; Xu, Li; Noeldner, Pamela; Patel, Sachit; Wollish, Amy; Gunaratne, Aruni; Gentry, Tracy; Matsushima, Glenn K.; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Balber, Andrew E.

    2016-01-01

    Microglia and monocytes play important roles in regulating brain remyelination. We developed DUOC-01, a cell therapy product intended for treatment of demyelinating diseases, from banked human umbilical cord blood (CB) mononuclear cells. Immunodepletion and selection studies demonstrated that DUOC-01 cells are derived from CB CD14+ monocytes. We compared the ability of freshly isolated CB CD14+ monocytes and DUOC-01 cells to accelerate remyelination of the brains of NOD/SCID/IL2Rγnull mice following cuprizone feeding–mediated demyelination. The corpus callosum of mice intracranially injected with DUOC-01 showed enhanced myelination, a higher proportion of fully myelinated axons, decreased gliosis and cellular infiltration, and more proliferating oligodendrocyte lineage cells than those of mice receiving excipient. Uncultured CB CD14+ monocytes also accelerated remyelination, but to a significantly lesser extent than DUOC-01 cells. Microarray analysis, quantitative PCR studies, Western blotting, and flow cytometry demonstrated that expression of factors that promote remyelination including PDGF-AA, stem cell factor, IGF1, MMP9, MMP12, and triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 were upregulated in DUOC-01 compared to CB CD14+ monocytes. Collectively, our results show that DUOC-01 accelerates brain remyelination by multiple mechanisms and could be beneficial in treating demyelinating conditions.

  10. A cord blood monocyte–derived cell therapy product accelerates brain remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Buntz, Susan; Scotland, Paula; Xu, Li; Noeldner, Pamela; Patel, Sachit; Wollish, Amy; Gunaratne, Aruni; Gentry, Tracy; Matsushima, Glenn K.; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Balber, Andrew E.

    2016-01-01

    Microglia and monocytes play important roles in regulating brain remyelination. We developed DUOC-01, a cell therapy product intended for treatment of demyelinating diseases, from banked human umbilical cord blood (CB) mononuclear cells. Immunodepletion and selection studies demonstrated that DUOC-01 cells are derived from CB CD14+ monocytes. We compared the ability of freshly isolated CB CD14+ monocytes and DUOC-01 cells to accelerate remyelination of the brains of NOD/SCID/IL2Rγnull mice following cuprizone feeding–mediated demyelination. The corpus callosum of mice intracranially injected with DUOC-01 showed enhanced myelination, a higher proportion of fully myelinated axons, decreased gliosis and cellular infiltration, and more proliferating oligodendrocyte lineage cells than those of mice receiving excipient. Uncultured CB CD14+ monocytes also accelerated remyelination, but to a significantly lesser extent than DUOC-01 cells. Microarray analysis, quantitative PCR studies, Western blotting, and flow cytometry demonstrated that expression of factors that promote remyelination including PDGF-AA, stem cell factor, IGF1, MMP9, MMP12, and triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 were upregulated in DUOC-01 compared to CB CD14+ monocytes. Collectively, our results show that DUOC-01 accelerates brain remyelination by multiple mechanisms and could be beneficial in treating demyelinating conditions. PMID:27699230

  11. Background and Future Considerations for Human Cord Blood Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, Including Economic Concerns

    PubMed Central

    Broxmeyer, Hal E.; Farag, Sherif

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Cord blood (CB) has been used since 1988 as a source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitor cells for hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) to treat patients with malignant and nonmalignant disorders. CB has both advantages and disadvantages when compared with other tissue sources of HSCs such as bone marrow and mobilized peripheral blood, which are also being used in the setting of HCT. This short review focuses on some historical information, as well as current efforts that are being assessed to enhance the efficacy of CB HCT. Also of importance are the costs of CB, and the feasibility and economics of using such to be identified, and newly confirmed improvements worldwide for the greatest number of patients. In this context, simple methods that would not necessarily entail the need for selected cell-processing facilities to ex vivo expand or improve the CB graft's functional activity may be of interest, with one such possibility being the use of an orally active inhibitor of the enzyme dipeptidylpeptidase 4, alone or in combination with other new and innovative approaches for improving HSC engraftment and in vivo repopulating capability of CB. PMID:24304086

  12. Human cord blood T-cell receptor alpha beta cell responses to protein antigens of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis yeast forms.

    PubMed Central

    Munk, M E; Kaufmann, S H

    1995-01-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis causes a chronic granulomatous mycosis, prevalent in South America, and cell-mediated immunity represents the principal mode of protection against this fungal infection. We investigated the response of naive cord blood T cells to P. brasiliensis lysates. Our results show: (1) P. brasiliensis stimulates T-cell expansion, interleukin-2 (IL-2) production and differentiation into cytotoxic T cells; (2) T-cell stimulation depends on P. brasiliensis processing and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II expression; (3) the responsive T-cell population expresses alpha beta T-cell receptors (TCR) with different V beta gene products, CD4 and CD45RO; (4) the P. brasiliensis components involved in T-cell expansion primarily reside in a high molecular weight (100,000 MW) and a low molecular weight (< 1000 MW) protein fraction. These results indicate that protein antigens of P. brasiliensis stimulate cord blood CD4 alpha beta T cells, independent from in vivo presensitization, and thus question direct correlation of positive in vitro responses with protective immunity in vivo. PMID:7890308

  13. Tumorigenicity Evaluation of Umbilical Cord Blood-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Jin; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Woojin; Kim, Ok-Sun; Lee, Sunyeong; Han, Su-Yeon; Jeong, Eun Ju; Park, Hyun-Shin; Kim, Hea-Won; Moon, Kyoung-Sik

    2016-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been identified in multiple types of tissue and exhibit characteristic self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation abilities. However, the possibility of oncogenic transformation after transplantation is concerning. In this study, we investigated the tumorigenic potential of umbilical cord blood-derived MSCs (hUCB-MSCs) relative to MRC-5 and HeLa cells (negative and positive controls, respectively) both in vitro and in vivo. To evaluate tumorigenicity in vitro, anchorage-independent growth was assessed using the soft agar colony formation assay. hUCB-MSCs and MRC-5 cells formed few colonies, while HeLa cells formed a greater number of larger colonies, indicating that hUCB-MSCs and MRC-5 cells do not have anchorage-independent proliferation potential. To detect tumorigenicity in vivo, hUCB-MSCs were implanted as a single subcutaneous injection into BALB/c-nu mice. No tumor formation was observed in mice transplanted with hUCB-MSCs or MRC-5 cells based on macroand microscopic examinations; however, all mice transplanted with HeLa cells developed tumors that stained positive for a human gene according to immunohistochemical analysis. In conclusion, hUCB-MSCs do not exhibit tumorigenic potential based on in vitro and in vivo assays under our experimental conditions, providing further evidence of their safety for clinical applications.

  14. Tumorigenicity Evaluation of Umbilical Cord Blood-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-Jin; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Woojin; Kim, Ok-Sun; Lee, Sunyeong; Han, Su-Yeon; Jeong, Eun Ju; Park, Hyun-shin; Kim, Hea-Won; Moon, Kyoung-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been identified in multiple types of tissue and exhibit characteristic self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation abilities. However, the possibility of oncogenic transformation after transplantation is concerning. In this study, we investigated the tumorigenic potential of umbilical cord blood-derived MSCs (hUCB-MSCs) relative to MRC-5 and HeLa cells (negative and positive controls, respectively) both in vitro and in vivo. To evaluate tumorigenicity in vitro, anchorage-independent growth was assessed using the soft agar colony formation assay. hUCB-MSCs and MRC-5 cells formed few colonies, while HeLa cells formed a greater number of larger colonies, indicating that hUCB-MSCs and MRC-5 cells do not have anchorage-independent proliferation potential. To detect tumorigenicity in vivo, hUCB-MSCs were implanted as a single subcutaneous injection into BALB/c-nu mice. No tumor formation was observed in mice transplanted with hUCB-MSCs or MRC-5 cells based on macroand microscopic examinations; however, all mice transplanted with HeLa cells developed tumors that stained positive for a human gene according to immunohistochemical analysis. In conclusion, hUCB-MSCs do not exhibit tumorigenic potential based on in vitro and in vivo assays under our experimental conditions, providing further evidence of their safety for clinical applications. PMID:27437093

  15. Dendritic Cells Differentiated from Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Monocytes Exhibit Tolerogenic Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Kyung; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2015-12-01

    Human umbilical cord blood (UCB) is rich in diverse hematopoietic stem cells that are competent to differentiate into various cell types with immunological compatibility at transplantation. Thus, UCB is a potential source for the preparation of dendritic cells (DCs) to be used for cell therapy against inflammatory disorders or cancers. However, the immunological properties of UCB-derived DCs are not fully characterized. In this study, we investigated the phenotypes and functions of UCB monocyte-derived DCs (UCB-DCs) in comparison with those of adult peripheral blood (APB) monocyte-derived DCs (APB-DCs). UCB-DCs contained less CD1a(+) DCs, which is known as immunostimulatory DCs, than APB-DCs. UCB-DCs exhibited lower expression of CD80, MHC proteins, and DC-SIGN, but higher endocytic activity, than APB-DCs. Lipopolysaccharide stimulation of UCB-DCs minimally augmented the expression of maturation markers and production of interleukin (IL)-12 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, but potently expressed IL-10. When UCB-DCs were cocultured with CD14(+) cell-depleted allogeneic peripheral blood mononuclear cells, they weakly induced the proliferation, surface expression of activation markers, and interferon (IFN)-γ production of T lymphocytes compared with APB-DCs. UCB possessed higher levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) than APB, which might be responsible for tolerogenic phenotypes and functions of UCB-DCs. Indeed, APB-DCs prepared in the presence of PGE2 exhibited CD1a(-)CD14(+) phenotypes with tolerogenic properties, including weak maturation, impaired IL-12 production, and negligible T lymphocyte activation as UCB-DCs did. Taken together, we suggest that UCB-DCs have tolerogenic properties, which might be due to PGE2 highly sustained in UCB.

  16. Human umbilical cord blood stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor for optic nerve injury: a biomechanical evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhong-jun; Li, Ya-jun; Liu, Xiao-guang; Huang, Feng-xiao; Liu, Tie-jun; Jiang, Dong-mei; Lv, Xue-man; Luo, Min

    2015-01-01

    Treatment for optic nerve injury by brain-derived neurotrophic factor or the transplantation of human umbilical cord blood stem cells has gained progress, but analysis by biomechanical indicators is rare. Rabbit models of optic nerve injury were established by a clamp. At 7 days after injury, the vitreous body received a one-time injection of 50 μg brain-derived neurotrophic factor or 1 × 106 human umbilical cord blood stem cells. After 30 days, the maximum load, maximum stress, maximum strain, elastic limit load, elastic limit stress, and elastic limit strain had clearly improved in rabbit models of optical nerve injury after treatment with brain-derived neurotrophic factor or human umbilical cord blood stem cells. The damage to the ultrastructure of the optic nerve had also been reduced. These findings suggest that human umbilical cord blood stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor effectively repair the injured optical nerve, improve biomechanical properties, and contribute to the recovery after injury. PMID:26330839

  17. Quality and exploitation of umbilical cord blood for cell therapy: Are we beyond our capabilities?

    PubMed

    Roura, Santiago; Pujal, Josep Maria; Gálvez-Montón, Carolina; Bayes-Genis, Antoni

    2016-07-01

    There is increasing interest in identifying novel stem cell sources for application in emerging cell therapies. In this context, umbilical cord blood (UCB) shows great promise in multiple clinical settings. The number of UCB banks has therefore increased worldwide, with the objective of preserving potentially life-saving cells that are usually discarded after birth. After a rather long and costly processing procedure, the resultant UCB-derived cell products are cryopreserved until transplantation to patients. However, in many cases, only a small proportion of administered cells engraft successfully. Thus, can we do any better regarding current UCB-based therapeutic approaches? Here we discuss concerns about the use of UCB that are not critically pondered by researchers, clinicians, and banking services, including wasting samples with small volumes and the need for more reliable quality and functional controls to ensure the biological activity of stem cells and subsequent engraftment and treatment efficacy. Finally, we appeal for collaborative agreements between research institutions and UCB banks in order to redirect currently discarded small-volume UCB units for basic and clinical research purposes. Developmental Dynamics 245:710-717, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27043849

  18. Estimation of the haematological toxicity of minor groove alkylators using tests on human cord blood cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ghielmini, M.; Bosshard, G.; Capolongo, L.; Geroni, M. C.; Pesenti, E.; Torri, V.; D'Incalci, M.; Cavalli, F.; Sessa, C.

    1997-01-01

    We evaluated the myelotoxicity and the anti-tumor potential of tallimustine, three of its analogues and carzelesin, with melphalan as reference substance. Tallimustine was tested by clonogenic assays on both human bone marrow (BM) and cord blood (hCB) cells, the other compounds on hCB only. The degree of inhibition of the haemopoietic progenitors GM-CFC, CFC-E and BFU-E was evaluated after exposure to different concentrations. The same schedules were tested on five tumour cell lines. We found that the dose-response curves for tallimustine on BM and hCB cells were similar. Carzelesin was shown to be the most potent of the substances tested and to be the one with the best in vitro therapeutic index; of the distamycin analogues, the one bearing an alpha-bromoacrylic group (FCE 25450) had the best index. For melphalan, tallimustine and carzelesin, the concentration inhibiting the growth of 70% of progenitor cells in vitro (ID70) was similar to the concentrations found in the serum of patients treated at the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). We conclude that hCB cells may be used instead of BM cells for in vitro myelotoxicity tests. Therapeutic indexes can be extrapolated from this model and could help in selecting the most promising analogue for further clinical development. The in vitro-active concentrations are similar to myelotoxic concentrations in patients, suggesting a predictive value for the assay. PMID:9062410

  19. Quality and exploitation of umbilical cord blood for cell therapy: Are we beyond our capabilities?

    PubMed

    Roura, Santiago; Pujal, Josep Maria; Gálvez-Montón, Carolina; Bayes-Genis, Antoni

    2016-07-01

    There is increasing interest in identifying novel stem cell sources for application in emerging cell therapies. In this context, umbilical cord blood (UCB) shows great promise in multiple clinical settings. The number of UCB banks has therefore increased worldwide, with the objective of preserving potentially life-saving cells that are usually discarded after birth. After a rather long and costly processing procedure, the resultant UCB-derived cell products are cryopreserved until transplantation to patients. However, in many cases, only a small proportion of administered cells engraft successfully. Thus, can we do any better regarding current UCB-based therapeutic approaches? Here we discuss concerns about the use of UCB that are not critically pondered by researchers, clinicians, and banking services, including wasting samples with small volumes and the need for more reliable quality and functional controls to ensure the biological activity of stem cells and subsequent engraftment and treatment efficacy. Finally, we appeal for collaborative agreements between research institutions and UCB banks in order to redirect currently discarded small-volume UCB units for basic and clinical research purposes. Developmental Dynamics 245:710-717, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Trophic factor induction of human umbilical cord blood cells in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ning; Kamath, Siddharth; Newcomb, Jennifer; Hudson, Jennifer; Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana; Bickford, Paula; Davis-Sanberg, Cyndy; Sanberg, Paul; Zigova, Tanja; Willing, Alison

    2007-06-01

    The mononuclear fraction of human umbilical cord blood (HUCBmnf) is a mixed cell population that multiple research groups have shown contains cells that can express neural proteins. In these studies, we have examined the ability of the HUCBmnf to express neural antigens after in vitro exposure to defined media supplemented with a cocktail of growth and neurotrophic factors. It is our hypothesis that by treating the HUCBmnf with these developmentally-relevant factors, we can expand the population, enhance the expression of neural antigens and increase cell survival upon transplantation. Prior to growth factor treatment in culture, expression of stem cell antigens is greater in the non-adherent HUCBmnf cells compared to the adherent cells (p < 0.05). Furthermore, treatment of the non-adherent cells with growth factors, increases BrdU incorporation, especially after 14 days in vitro (DIV). In HUCBmnf-embryonic mouse striata co-culture, a small number of growth factor treated HUCBmnf cells were able to integrate into the growing neural network and express immature (nestin and TuJ1) and mature (GFAP and MAP2) neural markers. Treated HUCBmnf cells implanted in the subventricular zone predominantly expressed GFAP although some grafted HUCBmnf cells were MAP2 positive. While short-term treatment of HUCBmnf cells with growth and neurotrophic factors enhanced proliferative capacity in vitro and survival of the cells in vivo, the treatment regimen employed was not enough to ensure long-term survival of HUCBmnf-derived neurons necessary for cell replacement therapies for neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. Xeno-free culture condition for human bone marrow and umbilical cord matrix-derived mesenchymal stem/stromal cells using human umbilical cord blood serum

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeli, Azadeh; Moshrefi, Mojgan; Shamsara, Ali; Eftekhar-vaghefi, Seyed Hasan; Nematollahi-mahani, Seyed Noureddin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Fetal bovine serum (FBS) is widely used in cell culture laboratories, risk of zoonotic infections and allergic side effects create obstacles for its use in clinical trials. Therefore, an alternative supplement with proper inherent growth-promoting activities is demanded. Objective: To find FBS substitute, we tested human umbilical cord blood serum (hUCS) for proliferation of human umbilical cord matrix derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) and human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cells (hBM-MSCs). Materials and Methods: Umbilical cord blood of healthy neonates, delivered by Caesarian section, was collected and the serum was separated. hUC-MSCs and hBM-MSCs were isolated and characterized by assessment of cell surface antigens by flow cytometry, alkaline phosphatase activity and osteogenic/adipogenic differentiation potential. The cells were then cultured in Iscove's Modified Dulbecco's Medium (IMDM) by conventional methods in three preparations: 1- with hUCS, 2- with FBS, and 3- without serum supplements. Cell proliferation was measured using WST-1 assay, and cell viability was assessed by trypan blue staining. Results: The cells cultured in hUCS and FBS exhibited similar morphology and mesenchymal stem cells properties. WST-1 proliferation assay data showed no significant difference between the proliferation rate of either cells following hUCS and FBS supplementation. Trypan blue exclusion dye test also revealed no significant difference for viability between hUCS and FBS groups. A significant difference was detected between the proliferation rate of stem cells cultured in serum-supplemented medium compared with serum-free medium. Conclusion: Our results indicate that human umbilical cord serum can effectively support proliferation of hBM-MSCS and hUC-MSCs in vitro and can be used as an appropriate substitute for FBS, especially in clinical studies. PMID:27738658

  2. Hematopoietic cell transplantation with cord blood for cure of HIV infections.

    PubMed

    Petz, Lawrence D; Redei, Istvan; Bryson, Yvonne; Regan, Donna; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Shpall, Elizabeth; Gutman, Jonathan; Querol, Sergio; Clark, Pamela; Tonai, Richard; Santos, Sarah; Bravo, Aide; Spellman, Stephen; Gragert, Loren; Rossi, John; Li, Shirley; Li, Haitang; Senitzer, David; Zaia, John; Rosenthal, Joseph; Forman, Stephen; Chow, Robert

    2013-03-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) using CCR5-Δ32/Δ32 stem cells from an adult donor has resulted in the only known cure of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. However, it is not feasible to repeat this procedure except rarely because of the low incidence of the CCR5-Δ32 allele, the availability of only a small number of potential donors for most patients, and the need for a very close human leukocyte antigen (HLA) match between adult donors and recipients. In contrast, cord blood (CB) transplantations require significantly less stringent HLA matching. Therefore, our hypothesis is that cure of HIV infections by HCT can be accomplished much more readily using umbilical CB stem cells obtained from a modestly sized inventory of cryopreserved CCR5-Δ32/Δ32 CB units. To test this hypothesis, we developed a screening program for CB units and are developing an inventory of CCR5-Δ32/Δ32 cryopreserved units available for HCT. Three hundred such units are projected to provide for white pediatric patients a 73.6% probability of finding an adequately HLA matched unit with a cell dose of ≥2.5 × 10(7) total nucleated cells (TNCs)/kg and a 27.9% probability for white adults. With a cell dose of ≥1 × 10(7) TNCs/kg, the corresponding projected probabilities are 85.6% and 82.1%. The projected probabilities are lower for ethnic minorities. Impetus for using CB HCT was provided by a transplantation of an adult with acute myelogenous leukemia who was not HIV infected. The HCT was performed with a CCR5-Δ32/Δ32 CB unit, and posttransplantation in vitro studies indicated that the patient's peripheral blood mononuclear cells were resistant to HIV infection.

  3. Phenotypic and immunomodulatory properties of equine cord blood-derived mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Tessier, Laurence; Bienzle, Dorothee; Williams, Lynn B; Koch, Thomas G

    2015-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have attracted interest for their cytotherapeutic potential, partly due to their immunomodulatory abilities. The aim of this study was to test the robustness of our equine cord blood (CB) MSC isolation protocol, to characterize the CB-MSC before and after cryopreservation, and to evaluate their immunosuppressive phenotype. We hypothesized that MSC can be consistently isolated from equine CB, have unique and reproducible marker expression and in vitro suppress lymphoproliferation. Preliminary investigation of constitutive cytoplasmic Toll-like receptor (TLR) 3 and 4 expression was also preformed due to their possible association with anti- or pro-inflammatory MSC phenotypes, respectively. Surface markers were assessed for antigen and mRNA expression by flow cytometry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Immunomodulatory properties were evaluated in mixed lymphocyte reaction assays, and TLR3 and TLR4 expression were measured by qPCR and immunocytochemistry (ICC). CB-MSC were isolated from each off nine cord blood samples. CB-MSC highly expressed CD29, CD44, CD90, and lacked or had low expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I, MHC-II, CD4, CD8, CD11a/18 and CD73 before and after cryopreservation. CB-MSC suppressed in vitro lymphoproliferation and constitutively expressed TLR4. Our findings confirmed CB as a reliable MSC source, provides an association of surface marker phenotype and mRNA expression and suggest anti-inflammatory properties of CB-MSC. The relationship between TLRs and lymphocyte function warrants further investigation. PMID:25902064

  4. Phenotypic and Immunomodulatory Properties of Equine Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tessier, Laurence; Bienzle, Dorothee; Williams, Lynn B.; Koch, Thomas G.

    2015-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have attracted interest for their cytotherapeutic potential, partly due to their immunomodulatory abilities. The aim of this study was to test the robustness of our equine cord blood (CB) MSC isolation protocol, to characterize the CB-MSC before and after cryopreservation, and to evaluate their immunosuppressive phenotype. We hypothesized that MSC can be consistently isolated from equine CB, have unique and reproducible marker expression and in vitro suppress lymphoproliferation. Preliminary investigation of constitutive cytoplasmic Toll-like receptor (TLR) 3 and 4 expression was also preformed due to their possible association with anti- or pro-inflammatory MSC phenotypes, respectively. Surface markers were assessed for antigen and mRNA expression by flow cytometry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Immunomodulatory properties were evaluated in mixed lymphocyte reaction assays, and TLR3 and TLR4 expression were measured by qPCR and immunocytochemistry (ICC). CB-MSC were isolated from each off nine cord blood samples. CB-MSC highly expressed CD29, CD44, CD90, and lacked or had low expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I, MHC-II, CD4, CD8, CD11a/18 and CD73 before and after cryopreservation. CB-MSC suppressed in vitro lymphoproliferation and constitutively expressed TLR4. Our findings confirmed CB as a reliable MSC source, provides an association of surface marker phenotype and mRNA expression and suggest anti-inflammatory properties of CB-MSC. The relationship between TLRs and lymphocyte function warrants further investigation. PMID:25902064

  5. [Effect of aspirin on function of human umbilical cord blood-derived late endothelial progenitor cells].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen-Zhen; Li, Guo-Qiang; Liu, Meng; Sun, Sheng-Xuan; An, Guan-Yu; Dong, Ning-Zheng

    2013-08-01

    This study was aimed to investigate whether aspirin has effect on function of late endothelial progenitor cells (EPC). Cord blood CD34(+) cells were purified using the ficoll density gradient centrifugation and human CD34 positive selection kit, then the cells were inoculated on fibronectin-coated culture plate. After culture for 2 weeks, adherent cells were identified as EPC by flow cytometry, immunofluorescence, RT-PCR, uptake of Dil-Ac-LDL and matrigel tube formation assay. EPC were treated with different concentrations of aspirin (0.1, 1, 10, 100, 1 000, 10 000 µmol/L) for 24 h, then the proliferation, adhesion and migration ability of these cells were analyzed by CCK-8 assay and transwell methods. The results indicated that the low concentrations of aspirin (0.1 and 1 000 µmol/L) promoted late EPC adhesive and migratory capacity, but no obvious effect on proliferation of late EPC were observed. On the other hand, the high concentrations of aspirin (10 000 µmol/L) inhibited proliferation and migratory capacity of EPC, but had no obvious effect on adhesive ability of EPC. It is concluded that low concentration of aspirin promotes migration and adhesion of late EPC, while the high concentration of aspirin decreases EPC proliferation and migratory capacity of EPC.

  6. Human cord blood-derived neural stem cell line--possible implementation in studying neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Buzańska, L; Habich, A; Jurga, M; Sypecka, J; Domańska-Janik, K

    2005-10-01

    Neural stem cell line developed from human umbilical cord blood (HUCB-NSC) [Buzańska et al., 2003. Journal of Neurochemistry 85, 33] is an ethically uncontroversial source of stem cells, able to differentiate into neuronal, astrocytic and oligodendroglial lineages. Developmental fate decisions of HUCB-NSC can be experimentally manipulated in vitro by the presence of trophic factors, mitogenes and neuromorphogenes, but can also be influenced by neurotoxins. In this report two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) HUCB-NSC cultures are introduced as useful models for testing developmental neurotoxicity. For 2-D culture models we established a standardized method for the assessment of the growth rate and cell differentiation in 96-well plates. The proliferative capacity of the HUCB-NSC was monitored by the MTT test while their ability to differentiate into neural-like cells by immunocytochemistry of beta-tubulin III and MAP-2 for neurons, GFAP and S-100beta for astrocytes and GalC for oligodendrocytes. The 3-D culture of HUCB-NSC is represented by neurospheres. Proliferation and migration of the intermediate precursors from attached neurospheres are shown to be controlled and altered by various growth factors and further modulated by the extracellular matrix component-fibronectin. Thus, neurospheres derived from the HUCB-NSC line can represent a suitable model of the activation of dormant stem cells residing in their niche, and can be used for neurotoxic studies. PMID:16084685

  7. Comparison of immunological status of African and European cord blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Carsten; Adegnika, Ayola A; Van der Linden, Reinier; Agnandji, Selidji T; Chai, Sanders K; Luty, Adrian J F; Szepfalusi, Zsolt; Kremsner, Peter G; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria

    2008-12-01

    The cellular aspects of the immunologic development of the fetus during pregnancy have been studied mainly in populations living in economically well developed countries, and there is no data concerning variation of the neonatal cellular immune system in geographically distinct areas with different environments. Here, we report a comparative immunologic marker analysis of the circulating mononuclear cell subsets in unstimulated cord blood of newborns from Gabon and Austria, assessing the activation and maturation status of T and B lymphocytes as well as antigen-presenting cells. Cells and markers hypothesized to be modulated by frequent exposure to microorganisms and parasites such as regulatory T cells and the expression of toll-like receptor 2 on antigen-presenting cells were also studied. We found marked differences in terms of expression of immunologic markers between the two populations, pointing to a comparatively enhanced maturation status of the neonatal immune system in general in the African setting. The observations suggest that environmental factors, including differential exposure to pathogens as well as nutritional differences, may have substantial impact on the development of the fetal immune system.

  8. Influence of human myasthenia gravis thymus on the differentiation of human cord blood stem cells in SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian Ru; Liu, Ping Ping; Xuan, Xiao Yan; Guan, Sha Sha; Du, Ying; Gao, Feng; Zhang, Qing Yong

    2014-02-01

    The normal thymus contributes to T lymphocytes differentiation and induction of tolerance to self-antigens. Myasthenia gravis (MG) is characterized by abnormal thymic hyperplasia. To assess the potential influence of MG-thymus on the differentiation of T lymphocytes differentiation, we used the MG-thymus transplanted severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice model to evaluate the human cord blood stem cells differentiation. Thymus fragments from MG patient and human cord blood stem cells were transplanted into SCID mice successively. SCID mice were observed to develop sustained human T lymphocytes and a functional anti-tumor immune. The levels of various T cell subsets in SCID mice with MG-thymus were different from that of control group. Among that, the frequency of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells was significant lower in SCID mice with MG-thymus. The deficiency of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells seens to contribute to the pathogenesis of MG.

  9. Alternative donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for mature lymphoid malignancies after reduced-intensity conditioning regimen: similar outcomes with umbilical cord blood and unrelated donor peripheral blood

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Celso Arrais; Rocha, Vanderson; Dreger, Peter; Brunstein, Claudio; Sengeloev, Henrik; Finke, Jürgen; Mohty, Mohamad; Rio, Bernard; Petersen, Eefke; Guilhot, François; Niederwieser, Dietger; Cornelissen, Jan J.; Jindra, Pavel; Nagler, Arnon; Fegueux, Nathalie; Schoemans, Hélène; Robinson, Stephen; Ruggeri, Annalisa; Gluckman, Eliane; Canals, Carmen; Sureda, Anna

    2014-01-01

    We have reported encouraging results of unrelated cord blood transplantation for patients with lymphoid malignancies. Whether those outcomes are comparable to matched unrelated donor transplants remains to be defined. We studied 645 adult patients with mature lymphoid malignancies who received an allogeneic unrelated donor transplant using umbilical cord blood (n=104) or mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (n=541) after a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen. Unrelated cord blood recipients had more refractory disease. Median follow-up time was 30 months. Neutrophil engraftment (81% vs. 97%, respectively; P<0.0001) and chronic graft-versus-host disease (26% vs. 52%; P=0.0005) were less frequent after unrelated cord blood than after matched unrelated donor, whereas no differences were observed in grade II–IV acute graft-versus-host disease (29% vs. 32%), non-relapse mortality (29% vs. 28%), and relapse or progression (28% vs. 35%) at 36 months. There were also no significant differences in 2-year progression-free survival (43% vs. 58%, respectively) and overall survival (36% vs. 51%) at 36 months. In a multivariate analysis, no differences were observed in the outcomes between the two stem cell sources except for a higher risk of neutrophil engraftment (hazard ratio=2.12; P<0.0001) and chronic graft-versus-host disease (hazard ratio 2.10; P=0.0002) after matched unrelated donor transplant. In conclusion, there was no difference in final outcomes after transplantation between umbilical cord blood and matched unrelated donor transplant. Umbilical cord blood is a valuable alternative for patients with lymphoid malignancies lacking an HLA-matched donor, being associated with lower risk of chronic graft-versus-host disease. PMID:23935024

  10. CD4+CD25+ FOXP3+ regulatory T cells from human thymus and cord blood suppress antigen-specific T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Wing, Kajsa; Larsson, Pia; Sandström, Kerstin; Lundin, Samuel B; Suri-Payer, Elisabeth; Rudin, Anna

    2005-01-01

    Activation of self-reactive T cells in healthy adults is prevented by the presence of autoantigen-specific CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (CD25+ Treg). To explore the functional development of autoantigen-reactive CD25+ Treg in humans we investigated if thymic CD25+ Treg from children aged 2 months to 11 years and cord blood CD25+ Treg are able to suppress proliferation and cytokine production induced by specific antigens. While CD4+CD25− thymocytes proliferated in response to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), tetanus toxoid and beta-lactoglobulin, suppression of proliferation was not detected after the addition of thymic CD25+ Treg. However, CD25+ Treg inhibited interferon (IFN)-γ production induced by MOG, which indicates that MOG-reactive CD25+ Treg are present in the thymus. In contrast, cord blood CD25+ Treg suppressed both proliferation and cytokine production induced by MOG. Both cord blood and thymic CD25+ Treg expressed FOXP3 mRNA. However, FOXP3 expression was lower in cord blood than in thymic CD25+ T cells. Further characterization of cord blood CD25+ T cells revealed that FOXP3 was highly expressed by CD25+CD45RA+ cells while CD25+CD45RA− cells contained twofold less FOXP3, which may explain the lower expression level of FOXP3 in cord blood CD25+ T cells compared to thymic CD25+ T cells. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that low numbers of MOG-reactive functional CD25+ Treg are present in normal thymus, but that the suppressive ability of the cells is broader in cord blood. This suggests that the CD25+ Treg may be further matured in the periphery after being exported from the thymus. PMID:16011520

  11. Human Umbilical Cord Blood Cells Restore Brain Damage Induced Changes in Rat Somatosensory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Geißler, Maren; Dinse, Hubert R.; Neuhoff, Sandra; Kreikemeier, Klaus; Meier, Carola

    2011-01-01

    Intraperitoneal transplantation of human umbilical cord blood (hUCB) cells has been shown to reduce sensorimotor deficits after hypoxic ischemic brain injury in neonatal rats. However, the neuronal correlate of the functional recovery and how such a treatment enforces plastic remodelling at the level of neural processing remains elusive. Here we show by in-vivo recordings that hUCB cells have the capability of ameliorating the injury-related impairment of neural processing in primary somatosensory cortex. Intact cortical processing depends on a delicate balance of inhibitory and excitatory transmission, which is disturbed after injury. We found that the dimensions of cortical maps and receptive fields, which are significantly altered after injury, were largely restored. Additionally, the lesion induced hyperexcitability was no longer observed in hUCB treated animals as indicated by a paired-pulse behaviour resembling that observed in control animals. The beneficial effects on cortical processing were reflected in an almost complete recovery of sensorimotor behaviour. Our results demonstrate that hUCB cells reinstall the way central neurons process information by normalizing inhibitory and excitatory processes. We propose that the intermediate level of cortical processing will become relevant as a new stage to investigate efficacy and mechanisms of cell therapy in the treatment of brain injury. PMID:21673795

  12. [Recovery of transplantable hematopoietic progenitor cells from the umbilical cord blood].

    PubMed

    Perutelli, P; Murugesan, S

    2001-12-01

    Cord blood (CB) is a source of transplantable hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC); it represents an alternative to bone marrow to restore hematopoiesis in patients affected by malignant and non-malignant disease. Therefore, large-scale CB banks would be a natural complement to bone marrow donor registries. Storage of unmanipulated whole CB units requires a great number of liquid nitrogen containers. Separation of leukocytes allows CB storage in smaller space, thus lowering banking costs; unfortunately, CB processing may cause significant losses of stem/progenitor cells. We describe here a procedure for erythrocyte removal from CB units by 1 xg sedimentation on Emagel, a gelatin-based colloidal compound commonly used as plasma expander. The erythrocyte-depleted supernatant was collected and then centrifuged to recover the leukocyte pool. We evaluated erythrocyte depletion and leukocyte recovery after different sedimentation time (30, 45 and 60 min), on 139 CB units collected at delivery. All the considered parameters were improved by increasing sedimentation time. Erythrocyte depletion at 60 min was 86.0% and we recovered 93.3% of CD34+ cells. The proposed CB-processing method allowed us to collect a satisfactory amount of HPC in view of stem cell transplantation; it may have a potential role in UCB banking.

  13. Cord blood-derived CD34+ hematopoietic cells with low mitochondrial mass are enriched in hematopoietic repopulating stem cell function.

    PubMed

    Romero-Moya, Damia; Bueno, Clara; Montes, Rosa; Navarro-Montero, Oscar; Iborra, Francisco J; López, Luis Carlos; Martin, Miguel; Menendez, Pablo

    2013-07-01

    The homeostasis of the hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell pool relies on a fine-tuned balance between self-renewal, differentiation and proliferation. Recent studies have proposed that mitochondria regulate these processes. Although recent work has contributed to understanding the role of mitochondria during stem cell differentiation, it remains unclear whether the mitochondrial content/function affects human hematopoietic stem versus progenitor function. We found that mitochondrial mass correlates strongly with mitochondrial membrane potential in CD34(+) hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. We, therefore, sorted cord blood CD34(+) cells on the basis of their mitochondrial mass and analyzed the in vitro homeostasis and clonogenic potential as well as the in vivo repopulating potential of CD34(+) cells with high (CD34(+) Mito(High)) versus low (CD34(+) Mito(Low)) mitochondrial mass. The CD34(+) Mito(Low) fraction contained 6-fold more CD34(+)CD38(-) primitive cells and was enriched in hematopoietic stem cell function, as demonstrated by its significantly greater hematopoietic reconstitution potential in immuno-deficient mice. In contrast, the CD34(+) Mito(High) fraction was more enriched in hematopoietic progenitor function with higher in vitro clonogenic capacity. In vitro differentiation of CD34(+) Mito(Low) cells was significantly delayed as compared to that of CD34(+) Mito(High) cells. The eventual complete differentiation of CD34(+) Mito(Low) cells, which coincided with a robust expansion of the CD34(-) differentiated progeny, was accompanied by mitochondrial adaptation, as shown by significant increases in ATP production and expression of the mitochondrial genes ND1 and COX2. In conclusion, cord blood CD34(+) cells with low levels of mitochondrial mass are enriched in hematopoietic repopulating stem cell function whereas high levels of mitochondrial mass identify hematopoietic progenitors. A mitochondrial response underlies hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell

  14. Cord blood-derived CD34+ hematopoietic cells with low mitochondrial mass are enriched in hematopoietic repopulating stem cell function

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Moya, Damia; Bueno, Clara; Montes, Rosa; Navarro-Montero, Oscar; Iborra, Francisco J.; López, Luis Carlos; Martin, Miguel; Menendez, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    The homeostasis of the hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell pool relies on a fine-tuned balance between self-renewal, differentiation and proliferation. Recent studies have proposed that mitochondria regulate these processes. Although recent work has contributed to understanding the role of mitochondria during stem cell differentiation, it remains unclear whether the mitochondrial content/function affects human hematopoietic stem versus progenitor function. We found that mitochondrial mass correlates strongly with mitochondrial membrane potential in CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. We, therefore, sorted cord blood CD34+ cells on the basis of their mitochondrial mass and analyzed the in vitro homeostasis and clonogenic potential as well as the in vivo repopulating potential of CD34+ cells with high (CD34+ MitoHigh) versus low (CD34+ MitoLow) mitochondrial mass. The CD34+ MitoLow fraction contained 6-fold more CD34+CD38− primitive cells and was enriched in hematopoietic stem cell function, as demonstrated by its significantly greater hematopoietic reconstitution potential in immuno-deficient mice. In contrast, the CD34+ MitoHigh fraction was more enriched in hematopoietic progenitor function with higher in vitro clonogenic capacity. In vitro differentiation of CD34+ MitoLow cells was significantly delayed as compared to that of CD34+ MitoHigh cells. The eventual complete differentiation of CD34+ MitoLow cells, which coincided with a robust expansion of the CD34− differentiated progeny, was accompanied by mitochondrial adaptation, as shown by significant increases in ATP production and expression of the mitochondrial genes ND1 and COX2. In conclusion, cord blood CD34+ cells with low levels of mitochondrial mass are enriched in hematopoietic repopulating stem cell function whereas high levels of mitochondrial mass identify hematopoietic progenitors. A mitochondrial response underlies hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell differentiation and proliferation of

  15. Role of CD271 enrichment in the isolation of mesenchymal stromal cells from umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Attar, Armin; Ghalyanchi Langeroudi, Arash; Vassaghi, Attyieh; Ahrari, Iman; Maharlooei, Mohsen Khosravi; Monabati, Ahmad

    2013-09-01

    Isolation of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from the umbilical cord blood (UCB) has a success rate of 25% and is frequently contaminated by osteoclast-like cells (OLCs). CD271 is a well-known marker for the enrichment of bone marrow (BM) MSCs. We have assessed the effect of CD271 isolation on the isolation rate of MSCs from UCB. Twenty-one samples of UCB were collected. Ten samples of UCB and five of BM underwent CD271 isolation using magnetic activated cell sorting. The other 11 UCB samples were used as the control. The isolated cells were cultured and MSC isolation was confirmed with respect to morphology, flow cytometry, adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation potentials. CD271-positive UCB cells did not show outgrowth despite 54.5% MSCs isolation in the non-enriched portion. No OLC was noted in the CD271-enriched group, but 66% of the non-enriched samples were contaminated. All the CD271-positive BM cells formed MSC colonies. Although the per cent of CD271+ cells showed no difference between BM-mononuclear cells (MNCs) and UCB-MNCs, the haematopoietic marker, CD45, was found in a higher percentage of CD271-positive UCB-MNCs. The results of our study indicate that, although CD271 is a valuable marker for enrichment of MSCs from BM, it does not contribute to isolation of MSCs from UCB. In this source, most of the CD271+ cells are from haematopoietic origin, and possibly the process of isolation may eliminate the very low frequent MSCs and the isolation therefore fails.

  16. Bioadhesive control of plasma proteins and blood cells from umbilical cord blood onto the interface grafted with zwitterionic polymer brushes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu; Chang, Yung; Higuchi, Akon; Shih, Yu-Ju; Li, Pei-Tsz; Chen, Wen-Yih; Tsai, Eing-Mei; Hsiue, Ging-Ho

    2012-03-01

    In this work, bioadhesive behavior of plasma proteins and blood cells from umbilical cord blood (UCB) onto zwitterionic poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) (polySBMA) polymer brushes was studied. The surface coverage of polySBMA brushes on a hydrophobic polystyrene (PS) well plate with surface grafting weights ranging from 0.02 mg/cm(2) to 0.69 mg/cm(2) can be effectively controlled using the ozone pretreatment and thermal-induced radical graft-polymerization. The chemical composition, grafting structure, surface hydrophilicity, and hydration capability of prepared polySBMA brushes were determined to illustrate the correlations between grafting properties and blood compatibility of zwitterionic-grafted surfaces in contact with human UCB. The protein adsorption of fibrinogen in single-protein solutions and at complex medium of 100% UCB plasma onto different polySBMA brushes with different grafting coverage was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with monoclonal antibodies. The grafting density of the zwitterionic brushes greatly affects the PS surface, thus controlling the adsorption of fibrinogen, the adhesion of platelets, and the preservation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) in UCB. The results showed that PS surfaces grafted with polySBMA brushes possess controllable hydration properties through the binding of water molecules, regulating the bioadhesive and bioinert characteristics of plasma proteins and blood platelets in UCB. Interestingly, it was found that the polySBMA brushes with an optimized grafting weight of approximately 0.1 mg/cm(2) at physiologic temperatures show significant hydrated chain flexibility and balanced hydrophilicity to provide the best preservation capacity for HSPCs stored in 100% UCB solution for 2 weeks. This work suggests that, through controlling grafting structures, the hemocompatible nature of grafted zwitterionic polymer brushes makes them well suited to the molecular design of regulated

  17. Human cord blood mononuclear cells decrease cytokines and inflammatory cells in acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Henning, Robert J; Shariff, Masood; Eadula, Ujwala; Alvarado, Felipe; Vasko, Mark; Sanberg, Paul R; Sanberg, Cyndy D; Delostia, Vincent

    2008-12-01

    We investigated whether human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (HUCBC), which contain hematopoietic and mesenchymal progenitor cells, can limit myocardial cytokine expression and inflammatory cell infiltration in acute myocardial infarction. We permanently ligated the left coronary artery of rats and injected into the myocardium either Isolyte or 4 x 10(6) HUCBC in Isolyte and measured myocardial cytokines with antibody arrays at 2, 6, 12, 24, and 72 hours after infarction. We then measured with flow cytometry myocardial macrophages, neutrophils and lymphocytes at 12, 24, and 72 hours after infarctions in rats treated with either intramyocardial Isolyte or 4 x 10(6) HUCBC. In the Isolyte-treated hearts, between 2 and 12 hours after myocardial infarction, tumor necrosis factor-alpha increased from 6.7 +/- 0.9% to 52.3 +/- 4.7%, monocyte chemoattract protein increased from 9.5 +/- 1.2% to 39.8 +/- 2.1%, fractalkine increased from 11 +/- 1.5% to 28.1 +/- 1.3%, ciliary neurotrophic factor increased from 12.1 +/- 0.02% to 25.9 +/- 1.1%, macrophage inflammatory protein increased from 10.3 +/- 1.5% to 23.9.0 +/- 1.4%, interferon-gamma increased from 8.7 +/- 0.4% to 26.0 +/- 1.6%, interleukin-1beta increased from 6.1 +/- 0.04% to 19.0 +/- 1.2%, and IL-4 increased from 5.9 +/- 0.03% to 15 +/- 1.5% (all p < 0.001 compared with controls). The concentrations of fractalkine remained significantly increased at 72 hours after acute infarction. In contrast, the myocardial concentrations of these cytokines did not significantly change in HUCBC treated hearts at 2, 6, 12, 24, or 72 hours after infarction. The percentage of neutrophils increased from 0.04 +/- 0.2%/50,000 heart cells in the controls to 5.3 +/- 1.2%/50,000 heart cells 12 hours after infarction in Isolyte-treated hearts but averaged only 1.3 +/- 0.7%/50,000 heart cells in HUCBC treated hearts (p < 0.02). Thereafter, the percentages of neutrophils rapidly decreased at 24 and at 72 hours after infarction and

  18. Phenotypical and functional characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells derived from equine umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, N; Gulati, B R; Kumar, R; Gera, S; Kumar, S; Kumar, P; Yadav, P S

    2016-08-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) offer promise as therapeutic aid in the repair of tendon and ligament injuries in race horses. Fetal adnexa is considered as an ideal source of MSCs due to many advantages, including non-invasive nature of isolation procedures and availability of large tissue mass for harvesting the cells. However, MSCs isolated from equine fetal adnexa have not been fully characterized due to lack of species-specific markers. Therefore, this study was carried out to isolate MSCs from equine umbilical cord blood (UCB) and characterize them using cross-reactive markers. The plastic-adherent cells could be isolated from 13 out of 20 (65 %) UCB samples. The UCB derived cells proliferated till passage 20 with average cell doubling time of 46.40 ± 2.86 h. These cells expressed mesenchymal surface markers but did not express haematopoietic/leucocytic markers by RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. The phenotypic expression of CD29, CD44, CD73 and CD90 was shown by 96.36 ± 1.28, 93.40 ± 0.70, 73.23 ± 1.29 and 46.75 ± 3.95 % cells, respectively in flow cytometry, whereas, reactivity against the haematopoietic antigens CD34 and CD45 was observed only in 2.4 ± 0.20 and 0.1 ± 0.0 % of cells, respectively. Osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation could be achieved using established methods, whereas the optimum adipogenic differentiation was achieved after supplementing media with 15 % rabbit serum and 20 ng/ml of recombinant human insulin. In this study, we optimized methodology for isolation, cultural characterization, differentiation and immunophenotyping of MSCs from equine UCB. Protocols and markers used in this study can be employed for unequivocal characterization of equine MSCs.

  19. Neurotherapeutic Effect of Cord Blood Derived CD45+ Hematopoietic Cells in Mice after Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Arien-Zakay, Hadar; Gincberg, Galit; Nagler, Arnon; Cohen, Gadi; Liraz-Zaltsman, Sigal; Trembovler, Victoria; Alexandrovich, Alexander G.; Matok, Ilan; Galski, Hanan; Elchalal, Uriel; Lelkes, Peter I.; Shohami, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI) is still an unmet need. Cell therapy by human umbilical cord blood (HUCB) has shown promising results in animal models of TBI and is under evaluation in clinical trials. HUCB contains different cell populations but to date, only mesenchymal stem cells have been evaluated for therapy of TBI. Here we present the neurotherapeutic effect, as evaluated by neurological score, using a single dose of HUCB-derived mononuclear cells (MNCs) upon intravenous (IV) administration one day post-trauma in a mouse model of closed head injury (CHI). Delayed (eight days post-trauma) intracerebroventricular administration of MNCs showed improved neurobehavioral deficits thereby extending the therapeutic window for treating TBI. Further, we demonstrated for the first time that HUCB-derived pan-hematopoietic CD45 positive (CD45+) cells, isolated by magnetic sorting and characterized by expression of CD45 and CD11b markers (96–99%), improved the neurobehavioral deficits upon IV administration, which persisted for 35 days. The therapeutic effect was in a direct correlation to a reduction in the lesion volume and decreased by pre-treatment of the cells with anti-human-CD45 antibody. At the site of brain injury, 1.5-2 h after transplantation, HUCB-derived cells were identified by near infrared scanning and immunohistochemistry using anti-human-CD45 and anti-human-nuclei antibodies. Nerve growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor levels were differentially expressed in both ipsilateral and contralateral brain hemispheres, thirty-five days after CHI, measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. These findings indicate the neurotherapeutic potential of HUCB-derived CD45+ cell population in a mouse model of TBI and propose their use in the clinical setting of human TBI. PMID:24640955

  20. Fucosyltransferase VII improves the function of selectin ligands on cord blood hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xiang; Sato, Hidetaka; Miyaji, Hiromasa; McDaniel, J Michael; Wang, Yuesi; Kaneko, Etsuji; Gibson, BreeAnna; Mehta-D'Souza, Padmaja; Chen, Yiyuan; Dozmorov, Mikhail; Miller, Leonard P; Goodman, Jean; Sun, Zimin; Xia, Lijun

    2013-01-01

    Selectins and their carbohydrate ligands mediate the homing of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) to the bone marrow. We have previously shown that ex vivo fucosylation of selectin ligands on HSPCs by α1,3 fucosyltransferase VI (FUT6) leads to improved human cord blood (CB)-HSPC engraftment in non-obese diabetic (NOD)/severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mice. In the present study, we determined whether surface fucosylation with α1,3 fucosyltransferase VII (FUT7), which is primarily expressed by hematopoietic cells, improves the function of selectin ligands on CB-HSPCs in comparison with FUT6. A saturating amount of either FUT6 or FUT7, which generates comparable levels of expression of fucosylated epitopes on CB CD34+ cells, was used for these experiments. In vitro, FUT7-treated CB CD34+ cells exhibited greater binding to P- or E-selectin than that of FUT6-treated CB CD34+ cells under static or physiological flow conditions. In vivo, FUT7 treatment, like FUT6, improved the early engraftment of CB CD34+ cells in the bone marrow of sublethally irradiated NOD/SCID interleukin (IL)-2Rγnull (NSG) mice. FUT7 also exhibited marginally—yet statistically significant—increased engraftment at 4 and 6 weeks after transplantation. In addition, FUT7-treated CB CD34+ cells exhibited increased homing to the bone marrow of irradiated NSG mice relative to sham-treated cells. These data indicate that FUT7 is effective at improving the function of selectin ligands on CB-HSPCs in vitro and enhancing early engraftment of treated CB-HSPCs in the bone marrow of recipients. PMID:23899669

  1. Human Umbilical Cord Blood Cells Ameliorates Motor Deficits In Rabbits In a Cerebral Palsy Model

    PubMed Central

    Drobyshevsky, A.; Cotten, C. M.; Shi, Z.; Luo, K.; Jiang, R.; Derrick, M.; Tracy, E. T.; Gentry, T.; Goldberg, R. N.; Kurtzberg, J.; Tan, S.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) has significant impact on both patients and society but therapy is limited. Human umbilical cord blood cells (HUCBC), containing various stem and progenitor cells, have been used to treat various brain genetic conditions. In small animal experiments, HUCBC have improved outcomes after hypoxic-ischemic injury. Clinical trials using HUCBC are underway testing feasibility, safety and efficacy for neonatal injury as well as CP. We tested HUCBC therapy in a validated rabbit model of CP after acute changes secondary to hypoxic-ischemic (H-I) injury had subsided. Following uterine ischemia at 70% gestation, we infused HUCBC to newborn rabbit kits with either mild or severe neurobehavioral changes. Infusion of high dose HUCBC, 5x106 cells, dramatically altered the natural history of the injury alleviating the abnormal phenotype including posture, righting reflex, locomotion, tone, and dystonia. Half the high dose showed lesser but still significant improvement. The swimming test however showed that joint function did not restore to naïve control function in either group. Tracing HUCBCs with either MRI biomarkers or PCR for human DNA found little penetration of HUCBC in the newborn brain in the immediate newborn period, suggesting that the beneficial effects were not due to cellular integration or direct proliferative effects but rather to paracrine signaling. This is the first study to show that HUCBC improve motor performance in a dose-dependent manner perhaps by improving compensatory repair processes. PMID:25791742

  2. Human Haemato-Endothelial Precursors: Cord Blood CD34+ Cells Produce Haemogenic Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Pelosi, Elvira; Castelli, Germana; Martin-Padura, Ines; Bordoni, Veronica; Santoro, Simona; Conigliaro, Alice; Cerio, Anna Maria; De Santis Puzzonia, Marco; Marighetti, Paola; Biffoni, Mauro; Alonzi, Tonino; Amicone, Laura; Alcalay, Myriam; Bertolini, Francesco; Testa, Ugo; Tripodi, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Embryologic and genetic evidence suggest a common origin of haematopoietic and endothelial lineages. In the murine embryo, recent studies indicate the presence of haemogenic endothelium and of a common haemato-endothelial precursor, the haemangioblast. Conversely, so far, little evidence supports the presence of haemogenic endothelium and haemangioblasts in later stages of development. Our studies indicate that human cord blood haematopoietic progenitors (CD34+45+144−), triggered by murine hepatocyte conditioned medium, differentiate into adherent proliferating endothelial precursors (CD144+CD105+CD146+CD31+CD45−) capable of functioning as haemogenic endothelium. These cells, proven to give rise to functional vasculature in vivo, if further instructed by haematopoietic growth factors, first switch to transitional CD144+45+ cells and then to haematopoietic cells. These results highlight the plasticity of haemato-endhothelial precursors in human post-natal life. Furthermore, these studies may provide highly enriched populations of human post-fetal haemogenic endothelium, paving the way for innovative projects at a basic and possibly clinical level. PMID:23226561

  3. Umbilical cord blood transplant for malignancies: a hope or hype.

    PubMed

    Bahl, Ankur; Bakhshi, Sameer

    2013-08-01

    Cord blood is a rich and unlimited source of hematopoietic stem cells for allogeneic stem cell transplant to treat a variety of oncologic, genetic, hematologic, and immunodeficiency disorders. Since the first successful cord blood transplant in 1988, a large number of cord blood banks have been established world over for collection and storage of cord blood for future use. Majority of such transplants are performed in children, however, the number in adults have been growing steadily in recent years. Results from various transplant registries reveals that a single cord blood provides enough stem cells to provide short and long term engraftment, and has low incidence and less severity of graft versus host disease. With a high booming birth rate and a large genetic diversity, India has potential to become the largest supplier of cord blood stem cells in world. To meet the future transplant need of the country sincere efforts from various institutes and government agencies are needed to increase the number of public cord blood banks in the country. In this article the author will focus on the issue of public and private cord blood banking; the role of physicians in educating and counseling families with regard to the utility of cord blood for donor itself as well as the future of umbilical cord blood transplant in India.

  4. Mononuclear cells from the cord blood and granulocytecolony stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood: is there a potential for treatment of cerebral palsy?

    PubMed

    Koh, Hani; Hwang, Kyoujung; Lim, Hae-Young; Kim, Yong-Joo; Lee, Young-Ho

    2015-12-01

    To investigate a possible therapeutic mechanism of cell therapy in the field of cerebral palsy using granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)-mobilized peripheral blood mononuclear cells (mPBMCs), we compared the expression of inflammatory cytokines and neurotrophic factors in PBMCs and mPBMCs from children with cerebral palsy to those from healthy adult donors and to cord blood mononuclear cells donated from healthy newborns. No significant differences in expression of neurotrophic factors were found between PBMCs and mPBMCs. However, in cerebral palsy children, the expression of interleukin-6 was significantly increased in mPBMCs as compared to PBMCs, and the expression of interleukin-3 was significantly decreased in mPBMCs as compared to PBMCs. In healthy adults, the expression levels of both interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 were significantly increased in mPBMCs as compared to PBMCs. The expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factors in mPBMC from cerebral palsy children was significantly higher than that in the cord blood or mPBMCs from healthy adults. The expression of G-CSF in mPBMCs from cerebral palsy children was comparable to that in the cord blood but significantly higher than that in mPBMCs from healthy adults. Lower expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β, interleukin-3, and -6) and higher expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-8 and interleukin-9) were observed from the cord blood and mPBMCs from cerebral palsy children rather than from healthy adults. These findings indicate that mPBMCs from cerebral palsy and cord blood mononuclear cells from healthy newborns have the potential to become seed cells for treatment of cerebral palsy.

  5. Association between maternal and fetal factors and quality of cord blood as a source of stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Rodrigo Dias; Zandavalli, Flávia Maria

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To comparatively analyze maternal and fetal factors and quality markers of blood samples in a public umbilical cord blood bank. Method This is a cross-sectional descriptive study that revisited 458 records of donations from September 2009 to March 2013 at the Hemocentro de Santa Catarina. The means of markers were used to define cutoff points for the quality of cord blood. Results Most donations came from women with ages between 18 and 29 years (62.8%), gestational age ≥ 40 weeks (55.2%), vaginal delivery (51.3%), primiparous (41.4%), and with male newborns (54.4%) weighing between 3000 and 3499 g (41.8%). The volume of the donations ranged from 71.6 to 275.2 mL, the total nucleated cell count ranged from 4.77 × 108 to 31.0 × 108 cells and CD34+ cells ranged from 0.05 to 1.23%. There were statistically significant differences in the volume with respect to gestation age > 38 weeks (p-value = 0.001), cesarean section (p-value < 0.001) and birth weight > 3500 g (p-value < 0.001). The total nucleated cell count was positively affected by cesarean section (p-value = 0.022) and birth weight > 3500 g (p-value < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference between the variables and the percentage of CD34+ cells. Conclusions Delivery route and birth weight influence the volume of cord blood and the total nucleated cell count. Gestational age influences only the volume of cord blood. PMID:25638766

  6. Successful cord blood stem cell transplantation for congenital erythropoietic porphyria (Gunther's disease).

    PubMed

    Zix-Kieffer, I; Langer, B; Eyer, D; Acar, G; Racadot, E; Schlaeder, G; Oberlin, F; Lutz, P

    1996-07-01

    Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (Gunther's disease, GD) is a rare autosomal recessive disease. It results from the deficiency of uroporphyrinogen III synthase, the fourth enzyme on the metabolic pathway of heme synthesis. GD leads to severe scarring of the face and hands as a result of photosensitivity and fragility of the skin due to uroporphyrin I and coproporphyrin I accumulation. It also causes erythrocyte fragility leading to haemolytic anaemia. The other clinical features include hirsutism, red discolouration of teeth, finger-nails and urine and stunted growth. The outcome is poor, and the disfiguring nature of GD may partly explain the legend of the werewolf. No curative treatment was known until 1991, when the first case of BMT in GD was reported. The clinical and biological outcome after transplantation was encouraging, with an important regression of the symptoms of the disease, but the child died of CMV-infection 11 months after BMT. We report the second case of GD treated successfully by stem cell transplantation using umbilical cord blood from an HLA-identical brother in a 4-year-old girl suffering from severe GD. Our patient is very well 10 months after transplantation. We confirm that stem cell transplantation is curative for GD.

  7. Frozen cord blood hematopoietic stem cells differentiate into higher numbers of functional natural killer cells in vitro than mobilized hematopoietic stem cells or freshly isolated cord blood hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Luevano, Martha; Domogala, Anna; Blundell, Michael; Jackson, Nicola; Pedroza-Pacheco, Isabela; Derniame, Sophie; Escobedo-Cousin, Michelle; Querol, Sergio; Thrasher, Adrian; Madrigal, Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive natural killer (NK) cell therapy relies on the acquisition of large numbers of NK cells that are cytotoxic but not exhausted. NK cell differentiation from hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) has become an alluring option for NK cell therapy, with umbilical cord blood (UCB) and mobilized peripheral blood (PBCD34(+)) being the most accessible HSC sources as collection procedures are less invasive. In this study we compared the capacity of frozen or freshly isolated UCB hematopoietic stem cells (CBCD34(+)) and frozen PBCD34(+) to generate NK cells in vitro. By modifying a previously published protocol, we showed that frozen CBCD34(+) cultures generated higher NK cell numbers without loss of function compared to fresh CBCD34(+) cultures. NK cells generated from CBCD34(+) and PBCD34(+) expressed low levels of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors but high levels of activating receptors and of the myeloid marker CD33. However, blocking studies showed that CD33 expression did not impact on the functions of the generated cells. CBCD34(+)-NK cells exhibited increased capacity to secrete IFN-γ and kill K562 in vitro and in vivo as compared to PBCD34(+)-NK cells. Moreover, K562 killing by the generated NK cells could be further enhanced by IL-12 stimulation. Our data indicate that the use of frozen CBCD34(+) for the production of NK cells in vitro results in higher cell numbers than PBCD34(+), without jeopardizing their functionality, rendering them suitable for NK cell immunotherapy. The results presented here provide an optimal strategy to generate NK cells in vitro for immunotherapy that exhibit enhanced effector function when compared to alternate sources of HSC.

  8. Production of good manufacturing practice-grade human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells for therapeutic use.

    PubMed

    Van Pham, Phuc; Phan, Ngoc Kim

    2015-01-01

    Human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCB-MSCs) are multipotent stem cells that can be differentiated into several specific cell types such as adipocytes, osteoblasts, and chondroblasts. They also were demonstrated to trans-differentiate into other cell lineages such as muscle cells and neurons. Thus, they are considered a promising stem cell source for therapeutic use. Here, we describe a method for production of good manufacturing practice-grade human UCB-MSCs for therapeutic use. The obtained UCB-MSCs are free of allogenous or xenogenous proteins. In addition, these MSCs could maintain the MSC phenotype in long-term culture.

  9. Enveloped virus but not bacteria block IL-13 responses in human cord blood T cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Svensson, A; Nordström, I; Rudin, A; Bergström, T; Eriksson, K

    2012-04-01

    Infections that occur early in life may have a beneficial effect on the immune system and thereby reduce the risk of allergen sensitization and/or allergic disease. It is not yet clear to what extent specific virus and/or bacteria can mediate this effect. The purpose of this study was to assess the role of virus and bacteria in CD4(+) T cell-derived cytokine production in newborns. We compared the effects of five bacteria (Staphlococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Clostridium difficile, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Bifidobacterium bifidus) and seven virus (adenovirus, coronavirus, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, influenza virus, morbillivirus and poliovirus) on the Th1/Th2 cytokine production in mixed lymphocyte reactions using CD4(+) T cells from cord blood cocultured with allogenic myeloid or plasmacytoid dendritic cells. When comparing the baseline cytokine production prior to microbial stimulation, we observed that cord plasmacytoid DC were stronger inducers of Th2 cytokines (IL-5 and IL-13) compared with cord myeloid DC and to adult DC. When adding microbes to these cultures, bacteria and virus differed in two major respects; Firstly, all enveloped viruses, but none of the bacteria, blocked Th2 (IL-13) production by cord CD4(+) cells. Secondly, all Gram-positive bacteria, but none of the virus, induced IL-12p40 responses, but the IL-12p40 responses did not affect Th1 cytokine production (IFN-γ). Instead, Th1 responses were correlated with the capacity to induce IFN-α secretion, which in cord cells were induced by S. aureus and influenza virus alone. These data imply that enveloped virus can deviate Th2 responses in human cord T cells.

  10. Cord blood-derived endothelial colony-forming cell function is disrupted in congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Fujinaga, Hideshi; Fujinaga, Hiroko; Watanabe, Nobuyuki; Kato, Tomoko; Tamano, Moe; Terao, Miho; Takada, Shuji; Ito, Yushi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Kuroda, Masahiko

    2016-06-01

    Vascular growth is necessary for normal lung development. Although endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play an important role in vascularization, little is known about EPC function in congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), a severe neonatal condition that is associated with pulmonary hypoplasia. We hypothesized that the function of endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs), a type of EPC, is impaired in CDH. Cord blood (CB) was collected from full-term CDH patients and healthy controls. We assessed CB progenitor cell populations as well as plasma vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and stromal cell-derived factor 1α (SDF1α) levels. CB ECFC clonogenicity; growth kinetics; migration; production of VEGF, SDF1α, and nitric oxide (NO); vasculogenic capacity; and mRNA expression of VEGF-A, fms-related tyrosine kinase 1 (FLT1), kinase insert domain receptor (KDR), nitric oxide synthase (NOS) 1-3, SDF1, and chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4) were also assessed. Compared with controls, CB ECFCs were decreased in CDH. CDH ECFCs had reduced potential for self-renewal, clonogenicity, proliferation, and migration. Their capacity for NO production was enhanced but their response to VEGF was blunted in CDH ECFCs. In vivo potential for de novo vasculogenesis was reduced in CDH ECFCs. There was no difference in CB plasma VEGF and SDF1α concentrations, VEGF and SDF1α production by ECFCs, and ECFC mRNA expression of VEGF-A, FLT1, KDR, NOS1-3, SDF1, and CXCR4 between CDH and control subjects. In conclusion, CB ECFC function is disrupted in CDH, but these changes may be caused by mechanisms other than alteration of VEGF-NO and SDF1-CXCR4 signaling. PMID:27130531

  11. Antiepileptic and neuroprotective effects of human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells in a pilocarpine-induced epilepsy model.

    PubMed

    Costa-Ferro, Zaquer Suzana Munhoz; de Borba Cunha, Fernanda; de Freitas Souza, Bruno Solano; Leal, Marcos Maurício Tosta; da Silva, Adelson Alves; de Bellis Kühn, Telma Ingrid Borges; Forte, Andresa; Sekiya, Eliseo Joji; Soares, Milena Botelho Pereira; Dos Santos, Ricardo Ribeiro

    2014-03-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) is a condition of persistent seizure that leads to brain damage and, frequently, to the establishment of chronic epilepsy. Cord blood is an important source of adult stem cells for the treatment of neurological disorders. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (HUCBC) transplanted into rats after induction of SE by the administration of lithium and pilocarpine chloride. Transplantation of HUCBC into epileptic rats protected against neuronal loss in the hippocampal subfields CA1, CA3 and in the hilus of the dentate gyrus, up to 300 days after SE induction. Moreover, transplanted rats had reduced frequency and duration of spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS) 15, 120 and 300 days after the SE. Our study shows that HUCBC provide prominent antiepileptic and neuroprotective effects in the experimental model of epilepsy and reinforces that early interventions can protect the brain against the establishment of epilepsy.

  12. The therapeutic potential of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Ju; Lee, Jong Kil; Lee, Hyun; Shin, Ji-woong; Carter, Janet E; Sakamoto, Toshiro; Jin, Hee Kyung; Bae, Jae-sung

    2010-08-30

    The neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) include the presence of extracellular amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta) in the form of amyloid plaques in the brain parenchyma and neuronal loss. The mechanism associated with neuronal death by amyloid plaques is unclear but oxidative stress and glial activation has been implicated. Human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) are being scrutinized as a potential therapeutic tool to prevent various neurodegenerative diseases including AD. However, the therapeutic impact of hUCB-MSCs in AD has not yet been reported. Here we undertook in vitro work to examine the potential impact of hUCB-MSCs treatment on neuronal loss using a paradigm of cultured hippocampal neurons treated with Abeta. We confirmed that hUCB-MSCs co-culture reduced the hippocampal apoptosis induced by Abeta treatment. Moreover, in an acute AD mouse model to directly test the efficacy of hUCB-MSCs treatment on AD-related cognitive and neuropathological outcomes, we demonstrated that markers of glial activation, oxidative stress and apoptosis levels were decreased in AD mouse brain. Interestingly, hUCB-MSCs treated AD mice demonstrated cognitive rescue with restoration of learning/memory function. These data suggest that hUCB-MSCs warrant further investigation as a potential therapeutic agent in AD.

  13. Comparison of Hematopoietic Stem Cells Derived from Fresh and Cryopreserved Whole Cord Blood in the Generation of Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Westphal, Florian; Egger, Dietmar; Wege, Anja Kathrin; Patties, Ina; Köberle, Margarethe; Sack, Ulrich; Lange, Franziska

    2012-01-01

    To study the function and maturation of the human hematopoietic and immune system without endangering individuals, translational human-like animal models are needed. We compare the efficiency of CD34+ stem cells isolated from cryopreserved cord blood from a blood bank (CCB) and fresh cord blood (FCB) in generating highly engrafted humanized mice in NOD-SCID IL2Rγnull (NSG) rodents. Interestingly, the isolation of CD34+ cells from CCB results in a lower yield and purity compared to FCB. The purity of CD34+ isolation from CCB decreases with an increasing number of mononuclear cells that is not evident in FCB. Despite the lower yield and purity of CD34+ stem cell isolation from CCB compared to FCB, the overall reconstitution with human immune cells (CD45) and the differentiation of its subpopulations e.g., B cells, T cells or monocytes is comparable between both sources. In addition, independent of the cord blood origin, human B cells are able to produce high amounts of human IgM antibodies and human T cells are able to proliferate after stimulation with anti-CD3 antibodies. Nevertheless, T cells generated from FCB showed increased response to restimulation with anti-CD3. Our study reveals that the application of CCB samples for the engraftment of humanized mice does not result in less engraftment or a loss of differentiation and function of its subpopulations. Therefore, CCB is a reasonable alternative to FCB and allows the selection of specific genotypes (or any other criteria), which allows scientists to be independent from the daily changing birth rate. PMID:23071634

  14. Transplant Outcomes (Bone Marrow and Cord Blood)

    MedlinePlus

    ... reports show patient survival and transplant data of bone marrow and umbilical cord blood transplants in the transplant ... Data by Center Report —View the number of bone marrow and cord blood transplants performed at a specific ...

  15. Dissimilar differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, and adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Rebelatto, C K; Aguiar, A M; Moretão, M P; Senegaglia, A C; Hansen, P; Barchiki, F; Oliveira, J; Martins, J; Kuligovski, C; Mansur, F; Christofis, A; Amaral, V F; Brofman, P S; Goldenberg, S; Nakao, L S; Correa, A

    2008-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been investigated as promising candidates for use in new cell-based therapeutic strategies such as mesenchyme-derived tissue repair. MSCs are easily isolated from adult tissues and are not ethically restricted. MSC-related literature, however, is conflicting in relation to MSC differentiation potential and molecular markers. Here we compared MSCs isolated from bone marrow (BM), umbilical cord blood (UCB), and adipose tissue (AT). The isolation efficiency for both BM and AT was 100%, but that from UCB was only 30%. MSCs from these tissues are morphologically and immunophenotypically similar although their differentiation diverges. Differentiation to osteoblasts and chondroblasts was similar among MSCs from all sources, as analyzed by cytochemistry. Adipogenic differentiation showed that UCB-derived MSCs produced few and small lipid vacuoles in contrast to those of BM-derived MSCs and AT-derived stem cells (ADSCs) (arbitrary differentiation values of 245.57 +/- 943 and 243.89 +/- 145.52 mum(2) per nucleus, respectively). The mean area occupied by individual lipid droplets was 7.37 mum(2) for BM-derived MSCs and 2.36 mum(2) for ADSCs, a finding indicating more mature adipocytes in BM-derived MSCs than in treated cultures of ADSCs. We analyzed FAPB4, ALP, and type II collagen gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction to confirm adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic differentiation, respectively. Results showed that all three sources presented a similar capacity for chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation and they differed in their adipogenic potential. Therefore, it may be crucial to predetermine the most appropriate MSC source for future clinical applications.

  16. Advances in umbilical cord blood stem cell expansion and clinical translation.

    PubMed

    Pineault, Nicolas; Abu-Khader, Ahmad

    2015-07-01

    Umbilical cord blood (CB) is a rich source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with important applications in allogeneic stem cell transplantation. However, the low numbers of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) in banked units remain a major limitation. Protocols developed for HSPC expansion ex vivo or to improve HSPC homing to the marrow represent solutions to overcome this shortcoming. In recent decades, wide arrays of functionally divergent approaches were developed for the amplification of HSPCs. These include optimization of cytokine cocktails, coculture systems, small molecules, and delivery systems for HSPC-expansion genes. Herein, we review past and current strategies, focusing on studies that characterize the contribution of expanded CB HSPC to short- and long-term engraftment in transplantation models or in clinical trials. Also discussed are homing effectors used to promote engraftment. In summary, these studies underscore that early-acting cytokines alone can expand HSPC with short-term engraftment activity, but that robust expansion of HSPCs with long-term engraftment necessitates the synergistic action of multiple HSC-expansion agonists. In support of this, early clinical trials based on cytokine-driven HSPC-expansion protocols delivered disappointing results, whereas recent trials based on the synergistic action of cytokines and HSPC-expansion agonists reported significant improvements in engraftment and therapeutic outcomes. Conversely, molecules that enhance homing of HSPC may represent a complementary approach to improve and perhaps accelerate engraftment. Optimization of the next generation of HSPC-expansion and priming strategies should support a paradigm shift in CB transplantation in which smaller, better matched units may preferentially be used.

  17. Dissimilar differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, and adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Rebelatto, C K; Aguiar, A M; Moretão, M P; Senegaglia, A C; Hansen, P; Barchiki, F; Oliveira, J; Martins, J; Kuligovski, C; Mansur, F; Christofis, A; Amaral, V F; Brofman, P S; Goldenberg, S; Nakao, L S; Correa, A

    2008-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been investigated as promising candidates for use in new cell-based therapeutic strategies such as mesenchyme-derived tissue repair. MSCs are easily isolated from adult tissues and are not ethically restricted. MSC-related literature, however, is conflicting in relation to MSC differentiation potential and molecular markers. Here we compared MSCs isolated from bone marrow (BM), umbilical cord blood (UCB), and adipose tissue (AT). The isolation efficiency for both BM and AT was 100%, but that from UCB was only 30%. MSCs from these tissues are morphologically and immunophenotypically similar although their differentiation diverges. Differentiation to osteoblasts and chondroblasts was similar among MSCs from all sources, as analyzed by cytochemistry. Adipogenic differentiation showed that UCB-derived MSCs produced few and small lipid vacuoles in contrast to those of BM-derived MSCs and AT-derived stem cells (ADSCs) (arbitrary differentiation values of 245.57 +/- 943 and 243.89 +/- 145.52 mum(2) per nucleus, respectively). The mean area occupied by individual lipid droplets was 7.37 mum(2) for BM-derived MSCs and 2.36 mum(2) for ADSCs, a finding indicating more mature adipocytes in BM-derived MSCs than in treated cultures of ADSCs. We analyzed FAPB4, ALP, and type II collagen gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction to confirm adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic differentiation, respectively. Results showed that all three sources presented a similar capacity for chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation and they differed in their adipogenic potential. Therefore, it may be crucial to predetermine the most appropriate MSC source for future clinical applications. PMID:18445775

  18. Differentiation of naive cord-blood T cells into CD19-specific cytolytic effectors for posttransplantation adoptive immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Lisa Marie; Pfeiffer, Timothy; Olivares, Simon; Numbenjapon, Tontanai; Bennitt, Jennifer; Kim, Daniel; Smith, David; McNamara, George; Al-Kadhimi, Zaid; Rosenthal, Joseph; Forman, Stephen J.; Jensen, Michael C.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2006-01-01

    Disease relapse is a barrier to achieving therapeutic success after unrelated umbilical cord-blood transplantation (UCBT) for B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). While adoptive transfer of donor-derived tumor-specific T cells is a conceptually attractive approach to eliminating residual disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, adoptive immunotherapy after UCBT is constrained by the difficulty of generating antigen-specific T cells from functionally naive umbilical cord-blood (UCB)–derived T cells. Therefore, to generate T cells that recognize B-ALL, we have developed a chimeric immunoreceptor to redirect the specificity of T cells for CD19, a B-lineage antigen, and expressed this transgene in UCB-derived T cells. An ex vivo process, which is compliant with current good manufacturing practice for T-cell trials, has been developed to genetically modify and numerically expand UCB-derived T cells into CD19-specific effector cells. These are capable of CD19-restricted cytokine production and cytolysis in vitro, as well as mediating regression of CD19+ tumor and being selectively eliminated in vivo. Moreover, time-lapse microscopy of the genetically modified T-cell clones revealed an ability to lyse CD19+ tumor cells specifically and repetitively. These data provide the rationale for infusing UCB-derived CD19-specific T cells after UCBT to reduce the incidence of CD19+ B-ALL relapse. PMID:16352804

  19. Human umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor protect injured optic nerve: viscoelasticity characterization.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xue-Man; Liu, Yan; Wu, Fei; Yuan, Yi; Luo, Min

    2016-04-01

    The optic nerve is a viscoelastic solid-like biomaterial. Its normal stress relaxation and creep properties enable the nerve to resist constant strain and protect it from injury. We hypothesized that stress relaxation and creep properties of the optic nerve change after injury. More-over, human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells may restore these changes to normal. To validate this hypothesis, a rabbit model of optic nerve injury was established using a clamp approach. At 7 days after injury, the vitreous body re-ceived a one-time injection of 50 μg human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or 1 × 10(6) human umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells. At 30 days after injury, stress relaxation and creep properties of the optic nerve that received treatment had recovered greatly, with patho-logical changes in the injured optic nerve also noticeably improved. These results suggest that human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or umbilical cord blood-derived stem cell intervention promotes viscoelasticity recovery of injured optic nerves, and thereby contributes to nerve recovery. PMID:27212930

  20. Stem Cell Transplant (Peripheral Blood, Bone Marrow, and Cord Blood Transplants)

    MedlinePlus

    ... donor cells may be harvested (removed) in an operating room, and then processed in the lab right ... called bone marrow harvest . It’s done in an operating room, while the donor is under general anesthesia ( ...

  1. [Marrow donor registration and cord blood banking: current issues].

    PubMed

    Takanashi, Minoko

    2016-03-01

    Marrow donor registration and cord blood banking are essential components of the infrastructure required for unrelated haemopoietic stem cell transplantations. We now have a new law to support and regulate the Marrow Donor Coordination Agency, Cord Blood Banks and the Haematopoietic Stem Cell Provision Support Organization. We also need to have a specific goal for bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cell donor registration, a minimum cord blood bank size, and the demographic data to back the medical needs for unrelated haemopoietic stem cell transplantations. To improve bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cell transplantations, we need to recruit younger adults for marrow registration and make greater efforts to shorten the coordinating period. For cord blood transplantations, uniting and empowering the cord blood collection sites is needed, to encourage and motivate obstetricians and other staff, as the quality of cord blood units is primarily determined during collection. Also, the cord blood banks must work cooperatively to provide cord blood internationally, which includes coordinating with international agencies and their regulations. PMID:27076238

  2. [Marrow donor registration and cord blood banking: current issues].

    PubMed

    Takanashi, Minoko

    2016-03-01

    Marrow donor registration and cord blood banking are essential components of the infrastructure required for unrelated haemopoietic stem cell transplantations. We now have a new law to support and regulate the Marrow Donor Coordination Agency, Cord Blood Banks and the Haematopoietic Stem Cell Provision Support Organization. We also need to have a specific goal for bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cell donor registration, a minimum cord blood bank size, and the demographic data to back the medical needs for unrelated haemopoietic stem cell transplantations. To improve bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cell transplantations, we need to recruit younger adults for marrow registration and make greater efforts to shorten the coordinating period. For cord blood transplantations, uniting and empowering the cord blood collection sites is needed, to encourage and motivate obstetricians and other staff, as the quality of cord blood units is primarily determined during collection. Also, the cord blood banks must work cooperatively to provide cord blood internationally, which includes coordinating with international agencies and their regulations.

  3. Influence of IL-3 functional fragment on cord blood stem cell ex vivo expansion and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhihua; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Yanxi; Jiang, Wenhong; Dai, Wei; Ding, Xinxin

    2016-01-01

    Background Recombinant human interleukin-3 (rhIL-3) is a multiple hematopoietic growth factor, which enhances stem cell expansion and hematopoiesis regeneration in vitro and in vivo, when administrated in combination with other cytokines. However, the structure-function study of rhIL-3 remains rarely studied, so far. The purpose of this study was to recognize the short peptide with similar function as rhIL-3, and assess the hematopoietic efficacy in umbilical cord blood (UCB) stem cell culture as well. Methods Two novel monoclonal antibodies (mAb) (C1 and E1) were generated against rhIL-3 using hybridoma technique. Eleven short peptides were depicted and synthesized to overlap covering the full length sequence of rhIL-3. ELISA was employed to distinguish the antibody-binding peptide from the negative peptides. In addition, the multi-potential hematopoiesis capabilities of the positive peptides were evaluated by adding 25 ng/mL of each peptide to the culture medium of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) derived from UCB. Total nucleated cell number and the CD34+ cell number from each individual treatment group were calculated on day 7. Correlated antibodies at 0.5 or 2 molar fold to each peptide were also tested in the stem cell expansion experiment, to further confirm the bioactivity of the peptides. Results Two peptides were recognized by the novel generated antibodies, using ELISA. Peptide 3 and 8 exhibited comparable hematopoiesis potentials, with 25.01±0.14 fold, and 19.89±0.12 fold increase of total nucleated cell number on day 7, respectively, compared with the basal medium control (4.93±0.55 fold). These biological effects were neutralized by adding the corresponding mAb at a dose dependent manner. Conclusions Our results identified two specific regions of rhIL-3 responsible for HSC proliferation and differentiation, which were located from 28 to 49 amino acids (P3), and 107 to 127 amino acids (P8), respectively. The short peptide 3 and 8 might act

  4. Availability of Cord Blood Extends Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Access to Racial and Ethnic Minorities

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Juliet N.; Byam, Courtney E.; Kernan, Nancy A.; Lee, Sinda S.; Hawke, Rebecca M.; Doshi, Kathleen A.; Wells, Deborah S.; Heller, Glenn; Papadopoulos, Esperanza B.; Scaradavou, Andromachi; Young, James W.; van den Brink., Marcel R. M.

    2013-01-01

    Allogeneic transplant access can be severely limited for patients of racial and ethnic minorities without suitable sibling donors. Whether cord blood (CB) transplantation can extend transplant access due to the reduced stringency of required HLA-match is not proven. We prospectively evaluated availability of unrelated donors (URD) and CB according to patient ancestry in 553 patients without suitable sibling donors. URDs had priority if adequate donors were available. Otherwise ≥ 4/6 HLA-matched CB grafts were chosen utilizing double units to augment graft dose. Patients had highly diverse ancestries including 35% non-Europeans. In 525 patients undergoing combined searches, 10/10 HLA-matched URDs were identified in 53% of those with European ancestry, but only 21% of patients with non-European origins (p < 0.001). However, the majority of both groups had 5–6/6 CB units. The 269 URD transplant recipients were predominantly European, with non-European patients accounting for only 23%. By contrast, 56% of CB transplant recipients had non-European ancestries (p < 0.001). Of 26 patients without any suitable stem cell source, 73% had non-European ancestries (p < 0.001). Their median weight was significantly higher than CB transplant recipients (p < 0.001), partially accounting for their lack of a CB graft. Availability of CB significantly extends allo-transplant access, especially in non-European patients, and has the greatest potential to provide a suitable stem cell source regardless of race or ethnicity. Minority patients in need of allografts, but without suitable matched sibling donors, should be referred for combined URD and CB searches to optimize transplant access. PMID:20800103

  5. Cord blood transplantation in Japan.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Naoyuki

    2016-05-01

    Cord blood transplantation (CBT) has increasingly been used in Japan and the annual number of CBT now exceeds 1,200. The cumulative number of CBT reached 12,853 in 2015, accounting for almost 1/3 of total CBT performed worldwide. It is true that smaller body size and lower costs, as compared to western countries, have been advantages for Japanese people in using CB as graft alternative. In addition, several novel findings regarding serious issues following CBT have been obtained, which further enhanced the use of CB. First, several mechanisms of engraftment failure following CBT other than cell dose have been reported, such as the presence of donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies or the development of hemophagocytic syndrome. Second, unique profiles of infectious complications following CBT have been reported, such as higher incidences of early bacterial infections and HHV-6 encephalitis, as compared to those following bone marrow (BM)/peripheral blood (PB) transplants. Third, the incidence of disease relapse was comparable to those following BM/PB transplants. Novel pre-transplant conditioning regimens using intravenous busulfan have been investigated with promising results being obtained to date. A recent analysis of Japanese transplant registry data revealed similar survival following CBT to HLA-matched unrelated BM/PB transplants. PMID:27263776

  6. Electrophysiological characterisation of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells induced by olfactory ensheathing cell-conditioned medium.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yu; Rong, Mingqiang; Liu, Yunsheng; Liu, Jingfang; Lu, Ming; Tao, Xiaoyu; Li, Zhenyan; Chen, Xin; Yang, Kui; Li, Chuntao; Liu, Zhixiong

    2013-12-01

    Umbilical cord blood-derived marrow stromal cells (UCB-MSCs) with high proliferation capacity and immunomodulatory properties are considered to be a good candidate for cell-based therapies. But until now, little work has been focused on the differentiation of UCB-MSCs. In this work, UCB-MSCs were demonstrated to be negative for CD34 and CD45 expression but positive for CD90 and CD105 expression. The gate values of UCB-MSCs for CD90 and CD105 were 99.3 and 98.6 %, respectively. Two weeks after treatment, the percentage of neuron-like cells differentiated from UCB-MSCs was increased to 84 ± 12 % in the experimental group [treated with olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs)-conditioned medium] and they were neuron-specific enolase positive; few neuron-like cells were found in the control group (without OECs-conditioned medium). Using whole-cell recording, sodium and potassium currents were recorded in UCB-MSCs after differentiation by OECs. Thus, human UCB-MSCs could be differentiated to neural cells by secreted secretion from OECs and exhibited electrophysiological properties similar to mature neurons after 2 weeks post-induction. These results imply that OECs can be used as a new strategy for stem cell differentiation and provide an alternative neurogenesis pathway for generating sufficient numbers of neural cells for cell therapy.

  7. Successful cord blood transplantation in a girl with monosomy 7 myelodysplastic syndrome and reduced numbers of B cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chien-Chung; Yang, Chao-Ping; Tsai, Ming Horng; Lee, Wen-I; Fang, En-Chen; Jaing, Tang-Her

    2010-05-01

    This report described unrelated umbilical cord blood transplantation for a 3-year-old girl with myelodysplastic syndrome and monosomy 7. The patient had a prolonged course characterized by recurrent infection and slowly progressive pancytopenia. She had reduced numbers of circulating B cells but no decline in immunoglobulin levels. Chemotherapy was not initially recommended because it was contraindicated due to intercurrent lower respiratory tract infection. After 10 months, the girl achieved hematologic remission after induction chemotherapy. The patient then underwent 2-loci HLA-mismatched unrelated donor cord blood transplantation. The time to neutrophil and platelet engraftment was 12 and 23 days post-transplantation, respectively. Acute graft-versus-host disease following transplantation was minimal. She was in continuing hematological remission with full donor chimerism 3 years after transplantation.

  8. Cord blood testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... gases (to evaluate the oxygen, carbon dioxide, and pH levels) Blood sugar level Blood type and Rh Complete ... A low pH (less than 7.04 to 7.10) means there are higher levels ... This might occur when the baby does not get enough oxygen during ...

  9. Umbilical cord blood: a guide for primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Martin, Paul L; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Hesse, Brett

    2011-09-15

    Umbilical cord blood stem cell transplants are used to treat a variety of oncologic, genetic, hematologic, and immunodeficiency disorders. Physicians have an important role in educating, counseling, and offering umbilical cord blood donation and storage options to patients. Parents may donate their infant's cord blood to a public bank, pay to store it in a private bank, or have it discarded. The federal government and many state governments have passed laws and issued regulations regarding umbilical cord blood, and some states require physicians to discuss cord blood options with pregnant women. Five prominent medical organizations have published recommendations about cord blood donation and storage. Current guidelines recommend donation of umbilical cord blood to public banks when possible, or storage through the Related Donor Cord Blood Program when a sibling has a disease that may require a stem cell transplant. Experts do not currently recommend private banking for unidentified possible future use. Step-by-step guidance and electronic resources are available to physicians whose patients are considering saving or donating their infant's umbilical cord blood. PMID:21916391

  10. Clinical-scale cultures of cord blood CD34(+) cells to amplify committed progenitors and maintain stem cell activity.

    PubMed

    Ivanovic, Zoran; Duchez, Pascale; Chevaleyre, Jean; Vlaski, Marija; Lafarge, Xavier; Dazey, Bernard; Robert-Richard, Elodie; Mazurier, Frédéric; Boiron, Jean-Michel

    2011-01-01

    We developed a clinical-scale cord blood (CB) cell ex vivo procedure to enable an extensive expansion of committed progenitors--colony-forming cells (CFCs) without impairing very primitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). CD34(++) cells, selected from previously cryopreserved and thawed CB units, were cultured in two steps (diluted 1:4 after 6 days) in the presence of stem cell factor (SCF), fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt-3L), megakaryocyte growth and development factor (MGDF) (100 ng/ml each), granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) (10 ng/ml) in HP01 serum-free medium. HSC activity was evaluated in a serial transplantation assay, by detection of human cells (CD45, CD33, CD19 and CFC of human origin) in bone marrow (BM) of primary and secondary recipient NOD/SCID mice 6-8 weeks after transplantation. A wide amplification of total cells (∼350-fold), CD34(+) cells (∼100-fold), and CFC (∼130-fold) without impairing the HSC activity was obtained. The activity of a particular HSC subpopulation (SRC(CFC)) was even enhanced.Thus, an extensive ex vivo expansion of CFCs is feasible without impairing the activity of HSCs. This result was enabled by associating antioxidant power of medium with an appropriate cytokine cocktail (i.e., mimicking physiologic effects of a weak oxygenation in hematopoietic environment). PMID:21294956

  11. Clinical-scale cultures of cord blood CD34(+) cells to amplify committed progenitors and maintain stem cell activity.

    PubMed

    Ivanovic, Zoran; Duchez, Pascale; Chevaleyre, Jean; Vlaski, Marija; Lafarge, Xavier; Dazey, Bernard; Robert-Richard, Elodie; Mazurier, Frédéric; Boiron, Jean-Michel

    2011-01-01

    We developed a clinical-scale cord blood (CB) cell ex vivo procedure to enable an extensive expansion of committed progenitors--colony-forming cells (CFCs) without impairing very primitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). CD34(++) cells, selected from previously cryopreserved and thawed CB units, were cultured in two steps (diluted 1:4 after 6 days) in the presence of stem cell factor (SCF), fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt-3L), megakaryocyte growth and development factor (MGDF) (100 ng/ml each), granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) (10 ng/ml) in HP01 serum-free medium. HSC activity was evaluated in a serial transplantation assay, by detection of human cells (CD45, CD33, CD19 and CFC of human origin) in bone marrow (BM) of primary and secondary recipient NOD/SCID mice 6-8 weeks after transplantation. A wide amplification of total cells (∼350-fold), CD34(+) cells (∼100-fold), and CFC (∼130-fold) without impairing the HSC activity was obtained. The activity of a particular HSC subpopulation (SRC(CFC)) was even enhanced.Thus, an extensive ex vivo expansion of CFCs is feasible without impairing the activity of HSCs. This result was enabled by associating antioxidant power of medium with an appropriate cytokine cocktail (i.e., mimicking physiologic effects of a weak oxygenation in hematopoietic environment).

  12. Business on hope: a case study on private cord blood stem cell banking.

    PubMed

    Kiatpongsan, Sorapop

    2008-04-01

    Traditionally, medical practice has been recognized as one of the professional practices with high honors. The interaction between physicians and patients is to provide health care services without the profit orientation. In modernized economy and in today's world of business, the relationship between doctors and patients has been dramatically changed. This transformation is very obvious in the private sector. Health care providers sell their services. Patients have been approached as customers. Decisions to make an investment on new medical technologies or new services would accompany with careful consideration on cost-benefit ratio, on marketing and also on short and long term return of the investment. However most of the medical services available in the past were focusing on the "real" and "tangible" products. This means that the patients or the customers would obtain diagnosis, treatment, palliation or prevention for the fees they paid. They can at least obtain and can feel some direct or indirect health benefits from the services. With the advancement of science and technology, there is recently a new model of business that sells only the hope for future use. Private cord blood stem cell banking is a good example for this business model. Actually, business on hope is not the brand new business model. Insurance is a well-known classical prototype of business on hope. However, when this kind of business model is applied for medical services, there should be some precautions and also intervention including an oversight system from the government sector to make sure that all the information delivered to the clients and family is accurate and unbiased. From the public policy perspective, this business of hope should be appropriately regulated to preserve consumer rights while promoting the advancement of science and technology through sustainable business development. PMID:18556871

  13. Business on hope: a case study on private cord blood stem cell banking.

    PubMed

    Kiatpongsan, Sorapop

    2008-04-01

    Traditionally, medical practice has been recognized as one of the professional practices with high honors. The interaction between physicians and patients is to provide health care services without the profit orientation. In modernized economy and in today's world of business, the relationship between doctors and patients has been dramatically changed. This transformation is very obvious in the private sector. Health care providers sell their services. Patients have been approached as customers. Decisions to make an investment on new medical technologies or new services would accompany with careful consideration on cost-benefit ratio, on marketing and also on short and long term return of the investment. However most of the medical services available in the past were focusing on the "real" and "tangible" products. This means that the patients or the customers would obtain diagnosis, treatment, palliation or prevention for the fees they paid. They can at least obtain and can feel some direct or indirect health benefits from the services. With the advancement of science and technology, there is recently a new model of business that sells only the hope for future use. Private cord blood stem cell banking is a good example for this business model. Actually, business on hope is not the brand new business model. Insurance is a well-known classical prototype of business on hope. However, when this kind of business model is applied for medical services, there should be some precautions and also intervention including an oversight system from the government sector to make sure that all the information delivered to the clients and family is accurate and unbiased. From the public policy perspective, this business of hope should be appropriately regulated to preserve consumer rights while promoting the advancement of science and technology through sustainable business development.

  14. An efficient nonviral method to generate integration-free human-induced pluripotent stem cells from cord blood and peripheral blood cells.

    PubMed

    Okita, Keisuke; Yamakawa, Tatsuya; Matsumura, Yasuko; Sato, Yoshiko; Amano, Naoki; Watanabe, Akira; Goshima, Naoki; Yamanaka, Shinya

    2013-03-01

    The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provides the opportunity to use patient-specific somatic cells, which are a valuable source for disease modeling and drug discovery. To promote research involving these cells, it is important to make iPSCs from easily accessible and less invasive tissues, like blood. We have recently reported the efficient generation of human iPSCs from adult fibroblasts using a combination of plasmids encoding OCT3/4, SOX2, KLF4, L-MYC, LIN28, and shRNA for TP53. We herein report a modified protocol enabling efficient iPSC induction from CD34+ cord blood cells and from peripheral blood isolated from healthy donors using these plasmid vectors. The original plasmid mixture could induce iPSCs; however, the efficiency was low. The addition of EBNA1, an essential factor for episomal amplification of the vectors, by an extra plasmid greatly increased the efficiency of iPSC induction, especially when the induction was performed from αβT cells. This improvement enabled the establishment of blood-derived iPSCs from seven healthy donors ranging in age from their 20s to their 60s. This induction method will be useful for the derivation of patient-specific integration-free iPSCs and would also be applicable to the generation of clinical-grade iPSCs in the future.

  15. Ethical reappraisal of 15 years of cord-blood transplantation.

    PubMed

    Burgio, Giuseppe Roberto; Gluckman, Eliane; Locatelli, Franco

    2003-01-18

    Since the first successful use of cord blood as source of haemopoietic stem cells for transplantation in 1988, more than 2000 patients with malignant or non-malignant disorders have been treated with this procedure. Collection and storage of cord blood has prompted ethical considerations, mainly dealing with the issues of autonomy in making decisions about donation of cord blood, and of privacy and confidentiality in the tests required before use of placental cells for transplantation. The ethical implications of possible storage of cord-blood cells for autologous use has also been discussed. Preimplantation selection of HLA-matched embryos to obtain a donor of cells for cord-blood transplantation of a sibling with a life-threatening disease has raised the issue of the extent to which this approach complies with the principles of bioethics. PMID:12547553

  16. Ethical reappraisal of 15 years of cord-blood transplantation.

    PubMed

    Burgio, Giuseppe Roberto; Gluckman, Eliane; Locatelli, Franco

    2003-01-18

    Since the first successful use of cord blood as source of haemopoietic stem cells for transplantation in 1988, more than 2000 patients with malignant or non-malignant disorders have been treated with this procedure. Collection and storage of cord blood has prompted ethical considerations, mainly dealing with the issues of autonomy in making decisions about donation of cord blood, and of privacy and confidentiality in the tests required before use of placental cells for transplantation. The ethical implications of possible storage of cord-blood cells for autologous use has also been discussed. Preimplantation selection of HLA-matched embryos to obtain a donor of cells for cord-blood transplantation of a sibling with a life-threatening disease has raised the issue of the extent to which this approach complies with the principles of bioethics.

  17. Potential of human umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells to heal damaged corneal endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Nancy C.; Harris, Deshea L.; Markov, Vladimir; Zhang, Zhe

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To test the feasibility of altering the phenotype of umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells (UCB MSCs) toward that of human corneal endothelial cells (HCEC) and to determine whether UCB MSCs can “home” to sites of corneal endothelial cell injury using an ex vivo corneal wound model. Methods RNA was isolated and purified from UCB MSCs and HCECs. Baseline information regarding the relative gene expression of UCB MSCs and HCEC was obtained by microarray analysis. Quantitative real-time PCR (q-PCR) verified the microarray findings for a subset of genes. The ability of different culture media to direct UCB MSCs toward a more HCEC-like phenotype was tested in both tissue culture and ex vivo corneal endothelial wound models using three different media: MSC basal medium (MSCBM), a basal medium used to culture lens epithelial cells (LECBM), or lens epithelial cell-conditioned medium (LECCM). Morphology of the MSCs was observed by phase-contrast microscopy or by light microscopic observation of crystal violet-stained cells. Immunolocalization of the junction-associated proteins, zonula occludins-1 (ZO1) and N-cadherin, was visualized by fluorescence confocal microscopy. Formation of cell-cell junctions was tested by treatment with the calcium chelator, EGTA. A second microarray analysis compared gene expression between UCB MSCs grown in LECBM and LECCM to identify changes induced by the lens epithelial cell-conditioned culture medium. The ability of UCB MSCs to “home” to areas of endothelial injury was determined using ZO1 immunolocalization patterns in ex vivo corneal endothelial wounds. Results Baseline microarray analysis provided information regarding relative gene expression in UCB MSCs and HCECs. MSCs attached to damaged, but not intact, corneal endothelium in ex vivo corneal wounds. The morphology of MSCs was consistently altered when cells were grown in the presence of LECCM. In tissue culture and in ex vivo corneal wounds, UCB MSC treated with

  18. MMP-3 secreted from endothelial cells of blood vessels after spinal cord injury activates microglia, leading to oligodendrocyte cell death.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jee Y; Choi, Hae Y; Yune, Tae Y

    2015-10-01

    The activation of microglia after spinal cord injury (SCI) contributes to secondary damage by producing pro-inflammatory cytokines and mediators, leading to cell death of oligodendrocytes and neurons. Here, we show that matrix metalloprotease-3 (MMP-3) produced and secreted in the endothelial cells of blood vessels after SCI mediates microglial activation. MMP-3 was produced and secreted in bEnd.3 cells, a mouse brain-derived endothelial cell line, by oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/RO). OGD/RO-induced MMP-3 expression and activity was also significantly inhibited by ghrelin, which was dependent on the ghrelin receptor GHS-R1a. Furthermore, the secreted MMP-3 from OGD/RO-induced bEnd.3 cells activated BV-2 cells, a murine microglial cell line. We also found that microglial activation after SCI was attenuated in MMP-3 knockout (KO) mice compared with wild type (WT) mice. Both p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation and pro-nerve growth factor (proNGF) production were more inhibited in MMP-3 KO than WT mice at 5d after injury. When WT mice were treated with Mmp-3 siRNA after injury, MMP-3 activity, microglial activation, p38MAPK activation and proNGF expression were significantly inhibited. Ghrelin treatment also significantly inhibited MMP-3 expression and activation after SCI, which was dependent on GHS-R1a. Finally, RhoA activation and oligodendrocyte cell death after injury were attenuated by Mmp-3 siRNA or ghrelin treatment compared with vehicle control. Thus, our study indicates that MMP-3 produced in blood vessel endothelial cells after SCI serves as an endogenous molecule for microglial activation followed by p38MAPK activation and proNGF production, and further indicates that the protective effect of ghrelin on oligodendrocytes cell death may be at least partly mediated by the inhibition of MMP-3-induced microglial activation after SCI.

  19. Application of porous glycosaminoglycan-based scaffolds for expansion of human cord blood stem cells in perfusion culture.

    PubMed

    Cho, Cheul H; Eliason, James F; Matthew, Howard W T

    2008-07-01

    In vitro expansion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) has been employed to obtain sufficient numbers of stem cells for successful engraftment after HSC transplantation. A three-dimensional perfusion bioreactor system with a heparin-chitosan scaffold was designed and evaluated for its capability to support maintenance and expansion of HSCs. Porous chitosan scaffolds were fabricated by a freeze-drying technique and N-desulfated heparin was covalently immobilized within the scaffolds using carbodiimide chemistry. CD34+ HSCs isolated from umbilical cord blood by immunomagnetic separation were cultured within the porous scaffold in a perfusion bioreactor system. Control cultures were maintained on dishes coated with similar heparin-chitosan films. Oxygen uptake was measured during the culture period. After 7 days of culture, scaffolds were harvested for analysis. Cellular phenotype and HSC characteristics were evaluated via flow cytometry and colony forming unit assays. The results indicate good cell retention and proliferation within the perfused scaffolds. Oxygen consumption in the perfusion bioreactor system increased continuously during the culture, indicating steady cell growth. Cells from the perfused scaffold cultures showed higher percentages of primitive progenitors and exhibited superior colony forming unit performance as compared to cells from static cultures. In addition, perfusion culture at low oxygen (5%) enhanced the expansion of CD34+ cells and colony-forming activity compared to high oxygen (19%) cultures. The results suggest that perfusion culture of cord blood CD34+ cells under bone marrow-like conditions enhances HSC expansion compared to static cultures.

  20. [Influence of different gelatin concentration and lymphocyte isolation liquid on primary culture of umbilical cord blood derived adhesive cells].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Chen, Xing-Hua; Zhang, Xi; Gao, Lei; Kong, Pei-Yan; Liu, Hong; Liang, Xue; Peng, Xian-Gui; Wang, Qing-Yu

    2008-12-01

    In order to study the influence of different gelatin concentrations, and lymphocyte isolation liquid on primary culture of umbilical cord blood-derived adhesive cells (hCBACs), the red blood cells of umbilical cord blood was separated by 3% and 6 % gelatin for detecting the effectiveness of sedimentation, then the adhesion rate at 48 hours, the day of initial expansion and the rate of culture success were detected for hCBACs cultured with CD34(+) cells after the mononuclear cells were separated by 6% gelatin followed by Ficoll and Percoll, and the morphological characteristics and growth status were observed by invert microscopy. Cytochemistry stain for nonspecific esterase stain (NSE), peroxidase (POX), periodic acid Schiff reaction (PAS) and alkali phosphatase (ALP) and immunocytochemistry labeling for CD31, CD45, CD68 and fibronectin (Fn) were detected. The results showed that 6 % gelatin was better than that 3% gelatin for red blood sedimentation. The Percoll was predominant over Ficoll in adhesion rate at 48 hours, the day of initial expansion, the time of initial formation of adhesive cell colony units, the time of maximal numbers of adhesive cell colony units, the the cell fusion time and ratio of culture success. 60% fibroblast-liked cells, 36% macrophage liked cells and 4% small-round cells were observed in cells isolated by both isolated methods. The cytochemistry stain for NSE, POX, PAS and ALP was similar in two groups, the difference was not statistically significant between these two groups. The immunocytochemistry labeling for CD31, CD45, CD68 and Fn was also similar in both groups and the difference was also not statistically significant between these two groups. It is concluded that the combination of 6% gelatin with Percoll is an ideal separation method for primary culture of hCBACs, which provides basic information for clinical application.

  1. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Microvesicles Support Ex Vivo Expansion of Cord Blood-Derived CD34+ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hui; Sun, Li; Zhang, Liming; Liu, Teng; Chen, Li; Zhao, Aiqi; Lei, Qian; Gao, Fei; Zou, Ping; Li, Qiubai; Guo, An-yuan; Chen, Zhichao; Wang, Hongxiang

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known to support the characteristic properties of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) in the bone marrow hematopoietic microenvironment. MSCs are used in coculture systems as a feeder layer for the ex vivo expansion of umbilical cord blood (CB) to increase the relatively low number of HSPCs in CB. Findings increasingly suggest that MSC-derived microvesicles (MSC-MVs) play an important role in the biological functions of their parent cells. We speculate that MSC-MVs may recapitulate the hematopoiesis-supporting effects of their parent cells. In the current study, we found MSC-MVs containing microRNAs that are involved in the regulation of hematopoiesis. We also demonstrated that MSC-MVs could improve the expansion of CB-derived mononuclear cells and CD34+ cells and generate a greater number of primitive progenitor cells in vitro. Additionally, when MSC-MVs were added to the CB-MSC coculture system, they could improve the hematopoiesis-supporting effects of MSCs. These findings highlight the role of MSC-MVs in the ex vivo expansion of CB, which may offer a promising therapeutic approach in CB transplantation. PMID:27042183

  2. Umbilical Cord Blood Banking and Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Alkindi, Salam; Dennison, David

    2011-01-01

    It is more than 20 years since the first cord blood transplant (CBT) was performed, following the realisation that cord blood (CB), which is normally wasted, is rich in progenitor cells and capable of rescuing haematopoiesis. Since then it has been appreciated that CB is rich in stem cells, and has many other features not the least of which is its ability to rescue the transplanted patient without a rigid need for full human lymphocyte antigen (HLA) compatibility. Also it is easily accessible, relatively free from infections and poses no medical risk to the donor. However, the quantity of the stem cells is rather small, thus predominantly restricting its use to children or adults requiring double units. In Oman, we have taken a keen interest in stem cell research and also CBT. We see such activities as an avenue for our patients, for whom a compatible bone marrow (BM) or a peripheral blood donor cannot be found, to have an alternative in the form of CBT. This has encouraged us to establish a national voluntary cord blood bank (CBB) which is a valuable option open to a selected group of patients, as compared to the controversial private CBB. This national CBB will have a better representation of HLA-types common in the region, an improvement on relying on banks in other countries. Considering the need for stem cell transplant/therapy in this country, it is only appropriate that this sort of bank is established to cater for some of these requirements. PMID:22087393

  3. Neurorestorative Therapy of Stroke in Type two Diabetes Rats Treated with Human Umbilical Cord Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Tao; Venkat, Poornima; Chopp, Michael; Zacharek, Alex; Ning, Ruizhuo; Cui, Yisheng; Roberts, Cynthia; Kuzmin-Nichols, Nicole; Sanberg, Cyndy Davis; Chen, Jieli

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Diabetes mellitus is a high risk factor for ischemic stroke. Diabetic stroke patients suffer worse outcomes, poor long term recovery, risk of recurrent strokes and extensive vascular damage. We investigated the neurorestorative effects and the underlying mechanisms of stroke treatment with human umbilical cord blood cells (HUCBCs) in Type two diabetes mellitus (T2DM) rats. Methods Adult male T2DM rats were subjected to 2 h of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). Three days after MCAo, rats were treated via tail-vein injection with: 1) phosphate-buffered-saline (PBS); 2) HUCBCs (5×106); n=10/group. Results HUCBC stroke treatment initiated 3 days after MCAo in T2DM rats did not significantly decrease blood-brain-barrier (BBB) leakage (p=0.1) and lesion volume (p=0.078), but significantly improved long term functional outcome and decreased brain hemorrhage (p<0.05) when compared to the PBS-treated T2DM-MCAo control group. HUCBC treatment significantly promoted white matter (WM) remodeling as indicated by increased expression of Bielschowsky silver (axons marker), Luxol fast blue (myelin marker), SMI-31 (neurofilament) and Synaptophysin in the ischemic border zone (IBZ). HUCBC promoted vascular remodeling, and significantly increased arterial and vascular density. HUCBC treatment of stroke in T2DM rats significantly increased M2 macrophage polarization (increased M2 macrophage CD163, CD 206; decreased M1 macrophage ED1 and iNOS expression) in the ischemic brain compared to PBS-treated T2DM-MCAo controls (p<0.05). HUCBC also significantly decreased pro-inflammatory factors i.e., matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) and toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression in the ischemic brain. Conclusion HUCBC treatment initiated 3 days after stroke significantly increased WM and vascular remodeling in the ischemic brain as well as decreased neuroinflammatory factor expression in the ischemic brain in T2DM

  4. Hematopoietic colony formation from human growth factor-dependent TF1 cells and human cord blood myeloid progenitor cells depends on SHP2 phosphatase function.

    PubMed

    Broxmeyer, Hal E; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Gotoh, Akihiko; Braun, Stephen E; Lu, Li; Cooper, Scott; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Li, Xing Jun; Chan, Rebecca J

    2013-03-15

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase, SHP2, is widely expressed; however, previous studies demonstrated that hematopoietic cell development more stringently requires Shp2 expression compared to other tissues. Furthermore, somatic gain-of-function SHP2 mutants are commonly found in human myeloid leukemias. Given that pharmacologic inhibitors to SHP2 phosphatase activity are currently in development as putative antileukemic agents, we conducted a series of experiments examining the necessity of SHP2 phosphatase activity for human hematopoiesis. Anti-sense oligonucleotides to human SHP2 coding sequences reduced human cord blood- and human cell line, TF1-derived colony formation. Expression of truncated SHP2 bearing its Src homology 2 (SH2) domains, but lacking the phosphatase domain similarly reduced human cord blood- and TF1-derived colony formation. Mechanistically, expression of truncated SHP2 reduced the interaction between endogenous, full-length SHP2 with the adapter protein, Grb2. To verify the role of SHP2 phosphatase function in human hematopoietic cell development, human cord blood CD34+ cells were transduced with a leukemia-associated phosphatase gain-of-function SHP2 mutant or with a phosphatase dead SHP2 mutant, which indicated that increased phosphatase function enhanced, while decreased SHP2 phosphatase function reduced, human cord blood-derived colonies. Collectively, these findings indicate that SHP2 phosphatase function regulates human hematopoietic cell development and imply that the phosphatase component of SHP2 may serve as a pharmacologic target in human leukemias bearing increased SHP2 phosphatase activity.

  5. Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Serum for Culturing the Supportive Feeder Cells of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Rungsiwiwut, Ruttachuk; Ingrungruanglert, Praewphan; Numchaisrika, Pranee; Virutamasen, Pramuan; Phermthai, Tatsanee; Pruksananonda, Kamthorn

    2016-01-01

    Although human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) can proliferate robustly on the feeder-free culture system, genetic instability of hPSCs has been reported in such environment. Alternatively, feeder cells enable hPSCs to maintain their pluripotency. The feeder cells are usually grown in a culture medium containing fetal bovine serum (FBS) prior to coculture with hPSCs. The use of FBS might limit the clinical application of hPSCs. Recently, human cord blood-derived serum (hUCS) showed a positive effect on culture of mesenchymal stem cells. It is interesting to test whether hUCS can be used for culture of feeder cells of hPSCs. This study was aimed to replace FBS with hUCS for culturing the human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) prior to feeder cell preparation. The results showed that HFFs cultured in hUCS-containing medium (HFF-hUCS) displayed fibroblastic features, high proliferation rates, short population doubling times, and normal karyotypes after prolonged culture. Inactivated HFF-hUCS expressed important genes, including Activin A, FGF2, and TGFβ1, which have been implicated in the maintenance of hPSC pluripotency. Moreover, hPSC lines maintained pluripotency, differentiation capacities, and karyotypic stability after being cocultured for extended period with inactivated HFF-hUCS. Therefore, the results demonstrated the benefit of hUCS for hPSCs culture system. PMID:26839561

  6. Diffuse and persistent blood-spinal cord barrier disruption after contusive spinal cord injury rapidly recovers following intravenous infusion of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Takashi; Lankford, Karen L; Arroyo, Edgardo J; Sasaki, Masanori; Neyazi, Milad; Radtke, Christine; Kocsis, Jeffery D

    2015-05-01

    Intravenous infusion of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been shown to reduce the severity of experimental spinal cord injury (SCI), but mechanisms are not fully understood. One important consequence of SCI is damage to the microvasculature and disruption of the blood spinal cord barrier (BSCB). In the present study we induced a contusive SCI at T9 in the rat and studied the effects of intravenous MSC infusion on BSCB permeability, microvascular architecture and locomotor recovery over a 10week period. Intravenously delivered MSCs could not be identified in the spinal cord, but distributed primarily to the lungs where they survived for a couple of days. Spatial and temporal changes in BSCB integrity were assessed by intravenous infusions of Evans blue (EvB) with in vivo and ex vivo optical imaging and spectrophotometric quantitation of EvB leakage into the parenchyma. SCI resulted in prolonged BSCB leakage that was most severe at the impact site but disseminated extensively rostral and caudal to the lesion over 6weeks. Contused spinal cords also showed an increase in vessel size, reduced vessel number, dissociation of pericytes from microvessels and decreases in von Willebrand factor (vWF) and endothelial barrier antigen (EBA) expression. In MSC-treated rats, BSCB leakage was reduced, vWF expression was increased and locomotor function improved beginning 1 week post-MSC infusion, i.e., 2weeks post-SCI. These results suggest that intravenously delivered MSCs have important effects on reducing BSCB leakage which could contribute to their therapeutic efficacy.

  7. Epstein-Barr Virus-positive T-cell Lymphoproliferative Disease Following Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation for Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yui, Shunsuke; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Imadome, Ken-ichi; Arai, Ayako; Takahashi, Mikiko; Ohashi, Ryuji; Tamai, Hayato; Moriya, Keiichi; Nakayama, Kazutaka; Shimizu, Akira; Inokuchi, Koiti

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of the extremely rare condition Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) which occurred after umbilical cord blood transplantation. A 25-year-old Japanese man underwent cord blood transplantation from a male human leukocyte antigen 4/6-matched donor due to acute myeloid leukemia with trisomy 8. Bone marrow examination on day 30 showed chimerism with at least 90% donor cells and complete hematological response. Chronic symptoms of graft-versus-host disease appeared only on the skin and were successfully treated with cyclosporine alone. Three years later, however, the patient experienced repeated cold-like symptoms and was hospitalized with liver dysfunction. A high fever developed and was followed by significant edema of the right side of the face. The EBV DNA copy number in whole peripheral blood was 2×10(4)/mL. Liver biopsy showed invasion of EBV-infected CD8-positive T cells. Southern blotting analysis of the whole peripheral blood showed that the T-cell receptor Cβ1 rearrangement was positive. On the basis of these results, EBV-positive T-cell LPD was diagnosed and treated with prednisolone, cyclosporine, and etoposide, followed by cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone. However, the patient died of cardiac function failure, pneumonia, and pulmonary hemorrhage, all of unidentified cause. Most cases of EBV-related LPD after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation consist of EBV-positive B-cell LPD, and, to our knowledge, de novo EBV-positive T-cell LPD subsequent to transplantation has not been previously reported. PMID:26960588

  8. Establishing a public umbilical cord blood stem cell bank for South Africa: an enquiry into public acceptability.

    PubMed

    Meissner-Roloff, Madelein; Pepper, Michael S

    2013-12-01

    South Africa (SA) faces a large unmet need for bone marrow (BM) transplantation, which could be alleviated in part by establishing a public umbilical cord blood stem cell bank (UCB SCB). Umbilical cord blood is an increasingly utilised source of hematopoietic stem cells for BM transplantation in addition to BM or mobilized peripheral blood stem cells. Establishing a public UCB SCB would therefore be a positive step towards improving the quality of health care in SA by providing for an important unmet need. This study takes the form of an enquiry into the acceptability of establishing a public bank through an interview with and questionnaire completed by mothers-to-be in the antenatal clinic of a large public hospital in SA. Initial results are positive, with 85 % of the participants in favour of establishing a public UCB SCB in SA. This initial probe will serve as a model for a more comprehensive national enquiry into public support and acceptability in different clinics, hospitals and provinces in SA. PMID:23943126

  9. Establishing a public umbilical cord blood stem cell bank for South Africa: an enquiry into public acceptability.

    PubMed

    Meissner-Roloff, Madelein; Pepper, Michael S

    2013-12-01

    South Africa (SA) faces a large unmet need for bone marrow (BM) transplantation, which could be alleviated in part by establishing a public umbilical cord blood stem cell bank (UCB SCB). Umbilical cord blood is an increasingly utilised source of hematopoietic stem cells for BM transplantation in addition to BM or mobilized peripheral blood stem cells. Establishing a public UCB SCB would therefore be a positive step towards improving the quality of health care in SA by providing for an important unmet need. This study takes the form of an enquiry into the acceptability of establishing a public bank through an interview with and questionnaire completed by mothers-to-be in the antenatal clinic of a large public hospital in SA. Initial results are positive, with 85 % of the participants in favour of establishing a public UCB SCB in SA. This initial probe will serve as a model for a more comprehensive national enquiry into public support and acceptability in different clinics, hospitals and provinces in SA.

  10. Volume reduction in routine cord blood banking.

    PubMed

    Solves, Pilar; Mirabet, Vicente; Roig, Roberto

    2010-12-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is an alternative source of hematopoietic progenitors for transplantation in the treatment of haematological malignancies, marrow failure, immunodeficiencies, hemoglobinopathies and inherited metabolic diseases. It has greatly contributed to increase the feasibility to transplantation for many patients in need. To date, more than 20,000 UCB transplants have been performed on children and adults, and more than 400,000 UCB units are available in more than 50 public CB banks. One of the most important objectives of banks is to cryopreserve and store high quality UCB units. Volume reduction is a usual process in cord blood banking that has some advantages as reducing the storage space and the DMSO quantity in final product. Volume reduction methodology must guarantee high cell recovery and red blood cell (RBC) depletion by reducing the UCB units to a standard volume. Hydroxyethyl starch (HES) sedimentation was the first method developed for this purpose by the New York Cord Blood Bank and implemented in many banks worldwide. The semi-automated top and bottom system, usually used for blood fractionation was further developed to simplify and short the process. Later, automatic devices as SEPAX and AXP have been developed in last years specifically for UCB volume reduction purpose. This review critically analyses the advantages and disadvantages of the different procedures. All of them have been used in Valencia Cord Blood Bank along 10 years. In general, automatic devices are preferred because of compliance with cGTP, closed systems, higher reproducibility and less influence of technician. PMID:20528760

  11. Research using autologous cord blood - time for a policy change.

    PubMed

    Han, Michael X; Craig, Maria E

    2013-08-19

    • Type 1 diabetes results from the loss of normal immunological self-tolerance, which may be attributable to the failure of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). Umbilical cord blood is rich in Tregs and therefore has the potential to prevent or delay the onset of type 1 diabetes. A pilot trial is currently underway in Australia to examine whether infusion of autologous cord blood can prevent type 1 diabetes in high-risk children with serum antibodies to multiple β-cell antigens. • A number of other potential therapeutic indications for autologous cord blood have been proposed, including cerebral palsy and hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. • Recruitment to clinical trials using cord blood is influenced by divergent public and private cord blood banking policy in Australia. The burgeoning consumer demand for storage of cord blood highlights the need for regulatory bodies to develop and adapt policies to facilitate research that may extend the use of cord blood beyond currently recognised indications. • Consumers, researchers and policymakers must also recognise specific ethical issues associated with collection and storage of cord blood, including storage in public and private banks, informed consent, ownership, access and the principle of beneficence.

  12. Comparative survival study of glial cells and cells composing walls of blood vessels in crustacean ventral nerve cord after photodynamic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolosov, Mikhail S.; Shubina, Elena

    2015-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy is a prospective treatment modality of brain cancers. It is of importance to have information about relative survival rate of different cell types in nerve tissue during photodynamic treatment. Particularly, for development of sparing strategy of the photodynamic therapy of brain tumors, which pursuits both total elimination of malignant cells, which are usually of glial origin, and, at the same time, preservation of normal blood circulation as well as normal glial cells in the brain. The aim of this work was to carry out comparative survival study of glial cells and cells composing walls of blood vessels after photodynamic treatment, using simple model object - ventral nerve cord of crustacean.

  13. Osteogenic potential of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stromal cells cultured with umbilical cord blood-derived fibrin: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Baba, Kyoko; Yamazaki, Yasuharu; Ishiguro, Masashi; Kumazawa, Kenichi; Aoyagi, Kazuya; Ikemoto, Shigehiro; Takeda, Akira; Uchinuma, Eiju

    2013-12-01

    This study examined the potential for osteogenesis via regenerative medicine using autologous tissues (umbilical cord (UC) and umbilical cord blood (UCB)) in nude mice. The study was designed to provide the three elements required for regenerative medicine (cell, scaffold, and growth factor) and autoserum for culture by means of autologous tissues. Mesenchymal stromal cells were obtained from UC (UC-MSCs). Fibrin, platelet-rich-plasma, and autoserum were obtained from UCB as scaffold, growth factor and serum for culture respectively. UC-MSCs were obtained from Wharton jelly and cultured with UCB-derived fibrin (UCB-fibrin) for 3-4 weeks to induce their differentiation into osteoblasts. They were implanted subcutaneously into the dorsum of male nude mice for 6 weeks prior to undergoing assessment. The assessments performed were haematoxylin and eosin, and alizarin red staining, immunohistochemical staining of human mitochondria, scanning electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction to assess the expressions of osteoblast markers. Consequently, the differentiation of UC-MSCs into osteoblasts and the production of hydroxyapatite were verified. This study suggested the possible formation of bone tissue using biomedical materials obtained from UC and UCB.

  14. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Mononuclear Cells From Cord Blood: Cotransplantation Provides a Better Effect in Treating Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gecai; Yue, Aihuan; Yu, Hong; Ruan, Zhongbao; Yin, Yigang; Wang, Ruzhu; Ren, Yin; Zhu, Li

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of cotransplanting mononuclear cells from cord blood (CB-MNCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as treatment for myocardial infarction (MI). Transplanting CD34+ cells or MSCs separately has been shown effective in treating MI, but the effect of cotransplanting CB-MNCs and MSCs is not clear. In this study, MSCs were separated by their adherence to the tissue culture. The morphology, immunophenotype, and multilineage potential of MSCs were analyzed. CB-MNCs were separated in lymphocyte separation medium 1.077. CD34+ cell count and viability were analyzed by flow cytometry. Infarcted male Sprague-Dawley rats in a specific-pathogen-free grade were divided into four treatment groups randomly: group I, saline; group II, CB-MNCs; group III, MSCs; and group IV, CB-MNCs plus MSCs. The saline, and CB-MNCs and/or MSCs were injected intramyocardially in infarcted rats. Their cardiac function was evaluated by echocardiography. The myocardial capillary density was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Both cell types induced an improvement in the left ventricular cardiac function and increased tissue cell proliferation in myocardial tissue and neoangiogenesis. However, CB-MNCs plus MSCs were more effective in reducing the infarct size and preventing ventricular remodeling. Scar tissue was reduced significantly in the CB-MNCs plus MSCs group. MSCs facilitate engraftment of CD34+ cells and immunomodulation after allogeneic CD34+ cell transplantation. Cotransplanting MSCs and CB-MNCs might be more effective than transplanting MSCs or CB-MNCs separately for treating MI. This study contributes knowledge toward effective treatment strategies for MI.

  15. Bone marrow and umbilical cord blood human mesenchymal stem cells: state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Malgieri, Arianna; Kantzari, Eugenia; Patrizi, Maria Patrizia; Gambardella, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent adult stem cells present in all tissues, as part of the perivascular population. As multipotent cells, MSCs can differentiate into different tissues originating from mesoderm ranging from bone and cartilage, to cardiac muscle. MSCs are an excellent candidate for cell therapy because they are easily accessible, their isolation is straightforward, they can be bio-preserved with minimal loss of potency, and they have shown no adverse reactions to allogeneic versus autologous MSCs transplants. Therefore, MSCs are being explored to regenerate damaged tissue and treat inflammation, resulting from cardiovascular disease and myo-cardial infarction (MI), brain and spinal cord injury, stroke, diabetes, cartilage and bone injury, Crohn's disease and graft versus host disease (GvHD). Most of the application and clinical trials involve MSCs from bone marrow (BMMSCs). Transplantation of MSCs from bone marrow is considered safe and has been widely tested in clinical trials of cardiovascular, neurological, and immunological disease with encouraging results. There are examples of MSCs utilization in the repair of kidney, muscle and lung. The cells were also found to promote angiogenesis, and were used in chronic skin wound treatment. Recent studies involve also mesenchymal stem cell transplant from umbilical cord (UCMSCt). One of these demonstrate that UCMSCt may improve symptoms and biochemical values in patients with severe refractory systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and therefore this source of MSCs need deeper studies and require more attention. However, also if there are 79 registered clinical trial sites for evaluating MSC therapy throughout the world, it is still a long way to go before using these cells as a routinely applied therapy in clinics. PMID:21072260

  16. Cord blood banking activity in Iran National Cord Blood Bank: a two years experience.

    PubMed

    Jamali, Mostafa; Atarodi, Kamran; Nakhlestani, Mozhdeh; Abolghasemi, Hasan; Sadegh, Hosein; Faranoosh, Mohammad; Golzade, Khadije; Fadai, Razieh; Niknam, Fereshte; Zarif, Mahin Nikougoftar

    2014-02-01

    Today umbilical cord blood (UCB) has known as a commonly used source of hematopoietic stem cells for allogeneic transplantation and many cord blood banks have been established around the world for collection and cryopreservation of cord blood units. Herein, we describe our experience at Iran National Cord Blood Bank (INCBB) during 2 years of activity. From November 2010 to 2012, UCBs were collected from 5 hospitals in Tehran. All the collection, processing, testing, cryopreservation and storage procedures were done according to standard operation procedures. Total nucleated cells (TNC) count, viability test, CD34+ cell count, colony forming unit (CFU) assay, screening tests and HLA typing were done on all banked units. Within 3770 collected units, only 32.9% fulfilled banking criteria. The mean volume of units was 105.2 ml and after volume reduction the mean of TNC, viability, CD34+ cells and CFUs was 10.76×10(8), 95.2%, 2.99×10(6) and 7.1×10(5), respectively. One unit was transplanted at Dec 2012 to a 5-year old patient with five of six HLA compatibilities. In our country banking of UCB is new and high rate of hematopoietic stem cell transplants needs expanding CB banks capacity to find more matching units, optimization of methods and sharing experiences to improve biological characterization of units.

  17. Alternative donors: cord blood for adults.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Annalisa

    2016-04-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a curative treatment for patients with hematological diseases. The probability of finding a human leukocyte antigen (HLA)- identical donor among family members is around 25% and 30% that of having a full matched unrelated donor in the registry. Patients in need may also benefit of a HLA-mismatched HSCT either from an haploidentical donors or from umbilical cord blood (UCB). Much has been learned about UCB transplant (UCBT) since the first human UCBT was performed back in 1988. Cord blood banks have been established worldwide for the collection, cryopreservation, and distribution of UCB for HSCT. Today, a global network of cord blood banks and transplant centers has been established with a large common inventory of more than 650,000 UCB units available, allowing for more than 40,000 UCBT worldwide in children and adults with severe hematological diseases. Several studies have been published on UCBT, assessing risk factors such as cell dose and HLA mismatch. Outcomes of several retrospective comparative studies showed similar results using other stem cell sources both in pediatric and adult setting. New strategies are ongoing to facilitate engraftment and reduce transplant-related mortality. In this issue, we review the current results of UCBT in adults with hematological malignancies and the clinical studies comparing UCBT with other transplant strategies. We provide guidelines for donor algorithm selection in UCBT setting.

  18. The expression of pluripotency genes and neuronal markers after neurodifferentiation in fibroblasts co-cultured with human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Marinowic, D R; Domingues, M F; Machado, D C; DaCosta, J C

    2015-01-01

    Human umbilical cord blood is an attractive source of stem cells; however, it has a heterogeneous cell population with few mesenchymal stem cells. Cell reprogramming induced by different methodologies can confer pluripotency to differentiated adult cells. The objective of this study was to evaluate the reprogramming of fibroblasts and their subsequent neural differentiation after co-culture with umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells. Cells were obtained from four human umbilical cords. The mononuclear cells were cultured for 7 d and subsequently co-cultured with mouse fibroblast NIH-3T3 cells for 6 d. The pluripotency of the cells was evaluated by RT-PCR using primers specific for pluripotency marker genes. The pluripotency was also confirmed by adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation. Neural differentiation of the reprogrammed cells was evaluated by immunofluorescence. All co-cultured cells showed adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation capacity. After co-cultivation, cells expressed the pluripotency gene KLF4. Statistically significant differences in cell area, diameter, optical density, and fractal dimension were observed by confocal microscopy in the neurally differentiated cells. Contact in the form of co-cultivation of fibroblasts with umbilical cord blood mononuclear fraction for 6 d promoted the reprogramming of these cells, allowing the later induction of neural differentiation. PMID:25134818

  19. Identification of Lymphomyeloid Primitive Progenitor Cells in Fresh Human Cord Blood and in the Marrow of Nonobese Diabetic–Severe Combined Immunodeficient (NOD-SCID) Mice Transplanted with Human CD34+ Cord Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Robin, Catherine; Pflumio, Françoise; Vainchenker, William; Coulombel, Laure

    1999-01-01

    Transplantation of genetically marked donor cells in mice have unambiguously identified individual clones with full differentiative potential in all lymphoid and myeloid pathways. Such evidence has been lacking in humans because of limitations inherent to clonal stem cell assays. In this work, we used single cell cultures to show that human cord blood (CB) contains totipotent CD34+ cells capable of T, B, natural killer, and granulocytic cell differentiation. Single CD34+ CD19−Thy1+ (or CD38−) cells from fresh CB were first induced to proliferate and their progeny separately studied in mouse fetal thymic organotypic cultures (FTOCs) and cocultures on murine stromal feeder layers. 10% of the clones individually analyzed produced CD19+, CD56+, and CD15+ cells in stromal cocultures and CD4+CD8+ T cells in FTOCs, identifying totipotent progenitor cells. Furthermore, we showed that totipotent clones with similar lymphomyeloid potential are detected in the bone marrow of nonobese diabetic severe combined immunodeficient (NOD-SCID) mice transplanted 4 mo earlier with human CB CD34+ cells. These results provide the first direct demonstration that human CB contains totipotent lymphomyeloid progenitors and transplantable CD34+ cells with the ability to reconstitute, in the marrow of recipient mice, the hierarchy of hematopoietic compartments, including a compartment of functional totipotent cells. These experimental approaches can now be exploited to analyze mechanisms controlling the decisions of such primitive human progenitors and to design conditions for their ampification that can be helpful for therapeutic purposes. PMID:10330439

  20. Umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells improve heat tolerance and hypothalamic damage in heat stressed mice.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ling-Shu; Chen, Sheng-Hsien; Lin, Mao-Tsun; Lin, Ying-Chu

    2014-01-01

    Heatstroke is characterized by excessive hyperthermia associated with systemic inflammatory responses, which leads to multiple organ failure, in which brain disorders predominate. This definition can be almost fulfilled by a mouse model of heatstroke used in the present study. Unanesthetized mice were exposed to whole body heating (41.2°C for 1 hour) and then returned to room temperature (26°C) for recovery. Immediately after termination of whole body heating, heated mice displayed excessive hyperthermia (body core temperature ~42.5°C). Four hours after termination of heat stress, heated mice displayed (i) systemic inflammation; (ii) ischemic, hypoxic, and oxidative damage to the hypothalamus; (iii) hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis impairment (reflected by plasma levels of both adrenocorticotrophic-hormone and corticosterone); (iv) decreased fractional survival; and (v) thermoregulatory deficits (e.g., they became hypothermia when they were exposed to room temperature). These heatstroke reactions can be significantly attenuated by human umbilical cord blood-derived CD34(+) cells therapy. Our data suggest that human umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells therapy may improve outcomes of heatstroke in mice by reducing systemic inflammation as well as hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis impairment.

  1. Biodegradable nanoparticle mediated antigen delivery to human cord blood derived dendritic cells for induction of primary T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Diwan, Manish; Elamanchili, Praveen; Lane, Helena; Gainer, Anita; Samuel, John

    2003-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) in the peripheral tissues act as sentinels of the immune system. They detect and capture pathogens entering the body and present their antigens to T cells to trigger responses directed towards elimination of the pathogen. The induction of peripheral tolerance against self and certain foreign antigens is also believed to be mediated through DCs. The outcome of any immune response is largely controlled by the microenvironment of antigen capture, processing and presentation by DCs. The "context" of antigen delivery to DCs will directly influence the microenvironment of antigen presentation and hence the regulation of immune responses. We report here preliminary investigations describing the formulation of a pharmaceutically acceptable, biodegradable, and strategic nanoparticulate delivery system, and its application for efficient antigen loading of DCs to achieve antigen specific T cell activation. "Pathogen-mimicking" nanoparticles capable of interacting with DCs were fabricated by incorporating monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA; toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 ligand) or CpG ODN (seq #2006; TLR9 ligand) in biodegradable copolymer, poly(D,L,-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). The uptake of PLGA nanoparticles by human umbilical cord blood derived DCs (DCs propagated from CD34 progenitors) was conclusively demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Cell phenotype at day 12 of cultures was determined as immature DC using specific cell surface markers, i.e. CD11c (approximately 90%), MHC-II (approximately 70%), CD86 (approximately 20%), CD83 (approximately 5%), CD80 (approximately 40%), CD40 (approximately 40%), and CCR7 (approximately 5%). Tetanus toxoid (TT), a model antigen, was encapsulated in nanoparticles along with an immunomodulator, i.e. either MPLA or CpG ODN. DCs pulsed with various antigen formulations were co-cultured with autologous naïve T cells at

  2. How to Improve Cord Blood Engraftment?

    PubMed

    Beksac, Meral; Yurdakul, Pinar

    2016-01-01

    Various factors make cord blood (CB) a significant source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), including ease of procurement and lack of donor attrition, with the ability to process and store the donor cells long term. Importantly, high proliferative potential of the immature HSCs allows one log less use of cells compared to bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cells. As total nucleated cell (TNC) and CD34(+) cell content of CB grafts are correlated to engraftment rate and speed, strategies to expand HSC and homing have been developed. This chapter will focus only on modalities such as intrabone administration, fucosylation, CD26 inhibition, prostaglandin E2 derivative or complement 3 exposure, and SDF-1/CXCR4/CXCL-12 pathway interventions that have been experimented successfully. Furthermore, increasing evidence in line with better recognition of CB progenitors that are involved in engraftment and homing will also be addressed. PMID:26925402

  3. How to Improve Cord Blood Engraftment?

    PubMed Central

    Beksac, Meral; Yurdakul, Pinar

    2016-01-01

    Various factors make cord blood (CB) a significant source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), including ease of procurement and lack of donor attrition, with the ability to process and store the donor cells long term. Importantly, high proliferative potential of the immature HSCs allows one log less use of cells compared to bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cells. As total nucleated cell (TNC) and CD34+ cell content of CB grafts are correlated to engraftment rate and speed, strategies to expand HSC and homing have been developed. This chapter will focus only on modalities such as intrabone administration, fucosylation, CD26 inhibition, prostaglandin E2 derivative or complement 3 exposure, and SDF-1/CXCR4/CXCL-12 pathway interventions that have been experimented successfully. Furthermore, increasing evidence in line with better recognition of CB progenitors that are involved in engraftment and homing will also be addressed. PMID:26925402

  4. Histone Deacetylase Inhibition Enhances Self Renewal and Cardioprotection by Human Cord Blood-Derived CD34+ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Burba, Ilaria; Colombo, Gualtiero I.; Staszewsky, Lidia Irene; De Simone, Marco; Devanna, Paolo; Nanni, Simona; Avitabile, Daniele; Molla, Fabiola; Cosentino, Simona; Russo, Ilaria; De Angelis, Noeleen; Soldo, Annarita; Biondi, Antonella; Gambini, Elisa; Gaetano, Carlo; Farsetti, Antonella; Pompilio, Giulio; Latini, Roberto; Capogrossi, Maurizio C.; Pesce, Maurizio

    2011-01-01

    Background Use of peripheral blood- or bone marrow-derived progenitors for ischemic heart repair is a feasible option to induce neo-vascularization in ischemic tissues. These cells, named Endothelial Progenitors Cells (EPCs), have been extensively characterized phenotypically and functionally. The clinical efficacy of cardiac repair by EPCs cells remains, however, limited, due to cell autonomous defects as a consequence of risk factors. The devise of “enhancement” strategies has been therefore sought to improve repair ability of these cells and increase the clinical benefit. Principal Findings Pharmacologic inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs) is known to enhance hematopoietic stem cells engraftment by improvement of self renewal and inhibition of differentiation in the presence of mitogenic stimuli in vitro. In the present study cord blood-derived CD34+ were pre-conditioned with the HDAC inhibitor Valproic Acid. This treatment affected stem cell growth and gene expression, and improved ischemic myocardium protection in an immunodeficient mouse model of myocardial infarction. Conclusions Our results show that HDAC blockade leads to phenotype changes in CD34+ cells with enhanced self renewal and cardioprotection. PMID:21789227

  5. Enhanced cytotoxic function of natural killer and CD3+CD56+ cells in cord blood after culture.

    PubMed

    Tomchuck, Suzanne L; Leung, Wing H; Dallas, Mari H

    2015-01-01

    Rate of immune reconstitution directly correlates with the number of hematopoietic stem cells infused and is particularly delayed in patients undergoing cord blood (CB) transplantation (CBT). Methods to increase the number of CB natural killer (NK) cells have the potential to improve immune reconstitution after CBT. NK cells are the first lymphocyte population to recover after hematopoietic stem cells transplantation and are central to preventing early relapse and infection. CB NK cells are low in number and are known to be incomplete in maturation and require activation for effective function. Here, we report a clinically relevant ex vivo expansion method that increases the number of activated CB NK cells. We report a multilog increase in NK cell number when CB mononuclear cells are cocultured with IL-2 and IL-15. Furthermore, NK cells expressing activating receptors and adhesion molecules responsible for cytotoxicity increased throughout culture, whereas inhibitory receptor expression remained low. Additionally, cytotoxic function against various malignancies was significantly enhanced in cultured NK cells but not CD3(+)CD56(+) cells. These data suggest that ex vivo expansion and activation of CB NK cells is a clinically feasible and relevant approach to prevent early infection and relapse after CBT.

  6. A Novel Molecular and Functional Stemness Signature Assessing Human Cord Blood-Derived Endothelial Progenitor Cell Immaturity

    PubMed Central

    Pascaud, Juliette; Driancourt, Catherine; Boyer-Di-Ponio, Julie; Uzan, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial Colony Forming Cells (ECFCs), a distinct population of Endothelial Progenitor Cells (EPCs) progeny, display phenotypic and functional characteristics of endothelial cells while retaining features of stem/progenitor cells. Cord blood-derived ECFCs (CB-ECFCs) have a high clonogenic and proliferative potentials and they can acquire different endothelial phenotypes, this requiring some plasticity. These properties provide angiogenic and vascular repair capabilities to CB-ECFCs for ischemic cell therapies. However, the degree of immaturity retained by EPCs is still confused and poorly defined. Consequently, to better characterize CB-ECFC stemness, we quantified their clonogenic potential and demonstrated that they were reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) more efficiently and rapidly than adult endothelial cells. Moreover, we analyzed the transcriptional profile of a broad gene panel known to be related to stem cells. We showed that, unlike mature endothelial cells, CB-ECFCs expressed genes involved in the maintenance of embryonic stem cell properties such as DNMT3B, GDF3 or SOX2. Thus, these results provide further evidence and tools to appreciate EPC-derived cell stemness. Moreover this novel stem cell transcriptional signature of ECFCs could help better characterizing and ranging EPCs according to their immaturity profile. PMID:27043207

  7. Interleukin-15 enhances the expansion and function of natural killer T cells from adult peripheral and umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Lin, Syh-Jae; Huang, Ying-Cheng; Cheng, Po-Jen; Lee, Pei-Tzu; Hsiao, Hsiu-Shan; Kuo, Ming-Ling

    2015-12-01

    Invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells) are innate-like non-conventional T cells restricted by the CD1d molecule that are unique in their ability to play a pivotal role in immune regulation. Deficient iNKT function has been reported in patients receiving umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation. We sought to determine the effect of interleukin (IL)-15 on α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer)-expanded iNKT cell function from UCB and adult peripheral blood (APB) mononuclear cells (MNCs). Fresh APB and UCB MNCs were cultured with IL-15 (50 ng/ml) in the presence or absence of α-GalCer (100 ng/ml) for 10 days. Cells were harvested for examination of cell yield, apoptosis, cytokine production and cytotoxic function of Vα24(+)/Vβ11(+) iNKT cells. We observed that α-GalCer-expanded APB and UCB iNKT cells and such expansion was further enhanced with IL-15. The percentage of CD3(+)CD56(+) NKT-like cells in both APB and UCB MNCs was increased with IL-15 but not with α-GalCer. Apoptosis of UCB iNKT cells was ameliorated by IL-15. Although APB and UCB iNKT cells secreted lower IFN-γ, it could be enhanced with IL-15. The expression of perforin in APB iNKT cells can also be enhanced with IL-15. UCB Vα24(+)Vβ11(+) iNKT cells further augmented K562 cytotoxicity mediated by IL-15. Taken together, these results demonstrated the relative functional deficiencies of α-GalCer induced UCB iNKT cells, which can be ameliorated by IL-15. Our findings suggest a therapeutic benefit of IL-15 immunotherapy during the post-UCB transplant period when iNKT function remains poor.

  8. Monocytes are Essential for the Neuroprotective Effect of Human Cord Blood Cells Following Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Womble, T. A.; Green, S.; Shahaduzzaman, M.; Grieco, J.; Sanberg, P. R.; Pennypacker, K. R.; Willing, A. E.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic administration of human umbilical cord blood (HUCB) mononuclear cells (MNC) following middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in the rat reduces infarct size and, more importantly, restores motor function. The HUCB cell preparation is composed of immature T-cells, B-cells, monocytes and stem cells. In this study we examined whether the beneficial effects of HUCB injection were attributable to one of these cell types. Male Sprague Dawley rats underwent permanent MCAO followed 48 hours later by intravenous administration of HUCB MNC preparations depleted of either CD14+ monocytes, CD133+ stem cells, CD2+ T-cells or CD19+ B cells. Motor function was measured prior to MCAO and 30 days post-stroke. When CD14+ monocytes were depleted from the HUCB MNC, activity and motor asymmetry were similar to the MCAO only treated animals. Monocyte depletion prevented HUCB cell treatment from reducing infarct size while monocyte enrichment was sufficient to reduce infarct size. Administration of monocyte-depleted HUCB cells did not suppress Iba1 labeling of microglia in the infarcted area relative to treatment with the whole HUCB preparation. These data demonstrate that the HUCB monocytes provide the majority of the efficacy in reducing infarct volume and promoting functional recovery. PMID:24472845

  9. [Increasing clinical applications of stem cells from umbilical cord blood and consequences for the handling of this biomaterial].

    PubMed

    Jacobs, V R; Schneider, K T M

    2009-04-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) of a newborn contains stem cells with a remarkably high differentiation and regeneration potential. They are therefore useful for application in regenerative medicine. In this review current clinical applications are summarised and the necessity for the storage of UCB stem cells is derived and discussed. A Medline search for publications regarding clinical application of UCB stem cells was carried out and other data bases were reviewed. The transplantation of UCB stem cells, a special class of adult stem cells, has not only been established successfully in a variety of haematoblastoses but could also improve the prognosis in diseases which are related to degeneration and/or injuries of body cells and organs. The current focus in worldwide research is tissue engineering of bioartificial heart valves and vessels as well as applications of UCB stem cells in acute myocardial infarction, diabetes mellitus type 1 and neurodegenerative diseases. In urology the first results regarding the successful application of UCB stem cells in incontinence have been published. This definite progress in adult stem cell research as well as in clinical application requires a more rational handling of the resource UCB stem cells. Personal strategies as well as governmental concepts for storage of UCB stem cells for personal precautions, for donation to others or for research, respectively, have to be developed. PMID:19319793

  10. Toll-like receptor 3 regulates cord blood-derived endothelial cell function in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Grelier, Aurore; Cras, Audrey; Balitrand, Nicole; Delmau, Catherine; Lecourt, Séverine; Lepelletier, Yves; Riesterer, Hélène; Freida, Delphine; Lataillade, Jean-Jacques; Lebousse-Kerdiles, Marie-Caroline; Cuccini, Wendy; Peffault de Latour, Regis; Marolleau, Jean-Pierre; Uzan, Georges; Larghero, Jérôme; Vanneaux, Valérie

    2013-10-01

    Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (cEPC) are capable of homing to neovascularisation sites, in which they proliferate and differentiate into endothelial cells. Transplantation of cEPC-derived cells, in particular those isolated from umbilical cord blood (UCB), has emerged as a promising approach in the treatment of cardio-vascular diseases. After in vivo transplantation, these cells may be exposed to local or systemic inflammation or pathogens, of which they are a common target. Because Toll-like receptors (TLR) are critical in detecting pathogens and in initiating inflammatory responses, we hypothesized that TLR may govern UCB cEPC-derived cells function. While these cells expressed almost all TLR, we found that only TLR3 dramatically impaired cell properties. TLR3 activation inhibited cell proliferation, modified cell cycle entry, impaired the in vitro angiogenic properties and induced pro-inflammatory cytokines production. The anti-angiogenic effect of TLR3 activation was confirmed in vivo in a hind-limb ischemic mice model. Moreover, TLR3 activation consistently leads to an upregulation of miR-29b, -146a and -155 and to a deregulation of cytoskeleton and cell cycle regulator. Hence, TLR3 activation is likely to be a key regulator of cEPC-derived cells properties.

  11. BK polyomavirus reactivation after reduced-intensity double umbilical cord blood cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Satyanarayana, Gowri; Hammond, Sarah P; Broge, Thomas A; Mackenzie, Matthew R; Viscidi, Raphael; Politikos, Ioannis; Koralnik, Igor J; Cutler, Corey S; Ballen, Karen; Boussiotis, Vassiliki; Marty, Francisco M; Tan, Chen Sabrina

    2015-03-01

    Serial serum samples from 27 patients who underwent double umbilical cord blood transplantation (dUCBT) were analyzed for BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) DNA by real-time PCR and BKPyV-specific immune globulin by ELISA. Clinical data were collected on all patients. All pre-transplant sera had detectable anti-BKPyV IgG. Fifteen patients (56%) had detectable serum BKPyV DNA (median 8.9 × 10(4) copies/ml; range 4.1 × 10(3)-7.9 × 10(6) copies/ml) a median of 40 days (range, 27-733 days) after dUCBT, with highest viral loads on Day 100 assessment. The cumulative probability of developing BKPyV viremia by Day 100 was 0.52 (95% CI, 0.33-0.71). Six of 15 patients with BKPyV viremia experienced hemorrhagic cystitis by Day 100. By Day 100, there was a trend towards higher BKPyV viral loads in sera of patients with hemorrhagic cystitis than in those BKPyV viremic patients without hemorrhagic cystitis (p = 0.06). BKPyV viremia was associated with significantly higher anti-BKPyV IgM values at 6 months post-dUCBT (P = 0.003). BKPyV viremia occurs early after dUBCT and is associated with a detectable humoral immune response by 6 months post-dUBCT.

  12. Cord blood mesenchymal stem cells propel human dendritic cells to an intermediate maturation state and boost interleukin-12 production by mature dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    van den Berk, Lieke C J; Roelofs, Helene; Huijs, Tonnie; Siebers-Vermeulen, Kim G C; Raymakers, Reinier A; Kögler, Gesine; Figdor, Carl G; Torensma, Ruurd

    2009-12-01

    Pathogen-derived entities force the tissue-resident dendritic cells (DCs) towards a mature state, followed by migration to the draining lymph node to present antigens to T cells. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) modulate the differentiation, maturation and function of DCs. In umbilical cord blood an immature MSC population was identified. Remarkably, these immature stem cells modulated DCs in a different way. Marker expression was unchanged during the differentiation of monocytes towards immature DCs (iDCs) when cocultured with cord blood MSC [unrestricted somatic stem cells (USSCs)]. The maturation to mature DCs (mDCs) was enhanced when DCs were co-cultured with USSC, as evidenced by the up-regulation of costimulatory molecules. Endocytosis of dextran by iDCs was hampered in the presence of USSCs, which is indicative for the maturation of iDCs. Despite this maturation, the migration of iDCs cocultured with USSCs appeared to be identical to iDCs cultured alone. However, USSCs increased the migration of mDCs towards CCL21 and boosted interleukin-12 production. So, USSCs mature iDCs, thereby redirecting the antigen-uptake phenotype towards a mature phenotype. Furthermore, DC maturation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or USSCs reflects two distinct pathways because migration was unaffected when iDCs were matured by coculture with USSCs, while it was strongly enhanced in the presence of LPS. DCs are able to discriminate the different MSC subtypes, resulting in diverse differentiation programmes.

  13. Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mononuclear Cells Exhibit Pericyte-Like Phenotype and Support Network Formation of Endothelial Progenitor Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Erica B.; Liu, Betty; Christoforou, Nicolas; West, Jennifer L.; Truskey, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood represents a promising cell source for pro-angiogenic therapies. The present study examined the potential of mononuclear cells (MNCs) from umbilical cord blood to support endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) microvessel formation. MNCs were isolated from the cord blood of 20 separate donors and selected for further characterization based upon their proliferation potential and morphological resemblance to human vascular pericytes (HVPs). MNCs were screened for their ability to support EPC network formation using an in vitro assay (Matrigel™) as well as a reductionist, coculture system consisting of no additional angiogenic cytokines beyond those present in serum. In less than 15% of the isolations, we identified a population of highly proliferative MNCs that phenotypically resembled HVPs as assessed by expression of PDGFR-β, NG2, α-SMA, and ephrin-B2. Within a Matrigel™ system, MNCs demonstrated pericyte-like function through colocalization to EPC networks and similar effects as HVPs upon total EPC tubule length (p = 0.95) and number of branch points (p = 0.93). In a reductionist coculture system, MNCs served as pro-angiogenic mural cells by supporting EPC network formation to a significantly greater extent than HVP cocultures, by day 14 of coculture, as evidenced through EPC total tubule length (p <0.0001) and number of branch points (p < 0.0001). Our findings are significant as we demonstrate mural cell progenitors can be isolated from umbilical cord blood and develop culture conditions to support their use in microvascular tissue engineering applications. PMID:25777295

  14. UPDATE ON UMBILICAL CORD BLOOD TRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Kurtzberg, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of Review 2008 marks the 20th anniversary of the first use of umbilical cord blood (UCB) as a source of donor cells for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In those early days, there was great doubt and skepticism about the utility of UCB as a source of hematopoietic stem cells. Doubts about whether UCB, containing 10-20x fewer cells than bone marrow, had sufficient cells to durably engraft a myeloablated patient and, after demonstration that engraftment occurred with less graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), whether it would confer graft versus leukemia (GvL) activity were raised. Recent Findings Transplantation with UCB is effective in the treatment of children with hematological malignancies, marrow failure, immunodeficiencies, hemoglobinopathies and inherited metabolic diseases. Transplantation without full HLA matching is possible and despite a lower incidence of GvHD, GvL is preserved. The number of cells in a single UCB can be limiting, but the use of 2 UCBs for a single transplant shows promise to overcome this obstacle. Summary Cord blood transplantation is now an established field with enormous potential. UCB increases access to transplantation therapy for many patients unable to indentify a fully matched adult donor. In the future, it may emerge as a source of cells for cellular therapies focused on tissue repair and regeneration. PMID:19253461

  15. Stem cells from umbilical cord blood do have myogenic potential, with and without differentiation induction in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Jazedje, Tatiana; Secco, Mariane; Vieira, Natássia M; Zucconi, Eder; Gollop, Thomaz R; Vainzof, Mariz; Zatz, Mayana

    2009-01-01

    The dystrophin gene, located at Xp21, codifies dystrophin, which is part of a protein complex responsible for the membrane stability of muscle cells. Its absence on muscle causes Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), a severe disorder, while a defect of muscle dystrophin causes Becker Muscular Dystrophy (DMB), a milder disease. The replacement of the defective muscle through stem cells transplantation is a possible future treatment for these patients. Our objective was to analyze the potential of CD34+ stem cells from umbilical cord blood to differentiate in muscle cells and express dystrophin, in vitro. Protein expression was analyzed by Immunofluorescence, Western Blotting (WB) and Reverse Transcriptase – Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR). CD34+ stem cells and myoblasts from a DMD affected patient started to fuse with muscle cells immediately after co-cultures establishment. Differentiation in mature myotubes was observed after 15 days and dystrophin-positive regions were detected through Immunofluorescence analysis. However, WB or RT-PCR analysis did not detect the presence of normal dystrophin in co-cultures of CD34+ and DMD or DMB affected patients' muscle cells. In contrast, some CD34+ stem cells differentiated in dystrophin producers' muscle cells, what was observed by WB, reinforcing that this progenitor cell has the potential to originate muscle dystrophin in vitro, and not just in vivo like reported before. PMID:19144182

  16. Effects of intravenous administration of umbilical cord blood CD34(+) cells in a mouse model of neonatal stroke.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, M; Taguchi, A; Ohshima, M; Kasahara, Y; Sato, Y; Tsuda, H; Otani, K; Yamahara, K; Ihara, M; Harada-Shiba, M; Ikeda, T; Matsuyama, T

    2014-03-28

    Neonatal stroke occurs in approximately 1/4000 live births and results in life-long neurological impairments: e.g., cerebral palsy. Currently, there is no evidence-based specific treatment for neonates with stroke. Several studies have reported the benefits of umbilical cord blood (UCB) cell treatment in rodent models of neonatal brain injury. However, all of the studies examined the effects of administering either the UCB mononuclear cell fraction or UCB-derived mesenchymal stem cells in neonatal rat models. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of human UCB CD34(+) cells (hematopoietic stem cell/endothelial progenitor cells) in a mouse model of neonatal stroke, which we recently developed. On postnatal day 12, immunocompromized (SCID) mice underwent permanent occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery (MCAO). Forty-eight hours after MCAO, human UCB CD34(+) cells (1×10(5)cells) were injected intravenously into the mice. The area in which cerebral blood flow (CBF) was maintained was temporarily larger in the cell-treated group than in the phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-treated group at 24h after treatment. With cell treatment, the percent loss of ipsilateral hemispheric volume was significantly ameliorated (21.5±1.9%) compared with the PBS group (25.6±5.1%) when assessed at 7weeks after MCAO. The cell-treated group did not exhibit significant differences from the PBS group in either rotarod (238±46s in the sham-surgery group, 175±49s in the PBS group, 203±54s in the cell-treated group) or open-field tests. The intravenous administration of human UCB CD34(+) cells modestly reduced histological ischemic brain damage after neonatal stroke in mice, with a transient augmentation of CBF in the peri-infarct area. PMID:24444827

  17. Valproic acid affects the engraftment of TPO-expanded cord blood cells in NOD/SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Vulcano, Francesca; Milazzo, Luisa; Ciccarelli, Carmela; Barca, Alessandra; Agostini, Francesca; Altieri, Ilaria; Macioce, Giampiero; Di Virgilio, Antonio; Screnci, Maria; De Felice, Lidia; Giampaolo, Adele; Hassan, Hamisa Jane

    2012-02-15

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) can improve the long-term outcome of transplanted individuals and reduce the relapse rate. Valproic acid (VPA), an inhibitor of histone deacetylase, when combined with different cytokine cocktails, induces the expansion of CD34+ cell populations derived from cord blood (CB) and other sources. We evaluated the effect of VPA, in combination with thrombopoietin (TPO), on the viability and expansion of CB-HSPCs and on short- and long-term engraftability in the NOD/SCID mouse model. In vitro, VPA+TPO inhibited HSPC differentiation and preserved the CD34+ cell fraction; the self-renewal of the CD34+ TPO+VPA-treated cells was suggested by the increased replating efficiency. In vivo, short- and long-term engraftment was determined after 6 and 20 weeks. After 6 weeks, the median chimerism percentage was 13.0% in mice transplanted with TPO-treated cells and only 1.4% in those transplanted with TPO+VPA-treated cells. By contrast, after 20 weeks, the engraftment induced by the TPO+VPA-treated cells was three times more effective than that induced by TPO alone, and over ten times more effective compared to the short-term engraftment induced by the TPO+VPA-treated cells. The in vivo results are consistent with the higher secondary plating efficiency of the TPO+VPA-treated cells in vitro. PMID:22166516

  18. Pharmacological preconditioning for short-term ex vivo expansion of human umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells by filgrastim

    PubMed Central

    Grigoriadis, Nikolaos G; Grigoriadis, Ioannis G; Markoula, Sofia; Paschopoulos, Minas; Zikopoulos, Konstantinos; Apostolakopoulos, Panagiotis Gr; Vizirianakis, Ioannis S; Georgiou, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Although umbilical cord blood (UCB) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (UCBT) has emerged as a promising haematological reconstitution therapy for leukemias and other related disorders, the insufficient UCB stem cell dosage still hinders better clinical outcomes. Previous research efforts, by focusing on ex vivo UCB expansion capabilities have sought to benefit from well-known mechanisms of self-renewal characteristics of UCB stem cells. However, the long-term (> 21 days) in vitro culture period and the low neutrophil recovery significantly reduce the transplantability of such ex vivo expanded UCB stem cells. To overcome the latter hurdles in this study, a post-thaw, short-term ex vivo expansion methodology of UCB mononuclear (UCB-MN) and CD34+ cells has been established. Notably, such effort was achieved through pharmacological preconditioned of UCB cultures by filgrastim agent already used in the clinical setting. In crucial cell populations implicated in the promotion of functional engraftment, the progression of free survival rates (PFS), a marked increase of 6.65 to 9.34 fold for UCB-MN and 35 to 49 fold for CD34+ cells has been noticed. Overall, these results indicate that transplantation of pharmacologically-preconditioned ex vivo expansion of UCB stem and progenitor cells keep high promise upon transplantation to enhance therapeutic potential in everyday clinical practice. PMID:27335700

  19. Development of a Xeno-Free Autologous Culture System for Endothelial Progenitor Cells Derived from Human Umbilical Cord Blood

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soon-Jung; Kim, Hojin; Bae, Daekyeong

    2013-01-01

    Despite promising preclinical outcomes in animal models, a number of challenges remain for human clinical use. In particular, expanding a large number of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in vitro in the absence of animal-derived products is the most critical hurdle remaining to be overcome to ensure the safety and efficiency of human therapy. To develop in vitro culture conditions for EPCs derived from human cord blood (hCB-EPCs), we isolated extracts (UCE) and collagen (UC-collagen) from umbilical cord tissue to replace their animal-derived counterparts. UC-collagen and UCE efficiently supported the attachment and proliferation of hCB-EPCs in a manner comparable to that of animal-derived collagen in the conventional culture system. Our developed autologous culture system maintained the typical characteristics of hCB-EPCs, as represented by the expression of EPC-associated surface markers. In addition, the therapeutic potential of hCB-EPCs was confirmed when the transplantation of hCB-EPCs cultured in this autologous culture system promoted limb salvage in a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia and was shown to contribute to attenuating muscle degeneration and fibrosis. We suggest that the umbilical cord represents a source for autologous biomaterials for the in vitro culture of hCB-EPCs. The main characteristics and therapeutic potential of hCB-EPCs were not compromised in developed autologous culture system. The absence of animal-derived products in our newly developed in vitro culture removes concerns associated with secondary contamination. Thus, we hope that this culture system accelerates the realization of therapeutic applications of autologous hCB-EPCs for human vascular diseases. PMID:24086472

  20. Effect of cord blood processing on transplantation outcomes after single myeloablative umbilical cord blood transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ballen, Karen K; Logan, Brent R; Laughlin, Mary J; He, Wensheng; Ambruso, Daniel R; Armitage, Susan E; Beddard, Rachel L; Bhatla, Deepika; Hwang, William Y K; Kiss, Joseph E; Koegler, Gesine; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Nagler, Arnon; Oh, David; Petz, Lawrence D; Price, Thomas H; Quinones, Ralph R; Ratanatharathorn, Voravit; Rizzo, J Douglas; Sazama, Kathleen; Scaradavou, Andromachi; Schuster, Michael W; Sender, Leonard S; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Spellman, Stephen R; Sutton, Millicent; Weitekamp, Lee Ann; Wingard, John R; Eapen, Mary

    2015-04-01

    Variations in cord blood manufacturing and administration are common, and the optimal practice is not known. We compared processing and banking practices at 16 public cord blood banks (CBB) in the United States and assessed transplantation outcomes on 530 single umbilical cord blood (UCB) myeloablative transplantations for hematologic malignancies facilitated by these banks. UCB banking practices were separated into 3 mutually exclusive groups based on whether processing was automated or manual, units were plasma and red blood cell reduced, or buffy coat production method or plasma reduced. Compared with the automated processing system for units, the day 28 neutrophil recovery was significantly lower after transplantation of units that were manually processed and plasma reduced (red cell replete) (odds ratio, .19; P = .001) or plasma and red cell reduced (odds ratio, .54; P = .05). Day 100 survival did not differ by CBB. However, day 100 survival was better with units that were thawed with the dextran-albumin wash method compared with the "no wash" or "dilution only" techniques (odds ratio, 1.82; P = .04). In conclusion, CBB processing has no significant effect on early (day 100) survival despite differences in kinetics of neutrophil recovery. PMID:25543094

  1. Effect of Cord Blood Processing on Transplant Outcomes after Single Myeloablative Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ballen, Karen K.; Logan, Brent R.; Laughlin, Mary J.; He, Wensheng; Ambruso, Daniel R.; Armitage, Susan E.; Beddard, Rachel L.; Bhatla, Deepika; Hwang, William Y.K.; Kiss, Joseph E.; Koegler, Gesine; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Nagler, Arnon; Oh, David; Petz, Lawrence D.; Price, Thomas H.; Quinones, Ralph R.; Ratanatharathorn, Voravit; Rizzo, J. Douglas; Sazama, Kathleen; Scaradavou, Andromachi; Schuster, Michael W.; Sender, Leonard S.; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Spellman, Stephen R.; Sutton, Millicent; Weitekamp, Lee Ann; Wingard, John R.; Eapen, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Variations in cord blood manufacturing and administration are common, and the optimal practice, not known. We compared processing and banking practices at 16 public cord blood banks (CBB) in the United States, and assessed transplant outcomes on 530 single umbilical cord blood (UCB) myeloablative transplantations for hematologic malignancies, facilitated by these banks. UCB banking practices were separated into three mutually exclusive groups based on whether processing was automated or manual; units were plasma and red blood cell reduced or buffy coat production method or plasma reduced. Compared to the automated processing system for units, the day-28 neutrophil recovery was significantly lower after transplantation of units that were manually processed and plasma reduced (red cell replete) (odds ratio [OR] 0.19 p=0.001) or plasma and red cell reduced (OR 0.54, p=0.05). Day-100 survival did not differ by CBB. However, day-100 survival was better with units that were thawed with the dextran-albumin wash method compared to the “no wash” or “dilution only” techniques (OR 1.82, p=0.04). In conclusion, CBB processing has no significant effect on early (day 100) survival despite differences in kinetics of neutrophil recovery. PMID:25543094

  2. Umbilical cord cell banking-implications for the future

    SciTech Connect

    Gunning, Jennifer . E-mail: gunning@cf.ac.uk

    2005-09-01

    The first successful cord cell transplant to a sibling with Fanconi's anaemia took place 15 years ago. This proven utility of cord blood led to the establishment of cord blood banks both private and public and there are now nearly 100 cord blood banks worldwide. It is estimated that over 200,000 cord blood units (CBU) are held by the private sector and over 160,000 CBU are registered with the largest public cord blood registry. There is a tension between private cord blood banks, which store CBU for autologous or family use, and public banks, which store CBU for unrelated use and the ethics of private cord blood storage has been questioned. But more general ethical questions also arise regarding ownership, consent, confidentiality, costs and quality standards and patenting. In looking at these ethical issues one also needs to look at potential future use of cord blood stem cells. Up until now cord cells have principally been used in the treatment of paediatric blood and immune disorders. Improvements in cell expansion technology will make CBU more appropriate also for treating adults with such disorders. However, it has also been demonstrated that cord blood stem cells have the capacity to differentiate into other types of cells, neuronal, bone, epithelial and muscle which would have a future role to play in cell therapy and regenerative medicine.

  3. MicroRNAs as markers for neurally committed CD133+/CD34+ stem cells derived from human umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Hafizi, Maryam; Atashi, Amir; Bakhshandeh, Behnaz; Kabiri, Mahboubeh; Nadri, Samad; Hosseini, Reza Haji; Soleimani, Masoud

    2013-04-01

    Neural differentiation of the CD133+/CD34+ subpopulation of human umbilical cord blood stem cells was investigated, and neuro-miR (mir-9 and mir-124) expression was examined. An efficient induction protocol for neural differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells together with the exclusion of retinoic acid in this process was also studied. Transcription of some neural markers such as microtubule-associated protein-2, beta-tubulin III, and neuron-specific enolase was evaluated by real-time PCR, immunocytochemistry, and western blotting. Increased expression of neural indicators in the treated cells confirmed the appropriate neural differentiation, which supported the high efficiency of our defined neuronal induction protocol. Verified high expression of neuro-miRNAs along with neuronal specific proteins not only strengthens the regulatory role of miRNAs in determining stem cell fate but also introduces these miRNAs as novel indicators of neural differentiation. These data highlight the prominent therapeutic potential of hematopoietic stem cells for use in cell therapy of neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Plasma Derived From Human Umbilical Cord Blood Modulates Mitogen-Induced Proliferation of Mononuclear Cells Isolated From the Peripheral Blood of ALS Patients.

    PubMed

    Eve, David J; Ehrhart, Jared; Zesiewicz, Theresa; Jahan, Israt; Kuzmin-Nichols, Nicole; Sanberg, Cyndy Davis; Gooch, Clifton; Sanberg, Paul R; Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by degeneration of motor neurons in the spinal cord and brain. This disease clinically manifests as gradual muscular weakness and atrophy leading to paralysis and death by respiratory failure. While multiple interdependent factors may contribute to the pathogenesis of ALS, increasing evidence shows the possible presence of autoimmune mechanisms that promote disease progression. The potential use of plasma derived from human umbilical cord blood (hUCB) as a therapeutic tool is currently in its infancy. The hUCB plasma is rich in cytokines and growth factors that are required for growth and survival of cells during hematopoiesis. In this study, we investigated the effects of hUCB plasma on the mitogen-induced proliferation of mononuclear cells (MNCs) isolated from the peripheral blood of ALS patients and apoptotic activity by detection of caspase 3/7 expression of the isolated MNCs in vitro. Three distinct responses to phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced proliferation of MNCs were observed, which were independent of age, disease duration, and the ALS rating scale: Group I responded normally to PHA, Group II showed no response to PHA, while Group III showed a hyperactive response to PHA. hUCB plasma attenuated the hyperactive response (Group III) and potentiated the normal response in Group I ALS patients, but did not alter that of the nonresponders to PHA (Group II). The elevated activity of caspase 3/7 observed in the MNCs from ALS patients was significantly reduced by hUCB plasma treatment. Thus, study results showing different cell responses to mitogen suggest alteration in lymphocyte functionality in ALS patients that may be a sign of immune deficiency in the nonresponders and autoimmunity alterations in the hyperactive responders. The ability of hUCB plasma to modulate the mitogen cell response and reduce caspase activity suggests that the use of hUCB plasma alone, or with

  5. Umbilical cord blood for unrelated bone marrow replacement; Asia bank and Japan cord blood bank network update.

    PubMed

    Mugishima, Hideo; Takahashi, Tuneo; Nagamura, Tokiko; Asano, Sigetaka; Saito, Hidehiko

    2002-08-01

    Cord blood offers many advantages including a high concentration of hematopoietic stem cells, a large number of potential donors, and ease of harvest. Furthermore, since there is no risk for either the mother or baby, few people refuse to donate. There is thought to be a low risk for virus contamination and also probably a low incidence and severity of GVHD. Cord blood can be obtained quickly without the assistance of a coordinator and one or 2 locus-mismatched HLA is usually acceptable. In Japan, there are 10 cord blood banks supported by the government. Between 1996 and June 2002, 9,500 units were registered with the Japan cord blood bank network (JCBBN). 630 units were delivered and most of these were transplanted. The status of registered cord blood units worldwide is shown. 59,081 units have been registered by NETCORD. The Japan cord blood bank network accounts for 13% of these units. I will discuss the Tokyo cord blood tank (TCBB). The bank at Tokyo, to which we belong, is one of the largest banks in Japan. We helped to establish Asia CORD in 2000 and have held annual conferences and meetings in Tokyo to exchange information. So far, China, Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, Viet Nam and Japan have participated. We accepted three trainees from the Ho Chi Minh City Blood Transfusion and Hematology Center for training in cord blood transplantation in May 2001. In January 2002, a patient with ALL received cord blood and was successfully engrafted at Ho Chi Minh City Blood Transfusion and Hematology Center. We present here the clinical outcome of these patients through Tokyo cord blood bank and Japan cord blood bank network. First, the number of CB units stored and registered at JCBBN and TCBB has increased rapidly over the past two years. Second, the survival rate of acute leukemia patients in release was significantly lower than that in patients in CR. Third, the engraftment rate in patients with metabolic disease (50%) was lower than that in patients with leukemia

  6. Hypoxia/hypercapnia-induced adaptation maintains functional capacity of cord blood stem and progenitor cells at 4°C.

    PubMed

    Vlaski, Marija; Negroni, Luc; Kovacevic-Filipovic, Milica; Guibert, Christelle; Brunet de la Grange, Philippe; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Chevaleyre, Jean; Duchez, Pascale; Lafarge, Xavier; Praloran, Vincent; Schmitter, Jean-Marie; Ivanovic, Zoran

    2014-12-01

    We analyzed the effect of exposure to hypoxic/hypercapnic (HH) gas mixture (5% O2 /9% CO2 ) on the maintenance of functional cord blood CD34(+) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in severe hypothermia (4°C) employing the physiological and proteomic approaches. Ten-day exposure to HH maintained the Day 0 (D-0) level of hematopoietic stem cells as detected in vivo on the basis of hematopoietic repopulation of immunodeficient mice-short-term scid repopulating cells (SRC). Conversely, in the atmospheric air (20% O2 /0.05% CO2 ), usual condition used for cell storage at 4°C, stem cell activity was significantly decreased. Also, HH doubled the survival of CD34(+) cells and committed progenitors (CFCs) with respect to the atmospheric air (60% vs. 30%, respectively). Improved cell maintenance in HH was associated with higher proportion of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) positive cells. Cell-protective effects are associated with an improved maintenance of the plasma and mitochondrial membrane potential and with a conversion to the glycolytic energetic state. We also showed that HH decreased apoptosis, despite a sustained ROS production and a drop of ATP amount per viable cell. The proteomic study revealed that the global protein content was better preserved in HH. This analysis identified: (i) proteins sensitive or insensitive to hypothermia irrespective of the gas phase, and (ii) proteins related to the HH cell-protective effect. Among them are some protein families known to be implicated in the prolonged survival of hibernating animals in hypothermia. These findings suggest a way to optimize short-term cell conservation without freezing.

  7. Multipotent human stromal cells isolated from cord blood, term placenta and adult bone marrow show distinct differences in gene expression pattern.

    PubMed

    Matigian, Nicholas; Brooke, Gary; Zaibak, Faten; Rossetti, Tony; Kollar, Katarina; Pelekanos, Rebecca; Heazlewood, Celena; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Wells, Christine A; Atkinson, Kerry

    2015-03-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells derived from human placenta (pMSCs), and unrestricted somatic stem cells (USSCs) derived from cord blood share many properties with human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (bmMSCs) and are currently in clinical trials for a wide range of clinical settings. Here we present gene expression profiles of human cord blood-derived unrestricted somatic stem cells (USSCs), human placental-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hpMSCs), and human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (bmMSCs), all derived from four different donors. The microarray data are available on the ArrayExpress database (www.ebi.ac.uk/arrayexpress) under accession number E-TABM-880. Additionally, the data has been integrated into a public portal, www.stemformatics.org. Our data provide a resource for understanding the differences in MSCs derived from different tissues. PMID:26484151

  8. Multipotent human stromal cells isolated from cord blood, term placenta and adult bone marrow show distinct differences in gene expression pattern

    PubMed Central

    Matigian, Nicholas; Brooke, Gary; Zaibak, Faten; Rossetti, Tony; Kollar, Katarina; Pelekanos, Rebecca; Heazlewood, Celena; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Wells, Christine A.; Atkinson, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells derived from human placenta (pMSCs), and unrestricted somatic stem cells (USSCs) derived from cord blood share many properties with human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (bmMSCs) and are currently in clinical trials for a wide range of clinical settings. Here we present gene expression profiles of human cord blood-derived unrestricted somatic stem cells (USSCs), human placental-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hpMSCs), and human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (bmMSCs), all derived from four different donors. The microarray data are available on the ArrayExpress database (www.ebi.ac.uk/arrayexpress) under accession number E-TABM-880. Additionally, the data has been integrated into a public portal, www.stemformatics.org. Our data provide a resource for understanding the differences in MSCs derived from different tissues. PMID:26484151

  9. Regulation of human umbilical cord blood-derived multi-potent stem cells by autogenic osteoclast-based niche-like structure

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Bo; Jeong, Yun-Hyeok; Jung, Ji-Won; Seo, Kwangwon; Lee, Yong-Soon ||; Kang, Kyung-Sun ||. E-mail: kangpub@snu.ac.kr

    2007-05-25

    Stem cell niches provide the micro-environment for the development of stem cells. Under our culturing regimen, a kind of osteoclast-centralized structure supports the proliferation of MSCs, derived from human cord blood, once they reside on osteoclasts. MSCs in this structure expressed Oct4 which is a marker of embryonic stem cells. Floating daughter cells of MSCs colony showed abilities to differentiate into osteocyte, adipocyte, and neuronal progenitor cells. Compared with the easy senescence of MSCs without this niche-like structure in vitro, these results suggested that osteoclasts might play an important role the development and maintenance of Umbilical cord blood (UCB)-derived MSCs and might provide a means to expand UCB-MSCs in vitro, more easily, through a stem cell niche-like structure.

  10. Development of a district Cord Blood Bank: a model for cord blood banking in the National Health Service.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, C; Buchanan, R; Webster, J; Laundy, V; Horsley, H; Barron, C; Anderson, N; Bradley, B; Hows, J

    2000-04-01

    The Bristol Cord Blood Bank was established as a pilot project within existing health services to establish cost-effective recruitment, collection and processing suitable for use in the NHS should cord blood become a routine source of haemopoietic stem cells for transplantation in the UK. An important aim of the project was to evaluate the feasibility of establishing a midwifery-based collection network, thus utilising expertise already in place. Collection was performed on the delivery suite immediately after the placenta was delivered. The clinical experience of the midwife collector/counsellors allowed rapid pre-collection assessment of the condition of the cord and placenta. This prevented collection attempts from diseased or otherwise damaged placentas, leading to conservation of resources by preventing collection of most small volume donations. The bank was established within the National Blood Service, Bristol Centre to achieve Good Manufacturing Practice standards and ensure that processing was subject to the same stringency required for other sources of haemopoietic stem cells. Cord blood is an expensive resource. By utilising existing expertise in district Obstetric and National Blood Services, the Bristol Cord Blood Bank may serve as a model for health economic evaluation of cord blood banking of volunteer donations within the NHS. PMID:10808213

  11. Development of a district Cord Blood Bank: a model for cord blood banking in the National Health Service.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, C; Buchanan, R; Webster, J; Laundy, V; Horsley, H; Barron, C; Anderson, N; Bradley, B; Hows, J

    2000-04-01

    The Bristol Cord Blood Bank was established as a pilot project within existing health services to establish cost-effective recruitment, collection and processing suitable for use in the NHS should cord blood become a routine source of haemopoietic stem cells for transplantation in the UK. An important aim of the project was to evaluate the feasibility of establishing a midwifery-based collection network, thus utilising expertise already in place. Collection was performed on the delivery suite immediately after the placenta was delivered. The clinical experience of the midwife collector/counsellors allowed rapid pre-collection assessment of the condition of the cord and placenta. This prevented collection attempts from diseased or otherwise damaged placentas, leading to conservation of resources by preventing collection of most small volume donations. The bank was established within the National Blood Service, Bristol Centre to achieve Good Manufacturing Practice standards and ensure that processing was subject to the same stringency required for other sources of haemopoietic stem cells. Cord blood is an expensive resource. By utilising existing expertise in district Obstetric and National Blood Services, the Bristol Cord Blood Bank may serve as a model for health economic evaluation of cord blood banking of volunteer donations within the NHS.

  12. [Effect of different cytokine combinations on the expression of CD49d and CXCR4 and ex vivo expansion of umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells].

    PubMed

    Mao, Ping; Xu, Li; Mo, Wen-Jian; Yin, Yi; Xu, Yan-Li; Lin, Xiu-Mei

    2006-04-01

    This study was purposed to explore the effect of different cytokine combinations on the expansion of the mononuclear cells drived from umbilical cord blood (CB) ex vivo and expression of CXCR4 and CD49d on CD34+ cells after expansion. Human fresh CB mononuclear cells were cultured in serum-free and stroma-free medium containing different combinations of cytokine for 7 days. At day o and 7, the total cells were counted, CD34+ cells and CD34+CXCR4+, CD34+CD49d+ cells were assayed by flow cytometry, and CFU were determined. According to the different combinations of cytokine, experiments were divided into four groups: control, SF group (SCF + FL), SFT group (SCF + FL + TPO) and SFT6 group (SCF + FL + TPO + IL-6). The results showed that the SF (SF group) combination supported only low expansion of total cells, CD34+ cells and CFU. The addition of TPO in SF group restored UCB stem/progenitors expansion to a higher level than that in SF group, while there was no difference between groups SFT and SFT6 (P > 0.05). The cytokine combinations in groups SF, SFT and SFT6 all could upregulate the expression levels of CD49d and CXCR4 on expanded cord blood CD34+ cells, but there were no significant differences between groups SF, SFT and SFT6 (P > 0.05). It is concluded that SCF + FL has no strong synergistic effects on primitive hematopoietic cells. TPO plays an important role in enhancing expansion of umbilical cord blood hematopoietic cells, while IL-6 only shows a neutral effect on it. SCF + FL + TPO combination not only promotes progenitor cells expansion but also upregulates the expression of CD49d and CXCR4 on CD34+ cells from cord blood.

  13. Effects of Intravenous Administration of Human Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cells in 3-Acetylpyridine-Lesioned Rats

    PubMed Central

    Calatrava-Ferreras, Lucía; Gonzalo-Gobernado, Rafael; Herranz, Antonio S.; Reimers, Diana; Montero Vega, Teresa; Jiménez-Escrig, Adriano; Richart López, Luis Alberto; Bazán, Eulalia

    2012-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxias include a heterogeneous group of infrequent diseases characterized by lack of motor coordination caused by disturbances in the cerebellum and its associated circuits. Current therapies are based on the use of drugs that correct some of the molecular processes involved in their pathogenesis. Although these treatments yielded promising results, there is not yet an effective therapy for these diseases. Cell replacement strategies using human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (HuUCBMCs) have emerged as a promising approach for restoration of function in neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of this work was to investigate the potential therapeutic activity of HuUCBMCs in the 3-acetylpyridine (3-AP) rat model of cerebellar ataxia. Intravenous administered HuUCBMCs reached the cerebellum and brain stem of 3-AP ataxic rats. Grafted cells reduced 3-AP-induced neuronal loss promoted the activation of microglia in the brain stem, and prevented the overexpression of GFAP elicited by 3-AP in the cerebellum. In addition, HuUCBMCs upregulated the expression of proteins that are critical for cell survival, such as phospho-Akt and Bcl-2, in the cerebellum and brain stem of 3-AP ataxic rats. As all these effects were accompanied by a temporal but significant improvement in motor coordination, HuUCBMCs grafts can be considered as an effective cell replacement therapy for cerebellar disorders. PMID:23150735

  14. Osteoblasts secrete miRNA-containing extracellular vesicles that enhance expansion of human umbilical cord blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Morhayim, Jess; van de Peppel, Jeroen; Braakman, Eric; Rombouts, Elwin W. J. C.; ter Borg, Mariette N. D.; Dudakovic, Amel; Chiba, Hideki; van der Eerden, Bram C. J.; Raaijmakers, Marc H.; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Cornelissen, Jan J.; van Leeuwen, Johannes P.

    2016-01-01

    Osteolineage cells represent one of the critical bone marrow niche components that support maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). Recent studies demonstrate that extracellular vesicles (EVs) regulate stem cell development via horizontal transfer of bioactive cargo, including microRNAs (miRNAs). Using next-generation sequencing we show that human osteoblast-derived EVs contain highly abundant miRNAs specifically enriched in EVs, including critical regulators of hematopoietic proliferation (e.g., miR-29a). EV treatment of human umbilical cord blood-derived CD34+ HSPCs alters the expression of candidate miRNA targets, such as HBP1, BCL2 and PTEN. Furthermore, EVs enhance proliferation of CD34+ cells and their immature subsets in growth factor-driven ex vivo expansion cultures. Importantly, EV-expanded cells retain their differentiation capacity in vitro and successfully engraft in vivo. These discoveries reveal a novel osteoblast-derived EV-mediated mechanism for regulation of HSPC proliferation and warrant consideration of EV-miRNAs for the development of expansion strategies to treat hematological disorders. PMID:27585950

  15. Study on osteoblast like behavior of umbilical cord blood cells on various combinations of PLGA scaffolds prepared by salt fusion.

    PubMed

    Mekala, Naveen Kumar; Baadhe, Rama Raju; Parcha, Sreenivasa Rao

    2013-05-01

    The osteogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from umbilical cord blood (UCB) on porous poly lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) scaffolds have been reported to differentially support osteogenic differentiation based on polymer composition (80:20, 75:25 and 70:30 percent of PLA: PGA, respectively). Along with polymer composition; fused NaCl crystal matrix prior to solvent casting improves the porosity and pore interconnectivity in 3D scaffolds, which has significant impact on cell proliferation. FTIR and XRD studies of PLGA scaffolds also verified the intermolecular interactions, phase distribution and crystallinity in scaffolds. Among three scaffold combinations, sample B (75:25) has showed maximum porosity with optimum water uptake/retention abilities. Impact of polymer composition and porosity on cell proliferation was investigated through MTT assay, where sample B was observed to be supporting better cell proliferation,due to its internal structure. The above results were further confirmed by ALP and Col-I gene expression studies using RT-PCR. Immuno fluorescent studies also revealed the extracellular filamentous actin organization over the scaffolds, where cell adhesion and proliferation was found to be higher with increase in PGA content, which is a hydrophilic polymer. PMID:23317433

  16. Osteoblasts secrete miRNA-containing extracellular vesicles that enhance expansion of human umbilical cord blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morhayim, Jess; van de Peppel, Jeroen; Braakman, Eric; Rombouts, Elwin W. J. C.; Ter Borg, Mariette N. D.; Dudakovic, Amel; Chiba, Hideki; van der Eerden, Bram C. J.; Raaijmakers, Marc H.; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Cornelissen, Jan J.; van Leeuwen, Johannes P.

    2016-09-01

    Osteolineage cells represent one of the critical bone marrow niche components that support maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). Recent studies demonstrate that extracellular vesicles (EVs) regulate stem cell development via horizontal transfer of bioactive cargo, including microRNAs (miRNAs). Using next-generation sequencing we show that human osteoblast-derived EVs contain highly abundant miRNAs specifically enriched in EVs, including critical regulators of hematopoietic proliferation (e.g., miR-29a). EV treatment of human umbilical cord blood-derived CD34+ HSPCs alters the expression of candidate miRNA targets, such as HBP1, BCL2 and PTEN. Furthermore, EVs enhance proliferation of CD34+ cells and their immature subsets in growth factor-driven ex vivo expansion cultures. Importantly, EV-expanded cells retain their differentiation capacity in vitro and successfully engraft in vivo. These discoveries reveal a novel osteoblast-derived EV-mediated mechanism for regulation of HSPC proliferation and warrant consideration of EV-miRNAs for the development of expansion strategies to treat hematological disorders.

  17. Comparative Analysis of the Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells from Placenta, Cord Blood, and Fetal Liver, Based on Their Immunophenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kuchma, Maria D.; Kyryk, Vitaliy M.; Svitina, Hanna M.; Shablii, Yulia M.; Lukash, Lubov L.; Lobyntseva, Galina S.; Shablii, Volodymyr A.

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the characteristics of human hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) with the CD34+CD45lowSSClow phenotype from full-term placental tissue (FTPT) as compared to cord blood (CB) and fetal liver (FL) cells. We demonstrated the presence of cell subpopulations at various stages of the differentiation with such immunophenotypes as CD34+/lowCD45low/−, CD34++CD45low/−, CD34+++CD45low/−, CD34+/lowCD45hi, and CD34++CD45hi in both first trimester placental tissue (FiTPT) and FTPT which implies their higher phenotypic heterogeneity compared to CB. HPCs of the FTPT origin expressed the CD90 antigen at a higher level compared to its expression by the CB HPCs and the CD133 antigen expression being at the same level in both cases. The HPCs compartment of FTPT versus CB contained higher number of myeloid and erythroid committed cells but lower number of myeloid and lymphoid ones compared to FL HPCs. HPCs of the FTPT and CB origin possess similar potentials for the multilineage differentiation in vitro and similar ratios of myeloid and erythroid progenitors among the committed cells. This observation suggests that the active hematopoiesis occurs in the FTPT. We obtained viable HPCs from cryopreserved placental tissue fragments allowing us to develop procedures for banking and testing of placenta-derived HPCs for clinical use. PMID:26347038

  18. Osteoblasts secrete miRNA-containing extracellular vesicles that enhance expansion of human umbilical cord blood cells.

    PubMed

    Morhayim, Jess; van de Peppel, Jeroen; Braakman, Eric; Rombouts, Elwin W J C; Ter Borg, Mariette N D; Dudakovic, Amel; Chiba, Hideki; van der Eerden, Bram C J; Raaijmakers, Marc H; van Wijnen, Andre J; Cornelissen, Jan J; van Leeuwen, Johannes P

    2016-01-01

    Osteolineage cells represent one of the critical bone marrow niche components that support maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). Recent studies demonstrate that extracellular vesicles (EVs) regulate stem cell development via horizontal transfer of bioactive cargo, including microRNAs (miRNAs). Using next-generation sequencing we show that human osteoblast-derived EVs contain highly abundant miRNAs specifically enriched in EVs, including critical regulators of hematopoietic proliferation (e.g., miR-29a). EV treatment of human umbilical cord blood-derived CD34(+) HSPCs alters the expression of candidate miRNA targets, such as HBP1, BCL2 and PTEN. Furthermore, EVs enhance proliferation of CD34(+) cells and their immature subsets in growth factor-driven ex vivo expansion cultures. Importantly, EV-expanded cells retain their differentiation capacity in vitro and successfully engraft in vivo. These discoveries reveal a novel osteoblast-derived EV-mediated mechanism for regulation of HSPC proliferation and warrant consideration of EV-miRNAs for the development of expansion strategies to treat hematological disorders. PMID:27585950

  19. Comparison of transplant outcomes from matched sibling bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell and unrelated cord blood in patients 50 years or older.

    PubMed

    Konuma, Takaaki; Tsukada, Nobuhiro; Kanda, Junya; Uchida, Naoyuki; Ohno, Yuju; Miyakoshi, Shigesaburo; Kanamori, Heiwa; Hidaka, Michihiro; Sakura, Toru; Onizuka, Makoto; Kobayashi, Naoki; Sawa, Masashi; Eto, Tetsuya; Matsuhashi, Yoshiko; Kato, Koji; Ichinohe, Tatsuo; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Miyamura, Koichi

    2016-05-01

    Older recipient and donor age were associated with higher incidences of severe graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from matched sibling donors (MSDs) and matched unrelated donors. Since a lower incidence of severe GVHD is advantageous in unrelated cord blood transplantation (CBT), a higher incidence of GVHD using older MSDs could be overcome using cord blood for older patients. We retrospectively analyzed Japanese registration data of 2,091 patients with acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and myelodysplastic syndrome aged 50 years or older who underwent MSD bone marrow transplantation (BMT) (n = 319), MSD peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) (n = 462), or unrelated CBT (n = 1,310) between 2007 and 2012. Median age of MSD was 56 (range, 38-74) years. Compared with CBT, the risk of developing extensive chronic GVHD was higher after BMT (hazard ratio [HR], 2.00; P = 0.001) or PBSCT (HR, 2.38; P < 0.001), and transplant-related mortality was lower after BMT (HR, 0.61; P < 0.001) or PBSCT (HR, 0.63; P < 0.001). Relapse rates were not significant difference between three groups. Although overall mortality was lower after BMT (HR, 0.67; P < 0.001) or PBSCT (HR, 0.75; P = 0.002) compared with CBT, the rates of a composite endpoint of GVHD-free, relapse-free survival (GRFS) were not significant difference between three groups. These data showed that MSDs remain the best donor source for older patients, but CBT led to similar GRFS to BMT and PBSCT.

  20. Comparison of transplant outcomes from matched sibling bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell and unrelated cord blood in patients 50 years or older.

    PubMed

    Konuma, Takaaki; Tsukada, Nobuhiro; Kanda, Junya; Uchida, Naoyuki; Ohno, Yuju; Miyakoshi, Shigesaburo; Kanamori, Heiwa; Hidaka, Michihiro; Sakura, Toru; Onizuka, Makoto; Kobayashi, Naoki; Sawa, Masashi; Eto, Tetsuya; Matsuhashi, Yoshiko; Kato, Koji; Ichinohe, Tatsuo; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Miyamura, Koichi

    2016-05-01

    Older recipient and donor age were associated with higher incidences of severe graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from matched sibling donors (MSDs) and matched unrelated donors. Since a lower incidence of severe GVHD is advantageous in unrelated cord blood transplantation (CBT), a higher incidence of GVHD using older MSDs could be overcome using cord blood for older patients. We retrospectively analyzed Japanese registration data of 2,091 patients with acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and myelodysplastic syndrome aged 50 years or older who underwent MSD bone marrow transplantation (BMT) (n = 319), MSD peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) (n = 462), or unrelated CBT (n = 1,310) between 2007 and 2012. Median age of MSD was 56 (range, 38-74) years. Compared with CBT, the risk of developing extensive chronic GVHD was higher after BMT (hazard ratio [HR], 2.00; P = 0.001) or PBSCT (HR, 2.38; P < 0.001), and transplant-related mortality was lower after BMT (HR, 0.61; P < 0.001) or PBSCT (HR, 0.63; P < 0.001). Relapse rates were not significant difference between three groups. Although overall mortality was lower after BMT (HR, 0.67; P < 0.001) or PBSCT (HR, 0.75; P = 0.002) compared with CBT, the rates of a composite endpoint of GVHD-free, relapse-free survival (GRFS) were not significant difference between three groups. These data showed that MSDs remain the best donor source for older patients, but CBT led to similar GRFS to BMT and PBSCT. PMID:26910296

  1. Low immunogenicity of allogeneic human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Miyoung; Jeong, Sang Young; Ha, Jueun; Kim, Miyeon; Jin, Hye Jin; Kwon, Soon-Jae; Chang, Jong Wook; Choi, Soo Jin; Oh, Wonil; Yang, Yoon Sun; Kim, Jae-Sung; Jeon, Hong Bae

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • hUCB-MSCs maintained low immunogenicity even after immune challenge in vitro. • Humanized NSG mice were established using human UCB CD34+ cells. • Repeated intravenous hUCB-MSC injection into mice did not lead to immune responses and adverse events. • Allogeneic hUCB-MSCs maintained low immunogenicity in vitro and in vivo. - Abstract: Evaluation of the immunogenicity of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in an allogeneic setting during therapy has been hampered by lack of suitable models due to technical and ethical limitations. Here, we show that allogeneic human umbilical cord blood derived-MSCs (hUCB-MSCs) maintained low immunogenicity even after immune challenge in vitro. To confirm these properties in vivo, a humanized mouse model was established by injecting isolated hUCB-derived CD34+ cells intravenously into immunocompromised NOD/SCID IL2γnull (NSG) mice. After repeated intravenous injection of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs) or MRC5 cells into these mice, immunological alterations including T cell proliferation and increased IFN-γ, TNF-α, and human IgG levels, were observed. In contrast, hUCB-MSC injection did not elicit these responses. While lymphocyte infiltration in the lung and small intestine and reduced survival rates were observed after hPBMC or MRC5 transplantation, no adverse events were observed following hUCB-MSC introduction. In conclusion, our data suggest that allogeneic hUCB-MSCs have low immunogenicity in vitro and in vivo, and are therefore “immunologically safe” for use in allogeneic clinical applications.

  2. Percutaneous umbilical cord blood sampling - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the spot where the umbilical cord meets the placenta. He then inserts a needle through your abdomen ... retrieving fetal blood: Placing the needle through the placenta or through the amniotic sac. The placenta's position ...

  3. Induction of differentiation by down-regulation of Nanog and Rex-1 in cord blood derived unrestricted somatic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Langroudi, Lida; Forouzandeh, Mehdi; Soleimani, Masoud; Atashi, Amir; Golestaneh, Azadeh Fahim

    2013-07-01

    Stem cells with high self-renewal and tissue regeneration potentials are the core components of regenerative medicine. Adult stem cells with many available sources, high repairing ability, and also possessing no ethical issues are popular candidates in the clinical field. In this study we looked upon the effects of two transcription factors Nanog and Rex-1 in self-renewal and differentiation abilities of a subpopulation of cord blood stem cells known as unrestricted somatic stem cells (USSCs). USSCs were expanded and transfected in vitro with siRNAs targeting either Nanog, Rex-1, and in combination. Gene suppressions were achieved at both transcript and proteome level. Differentiations were evaluated by specific Real time PCR and differentiating staining. Nanog knock down revealed a significant increase in osteogenic markers, Osteocalcin and Osteopontin expression as well as a positive Alizarin Red staining, which proposes Osteogenesis. This treatment also became positive for Oil Red staining, implying adipogenic differentiation as well. In contrast, Rex-1 knock down showed an increase in MAP II and Nestin expression, which is a hall mark of neural differentiation. Surprisingly, treatment with both siRNAs did not express any changes in any of the assessed markers. Therefore, our results indicated a bilateral mesenchymal differentiation for Nanog and a neural lineage fate for Rex-1 suppression. Considering that both transcription factors are core activators of self-renewal and also are orchestrating with other factors, our results imply a positive feedback in response to changes in the regulatory network of self-renewal.

  4. Human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stromal cells display a novel interaction between P-selectin and galectin-1.

    PubMed

    Suila, H; Hirvonen, T; Kotovuori, A; Ritamo, I; Kerkelä, E; Anderson, H; Natunen, S; Tuimala, J; Laitinen, S; Nystedt, J; Räbinä, J; Valmu, L

    2014-07-01

    Human multipotent mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) have been shown to exert immunomodulatory properties that have great potential in therapies for various inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. However, intravenous delivery of these cells is followed by massive cell entrapment in the lungs and insufficient homing to target tissues or organs. In targeting to tissues, MSCs and other therapeutic cells employ similar mechanisms as leucocytes, including a cascade of rolling and adhesion steps mediated by selectins, integrins and their ligands. However, the mechanisms of MSCs homing are not well understood. We discovered that P-selectin (CD62P) binds to umbilical cord blood (UCB)-derived MSCs independently of the previously known sialyl Lewis x (sLex)-containing ligands such as P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1, CD162). By biochemical assays, we identified galectin-1 as a novel ligand for P-selectin. Galectin-1 has previously been shown to be a key mediator of the immunosuppressive effects of human MSCs. We conclude that this novel interaction is likely to play a major role in the immunomodulatory targeting of human UCB-derived MSCs.

  5. Very small embryonic-like stem cells with maximum regenerative potential get discarded during cord blood banking and bone marrow processing for autologous stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Bhartiya, Deepa; Shaikh, Ambreen; Nagvenkar, Punam; Kasiviswanathan, Sandhya; Pethe, Prasad; Pawani, Harsha; Mohanty, Sujata; Rao, S G Ananda; Zaveri, Kusum; Hinduja, Indira

    2012-01-01

    Very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs) are possibly lost during cord blood banking and bone marrow (BM) processing for autologus stem cell therapy mainly because of their small size. The present study was conducted on human umbilical cord blood (UCB, n=6) and discarded red blood cells (RBC) fraction obtained after separation of mononuclear cells from human BM (n=6), to test this hypothesis. The results show that VSELs, which are pluripotent stem cells with maximum regenerative potential, settle along with the RBCs during Ficoll-Hypaque density separation. These cells are very small in size (3-5 μm), have high nucleo-cytoplasmic ratio, and express nuclear Oct-4, cell surface protein SSEA-4, and other pluripotent markers such as Nanog, Sox-2, Rex-1, and Tert as indicated by immunolocalization and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) studies. Interestingly, a distinct population of slightly larger, round hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with cytoplasmic Oct-4 were detected in the "buffy" coat, which usually gets banked or used during autologus stem cell therapy. Immunohistochemical studies on the umbilical cord tissue (UCT) sections (n=3) showed the presence of nuclear Oct-4-positive VSELs and many fibroblast-like mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with cytoplasmic Oct-4. These VSELs with nuclear Oct-4, detected in UCB, UCT, and discarded RBC fraction obtained after BM processing, may persist throughout life, maintain tissue homeostasis, and undergo asymmetric cell division to self-renew as well as produce larger progenitor stem cells, viz. HSCs or MSCs, which follow differentiation trajectories depending on the somatic niche. Hence, it can be concluded that the true stem cells in adult body tissues are the VSELs, whereas the HSCs and MSCs are actually progenitor stem cells that arise by asymmetric cell division of VSELs. The results of the present study may help explain low efficacy reported during adult autologous stem cell trials, wherein unknowingly

  6. Effect of The Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor кB and RANK Ligand on In Vitro Differentiation of Cord Blood CD133+ Hematopoietic Stem Cells to Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Kalantari, Nasim; Abroun, Saeid; Soleimani, Masoud; Kaviani, Saeid; Azad, Mehdi; Eskandari, Fatemeh; Habibi, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Objective Receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL) appears to be an osteoclast-activating factor, bearing an important role in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma. Some studies demonstrated that U-266 myeloma cell line and primary myeloma cells expressed RANK and RANKL. It had been reported that the expression of myeloid and monocytoid markers was increased by co-culturing myeloma cells with hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). This study also attempted to show the molecular mechanism of RANK and RANKL on differentiation capability of human cord blood HSC to osteoclast, as well as expression of calcitonin receptor (CTR) on cord blood HSC surface. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, CD133+ hematopoietic stem cells were isolated from umbilical cord blood and cultured in the presence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and RANKL. Osteoclast differentiation was characterized by using tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining, giemsa staining, immunophenotyping, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for specific genes. Results Hematopoietic stem cells expressed RANK before and after differentiation into osteoclast. Compared to control group, flow cytometric results showed an increased expression of RANK after differentiation. Expression of CTR mRNA showed TRAP reaction was positive in some differentiated cells, including osteoclast cells. Conclusion Presence of RANKL and M-CSF in bone marrow could induce HSCs differentiation into osteoclast.

  7. Effect of The Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor кB and RANK Ligand on In Vitro Differentiation of Cord Blood CD133+ Hematopoietic Stem Cells to Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Kalantari, Nasim; Abroun, Saeid; Soleimani, Masoud; Kaviani, Saeid; Azad, Mehdi; Eskandari, Fatemeh; Habibi, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Objective Receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL) appears to be an osteoclast-activating factor, bearing an important role in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma. Some studies demonstrated that U-266 myeloma cell line and primary myeloma cells expressed RANK and RANKL. It had been reported that the expression of myeloid and monocytoid markers was increased by co-culturing myeloma cells with hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). This study also attempted to show the molecular mechanism of RANK and RANKL on differentiation capability of human cord blood HSC to osteoclast, as well as expression of calcitonin receptor (CTR) on cord blood HSC surface. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, CD133+ hematopoietic stem cells were isolated from umbilical cord blood and cultured in the presence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and RANKL. Osteoclast differentiation was characterized by using tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining, giemsa staining, immunophenotyping, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for specific genes. Results Hematopoietic stem cells expressed RANK before and after differentiation into osteoclast. Compared to control group, flow cytometric results showed an increased expression of RANK after differentiation. Expression of CTR mRNA showed TRAP reaction was positive in some differentiated cells, including osteoclast cells. Conclusion Presence of RANKL and M-CSF in bone marrow could induce HSCs differentiation into osteoclast. PMID:27602313

  8. Early Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Stem Cell Transplantation Does Not Prevent Neurological Deterioration in Mucopolysaccharidosis Type III.

    PubMed

    Welling, Lindsey; Marchal, Jan Pieter; van Hasselt, Peter; van der Ploeg, Ans T; Wijburg, Frits A; Boelens, Jaap Jan

    2015-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type III (MPS III), or Sanfilippo disease, is a neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disease (LSD) caused by defective lysosomal degradation of heparan sulfate (HS). No effective disease-modifying therapy is yet available. In contrast to some other neuronopathic LSDs, bone marrow-derived hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) fails to prevent neurological deterioration in MPS III patients. We report on the 5-year outcome of early transplantation, i.e., before onset of clinical neurological disease, in combination with the use of umbilical cord blood-derived hematopoietic stem cells (UCBT), in two MPS III patients. Both patients had a normal developmental quotient at the time of UCBT. One patient had a combination of mutations predicting a classical severe phenotype (MPS IIIA), and one patient (MPS IIIB) had mutations predicting a very attenuated phenotype. Transplantation was uncomplicated with full engraftment of donor cells in both.Both patients showed progressive neurological deterioration with regression of cognitive skills and behavioral disturbances during 5 years after successful UCBT, comparable to the natural history of patients with the same combination of mutations. The concentration of HS in CSF in the patient with the attenuated phenotype of MPS IIIB 2 years after UCBT was very high and in the range of untreated MPS III patients.We conclude that the course of cognitive development, behavioral problems, and absence of biochemical correction in CSF demonstrate the absence of relevant effect of UCBT in MPS III patients, even when performed before clinical onset of CNS disease. PMID:25256447

  9. Potency of umbilical cord blood- and Wharton’s jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells for scarless wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Hanako; Kitajima, Yuriko; Luo, Lan; Yan, Chan; Tateishi, Seiko; Ono, Yusuke; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Mori, Ryoichi; Masuzaki, Hideaki; Shimokawa, Isao; Hirano, Akiyoshi; Li, Tao-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Postnatally, scars occur as a consequence of cutaneous wound healing. Scarless wound healing is highly desired for patients who have undergone surgery or trauma, especially to exposed areas. Based on the properties of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for tissue repair and immunomodulation, we investigated the potential of MSCs for scarless wound healing. MSCs were expanded from umbilical cord blood (UCB-MSCs) and Wharton’s jelly (WJ-MSCs) from healthy donors who underwent elective full-term pregnancy caesarean sections. UCB-MSCs expressed lower levels of the pre-inflammatory cytokines IL1A and IL1B, but higher levels of the extracellular matrix (ECM)-degradation enzymes MMP1 and PLAU compared with WJ-MSCs, suggesting that UCB-MSCs were more likely to favor scarless wound healing. However, we failed to find significant benefits for stem cell therapy in improving wound healing and reducing collagen deposition following the direct injection of 1.0 × 105 UCB-MSCs and WJ-MSCs into 5 mm full-thickness skin defect sites in nude mice. Interestingly, the implantation of UCB-MSCs tended to increase the expression of MMP2 and PLAU, two proteases involved in degradation of the extracellular matrix in the wound tissues. Based on our data, UCB-MSCs are more likely to be a favorable potential stem cell source for scarless wound healing, although a better experimental model is required for confirmation. PMID:26728342

  10. Potency of umbilical cord blood- and Wharton's jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells for scarless wound healing.

    PubMed

    Doi, Hanako; Kitajima, Yuriko; Luo, Lan; Yan, Chan; Tateishi, Seiko; Ono, Yusuke; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Mori, Ryoichi; Masuzaki, Hideaki; Shimokawa, Isao; Hirano, Akiyoshi; Li, Tao-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Postnatally, scars occur as a consequence of cutaneous wound healing. Scarless wound healing is highly desired for patients who have undergone surgery or trauma, especially to exposed areas. Based on the properties of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for tissue repair and immunomodulation, we investigated the potential of MSCs for scarless wound healing. MSCs were expanded from umbilical cord blood (UCB-MSCs) and Wharton's jelly (WJ-MSCs) from healthy donors who underwent elective full-term pregnancy caesarean sections. UCB-MSCs expressed lower levels of the pre-inflammatory cytokines IL1A and IL1B, but higher levels of the extracellular matrix (ECM)-degradation enzymes MMP1 and PLAU compared with WJ-MSCs, suggesting that UCB-MSCs were more likely to favor scarless wound healing. However, we failed to find significant benefits for stem cell therapy in improving wound healing and reducing collagen deposition following the direct injection of 1.0 × 10(5) UCB-MSCs and WJ-MSCs into 5 mm full-thickness skin defect sites in nude mice. Interestingly, the implantation of UCB-MSCs tended to increase the expression of MMP2 and PLAU, two proteases involved in degradation of the extracellular matrix in the wound tissues. Based on our data, UCB-MSCs are more likely to be a favorable potential stem cell source for scarless wound healing, although a better experimental model is required for confirmation. PMID:26728342

  11. Unrelated cord blood transplantation for patients with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma: experience at a single institute.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takayuki; Oku, Eijiro; Nomura, Kei; Morishige, Satoshi; Takata, Yuka; Seki, Ritsuko; Imamura, Rie; Osaki, Koichi; Hashiguchi, Michitoshi; Yakushiji, Kazuaki; Mouri, Fumihiko; Mizuno, Shinichi; Yoshimoto, Koji; Ohshima, Koichi; Nagafuji, Koji; Okamura, Takashi

    2012-11-01

    We report the results of unrelated cord blood transplantation (UCBT) for patients with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) conducted in our single institute. Ten patients with ATLL (nine acute and one lymphoma-type) received UCBT during the period from August 2003 to July 2011. The median age at the time of diagnosis of ATLL was 51 years (range 37-64). The median period from diagnosis of ATLL to UCBT was 130 days (range 94-344). Conditioning regimens were myeloablative for six and reduced intensity for four. The median number of infused nucleated cells and CD34 positive cells were 2.52 × 10(7)/kg and 1.04 × 10(5)/kg, respectively. There was no engraftment failure. Three patients developed grade II acute graft versus host disease, and four developed grade III. The estimated 2-year overall survival was 40 % (95 % CI 12-67 %). Four of six chemosensitive patients prior to UCBT survived for 1035, 793, 712, and 531 days post-UCBT, respectively. There were no survivors among the four chemorefractory patients prior to UCBT. Our data indicates that UCBT is feasible and provides long-term survival in patients with chemosensitive ATLL. PMID:22976114

  12. Chondrogenic commitment of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells in collagen matrices for cartilage engineering.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Leduc, Tangni; Hervieu, Magalie; Legendre, Florence; Bouyoucef, Mouloud; Gruchy, Nicolas; Poulain, Laurent; de Vienne, Claire; Herlicoviez, Michel; Demoor, Magali; Galéra, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is a promising alternative source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), because UCB-MSCs are abundant and harvesting them is a painless non-invasive procedure. Potential clinical applications of UCB-MSCs have been identified, but their ability for chondrogenic differentiation has not yet been fully evaluated. The aim of our work was to characterize and determine the chondrogenic differentiation potential of human UCB-MSCs (hUCB-MSCs) for cartilage tissue engineering using an approach combining 3D culture in type I/III collagen sponges and chondrogenic factors. Our results showed that UCB-MSCs have a high proliferative capacity. These cells differentiated easily into an osteoblast lineage but not into an adipocyte lineage. Furthermore, BMP-2 and TGF-β1 potentiated chondrogenic differentiation, as revealed by a strong increase in mature chondrocyte-specific mRNA (COL2A1, COL2B, ACAN) and protein (type II collagen) markers. Although growth factors increased the transcription of hypertrophic chondrocyte markers such as COL10A1 and MMP13, the cells present in the neo-tissue maintained their phenotype and did not progress to terminal differentiation and mineralization of the extracellular matrix after subcutaneous implantation in nude mice. Our study demonstrates that our culture model has efficient chondrogenic differentiation, and that hUCB-MSCs can be a reliable source for cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:27604951

  13. Chondrogenic commitment of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells in collagen matrices for cartilage engineering

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Leduc, Tangni; Hervieu, Magalie; Legendre, Florence; Bouyoucef, Mouloud; Gruchy, Nicolas; Poulain, Laurent; de Vienne, Claire; Herlicoviez, Michel; Demoor, Magali; Galéra, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is a promising alternative source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), because UCB-MSCs are abundant and harvesting them is a painless non-invasive procedure. Potential clinical applications of UCB-MSCs have been identified, but their ability for chondrogenic differentiation has not yet been fully evaluated. The aim of our work was to characterize and determine the chondrogenic differentiation potential of human UCB-MSCs (hUCB-MSCs) for cartilage tissue engineering using an approach combining 3D culture in type I/III collagen sponges and chondrogenic factors. Our results showed that UCB-MSCs have a high proliferative capacity. These cells differentiated easily into an osteoblast lineage but not into an adipocyte lineage. Furthermore, BMP-2 and TGF-β1 potentiated chondrogenic differentiation, as revealed by a strong increase in mature chondrocyte-specific mRNA (COL2A1, COL2B, ACAN) and protein (type II collagen) markers. Although growth factors increased the transcription of hypertrophic chondrocyte markers such as COL10A1 and MMP13, the cells present in the neo-tissue maintained their phenotype and did not progress to terminal differentiation and mineralization of the extracellular matrix after subcutaneous implantation in nude mice. Our study demonstrates that our culture model has efficient chondrogenic differentiation, and that hUCB-MSCs can be a reliable source for cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:27604951

  14. Pleiotrophin is involved in the amniotic epithelial cell-induced differentiation of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells into dopaminergic neuron-like cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shu; Xue, Dan-Dan; Wu, Bo; Sun, Hai-Mei; Li, Xiao-Shuang; Dong, Fang; Li, Wen-Shuai; Ji, Feng-Qing; Zhou, De-Shan

    2013-02-28

    We have reported that human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) are capable of differentiating into dopaminergic (DA) neuron-like cells upon being induced by amniotic epithelial cells (AECs). However, what factor(s) is involved in the differentiation process has not been explored out thoroughly. Because pleiotrophin (PTN) is known to exert important trophic effects on DA neurons, in the present study, we investigated whether PTN is released by AECs and whether it is involved in the differentiation of hUCB-MSCs into DA neuron-like cells. The expression and secretion of PTN by AECs were detected by immunofluorescence, RT-PCR and ELISA. The hUCB-MSCs were isolated and treated with AEC-conditioned medium (ACM) or recombinant human PTN. Compared to the controls, a higher proportion of treated cells differentiated into DA neuron-like cells, indicated by the increased expression of TH and DAT and the increased dopamine content. These results indicate that PTN released by AECs acts as a synergetic factor with other neurotrophic factors and is involved in the differentiation of hUCB-MSCs into DA neuron-like cells. We suggest that ACM, which contains PTN and other neurotrophic factors, could potentially be used as an agent to promote the differentiation of DA neuron-like cells from hUCB-MSCs for cell therapy of Parkinson's disease without creating legal or ethical issues.

  15. Cord Blood Stem Cell-Mediated Induction of Apoptosis in Glioma Downregulates X-Linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein (XIAP)

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Venkata Ramesh; Velpula, Kiran Kumar; Kaur, Kiranpreet; Fassett, Daniel; Klopfenstein, Jeffrey D.; Dinh, Dzung H.; Gujrati, Meena; Rao, Jasti S.

    2010-01-01

    Background XIAP (X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein) is one of the most important members of the apoptosis inhibitor family. XIAP is upregulated in various malignancies, including human glioblastoma. It promotes invasion, metastasis, growth and survival of malignant cells. We hypothesized that downregulation of XIAP by human umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells (hUCBSC) in glioma cells would cause them to undergo apoptotic death. Methodology/Principal Findings We observed the effect of hUCBSC on two malignant glioma cell lines (SNB19 and U251) and two glioma xenograft cell lines (4910 and 5310). In co-cultures of glioma cells with hUCBSC, proliferation of glioma cells was significantly inhibited. This is associated with increased cytotoxicity of glioma cells, which led to glioma cell death. Stem cells induced apoptosis in glioma cells, which was evaluated by TUNEL assay, FACS analyses and immunoblotting. The induction of apoptosis is associated with inhibition of XIAP in co-cultures of hUCBSC. Similar results were obtained by the treatment of glioma cells with shRNA to downregulate XIAP (siXIAP). Downregulation of XIAP resulted in activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9 to trigger apoptosis in glioma cells. Apoptosis is characterized by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and upregulation of mitochondrial apoptotic proteins Bax and Bad. Cell death of glioma cells was marked by downregulation of Akt and phospho-Akt molecules. We observed similar results under in vivo conditions in U251- and 5310-injected nude mice brains, which were treated with hUCBSC. Under in vivo conditions, Smac/DIABLO was found to be colocalized in the nucleus, showing that hUCBSC induced apoptosis is mediated by inhibition of XIAP and activation of Smac/DIABLO. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that downregulation of XIAP by hUCBSC treatment induces apoptosis, which led to the death of the glioma cells and xenograft cells. This study demonstrates the therapeutic

  16. Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem- and progenitor cells from cord blood in coculture with mesenchymal stroma cells from amnion, chorion, Wharton's jelly, amniotic fluid, cord blood, and bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Klein, Caroline; Strobel, Julian; Zingsem, Jürgen; Richter, Richard H; Goecke, Tamme W; Beckmann, Matthias W; Eckstein, Reinhold; Weisbach, Volker

    2013-12-01

    In most cases, the amount of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) in a single cord blood (CB) unit is not sufficient for allogenic transplantation of adults. Therefore, two CB units are usually required. The ex vivo expansion of HSPCs from CB in coculture with mesenchymal stroma cells (MSCs) might be an alternative. It was investigated, whether bone marrow-derived MSCs, which have to be obtained in an invasive procedure, introduce a further donor and increases the risk of transmissible infectious diseases for the patient can be replaced by MSCs from amnion, chorion, Wharton's jelly, amniotic fluid, and CB, which can be isolated from placental tissue which is readily available when CB is sampled. In a two-step ex vivo coculture mononuclear cells from cryopreserved CB were cultured with different MSC-feederlayers in a medium supplemented with cytokines (stem cell factor, thrombopoietin [TPO], and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor). Expansion rates were analyzed as well, by long-term culture-initiating cell (LTC-IC) and colony-forming unit (CFU) assays, as by measuring CD34(+)- and CD45(+)-cells. Due to the comparably low number of 5×10(2) to 1×10(4) CD34(+)-cells per cm(2) MSC-monolayer, we observed comparably high expansion rates from 80 to 391,000 for CFU, 70 to 313,000 for CD34(+)-, and 200 to 352,000 for CD45(+)-cells. Expansion of LTC-IC was partly observed. Compared to the literature, we found a better expansion rate of CD34(+)-cells with MSCs from all different sources. This is probably due to the comparably low number of 5×10(2) to 1×10 CD34(+)-cells per cm(2) MSC-monolayer we used. Comparably, high expansion rates were observed from 80 to 391,000 for CFUs, 70 to 313,000 for CD34(+)-, and 200 to 352,000 for CD45(+)-cells. However, the expansion of CD34(+)-cells was significantly more effective with MSCs from bone marrow compared to MSCs from amnion, chorion, and Wharton's jelly. The comparison of MSCs from bone marrow with MSCs from CB and

  17. Umbilical cord blood transplantation supplemented with the infusion of mesenchymal stem cell for an adolescent patient with severe aplastic anemia: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Chengxin; Chen, Runzhe; Chen, Baoan; Ding, Jiahua; Ni, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Delayed hematopoietic recovery and increased rate of engraftment failure limit the use of umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT). We describe a case of severe aplastic anemia treated by UCBT combined with mesenchymal stem cells. Our case reveals that infusing mesenchymal stem cells early (about 40 days) after UCBT may promote hematopoietic recovery. This experience will guide clinical scientists, especially hematologists, to deal with similar situations and encourage them to widen this strategy. PMID:26089653

  18. Good manufacturing practice-compliant isolation and culture of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an attractive source of stem cells for clinical applications. These cells exhibit a multilineage differentiation potential and strong capacity for immune modulation. Thus, MSCs are widely used in cell therapy, tissue engineering, and immunotherapy. Because of important advantages, umbilical cord blood-derived MSCs (UCB-MSCs) have attracted interest for some time. However, the applications of UCB-MSCs are limited by the small number of recoverable UCB-MSCs and fetal bovine serum (FBS)-dependent expansion methods. Hence, this study aimed to establish a xenogenic and allogeneic supplement-free expansion protocol. Methods UCB was collected to prepare activated platelet-rich plasma (aPRP) and mononuclear cells (MNCs). aPRP was applied as a supplement in Iscove modified Dulbecco medium (IMDM) together with antibiotics. MNCs were cultured in complete IMDM with four concentrations of aPRP (2, 5, 7, or 10%) or 10% FBS as the control. The efficiency of the protocols was evaluated in terms of the number of adherent cells and their expansion, the percentage of successfully isolated cells in the primary culture, surface marker expression, and in vitro differentiation potential following expansion. Results The results showed that primary cultures with complete medium containing 10% aPRP exhibited the highest success, whereas expansion in complete medium containing 5% aPRP was suitable. UCB-MSCs isolated using this protocol maintained their immunophenotypes, multilineage differentiation potential, and did not form tumors when injected at a high dose into athymic nude mice. Conclusion This technique provides a method to obtain UCB-MSCs compliant with good manufacturing practices for clinical application. PMID:24565047

  19. [Anti-mouse CD122 antibody promotes the hematopoietic repopulating capacity of cord blood CD34⁺ cells in NOD/SCID mice].

    PubMed

    Sheng, Men-Yao; Shi, Hui; Xing, Wen; Wang, Wen-Jun; Si, Xiao-Hui; Bai, Jie; Yuan, Wei-Ping; Zhou, Yuan; Yang, Feng-Chun

    2014-12-01

    The study was aimed to investigate the effect of anti-mouse CD122 antibody on the hematopoietic repopulating capacity of cord blood CD34⁺ cells in a humanized murine model-non obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice. After sublethal irradiation with γ-ray, NOD/SCID mice were intraperitoneally injected with 200 µg mouse isotype control antibody or anti-mouse CD122 antibody. Human cord blood CD34⁺ cells or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) were injected via the tail vein at 6-8 hours later. Cohort of the mice injected with anti-mice CD122 antibody or control antibody alone were sacrificed at different time point (at week 2, 3, and 4 weeks) after the injection, and the percentage of NK cells in the peripheral blood was analyzed by flow cytometry. To evaluate the effect of anti-mouse CD122 antibody on the repopulating capacity of cord blood CD34⁺ cells in the recipient mice, phenotype analysis was performed in the bone marrow at 6 and 8 weeks after the transplantation. The results showed that the proportion of NK cells in the peripheral blood were (4.6 ± 0.6)% and (5.7 ± 1.7)% at week 2 and 3 after anti-CD122 antibody injection respectively,which decreased by 60%, compared with the mice injected with isotype control antibody. After 6 and 8 weeks of cord blood CD34⁺ cell transplantation,the percentage of human CD45⁺ in the bone marrow of the recipient mice treated with anti-mice CD122 antibody was (63.0 ± 12.2)% and (53.2 ± 16.3)%,respectively,which were dramatically higher than that in the mice treated with isotype control antibody (7.7 ± 3.6)% and (6.1 ± 2.4)%. Moreover,at 8 weeks after transplantation,human CD34⁺ cells appeared significantly in the recipients treated with anti-CD122 antibody. It is concluded that the anti-mouse CD122 antibody enhances the hematopoietic repopulating capacity of cord blood CD34⁺ cells in the NOD/SCID mice through decreasing the proportion of NK cells.

  20. Rapid T-cell receptor CD4+ repertoire reconstitution and immune recovery in unrelated umbilical cord blood transplanted pediatric leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Finocchi, Andrea; Romiti, Maria Luisa; Di Cesare, Silvia; Puliafito, Pamela; Pensieroso, Simone; Rana, Ippolita; Pinto, Rita; Cancrini, Caterina; De Rossi, Giulio; Caniglia, Maurizio; Rossi, Paolo

    2006-07-01

    Umbilical cord blood transplantation has been successfully employed for treatment of many immune and hematologic disorders. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of immune reconstitution after umbilical cord blood transplantation in 6 leukemia children. T-cell receptor Vbeta third complementary region spectratyping was used for monitoring the contribution of the thymic pathway in patients' immune reconstitution. Absolute numbers of lymphocyte subsets (T, B, and natural killer), and lymphoproliferative in vitro response to mitogens, recovered within 12 months after transplantation. Furthermore, an overall diversification of T-cell receptor complexity in the repopulating T cells, with a polyclonal Gaussian profiles in most (74%) of total families was observed. Noteworthy, we showed a wider and more rapid reconstitution of T-cell receptor CD4+ T cell families compared with T-cell receptor CD8+ T ones still exhibiting some perturbations at 24 months. These data show that umbilical cord blood transplantation allows immune reconstitution already within 12 months with generation of newly diversified CD4+ T lymphocyte subsets.

  1. Umbilical cord blood-derived T regulatory cells to prevent GVHD: kinetics, toxicity profile, and clinical effect.

    PubMed

    Brunstein, Claudio G; Miller, Jeffrey S; McKenna, David H; Hippen, Keli L; DeFor, Todd E; Sumstad, Darin; Curtsinger, Julie; Verneris, Michael R; MacMillan, Margaret L; Levine, Bruce L; Riley, James L; June, Carl H; Le, Chap; Weisdorf, Daniel J; McGlave, Philip B; Blazar, Bruce R; Wagner, John E

    2016-02-25

    We studied the safety and clinical outcomes of patients treated with umbilical cord blood (UCB)-derived regulatory T cells (Tregs) that expanded in cultures stimulated with K562 cells modified to express the high-affinity Fc receptor (CD64) and CD86, the natural ligand of CD28 (KT64/86). Eleven patients were treated with Treg doses from 3-100 × 10(6) Treg/kg. The median proportion of CD4(+)FoxP3(+)CD127(-) in the infused product was 87% (range, 78%-95%), and we observed no dose-limiting infusional adverse events. Clinical outcomes were compared with contemporary controls (n = 22) who received the same conditioning regimen with sirolimus and mycophenolate mofetil immune suppression. The incidence of grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) at 100 days was 9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0-25) vs 45% (95% CI, 24-67) in controls (P = .05). Chronic GVHD at 1 year was zero in Tregs and 14% in controls. Hematopoietic recovery and chimerism, cumulative density of infections, nonrelapse mortality, relapse, and disease-free survival were similar in the Treg recipients and controls. KT64/86-expanded UCB Tregs were safe and resulted in low risk of acute GVHD.

  2. Cartilage repair by human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells with different hydrogels in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong-Beom; Song, Minjung; Lee, Choong-Hee; Kim, Jin-A; Ha, Chul-Won

    2015-11-01

    This study was carried out to assess the feasibility of human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) in articular cartilage repair and to further determine a suitable delivering hydrogel in a rat model. Critical sized full thickness cartilage defects were created. The hUCB-MSCs and three different hydrogel composites (hydrogel A; 4% hyaluronic acid/30% pluronic (1:1, v/v), hydrogel B; 4% hyaluronic acid, and hydrogel C; 4% hyaluronic acid/30% pluronic/chitosan (1:1:2, v/v)) were implanted into the experimental knee (right knee) and hydrogels without hUCB-MSCs were implanted into the control knee (left knee). Defects were evaluated after 8 weeks. The hUCB-MSCs with hydrogels composites resulted in a better repair as seen by gross and histological evaluation compared with hydrogels without hUCB-MSCs. Among the three different hydrogels, the 4% hyaluronic acid hydrogel composite (hydrogel B) showed the best result in cartilage repair as seen by the histological evaluation compared with the other hydrogel composites (hydrogel A and C). The results of this study suggest that hUCB-MSCs may be a promising cell source in combination with 4% hyaluronic acid hydrogels in the in vivo repair of cartilage defects.

  3. FOXP3 is a direct target of miR15a/16 in umbilical cord blood regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Robinson, S N; Setoyama, T; Tung, S S; D'Abundo, L; Shah, M Y; Yang, H; Yvon, E; Shah, N; Yang, H; Konopleva, M; Garcia-Manero, G; McNiece, I; Rezvani, K; Calin, G A; Shpall, E J; Parmar, S

    2014-06-01

    Exact mechanism of action of umbilical cord blood (CB)-derived regulatory T cells (Tregs) in the prevention of GVHD remains unclear. On the basis of selective overexpression of peptidase inhibitor 16 in CB Tregs, we explored the related p53 pathway, which has been shown to negatively regulate miR15a/16 expression. Significantly lower levels of miR15a/16 were observed in CB Tregs when compared with conventional CB T cells (Tcons). In a xenogeneic GVHD mouse model, lower levels of miR15a/16 were also found in Treg recipients, which correlated with a better GVHD score. Forced overexpression of miR15a/16 in CB Tregs led to inhibition of FOXP3 and CTLA4 expression and partial reversal of Treg-mediated suppression in an allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction that correlated with the reversal of FOXP3 demethylation in CB Tregs. On the other hand, miR15a/16 knockdown in CB Tcons led to expression of FOXP3 and CTLA4 and suppression of allogeneic lymphocyte proliferation. Using a luciferase-based mutagenesis assay, FOXP3 was determined to be a direct target of miR15a and miR16. We propose that miR15a/16 has an important role in mediating the suppressive function of CB Tregs and these microRNAs may have a 'toggle-switch' function in Treg/Tcon plasticity. PMID:24710569

  4. Combination of low O(2) concentration and mesenchymal stromal cells during culture of cord blood CD34(+) cells improves the maintenance and proliferative capacity of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hammoud, Mohammad; Vlaski, Marija; Duchez, Pascale; Chevaleyre, Jean; Lafarge, Xavier; Boiron, Jean-Michel; Praloran, Vincent; Brunet De La Grange, Philippe; Ivanovic, Zoran

    2012-06-01

    The physiological approach suggests that an environment associating the mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) and low O(2) concentration would be most favorable for the maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in course of ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic grafts. To test this hypothesis, we performed a co-culture of cord blood CD34(+) cells with or without MSC in presence of cytokines for 10 days at 20%, 5%, and 1.5% O(2) and assessed the impact on total cells, CD34(+) cells, committed progenitors (colony-forming cells-CFC) and stem cells activity (pre-CFC and Scid repopulating cells-SRC). Not surprisingly, the expansion of total cells, CD34(+) cells, and CFC was higher in co-culture and at 20% O(2) compared to simple culture and low O(2) concentrations, respectively. However, co-culture at low O(2) concentrations provided CD34(+) cell and CFC amplification similar to classical culture at 20% O(2) . Interestingly, low O(2) concentrations ensured a better pre-CFC and SRC preservation/expansion in co-culture. Indeed, SRC activity in co-culture at 1.5% O(2) was higher than in freshly isolated CD34(+) cells. Interleukin-6 production by MSC at physiologically low O(2) concentrations might be one of the factors mediating this effect. Our data demonstrate that association of co-culture and low O(2) concentration not only induces sufficient expansion of committed progenitors (with respect to the classical culture), but also ensures a better maintenance/expansion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), pointing to the oxygenation as a physiological regulatory factor but also as a cell engineering tool.

  5. Association of In Utero Sensitization to Schistosoma haematobium with Enhanced Cord Blood IgE and Increased Frequencies of CD5– B Cells in African Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Seydel, Larsen S.; Petelski, Annika; van Dam, Govert J.; van der Kleij, Desiree; Kruize-Hoeksma, Yvonne C. M.; Luty, Adrian J. F.; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Kremsner, Peter G.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated in utero priming as a consequence of maternal parasitic infections. Cord blood plasma samples of 63 African newborns were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for their content of total and schistosome-specific or filaria-specific IgE and IgG4. The frequencies of lymphocyte phenotypes in cord blood were also determined by using flow cytometry, and were compared with those of European newborns. We found significantly increased schistosome soluble egg antigen (SEA)–specific IgE in cord plasma of those born to mothers with schistosome infections and correlations between fetal and maternal SEA-specific and filaria antigen–specific IgE. These data are evidence for in utero priming of the fetal immune system to maternal helminth infections. Furthermore, we show significantly enhanced percentages of CD5– B cells in African newborns cord blood compared with Europeans, which is consistent with earlier maturation of the African fetal immune system. PMID:22492145

  6. High Log-Scale Expansion of Functional Human Natural Killer Cells from Umbilical Cord Blood CD34-Positive Cells for Adoptive Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Spanholtz, Jan; Preijers, Frank; van der Meer, Arnold; Joosten, Irma; Schaap, Nicolaas; de Witte, Theo M.; Dolstra, Harry

    2010-01-01

    Immunotherapy based on natural killer (NK) cell infusions is a potential adjuvant treatment for many cancers. Such therapeutic application in humans requires large numbers of functional NK cells that have been selected and expanded using clinical grade protocols. We established an extremely efficient cytokine-based culture system for ex vivo expansion of NK cells from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from umbilical cord blood (UCB). Systematic refinement of this two-step system using a novel clinical grade medium resulted in a therapeutically applicable cell culture protocol. CD56+CD3− NK cell products could be routinely generated from freshly selected CD34+ UCB cells with a mean expansion of >15,000 fold and a nearly 100% purity. Moreover, our protocol has the capacity to produce more than 3-log NK cell expansion from frozen CD34+ UCB cells. These ex vivo-generated cell products contain NK cell subsets differentially expressing NKG2A and killer immunoglobulin-like receptors. Furthermore, UCB-derived CD56+ NK cells generated by our protocol uniformly express high levels of activating NKG2D and natural cytotoxicity receptors. Functional analysis showed that these ex vivo-generated NK cells efficiently target myeloid leukemia and melanoma tumor cell lines, and mediate cytolysis of primary leukemia cells at low NK-target ratios. Our culture system exemplifies a major breakthrough in producing pure NK cell products from limited numbers of CD34+ cells for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:20169160

  7. Angiopoietin-like 5 and IGFBP2 stimulate ex vivo expansion of human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells as assayed by NOD/SCID transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng Cheng; Kaba, Megan; Iizuka, Satoru; Huynh, HoangDinh; Lodish, Harvey F

    2008-04-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the basis of bone marrow transplantation and are attractive target cells for hematopoietic gene therapy, but these important clinical applications have been severely hampered by difficulties in ex vivo expansion of HSCs. In particular, the use of cord blood for adult transplantation is greatly limited by the number of HSCs. Previously we identified angiopoietin-like proteins and IGF-binding protein 2 (IGFBP2) as new hormones that, together with other factors, can expand mouse bone marrow HSCs in culture. Here, we measure the activity of multipotent human severe combined immunodeficient (SCID)-repopulating cells (SRCs) by transplantation into the nonobese diabetic SCID (NOD/SCID) mice; secondary transplantation was performed to evaluate the self-renewal potential of SRCs. A serum-free medium containing SCF, TPO, and FGF-1 or Flt3-L cannot significantly support expansion of the SRCs present in human cord blood CD133+ cells. Addition of either angiopoietin-like 5 or IGF-binding protein 2 to the cultures led to a sizable expansion of HSC numbers, as assayed by NOD/SCID transplantation. A serum-free culture containing SCF, TPO, FGF-1, angiopoietin-like 5, and IGFBP2 supports an approximately 20-fold net expansion of repopulating human cord blood HSCs, a number potentially applicable to several clinical processes including HSC transplantation.

  8. The feasibility of in vivo imaging of infiltrating blood cells for predicting the functional prognosis after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, Kazuya; Saito, Takeyuki; Kobayakawa, Kazu; Kubota, Kensuke; Hara, Masamitsu; Murata, Masaharu; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Okada, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    After a spinal cord injury (SCI), a reliable prediction of the potential functional outcome is essential for determining the optimal treatment strategy. Despite recent advances in the field of neurological assessment, there is still no satisfactory methodology for predicting the functional outcome after SCI. We herein describe a novel method to predict the functional outcome at 12 hours after SCI using in vivo bioluminescence imaging. We produced three groups of SCI mice with different functional prognoses: 50 kdyn (mild), 70 kdyn (moderate) and 90 kdyn (severe). Only the locomotor function within 24 hours after SCI was unable to predict subsequent functional recovery. However, both the number of infiltrating neutrophils and the bioluminescence signal intensity from infiltrating blood cells were found to correlate with the severity of the injury at 12 hours after SCI. Furthermore, a strong linear relationship was observed among the number of infiltrating neutrophils, the bioluminescence signal intensity, and the severity of the injury. Our findings thus indicate that in vivo bioluminescence imaging is able to accurately predict the long-term functional outcome in the hyperacute phase of SCI, thereby providing evidence that this imaging modality could positively contribute to the future development of tailored therapeutic approaches for SCI. PMID:27156468

  9. Evaluation of Potential Ionizing Irradiation Protectors and Mitigators Using Clonogenic Survival of Human Umbilical Cord Blood Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Goff, Julie P.; Shields, Donna S.; Wang, Hong; Skoda, Erin M.; Sprachman, Melissa M.; Wipf, Peter; Garapati, Venkata Krishna; Atkinson, Jeffrey; London, Barry; Lazo, John S.; Kagan, Valerian; Epperly, Michael W.; Greenberger, Joel S.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the use of colony formation (CFU-GM, BFU-E, and CFU-GEMM) by human umbilical cord blood (CB) hematopoietic progenitor cells for testing novel small molecule ionizing irradiation protectors and mitigators. Each of 11 compounds was added before (protection) or after (mitigation) ionizing irradiation including: GS-nitroxides (JP4-039 and XJB-5-131), the bifunctional sulfoxide MMS-350, the phosphoinositol-3-kinase inhibitor (LY294002), TPP-imidazole fatty acid, (TPP-IOA), the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (MCF-201-89), the p53/mdm2/mdm4 inhibitor (BEB55), methoxamine, isoproterenol, propanolol, and the ATP sensitive potassium channel blocker (glyburide). The drugs XJB-5-131, JP4-039, and MMS-350 were radiation protectors for CFU-GM. JP4-039 was also a radiation protector for CFU-GEMM. The drugs, XJB-5-131, JP4-039, and MMS-350 were radiation mitigators for BFU-E, MMS-350 and JP4-039 were mitigators for CFU-GM, and MMS350 was a mitigator for CFU-GEMM. In contrast, other drugs that were effective in murine assays: TTP-IOA, LY294002, MCF201-89, BEB55, propranolol, isoproterenol, methoxamine, and glyburide showed no significant protection or mitigation in human CB assays. These data support testing of new candidate clinical radiation protectors and mitigators using human CB clonogenic assays early in the drug discovery process, reducing the need for animal experiments. PMID:23933481

  10. Conditioned medium from human amniotic epithelial cells may induce the differentiation of human umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells into dopaminergic neuron-like cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shu; Sun, Hai-Mei; Yan, Ji-Hong; Xue, Hong; Wu, Bo; Dong, Fang; Li, Wen-Shuai; Ji, Feng-Qing; Zhou, De-Shan

    2013-07-01

    Dopaminergic (DA) neuron therapy has been established as a new clinical tool for treating Parkinson's disease (PD). Prior to cell transplantation, there are two primary issues that must be resolved: one is the appropriate seed cell origin, and the other is the efficient inducing technique. In the present study, human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) were used as the available seed cells, and conditioned medium from human amniotic epithelial cells (ACM) was used as the inducing reagent. Results showed that the proportion of DA neuron-like cells from hUCB-MSCs was significantly increased after cultured in ACM, suggested by the upregulation of DAT, TH, Nurr1, and Pitx3. To identify the process by which ACM induces DA neuron differentiation, we pretreated hUCB-MSCs with k252a, the Trk receptor inhibitor of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF), and found that the proportion of DA neuron-like cells was significantly decreased compared with ACM-treated hUCB-MSCs, suggesting that NGF and BDNF in ACM were involved in the differentiation process. However, we could not rule out the involvement of other unidentified factors in the ACM, because ACM + k252a treatment does not fully block DA neuron-like cell differentiation compared with control. The transplantation of ACM-induced hUCB-MSCs could ameliorate behavioral deficits in PD rats, which may be associated with the survival of engrafted DA neuron-like cells. In conclusion, we propose that hUCB-MSCs are a good source of DA neuron-like cells and that ACM is a potential inducer to obtain DA neuron-like cells from hUCB-MSCs in vitro for an ethical and legal cell therapy for PD.

  11. Molecular and phenotypic characterization of CD133 and SSEA4 enriched very small embryonic-like stem cells in human cord blood.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, A; Nagvenkar, P; Pethe, P; Hinduja, I; Bhartiya, D

    2015-09-01

    Very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs) are immature primitive cells residing in adult and fetal tissues. This study describes enrichment strategy and molecular and phenotypic characterization of human cord blood VSELs. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that a majority of VSELs (LIN(-)/CD45(-)/CD34(+)) were present in the red blood cell (RBC) pellet after Ficoll-Hypaque centrifugation in contrast to the hematopoietic stem cells (LIN(-)/CD45(+)/CD34(+)) in the interphase layer. Thus, after lyses of RBCs, VSELs were enriched using CD133 and SSEA4 antibodies. These enriched cells were small in size (4-6 μm), spherical, exhibited telomerase activity and expressed pluripotent stem cell (OCT4A, OCT4, SSEA4, NANOG, SOX2, REX1), primordial germ cell (STELLA, FRAGILIS) as well as primitive hematopoietic (CD133, CD34) markers at protein and transcript levels. Heterogeneity was noted among VSELs based on subtle differences in expression of various markers studied. DNA analysis and cell cycle studies revealed that a majority of enriched VSELs were diploid, non-apoptotic and in G0/G1 phase, reflecting their quiescent state. VSELs also survived 5-fluorouracil treatment in vitro and treated cells entered into cell cycle. This study provides further support for the existence of pluripotent, diploid and relatively quiescent VSELs in cord blood and suggests further exploration of the subpopulations among them.

  12. Induction of human umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells with embryonic stem cell phenotypes into insulin producing islet-like structure.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bo; Roh, Kyung-Hwan; Lee, Sae-Rom; Lee, Yong-Soon; Kang, Kyung-Sun

    2007-03-23

    Success in islet-transplantation-based therapies for type I diabetes, coupled with a worldwide shortage of transplant-ready islets, has motivated efforts to develop renewable sources of islet-replacement tissue. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have been successfully induced into insulin producing islet-like structure in several studies. However, the source of the ESCs has presented ethical and technical concerns. Here, we isolated a population of stem cells from human cord blood (UCB), which expressed embryo stage specific maker, SSEA-4, and the multi-potential stem cell marker, Oct4. Subsequently, we successfully induced them into insulin-producing islet-like structures, which co-express insulin and C-peptide. These findings might have a significant potential to advance human UCB derived stem-cell-based therapeutics for diabetes.

  13. CD3(+) and/or CD14(+) depletion from cord blood mononuclear cells before ex vivo expansion culture improves total nucleated cell and CD34(+) cell yields.

    PubMed

    Yang, H; Robinson, S N; Lu, J; Decker, W K; Xing, D; Steiner, D; Parmar, S; Shah, N; Champlin, R E; Munsell, M; Leen, A; Bollard, C; Simmons, P J; Shpall, E J

    2010-06-01

    Cord blood (CB) is used increasingly in transplant patients lacking sibling or unrelated donors. A major hurdle in the use of CB is its low cell dose, which is largely responsible for an elevated risk of graft failure and a significantly delayed neutrophil and platelet engraftment. As a positive correlation has been shown between the total nucleated cell (TNC) and CD34(+) cell dose transplanted and time to neutrophil and platelet engraftment, strategies to increase these measures are under development. One strategy includes the ex vivo expansion of CB mononuclear cells (MNC) with MSC in a cytokine cocktail. We show that this strategy can be further improved if CD3(+) and/or CD14(+) cells are first depleted from the CB MNC before ex vivo expansion. Ready translation of this depletion strategy to improve ex vivo CB expansion in the clinic is feasible as clinical-grade devices and reagents are available. Ultimately, the aim of improving TNC and CD34(+) transplant doses is to further improve the rate of neutrophil and platelet engraftment in CB recipients.

  14. A Pilot Study to Evaluate the Co-Infusion of Ex Vivo Expanded Cord Blood Cells With an Unmanipulated Cord Blood Unit in Patients Undergoing Cord Blood Transplant for Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-10

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma

  15. Stem cell therapy to protect and repair the developing brain: a review of mechanisms of action of cord blood and amnion epithelial derived cells

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Melendez, Margie; Yawno, Tamara; Jenkin, Graham; Miller, Suzanne L.

    2013-01-01

    In the research, clinical, and wider community there is great interest in the use of stem cells to reduce the progression, or indeed repair brain injury. Perinatal brain injury may result from acute or chronic insults sustained during fetal development, during the process of birth, or in the newborn period. The most readily identifiable outcome of perinatal brain injury is cerebral palsy, however, this is just one consequence in a spectrum of mild to severe neurological deficits. As we review, there are now clinical trials taking place worldwide targeting cerebral palsy with stem cell therapies. It will likely be many years before strong evidence-based results emerge from these trials. With such trials underway, it is both appropriate and timely to address the physiological basis for the efficacy of stem-like cells in preventing damage to, or regenerating, the newborn brain. Appropriate experimental animal models are best placed to deliver this information. Cell availability, the potential for immunological rejection, ethical, and logistical considerations, together with the propensity for native cells to form teratomas, make it unlikely that embryonic or fetal stem cells will be practical. Fortunately, these issues do not pertain to the use of human amnion epithelial cells (hAECs), or umbilical cord blood (UCB) stem cells that are readily and economically obtained from the placenta and umbilical cord discarded at birth. These cells have the potential for transplantation to the newborn where brain injury is diagnosed or even suspected. We will explore the novel characteristics of hAECs and undifferentiated UCB cells, as well as UCB-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and how immunomodulation and anti-inflammatory properties are principal mechanisms of action that are common to these cells, and which in turn may ameliorate the cerebral hypoxia and inflammation that are final pathways in the pathogenesis of perinatal brain

  16. Conditioned Medium from Placental Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reduces Oxidative Stress during the Cryopreservation of Ex Vivo Expanded Umbilical Cord Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kadekar, Darshana; Rangole, Sonal; Kale, Vaijayanti; Limaye, Lalita

    2016-01-01

    Background The limited cell dose in umbilical cord blood (UCB) necessitates ex vivo expansion of UCB. Further, the effective cryopreservation of these expanded cells is important in widening their use in the clinics. During cryopreservation, cells experience oxidative stress due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Conditioned medium from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs-CM) has been shown to alleviate the oxidative stress during wound healing, Alzheimer’s disease and ischemic disease. This premise prompted us to investigate the influence of MSCs-CM during cryopreservation of expanded UCB cells. Methodology/Principle findings CM-was collected from cord/placental MSCs(C-MSCs-CM, P-MSC-CM). UCB CD34+cells were expanded as suspension cultures in serum free medium containing cytokines for 10 days. Cells were frozen with/without C-MSCs-CM and or P-MSCs-CM in the conventional freezing medium containing 20%FCS +10%DMSO using a programmable freezer and stored in liquid nitrogen. Upon revival, cells frozen with MSCs-CM were found to be superior to cells frozen in conventional medium in terms of viability, CD34+content and clonogenecity. Priming of revived cells for 48 hrs with MSCs-CM further improved their transplantation ability, as compared to those cultured without MSCs-CM. P-MSCs-CM radically reduced the oxidative stress in cryopreserved cells, resulting in better post thaw functionality of CD34+ cells than with C-MSCs-CM. The observed cryoprotective effect of MSCs-CM was primarily due to anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic properties of the MSCs-CM and not because of the exosomes secreted by them. Conclusions/Significance Our data suggest that MSCs-CM can serve as a valuable additive to the freezing or the priming medium for expanded UCB cells, which would increase their clinical applicability. PMID:27780236

  17. Stem cell therapy to protect and repair the developing brain: a review of mechanisms of action of cord blood and amnion epithelial derived cells.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Melendez, Margie; Yawno, Tamara; Jenkin, Graham; Miller, Suzanne L

    2013-10-24

    In the research, clinical, and wider community there is great interest in the use of stem cells to reduce the progression, or indeed repair brain injury. Perinatal brain injury may result from acute or chronic insults sustained during fetal development, during the process of birth, or in the newborn period. The most readily identifiable outcome of perinatal brain injury is cerebral palsy, however, this is just one consequence in a spectrum of mild to severe neurological deficits. As we review, there are now clinical trials taking place worldwide targeting cerebral palsy with stem cell therapies. It will likely be many years before strong evidence-based results emerge from these trials. With such trials underway, it is both appropriate and timely to address the physiological basis for the efficacy of stem-like cells in preventing damage to, or regenerating, the newborn brain. Appropriate experimental animal models are best placed to deliver this information. Cell availability, the potential for immunological rejection, ethical, and logistical considerations, together with the propensity for native cells to form teratomas, make it unlikely that embryonic or fetal stem cells will be practical. Fortunately, these issues do not pertain to the use of human amnion epithelial cells (hAECs), or umbilical cord blood (UCB) stem cells that are readily and economically obtained from the placenta and umbilical cord discarded at birth. These cells have the potential for transplantation to the newborn where brain injury is diagnosed or even suspected. We will explore the novel characteristics of hAECs and undifferentiated UCB cells, as well as UCB-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and how immunomodulation and anti-inflammatory properties are principal mechanisms of action that are common to these cells, and which in turn may ameliorate the cerebral hypoxia and inflammation that are final pathways in the pathogenesis of perinatal brain

  18. Characterization of Transcription Factor Networks Involved in Umbilical Cord Blood CD34+ Stem Cells-Derived Erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Biaoru; Ding, Lianghao; Yang, Chinrang; Kang, Baolin; Liu, Li; Story, Michael D.; Pace, Betty S.

    2014-01-01

    Fetal stem cells isolated from umbilical cord blood (UCB) possess a great capacity for proliferation and differentiation and serve as a valuable model system to study gene regulation. Expanded knowledge of the molecular control of hemoglobin synthesis will provide a basis for rational design of therapies for β-hemoglobinopathies. Transcriptome data are available for erythroid progenitors derived from adult stem cells, however studies to define molecular mechanisms controlling globin gene regulation during fetal erythropoiesis are limited. Here, we utilize UCB-CD34+ stem cells induced to undergo erythroid differentiation to characterize the transcriptome and transcription factor networks (TFNs) associated with the γ/β-globin switch during fetal erythropoiesis. UCB-CD34+ stem cells grown in the one-phase liquid culture system displayed a higher proliferative capacity than adult CD34+ stem cells. The γ/β-globin switch was observed after day 42 during fetal erythropoiesis in contrast to adult progenitors where the switch occurred around day 21. To gain insights into transcription factors involved in globin gene regulation, microarray analysis was performed on RNA isolated from UCB-CD34+ cell-derived erythroid progenitors harvested on day 21, 42, 49 and 56 using the HumanHT-12 Expression BeadChip. After data normalization, Gene Set Enrichment Analysis identified transcription factors (TFs) with significant changes in expression during the γ/β-globin switch. Forty-five TFs were silenced by day 56 (Profile-1) and 30 TFs were activated by day 56 (Profile-2). Both GSEA datasets were analyzed using the MIMI Cytoscape platform, which discovered TFNs centered on KLF4 and GATA2 (Profile-1) and KLF1 and GATA1 for Profile-2 genes. Subsequent shRNA studies in KU812 leukemia cells and human erythroid progenitors generated from UCB-CD34+ cells supported a negative role of MAFB in γ-globin regulation. The characteristics of erythroblasts derived from UCB-CD34+ stem cells

  19. Cord blood transplants supported by co-infusion of mobilized hematopoietic stem cells from a third-party donor.

    PubMed

    Bautista, G; Cabrera, J R; Regidor, C; Forés, R; García-Marco, J A; Ojeda, E; Sanjuán, I; Ruiz, E; Krsnik, I; Navarro, B; Gil, S; Magro, E; de Laiglesia, A; Gonzalo-Daganzo, R; Martín-Donaire, T; Rico, M; Millán, I; Fernández, M N

    2009-03-01

    This open label clinical study provides updated evaluation of the strategy of single unit cord blood transplants (CBTs) with co-infusion of third-party donor (TPD) mobilized hematopoietic stem cells (MHSC). Fifty-five adults with high-risk hematological malignancies, median age 34 years (16-60 years) and weight 70 kg (43-95 kg), received CBTs (median 2.39 x 10(7) total nucleated cell (TNC) per kg and 0.11 x 10(6) CD34+ per kg) and TPD-MHSC (median 2.4 x 10(6) CD34+ per kg and 3.2 x 10(3) CD3+ per kg). Median time to ANC and to CB-ANC >0.5 x 10(9)/l as well as to full CB-chimerism was 10, 21 and 44 days, with maximum cumulative incidences (MCI) of 0.96, 0.95 and 0.91. Median time to unsupported platelets >20 x 10(9)/l was 32 days (MCI 0.78). MCI for grades I-IV and III-IV acute GVHD (aGVHD) were 0.62 and 0.11; 12 of 41 patients (29%) who are at risk developed chronic GVHD, becoming severely extensive in three patients. Relapses occurred in seven patients (MCI=0.17). The main causes of morbi-mortality were post-engraftment infections. CMV reactivations were the most frequent, their incidence declining after the fourth month. Five-year overall survival and disease-free survival (Kaplan-Meier) were 56 % and 47% (63% and 54% for patients cell content and 0-3 HLA mismatches is feasible as a first choice option for adult patients who lack a readily available adequate adult donor. PMID:18850019

  20. Intrahepatic transplantation of CD34+ cord blood stem cells into newborn and adult NOD/SCID mice induce differential organ engraftment.

    PubMed

    Wulf-Goldenberg, Annika; Keil, Marlen; Fichtner, Iduna; Eckert, Klaus

    2012-04-01

    In vivo studies concerning the function of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are limited by relatively low levels of engraftment and the failure of the engrafted HSC preparations to differentiate into functional immune cells after systemic application. In the present paper we describe the effect of intrahepatically transplanted CD34(+) cells from cord blood into the liver of newborn or adult NOD/SCID mice on organ engraftment and differentiation. Analyzing the short and long term time dependency of human cell recruitment into mouse organs after cell transplantation in the liver of newborn and adult NOD/SCID mice by RT-PCR and FACS analysis, a significantly high engraftment was found after transplantation into liver of newborn NOD/SCID mice compared to adult mice, with the highest level of 35% human cells in bone marrow and 4.9% human cells in spleen at day 70. These human cells showed CD19 B-cell, CD34 and CD38 hematopoietic and CD33 myeloid cell differentiation, but lacked any T-cell differentiation. HSC transplantation into liver of adult NOD/SCID mice resulted in minor recruitment of human cells from mouse liver to other mouse organs. The results indicate the usefulness of the intrahepatic application route into the liver of newborn NOD/SCID mice for the investigation of hematopoietic differentiation potential of CD34(+) cord blood stem cell preparations.

  1. Over-expression of Oct4 and Sox2 transcription factors enhances differentiation of human umbilical cord blood cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Guseva, Daria; Rizvanov, Albert A; Salafutdinov, Ilnur I; Kudryashova, Nezhdana V; Palotás, András; Islamov, Rustem R

    2014-09-01

    Gene and cell-based therapies comprise innovative aspects of regenerative medicine. Even though stem cells represent a highly potential therapeutic strategy, their wide-spread exploitation is marred by ethical concerns, potential for malignant transformation and a plethora of other technical issues, largely restricting their use to experimental studies. Utilizing genetically modified human umbilical cord blood mono-nuclear cells (hUCB-MCs), this communication reports enhanced differentiation of transplants in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Over-expressing Oct4 and Sox2 induced production of neural marker PGP9.5, as well as transformation of hUCB-MCs into micro-glial and endothelial lines in ALS spinal cords. In addition to producing new nerve cells, providing degenerated areas with trophic factors and neo-vascularisation might prevent and even reverse progressive loss of moto-neurons and skeletal muscle paralysis.

  2. Transplantation of cryopreserved human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells does not induce sustained recovery after experimental stroke in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Weise, Gesa; Lorenz, Marlene; Pösel, Claudia; Maria Riegelsberger, Ute; Störbeck, Veronika; Kamprad, Manja; Kranz, Alexander; Wagner, Daniel-Christoph; Boltze, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have highlighted the enormous potential of cell-based therapies for stroke not only to prevent ischemic brain damage, but also to amplify endogenous repair processes. Considering its widespread availability and low immunogenicity human umbilical cord blood (HUCB) is a particularly attractive stem cell source. Our goal was to investigate the neurorestorative potential of cryopreserved HUCB mononuclear cells (MNC) after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Human umbilical cord blood MNC or vehicle solution was administered intravenously 24 hours after MCAO. Experimental groups were as follows: (1) quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of host-derived growth factors up to 48 hours after stroke; (2) immunohistochemical analysis of astroglial scarring; (3) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and weekly behavioral tests for 2 months after stroke. Long-term functional outcome and lesion development on MRI were not beneficially influenced by HUCB MNC therapy. Furthermore, HUCB MNC treatment did not change local growth factor levels and glial scarring extent. In summary, we could not demonstrate neurorestorative properties of HUCB MNC after stroke in SHR. Our results advise caution regarding a prompt translation of cord blood therapy into clinical stroke trials as long as deepened knowledge about its precise modes of action is missing. PMID:24169850

  3. Transplantation of cryopreserved human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells does not induce sustained recovery after experimental stroke in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Weise, Gesa; Lorenz, Marlene; Pösel, Claudia; Maria Riegelsberger, Ute; Störbeck, Veronika; Kamprad, Manja; Kranz, Alexander; Wagner, Daniel-Christoph; Boltze, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have highlighted the enormous potential of cell-based therapies for stroke not only to prevent ischemic brain damage, but also to amplify endogenous repair processes. Considering its widespread availability and low immunogenicity human umbilical cord blood (HUCB) is a particularly attractive stem cell source. Our goal was to investigate the neurorestorative potential of cryopreserved HUCB mononuclear cells (MNC) after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Human umbilical cord blood MNC or vehicle solution was administered intravenously 24 hours after MCAO. Experimental groups were as follows: (1) quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of host-derived growth factors up to 48 hours after stroke; (2) immunohistochemical analysis of astroglial scarring; (3) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and weekly behavioral tests for 2 months after stroke. Long-term functional outcome and lesion development on MRI were not beneficially influenced by HUCB MNC therapy. Furthermore, HUCB MNC treatment did not change local growth factor levels and glial scarring extent. In summary, we could not demonstrate neurorestorative properties of HUCB MNC after stroke in SHR. Our results advise caution regarding a prompt translation of cord blood therapy into clinical stroke trials as long as deepened knowledge about its precise modes of action is missing. PMID:24169850

  4. Umbilical cord blood lead levels in California

    SciTech Connect

    Satin, K.P.; Neutra, R.R.; Guirguis, G.; Flessel, P. )

    1991-05-01

    During the fall of 1984, we conducted a survey of umbilical cord blood lead levels of 723 live births that occurred at 5 hospitals located in 5 cities in California. Historical ambient air lead levels were used as a qualitative surrogate of air and dust exposure. The area-specific cord blood means (all means {approximately} 5 micrograms/dl), medians, deciles, and distributions did not vary among locations. The California distributions included means that were lower than the 6.6 micrograms/dl reported in Needleman et al.'s Boston study in 1979. Indeed, the entire California distribution was shifted to the left of the Boston study distribution, even though 3% of the California cord lead levels exceeded 10 micrograms/dl--the level above which Needleman et al. have documented psychoneurological effects in children during the first few years of life. Fourteen percent of premature babies had cord blood lead levels above 10 micrograms/dl. The association between prematurity (i.e., less than 260 d gestation) and elevated (greater than 5 micrograms/dl) cord blood lead was observed in all hospitals and yielded a relative risk of 2.9 (95% CI: .9, 9.2) and a population attributable risk of 47%. Further research is needed to confirm this association and to explore the roles of endogenous and exogenous sources of lead exposure to the mothers who give birth to premature infants.

  5. Pilot social feasibility study for the establishment of a public human umbilical cord blood stem cell bank in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Meissner-Roloff, Madelein; Young, Wendy; Rangaka, Isabella; Lombaard, Hennie; Dhai, Ames; Tsotsi, Norma; Pepper, Michael S

    2012-12-01

    There is a large unmet need in South Africa for bone marrow transplantation. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is an important source of stem cells for the treatment of haematological and non-haematological diseases. Access to the two existing private umbilical cord blood stem cell banks (UCB SCBs) in South Africa is limited to individuals that can afford it, which further aggravates the ever increasing divide between families from different socio-economic classes. The problem is compounded by a severe global shortage of genetically compatible samples, representative of the South African demographics. Establishing a public human UCB SCB in South Africa would provide more South Africans with access to previously unavailable treatment in the form of affordable, genetically compatible stem cells for bone marrow transplantation. A public UCB SCB has many facets to consider, one of which is public preparedness and support for the bank. This was assessed in a social feasibility pilot study which is reported here. In addition to the findings of this social feasibility study, other important considerations for establishing a public human UCB SCB in SA include; (a) testing the samples for HIV and other infectious diseases (required for compliance with international regulatory standards); (b) flow cytometric analysis for enumeration of CD34+ UCB stem cells; (c) mapping of HLA genotypes/alleles; and (d) a study of the economic feasibility of this endeavour.The social feasibility study was conducted to gauge public preparedness and support for a public SCB through patient interviews and questionnaires. The process was dynamic due to its novel nature for interviewers and interviewees alike. Many obstacles were met and dealt with which lead to the compilation of results discussed here in the form of a pilot social feasibility study.In the South African context, we are faced with unique and rich challenges relating to cultural and religious differences that are further augmented by

  6. Safety aspects of cord blood banking.

    PubMed

    Warwick, R M; Barbara, J A

    1998-06-01

    The safety of cord blood for transplantation depends upon a considered approach to donor selection, testing and processing of donations. It should be undertaken within a total quality system and good manufacturing practice facilities. Protocols should be developed based upon risk assessment and cost efficiency. In this context the retesting of donors for HIV is considered and the risk of a serological window period HIV transmission by cord blood illustrated to be minimal compared to the risks of transplant procedures or of not having a donor. PMID:9712492

  7. T-Regulatory Cell and CD3 Depleted Double Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation in Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-04

    Hematologic Malignancy; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blast Crisis; Anemia, Refractory, With Excess of Blasts; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disease; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Follicular Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Mantle-Cell Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Lymphoma; Large Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Burkitt's Lymphoma; High Grade Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

  8. Antigen Presenting Cell-Mediated Expansion of Human Umbilical Cord Blood Yields Log-Scale Expansion of Natural Killer Cells with Anti-Myeloma Activity

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nina; Martin-Antonio, Beatriz; Yang, Hong; Ku, Stephanie; Lee, Dean A.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.; Decker, William K.; Li, Sufang; Robinson, Simon N.; Sekine, Takuya; Parmar, Simrit; Gribben, John; Wang, Michael; Rezvani, Katy; Yvon, Eric; Najjar, Amer; Burks, Jared; Kaur, Indreshpal; Champlin, Richard E.; Bollard, Catherine M.; Shpall, Elizabeth J.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are important mediators of anti-tumor immunity and are active against several hematologic malignancies, including multiple myeloma (MM). Umbilical cord blood (CB) is a promising source of allogeneic NK cells but large scale ex vivo expansion is required for generation of clinically relevant CB-derived NK (CB-NK) cell doses. Here we describe a novel strategy for expanding NK cells from cryopreserved CB units using artificial antigen presenting feeder cells (aAPC) in a gas permeable culture system. After 14 days, mean fold expansion of CB-NK cells was 1848-fold from fresh and 2389-fold from cryopreserved CB with >95% purity for NK cells (CD56+/CD3−) and less than 1% CD3+ cells. Though surface expression of some cytotoxicity receptors was decreased, aAPC-expanded CB-NK cells exhibited a phenotype similar to CB-NK cells expanded with IL-2 alone with respect to various inhibitory receptors, NKG2C and CD94 and maintained strong expression of transcription factors Eomesodermin and T-bet. Furthermore, CB-NK cells formed functional immune synapses with and demonstrated cytotoxicity against various MM targets. Finally, aAPC-expanded CB-NK cells showed significant in vivo activity against MM in a xenogenic mouse model. Our findings introduce a clinically applicable strategy for the generation of highly functional CB-NK cells which can be used to eradicate MM. PMID:24204673

  9. Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-18

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult

  10. Reduced HIV-stimulated T-helper cell reactivity in cord blood with short-course antiretroviral treatment for prevention of maternal–infant transmission

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, L; Meddows-Taylor, S; Gray, G; Trabattoni, D; Clerici, M; Shearer, G M; Tiemessen, C

    2001-01-01

    T-helper cell responses to HIV have been associated with protection against maternal-infant HIV transmission in the absence of antiretroviral treatment, but the effects of antiretroviral treatment, now widely used for prevention, on development of these cell-mediated responses is unknown. We tested whether development of T-helper cell responses to HIV and other antigens would be affected by exposure to short-course regimens of zidovudine-lamivudine (ZDV-3TC) given to prevent maternal-infant HIV transmission. Cord blood samples were collected from 41 infants of HIV-infected mothers enrolled in a clinical trial in which they were treated with regimens of ZDV-3TC and from 29 infants whose HIV-infected mothers were not treated with any antiretroviral drugs. T-helper cell reactivity to HIV envelope peptides and other antigens was measured in vitro using a sensitive culture supernatant titration assay based on IL-2-dependent proliferation. Infants in the clinical trial were followed to 18 months to determine their HIV infection status, and venous blood samples were re-tested at 4·5 and 9 months for T-cell reactivity to HIV. HIV-stimulated T-helper cell reactivity in cord blood was detected 10-fold less frequently among those exposed to antiretroviral prophylaxis (2·4%) than among those unexposed (24·1%) (P = 0·007). Reductions in HIV-stimulated responses in cord blood occurred despite detectable HIV RNA (mean 3·38 standard deviation 0·76 log10 copies per ml) at delivery among treated women and occurred independent of treatment duration. Our results suggest that short-course antiretroviral treatment given to prevent maternal-infant HIV transmission may attenuate HIV-stimulated T-cell memory responses in the neonate. PMID:11298132

  11. Over-expression of Oct4 and Sox2 transcription factors enhances differentiation of human umbilical cord blood cells in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, Daria; Rizvanov, Albert A.; Salafutdinov, Ilnur I.; Kudryashova, Nezhdana V.; Palotás, András; Islamov, Rustem R.

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • Gene and cell-based therapies comprise innovative aspects of regenerative medicine. • Genetically modified hUCB-MCs enhanced differentiation of cells in a mouse model of ALS. • Stem cells successfully transformed into micro-glial and endothelial lines in spinal cords. • Over-expressing oct4 and sox2 also induced production of neural marker PGP9.5. • Formation of new nerve cells, secreting trophic factors and neo-vascularisation could improve symptoms in ALS. - Abstract: Gene and cell-based therapies comprise innovative aspects of regenerative medicine. Even though stem cells represent a highly potential therapeutic strategy, their wide-spread exploitation is marred by ethical concerns, potential for malignant transformation and a plethora of other technical issues, largely restricting their use to experimental studies. Utilizing genetically modified human umbilical cord blood mono-nuclear cells (hUCB-MCs), this communication reports enhanced differentiation of transplants in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Over-expressing Oct4 and Sox2 induced production of neural marker PGP9.5, as well as transformation of hUCB-MCs into micro-glial and endothelial lines in ALS spinal cords. In addition to producing new nerve cells, providing degenerated areas with trophic factors and neo-vascularisation might prevent and even reverse progressive loss of moto-neurons and skeletal muscle paralysis.

  12. Establishment of an adherent cell feeder layer from human umbilical cord blood for support of long-term hematopoietic progenitor cell growth.

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Z Q; Burkholder, J K; Qiu, P; Schultz, J C; Shahidi, N T; Yang, N S

    1994-01-01

    Previous attempts to establish a stromal cell feeder layer from human umbilical cord blood (HUCB) have met with very limited success. It has been suggested that there is an insufficient number of stromal precursor cells in HUCB to form a hematopoietic-supporting feeder layer in primary cultures. The present study shows that HUCB does contain a significant accessory cell population that routinely develops into a confluent, adherent cell layer under defined primary culture conditions. HUCB-derived adherent layers were shown to support long-term hematopoietic activity for an average of 4 months. This was achieved by using a customized coverslip with a modified surface structure as the cell attachment substratum and using a specialized culture feeding regime. We have characterized the various cell types (including fibroblasts, macrophages, and endothelial cells) and extracellular matrix proteins (including fibronectin, collagen III, and laminin) that were present in abundance in the HUCB-derived adherent cell layer. In contrast, oil red O-staining fat cells were rarely detected. ELISA and bioassays showed that stem cell factor and interleukin 6 were produced by the HUCB stromal cell cultures, but interleukin 3 or granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor was not detected. Application of this hematopoietic culture system to transgenic and gene therapy studies of stem cells is discussed. Images PMID:7527553

  13. Umbilical cord blood donation: public or private?

    PubMed

    Ballen, K K; Verter, F; Kurtzberg, J

    2015-10-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is a graft source for patients with malignant or genetic diseases who can be cured by allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), but who do not have an appropriately HLA-matched family or volunteer unrelated adult donor. Starting in the 1990s, unrelated UCB banks were established, accepting donations from term deliveries and storing UCB units for public use. An estimated 730 000 UCB units have been donated and stored to date and ~35 000 UCB transplants have been performed worldwide. Over the past 20 years, private and family banks have grown rapidly, storing ~4 million UCB units for a particular patient or family, usually charging an up-front and yearly storage fee; therefore, these banks are able to be financially sustainable without releasing UCB units. Private banks are not obligated to fulfill the same regulatory requirements of the public banks. The public banks have released ~30 times more UCB units for therapy. Some countries have transitioned to an integrated banking model, a hybrid of public and family banking. Today, pregnant women, their families, obstetrical providers and pediatricians are faced with multiple choices about the disposition of their newborn's cord blood. In this commentary, we review the progress of UCB banking technology; we also analyze the current data on pediatric and adult unrelated UCB, including the recent expansion of interest in transplantation for hemoglobinopathies, and discuss emerging studies on the use of autologous UCB for neurologic diseases and regenerative medicine. We will review worldwide approaches to UCB banking, ethical considerations, criteria for public and family banking, integrated banking ideas and future strategies for UCB banking.

  14. Cord Blood Banking Standards: Autologous Versus Altruistic.

    PubMed

    Armitage, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Cord blood (CB) is either donated to public CB banks for use by any patient worldwide for whom it is a match or stored in a private bank for potential autologous or family use. It is a unique cell product that has potential for treating life-threatening diseases. The majority of CB products used today are for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and are accessed from public banks. CB is still evolving as a hematopoietic stem cell source, developing as a source for cellular immunotherapy products, such as natural killer, dendritic, and T-cells, and fast emerging as a non-hematopoietic stem cell source in the field of regenerative medicine. This review explores the regulations, standards, and accreditation schemes that are currently available nationally and internationally for public and private CB banking. Currently, most of private banking is under regulated as compared to public banking. Regulations and standards were initially developed to address the public arena. Early responses from the medical field regarding private CB banking was that at the present time, because of insufficient scientific data to support autologous banking and given the difficulty of making an accurate estimate of the need for autologous transplantation, private storage of CB as "biological insurance" should be discouraged (1, 2, 3). To ensure success and the true realization of the full potential of CB, whether for autologous or allogeneic use, it is essential that each and every product provided for current and future treatments meets high-quality, international standards.

  15. Cord Blood Banking Standards: Autologous Versus Altruistic

    PubMed Central

    Armitage, Sue

    2016-01-01

    Cord blood (CB) is either donated to public CB banks for use by any patient worldwide for whom it is a match or stored in a private bank for potential autologous or family use. It is a unique cell product that has potential for treating life-threatening diseases. The majority of CB products used today are for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and are accessed from public banks. CB is still evolving as a hematopoietic stem cell source, developing as a source for cellular immunotherapy products, such as natural killer, dendritic, and T-cells, and fast emerging as a non-hematopoietic stem cell source in the field of regenerative medicine. This review explores the regulations, standards, and accreditation schemes that are currently available nationally and internationally for public and private CB banking. Currently, most of private banking is under regulated as compared to public banking. Regulations and standards were initially developed to address the public arena. Early responses from the medical field regarding private CB banking was that at the present time, because of insufficient scientific data to support autologous banking and given the difficulty of making an accurate estimate of the need for autologous transplantation, private storage of CB as “biological insurance” should be discouraged (1, 2, 3). To ensure success and the true realization of the full potential of CB, whether for autologous or allogeneic use, it is essential that each and every product provided for current and future treatments meets high-quality, international standards. PMID:26779485

  16. Human cord blood cells and myocardial infarction: effect of dose and route of administration on infarct size.

    PubMed

    Henning, Robert J; Burgos, Jose D; Vasko, Mark; Alvarado, Felipe; Sanberg, Cyndy D; Sanberg, Paul R; Morgan, Michael B

    2007-01-01

    There is no consensus regarding the optimal dose of stem cells or the optimal route of administration for the treatment of acute myocardial infarction. Bone marrow cells, containing hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells, in doses of 0.5 x 10(6) to >30 x 10(6) have been directly injected into the myocardium or into coronary arteries or infused intravenously in subjects with myocardial infarctions to reduce infarct size and improve heart function. Therefore, we determined the specific effects of different doses of human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (HUCBC), which contain hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells, on infarct size. In order to determine the optimal technique for stem cell administration, HUCBC were injected directly into the myocardium (IM), or into the LV cavity with the ascending aorta transiently clamped to facilitate coronary artery perfusion (IA), or injected intravenously (IV) in rats 1-2 h after the left anterior coronary artery was permanently ligated. Immune suppressive therapy was not given to any rat. One month later, the infarct size in control rat hearts treated with only Isolyte averaged 23.7 +/- 1.7% of the LV muscle area. Intramyocardial injection of HUCBC reduced the infarct size by 71% with 0.5 x 10(6) HUCBC and by 93% with 4 x 10(6) HUCBC in comparison with the controls (p < 0.001). Intracoronary injection reduced the infarction size by 47% with 0.5 x 10(6) HUCBC and by 80% with 4 x 10(6) HUCBC (p < 0.001), and IV HUCBC reduced infarct size by 51% with 0.5 x 10(6) and by 75-77% with 16-32 million HUCBC (p < 0.001) in comparison with control hearts. With 4 x 10(6) HUCBC, infarction size was 65% smaller with IM HUCBC than with IA HUCBC and 78% smaller than with IV HUCBC (p < 0.05). Nevertheless, IM, IA, and IV HUCBC all produced significant reductions in infarct size in comparison with Isolyte-treated infarcted hearts without requirements for host immune suppression. The present experiments demonstrate that the optimal dose

  17. Proposed policies and procedures for the establishment of a cord blood bank.

    PubMed

    McCullough, J; Clay, M E; Fautsch, S; Noreen, H; Segall, M; Perry, E; Stroncek, D

    1994-01-01

    To carry out cord blood transplants from allogeneic unrelated donors, cord blood stem cell banks must be established. This report proposed the policies and procedures that can be used to establish cord blood banks. The areas covered include donor consent and suitability criteria; infectious and genetic disease testing; collection, processing, and preservation of the cord blood; retention of specimens for special testing; confidentiality; documentation and record keeping; establishment of a quality control program; and related regulatory issues. There are no technologic impediments to establishing cord blood banks. Agreement on some standard policies and procedures would facilitate exchange of cord blood stem cells among transplant centers and should increase the number of transplants that can be done.

  18. Cord blood banking: volume reduction of cord blood units using a semi-automated closed system.

    PubMed

    Armitage, S; Fehily, D; Dickinson, A; Chapman, C; Navarrete, C; Contreras, M

    1999-03-01

    Clinical evidence indicates that placental/umbilical cord blood (CB) is an alternative source of haematopoietic stem cells for bone marrow reconstitution. To establish a CB bank large panels of frozen, HLA-typed CB units need to be stored. Cryopreserved, unprocessed CB units require vast storage space. This study describes a method, using the Optipress II Automated Blood Component Extractor (Opti II) from Baxter Healthcare Corporation, to reduce the volume of the CB collection, preserving the quantity and quality of the progenitor cells, in a closed system. The CB collection was transferred to a triple bag system, centrifuged to produce a buffy coat layer and processed using a standard Opti II protocol to separate the whole blood into three components: plasma, buffy coat and buffy coat-depleted red cell concentrate. The buffy coat volume was standardised to 25 ml; mean reduced volume of 24.5 ml (s.d. 1.5 ml) with 53% red cell depletion. Good recovery of cells was observed: 92%, 98%, 96% and 106% recovery of nucleated, mononuclear, CD34+ and total colony-forming cells, respectively. Using this method for processing CB units reduces storage requirement by two-thirds but preserves the quantity and quality of the progenitor cells. PMID:10100566

  19. Comparison of outcomes after unrelated cord blood and unmanipulated haploidentical stem cell transplantation in adults with acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, A; Labopin, M; Sanz, G; Piemontese, S; Arcese, W; Bacigalupo, A; Blaise, D; Bosi, A; Huang, H; Karakasis, D; Koc, Y; Michallet, M; Picardi, A; Sanz, J; Santarone, S; Sengelov, H; Sierra, J; Vincent, L; Volt, F; Nagler, A; Gluckman, E; Ciceri, F; Rocha, V; Mohty, M

    2015-09-01

    Outcomes after unmanipulated haploidentical stem cell transplantation (Haplo) and after unrelated cord blood transplantation (UCBT) are encouraging and have become alternative options to treat patients with high-risk acute leukemia without human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matched donor. We compared outcomes after UCBT and Haplo in adults with de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Median follow-up was 24 months. Analysis was performed separately for patients with AML, n=918 (Haplo=360, UCBT=558) and ALL, n=528 (Haplo=158 and UCBT=370). UCBT was associated with delayed engraftment and higher graft failure in both AML and ALL recipients. In multivariate analysis, UCBT was associated with lower incidence of chronic graft-vs-host disease both in the AML group (hazard ratio (HR)=0.63, P=0.008) and in the ALL group (HR=0.58, P=0.01). Not statistically significant differences were observed between Haplo and UCBT for relapse incidence (HR=0.95, P=0.76 for AML and HR=0.82, P=0.31 for ALL), non-relapse mortality (HR=1.16, P=0.47 for AML and HR=1.23, P=0.23 for ALL) and leukemia-free survival (HR 0.78, P=0.78 for AML and HR=1.00, P=0.84 for ALL). There were no statistically differences on main outcomes after unmanipulated Haplo and UCBT, and both approaches are valid for acute leukemia patients lacking a HLA matched donor. Both strategies expand the donor pool for patients in need.

  20. Evaluation of potential ionizing irradiation protectors and mitigators using clonogenic survival of human umbilical cord blood hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Goff, Julie P; Shields, Donna S; Wang, Hong; Skoda, Erin M; Sprachman, Melissa M; Wipf, Peter; Garapati, Venkata Krishna; Atkinson, Jeffrey; London, Barry; Lazo, John S; Kagan, Valerian; Epperly, Michael W; Greenberger, Joel S

    2013-11-01

    We evaluated the use of colony formation (colony-forming unit-granulocyte macrophage [CFU-GM], burst-forming unit erythroid [BFU-E], and colony-forming unit-granulocyte-erythroid-megakaryocyte-monocytes [CFU-GEMM]) by human umbilical cord blood (CB) hematopoietic progenitor cells for testing novel small molecule ionizing irradiation protectors and mitigators. The following compounds were added before (protection) or after (mitigation) ionizing irradiation: GS-nitroxides (JP4-039 and XJB-5-131), the bifunctional sulfoxide MMS-350, the phosphoinositol-3-kinase inhibitor LY29400, triphenylphosphonium-imidazole fatty acid, the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (MCF-201-89), the p53/mdm2/mdm4 inhibitor (BEB55), methoxamine, isoproterenol, propranolol, and the adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel blocker (glyburide). The drugs XJB-5-131, JP4-039, and MMS-350 were radiation protectors for CFU-GM. JP4-039 was also a radiation protector for CFU-GEMM. The drugs XJB-5-131, JP4-039, and MMS-350 were radiation mitigators for BFU-E, MMS-350 and JP4-039 were mitigators for CFU-GM, and MMS350 was a mitigator for CFU-GEMM. In contrast, other drugs were effective in murine assays; TTP-IOA, LY294002, MCF201-89, BEB55, propranolol, isoproterenol, methoxamine, and glyburide but showed no significant protection or mitigation in human CB assays. These data support the testing of new candidate clinical radiation protectors and mitigators using human CB clonogenic assays early in the drug discovery process, thus reducing the need for animal experiments.

  1. Therapy for Cerebral Palsy by Human Umbilical Cord Blood Mesenchymal Stem Cells Transplantation Combined With Basic Rehabilitation Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Che; Huang, Li; Gu, Jiaowei

    2015-01-01

    Background. Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common cause leading to childhood disability. Human umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) transplantation is a promising alternative considering the safety and efficacy in current reports. This report represents a case of hUCB-MSCs transplantation combined with basic rehabilitation treatment beginning as early as age 6 months with follow-up as long as 5 years. Methods. A 6-year-old female patient was diagnosed with CP at age 6 months. The patient accepted 4 infusions of intravenous hUCB-MSCs in each course and received 4 courses of transplantation totally. A series of assessments were performed before the first transplantation, including laboratory tests, CDCC Infant Mental Development Scale, and Gross Motor Function Measure-88 (GMFM-88). Then annual assessments using the GMFM-88, Ashworth spasm assessment, and comprehensive function assessment scale were made in addition to the annual laboratory tests. In addition, electroencephalography and brain magnetic resonance imaging were conducted before transplantation and in the follow-up phase. Rehabilitation and safety follow-up have been ongoing for 5 years up to date. Results. There was no complaint about adverse effects during hospitalization or postoperative follow-up. Motor function recovered to normal level according to the evaluation of scales. Language function improved significantly. Linguistic rehabilitation therapy was enhanced for further improvement. Conclusions. The clinical application of hUC-MSCs combined with basic rehabilitation treatment was effective and safe for improving motor and comprehensive function in a patient with CP. PMID:27335947

  2. Comparison of molecular profiles of human mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, placenta and adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Heo, June Seok; Choi, Youjeong; Kim, Han-Soo; Kim, Hyun Ok

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are clinically useful due to their capacity for self-renewal, their immunomodulatory properties and tissue regenerative potential. These cells can be isolated from various tissues and exhibit different potential for clinical applications according to their origin, and thus comparative studies on MSCs from different tissues are essential. In this study, we investigated the immunophenotype, proliferative potential, multilineage differentiation and immunomodulatory capacity of MSCs derived from different tissue sources, namely bone marrow, adipose tissue, the placenta and umbilical cord blood. The gene expression profiles of stemness-related genes [octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4), sex determining region Y-box (SOX)2, MYC, Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4), NANOG, LIN28 and REX1] and lineage‑related and differentiation stage-related genes [B4GALNT1 (GM2/GS2 synthase), inhibin, beta A (INHBA), distal-less homeobox 5 (DLX5), runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), proliferator‑activated receptor gamma (PPARG), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPA), bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP7) and SOX9] were compared using RT-PCR. No significant differences in growth rate, colony-forming efficiency and immunophenotype were observed. Our results demonstrated that MSCs derived from bone marrow and adipose tissue shared not only in vitro tri-lineage differentiation potential, but also gene expression profiles. While there was considerable inter-donor variation in DLX5 expression between MSCs derived from different tissues, its expression appears to be associated with the osteogenic potential of MSCs. Bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs) significantly inhibited allogeneic T cell proliferation possibly via the high levels of the immunosuppressive cytokines, IL10 and TGFB1. Although MSCs derived from different tissues and fibroblasts share many characteristics, some of the marker genes, such as B4GALNT1 and DLX5 may be useful for

  3. Comparison of molecular profiles of human mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, placenta and adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    HEO, JUNE SEOK; CHOI, YOUJEONG; KIM, HAN-SOO; KIM, HYUN OK

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are clinically useful due to their capacity for self-renewal, their immunomodulatory properties and tissue regenerative potential. These cells can be isolated from various tissues and exhibit different potential for clinical applications according to their origin, and thus comparative studies on MSCs from different tissues are essential. In this study, we investigated the immunophenotype, proliferative potential, multilineage differentiation and immunomodulatory capacity of MSCs derived from different tissue sources, namely bone marrow, adipose tissue, the placenta and umbilical cord blood. The gene expression profiles of stemness-related genes [octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4), sex determining region Y-box (SOX)2, MYC, Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4), NANOG, LIN28 and REX1] and lineage-related and differentiation stage-related genes [B4GALNT1 (GM2/GS2 synthase), inhibin, beta A (INHBA), distal-less homeobox 5 (DLX5), runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPA), bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP7) and SOX9] were compared using RT-PCR. No significant differences in growth rate, colony-forming efficiency and immunophenotype were observed. Our results demonstrated that MSCs derived from bone marrow and adipose tissue shared not only in vitro trilineage differentiation potential, but also gene expression profiles. While there was considerable interdonor variation in DLX5 expression between MSCs derived from different tissues, its expression appears to be associated with the osteogenic potential of MSCs. Bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs) significantly inhibited allogeneic T cell proliferation possibly via the high levels of the immunosuppressive cytokines, IL10 and TGFB1. Although MSCs derived from different tissues and fibroblasts share many characteristics, some of the marker genes, such as B4GALNT1 and DLX5 may be useful for the

  4. A cell surface marker gene transferred with a retroviral vector into CD34+ cord blood cells is expressed by their T-cell progeny in the SCID-hu thymus.

    PubMed

    Champseix, C; Maréchal, V; Khazaal, I; Schwartz, O; Fournier, S; Schlegel, N; Dranoff, G; Danos, O; Blot, P; Vilmer, E; Heard, J M; Péault, B; Lehn, P

    1996-07-01

    Gene transduction into immature hematopoietic cells collected at birth from the umbilical cord could be useful for the treatment of genetic or acquired disorders of the hematopoietic system diagnosed during pregnancy. The SCID-hu mouse is a convenient model to investigate T-cell lineage gene therapy, since it allows replication of human intrathymic T-cell development. CD34+ cells isolated from cord blood were cocultured with CRIP MFG-murine CD2 (mCD2) cells that produce recombinant retroviruses encoding the mCD2 antigen, a cell surface marker easily detectable by flow cytometry. After 3 and 4 days in coculture, a mean of 19% and 39% human hematopoietic cells, respectively, expressed the mCD2 antigen. CD34+ cells cocultured for 4 days were used to reconstitute human fetal thymus implanted in SCID mice. Five to 10 weeks later, the mCD2 antigen was detected on approximately 10% of human thymocytes repopulating the thymic grafts in four of nine SCID mouse chimeras. Vector genomes were detected in graft cell DNA by Southern blot. Analysis of vector integration indicated that positive cells were of polyclonal origin in three animals and predominantly monoclonal in the other one. Our data show that foreign genes can be transduced into CD34+ cord blood cells endowed with T-cell differentiation potential, and suggest strategies for T-cell lineage gene therapy in the neonate.

  5. Cadmium content of umbilical cord blood

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinowitz, M.; Finch, H.

    1984-06-01

    Cadmium was measured in the umbilical cord blood at birth from 94 healthy babies. Samples were dried and ashed at low temperatures with an oxygen plasma prior to atomic absorption spectrometry. The concentration of cadmium ranged from 0.003 to 0.210 ..mu..g/dl, with a mean of 0.045 +/- 0.063 (SD). Blood lead, maternal smoking, and proximity of residence to automobile traffic were not statistically related to cadmium levels.

  6. Impact of length of cryopreservation and origin of cord blood units on hematologic recovery following cord blood transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kurita, N; Frassoni, F; Chiba, S; Podestà, M

    2015-06-01

    As the history of the cord blood banking system has lengthened, the number of cord blood units (CBUs) cryopreserved for years has increased. The global expansion of cord blood banking resulted in active international exchange of CBUs. To determine whether long-term cryopreservation and international shipment of CBUs affect the quality of the units and outcome after transplantation, we retrospectively analyzed the quality of 95 CBUs and the hematologic recovery of 127 patients with hematological malignancy following single-unit cord blood transplantation. Of the 127 CBUs used to transplant, 42 units were cryopreserved for long periods (5-11.8 years), and 44 units were shipped from distant countries. We found that length of cryopreservation and origin of CBUs did not affect the ratio of viable total-nucleated cells after thawing. Also, neutrophil engraftment was not affected by long-term cryopreservation (> 5 years) or origin (from distant countries), (hazard ratio, 0.91 and 1.2; P=0.65 and 0.41; respectively). The number of CD34(+) cells before freezing (> 1.4 cells/kg recipient) was the only factor that enhanced neutrophil engraftment (hazard ratio, 1.8; P<0.01). This suggests that length of cryopreservation and origin need not be prioritized over the CD34(+) cell dose when selecting CBUs.

  7. Simultaneous maintenance of human cord blood SCID-repopulating cells and expansion of committed progenitors at low O2 concentration (3%).

    PubMed

    Ivanovic, Zoran; Hermitte, Francis; Brunet de la Grange, Philippe; Dazey, Bernard; Belloc, Francis; Lacombe, Francis; Vezon, Gérard; Praloran, Vincent

    2004-01-01

    In the present work, we tested the hypothesis that liquid cultures (LCs) of cord blood CD34+ cells at an appropriate low O2 concentration could simultaneously allow colony-forming cell (CFC) expansion and nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency mice-repopulating cell (SRC) maintenance. We first found that 3% was the minimal O2 concentration, still allowing the same rate of CFC expansion as at 20% O2. We report here that 7-day LCs of cord blood CD34+ cells at 3% O2 maintain SRC better than at 20% O2 and allow a similar amplification of CFCs (35- to 50-fold) without modifying the CD34+ cell proliferation. Their phenotypic profile (antigens: HLA-DR, CD117, CD33, CD13, CD11b, CD14, CD15, and CD38) was not modified, with exception of CD133, whose expression was lower at 3% O2. These results suggest that low O2 concentrations similar to those found in bone marrow participates in the regulation of hematopoiesis by favoring stem cell-renewing divisions. This expansion method that avoids stem cell exhaustion could be of paramount interest in hematopoietic transplantation by allowing the use of small-size grafts in adults. PMID:15342936

  8. Low oxygen tension favored expansion and hematopoietic reconstitution of CD34(+) CD38(-) cells expanded from human cord blood-derived CD34(+) Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziyan; Du, Zheng; Cai, Haibo; Ye, Zhaoyang; Fan, Jinli; Tan, Wen-Song

    2016-07-01

    Oxygen tension is an important factor that regulates hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in both in vivo hematopoietic microenvironment and ex vivo culture system. Although the effect of oxygen tension on ex vivo expansion of HSCs was extensively studied, there were no clear descriptions on physiological function and gene expression analysis of HSCs under different oxygen tensions. In this study, the effects of oxygen tension on ex vivo expansion characteristics of human umbilical cord blood (UCB)-derived CD34(+) cells are evaluated. Moreover, the physiological function of expanded CD34(+) cells was assessed by secondary expansion ability ex vivo and hematopoietic reconstitution ability in vivo. Also, genetic profiling was applied to analyze the expression of genes related to cell function. It was found that low oxygen tension favored expansion of CD34(+) CD38(-) cells. Additionally, CD34(+) cells expanded under low oxygen tension showed better secondary expansion ability and reconstitution ability than those under atmospheric oxygen concentration. Finally, the genetic profiling of CD34(+) CD38(-) cells cultured under low oxygen tension was more akin to freshly isolated cells. These results collectively demonstrate that low oxygen tension was able to better maintain both self-renewal and hematopoietic reconstitution potential and may lay an experimental basis for clinical transplantation of HSCs.

  9. Can Routine Commercial Cord Blood Banking Be Scientifically and Ethically Justified?

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Background to the debate: Umbilical cord blood—the blood that remains in the placenta after birth—can be collected and stored frozen for years. A well-accepted use of cord blood is as an alternative to bone marrow as a source of hematopoietic stem cells for allogeneic transplantation to siblings or to unrelated recipients; women can donate cord blood for unrelated recipients to public banks. However, private banks are now open that offer expectant parents the option to pay a fee for the chance to store cord blood for possible future use by that same child (autologous transplantation.) PMID:15737000

  10. Banking Umbilical Cord Blood (UCB) Stem Cells: Awareness, Attitude and Expectations of Potential Donors from One of the Largest Potential Repository (India)

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Deeksha

    2016-01-01

    Background The concept of Umbilical Cord blood (UCB) stem cells is emerging as a non-invasive, efficacious alternative source of hematopoietic stem cells to treat a variety of blood and bone marrow diseases, blood cancers, metabolic disorders and immune deficiencies. Aim of the present study was to determine the level of awareness about banking UCB among pregnant women in India. We also assessed patient perception for banking of UCB and explored the patient expectations of banking UCB in future. This is the first study to assess current attitudes, in a sample population of potential donors from one of the largest potential UCB repository (India). Obtaining this information may help optimize recruitment efforts and improve patient education. Material and Method Present explorative questionnaire based survey included 254 pregnant women in the final analysis. Results We established only 26.5% pregnant women in our study population knew what exactly is meant by UCB. A large proportion (55.1%) was undecided on whether they want to bank UCB or not. Women were more aware of the more advertised private cord blood banking compared to public banking. More than half of the pregnant women expected their obstetrician to inform them regarding UCB. One-third of the women in our population had undue expectations from banking of the UCB. Conclusion Obstetricians should play a more active role in explaining the patients regarding pros and cons of UCB banking. PMID:27228155

  11. Assessment of Glial Scar, Tissue Sparing, Behavioral Recovery and Axonal Regeneration following Acute Transplantation of Genetically Modified Human Umbilical Cord Blood Cells in a Rat Model of Spinal Cord Contusion

    PubMed Central

    Mukhamedshina, Yana O.; Garanina, Ekaterina E.; Masgutova, Galina A.; Galieva, Luisa R.; Sanatova, Elvira R.; Chelyshev, Yurii A.; Rizvanov, Albert A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective and Methods This study investigated the potential for protective effects of human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (UCB-MCs) genetically modified with the VEGF and GNDF genes on contusion spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats. An adenoviral vector was constructed for targeted delivery of VEGF and GDNF to UCB-MCs. Using a rat contusion SCI model we examined the efficacy of the construct on tissue sparing, glial scar severity, the extent of axonal regeneration, recovery of motor function, and analyzed the expression of the recombinant genes VEGF and GNDF in vitro and in vivo. Results Transplantation of UCB-MCs transduced with adenoviral vectors expressing VEGF and GDNF at the site of SCI induced tissue sparing, behavioral recovery and axonal regeneration comparing to the other constructs tested. The adenovirus encoding VEGF and GDNF for transduction of UCB-MCs was shown to be an effective and stable vehicle for these cells in vivo following the transplantation into the contused spinal cord. Conclusion Our results show that a gene delivery using UCB-MCs-expressing VEGF and GNDF genes improved both structural and functional parameters after SCI. Further histological and behavioral studies, especially at later time points, in animals with SCI after transplantation of genetically modified UCB-MCs (overexpressing VEGF and GDNF genes) will provide additional insight into therapeutic potential of such cells. PMID:27003408

  12. Angiogenic and anti-inflammatory properties of mesenchymal stem cells from cord blood: soluble factors and extracellular vesicles for cell regeneration.

    PubMed

    Montemurro, Tiziana; Viganò, Mariele; Ragni, Enrico; Barilani, Mario; Parazzi, Valentina; Boldrin, Valentina; Lavazza, Cristiana; Montelatici, Elisa; Banfi, Federica; Lauri, Eleonora; Giovanelli, Silvia; Baccarin, Marco; Guerneri, Silvana; Giordano, Rosaria; Lazzari, Lorenza

    2016-01-01

    In a recent work, our group showed the existence of two distinct mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) subsets within human umbilical cord blood. One less proliferative and short-living (SL-CBMSC), the other with higher growth rate and long-living (LL-CBMSC), and therefore better suited for regenerative medicine applications. We examined whether LL-CBMSC possess peculiar paracrine properties able to affect angiogenesis or inflammatory processes. It was shown for the first time that pro-angiogenic, proliferation-stimulating and tissue repairing factors were released at high level not only as soluble cytokines, but also as mRNA precursors embedded in membrane vesicles. The combination of this primary (proteic factors interacting with surface receptors) and delayed (mRNA transferred and translated via vesicle fusion and cargo release) interaction in endothelial target cells resulted in strong blood vessel induction with the development of capillary-like structures. In addition, LL-CBMSC dynamically modulated their release of pro-angiogenic and anti-inflammatory factors in an in vitro model of damage. In conclusion, LL-CBMSC synthesize and secrete multiple factors that may be attuned in response to the status of the target cell, a crucial requisite when paracrine mechanisms are needed at onset of tissue regeneration.

  13. In vivo differentiation of human amniotic epithelial cells into cardiomyocyte-like cells and cell transplantation effect on myocardial infarction in rats: comparison with cord blood and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Fang, Cheng-Hu; Jin, Jiyong; Joe, Jun-Ho; Song, Yi-Sun; So, Byung-Im; Lim, Sang Moo; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Woo, Sang-Keun; Ra, Jeong-Chan; Lee, Young-Yiul; Kim, Kyung-Soo

    2012-01-01

    Human amniotic epithelial cells (h-AECs), which have various merits as a cell source for cell therapy, are known to differentiate into cardiomyocytes in vitro. However, the ability of h-AECs to differentiate into cardiomyocytes in vivo and their cell transplantation effects on myocardial infarction are still unknown. In this study, we assessed whether h-AECs could differentiate into cardiomyocytes in vivo and whether h-AECs transplantation can decrease infarct size and improve cardiac function, in comparison to transplantation of cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or adipose tissue-derived MSCs. For our study, we injected h-AECs, cord blood-derived MSCs, adipose tissue-derived MSCs, and saline into areas of myocardial infarction in athymic nude rats. After 4 weeks, 3% of the surviving h-AECs expressed myosin heavy chain, a marker specific to the myocardium. Compared with the saline group, all cell-implanted groups showed a higher ejection fraction, lower infarct area by positron emission tomography and histology, and more abundant myocardial gene and protein expression in the infarct area. We showed that h-AECs can differentiate into cardiomyocyte-like cells, decrease infarct size, and improve cardiac function in vivo. The beneficial effects of h-AECs were comparable to those of cord blood and adipose tissue-derived MSCs. These results support the need for further studies of h-AECs as a cell source for myocardial regeneration due to their plentiful availability, low immunity, and lack of ethical issues related to their use.

  14. In vivo differentiation of human amniotic epithelial cells into cardiomyocyte-like cells and cell transplantation effect on myocardial infarction in rats: comparison with cord blood and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Fang, Cheng-Hu; Jin, Jiyong; Joe, Jun-Ho; Song, Yi-Sun; So, Byung-Im; Lim, Sang Moo; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Woo, Sang-Keun; Ra, Jeong-Chan; Lee, Young-Yiul; Kim, Kyung-Soo

    2012-01-01

    Human amniotic epithelial cells (h-AECs), which have various merits as a cell source for cell therapy, are known to differentiate into cardiomyocytes in vitro. However, the ability of h-AECs to differentiate into cardiomyocytes in vivo and their cell transplantation effects on myocardial infarction are still unknown. In this study, we assessed whether h-AECs could differentiate into cardiomyocytes in vivo and whether h-AECs transplantation can decrease infarct size and improve cardiac function, in comparison to transplantation of cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or adipose tissue-derived MSCs. For our study, we injected h-AECs, cord blood-derived MSCs, adipose tissue-derived MSCs, and saline into areas of myocardial infarction in athymic nude rats. After 4 weeks, 3% of the surviving h-AECs expressed myosin heavy chain, a marker specific to the myocardium. Compared with the saline group, all cell-implanted groups showed a higher ejection fraction, lower infarct area by positron emission tomography and histology, and more abundant myocardial gene and protein expression in the infarct area. We showed that h-AECs can differentiate into cardiomyocyte-like cells, decrease infarct size, and improve cardiac function in vivo. The beneficial effects of h-AECs were comparable to those of cord blood and adipose tissue-derived MSCs. These results support the need for further studies of h-AECs as a cell source for myocardial regeneration due to their plentiful availability, low immunity, and lack of ethical issues related to their use. PMID:22776022

  15. Post-Thaw Viable CD45+ Cells and Clonogenic Efficiency are Associated with Better Engraftment and Outcomes after Single Cord Blood Transplantation in Adult Patients with Malignant Diseases.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Nerea; García-Cadenas, Irene; Barba, Pere; Martino, Rodrigo; Azqueta, Carmen; Ferrà, Christelle; Canals, Carme; Sierra, Jorge; Valcárcel, David; Querol, Sergio

    2015-12-01

    The quantity of cells is widely accepted as the main factor influencing the outcome after umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT) however, the quality of the cord blood units (CBUs) has been less studied. In order to determine the impact of qualitative variables in UCBT outcomes, we conducted a multicenter retrospective study in adult patients with hematological malignancies who underwent single UCBT after a common myeloablative conditioning regimen. One hundred and ten patients from 3 institutions [median age, 35 years (range 18-55)] were included. Quantitative (TNC and total CD34+cells) and qualitative variables [viable CD45+ (vCD45+), vCD34+ and clonogenic efficiency [(CLONE), quotient of post-thaw colony-forming units (CFU)] and pre-freeze CD34+ cells predicted engraftment in univariate analysis however, only 2 qualitative variables remained significant in the multivariate analysis. Infusion of more than 2 × 10(7) post-thaw vCD45+ cells per kilogram was significantly associated with faster neutrophil (P = .01), platelet engraftment (P = .01), higher disease-free (P = .01) and overall survival (0.02). In addition, CLONE ≥ 20% predicted a faster neutrophil (P = .005), platelet engraftment (P = .01) and contributed to decrease the non-relapse mortality (P = .02). Our study suggests that the vCD45+ cells dose and CLONE are powerful surrogate markers of graft quality and can potentially help on CBUs selection if tested with representative reference samples.

  16. Monocytes play an IL-12-dependent crucial role in driving cord blood NK cells to produce IFN-g in response to Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Guilmot, Aline; Bosse, Julie; Carlier, Yves; Truyens, Carine

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported that foetuses congenitally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, mount an adult-like parasite-specific CD8(+) T-cell response, producing IFN-g, and present an altered NK cell phenotype, possibly reflecting a post-activation state supported by the ability of the parasite to trigger IFN-g synthesis by NK cells in vitro. We here extended our knowledge on NK cell activation by the parasite. We compared the ability of T. cruzi to activate cord blood and adult NK cells from healthy individuals. Twenty-four hours co-culture of cord blood mononuclear cells with T. cruzi trypomastigotes and IL-15 induced high accumulation of IFN-g transcripts and IFN-g release. TNF-a, but not IL-10, was also produced. This was associated with up-regulation of CD69 and CD54, and down-regulation of CD62L on NK cells. The CD56(bright) NK cell subset was the major IFN-g responding subset (up to 70% IFN-g-positive cells), while CD56(dim) NK cells produced IFN-g to a lesser extent. The response points to a synergy between parasites and IL-15. The neonatal response, observed in all newborns, remained however slightly inferior to that of adults. Activation of IL-15-sensitized cord blood NK cells by the parasite required contacts with live/intact parasites. In addition, it depended on the engagement of TLR-2 and 4 and involved IL-12 and cross-talk with monocytes but not with myeloid dendritic cells, as shown by the use of neutralizing antibodies and cell depletion. This work highlights the ability of T. cruzi to trigger a robust IFN-g response by IL-15-sensitized human neonatal NK cells and the important role of monocytes in it, which might perhaps partially compensate for the neonatal defects of DCs. It suggests that monocyte- and IL-12- dependent IFN-g release by NK cells is a potentially important innate immune response pathway allowing T. cruzi to favour a type 1 immune response in neonates.

  17. Decreased interleukin-15 from activated cord versus adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells and the effect of interleukin-15 in upregulating antitumor immune activity and cytokine production in cord blood.

    PubMed

    Qian, J X; Lee, S M; Suen, Y; Knoppel, E; van de Ven, C; Cairo, M S

    1997-10-15

    Interleukin-15 (IL-15) is an important lymphokine regulating natural killer (NK) activity, T-cell proliferation, and T-cell cytotoxic activities. We hypothesized that the reduced expression and production of IL-15 from cord blood (CB) may contribute to the immaturity of CB immunity and potentially delay immune reconstitution after CB transplantation. We compared the expression and production of IL-15 from activated cord versus adult mononuclear cells (MNCs) and the regulatory mechanisms associated with IL-15 expression in CB MNCs. We have also studied the effect of exogenous IL-15 stimulation on CB and adult peripheral blood (APB) MNCs in terms of NK and lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) activities and cytokine induction. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated CB and APB MNCs were used to determine IL-15 expression and protein production by Northern analysis and Western immunoblot analysis. IL-15 mRNA expression and protein accumulation in CB MNC were 25% +/- 2.0% (12 hours, n = 4, P < .05) and 30% +/- 2.5% (12 hours, n = 3, P < .05), respectively, when compared with APB MNCs. Nuclear run-on assays showed no differences between CB and APB MNCs during basal levels of transcription and after transcriptional activation. However, the half-life of IL-15 mRNA was approximately twofold lower in activated CB MNCs than in activated APB MNCs (CB: 101 +/- 5.8 minutes v APB: 210 +/- 8.2 minutes, n = 3, P < .05). Exogenous IL-15 significantly enhanced CB NK and LAK activities up to comparable levels of APB (P < .05). IL-15 also significantly induced interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) protein production (days 1, 3, and 6, P < .05, n = 3) in CB MNCs. IL-15-stimulated LAK cells induced a significant lytic response against two acute lymphoblastic cell lines and two pediatric neuroblastoma cell lines. Both NK and LAK activities were augmented by the combination of IL-12 and IL-15, and the low-dose combination of IL-12 and IL-15 achieved similar

  18. Middle-term expansion of hematopoietic cord blood cells with new human stromal cell line feeder-layers and different cytokine cocktails.

    PubMed

    De Angeli, S; Baiguera, S; Del Pup, L; Pavan, E; Gajo, G B; Di Liddo, R; Conconi, M T; Grandi, C; Schiavon, O; Parnigotto, P P

    2009-12-01

    Cord blood (CB) is a source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and is an alternative to bone marrow for allogenic transplantation in patients with hematological disorders. The improvement of HSC in vitro expansion is one of the main challenges in cell therapy. Stromal components and soluble factors, such as cytokines, can be useful to induce in vitro cell expansion. Hence, we investigated whether feeder-layers from new stromal cell lines and different exogenous cytokine cocktails induce HSC expansion in middle-term cultures. CB HSC middle-term expansion was carried out in co-cultures on different feeder-layers exposed to three different cytokine cocktails. CB HSC expansion was also carried out in stroma-free cultures in the presence of different cytokine cocktails. Clonogenic tests were performed, and cell growth levels were evaluated. Moreover, the presence of VCAM-1 mRNA was assessed, and the mesenchymal cell-like phenotype expression was detected. All feeder-layers were able to induce a significant clonogenic growth with respect to the control culture, and all of the cytokine cocktails induced a significant increase in CB cell expansion indexes, even though no potential variation dependent on their composition was noted. The modulative effects of the different cocktails, exerted on each cell line used, was dependent on their composition. Finally, all cell lines were positive for CD73, CD117 and CD309, similar to mesenchymal stem cells present in adult bone marrow and in other human tissues, and negative for the hematopoietic markers. These data indicate that our cell lines have, not only a stromal cell-like phenotype, but also a mesenchymal cell-like phenotype, and they have the potential to support in vitro expansion of CB HSCs. Moreover, exogenous cytokines can be used in synergism with feeder-layers to improve the expansion levels of CB HSCs in preparation for their clinical use in allogenic transplantation. PMID:19885627

  19. Increased Proportion of Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Population in Cord Blood of Neonates Born to Mothers with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hadarits, Orsolya; Zóka, András; Barna, Gábor; Al-Aissa, Zahra; Rosta, Klára; Rigó, János; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Somogyi, Anikó; Firneisz, Gábor

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) population in the cord blood of neonates born to mothers with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in a hypothesis generating pilot study, due to that, neonatal polycythemia may be the consequence of GDM pregnancy. Forty-five pregnant women with GDM (last trimester mean HbA1C = 33.9 mmol/mol) and 42 (nondiabetic) control pregnant women were enrolled after their routine 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) between the 24th and 28th gestational week (with expected differences in their mean routine clinical characteristics: plasma glucose at OGTT: 0' = 5.07 vs. 4.62 mM, 120' = 8.9 vs. 5.76 mM, age = 35.07 vs. 31.66 years, prepregnancy body mass index = 27.9 vs. 23.9 kg/m(2), GDM vs. control, respectively) on a voluntary basis after signing the informed consent. EDTA-treated cord blood samples were analyzed by flow cytometry and the software Kaluza1.2 using CD45 and CD34-specific fluorescent antibodies to identify the HSPC population (CD34(+) cells within the CD45(dim) blast gate). The proportion of CD34(+)CD45(dim) HSPCs among the nucleated cells was significantly (P < 0.05, statistical power = 60.8%) higher in the cord blood samples of neonates born to mothers with GDM (median 0.38%) compared to neonates born to nondiabetic mothers (median 0.32%) and according to treatment types (P < 0.05) median: control 0.32%, GDM-diet only 0.37%, GDM-on insulin 0.45%; control versus GDM on insulin (P < 0.05). The increased proportion of circulating CD34(+)CD45(dim) cells in the cord blood may possibly be related to altered fetal stem cell mobilization in GDM pregnancy, yet these results should be interpreted only as preliminary due to the small sample sizes.

  20. Good practices in collecting umbilical cord and placental blood 1

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Lauren Auer; Bernardino, Elizabeth; Crozeta, Karla; Guimarães, Paulo Ricardo Bittencourt

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to identify the factors related to the quality of umbilical cord and placental blood specimens, and define best practices for their collection in a government bank of umbilical cord and placental blood. Method: this was a descriptive study, quantitative approach, performed at a government umbilical cord and placental blood bank, in two steps: 1) verification of the obstetric, neonatal and operational factors, using a specific tool for gathering data as non-participant observers; 2) definition of best practices by grouping non-conformities observed before, during and after blood collection. The data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and the following statistical software: Statistica(r) and R(r). Results: while there was a correlation with obstetrical and neonatal factors, there was a larger correlation with operational factors, resulting in the need to adjust the professional practices of the nursing staff and obstetrical team involved in collecting this type of blood. Based on these non-conformities we defined best practices for nurses before, during and after blood collection. Conclusion: the best practices defined in this study are an important management tool for the work of nurses in obtaining blood specimens of high cell quality. PMID:27556876

  1. Repairing neural injuries using human umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao; Ma, Quan-Hong

    2013-06-01

    Stem cells are promising sources for repairing damaged neurons and glial cells in neural injuries and for replacing dead cells in neurodegenerative diseases. An essential step for stem cell-based therapy is to generate large quantities of stem cells and develop reliable culture conditions to direct efficient differentiation of specific neuronal and glial subtypes. The human umbilical cord and umbilical cord blood (UCB) are rich sources of multiple stem cells, including hematopoietic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, unrestricted somatic stem cells, and embryonic-like stem cells. Human UC/UCB-derived cells are able to give rise to multiple cell types of neural lineages. Studies have shown that UCB and UCB-derived cells can survive in injured sites in animal models of ischemic brain damage and spinal cord injuries, and promote survival and prevent cell death of local neurons and glia. Human UCB is easy to harvest and purify. Moreover, unlike embryonic stem cells, the use of human UCB is not limited by ethical quandaries. Therefore, human UCB is an attractive source of stem cells for repairing neural injuries.

  2. The special case of property rights in umbilical cord blood for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Munzer, S R

    1999-01-01

    In this Article, Professor Stephen R. Munzer makes a case for limited property rights in umbilical cord blood. Professor Munzer proposes that the unique nature of cord blood distinguishes it from body wastes and qualifies it as a body part in which property rights vest. Employing a theory of property, based in part on the articulation of the principles of utility and efficiency, justice and equality, and "labor-desert," he explores legal and philosophical arguments that justify the acknowledgment of such rights. He also discusses concerns over alleged generous granting of patents in the area of cord blood stem cells in light of these principles. Significant aspects of health policy are explored with particular focus on the potential value of using cord blood to treat various diseases and disorders. Professor Munzer discusses various difficult cases involving the exercise of property rights in umbilical cord blood with respect to the interests and/or motives of newborns, parents, and other parties. He argues that some of the concerns associated with the commercialization and commodification of cord blood are not serious enough to warrant significant barriers to market exchanges of property rights in cord blood. In addition, he concludes that the particular nature and harvesting of cord blood do not make its commodification morally problematic. Finally, Professor Munzer reinforces his treatment of property rights in cord blood by addressing objections that view property as "propriety," as a pragmatic institution, or as social relations.

  3. Thymic function recovery after unrelated donor cord blood or T-cell depleted HLA-haploidentical stem cell transplantation correlates with leukemia relapse

    PubMed Central

    Clave, Emmanuel; Lisini, Daniela; Douay, Corinne; Giorgiani, Giovanna; Busson, Marc; Zecca, Marco; Moretta, Francesca; Acquafredda, Gloria; Brescia, Letizia P.; Locatelli, Franco; Toubert, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    Use of alternative donors/sources of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), such as cord blood (CB) or HLA-haploidentical (Haplo)-related donors, is associated with a significant delay in immune reconstitution after transplantation. Long-term T-cell immune reconstitution largely relies on the generation of new T cells in the recipient thymus, which can be evaluated through signal joint (sj) and beta T-cell-Receptor Excision Circles (TREC) quantification. We studied two groups of 33 and 24 children receiving, respectively, HSC Transplantation (HSCT) from an HLA-haploidentical family donor or an unrelated CB donor, for both malignant (46) and non-malignant disorders (11). Relative and absolute sj and beta-TREC values indicated comparable thymic function reconstitution at 3 and 6 months after the allograft in both groups. Compared to children with non-malignant disorders, those with hematological malignancies had significantly lower pre-transplantation TREC counts. Patients who relapsed after HSCT had a significantly less efficient thymic function both before and 6 months after HSCT with especially low beta-TREC values, this finding suggesting an impact of early intra-thymic T-cell differentiation on the occurrence of leukemia relapse. PMID:23459761

  4. Fetal exposure to a diabetic intrauterine environment resulted in a failure of cord blood endothelial progenitor cell adaptation against chronic hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Dincer, U Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has long-term health consequences, and fetal exposure to a diabetic intrauterine environment increases cardiovascular risk for her adult offspring. Some part of this could be related to their endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). Understanding the vessel-forming ability of human umbilical cord blood (HUCB)-derived endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) against pathological stress such as GDM response to hypoxia could generate new therapeutic strategies. This study aims to investigate the role of chronic hypoxia in EPCs functional and vessel-forming ability in GDM subjects. Each ECFC was expressed in endothelial and pro-angiogenic specific markers, namely endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), platelet (PECAM-1) endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1, vascular endothelial-cadherin CdH5 (Ca-dependent cell adhesion molecule), vascular endothelial growth factor A, (VEGFA) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1). Chronic hypoxia did not affect CdH5, but PECAM1 MRNA expressions were increased in control and GDM subjects. Control hypoxic and GDM normoxic VEGFA MRNA expressions and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF1α) protein expressions were significantly increased in HUCB ECFCs. GDM resulted in most failure of HUCB ECFC adaptation and eNOS protein expressions against chronic hypoxia. Chronic hypoxia resulted in an overall decline in HUCB ECFCs’ proliferative ability due to reduction of clonogenic capacity and diminished vessel formation. Furthermore, GDM also resulted in most failure of cord blood ECFC adaptation against chronic hypoxic environment. PMID:25565870

  5. Toxoplasmosis in cord blood transplantation recipients.

    PubMed

    Bautista, G; Ramos, A; Forés, R; Regidor, C; Ruiz, E; de Laiglesia, A; Navarro, B; Bravo, J; Portero, F; Sanjuan, I; Fernández, M N; Cabrera, R

    2012-10-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a devastating opportunistic infection that can affect immunocompromised patients such as cord blood transplantation (CBT) recipients. The clinical characteristics of 4 toxoplasmosis CBT patients treated at our institution are reviewed, together with 5 cases collected from the literature. The rate of toxoplasmosis in our hospital was 6% in CBT recipients and 0.2% in other types of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (P < 0.001). Five patients (56%) presented disseminated toxoplasmosis and 4 patients (44%) had localized infection in the central nervous system. In 5 of the 9 patients considered (56%), cytomegalovirus viral replication had been detected before the clinical onset of toxoplasmosis. Seven patients (78%) had previously developed graft-versus-host disease. All patients who exhibited disseminated disease died due to Toxoplasma infection. Pre-transplant serology was positive in 1 patient, negative in 3 patients, and not performed in another. Only 1 of these 5 patients with disseminated disease had received Toxoplasma prophylaxis with cotrimoxazole. It could be concluded that mortality in CBT patients with disseminated toxoplasmosis is unacceptably high. The negative results of serology in the majority of these cases, and its unspecific clinical presentation, makes diagnosis exceedingly difficult. Better diagnostic tests and prophylaxis strategy are needed in CBT recipients.

  6. Human Adipose-Tissue Derived Stromal Cells in Combination with Hypoxia Effectively Support Ex Vivo Expansion of Cord Blood Haematopoietic Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Andreeva, Elena R.; Buravkov, Sergey V.; Romanov, Yury A.; Buravkova, Ludmila B.

    2015-01-01

    The optimisation of haematopoietic stem and progenitor cell expansion is on demand in modern cell therapy. In this work, haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) have been selected from unmanipulated cord blood mononuclear cells (cbMNCs) due to adhesion to human adipose-tissue derived stromal cells (ASCs) under standard (20%) and tissue-related (5%) oxygen. ASCs efficiently maintained viability and supported further HSPC expansion at 20% and 5% O2. During co-culture with ASCs, a new floating population of differently committed HSPCs (HSPCs-1) grew. This suspension was enriched with СD34+ cells up to 6 (20% O2) and 8 (5% O2) times. Functional analysis of HSPCs-1 revealed cobble-stone area forming cells (CAFCs) and lineage-restricted colony-forming cells (CFCs). The number of CFCs was 1.6 times higher at tissue-related O2, than in standard cultivation (20% O2). This increase was related to a rise in the number of multipotent precursors - BFU-E, CFU-GEMM and CFU-GM. These changes were at least partly ensured by the increased concentration of MCP-1 and IL-8 at 5% O2. In summary, our data demonstrated that human ASCs enables the selection of functionally active HSPCs from unfractionated cbMNCs, the further expansion of which without exogenous cytokines provides enrichment with CD34+ cells. ASCs efficiently support the viability and proliferation of cord blood haematopoietic progenitors of different commitment at standard and tissue-related O2 levels at the expense of direct and paracrine cell-to-cell interactions. PMID:25919031

  7. Residues 39-56 of Stem Cell Factor Protein Sequence Are Capable of Stimulating the Expansion of Cord Blood CD34+ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Bin; Jiang, Wenhong; Fan, Jie; Dai, Wei; Ding, Xinxin; Jiang, Yongping

    2015-01-01

    Background Stem cell factor (SCF) can stimulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) expansion; however, the specific structural region(s) of SCF protein that are critical for this function are still unknown. A novel monoclonal antibody (named 23C8) against recombinant human SCF (rhSCF) was previously found to inhibit the ability of rhSCF to enhance HSC expansion, making it possible to identify the relevant active region to HSC. Methods Eleven polypeptides were synthesized, which were designed to cover the full-length of rhSCF, with overlaps that are at least 3 amino acids long. ELISA was used to identify the polypeptide(s) that specifically react with the anti-SCF. The effects of the synthetic polypeptides on human HSC expansion, or on the ability of the full-length rhSCF to stimulate cell proliferation, were evaluated ex vivo. Total cell number was monitored using hemocytometer whereas CD34+ cell number was calculated based on the proportion determined via flow cytometry on day 6 of culture. Results Of all polypeptides analyzed, only one, named P0, corresponding to the SCF protein sequence at residues 39–56, was recognized by 23C8 mAb during ELISA. P0 stimulated the expansion of CD34+ cells derived from human umbilical cord blood (UCB). Addition of P0 increased the numbers of total mononucleated cells and CD34+ cells, by ~2 fold on day 6. P0 also showed partial competition against full-length rhSCF in the ex vivo cell expansion assay. Conclusion Residues 39–56 of rhSCF comprise a critical functional region for its ability to enhance expansion of human UCB CD34+ cells. The peptide P0 is a potential candidate for further development as a synthetic substitute for rhSCF in laboratory and clinical applications. PMID:26505626

  8. Institutional Knots: A Comparative Analysis of Cord Blood Policy in Canada and the United States.

    PubMed

    Denburg, Avram

    2016-02-01

    Umbilical cord blood is a rich source of blood stem cells, which are of critical clinical importance in the treatment of a variety of malignant and genetic conditions requiring stem cell transplantation. Many countries have established national public cord blood banks; such banks often coexist with a panoply of private options for cord blood banking. Until recently, Canada was the only G8 country without a national cord blood bank. This differs markedly from the United States, which years ago established a national cord blood bank policy and inventory. This article investigates potential reasons for this discrepancy through a comparative analysis of the evolution of programs and policies on national cord blood banking in Canada and the United States. My analysis suggests that cross-national discrepancies in policy on public cord blood banking were determined primarily by institutional factors, principal among them formal governmental structure and the legacy of past policies. Institutional entrepreneurialism in the health sector played a constitutive role in the earlier evolution of national cord blood policy in the United States as compared to Canada. PMID:26567379

  9. Institutional Knots: A Comparative Analysis of Cord Blood Policy in Canada and the United States.

    PubMed

    Denburg, Avram

    2016-02-01

    Umbilical cord blood is a rich source of blood stem cells, which are of critical clinical importance in the treatment of a variety of malignant and genetic conditions requiring stem cell transplantation. Many countries have established national public cord blood banks; such banks often coexist with a panoply of private options for cord blood banking. Until recently, Canada was the only G8 country without a national cord blood bank. This differs markedly from the United States, which years ago established a national cord blood bank policy and inventory. This article investigates potential reasons for this discrepancy through a comparative analysis of the evolution of programs and policies on national cord blood banking in Canada and the United States. My analysis suggests that cross-national discrepancies in policy on public cord blood banking were determined primarily by institutional factors, principal among them formal governmental structure and the legacy of past policies. Institutional entrepreneurialism in the health sector played a constitutive role in the earlier evolution of national cord blood policy in the United States as compared to Canada.

  10. MiRNAs and piRNAs from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell extracellular vesicles induce cell survival and inhibit cell differentiation of cord blood hematopoietic stem cells: a new insight in transplantation

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, Luciana; Trino, Stefania; Laurenzana, Ilaria; Simeon, Vittorio; Calice, Giovanni; Raimondo, Stefania; Podestà, Marina; Santodirocco, Michele; Di Mauro, Lazzaro; La Rocca, Francesco; Caivano, Antonella; Morano, Annalisa; Frassoni, Francesco; Cilloni, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), including umbilical cord blood CD34+ stem cells (UCB-CD34+), are used for the treatment of several diseases. Although different studies suggest that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSC) support hematopoiesis, the exact mechanism remains unclear. Recently, extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been described as a novel avenue of cell communication, which may mediate BM-MSC effect on HSC. In this work, we studied the interaction between UCB-CD34+ cells and BM-MSC derived EVs. First, by sequencing EV derived miRNAs and piRNAs we found that EVs contain RNAs able to influence UCB-CD34+ cell fate. Accordingly, a gene expression profile of UCB-CD34+ cells treated with EVs, identified about 100 down-regulated genes among those targeted by EV-derived miRNAs and piRNAs (e.g. miR-27b/MPL, miR-21/ANXA1, miR-181/EGR2), indicating that EV content was able to modify gene expression profile of receiving cells. Moreover, we demonstrated that UCB-CD34+ cells, exposed to EVs, significantly changed different biological functions, becoming more viable and less differentiated. UCB-CD34+ gene expression profile also identified 103 up-regulated genes, most of them codifying for chemokines, cytokines and their receptors, involved in chemotaxis of different BM cells, an essential function of hematopoietic reconstitution. Finally, the exposure of UCB-CD34+ cells to EVs caused an increased expression CXCR4, paralleled by an in vivo augmented migration from peripheral blood to BM niche in NSG mice. This study demonstrates the existence of a powerful cross talk between BM-MSC and UCB-CD34+ cells, mediated by EVs, providing new insight in the biology of cord blood transplantation. PMID:26760763

  11. MiRNAs and piRNAs from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell extracellular vesicles induce cell survival and inhibit cell differentiation of cord blood hematopoietic stem cells: a new insight in transplantation.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Luciana; Trino, Stefania; Laurenzana, Ilaria; Simeon, Vittorio; Calice, Giovanni; Raimondo, Stefania; Podestà, Marina; Santodirocco, Michele; Di Mauro, Lazzaro; La Rocca, Francesco; Caivano, Antonella; Morano, Annalisa; Frassoni, Francesco; Cilloni, Daniela; Del Vecchio, Luigi; Musto, Pellegrino

    2016-02-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), including umbilical cord blood CD34+ stem cells (UCB-CD34+), are used for the treatment of several diseases. Although different studies suggest that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSC) support hematopoiesis, the exact mechanism remains unclear. Recently, extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been described as a novel avenue of cell communication, which may mediate BM-MSC effect on HSC. In this work, we studied the interaction between UCB-CD34+ cells and BM-MSC derived EVs. First, by sequencing EV derived miRNAs and piRNAs we found that EVs contain RNAs able to influence UCB-CD34+ cell fate. Accordingly, a gene expression profile of UCB-CD34+ cells treated with EVs, identified about 100 down-regulated genes among those targeted by EV-derived miRNAs and piRNAs (e.g. miR-27b/MPL, miR-21/ANXA1, miR-181/EGR2), indicating that EV content was able to modify gene expression profile of receiving cells. Moreover, we demonstrated that UCB-CD34+ cells, exposed to EVs, significantly changed different biological functions, becoming more viable and less differentiated. UCB-CD34+ gene expression profile also identified 103 up-regulated genes, most of them codifying for chemokines, cytokines and their receptors, involved in chemotaxis of different BM cells, an essential function of hematopoietic reconstitution. Finally, the exposure of UCB-CD34+ cells to EVs caused an increased expression CXCR4, paralleled by an in vivo augmented migration from peripheral blood to BM niche in NSG mice. This study demonstrates the existence of a powerful cross talk between BM-MSC and UCB-CD34+ cells, mediated by EVs, providing new insight in the biology of cord blood transplantation.

  12. MiRNAs and piRNAs from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell extracellular vesicles induce cell survival and inhibit cell differentiation of cord blood hematopoietic stem cells: a new insight in transplantation.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Luciana; Trino, Stefania; Laurenzana, Ilaria; Simeon, Vittorio; Calice, Giovanni; Raimondo, Stefania; Podestà, Marina; Santodirocco, Michele; Di Mauro, Lazzaro; La Rocca, Francesco; Caivano, Antonella; Morano, Annalisa; Frassoni, Francesco; Cilloni, Daniela; Del Vecchio, Luigi; Musto, Pellegrino

    2016-02-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), including umbilical cord blood CD34+ stem cells (UCB-CD34+), are used for the treatment of several diseases. Although different studies suggest that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSC) support hematopoiesis, the exact mechanism remains unclear. Recently, extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been described as a novel avenue of cell communication, which may mediate BM-MSC effect on HSC. In this work, we studied the interaction between UCB-CD34+ cells and BM-MSC derived EVs. First, by sequencing EV derived miRNAs and piRNAs we found that EVs contain RNAs able to influence UCB-CD34+ cell fate. Accordingly, a gene expression profile of UCB-CD34+ cells treated with EVs, identified about 100 down-regulated genes among those targeted by EV-derived miRNAs and piRNAs (e.g. miR-27b/MPL, miR-21/ANXA1, miR-181/EGR2), indicating that EV content was able to modify gene expression profile of receiving cells. Moreover, we demonstrated that UCB-CD34+ cells, exposed to EVs, significantly changed different biological functions, becoming more viable and less differentiated. UCB-CD34+ gene expression profile also identified 103 up-regulated genes, most of them codifying for chemokines, cytokines and their receptors, involved in chemotaxis of different BM cells, an essential function of hematopoietic reconstitution. Finally, the exposure of UCB-CD34+ cells to EVs caused an increased expression CXCR4, paralleled by an in vivo augmented migration from peripheral blood to BM niche in NSG mice. This study demonstrates the existence of a powerful cross talk between BM-MSC and UCB-CD34+ cells, mediated by EVs, providing new insight in the biology of cord blood transplantation. PMID:26760763

  13. Concise Review: Ex Vivo Expansion of Cord Blood-Derived Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells: Basic Principles, Experimental Approaches, and Impact in Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Guzmán, Patricia; Fernández-Sánchez, Verónica

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) play key roles in the production of mature blood cells and in the biology and clinical outcomes of hematopoietic transplants. The numbers of these cells, however, are extremely low, particularly in umbilical cord blood (UCB); thus, ex vivo expansion of human UCB-derived HSCs and HPCs has become a priority in the biomedical field. Expansion of progenitor cells can be achieved by culturing such cells in the presence of different combinations of recombinant stimulatory cytokines; in contrast, expansion of actual HSCs has proved to be more difficult because, in addition to needing recombinant cytokines, HSCs seem to deeply depend on the presence of stromal cells and/or elements that promote the activation of particular self-renewal signaling pathways. Hence, there is still controversy regarding the optimal culture conditions that should be used to achieve this. To date, UCB transplants using ex vivo-expanded cells have already been performed for the treatment of different hematological disorders, and although results are still far from being optimal, the advances are encouraging. Recent studies suggest that HSCs may also give rise to nonhematopoietic cells, such as neural, cardiac, mesenchymal, and muscle cells. Such plasticity and the possibility of producing nonhematopoietic cells at the clinical scale could bring new alternatives for the treatment of neural, metabolic, orthopedic, cardiac, and neoplastic disorders. Once standardized, ex vivo expansion of human HSCs/HPCs will surely have a positive impact in regenerative medicine. PMID:24101670

  14. Fostering public cord blood banking and research in Canada.

    PubMed

    Isasi, Rosario; Dalpe, Gratien; Knoppers, Bartha M

    2013-12-01

    In June 2013, Canadian Blood Services (CBS) established the National Public Cord Blood Bank (NPCBB) accessible to Canadian and international patients and researchers. The NPCBB promotes efforts that contribute to research and improved clinical care by making units not suitable for banking or transplantation available for research. In the context of the NPCBB of the CBS, this article will focus on the practical tools (e.g., consent protocols) developed to optimize umbilical cord blood (UCB) banking and research while enabling ethical provenance of UCB stem cells. The Canadian approach represents an ideal model for comparison as it is a country in which the national public bank (and other regional/provincial public banks) coexists with private companies. PMID:24304072

  15. Knowledge about umbilical cord blood banking among Greek citizens

    PubMed Central

    Karagiorgou, Louiza Z.; Pantazopoulou, Maria-Nikoletta P.; Mainas, Nikolaos C.; Beloukas, Apostolos I.; Kriebardis, Anastasios G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Umbilical cord blood supplies in Greece are not sufficient to meet the high transfusion needs. This study was designed to determine Greeks’ opinion about umbilical cord blood, identify the reasons for the lack of motivation to donate umbilical cord blood and allow experts to establish better recruitment campaigns to enrich the donor pool. Materials and methods The attitudes and knowledge about umbilical cord blood of randomly selected Greek citizens (n=1,019) were assessed by means of a standardised anonymous questionnaire. The results were analysed using the χ2test and Spearman’s correlation coefficient. Results Forty-eight percent of respondents knew about umbilical cord blood and had full knowledge about what storage/donation offers. Media (35%) and doctors (25%) were the main source of information. The information from the state was considered either inadequate or non-existent by 85% of the responders. Ninety-five percent of the people questioned would like further information regarding umbilical cord blood transplantation and umbilical cord blood storage/donation. Six percent of the respondents who had children and were in favour of umbilical cord blood transplantation, had stored/donated UCB. With regards to future decisions, 84% of the sample would store/donate umbilical cord blood, of whom 57% would keep the umbilical cord blood in a private bank. Discussion It was concluded that Greek citizens receive information about umbilical cord blood from both the state and advertising campaigns by the Ministry of Health and Social Solidarity. A kind of cooperation between all hospitals and public umbilical cord blood banks would be advisable in order to facilitate access to umbilical cord blood donations. PMID:24120604

  16. Postinfarction Functional Recovery Driven by a Three-Dimensional Engineered Fibrin Patch Composed of Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Roura, Santiago; Soler-Botija, Carolina; Bagó, Juli R.; Llucià-Valldeperas, Aida; Férnandez, Marco A.; Gálvez-Montón, Carolina; Prat-Vidal, Cristina; Perea-Gil, Isaac; Blanco, Jerónimo

    2015-01-01

    Considerable research has been dedicated to restoring myocardial cell slippage and limiting ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI). We examined the ability of a three-dimensional (3D) engineered fibrin patch filled with human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCBMSCs) to induce recovery of cardiac function after MI. The UCBMSCs were modified to coexpress luciferase and fluorescent protein reporters, mixed with fibrin, and applied as an adhesive, viable construct (fibrin-cell patch) over the infarcted myocardium in mice (MI-UCBMSC group). The patch adhered well to the heart. Noninvasive bioluminescence imaging demonstrated early proliferation and differentiation of UCBMSCs within the construct in the postinfarct mice in the MI-UCBMSC group. The implanted cells also participated in the formation of new, functional microvasculature that connected the fibrin-cell patch to both the subjacent myocardial tissue and the host circulatory system. As revealed by echocardiography, the left ventricular ejection fraction and fractional shortening at sacrifice were improved in MI-UCBMSC mice and were markedly reduced in mice treated with fibrin alone and untreated postinfarction controls. In conclusion, a 3D engineered fibrin patch composed of UCBMSCs attenuated infarct-derived cardiac dysfunction when transplanted locally over a myocardial wound. Significance Ischemic heart failure (HF) is the end stage of many cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial infarction. The only definitive treatment for HF is cardiac transplant, which is hampered by limited number of heart donors and graft rejection. In recent times, cellular cardiomyoplasty has been expected to repair infarcted myocardium by implantation of different sources of stem or progenitor cells. However, low cell survival and myocardial implantation rates have motivated the emergence of novel approaches with the objective of generating graftable cell-based implants. Here, the potential

  17. Improved differentiation of umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells into insulin-producing cells by PDX-1 mRNA transfection.

    PubMed

    Van Pham, Phuc; Thi-My Nguyen, Phuoc; Thai-Quynh Nguyen, Anh; Minh Pham, Vuong; Nguyen-Tu Bui, Anh; Thi-Tung Dang, Loan; Gia Nguyen, Khue; Kim Phan, Ngoc

    2014-06-01

    Numerous studies have sought to identify diabetes mellitus treatment strategies with fewer side effects. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy was previously considered as a promising therapy; however, it requires the cells to be trans-differentiated into cells of the pancreatic-endocrine lineage before transplantation. Previous studies have shown that PDX-1 expression can facilitate MSC differentiation into insulin-producing cells (IPCs), but the methods employed to date use viral or DNA-based tools to express PDX-1, with the associated risks of insertional mutation and immunogenicity. Thus, this study aimed to establish a new method to induce PDX-1 expression in MSCs by mRNA transfection. MSCs were isolated from human umbilical cord blood and expanded in vitro, with stemness confirmed by surface markers and multipotentiality. MSCs were transfected with PDX-1 mRNA by nucleofection and chemically induced to differentiate into IPCs (combinatorial group). This IPC differentiation was then compared with that of untransfected chemically induced cells (inducer group) and uninduced cells (control group). We found that PDX-1 mRNA transfection significantly improved the differentiation of MSCs into IPCs, with 8.3±2.5% IPCs in the combinatorial group, 3.21±2.11% in the inducer group and 0% in the control. Cells in the combinatorial group also strongly expressed several genes related to beta cells (Pdx-1, Ngn3, Nkx6.1 and insulin) and could produce C-peptide in the cytoplasm and insulin in the supernatant, which was dependent on the extracellular glucose concentration. These results indicate that PDX-1 mRNA may offer a promising approach to produce safe IPCs for clinical diabetes mellitus treatment.

  18. Formation of human hepatocyte-like cells with different cellular phenotypes by human umbilical cord blood-derived cells in the human-rat chimeras

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yan; Xiao, Dong; Zhang, Ruo-Shuang; Cui, Guang-Hui; Wang, Xin-Hua; Chen, Xi-Gu . E-mail: xiguchen1516@yahoo.com.cn

    2007-06-15

    We took advantage of the proliferative and permissive environment of the developing pre-immune fetus to develop a noninjury human-rat xenograft small animal model, in which the in utero transplantation of low-density mononuclear cells (MNCs) from human umbilical cord blood (hUCB) into fetal rats at 9-11 days of gestation led to the formation of human hepatocyte-like cells (hHLCs) with different cellular phenotypes, as revealed by positive immunostaining for human-specific alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), cytokeratin 19 (CK19), cytokeratin 8 (CK8), cytokeratin 18 (CK18), and albumin (Alb), and with some animals exhibiting levels as high as 10.7% of donor-derived human cells in the recipient liver. More interestingly, donor-derived human cells stained positively for CD34 and CD45 in the liver of 2-month-old rat. Human hepatic differentiation appeared to partially follow the process of hepatic ontogeny, as evidenced by the expression of AFP gene at an early stage and albumin gene at a later stage. Human hepatocytes generated in this model retained functional properties of normal hepatocytes. In this xenogeneic system, the engrafted donor-derived human cells persisted in the recipient liver for at least 6 months after birth. Taken together, these findings suggest that the donor-derived human cells with different cellular phenotypes are found in the recipient liver and hHLCs hold biological activity. This humanized small animal model, which offers an in vivo environment more closely resembling the situations in human, provides an invaluable approach for in vivo investigating human stem cell behaviors, and further in vivo examining fundamental mechanisms controlling human stem cell fates in the future.

  19. Transplantation of umbilical cord blood-derived cells for novel indications in regenerative therapy or immune modulation: a scoping review of clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Iafolla, Marco A J; Tay, Jason; Allan, David S

    2014-01-01

    Although used mainly for transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells in the treatment of blood disorders, umbilical cord blood (UCB)-based therapies are now being used increasingly for novel applications in nonhematopoietic diseases and as a form of cellular regenerative therapy or immune modulation. We performed a systematic scoping review by searching Medline, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library for published articles, and we searched www.clinicaltrials.com and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform to describe the breadth of published studies and ongoing clinical activity in umbilical cord-based cellular therapy for regenerative therapy and immune modulation. The most commonly published area of expertise in the use of UCB-derived cellular transplantation for novel indications is for neurological disorders and this remains the most active area of study in ongoing registered trials. An increasingly broad range of disorders, however, are reflected in ongoing registered trials, which suggests greater activity, interest, and investment in UCB-derived cellular therapy. Interestingly, adult patients compose the majority of patients reported in published reports and registered ongoing clinical studies continue to enroll predominantly adult subjects. Geographically, Asian countries appear most active in UCB-derived cellular therapy and our analysis of ongoing studies suggests this trend will likely continue. Regular assessment of published and ongoing activity in UCB transplantation for emerging novel indications will be critical for informing UCB banking establishments and funding agencies to guide changes in banking practices related to emerging trends in cell therapy. PMID:24067504

  20. Imatinib and Nilotinib Inhibit Hematopoietic Progenitor Cell Growth, but Do Not Prevent Adhesion, Migration and Engraftment of Human Cord Blood CD34+ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Belle, Ludovic; Bruck, France; Foguenne, Jacques; Gothot, André; Beguin, Yves; Baron, Frédéric; Briquet, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    Background The availability of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has considerably changed the management of Philadelphia chromosome positive leukemia. The BCR-ABL inhibitor imatinib is also known to inhibit the tyrosine kinase of the stem cell factor receptor, c-Kit. Nilotinib is 30 times more potent than imatinib towards BCR-ABL in vitro. Studies in healthy volunteers and patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia or gastrointestinal stromal tumors have shown that therapeutic doses of nilotinib deliver drug levels similar to those of imatinib. The aim of this study was to compare the inhibitory effects of imatinib and nilotinib on proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, migration and engraftment capacities of human cord blood CD34+ cells. Design and Methods After a 48-hour cell culture with or without TKIs, CFC, LTC-IC, migration, adhesion and cell cycle analysis were performed. In a second time, the impact of these TKIs on engraftment was assessed in a xenotransplantation model using NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγ (null) mice. Results TKIs did not affect LTC-IC frequencies despite in vitro inhibition of CFC formation due to inhibition of CD34+ cell cycle entry. Adhesion of CD34+ cells to retronectin was reduced in the presence of either imatinib or nilotinib but only at high concentrations. Migration through a SDF-1α gradient was not changed by cell culture in the presence of TKIs. Finally, bone marrow cellularity and human chimerism were not affected by daily doses of imatinib and nilotinib in a xenogenic transplantation model. No significant difference was seen between TKIs given the equivalent affinity of imatinib and nilotinib for KIT. Conclusions These data suggest that combining non-myeloablative conditioning regimen with TKIs starting the day of the transplantation could be safe. PMID:23285088

  1. Umbilical cord blood transplants: treatment for selected hematologic and oncologic diseases.

    PubMed

    Stevens, K

    1997-12-01

    Umbilical cord blood transplantation is a rapidly growing form of treatment for many types of cancer and hematologic disorders. The concepts behind the use of umbilical cord blood transplantation are based on information gained from experience in bone marrow transplantation. Previously discarded as human waste, the blood in the umbilical cord remnant and the placenta has been observed to be rich in hematopoietic stem cells. Techniques for collecting these stem cells from the placenta may vary among the institutions, physicians, and other health care providers, including midwives and nurse practitioners, involved with this procedure. This source of hematopoietic stem cells in transplantation has many advantages, disadvantages, and controversies associated with its use.

  2. Effects of arsenic exposure on DNA methylation in cord blood samples from newborn babies and in a human lymphoblast cell line

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence indicates that in utero exposure to arsenic is associated with congenital defects and long-term disease consequences including cancers. Recent studies suggest that arsenic carcinogenesis results from epigenetic changes, particularly in DNA methylation. This study aimed to investigate DNA methylation changes as a result of arsenic exposure in utero and in vitro. Methods For the exposure in utero study, a total of seventy-one newborns (fifty-five arsenic-exposed and sixteen unexposed newborns) were recruited. Arsenic concentrations in the drinking water were measured, and exposure in newborns was assessed by measurement of arsenic concentrations in cord blood, nails and hair by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). In the in vitro study, human lymphoblasts were treated with arsenite at 0-100 μM for two, four and eight hours (short-term) and at 0, 0.5 and 1.0 μM for eight-weeks period (long-term). DNA methylation was analyzed in cord blood lymphocytes and lymphoblasts treated with arsenite in vitro. Global DNA methylation was determined as LINE-1 methylation using combined bisulfite restriction analysis (COBRA) and total 5-methyldeoxycytidine (5MedC) content which was determined by HPLC-MS/MS. Methylation of p53 was determined at the promoter region using methylation-specific restriction endonuclease digestion with MspI and HpaII. Results Results showed that arsenic-exposed newborns had significantly higher levels of arsenic in cord blood, fingernails, toenails and hair than those of the unexposed subjects and a slight increase in promoter methylation of p53 in cord blood lymphocytes which significantly correlated with arsenic accumulation in nails (p < 0.05) was observed, while LINE-1 methylation was unchanged. Short-term in vitro arsenite treatment in lymphoblastoid cells clearly demonstrated a significant global hypomethylation, determined as reduction in LINE-1 methylation and total 5-MedC content, and p53

  3. Real-time qPCR for chimerism assessment in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants from unrelated adult and double umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Frankfurt, Olga; Zitzner, Jennifer R; Tambur, Anat R

    2015-03-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the standard therapy for patients with various malignant hematologic disorders. A successful treatment results in complete engraftment of donor cells in the absence of the patient's own hematopoietic system. Chimerism analysis, aimed at determining the coexistence of genetically different cell populations, is considered a useful method to measure treatment success. A new, qPCR based, commercially available chimerism assay was recently introduced. Here we report our results of comparing STR with qPCR-based chimerism analysis, and assessment of sensitivity and reproducibility of the qPCR chimerism assay. A specific emphasis is put on analyzing chimerism in recipients of double cord blood transplantation. We conclude that the qPCR chimerism assay for engraftment monitoring is a reliable and sensitive assay. Advantages and limitations of the assay in its current format are summarized.

  4. Influence of atopic heredity on IL-4-, IL-12- and IFN-gamma-producing cells in in vitro activated cord blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsson, S; Söderlund, A; Nilsson, C; Lilja, G; Nordlund, M; Troye-Blomberg, M

    2001-12-01

    Several reports have claimed that there is a greater risk for a child with an atopic mother to develop allergy as compared to a child with an atopic father. This suggests that the fetal environment during pregnancy might be of importance for the development of atopic disease. Both proliferative and cytokine responses have been detected in cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMC) after stimulation with allergens, suggesting allergen priming already in utero. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the atopic status of the mother influences cytokine production by CBMC. We compared interleukin (IL)-4, IL-12 and interferon (IFN)-gamma-producing CBMC from children with double atopic heredity (dh), maternal atopic heredity only (mh) or no atopic heredity (nh). CBMC were stimulated in vitro with allergens (birch, ovalbumin and cat), phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) or purified protein derivative (PPD) and cytokine-producing cells were measured by the enzyme-linked immunospot assay. In response to PHA, the frequency of IL-4-producing cells, as well as the ratio of IL-4/IFN-gamma-producing cells, were significantly higher in the dh group compared to the nh group. High numbers of IL-12-producing cells in response to allergens were detected, significantly highest in the nh group, followed by the dh and mh groups. Our results suggest that there is a stronger Th2 bias after in vitro stimulation of CBMC from children with atopic heredity, as reflected by higher IL-4/IFN-gamma ratios in response to PHA, and lower numbers of IL-12-producing cells after allergen stimulation. Whether these differences influence later allergy development will be evaluated when the atopic status of the children is assessed at 2 years of age.

  5. Lack of correlation between membrane CD30 expression and cytokine secretion pattern in allergen-primed naive cord blood T-cell lines and clones.

    PubMed

    Spinozzi, F; Agea, E; Piattoni, S; Falini, B; Grignani, F; Bertotto, A

    1997-04-01

    Various surface molecules are expressed by activated T cells. Among them, the CD30 antigen has been proposed as a reproducible marker that identifies a subset of differentiated and/or activated T lymphocytes that produce T helper (Th)-2-type cytokines, i.e. interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-5. However, because CD30 has mainly been detected on established T-cell clones, it is still unclear whether a priming allergen and/or cytokine can induce its membrane expression on naive T cells, perhaps in parallel with the up-regulation of other relevant activation markers, such as CD25, HLA-DR and L-selectin. It is also unknown whether proper allergen stimulation affects the cytokine secretion pattern by CD30+ T-cell clones derived from antigen-unprimed (naive) T lymphocytes. More information on these questions was sought by adopting a model that used cord blood as a source of virgin T cells and exposing them to native cypress allergen or cytokine (IL-2 or IL-4) stimulation, as well as to conventional polyclonal activators such as PHA or anti-CD3. Peripheral blood MC from four adult cypress-sensitive patients was also assayed and used as controls for all culture experiments. Freshly isolated cord and adult T cells did not express the CD30 antigen on their membrane. Many of the stimulating agents tested were able to up-regulate the expression of CD30. However, despite high expression of this molecule, cloned allergen-specific cord CD4+ T lymphocytes were unable to produce IFN-gamma and/or IL-4. In contrast, they retained the capability to produce IL-2. Thus, expression of the CD30 antigen on virgin T cells does not correlate with a polarized model of T helper (Th)-1 or Th-2 cytokine-producing cells, suggesting that these types of lymphokine-secreting lymphocytes are not a paradigmatic example of T-cell subpopulations that display stable phenotypical features. PMID:9105430

  6. Gene expression profiles of cryopreserved CD34{sup +} human umbilical cord blood cells are related to their bone marrow reconstitution abilities in mouse xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Sudo, Kazuhiro; Yasuda, Jun; Nakamura, Yukio

    2010-07-09

    Human umbilical cord blood (UCB) cells are an alternative source of hematopoietic stem cells for treatment of leukemia and other diseases. It is very difficult to assess the quality of UCB cells in the clinical situation. Here, we sought to assess the quality of UCB cells by transplantation to immunodeficient mice. Cryopreserved CD34{sup +} UCB cells from twelve different human donors were transplanted into sublethally irradiated NOD/shi-scid Jic mice. In parallel, the gene expression profiles of the UCB cells were determined from oligonucleotide microarrays. UCB cells from three donors failed to establish an engraftment in the host mice, while the other nine succeeded to various extents. Gene expression profiling indicated that 71 genes, including HOXB4, C/EBP-{beta}, and ETS2, were specifically overexpressed and 23 genes were suppressed more than 2-fold in the successful UCB cells compared to those that failed. Functional annotation revealed that cell growth and cell cycle regulators were more abundant in the successful UCB cells. Our results suggest that hematopoietic ability may vary among cryopreserved UCB cells and that this ability can be distinguished by profiling expression of certain sets of genes.

  7. Identification of the hot-spot areas for sickle cell disease using cord blood screening at a district hospital: an Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Sujata; Sahu, Pushpansu; Kar, Shantanu Kumar; Negi, Sapna

    2015-10-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD), a genetic disorder often reported late, can be identified early in life, and hot-spot areas may be identified to conduct genetic epidemiology studies. This study was undertaken to estimate prevalence and to identify hot spot area for SCD in Kalahandi district, by screening cord blood of neonates delivered at the district hospital as first-hand information. Kalahandi District Hospital selected for the study is predominated by tribal population with higher prevalence of SCD as compared to other parts of Odisha. Cord blood screening of SCD was carried out on 761 newborn samples of which 13 were screened to be homozygous for SCD. Information on area of parent's residence was also collected. Madanpur Rampur area was found to be with the highest prevalence of SCD (10.52 %) and the gene distribution did not follow Hardy-Weinberg Equation indicating un-natural selection. The approach of conducting neonatal screening in a district hospital for identification of SCD is feasible and appropriate for prioritizing area for the implementation of large-scale screening and planning control measures thereof. PMID:25860337

  8. First Autologous Cord Blood Therapy for Pediatric Ischemic Stroke and Cerebral Palsy Caused by Cephalic Molding during Birth: Individual Treatment with Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hamelmann, E.

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial laceration due to traumatic birth injury is an extremely rare event affecting approximately one newborn per a population of 4.5 million. However, depending on the mode of injury, the resulting brain damage may lead to lifelong sequelae, for example, cerebral palsy for which there is no cure at present. Here we report a rare case of neonatal arterial ischemic stroke and cerebral palsy caused by fetal traumatic molding and parietal depression of the head during delivery caused by functional cephalopelvic disproportion due to a “long pelvis.” This patient was treated by autologous cord blood mononuclear cells (45.8 mL, cryopreserved, TNC 2.53 × 10e8) with a remarkable recovery. Active rehabilitation was provided weekly. Follow-up examinations were at 3, 18, 34, and 57 months. Generous use of neonatal head MRI in case of molding, craniofacial deformity, and a sentinel event during parturition is advocated to enhance diagnosis of neonatal brain damage as a basis for fast and potentially causative treatment modalities including autologous cord blood transplantation in a timely manner. PMID:27239361

  9. Humoral Activity of Cord Blood-Derived Stem/Progenitor Cells: Implications for Stem Cell-Based Adjuvant Therapy of Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Paczkowska, Edyta; Kaczyńska, Katarzyna; Pius-Sadowska, Ewa; Rogińska, Dorota; Kawa, Miłosz; Ustianowski, Przemysław; Safranow, Krzysztof; Celewicz, Zbigniew; Machaliński, Bogusław

    2013-01-01

    Background Stem/progenitor cells (SPCs) demonstrate neuro-regenerative potential that is dependent upon their humoral activity by producing various trophic factors regulating cell migration, growth, and differentiation. Herein, we compared the expression of neurotrophins (NTs) and their receptors in specific umbilical cord blood (UCB) SPC populations, including lineage-negative, CD34+, and CD133+ cells, with that in unsorted, nucleated cells (NCs). Methods and Results The expression of NTs and their receptors was detected by QRT-PCR, western blotting, and immunofluorescent staining in UCB-derived SPC populations (i.e., NCs vs. lineage-negative, CD34+, and CD133+ cells). To better characterize, global gene expression profiles of SPCs were determined using genome-wide RNA microarray technology. Furthermore, the intracellular production of crucial neuro-regenerative NTs (i.e., BDNF and NT-3) was assessed in NCs and lineage-negative cells after incubation for 24, 48, and 72 h in both serum and serum-free conditions. We discovered significantly higher expression of NTs and NT receptors at both the mRNA and protein level in lineage-negative, CD34+, and CD133+ cells than in NCs. Global gene expression analysis revealed considerably higher expression of genes associated with the production and secretion of proteins, migration, proliferation, and differentiation in lineage-negative cells than in CD34+ or CD133+ cell populations. Notably, after short-term incubation under serum-free conditions, lineage-negative cells and NCs produced significantly higher amounts of BDNF and NT-3 than under steady-state conditions. Finally, conditioned medium (CM) from lineage-negative SPCs exerted a beneficial impact on neural cell survival and proliferation. Conclusions Collectively, our findings demonstrate that UCB-derived SPCs highly express NTs and their relevant receptors under steady-state conditions, NT expression is greater under stress-related conditions and that CM from SPCs

  10. Modulation of AP-endonuclease1 levels associated with hepatic cirrhosis in rat model treated with human umbilical cord blood mononuclear stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Bassiouny, Ahmad R; Zaky, Amira Z; Abdulmalek, Shaymaa A; Kandeel, Kamal M; Ismail, Alaa; Moftah, Marie

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress in liver cells may contribute to the etiology of hepatic diseases, as in liver cirrhosis. AP-Endonuclease1 (APE1/Ref-1) is essential for cell protection toward oxidative stress by acting as a transcriptional regulator of pro-survival genes and as a redox sensitive protein. The aim of this study was to critically analyze the various parameters governing the success of human umbilical cord blood mononuclear stem cell-based (MNCs) therapy without the use of an immunosuppressant and to investigate for the first time the expression of APE1 during thioacetamide (TAA)-induced cirrhosis and MNCs therapy in a rat model. Umbilical cord blood samples from full-term deliveries were collected. Lethal fulminant hepatic cirrhosis in rats was induced by intraperitoneal injection of thio-acetamide. MNCs were then intrahepatically transplanted. We measured APE1 expression at mRNA and protein levels, mRNA expression of TGF-β, α-SMA, STAP, CTGF, MMP-9 and TIMP-1 in a follow up study. Histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses were performed 10 weeks after intrahepatic injection of the cells. Transdifferentiated cells could be efficiently stained with antihuman hepatocytes. Interestingly, human hepatocyte-specific markers, human albumin, cytokeratin-18 and cytokeratin-19 mRNAs were detected in rat liver after 10 days of MNCs infusion. MNC transplanted by intrahepatic route, could engraft recipient liver, differentiated into functional hepatocytes, and rescued liver failure. Moreover up regulation of APE1 expression confirmed by marked immunohistochemical staining may be involved in MNCs-induced hepatocytes regeneration suggesting that maintaining high level of APE1 has protective effect as pro-survival signal. PMID:22076170

  11. Private cord blood banking: current use and clinical future.

    PubMed

    Hollands, Peter; McCauley, Catherina

    2009-09-01

    International private umbilical cord blood banking has expanded rapidly in recent years since the first cord blood transplant which was 20 years ago. Private companies offer parents the opportunity to store umbilical cord blood for the possible future use by their child or other family members. The private cord blood industry has been criticised by a number of professional bodies including the EU Ethics Committee, the Royal College of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, the Royal College of Midwives and the US College of Paediatrics. This review presents the arguments from the opponents of private cord blood banking, and then makes the case for private cord banking based on the latest scientific and clinical evidence. PMID:19603288

  12. Umbilical cord blood graft enhancement strategies: has the time come to move these into the clinic?

    PubMed

    Norkin, M; Lazarus, H M; Wingard, J R

    2013-07-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is an attractive stem cell graft option for patients who need allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell support, but lack a suitable HLA-matched donor. However, the limited number of hematopoietic progenitor cells in a single cord blood unit can lead to an increased risk of graft failure, delayed hematological recovery and prolonged immunosuppression, particularly in adult patients. Several strategies to overcome these potential limitations are being evaluated. In this review, we discuss promising ex vivo manipulations to enhance cord blood engraftment capacity such as culture of UCB cells with stimulatory cytokines and growth factors, mesenchymal cells, Notch ligand, copper chelators, prostaglandins, complement components, nicotinamide and CD26/DPPIV inhibitors. All these approaches are now in early clinical trials. However, despite the fact that several cord blood enhancement strategies have resulted in increased numbers of progenitor cells and faster neutrophil recovery, the ability of these techniques to significantly shorten engraftment time and permit the use of cord units with low numbers of total nucleated cells, or accomplish reliable engraftment with a single cord, have yet to be convincingly demonstrated. The ultimate clinical value of ex vivo cord blood expansion or manipulation has not been defined yet, and the current data do not permit predicting which technology will prove to be the optimal strategy. Nevertheless, expectations remain high that eventually ex vivo enhancement will be able to improve clinical outcomes and significantly extend the applicability of UCB transplantation.

  13. Intravenous Administration of Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived AC133+ Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Rat Stroke Model Reduces Infarct Volume: Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Histological Findings

    PubMed Central

    Iskander, Asm; Knight, Robert A.; Zhang, Zheng Gang; Ewing, James R.; Shankar, Adarsh; Varma, Nadimpalli Ravi S.; Bagher-Ebadian, Hassan; Ali, Meser M.; Arbab, Ali S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) hold enormous therapeutic potential for ischemic vascular diseases. Previous studies have indicated that stem/progenitor cells derived from human umbilical cord blood (hUCB) improve functional recovery in stroke models. Here, we examined the effect of hUCB AC133+ EPCs on stroke development and resolution in a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) rat model. Since the success of cell therapies strongly depends on the ability to monitor in vivo the migration of transplanted cells, we also assessed the capacity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to track in vivo the magnetically labeled cells that were administered. Animals were subjected to transient MCAo and 24 hours later injected intravenously with 107 hUCB AC133+ EPCs. MRI performed at days 1, 7, and 14 after the insult showed accumulation of transplanted cells in stroke-affected hemispheres and revealed that stroke volume decreased at a significantly higher rate in cell-treated animals. Immunohistochemistry analysis of brain tissues localized the administered cells in the stroke-affected hemispheres only and indicated that these cells may have significantly affected the magnitude of endogenous proliferation, angiogenesis, and neurogenesis. We conclude that transplanted cells selectively migrated to the ischemic brain parenchyma, where they exerted a therapeutic effect on the extent of tissue damage, regeneration, and time course of stroke resolution. PMID:23934909

  14. Age, Sex, and Religious Beliefs Impact the Attitude towards Cord Blood Banking.

    PubMed

    Sundell, Inger Birgitta; Setzer, Teddi J

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a self-administered questionnaire was used to assess opinions about stem cell research and cord blood banking. Three attitudes were examined: willingness to accept cord blood banking, willingness to accept embryonic stem cell research, and religious belief system. A total of 90 Wayne State University students enrolled in the study in response to an invitation posted on a web page for the university. Sex distribution among study participants was 79 females and eight males; three declined to state their sex. Support for cord blood banking was high (> 70%) among students. Students over the age of 25 years of age were more (85%) positive than students 18 to 24 years old (57%). They prefered a public cord blood bank over a private cord blood bank. Atheist/agnostic or spiritual/not religious students (> 90%), Catholic students (78%) and Christian students (58%) support cord blood banking. Age, sex and religion seems influence the student's attitude towards stem cell research and cord blood banking.

  15. Humanizing NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγnull (NSG) mice using busulfan and retro-orbital injection of umbilical cord blood-derived CD34+ cells

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Young Kyung; Ko, Yunmi; Choi, Aery; Choi, Hyeong Jwa; Seo, Jin-Hee; Lee, Minyoung

    2016-01-01

    Background Humanized mouse models are still under development, and various protocols exist to improve human cell engraftment and function. Methods Fourteen NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγnull (NSG) mice (4‒5 wk old) were conditioned with busulfan and injected with human umbilical cord blood (hUCB)-derived CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) via retro-orbital sinuses. The bone marrow (BM), spleen, and peripheral blood (PB) were analyzed 8 and 12 weeks after HSC transplantation. Results Most of the NSG mice tolerated the regimen well. The percentage of hCD45+ and CD19+ cells rose significantly in a time-dependent manner. The median percentage of hCD45+cells in the BM was 55.5% at week 8, and 67.2% at week 12. The median percentage of hCD45+ cells in the spleen at weeks 8 and 12 was 42% and 51%, respectively. The median percentage of hCD19+ cells in BM at weeks 8 and 12 was 21.5% and 39%, respectively (P=0.04). Similarly, the median percentage of hCD19+ cells in the spleen at weeks 8 and 12 was 10% and 24%, respectively (P=0.04). The percentage of hCD19+ B cells in PB was 23% at week 12. At week 8, hCD3+ T cells were barely detectable, while hCD7+ was detected in the BM and spleen. The percentage of hCD3+ T cells was 2‒3% at week 12 in the BM, spleen, and PB of humanized NSG mice. Conclusion We adopted a simplified protocol for establishing humanized NSG mice. We observed a higher engraftment rate of human CD45+ cells than earlier studies without any significant toxicity. And human CD45+ cell engraftment at week 8 was comparable to that of week 12. PMID:27104189

  16. Optimizing Donor Selection for Public Cord Blood Banking: Influence of Maternal, Infant and Collection Characteristics on Cord Blood Unit Quality

    PubMed Central

    Page, Kristin M.; Mendizabal, Adam; Betz-Stablein, Brigid; Wease, Stephen; Shoulars, Kevin; Gentry, Tracy; Prasad, Vinod K.; Sun, Jessica; Carter, Shelly; Balber, Andrew E.; Kurtzberg, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    Background Banked unrelated donor umbilical cord blood (CB) has improved access to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for patients without a suitably matched donor. In a resource-limited environment, ensuring that the public inventory is enriched with high-quality cord blood units (CBUs) addressing the needs of a diverse group of patients is a priority. Identification of donor characteristics correlating with higher CBU quality could guide operational strategies to increase the yield of banked high-quality CBUs. Methods Characteristics of 5267 CBUs donated to the Carolinas Cord Blood Bank, a public bank participating in the National Cord Blood Inventory, were retrospectively analyzed. Eligible CBUs, collected by trained personnel, were processed using standard procedures. Routine quality and potency metrics [post-processing total nucleated cell count (post-TNCC), CD34+, colony-forming units (CFUs)] were correlated with maternal, infant, and collection characteristics. Results High-quality CBUs were defined as those with higher post-TNCC (>1.25×109), and CD34+ + CFU in the upper quartile. Factors associated with higher CD34+ or CFU content included a shorter interval from collection to processing (<10 hours), younger gestational age (34–37 weeks; CD34++CFU) Caucasian race, higher birth weight (>3500grams) and larger collection volumes (>80ml). Conclusions We describe characteristics identifying high-quality CBUs, which can be used to inform strategies for CBU collection for public banks. Efforts should be made to prioritize collections from larger babies born before 38 weeks of gestation. CBUs should be rapidly transported to the processing laboratory. The lower quality of CBUs from non-Caucasian donors highlights the challenges of building a racially diverse public CB inventory. PMID:23711284

  17. Dominant unit CD34+ cell dose predicts engraftment after double-unit cord blood transplantation and is influenced by bank practice.

    PubMed

    Purtill, Duncan; Smith, Katherine; Devlin, Sean; Meagher, Richard; Tonon, Joann; Lubin, Marissa; Ponce, Doris M; Giralt, Sergio; Kernan, Nancy A; Scaradavou, Andromachi; Stevens, Cladd E; Barker, Juliet N

    2014-11-01

    We investigated the unit characteristics associated with engraftment after double-unit cord blood (CB) transplantation (dCBT) and whether these could be reliably identified during unit selection. Cumulative incidence of neutrophil engraftment in 129 myeloablative dCBT recipients was 95% (95% confidence interval: 90-98%). When precryopreservation characteristics were analyzed, the dominant unit CD34(+) cell dose was the only characteristic independently associated with engraftment (hazard ratio, 1.43; P = .002). When postthaw characteristics were also included, only dominant unit infused viable CD34(+) cell dose independently predicted engraftment (hazard ratio, 1.95; P < .001). We then examined the determinants of infused viable CD34(+) cell dose (precryopreservation count, postthaw recovery, and postthaw viability) in 402 units thawed at our center. This revealed close correlation between precryopreservation and postthaw CD34(+) cell counts (r(2) = 0.73). Median CD34(+) cell recovery was 101%, although it ranged from 12% to 1480%. Notably, units from non-Netcord Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy (Netcord-FACT)-accredited banks were more likely to have low recovery (P < .001). Furthermore, although median postthaw CD34(+) cell viability was 92%, 33 (8%) units had <75% viable CD34(+) cells. Units from non-Netcord-FACT-accredited banks and units with cryovolumes other than 24.5 to 26.0 mL were more likely to have poor postthaw viability. Precryopreservation CD34(+) cell dose and banking practices should be incorporated into CB unit selection.

  18. In vitro activation of cord blood mononuclear cells and cytokine production in a remote coastal population exposed to organochlorines and methyl mercury.

    PubMed

    Bilrha, Houda; Roy, Raynald; Moreau, Brigitte; Belles-Isles, Marthe; Dewailly, Eric; Ayotte, Pierre

    2003-12-01

    Remote coastal populations that rely on seafood for subsistence often receive unusually high doses of organochlorines and methyl mercury. Immunosuppression resulting from prenatal exposure to organochlorines has been reported in wildlife species and humans. In this study, we assessed lymphocyte activation and associated cytokine secretion in 47 newborns from a remote maritime population living on the Mid and Lower North Shore regions of the St. Lawrence River (Québec, Canada; subsistence fishing group) and 65 newborns from nearby urban settings (reference group). Cord blood samples were collected for organochlorine and mercury analyses and also to isolate cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs) for the in vitro assessment of cytokine production and expression of surface markers after mitogenic stimulation (CD4(+)CD45RO(+), CD8(+)CD45RO(+), CD3(+)CD25(+), and CD8(+)HLA-DR(+)). Blood mercury and plasma concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethylene (p,p'-DDE), and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) were significantly higher in the subsistence fishing group than in the reference group (p < 0.001). No difference was observed between the two groups regarding subsets of lymphocytes showing markers of activation. In vitro secretion of cytokines by CBMCs after mitogenic stimulation was lower in the subsistence fishing group than in the reference group (p < 0.05). Moreover, we found an inverse correlation between tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) secretion and plasma PCB, p,p'-DDE, and HCB concentrations (p < 0.05). Our data support a negative association between TNF-alpha secretion by CBMCs and prenatal organochlorine exposure. If the relationship between organochlorine and TNF-alpha secretion is causal, it would suggest a role for this important proinflammatory cytokine in mediating organochlorine-induced immunotoxicity in infants developmentally exposed to these compounds. PMID:14644672

  19. A phased consent policy for cord blood donation.

    PubMed

    Vawter, Dorothy E; Rogers-Chrysler, Gayl; Clay, Mary; Pittelko, Larrie; Therkelsen, Dave; Kim, Debora; McCullough, Jeffrey

    2002-10-01

    This article focuses on ethical and policy questions concerning when consent may be sought for the collection and donation of cord blood. It reviews the advantages and disadvantages of alternative times for securing consent, challenges common objections to seeking consent during labor or after collection, and describes a phased consent process--a process that permits consent during early labor to the ex utero collection of cord blood followed by after-consent collection to donation. The phased consent policy attends to the unique characteristics of cord blood collection and donation, respects donors and their families, maximizes the number and diversity of cord blood units collected, preserves the relationship between providers and patients, and preserves public trust in cord blood and other types of tissue banking. PMID:12423509

  20. Cord-Blood Transplantation in Patients with Minimal Residual Disease.

    PubMed

    Milano, Filippo; Gooley, Ted; Wood, Brent; Woolfrey, Ann; Flowers, Mary E; Doney, Kristine; Witherspoon, Robert; Mielcarek, Marco; Deeg, Joachim H; Sorror, Mohamed; Dahlberg, Ann; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Salit, Rachel; Petersdorf, Effie; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Delaney, Colleen

    2016-09-01

    Background The majority of patients in need of a hematopoietic-cell transplant do not have a matched related donor. Data are needed to inform the choice among various alternative donor-cell sources. Methods In this retrospective analysis, we compared outcomes in 582 consecutive patients with acute leukemia or the myelodysplastic syndrome who received a first myeloablative hematopoietic-cell transplant from an unrelated cord-blood donor (140 patients), an HLA-matched unrelated donor (344), or an HLA-mismatched unrelated donor (98). Results The relative risks of death and relapse between the cord-blood group and the two other unrelated-donor groups appeared to vary according to the presence of minimal residual disease status before transplantation. Among patients with minimal residual disease, the risk of death was higher in the HLA-mismatched group than in the cord-blood group (hazard ratio, 2.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.52 to 5.63; P=0.001); the risk was also higher in the HLA-matched group than in the cord-blood group but not significantly so (hazard ratio, 1.69; 95% CI, 0.94 to 3.02; P=0.08). Among patients without minimal residual disease, the hazard ratios were lower (hazard ratio in the HLA-mismatched group, 1.36; 95% CI, 0.76 to 2.46; P=0.30; hazard ratio in the HLA-matched group, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.48 to 1.28; P=0.33). The risk of relapse among patients with minimal residual disease was significantly higher in the two unrelated-donor groups than in the cord-blood group (hazard ratio in the HLA-mismatched group, 3.01; 95% CI, 1.22 to 7.38; P=0.02; hazard ratio in the HLA-matched group, 2.92; 95% CI, 1.34 to 6.35; P=0.007). Among patients without minimal residual disease, the magnitude of these associations was lower (hazard ratio in the HLA-mismatched group, 1.28; 95% CI, 0.51 to 3.25; P=0.60; hazard ratio in the HLA-matched group, 1.30; 95% CI, 0.65 to 2.58; P=0.46). Conclusions Our data suggest that among patients with pretransplantation minimal

  1. Cord-Blood Transplantation in Patients with Minimal Residual Disease.

    PubMed

    Milano, Filippo; Gooley, Ted; Wood, Brent; Woolfrey, Ann; Flowers, Mary E; Doney, Kristine; Witherspoon, Robert; Mielcarek, Marco; Deeg, Joachim H; Sorror, Mohamed; Dahlberg, Ann; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Salit, Rachel; Petersdorf, Effie; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Delaney, Colleen

    2016-09-01

    Background The majority of patients in need of a hematopoietic-cell transplant do not have a matched related donor. Data are needed to inform the choice among various alternative donor-cell sources. Methods In this retrospective analysis, we compared outcomes in 582 consecutive patients with acute leukemia or the myelodysplastic syndrome who received a first myeloablative hematopoietic-cell transplant from an unrelated cord-blood donor (140 patients), an HLA-matched unrelated donor (344), or an HLA-mismatched unrelated donor (98). Results The relative risks of death and relapse between the cord-blood group and the two other unrelated-donor groups appeared to vary according to the presence of minimal residual disease status before transplantation. Among patients with minimal residual disease, the risk of death was higher in the HLA-mismatched group than in the cord-blood group (hazard ratio, 2.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.52 to 5.63; P=0.001); the risk was also higher in the HLA-matched group than in the cord-blood group but not significantly so (hazard ratio, 1.69; 95% CI, 0.94 to 3.02; P=0.08). Among patients without minimal residual disease, the hazard ratios were lower (hazard ratio in the HLA-mismatched group, 1.36; 95% CI, 0.76 to 2.46; P=0.30; hazard ratio in the HLA-matched group, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.48 to 1.28; P=0.33). The risk of relapse among patients with minimal residual disease was significantly higher in the two unrelated-donor groups than in the cord-blood group (hazard ratio in the HLA-mismatched group, 3.01; 95% CI, 1.22 to 7.38; P=0.02; hazard ratio in the HLA-matched group, 2.92; 95% CI, 1.34 to 6.35; P=0.007). Among patients without minimal residual disease, the magnitude of these associations was lower (hazard ratio in the HLA-mismatched group, 1.28; 95% CI, 0.51 to 3.25; P=0.60; hazard ratio in the HLA-matched group, 1.30; 95% CI, 0.65 to 2.58; P=0.46). Conclusions Our data suggest that among patients with pretransplantation minimal

  2. The Cord Blood Apgar: a novel scoring system to optimize selection of banked cord blood grafts for transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Page, Kristin M.; Zhang, Lijun; Mendizabal, Adam; Wease, Stephen; Carter, Shelly; Shoulars, Kevin; Gentry, Tracy; Balber, Andrew E.; Kurtzberg, Joanne

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Engraftment failure and delays, likely due to diminished cord blood unit (CBU) potency, remain major barriers to the overall success of unrelated umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT). To address this problem, we developed and retrospectively validated a novel scoring system, the Cord Blood Apgar (CBA), which is predictive of engraftment after UCBT. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS In a single-center retrospective study, utilizing a database of 435 consecutive single cord myeloablative UCBTs performed between January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2008, precryopreservation and postthaw graft variables (total nucleated cell, CD34+, colony-forming units, mononuclear cell content, and volume) were initially correlated with neutrophil engraftment. Subsequently, based on the magnitude of hazard ratios (HRs) in univariate analysis, a weighted scoring system to predict CBU potency was developed using a randomly selected training data set and internally validated on the remaining data set. RESULTS The CBA assigns transplanted CBUs three scores: a precryopreservation score (PCS), a postthaw score (PTS), and a composite score (CS), which incorporates the PCS and PTS values. CBA-PCS scores, which could be used for initial unit selection, were predictive of neutrophil (CBA-PCS ≥ 7.75 vs. <7.75, HR 3.5; p < 0.0001) engraftment. Likewise, CBA-PTS and CS scores were strongly predictive of Day 42 neutrophil engraftment (CBA-PTS ≥ 9.5 vs. <9.5, HR 3.16, p < 0.0001; CBA-CS ≥ 17.75 vs. <17.75, HR 4.01, p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION The CBA is strongly predictive of engraftment after UCBT and shows promise for optimizing screening of CBU donors for transplantation. In the future, a segment could be assayed for the PTS score providing data to apply the CS for final CBU selection. PMID:21810098

  3. Clinical application of Sleeping Beauty and artificial antigen presenting cells to genetically modify T cells from peripheral and umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Huls, M Helen; Figliola, Matthew J; Dawson, Margaret J; Olivares, Simon; Kebriaei, Partow; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Champlin, Richard E; Singh, Harjeet; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2013-01-01

    two DNA plasmids, a SB transposon (CD19RCD28) and a SB transposase (SB11) followed by retrieval of stable integrants by the every-7-day additions (stimulation cycle) of γ-irradiated aAPC (clone #4) in the presence of soluble recombinant human IL-2 and IL-21(13). Typically 4 cycles (28 days of continuous culture) are undertaken to generate clinically-appealing numbers of T cells that stably express the CAR. This methodology to manufacturing clinical-grade CD19-specific T cells can be applied to T cells derived from peripheral blood (PB) or umbilical cord blood (UCB). Furthermore, this approach can be harnessed to generate T cells to diverse tumor types by pairing the specificity of the introduced CAR with expression of the TAA, recognized by the CAR, on the aAPC. PMID:23407473

  4. Clinical application of Sleeping Beauty and artificial antigen presenting cells to genetically modify T cells from peripheral and umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Huls, M Helen; Figliola, Matthew J; Dawson, Margaret J; Olivares, Simon; Kebriaei, Partow; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Champlin, Richard E; Singh, Harjeet; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2013-02-01

    two DNA plasmids, a SB transposon (CD19RCD28) and a SB transposase (SB11) followed by retrieval of stable integrants by the every-7-day additions (stimulation cycle) of γ-irradiated aAPC (clone #4) in the presence of soluble recombinant human IL-2 and IL-21(13). Typically 4 cycles (28 days of continuous culture) are undertaken to generate clinically-appealing numbers of T cells that stably express the CAR. This methodology to manufacturing clinical-grade CD19-specific T cells can be applied to T cells derived from peripheral blood (PB) or umbilical cord blood (UCB). Furthermore, this approach can be harnessed to generate T cells to diverse tumor types by pairing the specificity of the introduced CAR with expression of the TAA, recognized by the CAR, on the aAPC.

  5. Improving Engraftment and Immune Reconstitution in Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Danby, Robert; Rocha, Vanderson

    2014-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is an important source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) for allogeneic transplantation when HLA-matched sibling and unrelated donors (MUD) are unavailable. Although the overall survival results for UCB transplantation are comparable to the results with MUD, UCB transplants are associated with slow engraftment, delayed immune reconstitution, and increased opportunistic infections. While this may be a consequence of the lower cell dose in UCB grafts, it also reflects the relative immaturity of cord blood. Furthermore, limited cell numbers and the non-availability of donor lymphocyte infusions currently prevent the use of post-transplant cellular immunotherapy to boost donor-derived immunity to treat infections, mixed chimerism, and disease relapse. To further develop UCB transplantation, many strategies to enhance engraftment and immune reconstitution are currently under investigation. This review summarizes our current understanding of engraftment and immune recovery following UCB transplantation and why this differs from allogeneic transplants using other sources of HSC. It also provides a comprehensive overview of promising techniques being used to improve myeloid and lymphoid recovery, including expansion, homing, and delivery of UCB HSC; combined use of UCB with third-party donors; isolation and expansion of natural killer cells, pathogen-specific T cells, and regulatory T cells; methods to protect and/or improve thymopoiesis. As many of these strategies are now in clinical trials, it is anticipated that UCB transplantation will continue to advance, further expanding our understanding of UCB biology and HSC transplantation. PMID:24605111

  6. Isolation of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells from small-volume umbilical cord blood units that do not qualify for the banking system.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Satoshi; Miura, Yasuo; Iwasa, Masaki; Fujishiro, Aya; Yao, Hisayuki; Miura, Masako; Fukuoka, Masaaki; Nakagawa, Yoko; Yokota, Asumi; Hirai, Hideyo; Ichinohe, Tatsuo; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Maekawa, Taira

    2015-08-01

    The clinical application of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) has been extensively explored. In this study, we examined the availability of freshly donated umbilical cord blood (UCB) units that do not qualify for the Japanese banking system for transplantation because of their small volume as a source of MSCs. Forty-five UCB units were used. The median volume of each UCB unit and number of nucleated cells per unit were 40 mL and 5.39 × 10(8), respectively. MSCs were successfully isolated from 18 of 45 units (40 %). The MSC isolation rate was not affected by cell processing method or the interval between delivery and cell processing. The volume of the UCB unit and the mononuclear cell count were predictive factors of the MSC isolation rate. MSCs were effectively isolated by selecting UCB units with a volume of ≥54 mL and containing ≥1.28 × 10(8) mononuclear cells, yielding a MSC isolation rate of >70 %. UCB-derived MSCs were similar to bone marrow-derived MSCs in terms of their morphology, surface marker expression, and differentiation potential, apart from adipogenesis. Our data indicate that UCB units that are currently discarded due to inadequate volume should be reconsidered as a source of MSCs using the well-established UCB banking system.

  7. Human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells and chorionic plate-derived mesenchymal stem cells promote axon survival in a rat model of optic nerve crush injury

    PubMed Central

    CHUNG, SOKJOONG; RHO, SEUNGSOO; KIM, GIJIN; KIM, SO-RA; BAEK, KWANG-HYUN; KANG, MYUNGSEO; LEW, HELEN

    2016-01-01

    The use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in cell therapy in regenerative medicine has great potential, particularly in the treatment of nerve injury. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) reportedly contains stem cells, which have been widely used as a hematopoietic source and may have therapeutic potential for neurological impairment. Although ongoing research is dedicated to the management of traumatic optic nerve injury using various measures, novel therapeutic strategies based on the complex underlying mechanisms responsible for optic nerve injury, such as inflammation and/or ischemia, are required. In the present study, a rat model of optic nerve crush (ONC) injury was established in order to examine the effects of transplanting human chorionic plate-derived MSCs (CP-MSCs) isolated from the placenta, as well as human UCB mononuclear cells (CB-MNCs) on compressed rat optic nerves. Expression markers for inflammation, apoptosis, and optic nerve regeneration were analyzed, as well as the axon survival rate by direct counting. Increased axon survival rates were observed following the injection of CB-MNCs at at 1 week post-transplantation compared with the controls. The levels of growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43) were increased after the injection of CB-MNCs or CP-MSCs compared with the controls, and the expression levels of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) were also significantly increased following the injection of CB-MNCs or CP-MSCs. ERM-like protein (ERMN) and SLIT-ROBO Rho GTPase activating protein 2 (SRGAP2) were found to be expressed in the optic nerves of the CP-MSC-injected rats with ONC injury. The findings of our study suggest that the administration of CB-MNCs or CP-MSCs may promote axon survival through systemic concomitant mechanisms involving GAP-43 and HIF-1α. Taken together, these findings provide further understanding of the mechanisms repsonsible for optic nerve injury and may aid in the development of novel cell-based therapeutic strategies with

  8. Increased Maternal and Cord Blood Betatrophin in Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wawrusiewicz-Kurylonek, Natalia; Telejko, Beata; Kuzmicki, Mariusz; Sobota, Angelika; Lipinska, Danuta; Pliszka, Justyna; Raczkowska, Beata; Kuc, Pawel; Urban, Remigiusz; Szamatowicz, Jacek; Kretowski, Adam; Laudanski, Piotr; Gorska, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of the study was to compare maternal and cord blood levels of betatrophin – a new peptide potentially controlling beta cell growth - as well as in its mRNA expression in subcutaneous adipose tissue, visceral adipose tissue and placental tissue obtained from pregnant women with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) and gestational diabetes (GDM). Methods Serum betatrophin and irisin concentrations were measured by ELISA in 93 patients with GDM and 97 women with NGT between 24 and 28 week of gestation. Additionally, maternal and cord blood betatrophin and irisin, as well as their genes (C19orf80 and Fndc5) expression were evaluated in 20 patients with GDM and 20 women with NGT at term. Results In both groups, serum betatrophin concentrations were significantly higher in the patients with GDM than in the controls (1.91 [1.40-2.60] ng/ml vs 1.63 [1.21-2.22] ng/ml, p=0.03 and 3.45 [2.77-6.53] ng/ml vs 2.78 [2.16-3.65] ng/ml, p=0.03, respectively). Cord blood betatrophin levels were also higher in the GDM than in the NGT group (20.43 [12.97-28.80] ng/ml vs 15.06 [10.11-21.36] ng/ml, p=0.03). In both groups betatrophin concentrations in arterial cord blood were significantly higher than in maternal serum (p=0.0001). Serum irisin levels were significantly lower in the patients with GDM (1679 [1308-2171] ng/ml) than in the healthy women between 24 and 28 week of pregnancy (1880 [1519-2312] ng/ml, p=0.03). Both C19orf80 and Fndc5 mRNA expression in fat and placental tissue did not differ significantly between the groups studied. Conclusions Our results suggest that an increase in maternal and cord blood betatrophin might be a compensatory mechanism for enhanced insulin demand in GDM. PMID:26115519

  9. Intranasal nerve growth factor bypasses the blood-brain barrier and affects spinal cord neurons in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Aloe, Luigi; Bianchi, Patrizia; De Bellis, Alberto; Soligo, Marzia; Rocco, Maria Luisa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate whether, by intranasal administration, the nerve growth factor bypasses the blood-brain barrier and turns over the spinal cord neurons and if such therapeutic approach could be of value in the treatment of spinal cord injury. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats with intact and injured spinal cord received daily intranasal nerve growth factor administration in both nostrils for 1 day or for 3 consecutive weeks. We found an increased content of nerve growth factor and enhanced expression of nerve growth factor receptor in the spinal cord 24 hours after a single intranasal administration of nerve growth factor in healthy rats, while daily treatment for 3 weeks in a model of spinal cord injury improved the deficits in locomotor behaviour and increased spinal content of both nerve growth factor and nerve growth factor receptors. These outcomes suggest that the intranasal nerve growth factor bypasses blood-brain barrier and affects spinal cord neurons in spinal cord injury. They also suggest exploiting the possible therapeutic role of intranasally delivered nerve growth factor for the neuroprotection of damaged spinal nerve cells. PMID:25206755

  10. Lead exposure induces changes in 5-hydroxymethylcytosine clusters in CpG islands in human embryonic stem cells and umbilical cord blood

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Arko; Cingolani, Pablo; Senut, Marie-Claude; Land, Susan; Mercado-Garcia, Adriana; Tellez-Rojo, Martha M; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Wright, Robert O; Ruden, Douglas M

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to neurotoxicants such as lead (Pb) may cause stable changes in the DNA methylation (5mC) profile of the fetal genome. However, few studies have examined its effect on the DNA de-methylation pathway, specifically the dynamic changes of the 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) profile. Therefore, in this study, we investigate the relationship between Pb exposure and 5mC and 5hmC modifications during early development. To study the changes in the 5hmC profile, we use a novel modification of the Infinium™ HumanMethylation450 assay (Illumina, Inc.), which we named HMeDIP-450K assay, in an in vitro human embryonic stem cell model of Pb exposure. We model Pb exposure-associated 5hmC changes as clusters of correlated, adjacent CpG sites, which are co-responding to Pb. We further extend our study to look at Pb-dependent changes in high density 5hmC regions in umbilical cord blood DNA from 48 mother-infant pairs from the Early Life Exposure in Mexico to Environmental Toxicants (ELEMENT) cohort. For our study, we randomly selected umbilical cord blood from 24 male and 24 female children from the 1st and 4th quartiles of Pb levels. Our data show that Pb-associated changes in the 5hmC and 5mC profiles can be divided into sex-dependent and sex-independent categories. Interestingly, differential 5mC sites are better markers of Pb-associated sex-dependent changes compared to differential 5hmC sites. In this study we identified several 5hmC and 5mC genomic loci, which we believe might have some potential as early biomarkers of prenatal Pb exposure. PMID:26046694

  11. The intra-bone marrow injection of cord blood cells extends the possibility of transplantation to the majority of patients with malignant hematopoietic diseases.

    PubMed

    Frassoni, Francesco; Varaldo, Riccardo; Gualandi, Francesca; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Sambuceti, GianMario; Sacchi, Nicoletta; Podestà, Marina

    2010-06-01

    Cord blood transplant (CBT) in adult patients is scarcely utilized because of the risk of graft failure or very delayed platelet recovery. To improve the capacity and the speed to engraft, we have developed an intra-bone (IB) cord blood transplant technique. 75 patients with hematological malignancies, categorized by disease phase as early (18%), intermediate (20%) and advanced (62%), were transplanted. The median cell dose (TNC) infused was: 2.6 (1.35-5.4)×10(7)/kg; the HLA disparity was: 12 cases=5/6, 62 cases=4/6 and 1 case=3/6 matched antigens. 72/75 patients engrafted (96%); median day of recovery of neutrophils (PMN) >500×10(9)/L and platelets (PLT) >20 000×10(9)/L was: 23 (14-44) and 35 (16-70) days respectively. The outcomes at 2 years according to Kaplan-Meier are: OS=46%±5; RI=18%±2; NRM=39%±5. Acute GVHD incidence/severity was: grade 0-I=64%, II=14%, III-IV=0%. The incidence of Chronic GVHD was globally low but in 3 cases was very severe. Intra-bone CBT is associated with high rate of engraftment, early and robust platelet recovery, low incidence of acute GVHD. A very promising aspect is that the relapse rate is low considering the advanced phase of the disease in two/thirds of patients. A suitable CBU was found for nearly every patient searching for a CBU. Therefore, IB CBT extends the possibility to transplant any patient for whom this approach represents the sole possibility of long-term survival.

  12. Expression of the sFLT1 Gene in Cord Blood Cells Is Associated to Maternal Arsenic Exposure and Decreased Birth Weight

    PubMed Central

    Remy, Sylvie; Govarts, Eva; Bruckers, Liesbeth; Paulussen, Melissa; Wens, Britt; Hond, Elly Den; Nelen, Vera; Baeyens, Willy; van Larebeke, Nicolas; Loots, Ilse; Sioen, Isabelle; Schoeters, Greet

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing epidemiologic evidence that arsenic exposure in utero is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and may contribute to long-term health effects. These effects may occur at low environmental exposures but the underlying molecular mechanism is not clear. We collected cord blood samples of 183 newborns to identify associations between arsenic levels and birth anthropometric parameters in an area with very low arsenic exposure. Our core research aim was to screen for transcriptional marks that mechanistically explain these associations. Multiple regression analyses showed that birth weight decreased with 47 g (95% CI: 16–78 g) for an interquartile range increase of 0.99 μg/L arsenic. The model was adjusted for child’s sex, maternal smoking during pregnancy, gestational age, and parity. Higher arsenic concentrations and reduced birth weight were positively associated with changes in expression of the sFLT1 (soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1) gene in cord blood cells in girls. The protein product of sFLT1 is a scavenger of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the extracellular environment and plays a key role in the inhibition of placental angiogenesis. In terms of fetal development, inhibition of placental angiogenesis leads to impaired nutrition and hence to growth retardation. Various genes related to DNA methylation and oxidative stress showed also changed expression in relation to arsenic exposure but were not related to birth outcome parameters. In conclusion, this study suggests that increased expression of sFLT1 is an intermediate marker that points to placental angiogenesis as a pathway linking prenatal arsenic exposure to reduced birth weight. PMID:24664213

  13. Treatment of foot disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus using human umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells: response and correction of immunological anomalies.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Yan; Zheng, Zhao-Hui; Li, Xue-Yi; Guo, Jian; Zhang, Yan; Li, Hui; Wang, Yang-Wei; Ren, Jun; Wu, Zhen-Biao

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the distribution of Tregs/Th17/Th1 cells in type 2 diabetic patients with foot disease before and after human umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cell (hUCB-MSCs) transplantation. Fifteen diabetic patients with foot disease under insulin therapy received hUCB-MSC transplantation. The hUCB-MSCs were directly injected into the quadriceps thigh muscles in patients with foot disease (cell quantity at 2 x 10⁶ per point). Physical attributes, blood cytokines, blood glucose and insulin dosage were evaluated before treatment and 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks thereafter. The ratios of Treg/Th17, Treg/Th1, and Th17/Th1 cells were measured using flow cytometry and their correlation with various cytokines (FoxP3, IL-17, INF-γ, C-RP, TNF-α, and VEGF) was scrutinized. Levels of blood glucose and insulin dosage were significantly reduced in all 15 patients following hUCB-MSC transplantation. The ratios of CD4⁺CD25(hi)FoxP3⁺ Treg/Th17 and CD4⁺CD25(hi)FoxP3⁺ Treg/Th1 cells were significantly increased 4 weeks after transplantation (p < 0.01), while the ratio of Th17/Th1 cells remained unchanged. Serum levels of VEGF peaked at 4 weeks following transplantation. Levels of C-RP and TNF-α were significantly reduced 4 weeks after transplantation. Intriguingly, the ratios of Treg/Th17 were positively correlated with VEGF levels, and were inversely correlated with plasma IL-6 levels. Our data indicated that immune disorders are associated with the development of type 2 diabetes and its complications. Levels of blood glucose and required insulin dosage were reduced after hUCB-MSC transplantation accompanied with improved clinical profiles in diabetic patients. These data favor a role for Treg cells in the onset and progression of T2D.

  14. Intravenous human umbilical cord blood transplantation for stroke: impact on infarct volume and caspase-3-dependent cell death in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Riegelsberger, Ute-Maria; Deten, Alexander; Pösel, Claudia; Zille, Marietta; Kranz, Alexander; Boltze, Johannes; Wagner, Daniel-Christoph

    2011-01-01

    Transplantation of human umbilical cord blood cells (HUCBC) produces reliable behavioral and morphological improvements in animal models of stroke. However, the mechanisms of action still have not been fully elucidated. The aim of the present study is the evaluation of potential neuroprotective effects produced by HUCBC in terms of reduced infarct volume and caspase-3-dependent cell death. Permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion was induced in 90 spontaneously hypertensive rats. The animals were randomly assigned to the control group (n=49) or the verum group (n=41). The cell suspension (8 × 10(6) HUCBC per kilogram bodyweight) or vehicle solution was intravenously administered 24h after stroke onset. Fifty subjects (n=25/25) were sacrificed after 25, 48, 72 and 96h, and brain specimens were removed for immunohistochemistry for MAP2, cleaved caspase-3 (casp3) and GFAP. Another 42 animals (n=26/16) were sacrificed after 0, 6, 24, 36 and 48h and their brains processed for quantitative PCR for casp3 and survivin. The infarct volume remained stable over the entire experimental period. However, cleaved casp3 activity increased significantly in the infarct border zone within the same time frame. Numerous cleaved casp3-positive cells were colocalized with the astrocytic marker GFAP, whereas cleavage of neuronal casp3 was observed rarely. Neither the infarct volume nor casp3 activity was significantly affected by cell transplantation. Delayed systemic transplantation of HUCBC failed to produce neuroprotective effects in a permanent stroke model using premorbid subjects.

  15. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 and stromal cell-derived factor-1 act synergistically to support migration of blood-borne monocytes into the injured spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haoqian; Trivedi, Alpa; Lee, Jung-Uek; Lohela, Marja; Lee, Sang Mi; Fandel, Thomas M; Werb, Zena; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J

    2011-11-01

    The infiltration of monocytes into the lesioned site is a key event in the inflammatory response after spinal cord injury (SCI). We hypothesized that the molecular events governing the infiltration of monocytes into the injured cord involve cooperativity between the upregulation of the chemoattractant stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1)/CXCL12 in the injured cord and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9/gelatinase B), expressed by infiltrating monocytes. SDF-1 and its receptor CXCR4 mRNAs were upregulated in the injured cord, while macrophages immunoexpressed CXCR4. When mice, transplanted with bone marrow cells from green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice, were subjected to SCI, GFP+ monocytes infiltrated the cord and displayed gelatinolytic activity. In vitro studies confirmed that SDF-1α, acting through CXCR4, expressed on bone marrow-derived macrophages, upregulated MMP-9 and stimulated MMP-9-dependent transmigration across endothelial cell monolayers by 2.6-fold. There was a reduction in F4/80+ macrophages in spinal cord-injured MMP-9 knock-out mice (by 36%) or wild-type mice, treated with the broad-spectrum MMP inhibitor GM6001 (by 30%). Mice were adoptively transferred with myeloid cells and treated with the MMP-9/-2 inhibitor SB-3CT, the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100, or a combination of both drugs. While either drug resulted in a 28-30% reduction of infiltrated myeloid cells, the combined treatment resulted in a 45% reduction, suggesting that SDF-1 and MMP-9 function independently to promote the trafficking of myeloid cells into the injured cord. Collectively, these observations suggest a synergistic partnership between MMP-9 and SDF-1 in facilitating transmigration of monocytes into the injured spinal cord.

  16. Advance in spinal cord ischemia reperfusion injury: Blood-spinal cord barrier and remote ischemic preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qijing; Huang, Jinxiu; Hu, Ji; Zhu, Hongfei

    2016-06-01

    The blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) is the physiological and metabolic substance diffusion barrier between blood circulation and spinal cord tissues. This barrier plays a vital role in maintaining the microenvironment stability of the spinal cord. When the spinal cord is subjected to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, the structure and function of the BSCB is disrupted, further destroying the spinal cord homeostasis and ultimately leading to neurological deficit. Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) is an approach in which interspersed cycles of preconditioning ischemia is followed by reperfusion to tissues/organs to protect the distant target tissues/organs against subsequent lethal ischemic injuries. RIPC is an innovation of the treatment strategies that protect the organ from I/R injury. In this study, we review the morphological structure and function of the BSCB, the injury mechanism of BSCB resulting from spinal cord I/R, and the effect of RIPC on it.

  17. [Ethical aspects of human embryonic stem cell use and commercial umbilical cord blood stem cell banking. Ethical reflections on the occasion of the regulation of the European Council and Parliament on advanced therapy medicinal products].

    PubMed

    Virt, G

    2010-01-01

    The regulation of the European Council and Parliament on advanced therapy medicinal products also includes therapies with human embryonic stem cells. The use of these stem cells is controversially and heavily discussed. Contrary to the use of adult stem cells, medical and ethical problems concerning the use of human embryonic stem cells persists, because this use is based on the destruction of human life at the very beginning. The regulation foresees, therefore, subsidiarity within the European Member States. Although there are no ethical problems in principle with the use of stem cells from the umbilical cord blood, there are social ethical doubts with the banking of these stem cells for autologous use without any currently foreseeable medical advantage by commercial blood banks. Also in this case subsidiarity is valid.

  18. Electron microscopic structure of human umbilical cord blood lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Forte, T.M.; Davis, P.A.; Nordhausen, R.W.; Glueck, C.J.

    1982-01-01

    Neonatal VLDL, LDL, HDL/sub 2/ and HDL/sub 3/ were isolated from umbilical cord blood by preparative ultracentrifugation and analyzed by electron microscopy. Cord blood VLDL were round particles that were heterogeneous in size, mean diameter 49.5 +/- 10.3 nm. This size was very similar to that of the normal adult population. Cord blood LDL had a mean diameter of 25.9 +/- 3.4 nm. Most LDL particles were round in profile, but there was always a small fraction of particles which had flattened sides and formed short, linear aggregates. Cord blood HDL/sub 3/ were homogeneous round particles indistinguishable from those of the adult. HDL/sub 2/ from cord blood had a mean diameter of 11.5 +/- 1.7 nm and are larger than the adult population. The HDL/sub 2/ were characterized by the presence of small amounts of rectangular-shaped structures, 14.0 by 10.0 nm in size. These latter particles are enriched in the density fraction d 1.095 g/ml and are unique to the cord blood HDL. The presence of these unusual particles suggests that cord blood HDL may transport lipids in a somewhat different fashion from that of normal adult HDL.

  19. Galectin-3 in cord blood of term and preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Demmert, M; Faust, K; Bohlmann, M K; Tröger, B; Göpel, W; Herting, E; Härtel, C

    2012-01-01

    In recent years galectin-3 has gained attention as a signalling molecule, mainly in inflammatory diseases. Data on galectin-3 expression in neonates, however, are limited, and expression of this lectin in cord blood has not yet been reported. The aim of this study was to determine galectin-3 levels in cord blood of term and preterm neonates as well as galectin-3 levels in cord blood of term neonates after stimulation with the prevalent pathogen Streptococcus agalactiae. Cord blood samples were incubated for 24 h and galectin-3 levels were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. There is a positive correlation between gestational age and galectin-3 levels in cord blood. Expression of galectin-3 is significantly higher in cord blood of small-for-gestational-age infants compared to appropriate-for-gestational-age infants. Stimulation with an invasive but not with a colonizing strain of S. agalactiae induced expression of galectin-3. Galectin-3 is expressed constitutively in cord blood of neonates and seems to play a role in the innate immunity of this population. PMID:22236000

  20. Developing Educational Resources to Advance Umbilical Cord Blood Banking and Research: A Canadian Perspective.

    PubMed

    Pereira Beak, Carla; Chargé, Sophie B; Isasi, Rosario; Knoppers, Bartha M

    2015-05-01

    In 2013 Canadian Blood Services (CBS) launched the National Public Cord Blood Bank (NPCBB), a program to collect, process, test, and store cord blood units donated for use in transplantation. A key component of the creation of the NPCBB is the establishment of a program that enables cord blood not suitable for banking or transplantation to be used for biomedical research purposes. Along with the development of processes and policies to manage the NPCBB and the cord blood research program, CBS-in collaboration with researchers from the Stem Cell Network-have also developed educational tools to provide relevant information for target audiences to aid implementation and operation. We describe here one of these tools, the REB Primer on Research and Cord Blood Donation (the Primer), which highlights key ethical and legal considerations and identifies Canadian documents that are relevant to the use of cord blood in biomedical research. The Primer also introduces the NPCBB and describes the systems CBS is implementing to address ethical issues. The Primer is intended to assist research ethics boards in evaluating the ethical acceptability of research protocols, to facilitate harmonized decision-making by providing a common reference, and to highlight the role of research ethics boards in governance frameworks. With the Primer we hope to illustrate how the development of such educational tools can facilitate the ethical implementation and governance of programs related to stem cell research in Canada and abroad.

  1. Developing Educational Resources to Advance Umbilical Cord Blood Banking and Research: A Canadian Perspective.

    PubMed

    Pereira Beak, Carla; Chargé, Sophie B; Isasi, Rosario; Knoppers, Bartha M

    2015-05-01

    In 2013 Canadian Blood Services (CBS) launched the National Public Cord Blood Bank (NPCBB), a program to collect, process, test, and store cord blood units donated for use in transplantation. A key component of the creation of the NPCBB is the establishment of a program that enables cord blood not suitable for banking or transplantation to be used for biomedical research purposes. Along with the development of processes and policies to manage the NPCBB and the cord blood research program, CBS-in collaboration with researchers from the Stem Cell Network-have also developed educational tools to provide relevant information for target audiences to aid implementation and operation. We describe here one of these tools, the REB Primer on Research and Cord Blood Donation (the Primer), which highlights key ethical and legal considerations and identifies Canadian documents that are relevant to the use of cord blood in biomedical research. The Primer also introduces the NPCBB and describes the systems CBS is implementing to address ethical issues. The Primer is intended to assist research ethics boards in evaluating the ethical acceptability of research protocols, to facilitate harmonized decision-making by providing a common reference, and to highlight the role of research ethics boards in governance frameworks. With the Primer we hope to illustrate how the development of such educational tools can facilitate the ethical implementation and governance of programs related to stem cell research in Canada and abroad. PMID:26168106

  2. HLA-mismatched cord blood transplantation: immunological studies.

    PubMed

    Vilmer, E; Quelvennec, E; Plouvier, E; Denamur, E; Rohrlich, P; Elion, J; Sterkers, G

    1994-01-01

    Two cases of HLA partially matched related cord blood transplantation were reported. The first patient remains healthy more than 4 years after graft. The second patient died from acute GVHD. In the first case, the immune reconstitution was studied over a 2 year period after graft: the alloreactive cytotoxic T-cell precursor (CTLp) frequencies were comparable between the donor and the recipient. Indirect evidence suggested that the resolution of GVHD was not due to a specific deletion of CTLp against the HLA antigens unshared between donor and recipient.

  3. The Structural Basis of Functional Improvement in Response to Human Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplantation in Hearts with Post-Infarct LV Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Ye, Lei; Zhong, Jia; Li, Xin; Yan, Chen; Chandler, Margaret P.; Calvin, Steve; Xiao, Feng; Negia, Mesfin; Low, Walter C.; Zhang, Jianyi; Yu, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Cellular therapy for myocardial repair has been one of the most intensely investigated interventional strategies for acute myocardium infarction. Although the therapeutic potential of stem cells has been demonstrated in various studies, the underlying mechanisms for such improvement are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the long-term effects of stem cell therapy on both myocardial fiber organization and regional contractile function using a rat model of post-infarct remodeling. Human non-hematopoietic umbilical cord blood stem cells (nh-UCBSCs) were administered via tail vein to rats 2 days after infarct surgery. Animals were maintained without immunosuppressive therapy. In vivo and ex vivo MR imaging was performed on infarct hearts ten months after cell transplantation. Compared to the age-matched rats exposed to the identical surgery, both global and regional cardiac function of the nh-UCBSC-treated hearts, such as ejection fraction, ventricular strain and torsion, were significantly improved. More importantly, the treated hearts exhibited preserved fiber orientation and water diffusivities that were similar to those in sham-operated control hearts. These data provide the first evidence that nh-UCBSC treatment may prevent/delay untoward structural remodeling in post-infarct hearts, which supports the improved LV function observed in vivo in the absence of immunosuppression, suggesting a beneficial paracrine effect that occurred with the cellular therapy. PMID:24332083

  4. Comparison of human fetal liver, umbilical cord blood, and adult blood hematopoietic stem cell engraftment in NOD-scid/gammac-/-, Balb/c-Rag1-/-gammac-/-, and C.B-17-scid/bg immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Lepus, Christin M; Gibson, Thomas F; Gerber, Scott A; Kawikova, Ivana; Szczepanik, Marian; Hossain, Jaber; Ablamunits, Vitaly; Kirkiles-Smith, Nancy; Herold, Kevan C; Donis, Ruben O; Bothwell, Alfred L; Pober, Jordan S; Harding, Martha J

    2009-10-01

    Immunodeficient mice bearing components of a human immune system present a novel approach for studying human immune responses. We investigated the number, phenotype, developmental kinetics, and function of developing human immune cells following transfer of CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) preparations originating from second trimester human fetal liver (HFL), umbilical cord blood (UCB), or granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized adult blood (G-CSF-AB) delivered via intrahepatic injection into sublethally irradiated neonatal NOD-scid/gammac(-/-), Balb/c-Rag1(-/-)gammac(-/-), and C.B-17-scid/bg mice. HFL and UCB HSC provided the greatest number and breadth of developing cells. NOD-scid/gammac(-/-) and Balb/c-Rag1(-/-)gammac(-/-) harbored human B and dendritic cells as well as human platelets in peripheral blood, whereas NOD-scid/gammac(-/-) mice harbored higher levels of human T cells. NOD-scid/gammac(-/-) mice engrafted with HFL CD34(+) HSC demonstrated human immunological competence evidenced by white pulp expansion and increases in total human immunoglobulin following immunization with T-dependent antigens and delayed-type hypersensitivity-infiltrating leukocytes in response to antigenic challenge. In conclusion, we describe an encouraging base system for studying human hematopoietic lineage development and function utilizing human HFL or UCB HSC-engrafted NOD-scid/gammac(-/-) mice that is well suited for future studies toward the development of a fully competent humanized mouse model.

  5. Changes in Interleukin-1 alpha serum levels after transplantation of umbilical cord blood cells in a model of perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

    PubMed

    Rosenkranz, Katja; Tenbusch, Matthias; May, Caroline; Marcus, Katrin; Meier, Carola

    2013-03-01

    Transplantation of human umbilical cord blood (hUCB) cells is a potential approach for the treatment of perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. Neurological and motor deficits resulting from the brain lesion are ameliorated upon transplantation. The molecular mechanisms underlying these improvements are currently being unravelled. One parameter identified as part of the beneficial effects of hUCB cells is the reduction of brain inflammation. It is, however, unclear whether the modulation of brain inflammation is due to local or systemic effects of hUCB cells. In this study, the effects of hUCB cell transplantation in a model of perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury were investigated at the systemic level by measurement of serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines by multiplex bead arrays. Two days after induction of the brain damage, levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines Interleukin-1α (IL-1α), Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and Tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) were increased in the serum of rats. Application of hUCB cells, in turn, correlated with a reduced elevation of serum levels of these pro-inflammatory cytokines. This decrease was accompanied by a reduced expression of CD68, a marker protein of activated microglia/macrophages in the brain. Therefore, systemic modulation of the immune response by hUCB cells could represent one possible mechanism of how these cells might mediate their beneficial effects. Creation of a regenerative environment with reduced inflammation might account for the functional regeneration observed upon hUCB cell treatment in lesioned animals.

  6. Kinetics of versican-expressing macrophages in bone marrow after cord blood stem cell transplantation for treatment of acute myelogenous leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Senda, Miho; Fukuyama, Ryuichi; Nagasaka, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    Aims To determine versican-producing cells in normocellular bone marrow and to evaluate chronological alteration in the number of versican-producing macrophages in bone marrow of patients with acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML) after cord blood stem cell transplantation (CBSCT) to gain insight in the significance of versican in recovery of haematopoiesis. Methods We enrolled seven age-matched unrelated patients with normocellular bone marrow for determining versican-producing cells in bone marrow, CBSCT-treated patients with AML, 18 with fine and other four with poor engraftment, for determining chronological alteration of versican-expressing and CD68-expressing cells in transplanted bone marrow in reference to the total cells. Clot samples of patients with AML were collected from the +16 to +55 day after transplantation and separated into four groups. We included an AML case whose specimen was obtained on the +9 day. Cells positive in immunohistochemistry using antibodies to versican and CD68 were counted to obtain the mean±SD in a unit area of the bone marrow, plotted chronologically and compared with the numbers from the age-matched normocellular group. Results We determined by a double immunohistochemistry that the versican-expressing cells in bone marrow are macrophages. The time-course curve demonstrated an inverse relationship between the versican-positive macrophages and the total cells in the transplanted bone marrow for over 55 days. In bone marrow of poor engraftment cases, versican-positive macrophages appeared to be decreased in comparison with age-matched and sampling day-matched patients. Conclusions These results suggest that versican and/or versican-expressing macrophages positively contribute to bone marrow regeneration of patients with AML after CBSCT. PMID:26951084

  7. Cochlear repair by transplantation of human cord blood CD133+ cells to nod-scid mice made deaf with kanamycin and noise.

    PubMed

    Revoltella, Roberto P; Papini, Sandra; Rosellini, Alfredo; Michelini, Monica; Franceschini, Valeria; Ciorba, Andrea; Bertolaso, Lucia; Magosso, Sara; Hatzopoulos, Stavros; Lorito, Guiscardo; Giordano, Pietro; Simoni, Edi; Ognio, Emanuela; Cilli, Michele; Saccardi, Riccardo; Urbani, Serena; Jeffery, Rosemary; Poulsom, Richard; Martini, Alessandro

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the fate of human cord blood CD133+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) transplanted intravenously (IV) into irradiated nod-scid mice previously made deaf by ototoxic treatment with kanamycin and/ or intense noise, to verify whether HSC engraft the cochlea and contribute to inner ear restoration, in vivo. We tested the presence of HLA.DQalpha1 by PCR, used for traceability of engrafted cells, finding evidence that HSC migrated to various host tissues, including the organ of Corti (OC). By histology, antibody and lectin-staining analysis, we confirmed that HSC IV transplantation in mice previously damaged by ototoxic agents correlated with the repair process and stimulation ex novo of morphological recovery in the inner ear, while the cochlea of control oto-injured, nontransplanted mice remained seriously damaged. Dual color FISH analysis also provided evidence of positive engraftment in the inner ear and in various mouse tissues, also revealing small numbers of heterokaryons, probably derived from fusion of donor with endogenous cells, for up to 2 months following transplantation. These observations offer the first evidence that transplanted human HSC migrating to the inner ear of oto-injured mice may provide conditions for the resumption of deafened cochlea, emerging as a potential strategy for inner ear rehabilitation. PMID:18819255

  8. Cytomegalovirus upregulates expression of CCR5 in central memory cord blood mononuclear cells, which may facilitate in utero HIV type 1 transmission.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Erica L; Howard, Chanie L; Thurman, Joy; Pontiff, Kyle; Johnson, Elan S; Chakraborty, Rana

    2015-01-15

    Administration of combination antiretroviral therapy to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected pregnant women significantly reduces vertical transmission. In contrast, maternal co-opportunistic infection with primary or reactivated cytomegalovirus (CMV) or other pathogens may facilitate in utero transmission of HIV-1 by activation of cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs). Here we examine the targets and mechanisms that affect fetal susceptibility to HIV-1 in utero. Using flow cytometry, we demonstrate that the fraction of CD4(+)CD45RO(+) and CD4(+)CCR5(+) CBMCs is minimal, which may account for the low level of in utero HIV-1 transmission. Unstimulated CD4(+) CBMCs that lack CCR5/CD45RO showed reduced levels of HIV-1 infection. However, upon in vitro stimulation with CMV, CBMCs undergo increased proliferation to upregulate the fraction of T central memory cells and expression of CCR5, which enhances susceptibility to HIV-1 infection in vitro. These data suggest that activation induced by CMV in vivo may alter CCR5 expression in CD4(+) T central memory cells to promote in utero transmission of HIV-1.

  9. Multiple low-dose infusions of human umbilical cord blood cells improve cognitive impairments and reduce amyloid-β-associated neuropathology in Alzheimer mice.

    PubMed

    Darlington, Donna; Deng, Juan; Giunta, Brian; Hou, Huayan; Sanberg, Cyndy D; Kuzmin-Nichols, Nicole; Zhou, Hua-Dong; Mori, Takashi; Ehrhart, Jared; Sanberg, Paul R; Tan, Jun

    2013-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common progressive age-related dementia in the elderly and the fourth major cause of disability and mortality in that population. The disease is pathologically characterized by deposition of β-amyloid plaques neurofibrillary tangles in the brain. Current strategies for the treatment of AD are symptomatic only. As such, they are less than efficacious in terms of significantly slowing or halting the underlying pathophysiological progression of the disease. Modulation by cell therapy may be new promising disease-modifying therapy. Recently, we showed reduction in amyloid-β (Aβ) levels/β-amyloid plaques and associated astrocytosis following low-dose infusions of mononuclear human umbilical cord blood cells (HUCBCs). Our current study extended our previous findings by examining cognition via (1) the rotarod test, (2) a 2-day version of the radial-arm water maze test, and (3) a subsequent observation in an open pool platform test to characterize the effects of monthly peripheral HUCBC infusion (1×10(6) cells/μL) into the transgenic PSAPP mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis (bearing mutant human APP and presenilin-1 transgenes) from 6 to 12 months of age. We show that HUCBC therapy correlates with decreased (1) cognitive impairment, (2) Aβ levels/β-amyloid plaques, (3) amyloidogenic APP processing, and (4) reactive microgliosis after a treatment of 6 or 10 months. As such, this report lays the groundwork for an HUCBC therapy as potentially novel alternative to oppose AD at the disease-modifying level.

  10. Response to Intravenous Allogeneic Equine Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Administered from Chilled or Frozen State in Serum and Protein-Free Media

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Lynn B.; Co, Carmon; Koenig, Judith B.; Tse, Crystal; Lindsay, Emily; Koch, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    Equine mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are commonly transported, chilled or frozen, to veterinary clinics. These MSC must remain viable and minimally affected by culture, transport, or injection processes. The safety of two carrier solutions developed for optimal viability and excipient use were evaluated in ponies, with and without allogeneic cord blood-derived (CB) MSC. We hypothesized that neither the carrier solutions nor CB-MSC would elicit measurable changes in clinical, hematological, or biochemical parameters. In nine ponies (study 1), a bolus of HypoThermosol® FRS (HTS-FRS), CryoStor® CS10 (CS10), or saline was injected IV (n = 3/treatment). Study 2, following a 1-week washout period, 5 × 107 pooled allogeneic CB-MSCs were administered IV in HTS-FRS following 24 h simulated chilled transport. Study 3, following another 1-week washout period 5 × 107 pooled allogeneic CB-MSCs were administered IV in CS10 immediately after thawing. Nine ponies received CB-MSCs in study 2 and 3, and three ponies received the cell carrier media without cells. CB-MSCs were pooled in equal numbers from five unrelated donors. In all studies, ponies were monitored with physical examination, and blood collection for 7 days following injection. CD4 and CD8 lymphocyte populations were also evaluated in each blood sample. In all three studies, physical exam, complete blood cell count, serum biochemistry, and coagulation panel did not deviate from established normal ranges. Proportions of CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes increased at 168 h postinjection in CB-MSC treatment groups regardless of the carrier solution. Decreases in CD4+/CD8+ double positive populations were observed at 24 and 72 h in CB-MSC-treated animals. There was no difference in viability between CB-MSCs suspended in HTS-FRS and CS10. HTS-FRS and CS10 used for low volume excipient injection of MSC suspensions were not associated with short-term adverse reactions. HTS-FRS and CS10 both adequately

  11. Response to Intravenous Allogeneic Equine Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Administered from Chilled or Frozen State in Serum and Protein-Free Media.

    PubMed

    Williams, Lynn B; Co, Carmon; Koenig, Judith B; Tse, Crystal; Lindsay, Emily; Koch, Thomas G

    2016-01-01

    Equine mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are commonly transported, chilled or frozen, to veterinary clinics. These MSC must remain viable and minimally affected by culture, transport, or injection processes. The safety of two carrier solutions developed for optimal viability and excipient use were evaluated in ponies, with and without allogeneic cord blood-derived (CB) MSC. We hypothesized that neither the carrier solutions nor CB-MSC would elicit measurable changes in clinical, hematological, or biochemical parameters. In nine ponies (study 1), a bolus of HypoThermosol(®) FRS (HTS-FRS), CryoStor(®) CS10 (CS10), or saline was injected IV (n = 3/treatment). Study 2, following a 1-week washout period, 5 × 10(7) pooled allogeneic CB-MSCs were administered IV in HTS-FRS following 24 h simulated chilled transport. Study 3, following another 1-week washout period 5 × 10(7) pooled allogeneic CB-MSCs were administered IV in CS10 immediately after thawing. Nine ponies received CB-MSCs in study 2 and 3, and three ponies received the cell carrier media without cells. CB-MSCs were pooled in equal numbers from five unrelated donors. In all studies, ponies were monitored with physical examination, and blood collection for 7 days following injection. CD4 and CD8 lymphocyte populations were also evaluated in each blood sample. In all three studies, physical exam, complete blood cell count, serum biochemistry, and coagulation panel did not deviate from established normal ranges. Proportions of CD4(+) and CD8(+) lymphocytes increased at 168 h postinjection in CB-MSC treatment groups regardless of the carrier solution. Decreases in CD4(+/)CD8(+) double positive populations were observed at 24 and 72 h in CB-MSC-treated animals. There was no difference in viability between CB-MSCs suspended in HTS-FRS and CS10. HTS-FRS and CS10 used for low volume excipient injection of MSC suspensions were not associated with short-term adverse reactions. HTS-FRS and CS10 both

  12. The Effect of Donor-Dependent Administration of Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells following Focal Cerebral Ischemia in Rats.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyung Woo; Chang, Jong Wook; Yang, Yoon Sun; Oh, Wonil; Hwang, Jae Ha; Kim, Dong Gyu; Paek, Sun Ha

    2015-12-01

    Stroke is an ischemic disease caused by clotted vessel-induced cell damage. It is characterized by high morbidity and mortality and is typically treated with a tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). However, this therapy is limited by temporal constraints. Recently, several studies have focused on cell therapy as an alternative treatment. Most researches have used fixed donor cell administration, and hence, the effect of donor-dependent cell administration is unknown. In this study, we administered 3 types of donor-derived human umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) in the ischemic boundary zone of the ischemic stroke rat model. We then performed functional and pathological characterization using rotarod, the limb placement test, and immunofluorescent staining. We observed a significant decrease in neuron number, and notable stroke-like motor dysfunction, as assessed by the rotarod test (~40% decrease in time) and the limb placement test (4.5 point increase) in control rats with ischemic stroke. The neurobehavioral performance of the rats with ischemic stroke that were treated with hUCB-MSCs was significantly better than that of rats in the vehicle-injected control group. Regardless of which donor cells were used, hUCB-MSC transplantation resulted in an accumulation of neuronal progenitor cells, and angiogenic and tissue repair factors in the ischemic boundary zone. The neurogenic and angiogenic profiles of the 3 types of hUCB-MSCs were very similar. Our results suggest that intraparenchymal administration of hUCB-MSCs results in significant therapeutic effects in the ischemic brain regardless of the type of donor. PMID:26713083

  13. Relationship of BK polyoma virus (BKV) in the urine with hemorrhagic cystitis and renal function in recipients of T Cell-depleted peripheral blood and cord blood stem cell transplantations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeon Joo; Zheng, Junting; Kolitsopoulos, Yovanna; Chung, Dick; Amigues, Isabelle; Son, Tammy; Choo, Kathleen; Hester, Jeff; Giralt, Sergio A; Glezerman, Ilya G; Jakubowski, Ann A; Papanicolaou, Genovefa A

    2014-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients are at significant risk for BK virus (BKV) reactivation, hemorrhagic cystitis (HC), and renal dysfunction. We prospectively monitored 98 patients who had received HSCT by serial BKV PCR in the urine through day (D) +100 to analyze the relationship between BK viruria and HC, serum creatinine (Cr), and creatinine clearance (CrCl) through D +180 or death. Patients, median age 52 years (range, 20 to 73), received T cell-depleted (50%) or cord blood allografts (21%). Median pre-HSCT BKV IgG titers were 1:10,240. Incremental increase in BKV IgG titers correlated with developing BK viruria ≥ 10(7) copies/mL. By D +100, 53 (54%) patients had BK viruria. BKV load in the urine increased at engraftment and persisted throughout D +100. HC developed in 10 patients (10%); 7 of 10 with BK viruria. In competing risk analyses, BK viruria ≥ 10(7) copies/mL, older age, cytomegalovirus reactivation, and foscarnet use were risk factors for HC. Cr and CrCl at 2, 3, and 6 months after HSCT were similar between patients with and without BK viruria.

  14. Storage of cord blood attracts private-sector interest

    PubMed Central

    Hass, J

    1999-01-01

    Storage of cord blood from their babies can cost parents several hundred dollars, and some private companies are already offering the service. Janis Hass reports that some Canadian specialists question the value of the banks. PMID:10081471

  15. [Cord blood transplantation: current status and new perspectives].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hisashi

    2016-03-01

    Cord blood (CB) has been an alternative stem cell source for patients with a wide variety of hematological diseases. When compared with unrelated bone marrow transplantation (u-BMT), obvious advantages of CB are the rapid availability and tolerance of 2 HLA antigen mismatch, which have increased the chances of transplantation for patients who lack a suitable donor or need urgent transplantation. Although higher rates of engraftment failure as compared to other stem cell sources after cord blood transplantation (CBT) have been a serious concern, the mechanisms underlying these failures have gradually been clarified by analyzing accumulated clinical data, thereby contributing to improvement of engraftment. Recent large-scale retrospective comparisons of clinical outcomes between CBT and u-BMT from HLA-matched donors have obtained comparable results, and moreover, results of CBT have been promising even in elderly patients and those in non-remission status. This review describes the current status of CBT and problems to be solved, along with discussion of developing strategies aimed at improving patient outcomes. PMID:27076239

  16. Gene Expression Status and Methylation Pattern in Promoter of P15INK4b and P16INK4a in Cord Blood CD34+ Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Mehdi; Kaviani, Saeid; Noruzinia, Mehrdad; Mortazavi, Yousef; Mobarra, Naser; Alizadeh, Shaban; Shahjahani, Mohammad; Skandari, Fatemeh; Ahmadi, Mohammad Hosein; Atashi, Amir; Abroun, Saeid; Zonoubi, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s) : Stem cell differentiation into different cell lineages depends upon several factors, cell cycle control elements and intracellular signaling elements, including P15INK4b and P16INK4a genes. Epigenetics may be regarded as a control mechanism which is affected by these factors with respect to their promoter structure. Materials and Methods : The CD34 + cord blood stem cells were purified, isolated and then expanded. The undifferentiated day genome was isolated from part of the cultured cells, and the seventh day differentiated genome was isolated from the other part after differentiation to erythroid lineage. The procedure was followed by a separate Real-Time PCR for the two genes using the obtained cDNA. The processed DNA of the former stages was used for MSP (Methylation Specific PCR) reaction. Finally, pre- and post differentiation results were compared.  Results : After performing MSP for each gene, it became clear that P15INK4b gene has undergone methylation and expression in predifferentiation stage. In addition, its status has not been changed after differentiation. P15INK4b gene expression was reduced after the differentiation. The other gene, P16INK4a, showed no predifferentiation methylation. Itwas completely expressed methylated and underwent reduced expression after differentiation. Conclusion : Specific predifferentiation expression of P15INK4b and P16INK4a genes along with reduction in their expression after erythroid differentiation indicated animportant role for these two genes in biology of CD34+ cells in primary stages and before differentiation. In addition, both genes are capable of epigenetic modifications due to the structure of their promoters. PMID:23997911

  17. Human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells improve functional recovery through thrombospondin1, pantraxin3, and vascular endothelial growth factor in the ischemic rat brain.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyung Woo; Moon, Hyo-Eun; Kim, Hye-Soo R; Paek, Seung Leal; Kim, Yona; Chang, Jong Wook; Yang, Yoon Sun; Kim, KwanWoo; Oh, Wonil; Hwang, Jae Ha; Kim, Jin Wook; Kim, Dong Gyu; Paek, Sun Ha

    2015-12-01

    Cell therapy is a potential therapeutic method for cerebral ischemia, which remains a serious problem. In the search for more effective therapeutic methods, many kinds of stem cells from various tissues have been developed and tested as candidate therapeutic agents. Among them, human umbilical cord blood (hUCB)-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are widely used for cell therapy because of their genetic flexibility. To confirm that they are effective and understand how they affect ischemic neural cells, hUCB-MSCs were directly administered ipsilaterally into an ischemic zone induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). We found that the neurobehavioral performance of the hUCB-MSC group was significantly improved compared with that of the vehicle-injected control group. The infarct was also remarkably smaller in the hUCB-MSC group. Additionally, hUCB-MSC transplantation resulted in a greater number of newly generated cells and angiogenic and tissue repair factors and a lower number of inflammatory events in the penumbra zone. To determine why these events occurred, hUCB-MSCs were assayed under hypoxic and normoxic conditions in vitro. The results showed that hUCB-MSCs exhibit higher expression levels of thrombospondin1, pantraxin3, and vascular endothelial growth factor under hypoxic conditions than under normoxic conditions. These results were found to be correlated with our in vivo immunofluorescent staining results. On the basis of these findings, we suggest that hUCB-MSCs may have a beneficial effect on cerebral ischemia, especially through angiogenesis, neurogenesis, and anti-inflammatory effects, and thus could be used as a therapeutic agent to treat neurological disorders such as cerebral ischemia.

  18. The Protective Effect of Human Umbilical Cord Blood CD34+ Cells and Estradiol against Focal Cerebral Ischemia in Female Ovariectomized Rat: Cerebral MR Imaging and Immunohistochemical Study.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ching-Chung; Liu, Ho-Ling; Chang, Shuenn-Dhy; Chen, Sheng-Hsien; Lee, Tsong-Hai

    2016-01-01

    Human umbilical cord blood derived CD34+ stem cells are reported to mediate therapeutic effects in stroke animal models. Estrogen was known to protect against ischemic injury. The present study wished to investigate whether the protective effect of CD34+ cells against ischemic injury can be reinforced with complemental estradiol treatment in female ovariectomized rat and its possible mechanism. Experiment 1 was to determine the best optimal timing of CD34+ cell treatment for the neuroprotective effect after 60-min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Experiment 2 was to evaluate the adjuvant effect of 17β-estradiol on CD34+ cell neuroprotection after MCAO. Experiment 1 showed intravenous infusion with CD34+ cells before MCAO (pre-treatment) caused less infarction size than those infused after MCAO (post-treatment) on 7T magnetic resonance T2-weighted images. Experiment 2 revealed infarction size was most significantly reduced after CD34+ + estradiol pre-treatment. When compared with no treatment group, CD34+ + estradiol pre-treatment showed significantly less ADC reduction at 2 h and 2 d, less CBF reduction at 2 h and less hyperperfusion at 2 d. The immunoreactivity of c-Fos, c-Jun and GFAP was attenuated, and BDNF showed significant recovery from 2 h to 2 d after MCAO, especially after CD34+ + estradiol pre-treatment. The present study suggests pre-treatment with CD34+ cells with complemental estradiol can be most protective against ischemic injury, which may act through stabilization of cerebral hemodynamics and normalization of the expressions of immediate early genes and BDNF. PMID:26760774

  19. Post-Thaw Non-Cultured and Post-Thaw Cultured Equine Cord Blood Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Equally Suppress Lymphocyte Proliferation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Lynn B.; Tessier, Laurence; Koenig, Judith B.; Koch, Thomas G.

    2014-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are receiving increased attention for their non-progenitor immunomodulatory potential. Cryopreservation is commonly used for long-term storage of MSC. Post-thaw MSC proliferation is associated with a lag-phase in vitro. How this lag-phase affect MSC immunomodulatory properties is unknown. We hypothesized that in vitro there is no difference in lymphocyte suppression potential between quick-thawed cryopreserved equine cord blood (CB) MSC immediately included in mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) and same MSC allowed post-thaw culture time prior to inclusion in MLR. Cryopreserved CB-MSC from five unrelated foals were compared using two-way MLR. For each of the five unrelated MSC cultures, paired MLR assays of MSC allowed five days of post-thaw culture and MSC included in MLR assay immediately post-thawing were evaluated. We report no difference in the suppression of lymphocyte proliferation by CB-MSC that had undergone post-thaw culture and MSC not cultured post-thaw (p<0.0001). Also, there was no inter-donor variability between the lymphocyte suppressive properties of MSC harvested from the five different donors (p = 0.13). These findings suggest that cryopreserved CB-MSC may have clinical utility immediately upon thawing. One implication hereof is the possibility of using cryopreserved CB-MSC at third party locations without the need for cell culture equipment or competencies. PMID:25438145

  20. Human umbilical cord blood-mesenchymal stem cells transplantation renovates the ovarian surface epithelium in a rat model of premature ovarian failure: Possible direct and indirect effects.

    PubMed

    Elfayomy, Amr K; Almasry, Shaima M; El-Tarhouny, Shereen A; Eldomiaty, Magda A

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to isolate mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from human umbilical cord blood (HCB) and to explore their influence on the ovarian epithelium after paclitaxel-induced ovarian failure. Ninety-five rats were divided into 6 groups: control, paclitaxel, paclitaxel and saline, HCB-MSC-treated for 2 weeks, HCB-MSC-treated for 4 weeks, and HCB-MSC-treated for 6 weeks. HCB cells were studied for CD34, CD44, and Oct ¾ using flow cytometry. Serum levels of FSH and E2 were measured using ELISA, RT-PCR analysis for human gene; beta-actin (ACTB), immunohistochemical analysis for CK 8/18, TGF-ß, PCNA and CASP-3 were performed. We found that ACTB gene was expressed in all rats' ovaries received HCB-MSC. After 4 weeks of transplantation, there was significant reduction in FSH, elevation in E2 levels, stabilization of the surface epithelium morphostasis, an increase in the antral follicle count and increase in integrated densities (ID) of CK 8/18, TGF-ß, and PCNA expressions and decrease in ID of CASP-3 expression. We concluded that HCB-MSC can restore the ovarian function after paclitaxel injection through a direct triggering effect on the ovarian epithelium and/or indirect enrichment of ovarian niche through regulating tissue expression of CK 8/18, TGF-ß and PCNA. These molecules are crucial in regulating folliculogenesis and suppressing CASP-3-induced apoptosis.

  1. Autocrine Action of Thrombospondin-2 Determines the Chondrogenic Differentiation Potential and Suppresses Hypertrophic Maturation of Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sang Young; Ha, Jueun; Lee, Miyoung; Jin, Hye Jin; Kim, Dong Hyun; Choi, Soo Jin; Oh, Wonil; Yang, Yoon Sun; Kim, Jae-Sung; Kim, Byung-Gyu; Chang, Jeong Ho; Cho, Dong-Hyung; Jeon, Hong Bae

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapies have varying efficacies for the treatment of various diseases, including cartilage defects. In this study, we demonstrated that the chondrogenic differentiation potential of human umbilical cord blood-derived MSCs (hUCB-MSCs) obtained from different individual donors varies, and we investigated the molecular basis for this variation. Microarray gene expression analysis identified thrombospondin-2 (TSP2) as a candidate gene underlying the interindividual variation in the chondrogenic differentiation potential of hUCB-MSCs. To assess the association between TSP-2 and the differentiation potential, we evaluated chondrogenic differentiation of hUCB-MSCs treated with TSP2 siRNA. In addition, we studied the effect of supplementing exogenous recombinant TSP-2 on TSP2 siRNA-treated hUCB-MSCs. We found that TSP-2 autocrinally promoted chondrogenic differentiation of hUCB-MSCs via the Notch signaling pathway, which was confirmed in MSCs from other sources such as bone marrow and adipose tissue. Interestingly, we observed that TSP-2 attenuated hypertrophy, which inevitably occurs during chondrogenic differentiation of hUCB-MSCs. Our findings indicated that the variable chondrogenic differentiation potential of MSCs obtained from different donors is influenced by the TSP-2 level in the differentiating cells. Thus, the TSP-2 level can be used as a marker to select MSCs with superior chondrogenic differentiation potential for use in cartilage regeneration therapy. PMID:26235673

  2. A low effective dose of interleukin-7 is sufficient to maintain cord blood T cells alive without potentiating allo-immune responses.

    PubMed

    Pascal, Laurent; Hivert, Bénédicte; Trauet, Jacques; Deberranger, Eva; Dessaint, Jean-Paul; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Labalette, Myriam

    2015-04-01

    Slow reconstitution of T cell immunity remains a critical issue after umbilical cord blood (CB) transplantation. Although this may be a consequence of the low cell dose, it may also reflect the propensity of naïve T cells, which predominate in CB, to undergo apoptotic cell death. Exogenous interleukin 7 (IL-7) can prevent apoptosis of naïve T cells, but at high concentrations, IL-7 may also expand alloreactive T cells, thereby aggravating the risk of graft-versus-host disease. We evaluated the survival of CB T cells from 34 healthy full-term pregnancies, and we found wide interdonor variation, from 17.4% to 79.7%, of CB T cells that were still alive after being rested for 4 days in culture medium without cytokine supplementation. The viability of CB T cells was negatively correlated to infant birth weight (Spearman's ρ = .376; P = .031) and positively correlated to venous CB pH (ρ = .397; P = .027); both associations were confirmed by multivariate analysis (P = .023 and P = .005, respectively). A low supplemental concentration (100 pg/mL) of recombinant human IL-7 was sufficient to maintain the viability of cryopreserved/thawed CB T cells, with most (>80%) cells remaining in a quiescent state and without significant changes in their CD4/CD8 ratio and the proportion of CD4(+) CD31(+) PTK7(+) recent thymic emigrants. IL-7 at 100 pg/mL did not lead to any significant enhancement of the alloreactive response of CB T cells, as evaluated by proliferation rates (thymidine incorporation and carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester dilution) and interferon-gamma production (ELISPOT). This effective concentration of IL-7 is far lower than that obtained in vivo after pharmacological administration of the cytokine. This study suggests that administration of lower doses of recombinant human IL-7 than used in previous clinical trials may be sufficient to sustain the viability of infused CB T cells and, thus, help to accelerate naïve T cell reconstitution without

  3. Derivation of human T lymphocytes from cord blood and peripheral blood with antiviral and antileukemic specificity from a single culture as protection against infection and relapse after stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Micklethwaite, Kenneth P; Savoldo, Barbara; Hanley, Patrick J; Leen, Ann M; Demmler-Harrison, Gail J; Cooper, Laurence J N; Liu, Hao; Gee, Adrian P; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Rooney, Cliona M; Heslop, Helen E; Brenner, Malcolm K; Bollard, Catherine M; Dotti, Gianpietro

    2010-04-01

    Viral infections and leukemic relapse account for the majority of treatment failures in patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) receiving allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) or cord blood (CB) transplants. Adoptive transfer of virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) provides protection against common viruses causing serious infections after HSC transplantation without concomitant graft-versus-host disease. We have now generated CTL lines from peripheral blood (PB) or CB units that recognize multiple common viruses and provide antileukemic activity by transgenic expression of a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) targeting CD19 expressed on B-ALL. PB-derived CAR(+) CTLs produced interferon-gamma (IFNgamma) in response to cytomegalovirus-pp65, adenovirus-hexon, and Epstein-Barr virus pepmixes (from 205 +/- 104 to 1034 +/- 304 spot-forming cells [SFCs]/10(5) T cells) and lysed primary B-ALL blasts in (51)Cr-release assays (mean, 66% +/- 5% specific lysis; effector-target [E/T] ratio, 40:1) and the CD19(+) Raji cell line (mean, 78% +/- 17%) in contrast to nontransduced controls (8% +/- 8% and 3% +/- 2%). CB-derived CAR(+) CTLs showed similar antiviral and antitumor function and both PB and CB CAR(+) CTLs completely eliminated B-ALL blasts over 5 days of coculture. This approach may prove beneficial for patients with high-risk B-ALL who have recently received an HSC or CB transplant and are at risk of infection and relapse.

  4. Apoptosis, DAP-Kinase1 Expression and the Influences of Cytokine Milieu and Mesenchymal Stromal Cells on Ex Vivo Expansion of Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Amirizadeh, Naser; Oodi, Arezoo; Mehrasa, Roya; Nikougoftar, Mahin

    2016-03-01

    Expansion of umbilical cord blood-derived CD34(+) cells can potentially provide them in numbers sufficient for clinical applications in adult humans. In this study apoptosis rate of expanded cells, mRNA expression and promoter methylation status of DAPK1 were evaluated during cord blood hematopoietic stem cell (CB-HSC) ex vivo expansion using cytokines and a co-culture system with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). Ex vivo cultures of CB-HSCs were performed in three culture conditions for 14 days: cytokines with MSCs feeder layer, cytokines without MSCs feeder layer and co-culture with MSCs feeder layer without cytokine. Total number of cells, CD34(+) cells and colony forming unit assay were performed during expansion. Flow cytometric analysis by propidium iodide was performed to detection of apoptosis rate in expanded cells. Methylation status of the DAPK1 gene promoter was analyzed using methylation specific PCR, and DAPK1 mRNA expression was evaluated by real time-PCR. Maximum CB-CD34(+) cells expansion was observed in day 10 of expansion. The highest apoptosis rate was observed in cytokine culture without feeder layer that showed significant difference with co-culture condition. The data showed that ex vivo expansion of CD34(+) cells in all three culture conditions after 10 days resulted in, significant increased expression of DAPK1, also a significant difference between co-culture without cytokine and two other cytokine culture was observed (p < 0.01). DAPK1gene promoter of expanded CD34(+) cells at days 5, 10 and 14 of culture remained in unmethylated form similar to fresh CD34(+) cells. Expression of DAPK1 in hematopoietic cells was increased during 10 days expansion of CD34(+) cells. Also no methylation of DAPK1 promoter was observed; otherwise it would be capable of initiating some leukemic cell progression or disruption in hematopoietic regeneration.

  5. ACOG committee opinion number 399, February 2008: umbilical cord blood banking.

    PubMed

    2008-02-01

    Two types of banks have emerged for the collection and storage of umbilical cord blood--public banks and private banks. Public banks promote allogenic (related or unrelated) donation, analogous to the current collection of whole blood units in the United States. Private banks were initially developed to store stem cells from umbilical cord blood for autologous use (taken from an individual for subsequent use by the same individual) by a child if the child develops disease later in life. If a patient requests information on umbilical cord blood banking, balanced and accurate information regarding the advantages and disadvantages of public versus private banking should be provided. The remote chance of an autologous unit of umbilical cord blood being used for a child or a family member (approximately 1 in 2,700 individuals) should be disclosed. The collection should not alter routine practice for the timing of umbilical cord clamping. Physicians or other professionals who recruit pregnant women and their families for for-profit umbilical cord blood banking should disclose any financial interests or other potential conflicts of interest. PMID:18238991

  6. Increased Cord Blood Betatrophin Levels in the Offspring of Mothers with Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shimin; Zhao, Yue; Du, Caiqi; Yuan, Guandou; Ning, Qin; McCormick, Kenneth; Luo, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Aim Exposing a fetus to hyperglycemia can increase the risk for later-life metabolic disorders. Betatrophin has been proposed as a key regulator of pancreatic beta cell proliferation and lipid regulation. Highly responsive to nutritional signals, serum betatrophin concentrations have been found to be altered by various physiological and pathological conditions. We hypothesized that betatrophin levels are increased in the cord blood in offspring exposed to intrauterine hyperglycemia. Methods This was a cross-sectional study including 54 mothers who underwent uncomplicated Cesarean delivery in a university hospital. Maternal gestational glucose concentration was determined at 24–48 weeks gestation after a 75-g OGTT. Cord blood and placental tissue was collected immediately post delivery. Metabolic parameters were determined in the Clinical Laboratory. Cord blood betatrophin levels were assayed using a commercially available ELISA kit. Placental mitochondrial content was determined by real-time PCR. Results Cord blood betatrophin levels were increased in the gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) group compared with the normoglycemic group. Furthermore, betatrophin levels were positively correlated with maternal gestational 2h post-OGTT glucose, cord blood insulin, HOMA-IR, and inversely correlated with placental mitochondrial content. Conclusions Cord blood betatrophin may function as a potential biomarker of maternal intrauterine hyperglycemia and fetal insulin resistance, which may presage for long-term metabolic impact of GDM on offspring. PMID:27196053

  7. Increased reticulocyte count from cord blood samples using hypotonic lysis.

    PubMed

    Grimberg, Brian T; Scheetz, Emily A; Erickson, John J; Bales, Jacquelyn M; David, Makindi; Daum-Woods, Kathleen; King, Christopher L; Zimmerman, Peter A

    2012-10-01

    Human reticulocytes are one of the fundamental components needed to study the in vitro invasion processes of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax. Additionally examinations of reticulocytes and their binding proteins are difficult in areas of the world that do not have access to advanced equipment or stem cell lines. These issues are particularly relevant to malaria vaccine candidate studies that are directed against surface proteins that the parasites use to gain entry into erythrocytes. Described here is a simple and inexpensive method to increase the reticulocyte count of cord blood samples. Exposure of cord blood to hypotonic saline (0.2%) for 5 min selectively lyses the non-reticulocytes resulting in an average 3.6-fold increase in reticulocyte count. Our studies show that this enrichment process does not damage the hemoglobin of the remaining erythrocytes which are still capable of supporting Plasmodium falciparum invasion and growth. This economical and rapid method of enrichment could facilitate studies of in vitro laboratory culturing of other malaria parasite species which preferentially invade reticulocytes such as P. vivax.

  8. Human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells improve neuropathology and cognitive impairment in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model through modulation of neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Ju; Lee, Jong Kil; Lee, Hyun; Carter, Janet E; Chang, Jong Wook; Oh, Wonil; Yang, Yoon Sun; Suh, Jun-Gyo; Lee, Byoung-Hee; Jin, Hee Kyung; Bae, Jae-Sung

    2012-03-01

    Human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSC) have a potential therapeutic role in the treatment of neurological disorders, but their current clinical usage and mechanism of action has yet to be ascertained in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we report that hUCB-MSC transplantation into amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin1 (PS1) double-transgenic mice significantly improved spatial learning and memory decline. Furthermore, amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) deposition, β-secretase 1 (BACE-1) levels, and tau hyperphosphorylation were dramatically reduced in hUCB-MSC transplanted APP/PS1 mice. Interestingly, these effects were associated with reversal of disease-associated microglial neuroinflammation, as evidenced by decreased microglia-induced proinflammatory cytokines, elevated alternatively activated microglia, and increased anti-inflammatory cytokines. These findings lead us to suggest that hUCB-MSC produced their sustained neuroprotective effect by inducing a feed-forward loop involving alternative activation of microglial neuroinflammation, thereby ameliorating disease pathophysiology and reversing the cognitive decline associated with Aβ deposition in AD mice.

  9. Cord blood--an alternative source for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Marcus; Zilkens, Christoph; Bittersohl, Bernd; Krauspe, Rüdiger

    2009-09-01

    Bone regeneration is one of the best investigated pathways in mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) biology. Therefore strong efforts have been made to introduce tissue engineering and cell therapeutics as an alternative treatment option for patients with bone defects. This review of the literature gives an overview of MSC biology aiming for clinical application including advantages but also specific challenges and problems which are associated with cord blood derived stromal cell (CB-MSC) as a source for bone regeneration. The use of postnatal CB-MSC is ethically uncomplicated and requires no invasive harvesting procedure. Moreover, most data document a high osteogenic potential of CB-MCS and also low immunoreactivity compared with other MSC types. The expression profile of CB-MSC during osteogenic differentiation shows similarities to that of other MSC types. Within the umbilical cord different MSC types have been characterized which are potent to differentiate into osteoblasts. In contrast to a large number of in vitro investigations there are only few in vivo studies available so far.

  10. Adeno-associated virus 2-mediated high efficiency gene transfer into immature and mature subsets of hematopoietic progenitor cells in human umbilical cord blood

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV) virions were constructed containing a gene for resistance to neomycin (neoR), under the control of either the herpesvirus thymidine kinase (TK) gene promoter (vTK- Neo), or the human parvovirus B19 p6 promoter (vB19-Neo), as well as those containing an upstream erythroid cell-specific enhancer (HS-2) from the locus control region of the human beta-globin gene cluster (vHS2-TK-Neo; vHS2-B19-Neo). These recombinant virions were used to infect either low density or highly enriched populations of CD34+ cells isolated from human umbilical cord blood. In clonogenic assays initiated with cells infected with the different recombinant AAV-Neo virions, equivalent high frequency transduction of the neoR gene into slow-cycling multipotential, erythroid, and granulocyte/macrophage (GM) progenitor cells, including those with high proliferative potential, was obtained without prestimulation with growth factors, indicating that these immature and mature hematopoietic progenitor cells were susceptible to infection by the recombinant AAV virions. Successful transduction did not require and was not enhanced by prestimulation of these cell populations with cytokines. The functional activity of the transduced neo gene was evident by the development of resistance to the drug G418, a neomycin analogue. Individual high and low proliferative colony-forming unit (CFU)-GM, burst-forming unit-erythroid, and CFU- granulocyte erythroid macrophage megakaryocyte colonies from mock- infected, or the recombinant virus-infected cultures were subjected to polymerase chain reaction analysis using a neo-specific synthetic oligonucleotide primer pair. A 276-bp DNA fragment that hybridized with a neo-specific DNA probe on Southern blots was only detected in those colonies cloned from the recombinant virus-infected cells, indicating stable integration of the transduced neo gene. These studies suggest that parvovirus-based vectors may prove to be a useful

  11. Localization of human mesenchymal stem cells from umbilical cord blood and their role in repair of diabetic foot ulcers in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qing-Song; Xia, Nan; Zhao, Nan; Li, Ming; Bi, Chang-Long; Zhu, Qing; Qiao, Guo-Fen; Cheng, Zhi-Feng

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the localization of human mesenchymal stem cells from umbilical cord matrix (hMSCs-UC) and the role of these cells in the repair of foot ulcerate tissue in diabetic foot ulcers in rats. A diabetic rat model was established by administering Streptozotocin. Diabetic foot ulceration was defined as non-healing or delayed-healing of empyrosis on the dorsal hind foot after 14 weeks. hMSCs-UC were delivered through the left femoral artery. We evaluated the localization of hMSCs-UC and their role in tissue repair in diabetic foot ulcers by histological analysis, PCR, and immunohistochemical staining. A model for diabetes was established in 54 out of 60 rats (90% success rate) and 27 of these rats were treated with hMSCs-UC. The area of ulceration was significantly and progressively reduced at 7 and 14 days following treatment with hMSCs-UC. This gross observation was strongly supported by the histological changes, including newly developed blood vessels and proliferation of inflammatory cells at 3 days post-treatment, significant increase in granulation tissue at 7 days post-treatment and squamous epithelium or stratified squamous epithelium at 14 days post-treatment. Importantly, human leukocyte antigen type-I (HLA-1) was confirmed in ulcerated tissue by RT-PCR. The expression of cytokeratin 19 was significantly increased in diabetic model rats, with no detectable change in cytokeratin 10. Additionally, both collagens I and III increased in model rats treated with hMSCs-UC, but the ratio of collagen I/III was less significant in treated rats compared with control rats. These results suggest that hMSCs-UC specifically localize to the target ulcerated tissue and may promote the epithelialization of ulcerated tissue by stimulating the release of cytokeratin 19 from keratinocytes and extracellular matrix formation.

  12. Human umbilical cord blood derived mesenchymal stem cells improve cardiac function in cTnT(R141W) transgenic mouse of dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xuhe; Wang, Pengbo; Wu, Qingqing; Wang, Sijia; Yu, Litian; Wang, Guogan

    2016-01-01

    Cell transplantation is a promising strategy in regenerative medicine. Beneficial effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) on heart disease have been widely reported. However, the MSCs in these studies have been mainly derived from autologous animals, and data on MSCs from human umbilical cord blood (UCB-MSCs) are still scarce. We investigated whether intramyocardial xenogeneic administration of UCB-MSCs is beneficial for preserving heart function in a cTnT(R141W) transgenic mouse of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Cultured UCB-MSCs, which were identified by there morphology, differentiation and cell surface markers, were transplanted into cTnT(R141W) transgenic mice to examine apoptosis, fibrosis, vasculogenesis and the associated Akt pathway. Moreover, we measured the expression levels of VEGF and IGF-1, which are growth factors required for differentiation into cardiomyocytes, and are also involved in cardiac regeneration and improving heart function. One month after transplantation, MSCs significantly decreased chamber dilation and contractile dysfunction in the cTnT(R141W) mice. MSCs transplanted hearts showed a significant decrease in cardiac apoptosis and its regulation by the Akt pathway. Cardiac fibrosis and cytoplasmic vacuolisation were significantly attenuated in the MSCs group. Importantly, the levels of VEGF and IGF-1 were increased in the MSCs transplanted hearts. In vitro, the MSC-conditioned medium displayed anti-apoptotic activity in h9c2 cardiomyocytes subjected to hypoxia. These results further confirm the paracrine effects of MSCs. In conclusion, UCB-MSCs preserve cardiac function after intramyocardial transplantation in a DCM mouse, and this effect may be associated with reductions in cellular apoptosis, inflammation, hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis; in addition to; up-regulation of Akt, VEGF and IGF-1; and enhanced angiogenesis. PMID:26655348

  13. Autoregulation of spinal cord blood flow: is the cord a microcosm of the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, R.; Albin, M.S.; Bunegin, L.; Gelineau, J.

    1986-11-01

    The autoregulatory capability of regional areas of the brain and spinal cord was demonstrated in 18 rats anesthetized with a continuous infusion of intravenous pentothal. Blood flow was measured by the injection of radioactive microspheres (Co57, Sn113, Ru103, Sc46). Blood flow measurements were made at varying levels of mean arterial pressure (MAP) which was altered by neosynephrine to raise MAP or trimethaphan to lower MAP. Autoregulation of the spinal cord mirrored that of the brain, with an autoregulatory range of 60 to 120 mm Hg for both tissues. Within this range, cerebral blood flow (CBF) was 59.2 +/- 3.2 ml/100 g/min (SEM) and spinal cord blood flow (SCBF) was 61.1 +/- 3.6. There was no significant difference in CBF and SCBF in the autoregulatory range. Autoregulation was also demonstrated regionally in the left cortex, right cortex, brainstem, thalamus, cerebellum, hippocampus and cervical, thoracic and lumbar cord. This data provides a coherent reference point in establishing autoregulatory curves under barbiturate anesthesia. Further investigation of the effects of other anesthetic agents on autoregulation of the spinal cord is needed. It is possible that intraspinal cord compliance, like intracranial compliance, might be adversely affected by the effects of anesthetics on autoregulation.

  14. Umbilical cord blood transplants: treatment for selected hematologic and oncologic diseases.

    PubMed

    Stevens, K

    1997-12-01

    Umbilical cord blood transplantation is a rapidly growing form of treatment for many types of cancer and hematologic disorders. The concepts behind the use of umbilical cord blood transplantation are based on information gained from experience in bone marrow transplantation. Previously discarded as human waste, the blood in the umbilical cord remnant and the placenta has been observed to be rich in hematopoietic stem cells. Techniques for collecting these stem cells from the placenta may vary among the institutions, physicians, and other health care providers, including midwives and nurse practitioners, involved with this procedure. This source of hematopoietic stem cells in transplantation has many advantages, disadvantages, and controversies associated with its use. PMID:9451189

  15. Cord blood transplantation from sibling donors in Japan. Report of the national survey.

    PubMed